WorldWideScience

Sample records for psychiatric nursing research

  1. Metasynthesis of research on the role of psychiatric inpatient nurses: what is important to staff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Kathleen R; Johnson, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient psychiatric nurses are a large workforce, but their work is poorly articulated and thus poorly understood outside of the professional inpatient community. To learn how inpatient psychiatric nurses depict their work, define important aspects of their role, and view the impact of the unit environment on their clinical practice. Metasynthesis of research that has focused on the ideas and perceptions of inpatient psychiatric nurses around their role and practice on inpatient psychiatric units. Three themes emerged from the analysis; the first was an umbrella for three important aspects of nursing work: the nurses' efforts to forge engagement with patients; their activities which maintained the safety of the unit and interventions nurses viewed as educating/empowering patients. The second theme captures the conditions that enabled nurses to do this work such as a cohesive nursing team and their sense of self-direction in their role. The final theme centers on difficulties nurses encountered in enacting their role which included multiple responsibilities for patient care and management of the milieu; intense work often with low visibility and scant support within the organization. Nurses need to articulate their practice so they can assert for the staffing and resources needed to keep units safe and promote patients' well-being, strive toward quality, and promote the development of the specialty.

  2. Videotaped recording as a method of participant observation in psychiatric nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latvala, E; Vuokila-Oikkonen, P; Janhonen, S

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes videotaped recording as a data collection method when conducting participant observation in a psychiatric nursing study. The videotaped episodes were part of the daily life of psychiatric nursing in a hospital environment. The advantages and limitations of using videotaped recording in nursing research will be discussed. This paper is based on two studies. The data consisted of 21 videotaped episodes of nursing report sessions or interdisciplinary team meetings in the psychiatric clinic of a university hospital. The participants consisted of patients, their significant others, nurses, doctors, social workers and physiotherapists. All videotaped material was transcribed verbatim. An essential advantage of videotaping is that most potentially useful interaction and behaviour can be captured. The advantage in terms of the credibility of videotaping was that the investigator was able to review the same videotaped situations again and again. Videotaped material is rich and provides several possibilities for analysing the data. In these studies data and source triangulation enabled the researchers to reduce personal influence on the results. The investigator must also be aware of the limitations concerning this method. The most essential limitations are mechanical problems and the influence of videotaping on behaviour. Careful ethical considerations are important concerning personal privacy, informed consent and respect for the self-determination of psychiatric patients.

  3. Workroles of staff nurses in psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, E G; Shealy, A H; Kowalski, C; LaMont, J; Range, B A

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to operationalize Peplau's workroles of the psychiatric staff nurse. Thirty registered nurses audiotaped one-to-one interactions with 62 adult, child, and adolescent psychiatric patients. Content analysis was used to identify role behaviors and to identify roles that were different from those outlined by Peplau. The counselor role was the most frequently occurring primary workrole. Overlap was found between behaviors indicative of autocratic leader versus surrogate and those of resource person versus teacher. The findings supported Peplau's contention that the counselor role is central to the practice of psychiatric nursing.

  4. All this happened, more or less: thoughts on 'truth', the role of fiction and its potential application in mental health and psychiatric nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biley, F C

    2009-12-01

    Fundamental differences in the philosophy of history as an academic discipline are briefly explored, primarily from two perspectives. The traditional psychiatric and mental health nursing historian objectively uses primary sources in order to be able to make 'truth' claims about the past. The post-modern psychiatric nursing historian, on the other hand, constructs truth claims, rather than discovers them, and in the process of doing so creates historical discourses that are different from the past. To the postmodern psychiatric nursing historian, all histories are fictions, created with the use of imagination, and have characteristics that are similar to the literary constructions that are more traditionally identified as fiction. A variety of literature is used in order to explore such claims, and the conclusion is drawn that, with caution and careful attention to the rigorous use of historical method, fiction can be used as a valid source for historical research in psychiatric and mental health nursing.

  5. The professional paradigm of qualified psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, U A

    1995-10-01

    The main purpose of this research was to determine the professional paradigm of the qualified psychiatric nurse and the factors influencing the formation of this paradigm. The research was both explorative and descriptive, and both qualitative and quantitative methods were used. The research approach was deductive and based on the theory of paradigm of Törnebohm. The test persons comprised three groups: Swedish-speaking Finns, Swedes and Finns. In each group there were eight students in the final stages of their psychiatric nursing training. A total of 40 questionnaires were distributed to each group. The research revealed four different characteristic types of qualified psychiatric nurses: caring science oriented, partly caring science oriented, general humanist and finally the personality- and experience-oriented. The results also indicate that there is a discrepancy between will and ability within caring. This can partly be interpreted as an expression of the discrepancy between philosophical and ideological impressions and real acts but it may partly indicate a lack of information. Many informants had difficulty naming a theoretical frame of reference for their work and stating aspects of psychiatric caring that would be important to know but on which no information so far exists. Many informants expressed the need for more research and development but did not indicate the subjects.

  6. Child psychiatric nursing. Moving into the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, L M

    1994-03-01

    Changes in health care policy must be made to pave the way for the appropriate treatment and prevention of child and adolescent mental health problems. Nurses can provide the leadership needed to make the changes. Organizations such as the Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nurses and the Society for Education and Research in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing are already making important contributions. Challenges in the arenas of treatment, education, and research are before us in child psychiatric nursing. We are facing these demands, however, and are moving forward into the twenty-first century.

  7. The competencies of newly qualified psychiatric nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunice B Khoza

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This research report comprises part of a larger study, which endeavoured to identified the competencies of newly qualified nurses (NQNs as viewed by senior professional nurses (SPNs in the clinical units. This report concentrates only on the competencies of the NQNs working in the psychiatric nursing units. SPNs (N=29 from certain health services in the Northern Province (NP of the RSA, constituted the population for this research. A descriptive survey was used as a research approach to conduct this research. The fieldwork, entailing the distrib~ltiona nd collection of the questionnaires by a researcher, was done during a period of political and labour unrest in this area. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  8. Nurses' attitudes toward ethical issues in psychiatric inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Nurhan

    2014-05-01

    Nursing is an occupation that deals with humans and relies upon human relationships. Nursing care, which is an important component of these relationships, involves protection, forbearance, attention, and worry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ethical beliefs of psychiatric nurses and ethical problems encountered. The study design was descriptive and cross-sectional. RESEARCH CONTEXT: Methods comprised of a questionnaire administered to psychiatric nurses (n=202) from five psychiatric hospitals in Istanbul, Turkey, instruction in psychiatric nursing ethics, discussion of reported ethical problems by nursing focus groups, and analysis of questionnaires and reports by academicians with clinical experience. PARTICIPANTS consist of the nurses who volunteered to take part in the study from the five psychiatric hospitals (n=202), which were selected with cluster sampling method. Ethical considerations: Written informed consent of each participant was taken prior to the study. The results indicated that nurses needed additional education in psychiatric ethics. Insufficient personnel, excessive workload, working conditions, lack of supervision, and in-service training were identified as leading to unethical behaviors. Ethical code or nursing care -related problems included (a) neglect, (b) rude/careless behavior, (c) disrespect of patient rights and human dignity, (d) bystander apathy, (e) lack of proper communication, (f) stigmatization, (g) authoritarian attitude/intimidation, (h) physical interventions during restraint, (i) manipulation by reactive emotions, (j) not asking for permission, (k) disrespect of privacy, (l) dishonesty or lack of clarity, (m) exposure to unhealthy physical conditions, and (n) violation of confidence. The results indicate that ethical codes of nursing in psychiatric inpatient units are inadequate and standards of care are poor. In order to address those issues, large-scale research needs to be conducted in psychiatric nursing with a

  9. Psychiatric Nurses' Attitude and Practice toward Physical Restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Amal Sobhy

    2017-02-01

    This study was to assess psychiatric nurses' attitude and practice toward physical restraint among mentally ill patients. A descriptive research design was used to achieve the study objective. The present study was carried out in three specialized governmental mental hospitals and two psychiatric wards in general hospital. A convenient purposive sample of 96 nurses who were working in the previously mentioned setting was included. The tool used for data collection was the Self-Administered Structured Questionnaire; it included three parts: The first comprised items concerned with demographic characteristics of the nurses, the second comprised 10 item measuring nurses' attitudes toward physical restraint, and the third was used to assess nurses' practices regarding use of physical restraint. There were insignificant differences between attitudes and practices in relation to nurses' sex, level of education, years of experience and work place. Moreover, a positive significant correlation was found between nurses' total attitude scores, and practices regarding use of physical restraint. Psychiatric nurses have positive attitude and adequate practice toward using physical restraints as an alternative management for psychiatric patients. It is important for psychiatric nurses to acknowledge that physical restraints should be implemented as the last resort. The study recommended that it is important for psychiatric nurses to acknowledge that physical restraints should be implemented as the last resort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The exploration of in-service training needs of psychiatric nurses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-10

    Oct 10, 2014 ... to psychiatric nursing. This study aimed to increase the awareness of the needs and benefits of in-service training of psychiatric nurses and to formulate recommendations for in- service training for psychiatric nursing. Research method and design. Design. A qualitative research design with explorative, ...

  11. Stress levels of psychiatric nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looff, P.C. de; Kuijpers, E.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2014-01-01

    During a total of 30 shifts, the arousal levels of 10 psychiatric nurses were assessed while working on a (forensic) psychiatric admissions ward. Arousal was assessed by means of a small device (wristband) by which the Skin Conductance Level (SCL) of the participating nurses was monitored. Each

  12. Epigenetics: An Emerging Framework for Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSocio, Janiece E

    2016-07-01

    The aims of this paper are to synthesize and report research findings from neuroscience and epigenetics that contribute to an emerging explanatory framework for advanced practice psychiatric nursing. Discoveries in neuroscience and epigenetics reveal synergistic mechanisms that support the integration of psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, and psychoeducation in practice. Advanced practice psychiatric nurses will benefit from an expanded knowledge base in neuroscience and epigenetics that informs and explains the scientific rationale for our integrated practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [A staff development model in psychiatric nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, D; Muller, M; Poggenpoel, M

    1995-03-01

    The nursing service manager is accountable for the quality of nursing care delivered in the nursing service. It is therefore important that the nursing service manager facilitates staff development in the nursing service. It is not only the nursing service manager's responsibility to make provision for staff development--the nurse also has a responsibility in this regard. He/she should purposefully make an effort to keep up to date with the latest developments. This article focuses on the co-responsibility of the psychiatric nurse and nursing service manager regarding staff development. A model for staff development is described, in accordance with the guidelines of Dickoff, James & Wiedenbach for theory development. An inductive approach was primarily followed to describe the provisional model, after which a literature study was employed to refine and purify the model. This model was exposed to expert evaluation, after which the final model for staff development of psychiatric nurses was described. Recommendations include the testing of certain hypotheses and utilisation of this model in psychiatric nursing practice.

  14. Cyberbullying: implications for the psychiatric nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Lindsey M; Hubbard, Grace B

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to inform and educate psychiatric nurse practitioners about the pervasiveness of the rapidly increasing problem of cyberbullying. As more children and adolescents obtain access to the Internet, mobile devices, and social networking sites, the exposure to bullying in the virtual format increases. Cyberbullying is a growing public health concern and can affect mental health and school performance. Cyberbullying often results in a range of psychiatric symptoms and has been linked to suicide attempts and completions. The psychiatric nurse practitioner is uniquely prepared to provide a range of interventions for patients, families, and communities who have experienced cyberbullying. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Technological Advances in Psychiatric Nursing: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, Andrea C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and treating mental illness has improved in many ways as a result of the fast pace of technological advances. The technologies that have the greatest potential impact are those that (1) increase the knowledge of how the brain functions and changes based on interventions, (2) have the potential to personalize interventions based on understanding genetic factors of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, and (3) use information technology to provide treatment in the absence of an adequate mental health workforce. Technologies are explored for psychiatric nurses to consider. Psychiatric nurses are encouraged to consider the experiences of psychiatric patients, including poor health, stigmatization, and suffering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Understanding the domestic rupture in forensic psychiatric nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jean Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the tensions that exist between care and custody in correctional environments by presenting the (im)possibilities of psychiatric nursing practice within this context. The analysis will be guided by empirical data obtained from a qualitative research conducted in a correctional setting. Semistructured interviews with nurses were conducted and used as the primary source of data for analysis. This article will explore the contextual characteristics of psychiatric nursing practice in correctional settings, describe the alienating effects of this context on nursing practice, theorize nurses' experience using Festinger's theory on cognitive dissonance, and, finally, explore how some nurses engage in the reconstruction of their care to counter the effects of working in correctional settings.

  17. Ideology of nursing care in child psychiatric inpatient treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellilä, Heikki; Välimäki, Maritta; Warne, Tony; Sourander, Andre

    2007-09-01

    Research on nursing ideology and the ethics of child and adolescent psychiatric nursing care is limited. The aim of this study was to describe and explore the ideological approaches guiding psychiatric nursing in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient wards in Finland, and discuss the ethical, theoretical and practical concerns related to nursing ideologies. Data were collected by means of a national questionnaire survey, which included one open-ended question seeking managers' opinions on the nursing ideology used in their area of practice. Questionnaires were sent to all child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient wards (n = 69) in Finland; 61 ward managers responded. Data were analysed by qualitative and quantitative content analysis. Six categories -- family centred care, individual care, milieu centred care, integrated care, educational care and psychodynamic care -- were formed to specify ideological approaches used in inpatient nursing. The majority of the wards were guided by two or more approaches. Nursing models, theories and codes of ethics were almost totally ignored in the ward managers' ideological descriptions.

  18. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.; Jansen, G.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatient aggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this "Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale" (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff

  19. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.L.I.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.E.; Jansen, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatienaggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff members

  20. Psychiatric Nurses' Views on Caring: Patients and Canine Companions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Camille

    2017-03-01

    Psychiatric nurses are expert care providers for individuals with mental health needs. The art of caring spans across multiple species, is important to understand, and is universal whether intentions are toward individuals or animals. Pets are often cared for and viewed as family members. The current research examined psychiatric nurses' views on the similarities and differences of caring for patients and their pet dogs. Twenty-five nurses were interviewed. Similarities of caring for patients and canines included trusting relationships, companionship, daily basic needs, and improved communication through monitored body language. Differences in caring included personal expectations, unconditional love, and professional boundaries. Understanding the concepts of caring for patients and pet dogs will provide the opportunity for insight into familial versus professional relationships, improve communication with others, and strengthen the human-animal bond. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(3), 46-52.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Psychiatric nursing liaison in a combat zone: an autoethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whybrow, D

    2013-12-01

    Military mental health nurses are tasked with providing psychiatric liaison to British forces deployed to combat zones. This forms part of a wider effort to maintain the combat effectiveness of the fighting force. During a recent deployment, I maintained a reflexive journal of my experience of liaising with the British Chain of Command. I then used line by line coding via the NVIVO 9 software package to formulate the core themes that became a framework for this autoethnography. My personality and social anxieties shaped how I performed the psychiatric liaison role. I was able to develop a template for liaison that accounted for both 'me' and my need to feel authentic or credible as a nurse, yet still enabled me to communicate effectively with the Chain of Command. One template for psychiatric nursing liaison with British combat forces is to focus upon key stakeholders within the Chain of Command, specifically, the Officer Commanding, the Sergeant Major, the Trauma Risk Management co-ordinator (usually the Sergeant Major) and the embedded medical asset. Further research is needed to establish how other nurses approach psychiatric nursing liaison. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Qualitative methods in psychiatric research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Claudia; Glaesmer, Heide

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the usage of qualitative methods in psychiatric research and presents the qualitative approach in more detail. Recent original empirical work of a German psychiatric journal was systematically reviewed. Methods used to collect and analyse the information are detailed. One third of the articles used a solely qualitative research design. One further article applied a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Three kinds of the qualitative interviews were used (in depth, narrative and problem-focussed interview). Additionally, focus groups (group discussions) and qualitative content analysis were applied by studies. Qualitative approaches are an integral part of psychiatric research. Further work should assure to use adequate sampling strategies.

  3. Career Choice and Longevity in U.S. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Robbi K; Diefenbeck, Cynthia A; Brown, Carlton G

    2015-06-01

    The demand for mental health services in the United States taxes the existing care continuum and is projected to increase as federal initiatives such as the Affordable Care Act and mental health parity improve access to, and coverage for, mental health services. Quality health care providers, such as psychiatric-mental health nurses, are needed to bolster the mental health system. Prior research has focused on the unpopularity of psychiatric nursing as a career choice for nursing students. The purpose of this study is to understand how seasoned psychiatric nurses came to choose and remain in the specialty; descriptive phenomenology is used. In a face-to-face interview, eight registered nurses described their experiences with psychiatric nursing as a student, their entry into psychiatric nursing, and factors related to their longevity in the specialty. Giorgi's Existential Phenomenological Research Method was employed to analyze the interview data. Three themes emerged related to career choice: Interest Developed Prior to or While in Nursing School, Personal Relevance, and Validation of Potential. Three themes emerged related to retention: Overcoming Stereotypes to Develop Career Pride, Positive Team Dynamics, and Remaining Hopeful. Nurse educators play an important role in identifying talent, validating capability, enhancing interest, and increasing students' confidence to pursue a psychiatric nursing career, while nursing administrators and clinical specialists play a key role in retention. Findings also stimulate pertinent questions surrounding the long-term viability of the psychiatric-mental health nursing specialty.

  4. Correlation between Anger and Job Motivation among Psychiatric Nurses in Kashan Psychiatric Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouchaki E.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: In general, nurses who work in department of psychiatric are in fact interacting with emotional disorders of patients once providing their care services. higher levels of job motivation and satisfaction can markedly foster service improvement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between anger and job motivation in nurses of a psychiatric hospital. Instrument & Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive research in 2014, all 50 psychiatry nurses working at Kargarnejad Hospital of Kashan City, Iran, were entirely studied. A demographical questionnaire, the Anger Multiple Scale and the Job Motivation Scale were used for data gathering. Data were analyzed by SPSS 19 software using Pearson correlation coefficient. Findings: The mean score of anger was 3.01±0.36 and of job motivation was 1.70±0.86. There was a significant relationship between job motivation and the number of family members and conditions of employment of nurses (p=0.001. There was a significant inverse relationship between scores of anger and job motivation of psychiatry nurses of the hospital (r=-0.712; p=0.001. Conclusion: There is a relationship between anger and job motivation in nurses of Kashan Psychiatric hospital.

  5. The lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimenyimana, E; Poggenpoel, M; Myburgh, C; van Niekerk, V

    2009-09-01

    Caring for good people is difficult enough; to care for people who are either aggressive or violent is even more difficult. This is what psychiatric nurses working in the psychiatric institution in which research was done are exposed to on a daily basis. The aim of the research was to explore and describe the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, and contextual study design was utilised. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and naïve sketches. Tesch 's (Creswell, 2004: 256) method of open coding and an independent coder were utilised for data analysis. This study shed some light on the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. The findings show that the level of violence and aggression to which psychiatric nurses are exposed is overwhelming and the consequences are alarming. The contributing factors to this violence and aggression are: the mental status and the conditions in which patients are admitted; the staff shortage; the lack of support among the members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT); and the lack of structured and comprehensive orientation among newly appointed staff members. As a result, psychiatric nurses are emotionally, psychologically, and physically affected. They then respond with the following emotions and behaviour: fear, anger, frustration, despair, hopelessness and helplessness, substance abuse, absenteeism, retaliation and the development of an "I don't care" attitude.

  6. Psychiatric Nursing Care for Adult Survivors of Child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thóra van der Hafsteinsdóttir; Cokky van der Venne; Yvonne van der Zalm; Nienke Kool; Willem Nugteren; prof Berno van Meijel

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to

  7. Internal predictors of burnout in psychiatric nurses: An Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudraprosad Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research has not adequately focused on the issue of burnout in Psychiatric nurses, despite the fact that they suffer considerable stress in their work. Till date no study has been conducted on burnout among psychiatric nurses in India. Further, there is a particular lack of research in internal variables predicting burnout in them. Aims: To determine whether there are any internal psychological factors relevant to burnout in psychiatric nurses in India. Materials and Methods: We recruited 101 psychiatric nurses scoring less than two in General Health Questionnaire, version 12 (GHQ-12 from two psychiatric hospitals after obtaining informed consent. All subjects filled up a sociodemographic data sheet along with global adjustment scale, emotional maturity scale, PGI general well-being scale, locus of control scale, and Copenhagen burnout inventory (CBI. Correlations between burnout and sociodemographic/clinical variables were done by Pearson′s r or Spearman′s rho. Signi ficant variables were entered in a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis with total burnout score as dependent variable. Results: Age, duration of total period of nursing, prior military training, locus of control, sense of general well-being, adjustment capabilities, and emotional maturity had significant relation with burnout. Of them, emotional maturity was the most significant protective factors against burnout along with adjustment capabilities, sense of physical well-being, and military training in decreasing significance. Together they explained 41% variation in total burnout score which is significant at <0.001 level. An internal locus of control was inversely correlated with burnout, but failed to predict it in regression analysis. Conclusion: Emotional maturity, adjustability, sense of general physical well-being as well as prior military training significantly predicted lower burnout. Of them, emotional maturity was the most important predictor

  8. Efficacy of integrated interventions combining psychiatric care and nursing home care for nursing home residents: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Janine; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Verhey, Frans R J; Schols, Jos M G A

    2010-01-01

    Nursing home residents needing both psychiatric care and nursing home care for either somatic illness or dementia combined with psychiatric disorders or severe behavioural problems are referred to as Double Care Demanding patients, or DCD patients. Integrated models of care seem to be necessary in order to improve the well-being of these residents. Two research questions were addressed. First, which integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are described in the research literature? And second, which outcomes of integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are reported in the literature? A critical review of studies was done that involved integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care on psychiatric disorders and severe behavioural problems in nursing home patients. A systematic literature search was performed in a number of international databases. Eight intervention trials, including four RCTs (2b level of evidence), were identified as relevant studies for the purpose of this review. Seven studies, three of which were RCTs, showed beneficial effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach combining medical, psychiatric and nursing interventions on severe behavioural problems in DCD nursing home patients. Important elements of a successful treatment strategy for DCD nursing home patients include a thorough assessment of psychiatric, medical and environmental causes as well as programmes for teaching behavioural management skills to nurses. DCD nursing home patients were found to benefit from short-term mental hospital admission.This review underlines the need for more rigorously designed studies to assess the effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach towards DCD nursing home residents. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Psychiatric nursing education in Nebraska: 1989-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, M D; Pierce, A; Roach, R; Shanahan, C; Loch, E

    1991-01-01

    The academic and clinical content of psychiatric nursing curricula in the registered nurse basic educational programs in Nebraska for academic year 1989-1990 was explored by the Nebraska Sub-group of the Nursing Curriculum and Training Task Force of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill. The review includes literature regarding the history, development, and future trends of psychiatric nursing; factors affecting nursing student attitudes toward psychiatric patients; basic content included in psychiatric and psychosocial nursing curricula; and concepts essential in working with the seriously, persistently mentally ill. Contrary to current trends in the United States, all Nebraska schools of nursing have a generic psychiatric nursing course taught by clinical specialists in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Hands-on clinical time spent with patients with psychiatric diagnoses as well as those with psychosocial needs varies from 84 to 200 hr per semester. Not all students are exposed to patients with severe and persistent mental illness. Fewer than 5% of Nebraska graduates choose psychiatric nursing as their area of practice. The authors express grave concern for the future of psychiatric nursing education. Implications for curriculum revision and replication studies are suggested.

  10. The Competencies, Roles and Scope of Practice of Advanced Psychiatric Nursing in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Wardani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The graduate advanced psychiatric nursing (psychiatric nursing specialist from master degree in Indonesia are about 70 nurses, 67 nurses were graduated from University of Indonesia. They are working at mental health services and educational setting around Indonesia and yet seem not ready to perform some specific advanced competencies in clinical area. The mastery on mental health assessment, neurochemical perspectives, medical management and psychotherapy have not yet performed by the psychiatric nurse specialist in the clinical area or community.To have those competencies and its performances, therefore the curriculum in a psychiatric nursing graduate program must include advanced courses in physiopsychology, psychopathology, advanced psychopharmacology, neurobehavioral science, advanced mental health assessment, and advanced treatment interventions such as psychotherapy and prescription and management of psychotropic medications as their core and major courses in the curriculum. Those courses should be performed in their clinical practice courses or other related learning experiences. When those qualifications are met, then they are competent to be called advanced psychiatric nurse.As advanced practice registered nurses, the advanced psychiatric nurses should be able to demonstrate their direct expertise and roles in advanced mental health assessment, diagnostic evaluation, psychopharmacology management, psychotherapy with individuals, group and families, case management, millieu management, liason and counselling from prevention, promotion until psychiatric rehabilitation. Meanwhile the skill such as psycho-education, teaching, unit management, research and staff development can be added as their indirect roles.

  11. Development of the Psychiatric Nurse Job Stressor Scale (PNJSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Hironori; Abe, Hiroshi; Funakoshi, Yayoi; Omori, Hisamitsu; Matsuo, Hisae; Ishida, Yasushi; Katoh, Takahiko

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a tool, the Psychiatric Nurse Job Stressor Scale (PNJSS), for measuring the stress of psychiatric nurses, and to evaluate the reliability and validity of the PNJSS. A total of 302 psychiatric nurses completed all the questions in an early version of the PNJSS, which was composed of 63 items and is based on past literature of psychiatric nurses' stress. A total of 22 items from four factors, 'Psychiatric Nursing Ability', 'Attitude of Patients', 'Attitude Toward Nursing' and 'Communication', were extracted in exploratory factor analysis. With regard to scale reliability, the item-scale correlation coefficient was r = 0.265-0.570 (P job stressor' scale was r = 0.172-0.420 (P job reaction' scale was r = 0.201-0.453 (P job stressors. © 2011 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2011 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  12. Student nurses' learning processes in interaction with psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Linda

    2011-01-01

    When the Danish government converted the national practice-oriented nursing qualification from a vocational course to a bachelor’s degree in 2002, the clinical training component was scaled back. Accordingly, mentors needed to optimise students’ learning from this curtailed clinical practice....... A fuller understanding of how student nurses function and learn during clinical training is vital. This article presents the findings of a qualitative investigation of student nurses’ learning processes during their clinical placement in psychiatric nursing practice. An explorative and qualitative...... to understanding and analysing the content of student nurses’ learning processes. Data was generated from qualitative, semi-structured interviews with, observations of, and obser-views with, eleven students. The obser-view process is my development. It is a common reflection between researcher and research...

  13. Patient participation: causing moral stress in psychiatric nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Trine-Lise; Hanssen, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore psychiatric nurses' experiences and perspectives regarding patient participation. Patient participation is an ambiguous, complex and poorly defined concept with practical/clinical, organisational, legal and ethical aspects, some of which in psychiatric units may cause ethical predicaments and moral stress in nurses, for instance when moral caring acts are thwarted by constraints. An explorative quantitative pilot study was conducted at a psychiatric subacute unit through three focus group interviews with a total of nine participants. A thematic analytic approach was chosen. Preliminary empirical findings were discussed with participants before the final data analysis. Ethical research guidelines were followed. Patient participation is a difficult ideal to realise because of vagueness of aim and content. What was regarded as patient participation differed. Some interviewees held that patients may have a say within the framework of restraints while others saw patient participation as superficial. The interviewees describe themselves as patient's spokespersons and contributing to patients participating in their treatment as a great responsibility. They felt squeezed between their ethical values and the 'system'. They found themselves in a negotiator role trying to collaborate with both the doctors and the patients. Privatisation of a political ideal makes nurses vulnerable to burn out and moral distress. Nurses have a particular ethical responsibility towards vulnerable patients, and may themselves be vulnerable when caught in situations where their professional and moral values are threatened. Unclear concepts make for unclear division of responsibility. Patient participation is often a neglected value in current psychiatric treatment philosophy. When healthcare workers' ethical sensibilities are compromised, this may result in moral stress. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. Comparing Mental Illness Stigma among Nurses in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahimi Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stigma can complicate people’s mental health problems by affecting different sides of personal life, increasing negative attitudes, causing discriminatory behavior towards them, and reducing the chances of recovery and returning to normal life. This research aims to compare the stigma of mental illness among nurses working in psychiatric and non-psychiatric wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. A total of 240 nurses participated in this descriptive and analytic study. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI Scale, which is a 40-item self-report questionnaire. All data were analyzed using SPSS 13. The majority of nurses have a medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness, and there is no significant relation between the type of wards and mean stigma scores. After eliminating factors such as mental illness in nurses and their families, it seems that only working with people with mental illness in psychiatric wards is not enough to create a positive attitude toward them. Additionally, the less physical activity and taking advantage of legal benefits of work hardship for psychiatric nurses, low income, and stigma toward psychiatric nursing, probably may make a difference in inclining to work in psychiatry ward between the two groups in spite of relatively equal stigma scores.

  15. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  16. Community psychiatric nurses and the care co-ordinator role: squeezed to provide 'limited nursing'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Alan

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports a study illuminating the factors that either facilitate or constrain the ability of community psychiatric nurses, in their role as care co-ordinators, to meet service users' and carers' needs. The Care Programme Approach is the key policy underpinning community-focused mental health services in England, but has been unevenly implemented and is associated with increased inpatient bed use. The care co-ordinator role is central to the Care Programme Approach and is most often held by community psychiatric nurses, but there has been little research into how this role is performed or how it affects the work of community psychiatric nurses and their ability to meet the needs of service users. A multiple case study of seven sectorised community mental health teams was employed over 2 years using predominantly qualitative methods including participant observation, semi-structured interviews and document review. The data were collected in one National Health Service trust in south England between 1999 and 2001. Additional duties and responsibilities specifically associated with the care co-ordinator role and multidisciplinary working, combined with heavy workloads, produced 'limited nursing', whereby community psychiatric nurses were unable to provide evidence-based psychosocial interventions that are recognized to reduce relapse amongst people with severe mental illness. The role of the Care Programme Approach care co-ordinator was not designed to support the provision of psychosocial interventions. Consequently, community psychiatric nurses in the co-ordinator role are faced with competing demands and are unable to provide the range of structured, evidence-based interventions required. This may partially account for the increased inpatient bed use associated with the Care Programme Approach.

  17. The lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bimenyimana

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Caring for good people is difficult enough; to care for people who are either aggressive or violent is even more difficult. This is what psychiatric nurses working in the psychiatric institution in which research was done are exposed to on a daily basis. The aim of the research was to explore and describe the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, and contextual study design was utilised. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and naïve sketches. Tesch’s (Creswell, 2004:256 method of open coding and an independent coder were utilised for data analysis. This study shed some light on the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. The findings show that the level of violence and aggression to which psychiatric nurses are exposed is overwhelming and the consequences are alarming. The contributing factors to this violence and aggression are: the mental status and the conditions in which patients are admitted; the staff shortage; the lack of support among the members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT; and the lack of structured and comprehensive orientation among newly appointed staff members. As a result, psychiatric nurses are emotionally, psychologically, and physically affected. They then respond with the following emotions and behaviour: fear, anger, frustration, despair, hopelessness and helplessness, substance abuse, absenteeism, retaliation and the development of an “I don’t care” attitude.

  18. Advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners' ideas and needs for supervision in private practice in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temane, Annie M; Poggenpoel, Marie; Myburgh, Chris P H

    2014-04-07

    Supervision forms an integral part of psychiatric nursing. The value of clinicalsupervision has been demonstrated widely in research. Despite efforts made toward advancedpsychiatric nursing, supervision seems to be non-existent in this field. The aim of this study was to explore and describe advanced psychiatric nursepractitioners' ideas and needs with regard to supervision in private practice in order tocontribute to the new efforts made in advanced psychiatric nursing in South Africa. A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory, and contextual design using a phenomenological approach as research method was utilised in this study. A purposive sampling was used. Eight advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice described their ideas and needs for supervision during phenomenological interviews. Tesch's method of open coding was utilised to analyse data. After data analysis the findings were recontextualised within literature. The data analysis generated the following themes - that the supervisor should have or possess: (a) professional competencies, (b) personal competencies and (c) specificfacilitative communication skills. The findings indicated that there was a need for supervision of advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice in South Africa. This study indicates that there is need for supervision and competent supervisors in private practice. Supervision can be beneficial with regard to developing a culture of support for advanced psychiatric practitioners in private practice and also psychiatric nurse practitioners.

  19. Advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners’ ideas and needs for supervision in private practice in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie M. Temane

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supervision forms an integral part of psychiatric nursing. The value of clinicalsupervision has been demonstrated widely in research. Despite efforts made toward advancedpsychiatric nursing, supervision seems to be non-existent in this field.Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore and describe advanced psychiatric nursepractitioners’ ideas and needs with regard to supervision in private practice in order tocontribute to the new efforts made in advanced psychiatric nursing in South Africa.Method: A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory, and contextual design using a phenomenological approach as research method was utilised in this study. A purposive sampling was used. Eight advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice described their ideas and needs for supervision during phenomenological interviews. Tesch’s method of open coding was utilised to analyse data. After data analysis the findings were recontextualised within literature.Results: The data analysis generated the following themes – that the supervisor should have or possess: (a professional competencies, (b personal competencies and (c specificfacilitative communication skills. The findings indicated that there was a need for supervision of advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice in South Africa.Conclusion: This study indicates that there is need for supervision and competent supervisors in private practice. Supervision can be beneficial with regard to developing a culture of support for advanced psychiatric practitioners in private practice and also psychiatric nurse practitioners.

  20. Patient Aggression and the Wellbeing of Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Virve Pekurinen; Laura Willman; Marianna Virtanen; Mika Kivimäki; Jussi Vahtera; Maritta Välimäki

    2017-01-01

    Wellbeing of nurses is associated with patient aggression. Little is known about the differences in these associations between nurses working in different specialties. We aimed to estimate and compare the prevalence of patient aggression and the associations between patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses in psychiatric and non-psychiatric specialties (medical and surgical, and emergency medicine). A sample of 5288 nurses (923 psychiatric nurses, 4070 medical and surgical nurses, 295 e...

  1. A modern history of psychiatric-mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Laura C; Scharer, Kathleen M

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the progression of developments in psychiatric-mental health nursing from the 1960s to the present. The 1960s were a time of shortage of psychiatric APRNs, with legislation expanding the availability of mental health services. We find ourselves in a similar time with 7 million new health insurance enrollees, because of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The expansion of health insurance coverage comes at a time when some colleges of nursing are closing master's programs in psychiatric-mental health, in lieu of the DNP mandate from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Is history repeating itself? Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. We are different: the voices of psychiatric advanced practice nurses on the performance of their roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Yuen-Ling; Chan, Zenobia C Y; Chien, Wai-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Many studies have affirmed that psychiatric advanced practice nurses (APNs) perform multifaceted roles. However, only a limited amount of research has been conducted on their perceptions of the performance of their roles. To explore the lived experiences of psychiatric APNs concerning the performance of their roles. Data were collected from individual semi-structured interviews and analysed using the interpretative phenomenological analysis method. The study was conducted in a hospital cluster in Hong Kong. Thirteen psychiatric APNs were purposively recruited. Three themes were discerned, namely, 'We are different', 'Who am I?', and 'I am who I am'. The findings can help psychiatric APNs and nurse administrators to better understand the needs of the role-bearers (APNs) and to develop strategies to support the development of advanced psychiatric nursing practices in Hong Kong and worldwide.

  3. Depression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feely, M; Long, A

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a theory of connectivity, which was formulated from the findings of a Classical Grounded Theory study that was designed to capture a sample of people's perceptions of living with depression or caring for individuals with depression. Data were collected from: (1) a focus group consisting of people with depression (n = 7), of which five were patients in the community and two were nurses; (2) one-to-one interviews with patients in the community (n = 5) and nurses (n = 5), three of whom had experienced depression from both sides of the caring process; and (3) two 'happy accident' focus groups (n = 25; n = 18) comprising of healthcare workers with a shared understanding of depression. Purposeful sampling was used initially. Thereafter, in keeping with one of the key tenets of grounded theory, theoretical sampling was used until theoretical saturation occurred. Data were analysed using the constant comparative approach together with the NVivo qualitative analysis software package. The core category that emerged was 'connectivity' relating to the connections and disconnections, which people make in their lives. Six key categories emerged all of which were integrated with the core category. Hence, connectivity provided a significant platform for understanding and responding to the life experience of depression. They were: (1) life encounters on the journey to naming; (2) depression: What's in a name? The silent thief; (3) tentative steps to health care; (4) connective encounters and challenges; (5) connecting with self; and (6) self-connection maintenance. Subsequently, a theory, 'Depression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivity', surfaced from the overall findings. We argue that this theory of connectivity provides a framework that people working in the field of holistic treatment and care could use to better understand and respond to the life experience of people living with depression.

  4. Patient Aggression and the Wellbeing of Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virve Pekurinen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wellbeing of nurses is associated with patient aggression. Little is known about the differences in these associations between nurses working in different specialties. We aimed to estimate and compare the prevalence of patient aggression and the associations between patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses in psychiatric and non-psychiatric specialties (medical and surgical, and emergency medicine. A sample of 5288 nurses (923 psychiatric nurses, 4070 medical and surgical nurses, 295 emergency nurses participated in the study. Subjective measures were used to assess both the occurrence of patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses (self-rated health, sleep disturbances, psychological distress and perceived work ability. Binary logistic regression with interaction terms was used to compare the associations between patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses. Psychiatric nurses reported all types of patient aggression more frequently than medical and surgical nurses, whereas nurses working in emergency settings reported physical violence and verbal aggression more frequently than psychiatric nurses. Psychiatric nurses reported poor self-rated health and reduced work ability more frequently than both of the non-psychiatric nursing groups, whereas medical and surgical nurses reported psychological distress and sleep disturbances more often. Psychiatric nurses who had experienced at least one type of patient aggression or mental abuse in the previous year, were less likely to suffer from psychological distress and sleep disturbances compared to medical and surgical nurses. Psychiatric nurses who had experienced physical assaults and armed threats were less likely to suffer from sleep disturbances compared to nurses working in emergency settings. Compared to medical and surgical nurses, psychiatric nurses face patient aggression more often, but certain types of aggression are more common in emergency settings. Psychiatric nurses have

  5. Attitudes of psychiatric nurses to treatment and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D J; Philip, A E

    1985-06-01

    A sample of 208 psychiatric nurses and nursing assistants completed a questionnaire assessing attitudes to treatment and patients. Significant attitudinal differences between groups were found in relation to professional grade, age and sex. Staff with more professional training were less authoritarian and impersonal than staff more junior in the hierarchy. Younger males with Registered Mental Nurse training were found to be significantly less inclined towards physical methods of nursing and treatment. Male nurses tended to favour therapeutic techniques which emphasized independent nurse action and psychological proximity to patients. Female nurses were more favourably inclined to physical methods of treatment and were significantly more authoritarian and formal towards patients in line with the traditional stereotype of the general hospital nurse. Results are discussed in relation to the setting up of new treatment regimes within psychiatric hospitals and the influence that staff attitudes have on their functioning.

  6. Job satisfaction among psychiatric registered nurses in New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, T P

    2008-06-01

    This research used Herzberg et al.'s two-factor theory as a framework with which to examine job satisfaction in a sample of 161 registered psychiatric nurses in the states of Connecticut, Maine and Massachusetts (USA). Weiss et al.'s Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire short form was used to measure possible relationships between ability utilization, compensation, co-workers, achievement and job satisfaction. Findings support Herzberg et al.'s theory, showing moderate correlations among nurses' ability utilization, achievement and job satisfaction. Mean general satisfaction of respondents was closer to satisfied than neutral; respondents indicated greatest satisfaction with ability utilization (86%) and achievement (83%); 67% were satisfied with co-workers, and 52% with compensation. Respondents were least satisfied with compensation, with 14% indicating that they were very dissatisfied. Although compensation was an issue, it is possible that other factors, such as safety, management conflict, and balancing the needs of job and family, if addressed, may help increase job satisfaction and retention of psychiatric nursing staff.

  7. Role performance of psychiatric nurses in advanced practice: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Y L; Chan, Z; Chien, W T

    2014-10-01

    This paper discusses findings from a systematic review of literature pertaining to the role performance of psychiatric nurses in advanced practice. A search of 11 electronic databases was conducted to identify research involving interventions by psychiatric (or mental health) nurses in advanced practice. A total of 14 studies were identified. In this review, the role performance of psychiatric nurses in advanced practice was categorized into three themes: (1) the provision of psychosocial interventions; (2) the provision of nurse-directed services in health-care contexts; and (3) the provision of psychiatric nursing consultation services. Our results document that psychiatric nurses in advanced practice perform multifaceted roles and provide mental health-care services in various contexts. This systematic review reveals that the nurses obtain significant results in managing clients with depression and psychological stress, and demonstrates their value when developing partnerships with non-mental health service providers. One study, however, showed that the nurses had insignificant results in performing transitional care for pre-discharged mental health service users. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Patient aggression in psychiatric services: the experience of a sample of nurses at two psychiatric facilities in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, B O; Isa, E W; Oud, N

    2011-05-01

    Aggression is a common feature in psychiatric in-patient units in Africa. The attitudes of psychiatric nurses and their perceptions of the frequency of in-patient aggression have not been explored in the Nigerian context. Using a crosssectional study design, two self-report questionnaires (the Attitudes toward Aggression Scale (ATAS) and the Perception of the Prevalence of Aggression Scale (POPAS)) were administered to nursing staff (n=73) at two psychiatric facilities in Benin City, Nigeria. Overall, nurses viewed aggression as offensive, destructive and intrusive. They were less likely to view it as a means of communication or serving protective functions. Verbal aggression was the commonest type of aggression experienced while sexual intimidation and suicide attempts were least common. Male nurses were more likely to experience physical violence and aggressive 'splitting' behaviours, while nurses with over a decade of professional experience were more likely to experience verbal and humiliating aggressive behaviours. In contrast to previous studies, fewer nurses required days off work due to aggressive behaviour. Aggression is commonly experienced by nurses in in-patient units in Nigeria. Their views were predominantly negative. Training programmes are required to change staff attitudes as well as research on the cultural factors mediating these attitude dispositions.

  9. Nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    Background : Potential inappropiate prescribing (IP) is associated with higher mortality, morbidity and risk of hospitalization. Potential IP has only been investigated in elderly populations and never in a psychiatric setting or a general population. Registered nurses are the healthprofessionals...

  10. Data mining in psychiatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Diego; Cornejo, Eduardo; Xanthopoulos, Petros; Guarracino, Mario R; Pardalos, Panos M

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical sciences and computational methods have found new applications in fields like medicine over the last few decades. Modern data acquisition and data analysis protocols have been of great assistance to medical researchers and clinical scientists. Especially in psychiatry, technology and science have made new computational methods available to assist the development of predictive modeling and to identify diseases more accurately. Data mining (or knowledge discovery) aims to extract information from large datasets and solve challenging tasks, like patient assessment, early mental disease diagnosis, and drug efficacy assessment. Accurate and fast data analysis methods are very important, especially when dealing with severe psychiatric diseases like schizophrenia. In this paper, we focus on computational methods related to data analysis and more specifically to data mining. Then, we discuss some related research in the field of psychiatry.

  11. A qualitative study of factors influencing psychiatric nursing practice in Australian prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J

    1999-01-01

    Factors influencing the practice of psychiatric nursing in Australian prisons. A qualitative study of psychiatric nurses (N = 30) working in a prison. The psychiatric nurses identified the following factors as influencing their work: challenging patients, threats to personal survival of patients, the technology and artifice of confinement, conflicting values of nurses and corrections staff, stigma by association, and prisoner identification of the nurses with prison administration. Psychiatric nurses who work in forensic settings must adapt to less than optimal practice conditions.

  12. Hospital staff nurse perceptions of competency to care for patients with psychiatric or behavioral health concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Dana N; Wickman, Mary E; Cacciata, Marysol; Winokur, Elizabeth J; Loucks, Jeannine; Drake, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Disruptive behaviors are common among hospitalized patients with psychiatric and substance abuse behaviors. Nurses working on nonpsychiatric units, however, may lack competencies to care for patients with such behaviors. A survey was developed and administered to 844 nurses across three hospital settings that revealed a lack of nurse confidence to intervene in situations that require de-escalation techniques and crisis communication. This study provides direction for further research and interventions in hospital settings with similar professional development needs.

  13. [Nursing perspective on psychiatric care in Ivory Coast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Dan

    2017-05-01

    Michaël Bilson is a nurse at the psychiatric hospital of Bingerville, in Ivory Coast. Here, he describes his mission supporting the National Health Worker Training Institute. It is the only nurse training school in Ivory Coast. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The Psychiatric Family Nurse Practitioner: A Collaborator in Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Patricia D.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner (Psych.F.N.P.) to contribute to family practice through physical care and mental health care exists in the here and now. This role is a synthesis of 2 advanced practice roles, the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist (Psych.C.N.S.) and family nurse practitioner (F.N.P.), both of which continue to have great utility independently. This synthesis is a practical application of concepts that have evolved to meet the changing patterns of ...

  15. Is it possible to strengthen psychiatric nursing staff's clinical supervision?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of a meta-supervision intervention in terms of participation, effectiveness and benefits of clinical supervision of psychiatric nursing staff. BACKGROUND: Clinical supervision is regarded as a central component in developing mental health nursing practices, but the evidence...... supporting positive outcomes of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing is not convincing. DESIGN: The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. All permanently employed nursing staff members at three general psychiatric wards at a Danish university hospital (n = 83) were allocated to either...... on individuals or wards already actively engaged in clinical supervision, which suggested that individuals and wards without well-established supervision practices may require more comprehensive interventions targeting individual and organizational barriers to clinical supervision....

  16. Occupational stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, K; McDonald, N

    2015-04-01

    Burnout negatively impacts the delivery of mental health services. Psychiatric nurses face stressors that are distinct from other nursing specialities. The research was conducted in Ireland and captured a relatively large sample of respondents. The results compared the stressors, coping strategies and burnout levels between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses. Occupational stress can negatively impact on the well-being of psychiatric nurses, which in turn can lead to poor client care. There is a dearth of published research conducted in Ireland that examines stress within the discipline. A between-groups study, undertaken in February 2011, investigated stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region. Sixty-nine participants (8 males and 61 females), aged between 18 to 60 years voluntarily completed the Mental Health Professional Stress Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the PsychNurse Methods of Coping Scale. The findings revealed that nurses were operating in a moderately stressful environment. Stressors focused on organizational issues as opposed to client issues. The main stressors identified were lack of resources, workload and organizational structures/processes. Both groups reported average levels of emotional exhaustion, low levels of depersonalization and average levels of personal accomplishment. A Mann-Whitney U-test and Independent Samples t-test found significant differences between hospital and community-based nurses regarding depersonalization and personal accomplishment, respectively. Hospital nurses reported higher depersonalization scores, and community nurses had a greater sense of personal accomplishment. The personal accomplishment scores of hospital nurses were below mental health professional norms. No significant differences emerged regarding coping strategies. Avoidant coping strategies were favoured by both groups. It is recommended that interventions

  17. A model to facilitate collaboration between institutions of higher education and psychiatric health care services to promote psychiatric clinical nursing education

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    D.Cur. The purpose of this research study was to describe a model to facilitate collaboration between the institutions of higher education and psychiatric health care services in order to promote psychiatric clinical nursing education, with guidelines to operationalise the model. In spite of the calls by statutory bodies and contemporary legislation for collaboration between institutions of higher education and psychiatric health care services, there are few instances where formalised coll...

  18. Ego States of nurses working in psychiatric clinics according to transactional analysis theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, Melike Yonder; Kececi, Ayla

    2016-01-01

    Objective: An effective interpersonal communication is an essential nursing skill required to help provide quality health care and meet the treatment objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate the communication between the psychiatric nurses and the patients in terms of Transactional Analysis Theory ego states. Methods: The quantitative and qualitative research methods were used. The descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation) were used in the data analysis and Kendall’s Tau-c coefficient was used to assess the agreement among the observers. Results: Of the psychiatric nurses, 66.7% (n = 14) had served as a psychiatric nurse for 1-10 years. Among the nurses, 52.4% (n=11) had received training about communication from any institution/organization. The agreement among the opinions of the nurses, the researcher and the charge nurses about the psychiatric nurses’ ego states showed that there was a significant relationship between the researcher’s opinion of the nurses’ ego states and the charge nurses’ opinion of the nurses’ ego states in terms of Critical Parent, Nurturing Parent, Adult, Adapted Child and Natural Child ego states. Conclusion: It is suggested that training be offered in regards to raising awareness about ulterior transactions that can affect communication negatively, patient autonomy and therapeutic communication in particular, and patients requiring the use of special communication methods. PMID:27182267

  19. Nursing diagnoses related to psychiatric adult inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfelder, Fritz; van Achterberg, Theo; Müller Staub, Maria

    2018-02-01

    To detect the prevalence of NANDA-I diagnoses and possible relationships between those and patient characteristics such as gender, age, medical diagnoses and psychiatric specialty/setting. There is a lack on studies about psychiatric inpatient characteristics and possible relationships among these characteristics with nursing diagnoses. A quantitative-descriptive, cross-sectional, completed data sampling study was performed. The data were collected from the electronic patient record system. Frequencies for the social-demographic data, the prevalence of the NANDA-I diagnoses and the explanatory variables were calculated. In total, 410 nursing phenomena were found representing 85 different NANDA-I diagnoses in 312 patients. The NANDA-I diagnosis "Ineffective Coping" was the most frequently stated diagnosis followed by "Ineffective Health Maintenance," "Hopelessness" and "Risk for Other-Directed Violence". Men were more frequently affected by the diagnoses "Ineffective Coping," "Hopelessness," "Risk for Self-Directed Violence," "Defensive Coping" and "Risk for Suicide," whereas the diagnoses "Insomnia," "Chronic Confusion," "Chronic Low Self-Esteem" and "Anxiety" were more common in women. Patients under the age of 45 years were more frequently affected by "Chronic Low Self-Esteem" and "Anxiety" than older patients. "Ineffective Coping" was the most prevalent diagnosis by patients with mental disorders due to psychoactive substance use. Patients with schizophrenia were primarily affected by the diagnoses "Ineffective Coping," "Impaired Social Interaction" and "Chronic Low Self-Esteem." This study demonstrates the complexity and diversity of nursing care in inpatient psychiatric settings. Patients' gender, age and psychiatric diagnoses and settings are a key factor for specific nursing diagnosis. There are tendencies for relationships between certain nursing diagnosis and patient characteristics in psychiatric adult inpatients. This enhances the specific, extended

  20. Patients' descriptions of nursing interventions supporting quality of life in acute psychiatric wards: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Anneli; Hätönen, Heli; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Välimäki, Maritta

    2008-11-01

    People with mental disorders suffer from impaired quality of life (QoL). In psychiatric hospital wards nurses are in a close relationship with patients and have good opportunities to support patients' QoL. Still, relatively little is known about patients' perceptions related to nursing interventions by which nurses can support the QoL of patients with severe mental illness. To explore patients' perceptions of nursing interventions in supporting patients' QoL in acute psychiatric inpatient settings. Explorative descriptive study design. The study was conducted in seven acute 24-h psychiatric wards of general hospitals in Southern Finland. Thirty-five inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder or delusional disorder. The data were generated through semi-structured interviews and processed by means of qualitative content analysis. Five main categories of patients' perceptions of nursing interventions were identified to support QoL from patients' descriptions: empowering interventions, social interventions, activating interventions, security interventions and interventions to support physical health. Impaired QoL of patients with severe mental illness can be supported in acute psychiatric wards through nursing interventions. However, we are not sure how effective these interventions are. Thus, research on the effectiveness of nursing interventions to support patients' QoL is needed.

  1. Tangled ruptures: discursive changes in Danish psychiatric nursing 1965-75

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, N

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing and psychiatric nurses have been referred to in various ways over the course of history. These articulations reflect and constitute the ways in which nursing is comprehended during specific periods. A rupture in these descriptions and conceptions of Danish psychiatric nursing...... over the period 1965--75 is identified using a discourse analytical framework, inspired primarily by Foucault. This rupture influenced all aspects of psychiatric nursing: the perception of the psychiatric patient, the expertise and knowledge of the nurse and the care given by the nurse. The study...

  2. A Professional Containment Method in Acute Psychiatric Care: Nursing Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Sabancigullari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Observation is a method that is used in place of other control methods such as chemical and physical detention, isolation. Observation is used especially as an interference method to ensure the safety of the patients with suicidal and aggressive behaviors in acute psychiatric care in many countries. Especially in acute psychiatric wards using observations of nursing as a professional control method is an important issue. This article aims to draw attention to the importance of the subject in our country about using nursing observations as a control method in acute psychiatric care from the view of the literature. In this article several studies related to risk assessment, decision making, the levels of observation, the application of observation and the ethical aspects of observation on acute psychiatric care have been discussed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(1.000: 79-91

  3. Ethics in Psychiatric Research: Issues and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Shobhit; Kuppili, Pooja Patnaik; Pattanayak, Raman Deep; Sagar, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Psychiatric research has increased remarkably over recent decades to help in understanding the current trends and better therapeutic options for illness. On the other hand, there is also a trend toward higher rates of retraction of published papers in the recent years. Ethics is required to maintain and increase the overall quality and morality of research. Psychiatric research faces several unique ethical challenges. Ethical guidelines are very important tool of research which safeguards par...

  4. Implementation of information technology in nursing practice - challenge for management in psychiatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Hätönen, Heli; Välimäki, Maritta

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of information technology (IT) applications in nursing practice requires systematic investments and guidance. A collaborative organisational culture, and systematic and close clinical and administrative cooperation during the implementation process support the acceptance of IT among users in organisation. Although knowledge of IT projects management exists, there is a lack of knowledge about nursing management in IT implementation processes in psychiatric nursing.

  5. Indian - American contributions to psychiatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangi, Anand K

    2010-01-01

    The Indian Diaspora, especially in North America, is a visible force in the field of psychiatric medicine. An estimated 5000 persons of Indian origin practice psychiatry in the USA and Canada, and an estimated 10% of these are in academic psychiatry. Wide ranging contributions, from molecular biology of psychiatric disorders to community and cultural psychiatry, are being made by this vibrant group of researchers. This article is a brief summary and work-in-progress report of the contributions by Indian - American psychiatric researchers. Although not exhaustive in coverage, it is meant to give the reader an overview of the contributions made by three waves of researchers over a span of 50 years.

  6. Cross-cultural differences in psychiatric nurses' attitudes to inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Gerard J.; Middel, Berry; Dassen, Theodoor; Reijneveld, Menno S A

    Little is currently known about the attitudes of psychiatric nurses toward patient aggression, particularly from an international perspective. Attitudes toward patient aggression of psychiatric nurses from five European countries were investigated using a recently developed and tested attitude

  7. Motivational Factors that Help in Coping with Barriers to Provision of Psychiatric Nursing Care: Perspective of Psychiatric Nurses in a Hospital Setting in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimba, Solomon Musa; Duma, Sinegugu

    2015-07-01

    This qualitative case study explored barriers to provision of psychiatric nursing care in a hospital in Plateau State, Nigeria, and revealed motivational factors that helped the nurses to cope with these barriers. Data collection methods included grand tour and in-depth interviews and participant observation. Motivational factors were related to the psychiatric nurse's individual intrinsic belief system, as well as to their intrinsic belief system as influenced by the environment. These motivational factors highlight how psychiatric nurses continue to cope with the barriers they face in provision of care. The findings indicate the need for hospital management to create and sustain an environment to complement the existing intrinsic motivation of psychiatric nurses to provide psychiatric nursing care, and to provide prompt and appropriate emotional and psychological support to psychiatric nurses worldwide.

  8. Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported sources of knowledge for practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yadav, B L

    2012-02-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an approach to health care in which health professionals use the best evidence available to guide their clinical decisions and practice. Evidence is drawn from a range of sources, including published research, educational content and practical experience. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the sources of knowledge or evidence for practice used by psychiatric nurses in Ireland. The paper is part of a larger study, which also investigated barriers, facilitators and level of skills in achieving EBP among Irish psychiatric nurses. Data were collected in a postal survey of a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. The findings revealed that the majority of survey respondents based their practice on information which was derived from interactions with patients, from their personal experience and from information shared by colleagues and members of the multidisciplinary team, in preference to published sources of empirically derived evidence. These findings are consistent with those of the previous similar studies among general nurses and suggest that Irish psychiatric nurses face similar challenges to their general nursing counterparts in attaining of EBP.

  9. Psychiatric nursing teaching at the Ana Nery School in the first half of the 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique da Silva Carvalho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the teaching of psychiatric nursing at Ana Néri Nursing School (EAN, between 1925 and 1954. Methodology: Socio-historical research whose sources were written documents and the oral statement of an ex-professor. The documentary analysis technique was used for data treatment. Results: For 27 years, the EAN did not introduce students into the psychiatric field due to the mental illness stigma, offering only theoretical disciplines, which were taught by physicians. Later there were theoretical disciplines with practical training in the classroom, and then theoretical disciplines with practice in psychiatric hospitals, taught by nurses. In conclusion, the law 775/49 lead the EAN to qualify a professor and initiate the reformulation of the nursing care provided at the Institute of Psychiatry of the University of Brazil, so as to adjust it to serve as a practical field and a model for teaching psychiatric nursing in Brazil.

  10. Providing structure. Unraveling and building a psychiatric nursing intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses commonly refer to ‘providing structure’ (PS) as a key intervention. But, no consensus exists about what PS entails. PS can be understood as a complex intervention. In five studies a definition, activities and context-variables were described. On the basis of results of a

  11. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Millennial Students' Preferred Methods for Learning Concepts in Psychiatric Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Janet K

    2015-09-01

    The current longitudinal, descriptive, and correlational study explored which traditional teaching strategies can engage Millennial students and adequately prepare them for the ultimate test of nursing competence: the National Council Licensure Examination. The study comprised a convenience sample of 40 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a psychiatric nursing course. The students were exposed to a variety of traditional (e.g., PowerPoint(®)-guided lectures) and nontraditional (e.g., concept maps, group activities) teaching and learning strategies, and rated their effectiveness. The students' scores on the final examination demonstrated that student learning outcomes met or exceeded national benchmarks. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Connectomics in psychiatric research: advances and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Miao Cao,* Zhijiang Wang,* Yong He State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Psychiatric disorders disturb higher cognitive functions and severely compromise human health. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders are very complex, and understanding these mechanisms remains a great challenge. Currently, many psychiatric disorders are hypothesized to reflect “faulty wiring” or aberrant connectivity in the brains. Imaging connectomics is arising as a promising methodological framework for describing the structural and functional connectivity patterns of the human brain. Recently, alterations of brain networks in the connectome have been reported in various psychiatric disorders, and these alterations may provide biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis for the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Here, we summarize the current achievements in both the structural and functional connectomes in several major psychiatric disorders (eg, schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism based on multi-modal neuroimaging data. We highlight the current progress in the identification of these alterations and the hypotheses concerning the aberrant brain networks in individuals with psychiatric disorders and discuss the research questions that might contribute to a further mechanistic understanding of these disorders from a connectomic perspective.Keywords: psychiatric disorders, connectome, graph theory, functional connectivity, structural connectivity

  14. Nurses of the psychiatric service as the specific occupational group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimentova I.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for psychiatric services in modern health care system will increase due to the growth in number of mental diseases. The role of nurses in prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of mental illness has a number of features. These features are related to care of patients with high level of aggressiveness, behavioral deviations, and problems in self-service. Differences in procedure practice and communicative space specialize and make narrower the nurses' professional practice in psychiatry and determine appearance of specific mechanisms and norms bound up with the necessity of supervision of patients while respecting their rights. Personnel's oversight functions, deviant behavior of patients, high degree of closure of psychiatric medical institutions — are the reasons for specialization of nurses' professional group in psychiatry, forming special mechanisms of maintaining tolerance to patients in professional sphere of this community.

  15. The relationships among work stress, resourcefulness, and depression level in psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu Mi; Lai, Chien Yu; Chang, Yong-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Yu, Ching-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Psychiatric nurses are exposed to highly stressful work environments that can lead to depression over time. This study aimed to explore the relationships among work stress, resourcefulness, and depression levels of psychiatric nurses. A cross-sectional design with randomized sampling was used; 154 psychiatric nurses were recruited from six medical centers in Taiwan. Psychiatric nurses' work stress was found positively correlated with their depression level, and negatively related to resourcefulness. Work stress significantly predicted depression level. These results suggest that the hospital administrative units may develop training courses about resourcefulness skills to reduce psychiatric nurses' work stress, and improve their mental health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rules of Thumb: Hints for the psychiatric nursing student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karshmer, J F

    1982-03-01

    The eight "rules of thumb" offered here are representative of numerous more that have been helpful stimulators for psychiatric nursing students. The suggest to the students a consistent approach based upon a rationale and do not encourage rote memorization of techniques. Students are encouraged to critically analyze the reasons and conceptual underpinnings for each encounter they have with patients. The "rules of thumb" encourage this self-exploration and attention to "What is it I'm really asking, or feeling, or thinking?" Only with this sort of continuous evaluation and reassessment can even the most novice of students begin to establish a therapeutic treatment approach with psychiatric patients.

  17. Care in psychiatric hospital under the perspective of a nursing team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mara de Melo Tavares

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed at describing the perception of the nursing team concerning the care in a psychiatric hospital. The research used a qualitative approach, exploratory type, using focus group technique, with five participants, in August 2011, in Niteroi, RJ, Brazil. From the data analysis five categories emerged, covering: sensitive listening; personal availability; therapeutic projects; human issues of the team; Traditional Psychiatry vs. Psychosocial Paradigm tension. It was concluded that despite the research, the subjects were still working at the hospital model. It was possible to bring awareness in a human, comprehensive and complete manner. But this perception of care has frailties once it does not bring any evidence of scientific basis of nursing. It is recommended that the professional nursing team invest in their role of caring in the context of the Psychiatric Reform, in the pursuit of an approach centered on the subject and in his way of living.

  18. Indian – American contributions to psychiatric research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangi, Anand K.

    2010-01-01

    The Indian Diaspora, especially in North America, is a visible force in the field of psychiatric medicine. An estimated 5000 persons of Indian origin practice psychiatry in the USA and Canada, and an estimated 10% of these are in academic psychiatry. Wide ranging contributions, from molecular biology of psychiatric disorders to community and cultural psychiatry, are being made by this vibrant group of researchers. This article is a brief summary and work-in-progress report of the contributions by Indian – American psychiatric researchers. Although not exhaustive in coverage, it is meant to give the reader an overview of the contributions made by three waves of researchers over a span of 50 years. PMID:21836715

  19. [Dementia - a relevant subject in psychiatric research?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wancata, Johannes

    2011-10-01

    Demographic change calls for increased efforts in dementia research. A systematic analysis of a German-speaking psychiatric journal was performed. 18.2 % of all papers published in were related to dementia and cognition. Dementia is a main issue; only papers regarding schizophrenia were more common. Health service research is largely lacking. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Pesquisa em enfermagem psiquiátrica: concepções e expectativas de enfermeiros que atuam em instituições psiquiátricas Investigación en enfermeria psiquiátrica: concepciónes y expectativas de los enfermeros que trabajan en instituciones psiquiátricas Psychiatric nursing research: conceptions and expectations of nurses in psychiatric institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Sadigursky

    1998-12-01

    encontraban en servicio en el periodo previsto para la realización de la colecta de datos, quienes emitieron sus opiniones a través de guía de entrevista semi-estructurada. Los resultados fueron cualitativamente analizados y se apoyaron en los principios teórico-metodológicos de las Representaciones Sociales, permitindo concluir que la mayoría de los enfermeros entrevistados refirió no tener acceso a las investigaciones específicas del área, y demostró dificultad en establecer relación e influencia desas investigaciones en sus servicios aunque admitieron su importancia en le desarrollo personal y profesional, lo que repercutiría sobremanera en la asistencia prestada por los enfermeros.This research has as objects of study the conceptions and expectations of the clinical nurses in psychiatric institutions about the research developed in this area. It has the purpose to identify conceptions and expectations, enabling the identification of the process of dissemination and utilization of the research in the attention and administration of psychiatric nursing care. It was developed with nurses that work in psychiatric instituitions at Salvador, in March, 1997. 25 nurses who worked in the period were interviewed expressing their opinions concerning the theme in study, through semi-structured interview. Results were quantitatively analised, based on the theoretical-methodological design of the Social Representations. It was possible to conclude that the great part of the nurses interviewed mentioned that they did not have acess to research in this area, as well as demonstrated difficulty to find the relations and influence of these research in their service, however they admit its importance to personal and professional development, that certainly, reflects on nursing care.

  1. Clinical Education In psychiatric mental health nursing: Overcoming current challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heeseung; Hwang, Boyoung; Kim, Sungjae; Ko, Heesung; Kim, Sumi; Kim, Chanhee

    2016-04-01

    In response to current challenges in psychiatric mental health nursing education, nursing schools have implemented new strategies in teaching undergraduate nursing students. The objectives of the study were to evaluate learning outcomes of a mental health nursing clinical practicum and to explore students' perceptions of the clinical practicum. This was a mixed-method study. Sixty-three undergraduate nursing students, who were undertaking their first mental health clinical practicum, completed a set of structured questionnaires and answered open-ended questions about the clinical practicum. Answers to open-ended questions were analyzed qualitatively, and learning outcomes (i.e., empathy, mental illness prejudice, simulation-related efficacy, and satisfaction) were measured at three time points: pre-clinical, post-simulation, and post-clinical. Students reported improvement in empathy and simulation-related self-efficacy after the clinical practicum, but no change was found in mental illness prejudice. Students' expectations for and evaluation of the clinical practicum are summarized. The observed improvement in learning outcomes of the clinical practicum may be attributed to the unique contribution of each component of the clinical practicum and the synergic effect of these diverse components. To manage emerging challenges in clinical settings and nursing education, it is critical to develop systematic and comprehensive mental health nursing clinical practicums for undergraduate nursing students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of two different psychiatric nursing courses on nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, perceptions of psychiatric nursing, and career choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Zekiye Çetinkaya; Günüşen, Neslihan Partlak; İnan, Figen Şengün; Ince, Sevecen Çelik; Sari, Ayşe

    This quasi-experimental study was carried out to compare the attitudes towards psychiatry patients of students educated with problem-based learning and students educated with a traditional method in western Turkey. The students' perceptions of psychiatric nursing and their career choices were also evaluated. The sample consisted of 202 students; 130 were educated with a problem-based learning model and 72 were educated with a traditional method. Students educated with the problem-based learning method developed more positive attitudes towards mental illness after the psychiatric nursing course in comparison with students educated with the traditional method. Students educated with the traditional method preferred psychiatric nursing in comparison with nursing students educated with problem-based learning. It is important that the psychiatric nursing curriculum includes topics and programs that will create awareness in students regarding stigmatization of mental illness and its effects. In addition, we suggest that studies are performed to determine the perceptions of students towards psychiatric nursing and the factors that affect their career choices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychiatric nursing care for adult survivors of child maltreatment: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zalm, Y.C.; Nugteren, W.A.; Hafsteinsdottir, T.B.; van der Venne, C.G.J.M.; Kool, N.; van Meijel, B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. Conclusions: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to ask

  4. Psychiatric clinical course strengthens the student-patient relationships of baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketola, J; Stein, J V

    2013-02-01

    Psychiatric nursing teaches students how to engage and communicate with patients who have severe emotional distress. Nurses need this knowledge as the majority of patients encountered in hospitals are distressed. This study explores the impact of a psychiatric clinical course in helping students learn to relate to distressed patients. The study used a mixed research methodology to survey 67 baccalaureate students about their experiences in the placement portion of the psychiatric nursing course. The pre-clinical questions focused on students' anticipation regarding individuals with mental illness and how the clinical experience would affect them as nurses and as individuals. The post-clinical questions asked how the clinical experience affected them. The students stated that their time with patients had changed them. Ninety-nine per cent were no longer frightened of the patients. Students realized the patients were distressed and were glad to help them. This work sensitized them to the individual rather than the generic patient. It initiated a process in self-awareness, in sensitivity to the feelings of another person and in communication skills. These are steps in the development of an empathetic presence. The students recognized the need for these skills in all nursing. The authors recommend strategies to assist students in developing an empathetic presence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  5. Exploring the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice: stories from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Teresa; Howie, Linsey

    2011-08-01

    Psychiatric nurses interested in extending their interpersonal and psychotherapeutic skills sometimes undertake postgraduate training in gestalt therapy. Little is known about how this new knowledge and psychotherapeutic skill base informs their practice. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study that aimed to explore the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice. Within a framework of narrative inquiry, four psychiatric nurses trained in gestalt therapy were invited to tell their stories of training in a gestalt approach to therapy, and recount their experiences of how it influenced their practice. In keeping with narrative analysis methods, the research findings were presented as a collection of four stories. Eight themes were derived from a thematic analysis conducted within and across the four stories. The discussion of the themes encapsulates the similarities and differences across the storied collection, providing a community and cultural context for understanding the individual stories. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  6. The impact of inpatient suicide on psychiatric nurses and their need for support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takusari Eri

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nurses working in psychiatric hospitals and wards are prone to encounter completed suicides. The research was conducted to examine post-suicide stress in nurses and the availability of suicide-related mental health care services and education. Methods Experiences with inpatient suicide were investigated using an anonymous, self-reported questionnaire, which was, along with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, administered to 531 psychiatric nurses. Results The rate of nurses who had encountered patient suicide was 55.0%. The mean Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R score was 11.4. The proportion of respondents at a high risk (≥ 25 on the 88-point IES-R score for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD was 13.7%. However, only 15.8% of respondents indicated that they had access to post-suicide mental health care programmes. The survey also revealed a low rate of nurses who reported attending in-hospital seminars on suicide prevention or mental health care for nurses (26.4% and 12.8%, respectively. Conclusions These results indicated that nurses exposed to inpatient suicide suffer significant mental distress. However, the low availability of systematic post-suicide mental health care programmes for such nurses and the lack of suicide-related education initiatives and mental health care for nurses are problematic. The situation is likely related to the fact that there are no formal systems in place for identifying and evaluating the psychological effects of patient suicide in nurses and to the pressures stemming from the public perception of nurses as suppliers rather than recipients of health care.

  7. The impact of inpatient suicide on psychiatric nurses and their need for support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Chizuko; Chida, Fuminori; Nakamura, Hikaru; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Yagi, Junko; Koeda, Atsuhiko; Takusari, Eri; Otsuka, Kotaro; Sakai, Akio

    2011-03-08

    The nurses working in psychiatric hospitals and wards are prone to encounter completed suicides. The research was conducted to examine post-suicide stress in nurses and the availability of suicide-related mental health care services and education. Experiences with inpatient suicide were investigated using an anonymous, self-reported questionnaire, which was, along with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, administered to 531 psychiatric nurses. The rate of nurses who had encountered patient suicide was 55.0%. The mean Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) score was 11.4. The proportion of respondents at a high risk (≥ 25 on the 88-point IES-R score) for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was 13.7%. However, only 15.8% of respondents indicated that they had access to post-suicide mental health care programmes. The survey also revealed a low rate of nurses who reported attending in-hospital seminars on suicide prevention or mental health care for nurses (26.4% and 12.8%, respectively). These results indicated that nurses exposed to inpatient suicide suffer significant mental distress. However, the low availability of systematic post-suicide mental health care programmes for such nurses and the lack of suicide-related education initiatives and mental health care for nurses are problematic. The situation is likely related to the fact that there are no formal systems in place for identifying and evaluating the psychological effects of patient suicide in nurses and to the pressures stemming from the public perception of nurses as suppliers rather than recipients of health care.

  8. Nurses' perceptions of nursing interventions supporting quality of life in acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Anneli; Hätönen, Heli; Kollanen, Marjo; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Välimäki, Maritta

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to examine nurses' (N=29) perceptions of nursing interventions in supporting patients' quality of life (QoL) in acute psychiatric inpatient settings. An explorative descriptive study design was applied. The data were generated through seven focus group interviews and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Five main categories of nursing interventions to support patients' QoL were identified. Interventions were related to care planning, empowering interventions, social interventions, activating interventions, and security interventions. Emphasis should be placed on nurses' opportunities to improve patients' QoL according to patients' individual needs. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A profile of students who followed a course in the didactics of psychiatric nursing at Unisa during 1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, V J

    1996-03-01

    Students who followed the above course did so as part of the Nursing Education III course offered at UNISA. This research aims at establishing a profile of these students. Aspects covered include age, sex, marital status, professional and academic qualifications, professional posts held and current fields of occupation. Such knowledge will clarify who the psychiatric nurse educators of the future might be, and also what the target population for the above course could be. Students' personal perceptions of the above course are sought in the second part of the questionnaire. Such information should be valuable in improving future courses for educators of psychiatric nurses.

  10. Why is psychiatric nursing not the preferred option for nursing students: A cross-sectional study examining pre-nursing and nursing school factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hui Lin; Seow, Esmond; Chua, Boon Yiang; Xie, Huiting; Wang, Jia; Lau, Ying Wen; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-05-01

    There is a shortage of nurses working in the mental health field globally. The aim of the present study was to examine Singapore nursing students' attitudes towards specializing in psychiatric nursing by examining the pre-nursing and nursing school factors as well as attitudes towards psychiatry and personality traits. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted with 500 nursing students from four nursing institutions in Singapore. Students' attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP-18), perception of psychiatric nursing career aspects relative to other fields, and personality traits (mini-IPIP) were assessed. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatric nursing. Logistic regression was used to examine the combined effect of factors upon the outcome. Twenty-six students (5.2%) rated "definitely decided to do" psychiatric nursing. Pre-nursing school factors associated with choosing psychiatry included ethnicity, current education, parents' wishes, having personal/family experience of mental illness, prior work experience, interest in psychiatric nursing and psychology module taken prior to current school admission. Nursing school factors such as teaching methods and clinical exposure were not associated with choosing psychiatric nursing. Positive attitudes towards psychiatry, perception of better career aspects in psychiatric nursing relative to other fields, and the personality traits of extraversion and intellect/imagination were associated with likelihood of choosing psychiatric nursing. Logistic regression revealed Malay (OR: 1.90, 1.14-3.16, p=0.013) and Indian ethnicity (OR: 2.56, 1.32-4.96, p=0.005), interest in psychiatry (OR: 22.56, 8.22-61.92, pnursing than other fields (OR: 1.91, 1.21-3.04, p=0.006), extraversion (OR: 1.09, 1.02-1.17, p=0.012) and positive attitude towards psychiatry (OR: 2.72, 1.75-4.23, pstudents choosing psychiatric nursing. The selection of psychiatry as a specialty by nursing students was affected by pre-nursing

  11. Clinical outcomes and satisfaction of patients of clinical nurse specialists in psychiatric-mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradell, J G

    1995-10-01

    Survey research was conducted to examine clinical outcomes and satisfaction of patients of psychiatric mental health clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). Patients who had terminated from outpatient psychotherapy with 6 CNSs in 1993 were mailed a questionnaire (N = 223). Follow-ups by mail yielded a response rate of 45% (n = 100). The questionnaires included the Profile of Mood States-Short Form ([POMS-SF]; McNair, Lorr, & Droppleman, 1992). Quality of Life Function ([QOL]; Lehman, 1991), and Patient Satisfaction Scale (Baradell, 1994). Paired difference t-tests were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. Percentages were used to report satisfaction, and Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationship between clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The mean age for respondents was 37 years; 82% were female. Diagnoses included depression (46%), adjustment disorders (34%), anxiety (10%), and other (10%). Patients reported significant improvement in all clinical symptoms: anxiety, depression, anger, confusion, fatigue and vigor. Patients reported significant improvement in all domains of QOL: family, social, and job. Patients reported a very high level of satisfaction with the care provided. The more clinical improvement the patients reported, the more satisfied they were with the care provided. If nurses are to be included in a reformed health care delivery system in the future, additional research is essential.

  12. Targeted research training: developing minority psychiatric investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Harold; Guerra, Ernesto; Regier, Darrel

    2014-04-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to review the career outcomes of a research training program specifically targeted to young psychiatric researchers from minority populations underrepresented in psychiatry. The aims of the program were (1) to support psychiatric investigators from under-represented populations in the development and maintenance of research careers and (2) to identify the factors which influence successful research career development. Demographic data from 99 program participants were collected from an online survey as part of a systematic program evaluation, and through a follow-up internet search. Outcome measures included current academic position, number and types of post-training grants received, number of peer-reviewed publications, and comparison of post-training career outcomes with those from other highly regarded research training programs. Of the 99 psychiatrists accepted into the program, 55 responded to the online survey; additional information on non-responders was obtained through a follow-up internet search. Results indicated that 64% of program trainees identified their primary employment setting as academic/research; 70% reported publication of their research findings, and 64% reported the award of post-training research grants. The percentage of program graduates appointed to academic faculty positions and their receipt of R01 and/or K awards, exceeded that of two highly regarded national training programs. The study further identified major factors influencing successful research career development. Findings from this study strongly suggest that research training programs targeted to young minority psychiatrists can be successful in supporting the development and maintenance of their research careers. The decline in the availability of such programs does not portend well for increasing the numbers of underrepresented minority psychiatric researchers.

  13. Cluster A personality disorders: considering the 'odd-eccentric' in psychiatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Brent A

    2007-02-01

    Psychiatric nurses are familiar with the concept of personality disorder because of their contact with persons with the most common personality disorder in clinical settings - borderline type, who frequently engage mental health services. Perhaps it is this familiarity that has focused research and clinical attention on borderline personality disorder compared with the other personality disorders. The significance of cluster A personality disorders for nursing is multifaceted because of their severity, prevalence, inaccurate diagnosis, poor response to treatment, and similarities to axis I diagnoses. Despite this, literature reviews have established that relatively few studies have focused on the treatment of the cluster A personality disorders - paranoid, schizotypal, and schizoid - resulting in a dearth of evidence-based interventions for this group of clients. A discussion of these disorders in the context of personality disorder and their individual characteristics demonstrates the distinctive and challenging engagement techniques required by psychiatric nurses to provide effective treatment and care. It is also strongly indicated that the discipline of psychiatric nursing has not yet begun to address the care of persons with cluster A personality disorders.

  14. Psychiatric hospital nursing staff's experiences of participating in group-based clinical supervision:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Angel, Sanne; Traynor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Group-based clinical supervision is commonly offered as a stress-reducing intervention in psychiatric settings, but nurses often feel ambivalent about participating. This study aimed at exploring psychiatric nurses' experiences of participating in groupbased supervision and identifying psychosocial...... reasons for their ambivalence. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 psychiatric nurses at a Danish university hospital. The results indicated that participation in clinical supervision was difficult for the nurses because of an uncomfortable exposure to the professional community. The sense...... of exposure was caused by the particular interactional organisation during the sessions, which brought to light pre-existing but covert conflicts among the nurses....

  15. Differences between Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses' family-focused practice in adult mental health services

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grant, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric nurses\\' practice with parents who have mental illness, their children and families is an important issue internationally. This study provides a comparison of Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses\\' family-focused practices in adult mental health services. Three hundred and forty three nurses across Ireland and 155 from Australia completed the Family Focused Mental Health Practice Questionnaire. Cross-country comparisons revealed significant differences, in terms of family-focused skill, knowledge, confidence and practice. Australian psychiatric nurses engaged in higher family-focused practice compared to Irish nurses. The comparative differences between countries may be attributable to differences in training, workplace support and policy.

  16. A Historical Overview of Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing Education in the United Kingdom: Going around in Circles or on the Straight and Narrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutcliffe, John

    2003-01-01

    Addresses historical issues in psychiatric/mental health nursing in the United Kingdom including attempts to integrate it with general nursing, the balance of theory/research and practice, and tensions over the recent shift to university-level nurse preparation. Discusses needs for the future. (Contains 42 references and commentary by Sheri…

  17. 'She's manipulative and he's right off': a critical analysis of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language in the acute inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Bridget; Manias, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Remarks such as 'she's manipulative' and 'he's right off' are familiar to psychiatric nurses. This paper critiques the language nurses use in acute inpatient psychiatry services, highlighting the diverse discourses implicated in nurses' writing and speaking about patients. Based on a review of the literature, this paper examines ethnographic studies and discourse analyses of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language. A prominent debate in the literature surrounds nurses' use of standardized language, which is the use of set terms for symptoms and nursing activities. This review of spoken descriptions of patients highlights nurses' use of informal and local descriptions, incorporating elements of moral judgement, common sense language and empathy. Research into written accounts in patient files and records show nurses' use of objectifying language, the dominance of medicine and the emergence of the language of bureaucracy in health services. Challenges to the language of psychiatry and psychiatric nursing arise from fields as diverse as bioscience, humanism and social theory. Authors who focus on the relationship between language, power and the discipline of nursing disagree in regard to their analysis of particular language as a constructive exercise of power by nurses. Thus, particular language is in some instances endorsed and in other instances censured, by nurses in research and practice. In this paper, a Foucauldian analysis provides further critique of taken-for-granted practices of speech and writing. Rather than censoring language, we recommend that nurses, researchers and educators attend to nurses' everyday language and explore what it produces for nurses, patients and society.

  18. Revisiting Nursing Research in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Emelonye A.U; Pitkäaho T; Aregbesola A; Vehviläinen- Julkunen K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence from a nursing conference convened in Nigeria in 1973 amongst other things implied that Nigerian nurses are not adequately educated and ill-equipped with prerequisite research skills. Four decades after the first and only initiative that examined the capacity and contribution of Nigerian Nurses to health care research, it is therefore pertinent to revisit the state of nursing research in the country. Aim: To review the academic and research preparedness of ...

  19. From medicalization to hybridization: a postcolonial discourse for psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, P E

    2001-04-01

    I begin with an Orwellian dilemma [Orwell G. (1968) The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, Vol. 1, p. 239. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York]: do I 'shoot the elephant' (by writing the abstract) to impress the editor? Or, with the courage of my postmodern convictions, do I lay down my rifle and disregard such suppressive editorial instructions? Bang! My words strafe the paper and the elephant is dead. How difficult it is to stay standing against the powerful currents of the dominant tradition. How easy it is to disavow the inequalities and injustices of that tradition when your livelihood (and your ego) depends upon it. So goes the theme of my paper, that, despite the clarion calls of the illustrious minority to reject the patriarchal model of medical psychiatry, psychiatric nurses continue to be propelled by the twin engines of illness and diagnosis. Yet as soon as psychiatry encounters the 'other' it becomes, in Homi K. Bhabha's words, 'hybridized': a pregnant pause created from the seeds of two different cultures. In this sense, every psychiatric moment becomes a golden opportunity for the psychiatric nurse to abdicate her role as medical factotum. Freed from these contractual obligations, she can join the 'other' and share in his experiences, sustaining rather than negating him within a truly therapeutic alliance. In similar fashion, this article has become a mixture of rhetorical fluidity and structured reality: a hybridized compromise which acknowledges the journal's publication boundaries yet still revels, at times, in the freedom of an open and lyrical text.

  20. Community psychiatric nursing in the Netherlands: a survey of a thriving but threatened profession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekkoek, B.W.; Meijel, B.K.G. van; Schene, A.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the Dutch community psychiatric nursing profession. In spite of their large numbers, estimated at 2900, Dutch community psychiatric nurses (CPNs) have contributed little to the international literature. The history of the profession reveals a

  1. Power and leadership in psychiatric nursing. Directions for the next century: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, M L

    1997-01-01

    Power and leadership in psychiatric nursing. To describe power, leadership, and their relationship to psychiatric nursing, with suggestions for the future of the discipline. Review of literature and author's observations of the discipline. The relationship of power and leadership focuses on leader qualities, a model for the interrelationship of leaders and colleagues, and the leader's achievement of a power position.

  2. Constructivism applied to psychiatric-mental health nursing: an alternative to supplement traditional clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoux Hampton, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    With the popularity of accelerated pre-licensure nursing programmes and the growth in nursing student enrolments, traditional clinical education continues to be a challenge to deliver. Nursing faculty members are required to develop and implement educational innovations that achieve effective learning outcomes, while using fewer resources. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the effectiveness of a constructivism-based learning project to achieve specific learning outcomes and to supplement approximately 30 clinical hours in a psychiatric-mental health nursing course. Students participated in a 10-week, multistage project that examined life histories, treatment resources, and evidence-based practice, as applied to a single individual with a mental illness. Students reported increased understanding of mental health and illness, developed personal relevance associated with the knowledge gained, and learned to problem solve with regard to nursing care of individuals diagnosed with mental illness. For many students, there also appeared to be a reduction in stigmatized attitudes towards mental illness. Constructivism-based learning is a promising alternative to supplement clinical hours, while effectively achieving learning outcomes. Future research is needed to further validate the use of this method for the learning of course content, as well as the reduction of stigma. © 2011 The Author. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Respect in forensic psychiatric nurse-patient relationships: a practical compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Donald N; Peter, Elizabeth; Gallop, Ruth; Angus, Jan E; Liaschenko, Joan

    2011-03-01

    The context of forensic psychiatric nursing is distinct from other psychiatric settings as, it involves placement of patients in secure environments with restrictions determined by the courts. Previous literature has identified that nurses morally struggle with respecting patients who have committed heinous offences, which can lead to the patient being depersonalized and dehumanized. Although respect is fundamental to ethical nursing practice, it has not been adequately explored conceptually or empirically. As a result, little knowledge exists that identifies how nurses develop, maintain, and express respect for patients. The purpose of this study is to analyze the concept of respect systematically, from a forensic psychiatric nurse's perspective using the qualitative methodology of focused ethnography. Forensic psychiatric nurses were recruited from two medium secure forensic rehabilitation units. In the first interview, 13 registered nurses (RNs) and two registered practical nurses (RPNs) participated, and although all informants were invited to the second interview, six RNs were lost to follow-up. Despite this loss, saturation was achieved and the data were interpreted through a feminist philosophical lens. Respect was influenced by factors categorized into four themes: (1) emotive-cognitive reactions, (2) nonjudgmental approach, (3) social identity and power, and (4) context. The data from the themes indicate that forensic psychiatric nurses strike a practical compromise, in their understanding and enactment of respect in therapeutic relationships with forensic psychiatric patients. © 2011 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  4. Facing the challenges and building solutions in clinical psychiatric nursing in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, Kourosh; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Mohammadpour, Ali

    2012-10-01

    Psychiatric nurses play an important role in the process of caring for mentally ill patients and are continually faced with the numerous challenges and complex issues related to this field. This study aimed to understand the perspectives of psychiatric nurses regarding the issues they face while providing care and examine the possible solutions for improvement of inpatient care in clinical settings. The study adopted a qualitative approach that utilized a content analysis of audio taped, semi-structured interviews that had been conducted with 24 nurses. Two main themes emerged from the data. The first, Challenges in Providing Care within Psychiatric Wards, had the following subthemes: Politics and Rules of Organization, Safety and Security Issues, Uncertainty about the Role, Lack of Trained Staff, and Sociocultural Issues. The second theme, Solutions for Improving Psychiatric Care, had the subthemes of Empowerment across four domains: Psychiatric Nurses, Mentally Ill Patients and their Families, The Psychiatric Mental Health System, and the Cultural Context. The results indicated that if nurses are expected to provide optimal nursing care within a psychiatric ward, then there is a need for a stable and responsible organizational structure, skilled psychiatric nurses, and community-based care along with an anti-stigma program.

  5. Empathy toward Patients with Mental Illness among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Impact of a Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Marwa Abd El-Gawad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an ability and skill that can be learned and developed through appropriate education and practice. While the importance of nurses' empathy is widely acknowledged, little is known about the impact of passing through the psychiatric nursing and mental health educational experience at the Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University on…

  6. Psychiatric wards with locked doors--advantages and disadvantages according to nurses and mental health nurse assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, K; von Knorring, L; von Essen, L

    2006-04-01

    To describe nurses' and mental health nurse assistants' perceptions of advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door. Psychiatric staff sometimes needs to protect patients from harming themselves or others. To keep the entrance door locked may help staff to achieve this goal. How locked entrance doors at psychiatric wards are experienced by staff, working on these wards, has been investigated to a very limited extent. The study was explorative and descriptive. Audio taped, semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions about advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door, were conducted with 20 nurses and 20 mental health nurse assistants. Data were analyzed with content analysis. A content analysis revealed eight categories of advantages and 18 categories of disadvantages. Most advantages mentioned by nurses and mental health nurse assistants were categorized as providing staff with control over patients, providing patients with a secure and efficient care and protecting patients and staff against 'the outside'. Most disadvantages mentioned by nurses were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, making patients feel dependent and creating a non-caring environment. Most disadvantages mentioned by mental health nurse assistants were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, causing emotional problems for patients, making staff's power obvious and forcing patients to adapt to other patients' needs. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants mentioned more disadvantages than advantages and nurses mentioned more disadvantages than mental health nurse assistants. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants perceive a number of advantages and disadvantages for themselves, patients and significant others with a locked door at a psychiatric ward. Most of these concern patients' experiences. It is important for

  7. Clinical intervention research in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Angus

    2009-04-01

    As a healthcare profession nursing has a duty to develop practices that contribute to the health and well being of patients. The aim of this paper is to discuss current issues in clinical research within nursing. The paper defines clinical interventions research as a theoretically based, integrated and sequential approach to clinical knowledge generation. The paper provides specific criteria for defining a clinical intervention together with an overview of the stages involved in clinical research from problem identification to implementing knowledge in practice. The paper also explored the extent to which nursing research was focussed on clinical issues, through a snapshot review of all the original research papers in Europe's three leading nursing research journals. In total of 517 different papers were included and classified in the review. Of these 88% (n=455) were classified as non-clinical intervention and 12% (n=62) as clinical intervention studies. The paper examined the intervention studies in detail examining: the underpinning theory; linkage to previous (pre-clinical) work; evidence of granularity; protocol clarity (generalisable and parsimonious); the phase of knowledge development; and evidence of safety (adverse event reporting). The paper discusses some of the shortcomings of interventions research in nursing and suggests a number of ideas to help address these problems, including: a consensus statement on interventions research in nursing; a register of nursing intervention studies; the need for nursing to develop clinical research areas in which to develop potential interventions (nursing laboratories); and a call for nursing researchers to publish more research in nursing specific journals.

  8. Revisiting Nursing Research in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-18

    Aug 18, 2016 ... essential in finding innovative practice and policy health care framework. Nursing research is as old as the ..... hindering nursing research are dealt with, there will still continue to be poor involvement of. Nigeria nurses in .... (Assessed January 20 2014). 17. Nigeria Budget, Tax and economic analysis 2014.

  9. [Nursing care for psychiatric patients defined by NANDA-NIC-NOC terminology: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalada Hernández, Paula; Muñoz Hermoso, Paula; Marro Larrañaga, Itxaso

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to provide a synthesis of the most relevant studies describing nursing work in mental health by means of NNN taxonomy. Literature from 1990 to September 2011 was reviewed using the "scoping review" methodology. Three independent reviewers examined the articles which were found and selected those fulfilling the inclusion criteria for subsequent analysis. From the 220 articles obtained, 14 studies were finally included and divided into two groups. The aim of the first ten papers was examining the most frequent NANDA nursing diagnosis or/and NIC nursing interventions in different mental health care settings. The remaining four articles describe health care plans for psychiatric patients developed with NNN taxonomy. Combining results from both groups, the most prevalent diagnostic labels are: disturbed thought processes and impaired social interaction. This review has illustrated the lack of evidence in relation to NNN taxonomy in the field of mental health and the need of further research in this area.

  10. Psychiatric nursing menbers' reflections on participating in group-based clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Angel, Sanne; Traynor, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a report of an interview study exploring psychiatric hospital nursing staff members' reflections on participating in supervision. Clinical supervision is a pedagogical process designed to direct, develop, and support clinical nurses. Participation rates in clinical supervision...... they influence participation rates. Twenty-two psychiatric hospital nursing staff members were interviewed with a semistructured interview guide. Interview transcripts were interpreted by means of Ricoeur's hermeneutic method. The respondents understood clinical supervision to be beneficial, but with very...

  11. The journey between ideal and real: Experiences of beginners psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankeh, Hamidreza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Hoseini, Seyaid-Ali; Khodai-Ardekandi, Mohammad-Reza; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Bohm, Katarina; Nakhaie, Maryam; Ranjbar, Maryam; Castrén, Maaret

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how novice nurses perceive their career in the psychiatric ward can be helpful for nurse educators and managers to gain insight into psychiatric nursing care and adding applicable knowledge to the development of support strategies for this group. The aim of this study was to describe and illuminate experiences of new graduated nurses working at a psychiatric ward in an Iranian context. A descriptive phenomenology has been chosen. Participants with baccalaureate degrees in nursing were selected purposefully and they all had less than 6 months of work experience in psychiatric wards beforehand. The study was conducted at the Razi Hospital in Iran. Data were collected through unstructured individual in-depth interviews and analyzed according to the Colaizzi method by means of Husserlian phenomenology. Three main themes were found in this study, of which six sub-themes were constructed as follows: Being in the world of fear and complaint, which has been abstracted by having mixed feelings of conflict and compliant on entry to the psychiatric ward, doubt about adequacy of being a psychiatric nurse and working in psychiatric ward and a frightening and non-supportive environment; A sense of imprisoned and confined, which has been constructed by different experience with different environmental milieu in psychiatric ward, as a lock sense; Becoming a psychiatric nurse, which has been constructed as a sense of usefulness, a sense of sympathy and compassion for patients and a sense of professional identity. This study identified areas that require modification by providing insight into lived experiences of beginners' nurses as the value in psychiatric ward. New graduated nurses may face negative perceptions and feelings due to confrontation with a new environment, patients and colleagues as well as shortcomings in the preparation.

  12. The Importance of Nursing Research

    OpenAIRE

    Tingen, Martha S.; Burnett, Anna H.; Murchison, Rachel B.; Zhu, Haidong

    2009-01-01

    Nursing research has a tremendous influence on current and future professional nursing practice, thus rendering it an essential component of the educational process. This article chronicles the learning experiences of two undergraduate nursing students who were provided with the opportunity to become team members in a study funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research. The application process, the various learning opportunities and responsibilities performed by the students, and the b...

  13. Experiences by student nurses during clinical placement in psychiatric units in a hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J.C. Van Rhyn

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available An exploratory study was conducted with the aim of discovering and describing experiences of psychiatric nursing students during clinical placement in a psychiatric unit. For the purpose of the study an unstructured interview was conducted with each participant during their first placement in a psychiatric unit to identify the factors experienced as stressful. The results indicated that all eight participants experienced average to high stress. Sources of stress identified included, among others, ineffective teaching and learning programmes, poor managerial governance of the service, detachment of professional nurses from their teaching role, poor relationships among staff, overreliance on the medical model of care and patient neglect. Psychiatric nursing students sampled indicated universal support for in-service education and training for professional nurses, attitude change of professional nurses towards students, support for student initiatives, student involvement in patient care and adequate allocation of resources for patient care and nurse training. The exploration and description of experiences of the psychiatric nursing students will help nurse educators plan clinical learning opportunities in such a way that they are less stressful, thus ensuring that psychiatric nursing students are equipped to utilise themselves as therapeutic instruments.

  14. Nurses' caring and empathy in Jordanian psychiatric hospitals: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadidi, Majdi M B; Abdalrahim, Maysoon S; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    Nurses working in psychiatric hospitals need to acquire the skills of therapeutic communication and empathy, and have higher levels of caring. The present study aims to investigate the level of caring and empathy among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was utilized to collect data from 205 nurses recruited from three psychiatric hospitals in Jordan. The Background Information Questionnaire, Modified Caring Dimensions Inventory, and Toronto Empathy Questionnaire were administered to the recruited participants. The findings revealed that the sampled nurses had a high level of caring and empathy. Significant correlations were found between caring and having a specialized training in mental health nursing, and having organizational and managerial support. However, no significant correlations were found between empathy and participants' characteristics. Specialized training in mental health nursing, having organizational and managerial support, and empathy were found predictors for caring. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. Mental illness stigma among nurses in psychiatric wards of teaching hospitals in the north-west of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Namdar, Hossein; Vahidi, Maryam

    2012-11-01

    Stigma is one of the obstacles in the treatment and regaining the mental health of people with mental illness. The aim was determination of mental illness stigma among nurses in psychiatric wards. This study was conducted in psychiatric wards of teaching hospitals in Tabriz, Urmia, and Ardabil in the north-west of Iran. This research is a descriptive analysis study in which 80 nurses participated. A researcher-made questionnaire was used, which measured demographic characteristics and mental illness stigma in the three components of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral. All data were analyzed using SPSS13 software and descriptive and analytical statistics. Majority of nurses (72.5%) had medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness. About half of them (48.8%) had great inclination toward the social isolation of patients. The majority of them (62.5%) had positive emotional responses and 27.5% had stereotypical views. There was a significant correlation between experience of living with and kinship of nurses to person with mental illness, with prejudice toward and discrimination of patients. There was also a significant correlation between interest in the continuation of work in the psychiatric ward and prejudice, and also between educational degree and stereotypical views. The data suggest there is a close correlation between the personal experience of nurses and existence of mental illness stigma among them. Therefore, the implementation of constant educational programs on mental illness for nurses and opportunities for them to have direct contact with treated patients is suggested.

  16. Relationship between occupational stress and depression among psychiatric nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Kaori; Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Danjo, Kazuma; Furukori, Hanako; Sato, Yasushi; Tomita, Tetsu; Fujii, Akira; Nakagam, Taku; Sasaki, Masahide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing is a stressful area of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to examine occupational stress among psychiatric nurses in Japan. In this cross-sectional study, 238 psychiatric nurses were recruited from 7 hospitals. Data regarding the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire (GJSQ), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Health Practice Index (HPI) were obtained via self-report questionnaires. After adjusting for all the variables, CES-D scores were associated with job stress, but social support reduced the effect of stress on depression among psychiatric nurses. However, the interpretation of these results was hampered by the lack of data concerning important occupational factors, such as working position, personal income, and working hours. Further longitudinal investigation into the factors associated with depression may yield useful information for administrative and psychological interventions.

  17. Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported barriers, facilitators and skills for developing evidence-based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yadav, B L

    2012-03-01

    Evidence-based practice places an emphasis on integration of clinical expertise with available best evidence, patient\\'s clinical information and preferences, and with local health resources. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the barriers, facilitators and skills in developing evidence-based practice among psychiatric nurses in Ireland. A postal survey was conducted among a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses and survey data were collected using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. Respondents reported that insufficient time to find and read research reports and insufficient resources to change practice were the greatest barriers to the development of evidence-based practice. Practice development coordinators were perceived as the most supportive resource for changing practice. Using the Internet to search for information was the highest-rated skill and using research evidence to change practice was the lowest-rated skill for developing evidence-based practice. Nurses\\' precursor skills for developing evidence-based practice, such as database searching and information retrieval, may be insufficient in themselves for promoting evidence-based practice if they cannot find evidence relating to their particular field of practice or if they do not have the time, resources and supports to develop their practice in response to evidence.

  18. The customer is always right: patients' perceptions of psychiatric nursing actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, I; Roberson, E

    1995-01-01

    In this age of consumerism, consideration should be given to patients' perceptions of interactions with the health care provider as a factor in assessing the quality of care provided. This article describes a study of 100 psychiatric inpatients in a large urban medical center who evaluated 50 commonly used psychiatric nursing actions. Significant differences were found between the general psychiatric patient population and the substance abuse population in perception of helpfulness and frequency of performance with 7 of the 50 nursing actions. As the consumer's perception of the effectiveness of nursing actions is determined, emphasis can be given to those interventions when planning patient care.

  19. Design and evaluation of an online teaching strategy in an undergraduate psychiatric nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jane S; Marfurt, Stephanie; daCunha, Miguel; Engebretson, Joan

    2005-12-01

    Psychiatric nurse educators are challenged to prepare graduates in meeting the needs of individuals with a mental illness within an increasingly technology-based environment. This requires the development and evaluation of educational strategies that immerse students in web-based learning. This article presents an overview of a hybrid teaching design that includes classroom teaching and asynchronous threaded discussion in a teaching module in an undergraduate psychiatric nursing course. Evaluation of student preferences, advantages and disadvantages, and learning, as well as qualitative evaluation of students' description of critical thinking, supports the value of online teaching in psychiatric nursing education.

  20. Research Domain Criteria as Psychiatric Nosology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Faisal; Giordano, James

    2017-10-01

    Diagnostic classification systems in psychiatry have continued to rely on clinical phenomenology, despite limitations inherent in that approach. In view of these limitations and recent progress in neuroscience, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has initiated the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project to develop a more neuroscientifically based system of characterizing and classifying psychiatric disorders. The RDoC initiative aims to transform psychiatry into an integrative science of psychopathology in which mental illnesses will be defined as involving putative dysfunctions in neural nodes and networks. However, conceptual, methodological, neuroethical, and social issues inherent in and/or derived from the use of RDoC need to be addressed before any attempt is made to implement their use in clinical psychiatry. This article describes current progress in RDoC; defines key technical, neuroethical, and social issues generated by RDoC adoption and use; and posits key questions that must be addressed and resolved if RDoC are to be employed for psychiatric diagnoses and therapeutics. Specifically, we posit that objectivization of complex mental phenomena may raise ethical questions about autonomy, the value of subjective experience, what constitutes normality, what constitutes a disorder, and what represents a treatment, enablement, and/or enhancement. Ethical issues may also arise from the (mis)use of biomarkers and phenotypes in predicting and treating mental disorders, and what such definitions, predictions, and interventions portend for concepts and views of sickness, criminality, professional competency, and social functioning. Given these issues, we offer that a preparatory neuroethical framework is required to define and guide the ways in which RDoC-oriented research can-and arguably should-be utilized in clinical psychiatry, and perhaps more broadly, in the social sphere.

  1. Biological researchers: building nursing science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Ellen; Grady, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Nursing science addresses the individual from a multidimensional perspective, and the questions nurses generate from their practice are often grounded in basic biology. However, concern is frequently voiced as to whether there is adequate preparation and support for biological researchers within nursing. This study reports on a survey of nurse investigators funded by the National Institutes of Health who carry out biological research. All study participants were current faculty, and 48% had post-doctoral training. The majority worked with animal models. Research areas ranged from cell and molecular biology to delivery of health care. Some participants reported tension between their work and how others view "typical" nursing research. All participants had been awarded federal research funding, primarily from the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), and most reported receiving small grants from other funding organizations early in their careers. Self-identified factors influencing success included mentoring, flexibility, persistence, and hard work.

  2. Exploring the perceptions of psychiatric patients regarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-13

    Mar 13, 2012 ... recommendations for nursing education, nursing research and nursing practice, with the aim of reducing the readmission of ... impairment of memory, concentration, motivation, self- esteem, relationships with others and ..... at increasing nursing students' and psychiatric nurses' insight about psychiatric ...

  3. Psychiatric nurses' attitudes towards inpatient aggression : Preliminary report of the development of Attitude Towards Aggression Scale (ATAS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, GJ; Dassen, TWN; Burgerhof, JGM; Middel, B

    Professional skills to adequately manage patient aggression are a prerequisite for nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. These 'technical' skills, however, are necessary but not sufficient for effective nurse intervention. 'The attitude of nurses' towards client aggression also contributes to

  4. Administration of medication to use when needed and the care of psychiatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly da Silva Rocha Estrela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study aimed to analyze the clinical criteria used for the administration of prescribed medications for use when needed (SOS; and discuss the implication of the findings in this research to clinical psychiatric nursing. The records of female patients admitted to a psychiatric institution in the city of Rio de Janeiro, in the time frame from May to June 2009, were analyzed. In the 38 patient records, 16 prescriptions for medications SOS were found. The mean age of patients was around 45-55 years with a clinical diagnosis of Bipolar Mood Disorder. The medication category most prescribed as SOS was of benzodiazepines, followed by antipsychotics. It was noticed a tendency to not valuing the administration of medication in SOS notes. The study points out the importance to establish clinical criteria to indicate the need, or not, to administer prescribed SOS medications.

  5. Homophobia and attitudes toward gay men and lesbians by psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G B

    1993-12-01

    Stereotypic and stigmatic attitudes toward homosexuality may interfere both directly and indirectly with the care provided to gay and lesbian patients. The purpose of this study was to measure attitudes toward gays and lesbians and assess homophobia among psychiatric nurses. The demographic characteristics of education, religious identification, and knowledge of gays and lesbians had positive affects on attitudes and homophobia. The Attitudes Towards Gays and Lesbians Scale (ATGLS) developed by the researcher specifically for this study assessed cognitive attitudes and the Index of Homophobia (IHP), developed by Hudson and Ricketts (1980), measured homophobia, the affective response to gays and lesbians.

  6. Different Places, Different Ideas: Reimagining Practice in American Psychiatric Nursing After World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kylie M

    2018-01-01

    In 1952, Hildegard Peplau published her textbook Interpersonal Relations in Nursing: A Conceptual Frame of Reference for Psychodynamic Nursing. This was the same year the American Psychiatric Association (APA) published the first edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (1st ed.; DSM-I; APA). These events occurred in the context of a rapidly changing policy and practice environment in the United States after World War II, where the passing of the National Mental Health Act in 1946 released vast amounts of funding for the establishment of the National Institute of Mental Health and the development of advanced educational programs for the mental health professions including nursing. This article explores the work of two nurse leaders, Hildegard Peplau and Dorothy Mereness, as they developed their respective graduate psychiatric nursing programs and sought to create new knowledge for psychiatric nursing that would facilitate the development of advanced nursing practice. Both nurses had strong ideas about what they felt this practice should look like and developed distinct and particular approaches to their respective programs. This reflected a common belief that it was only through nurse-led education that psychiatric nursing could shape its own practice and control its own future. At the same time, there are similarities in the thinking of Peplau and Mereness that demonstrate the link between the specific social context of mental health immediately after World War II and the development of modern psychiatric nursing. Psychiatric nurses were able to gain significant control of their own education and practice after the war, but this was not without a struggle and some limitations, which continue to impact on the profession today.

  7. Job satisfaction and resilience in psychiatric nurses: A study at the Institute of Mental Health, Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhimin; Gangaram, Poornima; Xie, Huiting; Chua, Stephanie; Ong, Samantha Bee Cheng; Koh, Sioh Eng

    2017-12-01

    Job satisfaction ranks highly as one of the main factors influencing turnover rates among nurses. Mental health nursing has been reported to be a particularly stressful specialty, yet little is known about the level of job satisfaction among psychiatric nurses in Singapore. Resilience is defined as a means of adapting to stress at the workplace, and could serve as a factor influencing job satisfaction. The present study aimed to explore the current level of job satisfaction among psychiatric nurses working in the only tertiary psychiatric institution in Singapore, the influencing factors, and the relationship between resilience and job satisfaction. A survey questionnaire consisting of the following was administered to all eligible nurses working in the Institute of Mental Health between the period of 16-24 December 2014: (i) The McCloskey and Mueller Satisfaction Scale; (ii) The Resilience Scale; and (iii) sociodemographic data form. A total of 874 nurses were eligible for participation in the study, and a total of 748 nurses responded, totalling 85.6% response. A mean satisfaction score of 95.21 and mean resilience score of 125.74 were obtained. Mean satisfaction and resilience scores were the highest for nurses with longer working experience and those of older age. A positive and significant association between satisfaction and resilience scores (P = 0.001) was obtained. Psychiatric nurses in Singapore are generally satisfied with their job, but this can be further improved with the strengthening of personal resilience. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. Exploring Organizational Barriers to Strengthening Clinical Supervision of Psychiatric Nursing Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This article reports findings from a longitudinal controlled intervention study of 115 psychiatric nursing staff. The twofold objective of the study was: (a) To test whether the intervention could increase clinical supervision participation and effectiveness of existing supervision practices...

  9. Becoming a novice smoker: initial smoking behaviours among Jordanian psychiatric nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aldiabat, Khaldoun M; Clinton, Michael

    2013-01-01

      A better understanding of how male Jordanian psychiatric nurses become smokers and continue the habit mainly at work is necessary if smoking reduction and cessation programs are to help them better...

  10. Experiences by student nurses during clinical placement in psychiatric units in a hospital

    OpenAIRE

    W.J.C. Van Rhyn; M.R. Gontsana

    2004-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted with the aim of discovering and describing experiences of psychiatric nursing students during clinical placement in a psychiatric unit. For the purpose of the study an unstructured interview was conducted with each participant during their first placement in a psychiatric unit to identify the factors experienced as stressful. The results indicated that all eight participants experienced average to high stress. Sources of stress identified included, among oth...

  11. Recovery-Oriented Psychiatric Nursing in South Korea: A Hybrid Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Suyon; Kim, Sunah

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the attributes and verify the definition of the recovery-oriented psychiatric nursing concept using the hybrid model suggested by Schwartz-Barcott and Kim ( 2000 ). In the theoretical analysis phase, a literature search was conducted and data were collected using the Pubmed, CINAHL, and Google Scholar databases. This study considered of 7 empirical studies, 21 guidelines, 12 instruments, 2 related theories, 3 practical models, and 2 intervention programs. In the fieldwork phase, this study performed in-depth interviews with nine psychiatric nurses. After comprehensively analyzing the attributes of recovery-oriented psychiatric nursing through a literature review and the fieldwork phase, this study rearranged the final attributes and definition of recovery-oriented psychiatric nursing in the final analytic phase as follows: "Placing consumers in the center of nursing as human beings"; "Expecting with hope"; "Encouraging them to lead a satisfactory life"; "Guiding them to live along with their peers, family and the community"; "Becoming a companion"; "Growing together"; and "Establishing a nursing organizational culture and system." The results of this study will be used as the basic data for developing educational contents and practice guidelines for the quick resolution and activation of recovery-oriented psychiatric nursing.

  12. Nurses' attitudes towards sexual relationships between patients in high security psychiatric hospitals in England: an exploratory qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, Jean; Hayter, Mark

    2008-12-01

    The issue of relationships between patients in long-term care settings can present nurses with numerous challenges. However, addressing this element of patient care is recognised as an important element of nursing in this sphere of practice. What nurses think about patient sexual relationships and the difficulties of incorporating these into care is closely linked to the care they provide. However, the issue of patients sexual relationships within high security psychiatric hospitals is a relatively poorly researched area of clinical practice. To explore the attitudes towards patients' sexual relationships held by nurses working in high security psychiatric hospitals in England. A qualitative methodology was employed with data collected from 10 in-depth interviews with nurses working within secure psychiatric hospitals in England. Interview data were subjected to thematic analysis. Practitioners reject permissive policy in relation to patients' sexual relationships on account of perceived perpetuation of abuse and exploitation. Practices and attitudes are dominated by personal (lay) values that seek to restrict patient experience and undermine professional mores whilst also seeming to uphold a professional duty of care. Lay understandings are constructed as moral rights and priorities that are of higher order concern than professional values or the rights of the individual. This constitutes a clash of values and the minimisation of professional mores within the clinical context raises questions about the role of professional teaching, knowledge and policy in relation to professional socialisation.

  13. Experiences and Perceptions of Nursing Staff Working With Long-Stay Patients in a High Secure Psychiatric Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Snigdha; Majid, Shazmin; Völlm, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Forensic psychiatric nursing is a demanding nursing specialty that deals with a highly complex group of patients who are detained in restrictive environments, often for lengthy periods. There is little information about the daily experiences of these nurses. This study sought to explore the roles and relationships of forensic psychiatric nurses with long-stay patients in a high secure hospital in England. The study obtained data via three focus groups, and thematic analysis was carried out using NVIVO 10 software. Five prominent themes emerged: First, nurses elaborated on their roles with patients and the kinds of interactions they had with them. The next two themes explored the reasons why some patients are long-stay patients and the challenges nurses face while working with this group. The fourth theme was the impact of external support, such as the patient's families, on length of stay. The final theme covered the changes that the nurses observed in these patients and in themselves over time. It was noticeable that those interviewed were committed professionals, eager to provide an optimistic and hopeful environment for the patients to help them progress through "the system". The study presents a number of pertinent issues regarding long-stay patients that provide a basis for further research and to inform policy, educational reforms, and clinical practice.

  14. Introducing ADN students to nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, R; Smutko, P W

    1998-01-01

    Every nurse, regardless of educational preparation, should be involved in and benefit from nursing research. The research process needs to become an integral part of nursing practice. In this article, the authors emphasize the importance of nursing research in the associate degree nursing curriculum, emphasizing strategies that enable the ADN graduate to appreciate research reports and use the knowledge in the clinical practice setting.

  15. The professional psychiatric/mental health nurse: skills, competencies and supports required to adopt recovery-orientated policy in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, E; Killoury, F; Nugent, L E

    2017-03-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Nationally and internationally there has been a movement away from the traditional medical model towards a more holistic recovery-oriented approach to mental health care delivery. At every level of service provision the emphasis is firmly on recovery and on facilitating active partnership working and involvement of service users, their carers and family members. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This is the first study to identify on a national level specific areas of care that are addressed most or least by psychiatric and mental health nurses in care planning for mental health service users in Ireland. In addition, this is the first study to identify nationally how the recovery approach is being implemented by psychiatric and mental health nurses in relation to current recovery-orientated policy. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Mental healthcare staff require more education on the recovery concept and this needs to be multidisciplinary team wide. Further research is required to establish how best to develop a shared approach to working with service users and their families within the mental healthcare environment. Further investigation is required to help determine how funding could be allocated appropriately for education and training and service development nationally. Introduction The restructuring of national mental health policy to an integrated recovery ethos demands a clarification in the psychiatric/mental health nurse's role, skills and competencies. Aim/Question To explore the psychiatric/mental health nurse's role and identify skills, competencies and supports required to adopt recovery-orientated policy in practice. Method An exploratory mixed methods study in multiple health services in Ireland with N = 1249 psychiatric/mental health nurses. Data collection used a survey, focus groups and written submissions. Data analysis used descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Results The medical

  16. Nursing interventions in crisis-oriented and long-term psychiatric home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, J.; Dassen, T.WN; Dingemans, T.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses in The Netherlands are moving out of residential mental health institutions and are pioneering home care for the acutely and chronically mentally ill. The purpose of this study was to identify the interventions nurses currently use and to describe the differences between

  17. An observational study of providing structure as a psychiatric nursing intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Nugter, A.; Achterberg, T. van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To observe the actions of psychiatric nurses when providing structure and identify results in order to better understand providing structure as a complex nursing intervention. DESIGN AND METHOD: Participant observation data were collected on a dual diagnosis ward and a crisis intervention

  18. Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing in China: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiuying; Li, Xin-Min; Xu, Dongmei; Wang, Wenqiang

    2017-10-01

    The mental health service model and policy have undergone dramatic changes and are moving toward the establishment of integrated service network-based community mental health services in China. But there are still some issues, such as shortage of resources, a relatively low rate of psychiatric treatment, lack of the knowledge about mental health in the general population, and stigma associated with mental disorders. This paper summarizes the history of psychiatric and mental health nursing in China and analyzes the characteristics of the current situation. There are healthcare challenges for psychiatric and mental health nurses with the mental health services reform by government, and in this paper we discuss future trends and provide suggestions for development of the psychiatric nursing profession, and mental health services reform. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Research competencies in nursing specialties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltra-Rodríguez, Enrique; Rich-Ruiz, Manuel; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Sánchez-López, Dolores; González-Carrión, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Since nursing became an university degree in 1977, there have been several regulations to develop specialties, all of them agreeing on the need to include skills in research. Indeed, the relevance of acquiring these skills in all current disciplines has led to Royal Decree 99/2011, which regulates the official PhD courses, and recognises specialist nurses as qualified to access PhD studies. Nowadays, students from six of the seven specialties included in the Royal Decree 450/2005 on nursing specialties, are performing their training. The acquisition of research skills is seen as an opportunity and a challenge. However, the organizational structure of training facilities (multiprofessional teaching units) and the incorporation of nurses as clinical tutors, who initiated this teaching activity, deserve special attention to ensure the correct acquisition of research skills in the training of specialist nurses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychiatric research in an international perspective: the role of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychiatric research in an international perspective: the role of the World Psychiatric Association. Ahmed Okasha. Abstract. SA Psych Rev 2003;6:4-6. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  1. [Feminism and qualitative nursing research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myungsun; Yih, Bong-Sook

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe feminism and to propose the integration of a feminist method into qualitative nursing methodology in order to expand the body of nursing knowledge. The world view of feminism including philosophy, epistemology and methodology was outlined, and a feminist grounded theory and feminist ethnography were suggested as a way of strengthening nursing research methodology using literature review. Four different philosophical perspectives of feminism, that is, liberal feminism, radical feminism, Marxist feminism, and social feminism were described. Also epistemological perspectives including feminist empiricism, feminist standpoint, and postmodern feminism, were explained and were related to the methodology and methods of feminism. To enhance the strengths of nursing research within the feminist perspectives, feminist grounded theory and feminist ethnography were exemplified in the paradigm of qualitative nursing research. This paper suggested that incorporation of feminist approaches within nursing is a valuable attempt to expand the body of nursing knowledge and to enhance the quality of nursing care services by rectifying male-oriented knowledge and by empowering women in the care of other people as well as themselves.

  2. Assessment of knowledge about childhood autism among paediatric and psychiatric nurses in Ebonyi state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achor Justin U

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing public and professional awareness of autism spectrum disorders with early recognition, diagnosis and interventions that are known to improve prognosis. Poor knowledge about childhood autism among paediatric and psychiatric nurses who are members of multidisciplinary teams that care for such children may be a major barrier to early interventions that could improve quality of life and prognosis in childhood autism. Factors that influence knowledge about childhood autism among these nurses are not known. This study assessed knowledge about childhood autism among paediatric and psychiatric nurses in Ebonyi state, Nigeria and determined the factors that could be influencing such knowledge. Methods Forty specialist paediatric and forty psychiatric nurses, making a total sample of eighty, were randomly selected from all the health care facilities in Ebonyi state, Nigeria. A socio-demographic questionnaire and knowledge about childhood autism among health workers (KCAHW questionnaire were administered to them and the study was a point survey. Results The total mean score on the KCAHW questionnaire among the nurses that participated in the study was 12.56 ± 3.23 out of a total of 19 possible. The mean score for the paediatric nurses was 11.78 ± 3.64 while psychiatric nurses had mean score of 13.35 ± 2.58. The mean scores in Domain 1 were 6.17 ± 1.75 for the paediatric nurses and 6.52 ± 1.43 for the psychiatric nurses. The mean scores in Domain 2 were 0.65 ± 0.48 for the paediatric nurses and 0.80 ± 0.41 for the psychiatric nurses. Domain 3 showed mean scores of 1.97 ± 1.25 for the paediatric nurses while psychiatric nurses scored 2.62 ± 1.23. Domain 4 yielded the mean scores of 2.97 ± 1.54 and 3.42 ± 0.98 for the paediatric and psychiatric nurses respectively. There was significant relationship between the total mean score on the KCAHW questionnaire for the two groups and the area of specialisation of

  3. The essence of psychiatric nursing: redefining nurses' identity through moral dialogue about reducing the use of coercion and restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeweer, Elleke G M; Abma, Tineke A; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we focus on core values of psychiatric nurses in relation to coercion and constraint. We analyze changes that took place in a project aiming at reducing coercion at a closed inpatient ward of a psychiatric hospital. Using the philosophy of Hans-Georg Gadamer and Margaret Urban Walker, we analyze both the process of moral changes through dialogue and the outcome in terms of new identities and moral responsibilities. We conclude that the project stimulated nurses to redefine their roles and develop a deeper intersubjective understanding of core values of their profession.

  4. [Nursing research and positivism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, A M; de Oliveira, E R; Garcia, T R

    1996-04-01

    The authors discuss positivism foundations; the most remarkable influences to comtian's philosophy structuration; how Comte's ideas, as doctrine in so far as method, dominate society's thoughts, passing beyond XIX century and reaching XX century; and how the positivist doctrine and empirical method influenced Nursing conceptions about science and about human being/environment/disease.

  5. Curricular approaches to research ethics training for psychiatric investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Donna T

    2003-12-01

    Training in research ethics is crucial for psychiatric investigators. Addressing ethical dimensions of human subjects research requires knowledge about the rules and norms governing research; sensitivity to ethical implications of actions; and skills in ethics problem solving. Investigators in training who are physicians have the additional challenge of developing identities as investigators that sometimes conflict with their identities as physicians. To propose a curriculum for psychiatric research ethics training. Review of literature on ethics education and presentation of a curricular approach to research ethics training for psychiatric investigators. Research ethics can be learned and should be taught. Involvement of active investigators in teaching research ethics is important. While core topics of psychiatric research ethics training have not yet been identified, there are available models from which to draw. Research ethics should be introduced early and integrated throughout the research training period. Lack of resources and institutional support can be obstacles to development of comprehensive research ethics curricula. Small-group, case-based discussion is best for teaching ethics problem-solving skills. Examples of teaching module ideas and a fully developed sample teaching module are presented. There is opportunity for creative models for teaching psychiatric research ethics. Work is needed to identify core topics, target pedagogical strategies to trainees at different levels, and develop evaluation methods.

  6. Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; L Tz N, Kim; Ivarsson, Ann-Britt; Eriksson, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.

  7. An Integrative Review of Engaging Clinical Nurses in Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Elizabeth; Price, Carrie; Day, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    To review the literature for best practices for engaging clinical nurses in nursing research. Review of the research and nonresearch papers published between 2005 and 2015 that answered the evidence-based practice (EBP) question: what are the best practices for engaging clinical nursing staff in nursing research? PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Joanna Briggs Institute, and Cochrane were searched using a combination of controlled vocabulary and key words. Nineteen papers that answered the EBP question were selected for review. It can be difficult to involve clinical nurses in research. There are multiple factors to consider when nursing leadership looks to engage clinical nurses in nursing research. Nurse leaders can take many approaches to engage clinical nurses in research. Each organization must perform its own assessment to identify areas of opportunity. Nursing leadership can take these areas of opportunity to structure a multifaceted approach to support clinical staff in the conduct and dissemination of nursing research. The evidence from this review offers EBP recommendations as well as reports on the gaps in the literature related to best practices for engaging clinical nurses in nursing research. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  8. Developing a hospital nursing research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, R; Cruickshank, J; Matsuno, K

    Including nursing research as a stream in the nursing career structure in Western Australia paved the way for development of the Nursing Research Department at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. Over the last two years a program of research activities has been introduced to assist nurses to evaluate their practice, to critique the research and apply its results in patient care.

  9. Knowledge of Psychiatric Nurses About the Potentially Lethal Side-Effects of Clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hert, Marc; De Beugher, Annelien; Sweers, Kim; Wampers, Martien; Correll, Christoph U; Cohen, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Clozapine is an antipsychotic with superior efficacy in treatment refractory patients, and has unique anti-suicidal properties and a low propensity to cause extrapyramidal side-effects. Despite these advantages, clozapine utilization is low. This can in part be explained by a number of potentially lethal side effects of clozapine. Next to psychiatrists nurses play a crucial role in the long-term management of patients with schizophrenia. It is therefore important that nurses know, inform and monitor patients about the specific side-effects of clozapine. A recent study of psychiatrists published in 2011 has shown that there was a gap in the knowledge about side-effects of clozapine. The knowledge about side-effects of clozapine in nurses has never been studied. This cross-sectional study evaluated the knowledge base regarding the safety of clozapine, and its potential mediators, of psychiatric nurses in 3 psychiatric hospitals in Belgium with a specifically developed questionnaire based on the literature and expert opinion (3 clozapine experts). A total of 85 nurses completed the questionnaire. The mean total score was 6.1 of a potential maximum score of 18. Only 3 of the 18 multiple choice knowledge questions were answered correctly by more than 50% of nurses. Only 24.9% of participants passed the test (>50% correct answers). Nurses working on psychosis units were more likely to pass the test (xx.y% vs yy.z%, p=0.0124). There was a trend that nurses with a lower nursing diploma were more likely to fail the test (p=0.0561). Our study clearly identifies a large gap in the basic knowledge of psychiatric nurses about clozapine and its side-effects. Knowledge could be increased by more emphasis on the topic in nurse's training curricula as well as targeted onsite training. Only 23.5% of participants indicate that there was sufficient information in their basic nursing training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inquiry-based learning and critical thinking in an advanced practice psychiatric nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannelly, L; Inouye, J

    1998-06-01

    The advanced practice psychiatric nurse must be prepared to meet the changing demands being placed on the nursing profession. Some changes are the product of health care reforms, especially managed care. Others are more fundamental, because continuing scientific advances drive rapid changes in the knowledge base required of mental health nurses. Curricular reforms initiated earlier this decade were intended to equip nurses with the problem-solving and critical-thinking skills required to deal with novel and complex situations in a rapidly changing healthcare system. This article describes how the Inquiry-Based Learning tutorial method attends to the mental processes of graduate students and fosters critical-thinking skills.

  11. Negotiating clinical knowledge: a field study of psychiatric nurses' everyday communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2008-01-01

    was highly dependent on the individual nurses' practical ability to participate in the game. Furthermore, the nurses colluded in their mutual communication to enable the collective display and sense of knowing that protected them against explicit signs of uncertainty about the clinic. The game of clinical...... knowledge influenced processes of clinical decision-making among the nurses as the game added to a distorted widening of a 'fictional distance' between patients and the representations produced by the nurses.......Nursing practices at psychiatric hospitals have changed significantly over the last decades. In this paper, everyday nursing practices were interpreted in light of these institutional changes. The objective was to examine how mental health nurses' production of clinical knowledge was influenced...

  12. The 2014 Scope and Standards of Practice for Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing: Key Updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Catherine F

    2015-01-31

    The 2014 Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice is the specialty's description of competent nursing practice. The scope portion of this document identifies the focus of the specialty by defining nursing practice extents and limits. Standards are statements that identify the duties and obligations for which specialty nurses are held accountable, including general registered nurses and advanced practice nurses. This article begins with a brief overview of the revision process. The author describes key factors that influenced the revision, such as external documents and current priorities in healthcare, and synthesizes significant changes to the document, including commentary and comparisons to the generalist Scope and Standards of Practice. Implications for nursing education and a companion resource are discussed.

  13. Psychiatric nurse practitioners’ experiences of working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kgalabi J. Ngako

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric nurse practitioners (PNPs working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms work in a complex environment. This environment is characterised by mental health care users who may present with a history of violence, sexual assault and substance misuse.The objectives of this study were twofold: firstly, to explore and describe the experiences of PNPs working with mental health care users (MHCUs presenting with acute symptoms; and secondly, to make recommendations for the advanced PNPs to facilitate promotion of the mental health of PNPs with reference to nursing practice, research and education.A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. The target population was PNPs working with MHCUs presenting with acute symptoms in a public mental health care institution in Gauteng. Data were collected by means of four focus group interviews involving 21 PNPs. The researcher made use of drawings, naïve sketches and field notes for the purpose of data triangulation. Data were analysed in accordance with Tesch’s method of open coding.The three themes that emerged were: PNPs experienced working with these MHCUs as entering an unsafe world where care became a burden; they experienced negative emotional reactions and attitudes towards these MHCUs that compromised quality nursing care; and they made a plea for a nurturing environment that would enhance quality nursing care.The PNPs suggest skills and competency development, organisational support, and a need for external resources. Creation of a positive environment and mobilisation of resources as well as the identification and bridging of obstacles are essential in the promotion of the overall wellbeing and mental health of PNPs. 

  14. Organizational culture of a psychiatric hospital and resilience of nursing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi; Gaioli, Cheila Cristina Leonardo de Oliveira; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques; Mininel, Vivian Aline; Vegro, Thamiris Cavazzani

    2016-01-01

    to analyze the organizational culture of a psychiatric hospital and identify the capacity of resilience of nursing workers. quantitative research. For data collection, were used the Brazilian Instrument for Evaluation of Organizational Culture (IBACO - Instrumento Brasileiro para Avaliação da Cultura Organizacional) and the Resilience Scale (RS). participants reported the existence of centralization of power and devaluation of workers, despite recognizing the existence of collaboration at work and practices for improving interpersonal relations. In relation to the capacity of resilience, 50% of workers showed high level, and 42.9% a medium level of resilience. The correlation tests revealed negative values between the IBACO and RS domains, indicating that the lower the appreciation of individuals in the institution, the greater their capacity of resilience. the organizational values reflect the work organization model in the institution that devalues the workers' needs and requires greater capacity of resilience.

  15. Psychiatric/Mental health nursing education in Victoria, Australia: barriers to specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda

    2006-04-01

    The introduction of undergraduate comprehensive nursing education in Victoria, Australia, during the 1990s has resulted in significant changes in undergraduate preparation for psychiatric/mental health nursing. Comprehensive programs became charged with the responsibility of preparing graduates to provide care for people experiencing a mental illness across a broad range of health-care settings, as well as providing a pathway for graduates with an interest in specialist practice in this field. The aim of this article is to clearly articulate the issues associated with psychiatric/mental health nursing education at the undergraduate level, including prevalence of mental illness, the inadequacy of psychiatric/mental health nursing theory and practice at undergraduate level, the negative attitudes of students toward this field of practice, and the subsequent failure of nursing education and practice initiatives to provide a clear mechanism for specialization in this important area of nursing practice. Throughout the article, the distinction between generalist and specialist preparation is argued and accompanied by a call for nursing education to recognize and address the issues associated with both domains.

  16. Burnout in psychiatric nursing: examining the interplay of autonomy, leadership style, and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madathil, Renee; Heck, Nicholas C; Schuldberg, David

    2014-06-01

    It is important to consider ways in which nurses can be protected from experiencing the effects of burnout. This study examined the relationships between leadership style of psychiatric nurse supervisors, work role autonomy, and psychological distress in relation to psychiatric nurse burnout. Eighty-nine psychiatric nurses from Montana and New York hospitals completed an online survey that assessed their work-related experiences. Overall, results of this study indicate that the participants were experiencing high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization when compared to a normative sample of mental health workers. Results also showed that leadership style and work role autonomy are likely to be environmental factors that protect against burnout in nurses. Finally, it was shown that the relationship between depressive symptoms and the burnout component of personal accomplishment may be influenced by nurses' perceptions of the leadership style in their work environment. These findings are important because nurse supervisor leadership styles and amount of autonomy are characteristics of the work environment that may be amenable to change through training and intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [An exploratory study of psychiatric patients' needs and nurses' current practices related to sexual counseling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Su-Ching; Lin, Yen-Chin; Hong, Chi-Mei; Cho, Pei-Pei

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore psychiatric patient needs and current nursing practice with regard to sexual counseling and to understand differences in individual patient characteristics. A total of 182 psychiatric patients and 44 psychiatric nurses were purposively selected from a mental hospital in northern Taiwan. Results revealed that 63.2% of subjects had not been given sexuality information and 81.9% had not been approached by nurses to discuss such issues. While 35.2% of study patients treated sexual issues as psychological or private issues that should only be discussed with psychologists, 33.5% expressed a desire to discuss issues related to sexuality with nurses. Even so, most subjects preferred to discuss sexual issues in a private way, and asked for assistance from same-gender professionals. Also, patients with higher education levels placed greater attention on the counseling topics of how to express sexual needs and the impacts of mental illness on sexuality. With regard to nurses participating in the study, female nurses had a generally more conservative attitude toward sexual values than males. Those who were married, older, or had received continuing sexuality education were more comfortable with conducting sexual counseling. Those with clinical experience and continuing sexuality education were able to take more responsibility and a more professional role in sexual counseling. Data collected on the specific subject groups in order to provide effective comparisons can be employed to refine current sexual counseling training programs for nurses in order to improve patient care.

  18. Safety in psychiatric inpatient care: The impact of risk management culture on mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemon, Allie; Jenkins, Emily; Bungay, Vicky

    2017-10-01

    The discourse of safety has informed the care of individuals with mental illness through institutionalization and into modern psychiatric nursing practices. Confinement arose from safety: out of both societal stigma and fear for public safety, as well as benevolently paternalistic aims to protect individuals from self-harm. In this paper, we argue that within current psychiatric inpatient environments, safety is maintained as the predominant value, and risk management is the cornerstone of nursing care. Practices that accord with this value are legitimized and perpetuated through the safety discourse, despite evidence refuting their efficacy, and patient perspectives demonstrating harm. To illustrate this growing concern in mental health nursing care, we provide four exemplars of risk management strategies utilized in psychiatric inpatient settings: close observations, seclusion, door locking and defensive nursing practice. The use of these strategies demonstrates the necessity to shift perspectives on safety and risk in nursing care. We suggest that to re-centre meaningful support and treatment of clients, nurses should provide individualized, flexible care that incorporates safety measures while also fundamentally re-evaluating the risk management culture that gives rise to and legitimizes harmful practices. © 2017 The Authors Nursing Inquiry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A Conceptual Model for Nurses' Decision-making with the Aggressive Psychiatric Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Lois Biggin

    2015-08-01

    Violence in the acute care psychiatric setting is an ongoing serious problem. Maintenance of a safe therapeutic environment is a paramount responsibility of nurses practicing in this area. Ethical and legal standards demand that the nurse intervenes in aggressive situations in a manner that employs the least intrusive and restrictive measures necessary to provide safety. Therefore, accurate and effective decision-making in aggressive situations, which can escalate rapidly, is of great importance. This paper discusses a theoretical model for decision-making in selecting interventions with aggressive psychiatric patients. This model may provide a basis for the development of training and education programs for effective decision-making in this area.

  20. Uganda nursing research agenda: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, L A; Gray, J; Opollo, J; Mbalinda, S

    2015-06-01

    Use a Delphi Methodology to identify nursing research priorities in Uganda. Identifying nursing research priorities, empowering researchers, and encouraging relevant studies can advance attaining global health goals. The Uganda Nurses and Midwives Union identified the need to establish a nursing research agenda. Nurse leaders have a priority of increasing the influence of nurses in practice and policy. This study was conducted as a preliminary step in a long-term strategy to build nurses' capacity in nursing research. A three-round Delphi study was conducted. The 45 study participants were nurses in practice, nurse faculty and members of the Uganda Nurses and Midwives Union. In the initial round, the participants wrote their responses during face-to-face meetings and the follow-up rounds were completed via email. Maternal and child morbidity and HIV/AIDS were identified as research priorities. Nurses also identified nursing practice, education and policy as key areas that nursing research could impact. Demographic characteristics such as length of time in nursing were not collected. Additionally, first round participants completed a pencil-paper survey and the follow-up rounds were done by email. Nurse Leaders in Uganda identified areas where research efforts could have the most impact and were most relevant to nursing practice. Health policy decisions have historically been made without nursing input. Nursing research can provide evidence to inform policy and, ultimately, improve population health. The focus of nursing research in priority areas can be used to guide nursing contribution in policy discussions. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  1. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher Berthelsen, Connie; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    's eight-step framework for concept analysis. Results Five defining attributes of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice were identified: strong monodisciplinary nursing professionalism, academic thinking and socialization, research use as a part of daily nursing practice......, acceptance by colleagues and management and facilitation of resources from management and organization. Conclusion Although the method of concept analysis has been criticized and heavily debated, the development of nursing research cultures based on the defining attributes and antecedents of the concept......Aim To report an analysis of the concept of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice. Background Nursing research culture should be valued for its contribution to improving patient care and should be considered as a routine hospital activity. However, the demand...

  2. Development of the Psychiatric Nursing Intervention Providing Structure: An International Delphi Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.; Nugter, A.; Achterberg, T. van; Goossens, P.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatric nurses commonly refer to "providing structure" (PS) as a key intervention. But no consensus exists about what PS entails. PS can be understood as a complex intervention. In four previous studies, a definition, activities, and context variables were described that were

  3. Nurses' attitudes towards professional containment methods used in psychiatric wards and perceptions of aggression in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Neslihan Keser; Bilgin, Hülya; Akın, Münevver; Badırgalı Boyacıoğlu, Nur Elçin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine nurses' attitudes towards professional containment methods and to explore the relationship between those attitudes and nurses' perception of aggression. Different containment methods are used in psychiatric wards when patients behave aggressively towards others or exhibit self-harm. It is known that in addition to patient-specific and environmental influences, many factors related to the staff influence the choice of containment method. One of these factors is the perception of aggression. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used and the sample consisted of 144 nurses who are employed in a psychiatric hospital in Istanbul and who volunteered to participate in the study. Data were collected using a questionnaire addressing the socio-demographic and professional features of nurses and using the attitudes to professional containment methods and Perception of Aggression Scale. While pro re nata medication was used commonly, time-out was infrequently used in the wards. Intermittent observation, pro re nata medication and containment in the psychiatric intensive care unit were the most approved methods. The use of net beds was the least approved method. Nurses who perceive aggression as dysfunctional/undesirable are more likely to approve compulsory intramuscular medication and mechanical restraint. These results showed that nurses' perception of aggression is an important factor influencing the choice of a professional containment method. This study might lead to closer critiquing of psychiatric ward nurses' attitudes towards professional containment methods, leading to a decrease in the usage of these methods. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Ideologies and Research in Nursing Care. Nursing Education. Swedish Research on Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Goran

    Trends in nursing research in Sweden are first discussed in relation to nursing education. Beyond the university, two "roots" of nursing research are investigated: (1) The first studies included analysis of the working conditions of nursing care; and (2) Later research topics covered nurse-patient relations and patients' needs. The…

  5. Action research in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Bilfeldt, Anette

    2016-01-01

    quality in a joint effort between care workers, residents at the nursing home, and researchers. It concludes that the project led to empowerment of the residents and staff and played an important role in the development of democratic knowledge building about better quality and ethics in elder care...

  6. Action research in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Bilfeldt, Annette

    2016-01-01

    quality in a joint effort between care workers, residents at the nursing home, and researchers. It concludes that the project led to empowerment of the residents and staff and played an important role in the development of democratic knowledge building about better quality and ethics in elder care....

  7. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders among nurses of a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SCID), 57% of the 100 study sample of female nurses of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria met definitive diagnoses for Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Major Depressive Disorder, and Major Depression with probable Panic Disorder.

  8. Cognitive impairment, psychiatric disorders, and problematic behaviors in a tribal nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, Lori L; Manson, Spero M

    2007-04-01

    Residents' cognitive, psychiatric, and behavioral statuses were examined as part of a larger study of care in a nursing home (NH) owned and operated by a Northern Plains American Indian tribe. Reviews of 45 medical records and semistructured interviews with 36 staff were completed. Creekside residents had considerable psychiatric and behavioral morbidity. High prevalences of non-Alzheimer's disease dementia, cognitive impairment, anxious symptomatology, and resistance to care were met with psychopharmacotherapy, reorientation, and informal techniques for behavior management. Significant depressive, anxious, psychotic, and behavioral symptoms remained. Staff interpretations of resident problems consisted of an ethnopsychological schema emphasizing resident loneliness, grumpiness, and propensity to "fight" rather than formal psychiatric nosology. Tribal NH residents were likely underdiagnosed for dementia and anxiety. Residual behavioral and psychiatric symptomatology suggest room for improvement in the NH's behavioral management regimen. Need for greater attention to conceptual, diagnostic, clinical, and documentation processes in the NH setting is noted.

  9. Exploring the perceptions of psychiatric patients regarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the perceptions of psychiatric patients with regard to marijuana use in Potchefstroom, North West Province, as well as to formulate recommendations for nursing education, nursing research and nursing practice, with the aim of reducing the readmission of psychiatric ...

  10. Job Stress and Self-Efficacy among Psychiatric Nursing Working in Mental Health Hospitals at Cairo, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Rania. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nursing stress is considered a problem that affects the practice worldwide. Job stress is a harmful response physically and emotionally when the nurses' skills, resources, and needs could not fulfill the requirement of the job. This study was aimed to assess job stress and self-efficacy among psychiatric nursing working in mental health hospitals…

  11. A Research Review of Nurse Teachers' Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatanovic, Tatjana; Havnes, Anton; Mausethagen, Sølvi

    2017-01-01

    The conceptions of what constitutes nursing competence and how such competence is taught and learned are changing, due to rapid changes in in the health sector. Nurse teachers' competencies for providing high-quality, up-to-date nursing education, are developing accordingly. This paper reviews the existing research on nurse teachers' competencies…

  12. Bachelor of nursing student' attitude towards people with mental illness and career choices in psychiatric nursing. An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poreddi Vijayalakshmi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine undergraduate nursing student' attitudes toward people with mental illness and mental health nursing. Methodology. This was a cross sectional descriptive study carried out among conveniently selected nursing students (N=116. Data was collected through self- reported questionnaires. Results: Majority of the participants agreed that the theoretical (81.1% and cpnical placement (85.4% was adequate. Similarly, 62.9% would pke to apply for a post-basic program in Psychiatric nursing and 69.8% of the students intend to pursue their career as mental health nurses. However, a majority expressed that people with mental illness are unpredictable (80.2%, cannot handle too much responsibipty (71.5%, more pkely to commit offences or crimes (84.5% and more pkely to be violent (44%. Negative stereotype domain had significant relationships with future career (r=-0.2, p= 0.003, course effectiveness (r=-0.4, p<0.001, valuable contribution (r=-0.3, p<0.001 and readiness of the students (r=-.3, p<.000 domains. Conclusion. There is an urgent need to address these negative perceptions among nursing students towards people with mental illness. Innovative teaching strategies and appropriate changes in the nursing curriculum is required to prepare future nurses to deal mental health problems effectively.

  13. Issues for cross-cultural psychiatric research in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, L

    1985-03-01

    South Africa's heterogenous society offers many opportunities for cross-cultural psychiatric research, but researchers in the country are subject to a number of restraints. Apart from legally enforced segregation, there are strict censorship laws and restricted access to certain types of information. The issues surrounding categorization of cultures and factors affecting publishing research from South Africa have important implications for the type of work that is done. It is a central argument of this article that the issues affecting research in South Africa are relevant to other countries as well, and parallels between the local and international context are drawn. The South African experience suggests that analysis of the research enterprise itself is a useful part of the business of cross-cultural psychiatric research.

  14. Juvenile mental health courts for adjudicated youth: role implications for child and adolescent psychiatric mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burriss, F Antoinette; Breland-Noble, Alfiee M; Webster, Joe L; Soto, Jose A

    2011-05-01

    Juvenile mental health courts for adjudicated youth. To describe the role of psychiatric nurses in reducing mental health disparities for adjudicated youth via juvenile mental health courts. ISI Web of Knowledge; Sage Journals Online; HighWire; PubMed; Google Scholar and Wiley Online Library and websites for psychiatric nursing organizations. Years included: 2000-2010. Juvenile mental health courts may provide a positive and effective alternative to incarceration for youth with mental health problems with psychiatric nurses playing a key role in program implementation. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Qualitative versus quantitative methods in psychiatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafsha, Mahdi; Behforuzi, Hura; Azari, Hassan; Zhang, Zhiqun; Wang, Kevin K; Kobeissy, Firas H; Gold, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative studies are gaining their credibility after a period of being misinterpreted as "not being quantitative." Qualitative method is a broad umbrella term for research methodologies that describe and explain individuals' experiences, behaviors, interactions, and social contexts. In-depth interview, focus groups, and participant observation are among the qualitative methods of inquiry commonly used in psychiatry. Researchers measure the frequency of occurring events using quantitative methods; however, qualitative methods provide a broader understanding and a more thorough reasoning behind the event. Hence, it is considered to be of special importance in psychiatry. Besides hypothesis generation in earlier phases of the research, qualitative methods can be employed in questionnaire design, diagnostic criteria establishment, feasibility studies, as well as studies of attitude and beliefs. Animal models are another area that qualitative methods can be employed, especially when naturalistic observation of animal behavior is important. However, since qualitative results can be researcher's own view, they need to be statistically confirmed, quantitative methods. The tendency to combine both qualitative and quantitative methods as complementary methods has emerged over recent years. By applying both methods of research, scientists can take advantage of interpretative characteristics of qualitative methods as well as experimental dimensions of quantitative methods.

  16. The Development and Psychometric Testing on Psychiatric Nurses of a Nurse Case Management Competence Scale in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shing-Chia; Lee, Shih-Kai; Rong, Jiin-Ru; Wu, Chien-Chang; Liu, Wen-I

    2017-10-10

    Case management is a complex process involving multiple activities. It is vital that nurses are competent in all related tasks for case management. A competence scale is a valuable tool for assessing task-related competency. The aims of this study were to examine the reliability and validity of an assessment scale for nurse case management competence and to use this scale to assess the current competency of nurses. A nurse case management competence scale was developed in three stages: (a) selection of assessment items according to standards of practice for case management and literature review, (b) determination of content validity using the Delphi technique with a panel of experts, and (c) psychometric testing of the developed competence scale using a cross-sectional design. Convenience sampling was used to recruit psychiatric nurses at seven psychiatric centers in Taiwan to complete the scale anonymously. An exploratory factor analysis was performed to analyze construct validity. Discriminant validity, internal consistency, and 2-week test-retest reliability were also examined. Two hundred eighty-five psychiatric nurses completed an assessment scale comprising 18 items (originally 25 items). The content validity index reached 0.96 after the Delphi technique was applied twice in the expert panel. Seventy-eight percent of the total variance was explained by two dimension factors: coordination facilitation competence and direct care competence. Participants who had undertaken case management courses had superior case management ability compared with those who had not, indicating that the scale possesses excellent discriminant validity. Cronbach's α and the test-retest results showed excellent reliability. Of the two competence factors, direct care competence (3.03) was better than coordination facilitation competence (2.81). There is a dearth of studies investigating the development and psychometric testing of case management competence scales. The results of this

  17. The bulldozer and the ballet dancer: aspects of nurses' caring approaches in acute psychiatric intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkdahl, A; Palmstierna, T; Hansebo, G

    2010-08-01

    Demanding conditions in acute psychiatric wards inhibit provision of safe, therapeutic care and leave nurses torn between humanistic ideals and the harsh reality of their daily work. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' caring approaches within this context. Data were collected from interviews with nurses working in acute psychiatric intensive care. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis, based on interpretive description. Results revealed a caring-approach continuum on which two approaches formed the main themes: the bulldozer and the ballet dancer. The bulldozer approach functioned as a shield of power that protected the ward from chaos. The ballet dancer approach functioned as a means of initiating relationships with patients. When examining the data from a theoretical perspective of caring and uncaring encounters in nursing, the ballet dancer approach was consistent with a caring approach, while the bulldozer approach was more complex and somewhat aligned with uncaring approaches. Conclusions drawn from the study are that although the bulldozer approach involves a risk for uncaring and harming actions, it also brings a potential for caring. This potential needs to be further explored and nurses should be encouraged to reflect on how they integrate paternalistic nursing styles with person-centred care.

  18. Mental health nurses' perceptions of patient safety culture in psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaideh, S H

    2017-12-01

    Mental health nurses have a crucial role in preventing medical incidents and in promoting safety culture because they provide and coordinate most of patients' care. Therefore, they are able to enhance patients' outcomes and reduce nurses' injuries. The aims of this study were to assess the perception of mental health nurses about patients' safety culture and to detect the factors which may affect patients' safety culture at psychiatric hospitals. A predictive correlational design was employed to collect data about patient safety culture and safety outcomes from 224 mental health nurses working in psychiatric hospitals using Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Positive scores to patients' safety culture dimensions ranged between 13.4% and 81.2%. Two-thirds of mental health nurses perceived safety as excellent/very good, 20.5% perceived it as acceptable and 10.8% perceived it as poor/failing. Overall perception of safety correlated significantly with four dimensions and explained 32.6% of the variance. Frequency of events reported correlated significantly with six dimensions and explained 23.1% of the variance. Of the 12 dimensions of patients' safety culture, only one was strong, six within acceptable range and five were weak and need improvement. Healthcare managers and policy-makers should encourage educational interventions and help to establish a reporting system that focus on improving systems, not on blaming individuals and encourage open communication among mental healthcare workers. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  19. Nursing Research Priorities of the National Black Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Linda Burnes; Bennett, Crystal; Richards, Hilda; Gary, Faye; Harris, Lorna; Millon-Underwood, Sandra; Williams, Betty Smith

    2001-01-01

    Describes the research priorities of the National Black Nurses Association: women's health issues, use of diverse populations in research trials, and transcultural and culturally competent health care. Discusses the knowledge gaps in nursing research and recommends that priorities be aimed at improving the health of African Americans and other…

  20. Compassion Fatigue in Psychiatric Nursing: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Uslu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a systematic compilation study which aimed to determine whether psychiatry nurses were fatigue of compassion, or not. The screening of several databases revealed four articles fulfilling inclusion criteria of the study. While three of the articles examined were descriptive; one was in cross-sectional pattern. Along the inclusion criterions, no any Turkish article was determined regarding the subject. In these articles, compassion fatigue concept has usually been considered with “compassion satisfaction and burnout” concepts. According to the findings of aforesaid articles, it was determined that compassion satisfaction of psychiatry nurses was at low level; that their compassion fatigue and burnout levels were high; and as well that they showed post-traumatic stress symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(4.000: 421-420

  1. Teaching ethics of psychopharmacology research in psychiatric residency training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresin, Eugene V; Baldessarini, Ross J; Alpert, Jonathan; Rosenbaum, Jerrold

    2003-12-01

    American psychiatric residency training programs are now required to teach principles of research ethics. This task is especially pressing in light of evolving guidelines pertaining to human subjects, including psychiatric patients, especially when psychopharmacology is involved. Residents need to understand principles of research ethics and implications of roles of psychiatrists as investigators and clinicians. We consider major contemporary ethical issues in clinical psychiatric research, with an emphasis on psychopharmacology, and implications of addressing them within residency training programs. We reviewed recent literature on ethical issues in clinical research and on medical education in bioethics. This report considers: (1) an overview of current training; (2) perceived needs and rationales for training in research ethics, (3) recommended educational content and methods; (4) issues that require further study (including demonstration of acquired knowledge, practice issues, and the treatment versus-investigation misconception); and (5) conclusions. Recommended components of residency training programs include basic ethical principles; scientific merit and research design; assessment of risks and benefits; selection and informed consent of patient-subjects; and integrity of the clinical investigator, including definition of roles, conflicts-of-interest, and accountability. Evaluation of educational effectiveness for both trainees and faculty is a recommended component of such programs. We recommend that psychiatric training include education about ethical aspects of clinical research, with a particular emphasis on psychopharmacology. These activities can efficiently be incorporated into teaching of other aspects of bioethics, research methods, and psychopharmacology. Such education early in professional development should help to clarify roles of clinicians and investigators, improve the planning, conduct and reporting of research, and facilitate career

  2. Bachelor of nursing student' attitude towards people with mental illness and career choices in psychiatric nursing. An Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmi, Poreddi; Thimmaiah, Rohini; Chandra, Rama; BadaMath, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    To examine undergraduate nursing student' attitudes toward people with mental illness and mental health nursing. This was a cross sectional descriptive study carried out among conveniently selected nursing students (N=116). Data was collected through self- reported questionnaires. Majority of the participants agreed that the theoretical (81.1%) and clinical placement (85.4%) was adequate. Similarly, 62.9% would like to apply for a post-basic program in Psychiatric nursing and 69.8% of the students intend to pursue their career as mental health nurses. However, a majority expressed that people with mental illness are unpredictable (80.2%), cannot handle too much responsibility(71.5%), more likely to commit offences or crimes (84.5%) and more likely to be violent (44%). Negative stereotype domain had significant relationships with future career (r=-0.2, p= 0.003), course effectiveness (r=-0.4, pstudents (r=-.3, pstudents towards people with mental illness. Innovative teaching strategies and appropriate changes in the nursing curriculum is required to prepare future nurses to deal mental health problems effectively.

  3. Iranian nurses' constraint for research utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Neda

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper identifies the views of Iranian clinical nurses regarding the utilization of nursing research in practice. There is a need to understand what restricts Iranian clinical nurses to use research findings. The aim of this study was to identify practicing nurses' view of aspects which they perceived constrain them from research utilization that summarizes and uses research findings to address a nursing practice problem. Methods Data were collected during 6 months by means of face-to face interviews follow by one focus group. Analysis was undertaken using a qualitative content analysis. Results Findings disclosed some key themes perceived by nurses to restrict them to use research findings: level of support require to be research active, to be research minded, the extent of nurses knowledge and skills about research and research utilization, level of educational preparation relating to using research, administration and executive challenges in clinical setting, and theory-practice gap. Conclusion This study identifies constraints that require to be overcome for clinical nurses to actively get involved in research utilization. In this study nurses were generally interested to use research findings. However they felt restricted because of lack of time, lack of peer and manager support and limited knowledge and skills of the research process. This study also confirms that research utilization and the change to research nursing practice are complex issues which require both organizational and educational efforts.

  4. Effect of nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients - an interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    2013-01-01

    nurses are the health professionals spending most time directly with the patient and very few studies investigate nurses’ role and potential in improving the appropriateness of medication. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of educating nurses in general pharmacology...... and conducting systematic medication reviews using computer based screening. The effect is evaluated in a controlled interventional study. METHODS: An interventional study including 2 acute psychiatric wards. In one ward nurses’ will receive pharmacological training and the other ward will function as a control....... The nurses will perform approximately 250 medication reviews followed by medication reviews performed by pharmacologists. Primary outcomes are the respective frequencies, types and severity of potential inappropriate prescriptions identified by the nurses and pharmacologists and an estimation...

  5. Challenges, opportunities and achievements of nurses' research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nurse educators and researches are calling for national and international nursing education research to align resources within and outside the discipline, ... This paper explores the challenges, opportunities and achievements that nursing students face when supervised across culture, language borders and distance.

  6. Burnout of caregivers: a comparison between partners of psychiatric patients and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermeyer, Matthias C; Bull, Nadine; Bernert, Sebastian; Dietrich, Sandra; Kopf, Andrea

    2006-08-01

    Care of a person with mental illness involves multiple burdens, possibly leading to burnout. This study compares partners of persons with schizophrenia and depression with nursing staff based on dimensions of burnout. Nursing staff and partners of patients with schizophrenia or depression were consecutively recruited from psychiatric hospitals and interviewed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory. No significant differences were found in the three dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) for the two groups of caregivers. About one fourth of the respondents in both groups showed a high degree of burnout. Professional and nonprofessional caregivers face a similar degree of burden and need support to perform their caretaking tasks.

  7. Effect of nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients - an interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    nurses are the health professionals spending most time directly with the patient and very few studies investigate nurses’ role and potential in improving the appropriateness of medication. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of educating nurses in general pharmacology......OBJECTIVES: There is an increasing demand for medication reviews to improve the quality of prescribing for patients with chronic illness such as psychiatric patients. Traditionally, this has been undertaken by physicians. Pharmacists have also proven to be a resource in this field but registered...... and conducting systematic medication reviews using computer based screening. The effect is evaluated in a controlled interventional study. METHODS: An interventional study including 2 acute psychiatric wards. In one ward nurses’ will receive pharmacological training and the other ward will function as a control...

  8. Action research: changing nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegney, Desley Gail; Francis, Karen

    2015-06-03

    This article describes action research as a methodology and gives two examples of its application to nursing and health services research. Action research is cyclical in nature and involves the development, evaluation and redefining of an action plan using four basic steps: planning, action, observation and reflection. These cycles of action continue until the research group is satisfied that its objectives have been met. Data generation and analysis are iterative processes that occur continuously throughout the project, which is usually time-limited. Factors that should be taken into account to ensure success include: engaging the community, consideration of 'insider' versus 'outsider' perspectives, competing agendas, expectations not being met and the integrity of the research methodology.

  9. Salutogenic Model in Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Bag

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing number of people who live with mental health problems for many years in the community brings into focus the need for recovery within a coping and mental health promotion perspective. The value of the salutogenic theory is that it emphasizes promoting coping and health. This article aims to illustrate how Antonovsky’s salutogenic theory and its central concept of sense of coherence and discusses how mental health nurses can use the theories in their praxis. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(3.000: 284-300

  10. Positivism and qualitative nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, J

    2001-01-01

    Despite the hostility to positivism shown by qualitative methodologists in nursing, as in other disciplines, the epistemological and ontological instincts of qualitative researchers seem to coincide with those of the positivists, especially Bayesian positivists. This article suggests that positivists and qualitative researchers alike are pro-observation, proinduction, pro-plausibility and pro-subjectivity. They are also anti-cause, anti-realist, anti-explanation, anti-correspondence, anti-truth. In only one respect is there a significant difference between positivist and qualitative methodologists: most positivists have believed that, methodologically, the natural sciences and the social sciences are the same; most qualitative researchers are adamant that they are not. However, if positivism fails as a philosophy of the natural sciences (which it probably does), it might well succeed as a philosophy of the social sciences, just because there is a methodological watershed between the two. Reflex antagonism to positivism might therefore be a major obstacle to understanding the real reasons why qualitative research and the natural sciences are methodologically divergent; and less hostility on the part of qualitative nurse researchers might bring certain advantages in its wake.

  11. Creative classroom strategies for teaching nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Regina Miecznikoski

    2014-01-01

    Faculty are constantly challenged to find interesting classroom activities to teach nursing content and engage students in learning. Nursing students and graduates need to use research skills and evidence-based practice as part of their professional care. Finding creative and engaging ways to teach this material in undergraduate nursing programs are essential. This article outlines several successful strategies to engage nursing students in research content in the time and space constraints of the classroom.

  12. Human trafficking: what psychiatric nurses should know to help children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Amy; McGuinness, Teena M

    2012-04-01

    Psychiatric nurses are in key positions to identify and stop human trafficking, as well as aid its survivors. The combination of emotional trauma, sexual violence, and physical injuries experienced by these victims leads to high rates of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. To detect human trafficking, it is important to identify the salient risk factors of homelessness and runaway history. This article offers key questions to help identify victims, as well as web-based resources. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Market Research: An Area in Need of Nurse Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froberg, Debra G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The application of marketing principles to nursing education and the need for research into the applicant market are discussed for nursing education programs, effective recruiting techniques, prediction of student success in nursing education, program quality, and the current and future nursing market. (Author/MSE)

  14. Exploratory Study of Factors Influencing Job-Related Stress in Japanese Psychiatric Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Yada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the factor structure of psychiatric nurses’ job-related stress and examined the specificity of the related stressors using the job stressor scale of the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ. The stressor scale of the BJSQ was administered to 296 nurses and assistant nurses. Answers were examined statistically. Exploratory factor analysis was performed to identify factor structures; two factors (overload and job environment were valid. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to examine the two-factor structure and found 11 items with factor loadings of >0.40 (model 1, 13 items with factor loadings from 0.30 to <0.40 (model 2, and 17 items with factor loadings from 0.20 to <0.30 (model 3 for one factor; model 1 demonstrated the highest goodness of fit. Then, we observed that the two-factor structure (model 1 showed a higher goodness of fit than the original six-factor structure. This differed from subscales based on general workers’ job-related stressors, suggesting that the factor structure of psychiatric nurses’ job-related stressors is specific. Further steps may be necessary to reduce job-related stress specifically related to overload including attention to many needs of patients and job environment including complex ethical dilemmas in psychiatric nursing.

  15. Developing a reflection-centered curriculum for graduate psychiatric nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton-Deutsch, Sara; McNelis, Angela M; Day, Pamela O'Haver

    2012-10-01

    This article discusses theoretical underpinnings, teaching strategies, and preliminary evaluation relative to the development of a reflective curriculum used in our distance-accessible graduate psychiatric nursing program. Influenced by the collective ideas of J. Dewey (1993), J. Reed and S. Proctor (1993), D. A. Kolbe (1984), J. Mezirow (1981), C. Johns (2006), D. Schön (1983), D. Freshwater (2008), and others who have promoted reflection as a transformative teaching and learning process, we sought to develop a curriculum that balanced knowledge and skill acquisition with critical reflective practices that would instill habits of lifelong learning. We began with traditional approaches to psychiatric nursing education, including case study analysis and modified lectures that we call mini lectures. We then added principles and practices of reflection to allow for merging these traditional approaches with contemporary reflection-focused approaches. Specific ways to use reflection in a graduate psychiatric nursing curriculum are described to demonstrate how we have taken our curriculum beyond traditional ways of teaching and learning toward one that emphasizes building knowledge and skill through reflective practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Accounting for accountability: a discourse analysis of psychiatric nurses' experience of a patient suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Maggie; Paterson, Brodie; Lauder, Billy; Fenton, Rosemary; Gavin, John

    2010-01-27

    Whilst the experience of a patient suicide is likely to have a significant impact upon the nurses who had been providing care, little work has actually explored this experience in any depth. In this article we explore how two psychiatric nurses construct and orient to accountability when talking of their experiences of a patient suicide. Discourse analysis was used to explore particular phases that the nurses oriented to in their accounts: scene setting; risk assessment; attributing for the suicide. Findings highlight the different, sometimes contradictory, ways the nurses attended to interactional concerns relating to implicit accountability and potential inferences of blame. Analysis of the nurses' talk can make a valuable contribution to understanding the nature and the impact of 'accountability' in a mental health setting and so help nurses and other professionals gain an insight into their practice. The results from this study suggest that as a consequence of internalising fundamentally unrealisable expectations regarding suicide prevention, nurses can hold themselves to blame raising significant concerns around their needs in terms of support, which may not be recognised. This paper also makes a valuable contribution to our methodological understanding and the value of using discourse analysis in this setting.

  17. [Translation and validation in italian of the Moral Distress Scale for psychiatric nurses (MDS-P)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canciani, Eleonora; Spotti, Daniela; Bonetti, Loris

    2016-01-01

    Moral distress (MD) is a painful feeling and/or psychological disequilibrium, which may lead to negative consequences into the wellness of a nurse's working life. Nurses who work in psychiatry are more likely to experience a different type of MD compared with nurses of other contexts. In Italy a tool to evaluate MD in nurses who work in psychiatry doesn't exist. The aim of this study is to validate the Moral Distress Scale for Psychiatric Nurses (MDS-P) in Italian language. For translation the forward and back-translation has been used; the effectiveness regarding content and face validity of the translated scale has been analyzed through a focus group with experts of the field. In order to check the reliability of the scale the test-retest method has been used, by means of the determination of Spearman's correlation coefficient, Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach's alpha. The forward and back-translation process was successful. During the focus group analysis, 8 items were added to the 15 items of the original scale, due to experts suggestions. 32 nurses took part in the test-retest phase. Spearman's correlation coefficient resulted to be 0,91, ICC > 0,9, Cronbach's alpha calculated on test and retest, was always >0,9. The Italian version of the MDS-P proves to be an effective, appropriate and reliable instrument to measure the MD phenomenon within the population of nurses who work in the psychia- tric field in Italy.

  18. Association between moral distress and job satisfaction of Japanese psychiatric nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiyo Ando

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Moral distress of psychiatric nurses may affect their job satisfaction or quality of nursing care, thus examination of their moral distress is a significant issue for practice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of moral distress and job satisfaction, and association between moral distress and job satisfaction. One hundred and thirty nurses who worked in psychiatric wards in a hospital in Japan completed the Moral Distress Scale for psychiatric nurses (MDS-P and the Job Satisfaction scale (JS. The MDS-P consisted of subdomains such as “unethical conduct by caregivers,” “low staffing,” and “acquiescence to violations of patients’ rights” in intensity and frequency; the JS consisted of seven subcategories. An institutional review board in the researcher’s college approved this study. Results showed that the “acquiescence to violations of patients’ rights” was the highest of the subdomains of MDS-P, and the “interactions among nurses” was the highest of the subdomains of the JS. The unethical conduct by caregivers (MDS-P score was negatively correlated with administration (JS for intensity (r = -.40, p < .001 and frequency (r = .37, p < .001. Moreover “acquiescence to violations of patients’ rights (MDS-P” was also negatively correlated with the “task requirement (JS” score for intensity (r = -0.49, p < .001 and for frequency (r = -0.50, p < .001. These results suggest that reduction of moral distress increases job satisfaction particularly for administration and task requirement in nursing care.

  19. Attitudes of Psychiatric Nurses about the Request for Euthanasia on the Basis of Unbearable Mental Suffering(UMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc De Hert

    Full Text Available When psychiatric patients express a wish for euthanasia, this should first and foremost be interpreted as a cry for help. Due to their close day-to-day relationship, psychiatric nurses may play an important and central role in responding to such requests. However, little is known about nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia motivated by unbearable mental suffering.The aim of this study was to provide insight into the attitudes and actions taken by psychiatric nurses when confronted with a patient's euthanasia request based on unbearable mental suffering (UMS.A questionnaire was sent to 11 psychiatric hospitals in the Flemish part of Belgium.The overall response rate was 70% (N = 627. Psychiatric nurses were frequently confronted with a request for euthanasia, either directly (N = 329, 53% or through a colleague (N = 427, 69%. A majority (N = 536, 84% did not object to euthanasia in a psychiatrically ill population with UMS. Confounding factors were the psychiatric diagnosis and the type of ward where the nurses were working. Most participants acknowledged a lack of knowledge and skills to adequately address the euthanasia request (N = 434, 71%. Nearly unanimously (N = 618, 99%, study participants indicated that dealing with euthanasia requests and other end-of-life issues should be part of the formal training of nurses.The results highlight the need for ethically sound and comprehensive provision of care. Psychiatric nurses play an important role in dealing with the complex issue of requests for euthanasia. There is also a need for education, training and clear guidelines on the level of health care organizations.

  20. Attitudes of Psychiatric Nurses about the Request for Euthanasia on the Basis of Unbearable Mental Suffering(UMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hert, Marc; Van Bos, Liesbet; Sweers, Kim; Wampers, Martien; De Lepeleire, Jan; Correll, Christophe U

    2015-01-01

    When psychiatric patients express a wish for euthanasia, this should first and foremost be interpreted as a cry for help. Due to their close day-to-day relationship, psychiatric nurses may play an important and central role in responding to such requests. However, little is known about nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia motivated by unbearable mental suffering. The aim of this study was to provide insight into the attitudes and actions taken by psychiatric nurses when confronted with a patient's euthanasia request based on unbearable mental suffering (UMS). A questionnaire was sent to 11 psychiatric hospitals in the Flemish part of Belgium. The overall response rate was 70% (N = 627). Psychiatric nurses were frequently confronted with a request for euthanasia, either directly (N = 329, 53%) or through a colleague (N = 427, 69%). A majority (N = 536, 84%) did not object to euthanasia in a psychiatrically ill population with UMS. Confounding factors were the psychiatric diagnosis and the type of ward where the nurses were working. Most participants acknowledged a lack of knowledge and skills to adequately address the euthanasia request (N = 434, 71%). Nearly unanimously (N = 618, 99%), study participants indicated that dealing with euthanasia requests and other end-of-life issues should be part of the formal training of nurses. The results highlight the need for ethically sound and comprehensive provision of care. Psychiatric nurses play an important role in dealing with the complex issue of requests for euthanasia. There is also a need for education, training and clear guidelines on the level of health care organizations.

  1. Geography: research and teaching in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Gavin J

    2006-10-01

    This paper outlines how geography might be integrated into nurse education. At one level, researching nurse education geographically could add to the current academic understanding of the many transitional places that make educational experiences and influence outcomes. At another level, as part of a nursing curriculum, teaching geographical concepts and issues to students might provide them with unique insights into core subjects.

  2. Factors influencing adherence to standard precautions among nursing professionals in psychiatric hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Helena Piai-Morais

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Evaluate and correlate individual, work-related and organizational factors that influence adherence to standard precautions among nursing professionals of psychiatric hospitals in São Paulo. METHOD An exploratory cross-sectional study conducted with 35 nursing professionals, using the assessment tool for adherence to standard precautions through the Likert scale, ranging from 1 to 5. RESULTS Knowledge of the precautions received a high score (4.69; adherence received (3.86 and obstacles (3.78, while intermediaries and the scales of organizational factors received low scores (2.61. There was a strong correlation between the magnitude adherence scale and the personal protective equipment availability (r = 0.643; p = 0.000. The training scale for prevention of HIV exposure (p = 0.007 was statistically different between the nurses and nursing assistants. CONCLUSION The organizational factors negatively contributed to adherence to standard precautions, indicating that psychiatric institutions lack safe working conditions, ongoing training and management actions to control infections.

  3. Development of the TabacoQuest app for computerization of data collection on smoking in psychiatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Marques de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to develop a mobile app for research on the use of tobacco among psychiatric patients and the general population. Method: applied research with the technological development of an app for data collection on an Android tablet. For its development, we considered three criteria: data security, benefits for participants and optimization of the time of researchers. We performed tests with twenty fictitious participants and a final test with six pilots. Results: the app collects data, stores them in the database of the tablet and export then to an Excel spreadsheet. Resources: calculator, stopwatch, offline operation, branching logic, field validation and automatic tabulation. Conclusion: the app prevents human error, increases the quality of the data by validating them during the interview, allows the performing of automatic tabulation and makes the interviews less tiring. Its success may encourage the use of this and other computational resources by nurses as a research tool.

  4. Trends in Publication of Nursing Informatics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeoneui; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Oh, Janet; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed 741 journal articles on nursing informatics published in 7 biomedical/nursing informatics journals and 6 nursing journals from 2005 to 2013 to begin to understand publication trends in nursing informatics research and identify gaps. We assigned a research theme to each article using AMIA 2014 theme categories and normalized the citation counts using time from publication. Overall, nursing informatics research covered a broad spectrum of research topics in biomedical informatics and publication topics seem to be well aligned with the high priority research agenda identified by the nursing informatics community. The research themes with highest volume of publication were Clinical Workflow and Human Factors, Consumer Informatics and Personal Health Records, and Clinical Informatics, for which an increasing trend in publication was noted. Articles on Informatics Education and Workforce Development; Data Mining, NLP, Information Extraction; and Clinical Informatics showed steady and high volume of citations. PMID:25954387

  5. Exploring registered Psychiatric Nurses' responses towards Service Users with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    This study explored registered psychiatric nurses\\' (RPNs\\') interactions and level of empathy towards service users with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD). A qualitative approach was used, and 17 RPNs were interviewed using a semistructured interview schedule incorporating the "staff-patient interaction response scale" (SPIRS). Four themes emerged following data analysis: "challenging and difficult," "manipulative, destructive and threatening behaviour," "preying on the vulnerable resulting in splitting staff and other service users," and "boundaries and structure." Additionally, low levels of empathy were evident in the majority of participants\\' responses to the SPIRS. The findings provide further insight on nurses\\' empathy responses and views on caring for service users with BPD and further evidence for the need for training and education for nurses in the care of service users diagnosed with BPD.

  6. Exploring Registered Psychiatric Nurses' Responses towards Service Users with a Diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget McGrath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored registered psychiatric nurses' (RPNs' interactions and level of empathy towards service users with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD. A qualitative approach was used, and 17 RPNs were interviewed using a semistructured interview schedule incorporating the “staff-patient interaction response scale” (SPIRS. Four themes emerged following data analysis: “challenging and difficult,” “manipulative, destructive and threatening behaviour,” “preying on the vulnerable resulting in splitting staff and other service users,” and “boundaries and structure.” Additionally, low levels of empathy were evident in the majority of participants' responses to the SPIRS. The findings provide further insight on nurses' empathy responses and views on caring for service users with BPD and further evidence for the need for training and education for nurses in the care of service users diagnosed with BPD.

  7. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Workforce Agenda: Optimizing Capabilities and Capacity to Address Workforce Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Kathleen R

    2016-01-01

    The mental health service delivery transformation has created models of care that generate demand for a workforce with particular competencies. This article develops a psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing workforce agenda in light of demand generated by new models of care and the capacity/capabilities of the PMH RN and advanced practice nurse (APN) workforce. Examine the current capacity of the PMH nursing workforce and how health care reform and related service delivery models create demand for a particular set of behavioral health workforce competencies. PMH RNs and APNs have an educational background that facilitates development of competencies in screening, care coordination, leveling care, and wellness education. PMH RNs are a large workforce but the size of the PMH APN group is inadequate to meet demand. The specialty must strategize on how to build requisite PMH RN and APN competencies for the evolving service landscape. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Gender Roles in a Traditionally Female Occupation: A Study of Emergency, Operating, Intensive Care, and Psychiatric Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchmeyer, Catherine; Bullin, Carol

    1997-01-01

    A study of 12 emergency, 27 operating, 25 intensive care, and 22 psychiatric nurses in Canada demonstrated that, although gender roles appeared androgynous, the masculine component of nursing was more valued and rewarded. High masculinity was associated with higher pay, high femininity with low experience. Gender roles represented complex…

  9. Correlates of attitudes toward homosexuality and intention to care for homosexual people among psychiatric nurses in southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shu-Ying; Pan, Shung-Mei; Ko, Nai-Ying; Liu, Hsiu-Chin; Wu, Shu-Jung; Yang, Wen-Chiung; Yang, Hsing-Hu; Shieh, Shiu-Fen; Chuang, Li-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2006-08-01

    This study examined the association between attitudes toward homosexual individuals and intention to provide care and demographic and occupational factors, sexual orientation, knowledge about homosexuality, and experiences of contact with homosexual people among psychiatric nurses in southern Taiwan. In total, 133 psychiatric nurses from a medical center, three regional teaching hospitals, and one psychiatric hospital in southern Taiwan were recruited into this study. Their attitudes toward homosexual people as recorded on the Attitudes Toward Homosexuality Questionnaire, intention to provide care to homosexual individuals, and related factors were examined. The results revealed that psychiatric nurses who had a bachelor's or master's degree, higher level of knowledge about homosexuality, and friends or relatives with a homosexual orientation had a more positive attitude toward homosexuality. These psychiatric nurses, with more positive attitudes, and who worked in the medical center or regional teaching hospitals had a higher intention to care for homosexual people. The factors related to attitudes toward homosexuality and intention to care for homosexual people identified in this study should be taken into consideration when intervening in psychiatric nurses' attitudes toward homosexuality and intention to care for homosexual people.

  10. Recovery-oriented practices of psychiatric-mental health nursing staff in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Kris A; Du Wick, Amanda; Collazzi, Charlene M; Puntil, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    There is a national initiative to integrate recovery-oriented practices into the delivery of mental health services. Few empirical studies have been conducted to measure these practices in psychiatric-mental health (PMH) nursing, particularly in short-term acute hospital settings. This study examined the reliability of the Recovery Self Assessment-Registered Nurse Version (RSA-RN) and explored recovery practices of PMH nurses and nursing staff in an acute treatment setting. A descriptive one-group design with convenience sampling was employed. One hundred and five participants completed the RSA-RN and the demographic data form. The RSA-RN full-scale instrument demonstrated excellent internal consistency, and the five subscales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency. Significant, favorable relationships were found between RSA-RN scores and nursing staff who (a) had formal education in mental health recovery, (b) considered themselves knowledgeable about recovery, and (c) considered their place of work to be "recovery-oriented." The RSA-RN is a useful tool in measuring recovery-oriented practice. Formal education should be considered as an intervention to increase recovery-oriented practices in PMH nursing.

  11. Surveys and questionnaires in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona

    2015-06-17

    Surveys and questionnaires are often used in nursing research to elicit the views of large groups of people to develop the nursing knowledge base. This article provides an overview of survey and questionnaire use in nursing research, clarifies the place of the questionnaire as a data collection tool in quantitative research design and provides information and advice about best practice in the development of quantitative surveys and questionnaires.

  12. Heart Center nursing research: a team effort. Heart Center Nursing Research Work Group Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullwood, J; Granger, B B; Bride, W; Taylor, M C

    1999-01-01

    Our Heart Center staff identified a need to become more involved in nursing research and evidence based practice. A lack of awareness of the research process and current Heart Center nursing research studies resulted in low patient enrollment. To overcome these challenges a Heart Center Nursing Research Work Group (HCNRWG) was created with support of management. Staff nurses from each unit within the Heart Center participated, and sessions were facilitated by an Assistant Nurse Manager and Clinical Nurse Specialist. Advanced Practice Nurses functioned as consultants. The goal was to support nurses in developing a greater understanding of research and promote nursing research and visibility. Results included the development of research notebooks, inclusive of medical, nursing, and collaborative research projects, "Ask Me About Nursing Research" buttons, and mechanisms for study enrollment for each unit. Writing workshops were held to assist nurses with the preparation of abstracts, manuscripts, and research. A "hot line" was established to answer questions and informational packets and newsletters were distributed to staff and leadership quarterly. An increased awareness of research among the health care team has ensued. Meeting attendance has tripled, more nursing abstracts have been submitted to national conferences and there are ongoing research studies on all heart center units with increased patient enrollment.

  13. The Therapeutic Relationship in Inpatient Psychiatric Care: A Narrative Review of the Perspective of Nurses and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Poyato, Antonio R; Montesó-Curto, Pilar; Delgado-Hito, Pilar; Suárez-Pérez, Raquel; Aceña-Domínguez, Rosa; Carreras-Salvador, Regina; Leyva-Moral, Juan M; Lluch-Canut, Teresa; Roldán-Merino, Juan F

    2016-12-01

    To study the significance of 'therapeutic relationship' between nurses and patients within the context of a psychiatric hospital. Narrative literature review. Content analysis. The significance of the therapeutic relationship is quite similar for both nurses and patients in psychiatric hospital units. Nevertheless, several factors may separate the two positions: the time available for the relationship, the negative perceptions on the part of both parties, and the insecurity of the setting. Increased knowledge and understanding of the significance of the therapeutic relationship from the perspective of nurses and patients would allow the strengthening of areas of mutual interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Comparison of Psychiatric and Nonpsychiatric Nurse Practitioner Knowledge and Management Recommendations Regarding Adolescent Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tracy A; Graves, Janessa M

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) are statutorily authorized to provide assessment and cognitive recommendations for concussion in most states. Their scope of practice includes assessment and management of concussion sequalae including anxiety, insomnia, and depression, as well as return to school and activity guidance. Analysis of symptom-based diagnosis of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adolescents, including return to school and school workload recommendations comparing psychiatric and nonpsychiatric NPs. Cross-sectional Web-based survey with embedded videos using standardized actors and scripts randomized for patient sex and sport. A total of 4,849 NPs licensed in Oregon or Washington were invited by e-mail to view and respond to this study, with a response rate of 23%. Psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners (PMHNPs) were 44% less likely than family NPs to report using standardized concussion tools. 17% had completed continuing education on mild TBI compared to 54.5% of family NPs. Seven PMHNPs provided additional feedback related to discomfort in completing the survey due to lack of comfort or experience. Return to school recommendations and reduced workload advice did not significantly differ by NP type. PMHNPs may support individualized assessment through concussion evaluation, use of standardized tools, and differential consideration of TBI for mental health symptoms. More research is required related to the role and contribution of cognitive rest to full recovery.

  15. Using computerized clinical nursing data bases for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nail, L M; Lange, L L

    1996-01-01

    Computerized clinical nursing data bases (CCNDBs) have significant potential as sources of data for research on the processes and outcomes of nursing care. The emergence of nurse-managed practice sites, in which patient care is driven predominantly by nurses' decisions, has prompted renewed interest in using data from these practices to answer questions that are important to nurses. The purpose of this article is to articulate strategies for using CCNDBs for nursing research. Recognition of the differences between clinical and research data bases is essential. The steps involved in obtaining and using computerized clinical data can be grouped into three phases: (1) locating and accessing CCNDBs, (2) assessing the content and quality of the data, and (3) extracting and analyzing the data. Processes involved in phase 1 include determining the research question, identifying eligible CCNDBs, negotiating access to the CCNDB, and ensuring the privacy and confidentiality of subjects. In phase 2 the processes include determining the content of the candidate CCNDBs, assessing the quality of the data in candidate CCNDBs, and determining the technical usability of data in candidate CCNDBs. Phase 3 involves mapping CCNDB data elements to research variables; determining data and record selection criteria; writing and implementing a query to select the desired records; designing a data base and record structure for research variables; performing analytic procedures on the research data; and reporting results of the research. Phases and procedures are discussed in detail in the article.

  16. Facebook: a tool for nursing education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerson, Roxanne

    2011-07-01

    Facebook is an online social networking Web site that allows users to connect with other users. Nurse educators can use this technology to advance nursing research. Social networks provide new opportunities for locating potential research participants and maintaining contact during the research process. The purpose of this article is to explain how the researcher used Facebook to locate previous nursing students to ask them to participate in a qualitative study. Between 2006 and 2008, 22 nursing students had participated in international trips over a 3-year period. Because the students had graduated and moved to other geographical areas, the researcher had little or no contact information to use to follow-up with them. The researcher used Facebook to locate 18 of the 22 nursing graduates and invite them to participate in a qualitative research study. A discussion of the process and the potential ethical issues are provided. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Somatic symptoms, perceived stress and perceived job satisfaction among nurses working in an Indian psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sailaxmi; Sangeetha, G; Ahmed, Nurnahar; Chaturvedi, S K

    2014-12-01

    High stress perception by nurses caring for psychiatric patients can lead to somatic symptoms which impact on their job satisfaction perception. To assess and correlate the level of somatic symptoms, perceived stress and perceived job satisfaction among the subjects. The authors used a descriptive correlation design to invite 150 nurses of both genders working for more than one year with psychiatric patients. The Scale for Assessment of Somatic Symptoms (Chaturvedi et al., 1987) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for stress and job satisfaction perception were used to collect data. The nurses (128) reported mainly pain related (4.87±2.97) somatic symptoms. Somatic symptoms positively correlated (r=0.302) with stress perception and negatively correlated (r=-0.231) with perceived job satisfaction, while perceived stress and perceived job satisfaction were negatively correlated (r=-0.460, p=0.000). The results indicate a need for stress management interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interdisciplinarity and nursing research: opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco A. Carnevale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary collaboration is widely recognized and considered essential for optimizing the development of knowledge and practice. However, interdisciplinarity is commonly accepted as an unquestioned good; rarely examined as both a source of benefit as well as difficulty for nursing and other disciplines. The aim of this article is to critically examine the opportunities and challenges that interdisciplinarity can provide for research in nursing and other disciplines. Based on a North American perspective, I describe the emergence of uni-disciplinary nursing research and the knowledge exchanges that occurred between nursing and other disciplines. I discuss the rise of interdisciplinary research, outline several examples of nursing participation in interdisciplinarity, and highlight the prominent benefits and difficulties associated with interdisciplinary research. I argue that authentic collaboration is required to conduct meaningful interdisciplinary research and describe how this can be promoted.

  19. Interdisciplinarity and nursing research: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Franco A

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary collaboration is widely recognized and considered essential for optimizing the development of knowledge and practice. However, interdisciplinarity is commonly accepted as an unquestioned good; rarely examined as both a source of benefit as well as difficulty for nursing and other disciplines. The aim of this article is to critically examine the opportunities and challenges that interdisciplinarity can provide for research in nursing and other disciplines. Based on a North American perspective, I describe the emergence of uni-disciplinary nursing research and the knowledge exchanges that occurred between nursing and other disciplines. I discuss the rise of interdisciplinary research, outline several examples of nursing participation in interdisciplinarity, and highlight the prominent benefits and difficulties associated with interdisciplinary research. I argue that authentic collaboration is required to conduct meaningful interdisciplinary research and describe how this can be promoted.

  20. Development of psychiatric risk evaluation checklist and routine for nurses in a general hospital: ethnographic qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Ana Luiza Lourenço Simões; Maluf Neto, Alfredo; Colman, Fátima Tahira; Citero, Vanessa de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    There is high prevalence of mental and behavioral disorders in general hospitals, thus triggering psychiatric risk situations. This study aimed to develop a psychiatric risk assessment checklist and routine for nurses, the Psychiatric Risk Evaluation Check-List (PRE-CL), as an alternative model for early identification and management of these situations in general hospitals. Ethnographic qualitative study in a tertiary-level private hospital. Three hundred general-unit nurses participated in the study. Reports were gathered through open groups conducted by a trained nurse, at shift changes for two months. The questions used were: "Would you consider it helpful to discuss daily practice situations with a psychiatrist? Which situations?" The data were qualitatively analyzed through an ethnographic approach. The nurses considered it useful to discuss daily practice situations relating to mental and behavioral disorders with a psychiatrist. Their reports were used to develop PRE-CL, within the patient overall risk assessment routine for all inpatients within 24 hours after admission and every 48 hours thereafter. Whenever one item was present, the psychosomatic medicine team was notified. They went to the unit, gathered data from the nurses, patient files and, if necessary, attending doctors, and decided on the risk management: guidance, safety measures or mental health consultation. It is possible to develop a model for detecting and intervening in psychiatric and behavioral disorders at general hospitals based on nursing team observations, through a checklist that takes these observations into account and a routine inserted into daily practice.

  1. Violence exposure and resulting psychological effects suffered by psychiatric visiting nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, H; Hirota, M; Kodama, T; Greiner, C; Hashimoto, T

    2017-10-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: There is a developing body of research on violence in healthcare workplaces. Although psychiatric visiting nurses (PVNs) are an important group of professionals who provide medical services for people with mental disorders live in the community, little is known about the experiences and characteristics of violence exposure among PVNs, or the characteristics and work situations of PVNs related to violence exposure. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Approximately 40% of participants were exposed to violence during the previous 12 months; approximately 50% had been exposed during their PVN careers in PVN settings. The most frequent violence was verbal abuse. Longer career length as a PVN and greater number of visits per month were both positively associated with verbal abuse during the previous 12 months. Twenty-eight of the 34 participants (83%) who completed the IES-R-J survey had some residual psychological distress, and two (6%) had a potentially high risk of posttraumatic stress disorder. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: In devising policies and strategies against violence, PVN organizations and administrators should consider the characteristics of the violence, especially verbal abuse, as well as the characteristics and work situations of PVNs that are related to verbal abuse. Furthermore, they might provide relevant information on violence in PVN settings within their violence-prevention manuals or education. It would be important to provide support and to construct a safe workplace environment for PVNs who are experiencing residual psychological distress. Introduction Psychiatric visiting nurses (PVNs) play a crucial role by providing medical services for community-living individuals with mental disorders in Japan. However, little is known about violence towards PVNs. Aim This cross-sectional study investigated violence during visits and the resulting psychological effects for PVNs. Methods PVNs were assessed

  2. Use of Action Research in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Susan D; Vandenbark, R Todd; Pehler, Shelley-Rae; Stombaugh, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this article is to describe action research in nursing education and to propose a definition of action research for providing guidelines for research proposals and criteria for assessing potential publications for nursing higher education. Methods. The first part of this project involved a search of the literature on action research in nursing higher education from 1994 to 2013. Searches were conducted in the CINAHL and MEDLINE databases. Applying the criteria identified, 80 publications were reviewed. The second part of the project involved a literature review of action research methodology from several disciplines to assist in assessing articles in this review. Results. This article summarizes the nursing higher education literature reviewed and provides processes and content related to four topic areas in nursing higher education. The descriptions assist researchers in learning more about the complexity of both the action research process and the varied outcomes. The literature review of action research in many disciplines along with the review of action research in higher education provided a framework for developing a nursing-education-centric definition of action research. Conclusions. Although guidelines for developing action research and criteria for publication are suggested, continued development of methods for synthesizing action research is recommended.

  3. The Effect of Spiritual Intelligence Training on Job Satisfaction of Psychiatric Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Meshkinyazd, Ali; Soudmand, Parvaneh

    2017-04-01

    Objective: Nurses are the most important staff in the health care system, thus, their job satisfaction is important in nursing management. The present study aimed at determining the impact of teaching spiritual intelligence on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses. Method: The participants were divided into 2 groups by random allocation. Data were collected in 3 stages of before intervention, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks post intervention using Brayfield & Rother Job Satisfaction Questionnaire. Results: The results of this study revealed that the mean score of job satisfaction in the experimental group was 65.5±9.9 in the pre intervention stage, which increased to 69.8±6.3 one month after the intervention and to 72.5±8.9 in 2 months after the intervention, and it was significantly more than that of the control group. Conclusion: The job satisfaction rate of the control group decreased admirably in both 1 month and 2 months after the intervention stage. Thus, spiritual intelligence training is an effective method to increase job satisfaction, and it is suggested that managers consider spiritual intelligence training to increase job satisfaction in nurses.

  4. Comparing Efficacy of Implementing Two Teaching Methods Contract Learning and Traditional Instruction on Clinical Skills of Nursing Students in Psychiatric Wards of Hospitals of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Mohtashami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: A learning contract is defined as a written agreement between teacher and student which makes explicit what a learner will do to achieve specified learning outcomes.Learning contracts have been used as a teaching and learning strategy for both undergraduate and graduate nursing students in many countries.Methods : This research is a quasi-experimental study that compares effect of two different teaching methods , Contract learning and traditional on clinical skills for a group of nursing students who were in fourth year of study in a pre-registration bachelor of nursing degree program in Tehran . A learning contract was implemented as a learning tool in the students clinical placement in psychiatric nursing .Data were connected from questionnaires , interviews and clinical evaluation papers with students .Results : The results showed that students agreed that there was an increase in students autonomy and motivation in learning with the use of learning contract . It also increased the sharing between students and clinical instructors.Conclusion : According to the findings of this study , contract learning is considered beneficial to students learning and has the potential to be used in clinical learning .Key words : NURSING STUDENTS, LEARNING CONTRACTS , TRADITIONAL METHOD , MOTIVATION , AUTONOMY, PSYCHIATRIC WARDS .

  5. Psychiatric advanced practice nurses contributions to supporting survivors and caregivers affected by the Boston marathon bombings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Barbara E; Delisle, Leslie; Mitchell, Monique; Etheredge, Mary Lou

    2014-01-01

    The role of the psychiatric advanced practice nurse in promoting psychological health and resiliency for patients, their families and staff following the Boston Marathon bombings is reviewed. On April 15, 2013, 2 bombs exploded near the finish line at the Boston Marathon. Within minutes, 39 patients suffering from multiple injuries presented at a level I trauma center. The magnitude of this event and its effect on our hospital required a comprehensive response that would promote resiliency and healing. Lessons shared from responders to other tragedies were helpful in guiding our interprofessional efforts. The multiple layers of our response are reviewed to offer learnings that may inform others as they work to promote resiliency and healing following traumatic events. In response to this event, we utilized a trauma-informed care framework emphasizing physical, psychological, and emotional safety to assist staff, survivors, and families on their journey of healing. Emotional reactions were dramatic but were eased by the psychological care and education that our patients, their families, and staff received in the first days to weeks after the bombings. The psychiatric advanced practice nurse can influence positive outcomes by utilizing a trauma-informed care framework.

  6. [Prevention -- a topic in social-psychiatric research?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christiane K; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2005-10-01

    Currently, substantial effort is made to establish prevention as one of the main parts of the German health care system. In this context we investigated the current role of prevention in social-psychiatric research. We analysed original papers published in the journal Psychiatrische Praxis in the years 2003-2004 by computer-aided full text analysis. 16.5 % of the studies mentioned prevention, in one fourth of these, prevention was the main topic. Subject of these papers were suicide prevention in psychiatric patients, relapse prevention in mentally ill offenders, and prevention of acute confusional state after hip surgery. Most of the work was dedicated to tertiary prevention, followed by secondary prevention. Two papers mentioned primary preventive aspects and only one report was dedicated to primary prevention as a main topic. Although early diagnosis and intervention as well as rehabilitation of mental disorders are main topics of social psychiatry, only few reports relate explicitly to prevention. The role of social psychiatry in primary prevention has to be defined.

  7. [Nursing history research groups: a Brazilian reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, Maria Itayra; Borenstein, Miriam Susskind; Carvalho, Maria Aline Lima; Ferreira, Aline Coelho

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the activities of Nursing History research groups in Brazil and their relationships with the nursing undergraduate and graduate courses. This exploratory, descriptive, qualitative documental study was performed from July 2008 to March 2010. We identified 34 research groups that had Nursing History as the focus of at least one of the lines of research. Results showed that the groups have produced a great amount of bibliographical material, research lines and broad participation of undergraduate and graduate students. It was also found that there is a communication network among groups working within the same line of research. In conclusion, there is a need to increase interdisciplinarity and also strengthen some lines of research in order to support knowledge of the history of Brazilian nursing.

  8. TOPIC: CLINICAL NURSING RESEARCH: A TOOL FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MRS. AKPABIO

    other professional staff in the health arena for the purpose of improving patient care and health outcomes. There could therefore, not exist any professional development in Nursing without clinical nursing research. Professional development involves professional standards, increased accountabilities, effective and efficient ...

  9. Nursing research and bibliographic citation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angordans, Jordi Piqué; Puig, Ramón Camaño; Noguera, Carmen Piqué

    2009-01-01

    This research focuses on the analysis of how nursing journals publish their papers. Basically, two models are analyzed, Vancouver, by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, and APA by the American Psychological Association. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. In view of how research papers are currently published and how research is judged, the authors propose that nursing journals adopt their own model, irrespective of how medical professionals publish.

  10. National Institute of Nursing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and health care professionals to learn about the issues and challenges facing caregivers and the related science. ... Science, Improving Lives: A Vision for Nursing Science," details the Institute’s priorities for the conduct ...

  11. Invisible nursing research: thoughts about mixed methods research and nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2015-04-01

    In this this essay, the author addresses the close connection between mixed methods research and nursing practice. If the assertion that research and practice are parallel processes is accepted, then nursing practice may be considered "invisible mixed methods research," in that almost every encounter between a nurse and a patient involves collection and integration of qualitative (word) and quantitative (number) information that actually is single-case mixed methods research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program to reduce multiple psychiatric symptoms of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Ton J E M; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; van der Lee, Jacqueline; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Ribbe, Miel W

    2011-06-01

    To test the effectiveness of an integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program (integrative reactivation and rehabilitation [IRR]) to reduce multiple neuropsychiatry symptoms (MNPS) of cognitively impaired patients and caregiver burden (CB). Randomized controlled trial. Psychiatric-skilled nursing home (IRR) and usual care (UC), consisting of different types of nursing home care at home or in an institution. N = 168 (81 IRR and 87 UC). Patients had to meet classification of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition for dementia, amnestic disorders, or other cognitive disorders. Further inclusion criteria: Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) ≥3; Mini-Mental State Examination ≥18 and ≤27; and Barthel Index (BI) ≥5 and ≤19. IRR consisted of a person-oriented integrative psychotherapeutic nursing home program to reduce MNPS of the patient and CB. UC consisted of different types of nursing home care at home or in an institution, mostly emotion oriented. Primary outcome variable was MNPS (number and sum-severity of NPI). Furthermore, burden and competence of caregiver were also measured. T1 (inclusion), T2 (end of treatment), T3 (after 6 months of follow-up). Cohen's d (Cd) was calculated for mean differences (intention to treat). For confounding, repeated measurement modeling (random regression modeling [RRM]) was applied. In the short term from the perspective of the caregiver, IRR showed up to 34% surplus effects on MNPS of the patients; NPI symptoms: 1.31 lower (Cd, -0.53); and NPI sum- severity: 11.16 lower (Cd, -0.53). In follow-up, the effects were sustained. However, from the perspective of the nursing team, these effects were insignificant, although the trend was in the same direction and correlated significantly with the caregiver results over time (at T3: r = 0.48). In addition, IRR showed surplus effects (up to 36%) on burden and competence of caregiver: NPI emotional distress: 3.78 (Cd, -0.44); CB: 17.69 (Cd, -0

  13. Nurses' experiences of participation in a research and development programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kirsten Pryds; Bäck-Pettersson, Siv; Kýlén, Sven

    2013-01-01

    To describe clinical nurses' experience of participating in a Research and Development (R&D) programme and its influence on their research interest and ability to conduct and apply nursing research......To describe clinical nurses' experience of participating in a Research and Development (R&D) programme and its influence on their research interest and ability to conduct and apply nursing research...

  14. Psychiatric genetic research at the National Institute of Mental Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, K.; Mullican, C.; Maestri, N. [NIMH/NIH, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-15

    For some time it has been known through the results of family, twin, and adoption studies that hereditary appears to play a significant casual role in many mental disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other mood disorders, Alzheimer`s Disease, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism, dyslexia, and Tourette`s syndrome. The precise patterns of inheritance of these complex disorders have not been determined, nor have the relevant genes been localized or cloned. Because the genetics are complex and because there is also clearly an environmental contribution to behavior, we expect the analysis of the genetics of mental illness to be arduous and not quickly resolved. There are several compelling reasons to continue to focus our attention on uncovering the genetic factors for severe mental illness. Prominent among these are the implications for better treatment of mental disorders. The National Institute of Mental Health supports a wide range of studies on psychiatric genetic research. 16 refs.

  15. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  16. The Nephrology Clinical Research Nurse Role: Potential Role Conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklos, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research nursing is becoming more visible to nephrology professionals. As more nephrology practices and units are participating in clinical trials, clinical research nursing is gaining interest as a career niche among nephrology nurses. This unique specialty requires that nephrology clinical nurse nurses (CRNs) reconcile the roles of nurse as caregiver and nurse as researcher, which may result in a role conflict. Nephrology nurses should be aware that they may experience this role conflict when transitioning from patient care to a position as a clinical research nurse. These nurses can rely on the American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics for Nurses and the Oncology Nursing Society's Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse Competencies to help reconcile the potential role conflict.

  17. Critical discourse analysis for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer L

    2007-03-01

    Critical discourse analysis is a useful and productive qualitative methodology but has been underutilized within nursing research. In order to redress this deficiency the research presented in this article represents an exploration of the way in which critical discourse analysis may be applied to the analysis of public debates around policy for nursing practice. In this article the author discusses the history of the application of critical discourse analysis and provides an example of its application to the debate around the use of nurse practitioners within the Australian healthcare system.

  18. An Analysis of Canadian Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing through the Junctures of History, Gender, Nursing Education, and Quality of Work Life in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A society that values mental health and helps people live enjoyable and meaningful lives is a clear aspiration echoed throughout our Canadian health care system. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has put forth a framework for a mental health strategy with goals that reflect the virtue of optimal mental health for all Canadians (Mental Health Commission Canada, 2009). Canadian nurses, the largest group of health care workers, have a vital role in achieving these goals. In Canada, two-thirds of those who experience mental health problems do not receive mental health services (Statistics Canada, 2003). Through a gendered, critical, and sociological perspective the goal of this paper is to further understand how the past has shaped the present state of psychiatric mental health nursing (PMHN). This integrative literature review offers a depiction of Canadian PMHN in light of the intersections of history, gender, education, and quality of nursing work life. Fourteen articles were selected, which provide a partial reflection of contemporary Canadian PMHN. Findings include the association between gender and professional status, inconsistencies in psychiatric nursing education, and the limitations for Canadian nurse practitioners to advance the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner. PMID:23710367

  19. An Analysis of Canadian Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing through the Junctures of History, Gender, Nursing Education, and Quality of Work Life in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary; Khanlou, Nazilla

    2013-01-01

    A society that values mental health and helps people live enjoyable and meaningful lives is a clear aspiration echoed throughout our Canadian health care system. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has put forth a framework for a mental health strategy with goals that reflect the virtue of optimal mental health for all Canadians (Mental Health Commission Canada, 2009). Canadian nurses, the largest group of health care workers, have a vital role in achieving these goals. In Canada, two-thirds of those who experience mental health problems do not receive mental health services (Statistics Canada, 2003). Through a gendered, critical, and sociological perspective the goal of this paper is to further understand how the past has shaped the present state of psychiatric mental health nursing (PMHN). This integrative literature review offers a depiction of Canadian PMHN in light of the intersections of history, gender, education, and quality of nursing work life. Fourteen articles were selected, which provide a partial reflection of contemporary Canadian PMHN. Findings include the association between gender and professional status, inconsistencies in psychiatric nursing education, and the limitations for Canadian nurse practitioners to advance the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner.

  20. Qualitative study on the placement of Huntington disease patients in a psychiatric hospital: perceptions of Maltese nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Josianne; Cassar, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with adult or juvenile Huntington disease can be cared for within psychiatric hospitals. In this paper, nurses' perceptions about the appropriateness of a psychiatric setting for these patients were explored. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 Maltese nurses involved in the care of these individuals. Their responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified from this study: (i) Huntington disease is not a mental illness; (ii) the lack of specialized staff and equipment within a psychiatric setting; and (iii) a need for alternative care options. The findings provide an insight into the perceptions of nurses, as they play a key role in the care and management of individuals with Huntington disease in a psychiatric setting. The findings demonstrated the need to provide alternative residential options in the community, and to improve the care and support provided both within psychiatric hospitals and the community through staff education and the provision of necessary facilities and equipment. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Why nursing research in tobacco control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Linda; Bialous, Stella Aguinaga

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco use is an epidemic of overwhelming proportions affecting survival, causing millions of deaths every year, causing untold human suffering worldwide, and contributing to escalating health care costs. Nursing research is vital to advancing knowledge in the field and to the translation of science to evidence-based practice. As the largest group of health care professionals (17 million worldwide), nurses have the capacity for an enormous impact on this leading cause of preventable death. This chapter thus provides a historical overview of the tobacco epidemic, health risks of smoking and benefits of quitting, nicotine addiction, and recommendations of evidence-based tobacco dependence treatment as a backdrop for understanding the importance and need for nursing scholarship. Also examined are nursing science efforts and leadership in removing two barriers to mounting programs of nursing research in tobacco control: (1) lack of nursing education and training in tobacco control, and (2) limited research funding and mentorship. The chapter also addresses the issue of smoking in the profession as it impacts nurses' health, clinical practice, and, potentially, scholarship efforts.

  2. Stress and job satisfaction among social workers, community nurses and community psychiatric nurses: implications for the care management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry-Jones, Beth; Grant, Gordon; McGrath, Morag; Caldock, Kerry; Ramcharan, Paul; Robinson, Catherine A.

    1998-07-01

    The introduction in April 1993 of new arrangements for assessment and care management following the NHS and Community Care Act 1990 (Department of Health 1990a) heralded a period of major transition for front-line workers in the health and social services. Policy expectations for the development of the purchaser/provider split and the 'new managerialism' have posed unprecedented ideological, organizational and professional challenges. Two years after the full implementation of the reforms a postal survey of the experiences of care managers about policy and practice changes was undertaken in Wales. This paper focuses on the stresses and satisfactions of care management practice among three distinct groups of front-line workers: social workers, community nurses and community psychiatric nurses. The results of multiple regression analyses, corroborated by qualitative data, implicate an increased workload in general and administrative work in particular, combined with reduced opportunities for client contact, as the main sources of stress. Being able to control or shape those factors impinging on the experience of stress and job satisfaction appears to lie at the heart of the dilemma. Practice and policy implications are considered.

  3. Balancing technology with face-to-face interaction: navigating the path to psychiatric nursing education at a distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton-Deutsch, Sara; McNelis, Angela M; Day, Pamela O'Haver

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, we created a program that incorporated pedagogical approaches to support distance education for graduate psychiatric mental health nursing students in Indiana and adjacent states. This narrative provides a brief description of the five initiatives we originally proposed, our experiences with them, and future plans as our program continues to evolve.

  4. The place of words and numbers in psychiatric research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been widespread debate in the human and social sciences regarding the compatibility and the relative merits of quantitative and qualitative approaches in research. In psychiatry, depending on disciplines and traditions, objects of study can be represented either in words or using two types of mathematization. In the latter case, the use of mathematics in psychiatry is most often only local, as opposed to global as in the case of classical mechanics. Relationships between these objects of study can in turn be explored in three different ways: 1/ by a hermeneutic process, 2/ using statistics, the most frequent method in psychiatric research today, 3/ using equations, i.e. using mathematical relationships that are formal and deterministic. The 3 ways of representing entities (with language, locally with mathematics or globally with mathematics) and the 3 ways of expressing the relationships between entities (using hermeneutics, statistics or equations) can be combined in a cross-tabulation, and nearly all nine combinations can be described using examples. A typology of this nature may be useful in assessing which epistemological perspectives are currently dominant in a constantly evolving field such as psychiatry, and which other perspectives still need to be developed. It also contributes to undermining the overly simplistic and counterproductive beliefs that accompany the assumption of a Manichean “quantitative/qualitative” dichotomy. Systematic examination of this set of typologies could be useful in indicating new directions for future research beyond the quantitative/qualitative divide. PMID:24246064

  5. Comparing the Obvious: Interactional characteristics of staff in acute mental health nursing and forensic psychiatric nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bradley, Stephen K.; Hounsgaard, Lise

    2013-01-01

    interviews. Findings show that both acute and forensic mental health nursing practice is characterized by two overriding themes; ‘trust and relationship-enabling care’ and ‘behavior and perception-corrective care.’ The comparison of the two studies shows no major differences in the characteristics of staff......This article reports on and compares two separate studies of the interactional characteristics of forensic mental health staff and acute mental health staff as they interact with inpatients, respectively. Both studies were conducted using participant observation, along with informal and formal...

  6. What is cyberbullying & how can psychiatric-mental health nurses recognize it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan G; Godfrey, Alice J

    2011-10-01

    Cyberbullying is an emerging issue within our society, particularly among adolescents. The phenomenon is similar to traditional bullying in that it is hurtful, repetitive behavior involving a power imbalance, often causing psychosocial issues. With the availability of cell phones, Internet, and video gaming systems, adolescents are constantly plugged into technology and therefore at risk of being a victim or a perpetrator of cyberbullying. Both physical and mental health problems can result from cyberbullying, which, in turn, can affect an adolescent's performance in school and other crucial areas of life. Legal action is an option, but many times the law is not clear. Psychiatric-mental health nurses are in a position to help educate children about resources to prevent or cope with cyberbullying in a way that will help not only the patients themselves but also parents, teachers, school administrators, and the community. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. TOPIC: CLINICAL NURSING RESEARCH: A TOOL FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MRS. AKPABIO

    Good Clinical Practice guidelines. SM 13: Collecting data on research participants, based on study endpoints. SM 14: Facilitating scheduling and coordination of study procedures. SM 15: Providing nursing expertise to the research team during study development and implementation. SM 16: Protecting research participants ...

  8. Teaching Research Synthesis to Advanced Practice Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Sandra; Brosnan, Christine A.; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2002-01-01

    A process for teaching research synthesis to advanced practice nurses includes two courses: a first research applications course in which students build bibliographic databases, practice statistical analysis, and develop search skills; and a second course in which they complete literature reviews or meta analyses of research on clinical practice…

  9. Oral hygiene and oral flora evaluation in psychiatric patients in nursing homes in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, A Z; Yanik, K; Celenk, P; Unal-Erzurumlu, Z; Yilmaz, H; Bulut, N

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization has stated that psychiatric patients are a group of people who have oral and dental illnesses. The aims of this study were to document the oral hygiene of individuals with chronic psychiatric illness, to determine the extraoral and intraoral findings, to detect the dominant microorganisms in oral flora, and to inform clinicians of these findings. The study included 100 patients (69 men and 31 women) with different psychiatric illnesses living in a nursing home. They were 19-96 years old (median, 48 years). The participants completed a questionnaire about patients' oral health. They underwent extraoral and intraoral examinations. Two swab samples were obtained from the oral mucosa of these patients. Gram preparations were analyzed for leukocytes, bacteria, and yeast. Chi-square test and z-test were used. All patients (100%) had the necessary equipment for oral hygiene; however, many (43%) patients had poor oral hygiene. There was a high prevalence of xerostomia (56%) and fissured tongue (61.4%) (among other tongue anomalies). The most commonly isolated microorganisms were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus0 (35.9%), Streptococcus spp. (30.3%), nondiphtheroid Bacilli (16.9%), Staphylococcus aureus (2.3%), Candida spp. (11.8%), and Gram-negative Bacilli (2.8%). The oral hygiene of most patients was insufficient. The presence of Gram-negative Bacilli growth in the oral flora can be explained by poor hand hygiene. These findings suggest that it is useful to educate individuals about oral hygiene and hand hygiene and to inform the staff and families about this issue.

  10. Geriatric Hospital Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Research Utilization and Empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hyunwook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of nursing care in geriatric hospitals has been of concern. Nurses need to provide evidence-based nursing using best available research findings in order to maximize the quality of care. Research utilization is a major part of evidence-based nursing practice. Empowerment is an important factor that may influence the context of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers to research utilization in nursing practice and its relationship to empowe...

  11. The meaning of hope in nursing research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Kristianna; Mogensen, Ole; Hall, Elisabeth O C

    2009-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2009 The meaning of hope in nursing research: a meta-synthesisThe aim of this study was to develop a meta-synthesis of nursing research about hope as perceived by people during sickness and by healthy people. A meta-synthesis does not intend to cover all studies about hope....... Data were 15 qualitative studies published in nursing or allied health journals and conducted in USA, Great Britain, Canada, Australia, Norway, Sweden and Finland. The meta-synthesis resulted in six metaphors that illustrate dimensions of hope. These metaphors permeated the experiences of hope...... as weathering a storm. Knowing the multidimensionality of hope and what hope means from the patient's perspective might help nurses and other healthcare professionals to inspire hope as Florence Nightingale did when she walked with the lamp through the dark corridors and spread hope and light to the patients...

  12. Translating research findings to clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Fry, Margaret; Shaban, Ramon Z; Considine, Julie

    2017-03-01

    To describe the importance of, and methods for, successfully conducting and translating research into clinical practice. There is universal acknowledgement that the clinical care provided to individuals should be informed on the best available evidence. Knowledge and evidence derived from robust scholarly methods should drive our clinical practice, decisions and change to improve the way we deliver care. Translating research evidence to clinical practice is essential to safe, transparent, effective and efficient healthcare provision and meeting the expectations of patients, families and society. Despite its importance, translating research into clinical practice is challenging. There are more nurses in the frontline of health care than any other healthcare profession. As such, nurse-led research is increasingly recognised as a critical pathway to practical and effective ways of improving patient outcomes. However, there are well-established barriers to the conduct and translation of research evidence into practice. This clinical practice discussion paper interprets the knowledge translation literature for clinicians interested in translating research into practice. This paper is informed by the scientific literature around knowledge translation, implementation science and clinician behaviour change, and presented from the nurse clinician perspective. We provide practical, evidence-informed suggestions to overcome the barriers and facilitate enablers of knowledge translation. Examples of nurse-led research incorporating the principles of knowledge translation in their study design that have resulted in improvements in patient outcomes are presented in conjunction with supporting evidence. Translation should be considered in research design, including the end users and an evaluation of the research implementation. The success of research implementation in health care is dependent on clinician/consumer behaviour change and it is critical that implementation strategy

  13. Applying social impact assessment to nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Taylor, Julie

    2014-08-05

    Many nurses need to construct a research proposal at some stage of their career and there are multiple texts that provide guidance on doing so. However, most texts do not provide explicit guidance on the issue of social impact--the effect of research on the social health and wellbeing of individuals, families and communities and on the improved performance of relevant services. This article proposes that social impact should be considered from the beginning of a research project. It outlines a framework for assessing social impact to help strengthen the quality of research proposals and assist nurses constructing the proposal and also those evaluating it, including academic assessors or funding body reviewers. Nursing research should be useful and should have a positive effect on practice. Focusing on social impact can increase the chances of this desirable outcome.

  14. Interdisciplinarity and nursing research: opportunities and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Carnevale,Franco A.

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary collaboration is widely recognized and considered essential for optimizing the development of knowledge and practice. However, interdisciplinarity is commonly accepted as an unquestioned good; rarely examined as both a source of benefit as well as difficulty for nursing and other disciplines. The aim of this article is to critically examine the opportunities and challenges that interdisciplinarity can provide for research in nursing and other disciplines. Based on a North Am...

  15. Partnership, Trust and Leadership among Nursing Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Margareth S; Edwards, Susanne; Salami, Bukola; Osino, Eunice; Yu, Lina; Babalola, Oluwafunmbi; Cooper, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Members of a nursing research cluster realized that they needed to determine whether, given their diverse philosophies, they could formulate a collective research agenda responding to an administrative recommendation. The cluster's leaders conducted an appraisal of the role and importance of trust as an element for promoting collaboration in a nursing research cluster and for building a collective social identity. The Social Exchange Theory framed the appraisal. A survey and a facilitation session about trust in research partnerships were conducted with eight female nursing researchers/faculty. Facilitation day's discussion was fully audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and the content coded using ATLAS.ti 6. Thematic analysis was employed to analyze the qualitative aspects of the recorded discussion and the survey questionnaire explanatory responses. Responses to survey closed-questions were compiled as descriptive statistics. Participants revealed that mutual support, valuing each other and working collaboratively facilitated trust in intellectual partnership. Hindering factors were an environment suppressing expression of ideas and views, lack of open dialogue and decision-making among team members and lack of a sense of belonging. This paper has the potential to contribute to the knowledge of nursing leaders who are intending to develop and sustain nursing research teams in both academic and non-academic organizations. The paper will be especially useful as they deal with issues of trust in intellectual partnership in diverse settings.

  16. Development of psychiatric risk evaluation checklist and routine for nurses in a general hospital: ethnographic qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Lourenço Simões Camargo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE:There is high prevalence of mental and behavioral disorders in general hospitals, thus triggering psychiatric risk situations. This study aimed to develop a psychiatric risk assessment checklist and routine for nurses, the Psychiatric Risk Evaluation Check-List (PRE-CL, as an alternative model for early identification and management of these situations in general hospitals.DESIGN AND SETTING:Ethnographic qualitative study in a tertiary-level private hospital.METHOD:Three hundred general-unit nurses participated in the study. Reports were gathered through open groups conducted by a trained nurse, at shift changes for two months. The questions used were: "Would you consider it helpful to discuss daily practice situations with a psychiatrist? Which situations?" The data were qualitatively analyzed through an ethnographic approach.RESULTS:The nurses considered it useful to discuss daily practice situations relating to mental and behavioral disorders with a psychiatrist. Their reports were used to develop PRE-CL, within the patient overall risk assessment routine for all inpatients within 24 hours after admission and every 48 hours thereafter. Whenever one item was present, the psychosomatic medicine team was notified. They went to the unit, gathered data from the nurses, patient files and, if necessary, attending doctors, and decided on the risk management: guidance, safety measures or mental health consultation.CONCLUSION:It is possible to develop a model for detecting and intervening in psychiatric and behavioral disorders at general hospitals based on nursing team observations, through a checklist that takes these observations into account and a routine inserted into daily practice.

  17. Eradicating Barriers to Mental Health Care Through Integrated Service Models: Contemporary Perspectives for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Horace; Alexander, Vinette

    2016-06-01

    There has been renewed, global interest in developing new and transformative models of facilitating access to high-quality, cost-effective, and individually-centered health care for severe mentally-ill (SMI) persons of diverse racial/ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. However, in our present-day health-service delivery systems, scholars have identified layers of barriers to widespread dispersal of well-needed mental health care both nationally and internationally. It is crucial that contemporary models directed at eradicating barriers to mental health services are interdisciplinary in context, design, scope, sequence, and best-practice standards. Contextually, nurses are well-positioned to influence the incorporation and integration of new concepts into operationally interdisciplinary, evidence-based care models with measurable outcomes. The aim of this concept paper is to use the available evidence to contextually explicate how the blended roles of psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing can be influential in eradicating barriers to care and services for SMI persons through the integrated principles of collaboration, integration and service expansion across health, socioeconomic, and community systems. A large body of literature proposes that any best-practice standards aimed at eliminating barriers to the health care needs of SMI persons require systematic, well-coordinated interdisciplinary partnerships through evidence-based, high-quality, person-centered, and outcome-driven processes. Transforming the conceptual models of collaboration, integration and service expansion could be revolutionary in how care and services are coordinated and dispersed to populations across disadvantaged communities. Building on their longstanding commitment to individual and community care approaches, and their pivotal roles in research, education, leadership, practice, and legislative processes; PMH nurses are well-positioned to be both influential and instrumental in

  18. Nursing researchers' modifications of Ricoeur's hermeneutic phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singsuriya, Pagorn

    2015-12-01

    Paul Ricoeur's hermeneutic phenomenology has proved to be very helpful in guiding nursing researchers' qualitative analysis of interview transcripts. Modifying Ricoeur's philosophy, a number of nursing researchers have developed their own interpretive methods and shared them, along with their experience, with research community. Major contributors who published papers directly presenting their modifications of Ricoeur's theory include Rene Geanellos (2000), Lena Wiklund, Lisbet Lindholm and Unni Å. Lindström (2002), Anders Lindseth and Astrid Norberg (2004) and Pia Sander Dreyer and Birthe D Pedersen (2009). The aim of this article was to delineate differences among these methods. Descriptive presentation of each method side by side makes clear the differences among them. In addition, Ricoeur's hermeneutic theory is portrayed and compared with the modifications. It is believed that differences that are found can stimulate further thoughts on how to apply Ricoeur's theory in qualitative research in nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The challenge of the medical setting for the clinical specialist in psychiatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, B

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of sharing these ideas about the role of the psychiatric clinical specialist in the medical setting has been threefold: first, to stimulate the interest of others by communicating the needs for and the value of such a role in improving health care; secondly, to convey the variety of potential opportunities available in the role; and third, to share some ideas about specific activities which can be pursued in such a role. The clinical specialist who chooses to work in the medical setting will discover opportunities to develop creativeness, to explore innovative ideas, and to utilize the variety of one's personal resources and past learning experiences. It affords one with opportunities to serve as a change agent, to influence the quality of patient care, and to stimulate the growth of other nurses. It allows for on-going contact and exchange with other professional groups comprising the health care team, and finally, it provides the nurses with a high level of autonomy and challenge in defining their own roles.

  20. Determining nursing research priorities according to viewpoints of nurses in Bushehr City using Delphi technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Yazdankhah fard

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, determining research priorities is one of the strategic approaches for research planning. Since there is no clear research policy in nursing in Iran, the present study was designed to find research priorities for nursing. Methods: In this descriptive-analytic study, the nurses in academic and clinical settings of Bushehr city participated and responded to a questionnaire in two round Delphi survey (208 persons in the first round and 174 persons in the second round. The questionnaire contained a list of research topics to be prioritized according to 9 criteria (importance of the topic, their role in changing health status of the society, availability of data, change in nursing profession, potentiality to collaborate with other research centers, focus on social needs, protective principles and instructions, economical justification, possibility of applying achieved results. Its scoring scale was based on three options (high, good, low and an open question. Results: The research topics which received the highest ranking scores were: 1 Nursing and education, 2 Nursing and client education, 3 Nursing status in health system, 4 Nursing and medication therapy, 5 Nursing management and quality promotion, 6 Nursing and care, 7 Nursing and crisis (disasters, 8 Nursing and research, 9 occupational hazards, 10 Role of nurse in society health promotion. Conclusion: Delphi technique is a useful method for determining nursing research priorities. Through this method, topics related to nursing education and nursing status in health system were found to be of the highest level of priority in nursing.

  1. International survey of nursing home research priorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morley, J.E.; Caplan, G.; Cesari, M.; Dong, B.; Flaherty, J.H.; Grossberg, G.T.; Holmerova, I.; Katz, P.R.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Little, M.O.; Martin, F.; Orrell, M.; Ouslander, J.; Rantz, M.; Resnick, B.; Rolland, Y.; Tolson, D.; Woo, J.; Vellas, B.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a policy survey designed to establish research priorities to inform future research strategy and advance nursing home practice. The survey was administered in 2 rounds during 2013, and involved a combination of open questions and ranking exercises to move toward

  2. Psychiatric treatment and research unit for adolescent intensive care: the first adolescent forensic psychiatric service in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahila, K; Kilkku, N; Kaltiala-Heino, R

    2004-04-01

    Finland does not have a history of providing forensic adolescent psychiatric units although the need for this kind of service has been established. According to legislation patients who are minors have to be treated separately from adults, however, this has not been possible in practice. Also, adolescent psychiatric wards have not always been able to admit the most severely ill patients, those with impulsive and aggressive behaviours, because of lack of staff resources, problems associated with protecting other vulnerable patients and a shortage of secure environments. A previous report demonstrated the significant increase in adolescent's involuntary treatment within adult psychiatric wards. Data from this report were acknowledged as an important starting point in the planning process for the psychiatric treatment and research unit for adolescent intensive care. This paper describes the background, development process, plan of action, tailor-made education programme and supporting evidence for the first Finnish adolescent forensic service opened in April 2003 in the Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital. The tool used for planning the unit's activities and staff education programme was the Balanced Score Card approach, the structure and development of which is also outlined within the paper.

  3. Focus groups in nursing research: methodological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekara, Rasika S

    2012-01-01

    Focus groups have been increasingly used as a data collection method in nursing research. The key feature of focus groups is the active interaction among participants to explore their views and opinions. In this respect, focus groups are distinct from other methods such as Delphi groups, nominal groups, brainstorming, and consensus panels, which seek to determine a consensus between participants. Compared with other data collection methods, it can be concluded that the real strength of focus groups is not simply in exploring what participants have to say, but in providing insights into the sources of complex behaviors and motivations. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of the focus group as a research tool in nursing research, particularly in nursing education. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Twitter, Millennials, and Nursing Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Teresa M; Gunther, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the use of Twitter as an intervention delivery method in a multisite experimental nursing research study. A form of social networking, Twitter is considered a useful means of communication, particularly with millennials. This method was chosen based on current literature exploring the characteristics of millennial students. Ahern's Model of Adolescent Resilience served as the theoretical framework. Participants were 70 junior-level baccalaureate nursing students, ages 19-23, at two state-supported universities. Twitter was found to be a convenient, cost-effective, and enjoyable means of intervention delivery for the researcher. Participants in the experimental and control groups expressed positive feelings about the use of Twitter. The findings contribute to future efforts to use social media in nursing research and education to increase faculty-student engagement, promote critical reflection, provide social support, reinforce course content, and increase the sense of community.

  5. A nursing workforce program to advance knowledge and skills for nurses implementing cancer clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samborski, Cindy; Neimanis, Debbie; Paquette, Anne D; Hernandez, Lise; Klaes, Kathleen; Rudnicki, Karen

    2014-02-01

    Clinical nursing research is an emerging subspecialty that enhances nursing expertise. In an effort to provide a basic educational curriculum on cancer research and clinical trials, a major academic cancer center launched a novel program titled Clinical Research Nursing Grand Rounds that allowed nurses to receive continuing education units. The purpose of the current article is to describe the development and content of the education model, challenges encountered, and implications for oncology nursing education, practice, and research.

  6. Perceived Stress among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric Inpatient Care: The Influence of Perceptions of the Ward Atmosphere and the Psychosocial Work Environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Eklund, Mona; Wann-Hansson, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate (1) perceived stress as felt by the nursing staff working in psychiatric inpatient care, (2) possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants, and (3) associations among individual characteristics, the ward atmosphere, the psychosocial work environment, and perceived stress. Ninety-three members of the nursing staff completed three instruments-one each measuring perceived stress, the ward atmosphere, and the psychosocial work environment. The...

  7. Case Study Research Methodology in Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-11-01

    Through data collection methods using a holistic approach that focuses on variables in a natural setting, qualitative research methods seek to understand participants' perceptions and interpretations. Common qualitative research methods include ethnography, phenomenology, grounded theory, and historic research. Another type of methodology that has a similar qualitative approach is case study research, which seeks to understand a phenomenon or case from multiple perspectives within a given real-world context.

  8. Nurse researchers in corrections: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferszt, Ginette G; Hickey, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    The United States has more people, per capita, in prisons and jails than any other country in the world. Because the prison population is largely composed of people who have been economically and socially disadvantaged, a very high percentage enter correctional facilities in poor health. Because of the large concentrated numbers of women, men, and youth in prisons and jails, an exceptional opportunity exists for nurses and other researchers to conduct creative and innovative research to improve the health care of this hard-to-reach population. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurse researchers who have been successful in conducting studies in different correctional settings. A qualitative descriptive design was used, and telephone interviews with 16 participants were completed. The participants described how they established credibility, the challenges they faced, and the unexpected personal and professional rewards they received. Recommendations for potential researchers will hopefully lead to an increase in research with this invisible population.

  9. State of the World in Nursing Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    world based on the data available per continent and region. When scientific research output in the form .... prove access to treatment through telemedicine, and provide access to continuous education programmes ..... Nursing Management, 20(5), 685-95. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-. 2834.2011.01350.x. MacGregor, K. (2013).

  10. Nursing intuition: can it be researched?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, C

    Drawing on the work of Gilligan (1982) and Heidegger (1962), this article explores the topic of intuition. It examines whether nursing intuition can be researched, if it is possible to develop a language of intuition, and if it is related to 'hands-on' experience.

  11. Awareness and attitudes of Turkish nursing students towards research and development in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerçek, Emine; Okursoy, Algın; Dal, Nursel Alp

    2016-11-01

    The research course in nursing is included in almost all nursing curricula in national and international scales. To compare awareness and attitudes of Turkish nursing students towards research and development in nursing. This study had descriptive and cross-sectional research design. The research sampling is consisted of 390 senior students studying during the 2013-2014 academic year in six schools of health in six different geographical regions in Turkey. The Personal Identification Form and Nursing Students' Attitudes to and Awareness of Research and Development within Nursing Scale were utilized in data collection. It was determined that there is difference between awareness and attitude scores of nursing students from six different schools towards research and development in nursing according to their schools and background. It can be suggested that initiatives to increase awareness of students at nursing schools towards research course must be planned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Characteristics of quantitative nursing research from 1990 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarcheski, Adela; Mahon, Noreen E

    2013-12-01

    To assess author credentials of quantitative research in nursing, the composition of the research teams, and the disciplinary focus of the theories tested. Nursing Research, Western Journal of Nursing Research, and Journal of Advanced Nursing were selected for this descriptive study; 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010 were included. The final sample consisted of 484 quantitative research articles. From 1990 to 2010, there was an increase in first authors holding doctoral degrees, research from other countries, and funding. Solo authorship decreased; multi-authorship and multidisciplinary teams increased. Theories tested were mostly from psychology; the testing of nursing theory was modest. Multidisciplinary research far outdistanced interdisciplinary research. Quantitative nursing research can be characterized as multidisciplinary (distinct theories from different disciplines) rather than discipline-specific to nursing. Interdisciplinary (theories synthesized from different disciplines) research has been conducted minimally. This study provides information about the growth of the scientific knowledge base of nursing, which has implications for practice. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Child and adolescent psychiatric nursing and the 'plastic man': reflections on the implementation of change drawing insights from Lewin's theory of planned change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, Denise; Cashin, Andrew; Fowler, Cathrine

    2012-06-01

    Child and adolescent psychiatric nursing (CAPN) as a discipline has been remarkably slow in the uptake of high fidelity human patient simulation (HFHPS) as an education tool. Assuming HFHPS has potential use, and the issue is one of change management, this paper speculates about how Lewin's paradigm for Planned Change might provide guidance to the specialty discipline of CAPN in development of strategies to promote adoption of HFHPS to education of pre-registration nurses. Kurt Lewin (1890-1947) was a seminal theorist of change, whose pioneering work has had significant impact across many disciplines. His theory of Planned Change has four components - field theory, group dynamics, action research and the three-step model of change. Each component is considered briefly and then combined within an example of application.

  14. Supporting institution-to-community transitions for people with psychiatric disabilities: Findings and implications from a participatory action research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gossett Zakrajsek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite preference for community-based living, large numbers of people with psychiatric disabilities live in nursing homes throughout the US. Community-based services for this population are limited by public policy and service system barriers. This paper summarizes these barriers and presents the second phase of a participatory action research project jointly developed by university-based researchers and two Centers for Independent Living. A qualitative case study methodology was used to understand the experiences of three individuals with psychiatric disabilities reintegrating into the community from nursing homes. Findings revealed themes of social isolation, participation in virtual communities, variability of impairment experiences and unmet needs for community supports. In addition to thematic findings, action products were generated for the benefit of community partners. These products included national best practice resources and a needs assessment survey tool. Study findings and products point to specific systems change and policy recommendations to better support community reintegration for this population. These recommendations are discussed in light of U.S. healthcare reform and broader disability advocacy efforts.

  15. [The Mechanism of Free-Floating Discussion in a Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing Supervisory Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2015-06-01

    Although the free-floating discussion format is widely used in group therapy, the application of this format in the context of supervisory groups has yet to be clarified. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanisms involved in facilitating and learning the free-floating discussion format in a supervisory group. A phenomenological approach was used to investigate the group content and personal feedback of a psychiatric-nurse supervisory group. The group held on 12 sessions. Each session was conducted once weekly and lasting 150 minutes. The findings identified the functions of free-floating discussions in the context of supervisory groups as: embodied interaction and initiation by handling. Embodied interaction included: reflection on the experience of the other, sense of body, and present action. Initiation by handling included: facilitating the self-narrative, following the lead of the group, and reflecting in accordance with the group. The role of the facilitator is to parallel process rather than to lead in order to produce practical wisdom. Free-floating discussion and self-evidence from initiation by handling has the potential to promote spontaneity, creativity, and self-confidence in clinical practice and to promote deep learning.

  16. A challenge for community psychiatric nursing: is there a future in primary health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, B

    1997-10-01

    The growing debate surrounding the role of the community psychiatric nurse (CPN) in the United Kingdom is reviewed. Issues which have attracted significant interest and which form the focus of this paper are the prioritization of CPN services, CPN attachment to primary health care (PHC), and the effectiveness of clinical interventions. The requirement for CPNs is now to concentrate services on people experiencing severe and enduring mental health problems. Innovative and effective clinical and social interventions for this client group are beginning to disseminate into everyday CPN practice. Problem-solving family interventions, cognitive therapies and case management are three such examples. The past, present and possible future role for CPNs working in primary health care settings with people experiencing nonpsychotic mental health problems is a particular focus in this paper. Drawing on the relevant literature, central issues addressed are the process and outcome of CPN work with nonpsychotic service users, reasons for the growth of CPN involvement in PHC, and the overall expansion of interest in mental health interventions within the primary health care environment. The literature suggests that this expansion has been strategically unplanned, but that mental health need amongst primary health care service users is significant. The concluding contention of this paper is that a future role for CPNs in primary care does exist.

  17. [The Development of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing in Taiwan: Reflection From the Perspective of Recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Biau; Tsai, Sing-Ling

    2017-06-01

    Evidence-based nursing science has identified psychological recovery, partnership, and medication adherence as factors that have influenced the development of mental health care. This article discusses the process by which mental health care has developed from a medical / rehabilitation-focused model to a model that focuses on patient empowerment. The current model aims to assist patients to achieve self-awareness and to develop coping skills that enhance their motivation to transform. Medical advances have improved the control of psychiatric symptoms. Following the introduction of 2nd generation antipsychotics, patients were invited to establish decisions related to these prescription medications. Under the principles of patient-centered service, Taiwanese mental health professionals have changed their relationship with patients from a therapeutic model to a mutual-partnership model. Furthermore, investigations of the therapeutic care of patients with mental illness have used the needs of patients as their starting point and emphasized various aspects of patient and caregiver needs. Taiwanese mental health professionals are searching for a model of mental health care that is superior to the traditional operative framework of medical authority.

  18. The suitcase simulation: an effective and inexpensive psychiatric nursing teaching activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Joan C; Kane, Mary Frances; Pike, Mary Ellen

    2014-08-01

    A tabletop simulation was developed as a patient safety activity that involved checking in a patient admitted to a psychiatric care unit. Students were second-degree (n = 79) and traditional (n = 53) BSN students. They were given suitcases or backpacks containing various items, and following a fictional hospital policy, they had to decide whether to give the items to the patient, place them in a secured area, or send them to the pharmacy or security personnel. The activity was evaluated using the Simulation Effectiveness Tool (SET) and two open-ended questions. Students reported that they found the simulation to be enjoyable and a good learning experience. Checking in a patient's belongings is not an activity students typically perform, but the simulation can help prepare them for situations they will experience in the workplace. This inexpensive activity can easily be adapted for staff orientation and competencies. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(8), 39-44.]. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. From the front lines to the home front: a history of the development of psychiatric nursing in the U.S. during the World War II era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Christine M

    2008-07-01

    During World War II, psychiatric nurses learned valuable lessons on how to deal with the traumas of war. Using psychohistorical inquiry, this historian examined primary and secondary sources, beyond the facts and dates associated with historical events, to understand why and how psychiatric nurse pioneers developed therapeutic techniques to address the psychosocial and physical needs of combatants. Not only is the story told about the hardships endured as nurses ministered to soldiers, but their attitudes, beliefs, and emotions, that is, how they felt and what they thought about their circumstances, are explored. In this study the lived experiences of two psychiatric nurses, Votta and Peplau, are contrasted to explicate how knowledge development improved care and how this knowledge had an impact on the home front in nursing practice and education, as well as in mental institutions and society, long after the war was won.

  20. Minority International Research Training Program: Global Collaboration in Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElmurry, Beverly J.; Misner, Susan J.; Buseh, Aaron G.

    2003-01-01

    The Minority International Research Training Program pairs minority nursing students with faculty mentors at international sites for short-term research. A total of 26 undergraduate, 22 graduate, and 6 postdoctoral students have participated. Challenges include recruitment, orientation, and preparation of students; identification and preparation…

  1. Conducting international nursing research: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opollo, Jackline Gloria; Opollo, Diana Alaka; Gray, Jennifer; Spies, Lori

    2014-11-01

    To describe practical experiences before, during and after gaining entry into research fields in Kenya and Uganda. Planning, conducting and implementing international research can be an arduous task. Novice researchers need practical guides to accessing international fields and mitigating challenges met in the field. The researchers conducted three different studies in two developing nations. This paper reviews challenges encountered when conducting international research. Solutions used to overcome these challenges are discussed. Establishing and maintaining effective partnerships is critical to the success of international research efforts. Researchers must be tactful, flexible and creative when handling methodological, ethical and logistical challenges encountered in settings poor in resources. International research provides opportunities for increasing dedication, building cross-cultural competence and advancing health professional practice globally. This paper contributes to nursing scholarship by highlighting the practical challenges of conducting international research. Illustrations aimed at lending insight and encouraging others to expand their dedication to conducting international research are offered.

  2. [Personnel resources for psychiatric institutions. Needs assessment exemplified by the nursing profession in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhr, M; Sauter, D; Nienaber, A; Heuft, G; Ahrens, R; Oppermann, G; Heinz, A; Schulz, M

    2015-07-01

    resources needed for nursing personnel to provide guideline-based interventions; however, these represent only partial aspects of nursing activities. Further research and analytical methods are needed to calculate the currently needed personnel resources for all nursing activities and other professional groups involved in treatment in inpatient psychiatry.

  3. Paediatric oncology research nursing: improving the service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, Carol; Auld, Liz

    This article focuses on a paediatric oncology research nursing team, who highlighted potential gaps in their service provision because of the fact that both team members were part time. It discusses the processes undertaken once issues that were essential to maintain the smooth running of the service were highlighted. In today's climate of clinical governance, which facilitates the improvement and maintenance of high standards of patient care, nurses are required to demonstrate evidence of providing a high-quality service. By producing new documentation and consequently two standards, the oncology research team provided evidence of its endeavour to not only deliver a high level of care to children and families partaking in research studies, but also show written evidence of so doing. This evidence could be audited as a way of measuring service provision, to allow the team to make further developments and changes.

  4. The nursing professorial unit: translating acute and critical care nursing research

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Christensen; Judy Craft

    2017-01-01

    Background and context: Implementation of current research in practice is challenging for ward-based nursing staff. However, university-based nursing academics are seen as the research experts and are perhaps well placed to support clinical nursing research. The problem lies with the divide between practice and academia; universities often use the clinical environment as the place to conduct research but this is often not translated effectively into practice. The development of a nursing prof...

  5. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice: addressing a conceptual problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-05-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice. Nursing research culture should be valued for its contribution to improving patient care and should be considered as a routine hospital activity. However, the demand for efficiency, nurses' barriers to research use and the lack of definition of the concept of nursing research culture make it difficult to establish. Concept analysis. Data were collected through a literature review in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO during March 2016. Walker and Avant's eight-step framework for concept analysis. Five defining attributes of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice were identified: strong monodisciplinary nursing professionalism, academic thinking and socialization, research use as a part of daily nursing practice, acceptance by colleagues and management and facilitation of resources from management and organization. Although the method of concept analysis has been criticized and heavily debated, the development of nursing research cultures based on the defining attributes and antecedents of the concept will be important to emphasize evidence-based clinical nursing care. Further research should support the development and the implementation of nursing research culture in clinical nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Using evidence-integrated e-learning to enhance case management continuing education for psychiatric nurses: a randomised controlled trial with follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-I; Rong, Jiin-Ru; Liu, Chieh-Yu

    2014-11-01

    E-learning is a flexible strategy to improve nurses' knowledge of case management, but there are methodological limitations in previous research into the effectiveness of such programs. To describe the development and effectiveness of an evidence-integrated e-learning program in case management continuing education for Taiwanese psychiatric nurses. Multiple methods were adopted to develop the program and a randomised controlled trial with repeated measures was employed to evaluate it. The e-learning program was developed in four stages: (1) systematic review of literature; (2) needs assessment through a national survey and focus group; (3) development of learning materials; and (4) pilot test. Following program development, psychiatric nurses were recruited and randomly allocated into an experimental or comparison group. The experimental group participated in an e-learning continuing education program. The case management knowledge index with sufficient reliability and validity and a satisfaction survey were used to determine the outcomes. A generalised estimating equation was used to assess the difference between the 2 groups before, after, and at 3 months follow-up. The learning material comprised 5 simulated learning modules, self-assessment questions, learning cases, sharing experiences, and learning resources. A total of 200 participants completed the 3 measurements. Knowledge scores in the experimental group significantly exceeded those in the comparison group after the program and at the 3-month follow-up. Participants reported positive learning perceptions. The program provides an evidence-based educational resource for nursing continuing education in case management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Personality traits of nurses and organizational climate in relation to the use of coercion in psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Tomasz; Baranowski, Piotr

    2017-09-08

    The aim of this study was to analyze the personality traits of nurses and the organizational climate in psychiatric wards affecting the frequency of the use of coercion. The study applied a descriptive, longitudinal design based on a 1-year prospective observation. The best predictor for the initiation of coercion by nursing personnel was a low score on the Creative Personality Factor Scale in Adjective Check List and the low score in the area of Leadership in Kolb's Organizing Climate Questionnaire (KOQC). The best predictor for decisions to use coercion was the low score in the area Requirements in the KOQC, whereas the best predictors for the participation in coercion were a high value for Leadership area and a low value for Requirements area in KOQC. The nursing personnel should be given frequent practical and theoretical training regarding the use of coercion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Fusion of psychiatric and medical high fidelity patient simulation scenarios: effect on nursing student knowledge, retention of knowledge, and perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameg, Kirstyn M; Englert, Nadine Cozzo; Howard, Valerie M; Perozzi, Katherine J

    2013-12-01

    High fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) has become an increasingly popular teaching methodology in nursing education. To date, there have not been any published studies investigating HFPS scenarios incorporating medical and psychiatric nursing content. This study utilized a quasi-experimental design to assess if HFPS improved student knowledge and retention of knowledge utilizing three parallel 30-item Elsevier HESI(TM) Custom Exams. A convenience sample of 37 senior level nursing students participated in the study. The results of the study revealed the mean HESI test scores decreased following the simulation intervention although an analysis of variance (ANOVA) determined the difference was not statistically significant (p = .297). Although this study did not reveal improved student knowledge following the HFPS experiences, the findings did provide preliminary evidence that HFPS may improve knowledge in students who are identified as "at-risk." Additionally, students responded favorably to the simulations and viewed them as a positive learning experience.

  9. The relations between violence exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, secondary traumatization, vicarious post traumatic growth and illness attribution among psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerach, Gad; Shalev, Tal Ben-Itzchak

    2015-06-01

    This study examined posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSD), secondary traumatization (ST) and vicarious posttraumatic growth (VG) among Israeli psychiatric nurses (PN) who were compared to community nurses (CN). Furthermore, we examined the contribution of PN perceptions of the etiology of their patients' mental illness to their PTSD, ST and VG. Results show that PN reported higher levels of both PTSD and ST symptoms, but lower levels of VG, as compare to CN. While ST symptoms were positively related to VG among CN, PTSD and ST symptoms were negatively associated among PN. Finally, exposure to patients' violence, PTSD or ST symptoms, and illness attribution dimensions of 'powerful others', predicted nurses' VG. PN are an at-risk population for work-related stress residues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. "We Have to Be Satisfied with the Scraps": South African Nurses' Experiences of Care on Adult Psychiatric Intellectual Disability Inpatient Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capri, Charlotte; Buckle, Chanellé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migrating nursing labour inadvertently reinforces South Africa's care drain, contributes to a global care crisis and forces us to reconsider migration motivation. This paper highlights issues that complicate psychiatric intellectual disability nursing care and identifies loci for change in an attempt to redress this care challenge.…

  11. Perceived stress and coping strategies among Jordanian nursing students during clinical practice in psychiatric/mental health courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zayyat, Abdulkarim Subhi; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

    2014-08-01

    Clinical practice in the psychiatric/mental health nursing (PMHN) field is considered a highly-stressful experience for nursing students. The purpose of the present study was to identify the degrees of stress, the types of stressors, and coping strategies perceived by undergraduate nursing students during their clinical practice in PMHN courses. A descriptive, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five students registered in PMHN clinical courses were recruited from five Jordanian universities using a systematic random-sampling method. Data collection was conducted in the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year at two points of time: pre-PMHN clinical training and post-PMHN training. The Basic Information Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, and Coping Behavior Inventory were administered. Students' ages ranged from 20 to 25 years. The findings illustrate that the highest reported types of stressors at both data-collection times were taking care of patients, stress related to teachers and nursing staff, and from assignments and workloads. The most utilized coping strategy at both data-collection times was problem solving. The findings of the present study are useful for clinical educators in identifying nursing students' stressors, easing their learning in the clinical setting, and establishing an efficient PMHN course programme. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Using observational methods in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Jenny

    2015-07-08

    Observation is a research data-collection method used generally to capture the activities of participants as well as when and where things are happening in a given setting. It checks description of the phenomena against what the researcher perceives to be fact in a rich experiential context. The method's main strength is that it provides direct access to the social phenomena under consideration. It can be used quantitatively or qualitatively, depending on the research question. Challenges in using observation relate to adopting the role of participant or non-participant researcher as observer. This article discusses some of the complexities involved when nurse researchers seek to collect observational data on social processes in naturalistic settings using unstructured or structured observational methods in qualitative research methodology. A glossary of research terms is provided.

  13. Correlates of Stress and Coping among Jordanian Nursing Students during Clinical Practice in Psychiatric/Mental Health Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

    2016-10-01

    Training in psychiatric settings is stressful for nursing students. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations between the students' characteristics, their stress degrees, stressors and types of coping strategies they experience during training in psychiatric course. A descriptive, correlational, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five undergraduate nursing students were recruited randomly from five Jordanian universities. Self-report questionnaires were administered at the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. The findings showed that students who utilized avoidance or transference strategies reported high stress degrees. Moreover, the results showed that those students who were in the fourth year, with a low family income, who avoid extracurricular activities, with a low academic grade or who registered in other clinical course(s) reported high stress degrees. These findings present a worthy data for the clinical instructors that facilitate students training in psychiatric settings and promote their psychosocial well-being. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The 2014-2018 Oncology Nursing Society Research Agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Knobf, M Tish; Cooley, Mary E.; Duffy, Sonia; Doorenbos2, Ardith; Eaton, Linda; Given, Barbara; Mayer, Deborah K.; McCorkle, Ruth; Miaskowski, Christine; Mitchell, Sandra; Sherwood, Paula; Bender, Catherine; Cataldo, Janine; Hershey, Denise; Katapodi, Maria

    2015-01-01

    To identify priority areas of research for the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Research Agenda for 2014-2018, consistent with ONS's mission to promote excellence in oncology nursing and quality cancer care
.; Review of the literature, 2013 ONS Research Priorities Survey, National Institute of Nursing Research, and the National Cancer Institute research foci
.; Multimethod consensus-building approach by content leaders and content experts of the ONS Research Agenda Project Team
.; The 2014-2018...

  15. Information-Seeking, Research Utilization, and Barriers to Research Utilization of Pediatric Nurse Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Kathleen M.

    1995-01-01

    Responses from 52% of 409 pediatric nurse educators identified 3 top information sources for updating instruction: nursing journals, professional education activities, and texts. Level of research utilization measured by Nursing Practice Questionnaire-Education for eight nursing practices was the implementation stage. Those using nursing journals…

  16. Innovation in Nursing and Midwifery Education and Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nursing Research to Meet the Global Chal- lenges of Chronic Diseases. It is important for nurses to understand the major health challenges faced by individuals and popula- tions throughout the world in order to design and conduct nursing research studies that will adequate- ly address these global problems. Chronic ...

  17. State of the World in Nursing Research | Klopper | Rwanda Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to provide a global overview of the status of nursing research, showing the vast need for the increase in doctorally prepared nurses. There are several trends that influence nursing research, education, and practice and will continue to do so over the next decade. The paper discusses four of ...

  18. 2006 profile of postgraduate critical care nursing research in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. The aim of the study was to compile a profile of postgraduate critical care nursing research completed during 2006 in the nursing departments of South African universities, and to determine the extent to which this research contributes to the development of a unique body of specialist South African nursing knowledge.

  19. Nursing Research: Understanding Nursing Innovations for the Transformation of Communities of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Donna M.; Sullivan, Shelia Cox

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the potent impact of nursing research in shaping and implementing current healthcare trends. Further, the article provides contextual information relevant to the historical development of nursing science from Florence Nightingale forward while marking milestones of achievement in nursing research endeavors and subsequent…

  20. Internet research and ethics: transformative issues in nursing education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Pamela Young

    2014-01-01

    As practice in the educational and clinical settings seeks to be evidence based, faculty are increasingly required to conduct research and publish the results to advance the science of our profession. The purpose of this article is to discuss transformative research ethics because Internet use is an increasing component of current research studies. How nurse educators can engage in research-utilizing methodologies inclusive of technology while adhering to ethical standards developed before the advance of the Internet is reviewed. Recommendations are cited to address the new questions that arise at institutional review board meetings resulting from potential ethical implications of using students or research participants in cyber space. © 2014.

  1. The nurses' power to detain informal psychiatric patients: a review of the statutory and common law provisions in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, G D

    2000-10-01

    This paper explores the extent to which nurses can use statutory and common law provisions as lawful authority to detain informal psychiatric patients. The power of a nurse to detain informal psychiatric patients received statutory recognition for the first time in the Mental Health Act (1983). Section 5(4) of this Act, the 'Nurses Holding Power', provides for nurses of the 'prescribed class' to detain informal psychiatric patients for up to 6 hours. Further statutory authority that may be invoked with respect to the detention of patients is laid out in the Criminal Law Act (1967) and the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984). These statutes set out the circumstances whereby a nurse can use reasonable force to detain a patient. One of the most confusing areas in law is the extent to which common law powers can be used by nurses to detain or restrain informal psychiatric patients, including those who lack mental capacity. The detention of those patients who lack the mental capacity to express an informed desire to leave hospital has caused uncertainty and difficulties for nurses caring for them. These difficulties relate to whether it is lawful to detain and give treatment to informal patients who lack the capacity to express a choice. The principles derived from the case law are discussed in relation to detention, clinical practice and patients rights.

  2. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  3. Effective educator student relationships in nursing education to strengthen nursing students' resilience : original research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Froneman, Kathleen; Du Plessis, Emmerentia; Koen, Magdalena P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little research has been conducted in private nursing schools with regard to the educator student relationship to strengthen the resilience of nursing students and to improve the educator-student relationship...

  4. Transnational nurse migration: future directions for medical anthropological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Megan; Nichter, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Transnational nurse migration is a serious global health issue in which inequitably distributed shortages hinder health and development goals. This article selectively reviews the literature on nurse migration that has emerged from nursing, health planning, and the social sciences and offers productive directions for future anthropological research. The literature on global nurse migration has largely focused on push/pull economic logic and the concept of brain drain to understand the causes and effects of nurse migration. These concepts obscure political-economic, historical, and cultural factors that pattern nurse migration and influence the complex effects of nurse migration. Global nurse care chain analysis helps illuminate the numerous nodes in the production and migration of nurses, and management of this transnational process. Examples are provided from the Philippines and India to illustrate ways in which this analysis may be deepened, refined and rendered more critical by anthropological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pediatric Critical Care Nursing Research Priorities-Initiating International Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tume, Lyvonne N; Coetzee, Minette; Dryden-Palmer, Karen; Hickey, Patricia A; Kinney, Sharon; Latour, Jos M; Pedreira, Mavilde L G; Sefton, Gerri R; Sorce, Lauren; Curley, Martha A Q

    2015-07-01

    To identify and prioritize research questions of concern to the practice of pediatric critical care nursing practice. One-day consensus conference. By using a conceptual framework by Benner et al describing domains of practice in critical care nursing, nine international nurse researchers presented state-of-the-art lectures. Each identified knowledge gaps in their assigned practice domain and then poised three research questions to fill that gap. Then, meeting participants prioritized the proposed research questions using an interactive multivoting process. Seventh World Congress on Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care in Istanbul, Turkey. Pediatric critical care nurses and nurse scientists attending the open consensus meeting. Systematic review, gap analysis, and interactive multivoting. The participants prioritized 27 nursing research questions in nine content domains. The top four research questions were 1) identifying nursing interventions that directly impact the child and family's experience during the withdrawal of life support, 2) evaluating the long-term psychosocial impact of a child's critical illness on family outcomes, 3) articulating core nursing competencies that prevent unstable situations from deteriorating into crises, and 4) describing the level of nursing education and experience in pediatric critical care that has a protective effect on the mortality and morbidity of critically ill children. The consensus meeting was effective in organizing pediatric critical care nursing knowledge, identifying knowledge gaps and in prioritizing nursing research initiatives that could be used to advance nursing science across world regions.

  6. Towards a framework of advanced nursing practice for the clinical research nurse in cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, J.; Kirshbaum, Marilyn

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND:\\ud The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), the regulatory body in the UK, is in the process of opening a new part of the register for Advanced Nurse Practitioners. This presents a potential opportunity for clinical research nurses within cancer care. \\ud OBJECTIVES:\\ud To explore the role of the clinical research nurse in cancer care whilst considering whether the role can be performed at a level that could be considered advanced practice. Consequently, a developmental model to e...

  7. Structure and Development of Centers for Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Nursing research centers help strengthen faculty research capability, improve research education, and facilitate collaborations and use of resources. The director plays a pivotal role in securing funding, nurturing new researchers, and overseeing ethical behavior in human subjects research. (SK)

  8. The Study of Nursing Care project: back to the future for contemporary nursing research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kylie M; Crookes, Patrick A

    2012-11-01

      To discuss the Study of Nursing Care project, an initiative from the late 1970s in the UK. The article explores the impact of the Study of Nursing Care on nursing research, and considers to what extent it presents a useful model for contemporary nursing research.   It is acknowledged internationally that the nursing academic workforce is ageing and dwindling. Many possible solutions are being debated with all agreeing that the next generation of evidence based nurse leaders is urgently required.   In this article, the authors survey existing workforce schemes, describe the Study of Nursing Care series, published in the 1970s, and draw on interviews and correspondence conducted in 2009 with four of the original Study of Nursing Care research assistants.   The Study of Nursing Care project poses a potential response to academic workforce issues. This article discusses the evolution of the project, its methods and operation and considers its possible implications for contemporary practice. Implications for nursing.  The Study of Nursing Care model demonstrates the clear benefits of fully committed funding, a programmatic approach towards research development, and the importance of selecting the right kind of people for the work, in a national scheme.   The authors argue that although the clinical outcomes it set out to achieve remain elusive, the project produced a cohort of nurse researchers who went on to give important leadership in nursing, including in nursing academia/research. A contemporary version of the Study of Nursing Care has important potential to generate the next generation of nurse researchers, and leaders, into the twenty-first century. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. A History of the Western Institute of Nursing and Its Communicating Nursing Research Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Paula A; Lindeman, Carol A

    The Western Institute of Nursing (WIN) celebrated its 60th anniversary and the 50th Annual Communicating Nursing Research Conference in April 2017. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief history of the origin, development, and accomplishments of WIN and its Communicating Nursing Research conferences. Historical documents and conference proceedings were reviewed. WIN was created in 1957 as the Western Council on Higher Education for Nursing under the auspices of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education. The bedrock and enduring value system of the organization is the interrelated nature of nursing education, practice, and research. There was a conviction that people in the Western region of the United States needed nursing services of excellent quality and that nursing education must prepare nurses capable of providing that care. Shared goals were to increase the science of nursing through research and to produce nurses who could design, conduct, and supervise research-all to the end of improving quality nursing care. These goals were only achieved by collaboration and resource sharing among the Western region states and organizations. Consistent with the goals, the first research conferences were held between 1957 and 1962. Conference content focused on seminars for faculty teaching research, on the design and conduct of research in patient care settings, and on identification of priority areas for research. The annual Communicating Nursing Research conferences began in 1968 and grew over the years to a total 465 podium and poster presentations on a wide array of research topics-and an attendance of 926-in 2016. As WIN and its Communicating Nursing Research conferences face the next 50 years, the enduring values on which the organization was created will stand in good stead as adaptability, adjustments, and collaborative effort are applied to inevitable change for the nursing profession. It is the Western way.

  10. Refocusing research priorities in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulage, Kristine M; Ardizzone, Laura; Enlow, William; Hickey, Kathleen; Jeon, Christie; Kearney, Joan; Schnall, Rebecca; Larson, Elaine L

    2013-01-01

    It is critical for schools of nursing to periodically reassess their scholarly programs to ensure that their conceptual framework and approaches address current challenges and enhance productivity. This article describes the process undertaken at Columbia University School of Nursing to evaluate scholarly enterprise so that it remains relevant and responsive to changing trends and to revise our research conceptual model to be reflective of the foci of our clinicians and researchers. As part of a larger strategic initiative, a two-phase Research Excellence Planning and Implementation Workgroup was convened, consisting of a broad representation of faculty and administrative staff, with an overall goal of expanding scholarly capacity. During Phase I, members developed measurable outcomes and tactics and revised the school's conceptual research model. In Phase II, the workgroup implemented and monitored tactics and presented final recommendations to the dean. To measure progress, faculty members completed a survey to establish baseline scholarship and collaboration with results indicating room for growth in interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaboration. Ongoing assessment of outcomes includes Web-based tracking of scholarly activities and follow-up surveys to monitor expansion of faculty collaboration. We recommend this process to other schools committed to sustainable, increasingly relevant scholarship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The validity of the schizophrenia diagnosis in the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register is good

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uggerby, Peter; Østergaard, Søren Dinesen; Røge, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register (DPCRR) has been used extensively for research purposes during the past decades. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10 schizophrenia diagnosis in the DPCRR...... all 300 case records, the validity of the schizophrenia diagnosis was 89.7%. CONCLUSION: According to this assessment of patient case records, the diagnosis of schizophrenia in the DPCRR has a high validity and is well-suited for research. FUNDING: Aalborg Psychiatric Hospital funded the study...

  12. Emergence of Nordic nursing research: no position is an Island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Adamsen, Lis

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a detailed analysis of findings from a larger study of 'Nordic nursing theorists and clinical nurses' reflections on and experience with production and use of research, theory and findings'. The development of nursing science in the Nordic countries goes back to the late 1970s....... With use of a sociological approach the aim was to explore whether nursing science has constituted itself as an autonomous nursing research field in Bourdieu's terms. In-depth interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample of 10 professors drawn from seven universities in the Nordic countries....... The interview agenda explored the participants' research activities and knowledge production. Our conclusion is that one cannot speak of nursing research in the Nordic countries as a fully developed and autonomous field. Yet we see the outlines of an emerging nursing research field with a common doxa. At least...

  13. The nursing professorial unit: translating acute and critical care nursing research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Christensen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and context: Implementation of current research in practice is challenging for ward-based nursing staff. However, university-based nursing academics are seen as the research experts and are perhaps well placed to support clinical nursing research. The problem lies with the divide between practice and academia; universities often use the clinical environment as the place to conduct research but this is often not translated effectively into practice. The development of a nursing professorial unit for acute and critical care was undertaken to meet this challenge. The unit’s key aim is to develop, mentor and support a nursing research culture that is wholly situated within and driven by the requirements of the clinical environment. Aim: The aim of this article is to offer some insights as to how staff set about engaging with and developing the nursing professorial unit to support nursing research in our local hospital. Conclusions: The article highlights how an effective and coordinated approach to supporting clinical nursing research is possible. The nursing professorial unit has been successful in bridging the divide between academia and practice by using a non-university approach to supporting nursing research. Instead we have adopted the philosophy that practice is the sole driver for research and as academics our role is to support that position. Implications for practice: The adoption of the nursing professorial unit model for supporting clinical nursing research is beneficial in closing the divide between clinical practice and the university The continual presence of the academics in the clinical environment has had a positive impact on research development and implementation in practice The nursing professorial unit has become an integral part of the nursing culture in the hospital environment

  14. The role of nurse teachers in the empowerment of nurses through research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, C

    1993-02-01

    This paper explores some of the difficulties faced by nurse teachers supporting students in research studies. The issues raised in this paper were identified through a small scale exploratory study of the teachers role. Areas discussed include teachers' preparation for the research component of their role and their interpretation of research-based activity. Practical issues such as the time required to undertake research studies and methods of teaching research are also explored. It is argued that nurse teachers are a key group in increasing research knowledge within the nursing profession, yet attention to this important part of the role is lacking. If nurses are to be empowered through research it is suggested that nurse teachers are a key group in bridging a gap between the rhetoric and reality of research-based practices in nursing.

  15. Integration of research and nursing experiential learning: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C.D. Wright

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching research to undergraduates has its own challenges and involving undergraduates in research practical experience is just one of those challenges. As nursing students are in the process of becoming professional nurses, knowledge and skills in research are specific outcomes of the curriculum. One of the outcomes of the B Tech Nursing Science programme offered by the Tshwane University of Technology states that for the baccalaurcate nursing programme include analysis, interpretation and utilisation of a range of research findings in scientific nursing and midwifery care as well as the development of a research protocol in a given context. In an effort to ensure that students would experience research as an essential part of their daily activities, an integrated approach is suggested whereby the nursing experiential learning opportunities are also research experiential learning opportunities. Using the integration strategy, research theory come ‘alive’ for the students. The integration approach is uncomplicated and transferable to any other discipline. The case study presented is the second year nursing students using school nursing experiential learning as a research project. The second year nursing students have a community focus during their second year and one of the experiential learning opportunities is school health nursing in a primary school in Tshwane. The results of the school health survey are presented. The students developed a health education intervention based on the research results.

  16. Increasing understanding of nursing research for general duty nurses: an experiential strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatzky-Dickson, Doris M; Clarke, Diana E

    2008-03-01

    Misconceptions and trepidation about research abound among practicing nurses. However, in light of the movement toward increasing accountability to consumers and the concurrent drive toward evidence-based practice, the need for nursing research can no longer be ignored. Innovative approaches to augment nurses' training and education in research and evidence-based practice must be incorporated into continuing education programs. The Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice Committee of a large tertiary care teaching hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, developed a series of opportunities for staff nurses to participate in research projects and have ongoing exposure to the steps in the research process. The Great Canadian Cookie Experiment was an opportunity to participate in quantitative research. Qualitative data from patients' thank you cards were analyzed in an interactive fashion during luncheon seminars held during Nursing Week in 2 subsequent years. A survey of nurses who participated in the luncheon seminars indicated an overall increase in their knowledge about qualitative research methods and an appreciation for participating in the process of nursing research. Continued visibility of nursing research will contribute to changing nurses' attitudes toward fostering an evidence-based approach to clinical practice.

  17. Big data science: A literature review of nursing research exemplars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Bonnie L; Sylvia, Martha; Weinfurter, Elizabeth F; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Park, Jung In; Dodd, Dianna; Keenan, Gail M; Senk, Patricia; Richesson, Rachel L; Baukner, Vicki; Cruz, Christopher; Gao, Grace; Whittenburg, Luann; Delaney, Connie W

    Big data and cutting-edge analytic methods in nursing research challenge nurse scientists to extend the data sources and analytic methods used for discovering and translating knowledge. The purpose of this study was to identify, analyze, and synthesize exemplars of big data nursing research applied to practice and disseminated in key nursing informatics, general biomedical informatics, and nursing research journals. A literature review of studies published between 2009 and 2015. There were 650 journal articles identified in 17 key nursing informatics, general biomedical informatics, and nursing research journals in the Web of Science database. After screening for inclusion and exclusion criteria, 17 studies published in 18 articles were identified as big data nursing research applied to practice. Nurses clearly are beginning to conduct big data research applied to practice. These studies represent multiple data sources and settings. Although numerous analytic methods were used, the fundamental issue remains to define the types of analyses consistent with big data analytic methods. There are needs to increase the visibility of big data and data science research conducted by nurse scientists, further examine the use of state of the science in data analytics, and continue to expand the availability and use of a variety of scientific, governmental, and industry data resources. A major implication of this literature review is whether nursing faculty and preparation of future scientists (PhD programs) are prepared for big data and data science. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Advancing Nursing Research in Hospitals Through Collaboration, Empowerment, and Mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jill; Polivka, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Meeting the Magnet Recognition Program® requirements for integrating research into practice can be daunting, particularly for nonacademic hospitals. The authors describe 1 healthcare system's approach to advancing nursing research in 5 hospitals through collaboration with a local university school of nursing and development of an infrastructure to support, empower, and mentor clinical nurses in the conduct of research. Outcomes include completed research, presentations, publications, practice change, and professional development.

  19. Nurses’ Research Behavior and Barriers to Research Utilization Into Clinical Nursing Practice: a Closer Look

    OpenAIRE

    Efstratios Athanasakis

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is widely accepted that utilization of the best-known research evidence in nursing practice entails improvement of nursing care received by patients and strengthening of nursing profession.Aim: The aim of this paper was the review of nurses’ research behavior and the barriers that nurses meet in order to utilize research evidence into clinical nursing practice.Methodology: There has been conducted a literature search in Pubmed and Science Direct libraries, using specific search...

  20. Using electronic surveys in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2014-11-01

    Computer and Internet use in businesses and homes in the United States has dramatically increased since the early 1980s. In 2011, 76% of households reported having a computer, compared with only 8% in 1984 (File, 2013). A similar increase in Internet use has also been seen, with 72% of households reporting access of the Internet in 2011 compared with 18% in 1997 (File, 2013). This emerging trend in technology has prompted use of electronic surveys in the research community as an alternative to previous telephone and postal surveys. Electronic surveys can offer an efficient, cost-effective method for data collection; however, challenges exist. An awareness of the issues and strategies to optimize data collection using web-based surveys is critical when designing research studies. This column will discuss the different types and advantages and disadvantages of using electronic surveys in nursing research, as well as methods to optimize the quality and quantity of survey responses.

  1. Educational research methods for researching innovations in teaching, learning and assessment: The nursing lecturer as researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks-Maran, Diane

    2015-11-01

    The author, who has had previous experience as a nurse researcher, has been engaged in helping nurse lecturers to undertake evaluation research studies into innovations in their teaching, learning and assessment methods. In order to undertake this work successfully, it was important to move from thinking like a nurse researcher to thinking like an educational researcher and developing the role of the nursing lecturer as researcher of their teaching. This article explores the difference between evaluation and evaluation research and argues for the need to use educational research methods when undertaking evaluation research into innovations in teaching, learning and assessment. A new model for educational evaluation research is presented together with two case examples of the model in use. The model has been tested on over 30 research studies into innovations in teaching, learning and assessment over the past 8 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Orthopaedic nurses' perception of research utilization - A cross sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    of acceptance from colleagues and section head nurses and a shortage of time. This study forms a baseline as a part of a larger study and contributes knowledge useful to other orthopaedic departments with an interest in optimizing nursing research to improve orthopaedic nursing care quality....

  3. Nursing intellectual capital theory: implications for research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covell, Christine L; Sidani, Souraya

    2013-05-31

    Due to rising costs of healthcare, determining how registered nurses and knowledge resources influence the quality of patient care is critical. Studies that have investigated the relationship between nursing knowledge and outcomes have been plagued with conceptual and methodological issues. This has resulted in limited empirical evidence of the impact of nursing knowledge on patient or organizational outcomes. The nursing intellectual capital theory was developed to assist with this area of inquiry. Nursing intellectual capital theory conceptualizes the sources of nursing knowledge available within an organization and delineates its relationship to patient and organizational outcomes. In this article, we review the nursing intellectual capital theory and discuss its implications for research and practice. We explain why the theory shows promise for guiding research on quality work environments and how it may assist with administrative decision-making related to nursing human resource management and continuing professional development.

  4. The effectiveness of a nursing discharge programme to improve medication adherence and patient satisfaction in the psychiatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgolesi, Michele; Pucciarelli, Gianluca; Colantoni, Anna Maria; D'Andrea, Fabio; Di Donato, Barbara; Giorgi, Fabio; Landi, Lidia; Salustri, Eleonora; Turci, Carlo; Proietti, Maria Grazia

    2017-12-01

    To observe the extent to which a nursing discharge plan is effective in promoting therapeutic adherence and improving patient satisfaction with their treatment based on information interventions provided by nursing staff, direct hospital medication distribution and follow-up telephone calls. Patient adherence is a fundamental requirement for the treatment of chronic diseases. Among psychiatric patients, adherence to the prescribed course of treatment allows patients to keep the symptoms of their disease under control, allowing for improvements in the management of their condition, minimising the risks of relapse and reducing the number of hospitalisations. This study uses a prospective correlational design. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, the Satisfaction with Information about Medicine Scale and the General Satisfaction Questionnaire were used. Of the 135 patients enrolled in the study, 57% of the sample was female, and, on average, patients were aged 33 years. About 72.9% were unmarried, and 88.1% were educated at less than high school level. This study showed that patients who received more information on their health status and on what would be done for them after their hospitalisation had a higher adherence to treatment. In addition, patients who were more satisfied with the nursing care provided had a higher rate of adherence to their treatment plan. The interpersonal and educational nursing intervention improves adherence to a treatment plan by allowing patients to express themselves not only as individuals who rely on health care but also as protagonists able to effectively manage their disease and to empower themselves by acquiring disease management skills. A patient-nurse communication programme could help to analyse the individual patient circumstances that might become barriers to adherence and to apply nursing interventions that promote better patient adherence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Orthopaedic nurses' perception of research utilization - A cross sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    knowledge and practical research competencies among orthopaedic nurses and their interest and motivation to increase these in everyday practice. A newly developed questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 87 orthopaedic nurses. Forty three orthopaedic nurses (49.4%) completed the questionnaire....... The results indicated that despite the majority of orthopaedic nurses having low self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies, their interest and motivation to improve these were high, especially their inner motivation. However, the nurses' inner motivation was inhibited by a lack...

  6. The great American cookie experiment: engaging staff nurses in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Marlene; Cephus, Constance E; Gordon, Mary D; Hagan, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to engage staff nurses in research in an informative and fun way by determining nurses' preference for sugar-free chocolate chip cookies versus regular chocolate chip cookies. A descriptive, crossover, double-blinded study was performed using a convenience sample of 300 staff nurses. Nurses preferred the texture, flavor, and overall preference of the regular chocolate chip cookie as compared with the sugar-free chocolate chip cookie (pCookie Experiment remains a creative teaching strategy to enhance knowledge and engage nurses in the research process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The value to nursing research of Gadamer's hermeneutic philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, E

    1996-12-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness in nursing research of the importance of accumulation of knowledge related particularly to the art of nursing. Because of this, nurses are endeavouring to understand more comprehensively the meanings given to central phenomena such as caring, comfort and reassurance, and also to research them with methodologies in such a way that these meanings are not destroyed, distorted or decontextualized. Gadamer's hermeneutic philosophy may prove to be a valuable approach in enabling nurses to gain a deeper and fuller understanding of these phenomena which are central to nursing practice.

  8. The formation of social reintegration strategies of the psychic suffering carrier: new directions for psychiatric nursing in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Emilia Jales Simões de; Moreira, Lilian Hortale de Oliveira; Cardoso, Maria Manuela Vila Nova; Ferreira, Rosa Gomes dos Santos; Silva, Thuany Cristine Santos da

    2014-09-01

    This is an exploratory and descriptive study of a qualitative nature. Its objective is to analyse the formation of strategies for social reintegration of the psychic suffering carrier in the practice of nurses working in hospital psychiatric institutions. For this study, we use, as a basis, the concepts and processes of the formation of strategies presented by Isabel Nicholau, 2001. Twelve nurses with health care experience in hospital psychiatric institutions participated in this study, and data collection occurred through semi-structured interviews in the year 2013. The data revealed that, in addition to human, material, and financial resources, institutional support is needed as is articulation and interaction among professionals and services. The importance of the social dimension and of the negotiation process depicts the development of conception of collective and integrated work. We conclude that strategies are emerging from the daily life of work and are not limited to a rational logic of cost and fundraising, but instead are developed through a negotiated process.

  9. Dimensional approaches to psychiatric classification: refining the research agenda for DSM-V: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regier, Darrel A

    2007-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) will publish the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V), in 2012. This paper reviews the extended, multi-faceted research planning preparations that APA has undertaken, several in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the U.S. National Institutes of Health, to assess the current state of diagnosis-relevant research and to generate short- and long-term recommendations for research needed to enrich DSM-V and future psychiatric classifications. This research review and planning process has underscored widespread interest among nosologists in the US and globally regarding the potential benefits for research and clinical practice of incorporating a dimensional component into the existing categorical, or binary, classification system in the DSM. Toward this end, the APA and its partners convened an international conference in July 2006 to critically appraise the use of dimensional constructs in psychiatric diagnostic systems. Resultant papers appear in this issue of International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research and in a forthcoming monograph to be published by APA. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Practices for caring in nursing: Brazilian research groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, A L; de Andrade, S R; de Mello, A L Ferreira; Klock, P; do Nascimento, K C; Koerich, M Santos; Backes, D Stein

    2011-09-01

    The present study considers the production of knowledge and the interactions in the environment of research and their relationships in the system of caring in nursing and health. To elaborate a theoretical model of the organization of the practices used for caring, based on the experiences made by the research groups of administration and management in nursing, in Brazil. The study is based on grounded theory. Twelve leaders of research groups, working as professors in public universities in the south and the south-east of Brazil, distributed in sample groups, were interviewed. The core phenomenon 'research groups of administration and management in nursing: arrangements and interactions in the system of caring in nursing' was derived from the categories: conceptual bases and contexts of the research groups; experiencing interactions in the research groups; functionality of the research groups; and outputs of the research groups. The research groups are integrated in the system of caring in nursing. The activities of the Brazilian administration and management in nursing research groups are process oriented and in a process of constant renovation, socially relevant, operate in a complex scenario and contribute to the advancement of the organizations of the system of caring in nursing through strengthening the connection among academia, service and community. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  11. Integrating a Proposed Population Health Model with Nursing Informatics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn; Arcia, Adriana; Bjarnadottir, Ragnhildur Ingibjargardottir; Iribarren, Sarah; Yoon, Sunmoo

    2016-01-01

    In this panel we discuss how nursing informatics can provide a framework for carrying out population health nursing research, using a conceptual model for nursing and population health; the Conceptual Model of Nursing and Population Health (CMNPH). The panel will provide an overview of the CMNPH and then each presenter will present findings from ongoing informatics research that provides insights to different levels of the CNMPH model. The panel is targeted towards informatics researchers who wish to use novel informatics approaches to carry out population health research.

  12. Leadership mentoring in nursing research, career development and scholarly productivity : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/250099535; van der Zwaag, Angeli M.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/127722386

    2017-01-01

    Background Although nursing has been an academic discipline for decades, the infrastructure for nursing research in many countries is still fragile and struggling. Postdoctoral nurses have difficulties developing sustaining careers in nursing research due to lack of career opportunities.

  13. Celebrating 40 Years of the Midwest Nursing Research Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Patricia E; Wynd, Christine A; Glass, Laurie K; O'Connell, Karen M; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Bergstrom, Nancy; Lusk, Sally Lechlitner

    2017-05-01

    The Midwest Nursing Research Society (MNRS) recently held its 40th annual conference and celebrated four decades of nursing research in the Midwest. MNRS continues to be one of the largest nursing research societies in the United States. Over the years, a vast majority of programmatic initiatives included education and tangible support for novice and experienced nurse researchers. In this article, the background for development of MNRS is reviewed with examination of driving forces that led to its creation. Three past presidents, Dr. Joyce Fitzpatrick, the first President of MNRS (1980-1981); Dr. Nancy Bergstrom, the eighth President (1993-1995); and Dr. Sally Lusk, the 14th President (2005-2007), discuss challenges, opportunities, and the exceptional progress made toward fostering excellence in nursing research for the Midwest and contributing to nursing science on a national and global scale. Lessons from the past as well as opportunities for the future are addressed.

  14. [Retrospective analysis of nursing research in critical care nursing: 1975 to 1984].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Maria Sumie; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue; Takahashi, Edna Ikumi Umebayashi

    1986-04-01

    Nursing research in Intensive Care Units as compered to nursing research in other medical-surgical units, both in Brasil and in the United States, is the subject of this study. Data were collected from articles published in 1975, 1979 and 1984 in "Revista Brasileira de Enfermagem" (for Brasil) and "Nursing Research" and "Heart and Lungs" (for USA). The analysis of data included type of study, its depth, metodology employed and selected subject. Increase in number of studies in nursing in Intensive Care Units, both descriptive and experimental, was observed. The authors also noted the absence of replication of research and of continuity studies.

  15. Leadership Mentoring in Nursing Research: Creating the future cadre of nurse scientists in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafteinsdottir, T.B.; Hamers, J.P.H.; Francke, A.L.; Meijel, B. van; Roodbol, P.; Schoonhoven, L.; Vermeulen, H.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Netherlands’ Council for Healthcare Research (RGO) concluded some years ago that the Dutch infrastructure for nursing research was both limited and vulnerable. This was informed by the very few permanent senior nursing research positions, including a total of three full

  16. An integrative review of South African cancer nursing research published from 2002-2012 : original research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmollgruber, Shelley; Maree, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Background: This integrative review aimed to quantify the publication output of South African cancer nursing research conducted between 2002 and 2012 and to identify key trends relevant to cancer nurse researchers.Objectives...

  17. The National Institute of Nursing Research Explores Opportunities in Genetics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Hilary D.; Grady, Patricia A.; Amende, Lynn M.

    1997-01-01

    Genetics offers many opportunities for nursing research. Nurse researchers can contribute in such areas as biological, environmental, and behavioral linkages; genetic determination of physiological responses; and translation of science findings into clinical interventions. (SK)

  18. Spiritual care in nursing: an overview of published international research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Nell; McSherry, Wilfred

    2012-12-01

    This paper provides an overview of 80 papers on research into spiritual care in nursing between 2006 and 2010, to enable nurses and nurse managers to make use of evidence available to them to improve quality of care and implement best practice. Research into spiritual care has grown rapidly since a review of the field in 2006. The CINAHL database was used to search for 'spirituality' OR 'spiritual care' AND 'nursing, looking for original research papers involving health-care practitioners. Research is discussed in the following themes: nursing education; care of health-care practitioners, including nurses; descriptive and correlational research; assessment tools used in research; palliative care and oncology; culture and spiritual care research. Future research should take into account the risks of research that does not involve patients and the need for research that is translatable into contexts other than the setting under study. Spiritual care research has implications for staff training and education, staff motivation and health, organisational culture, best practice, quality of care and, most importantly, for the health of patients. Nurse managers, and indeed all involved in management of nursing, should use this growing body of evidence to inform their spiritual care training, planning and delivery. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Nurses as participants in research: an evaluation of recruitment techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Lauretta; Chok, Harrison Ng; Wilkes, Lesley

    2017-09-19

    Recruitment and retention of participants, as well as response rates, can be challenging in nursing research. This can be because of the questions asked; the choice of methodology; the methods used to collect data; the characteristics of potential participants; the sample size required; and the duration of the study. Additionally, conducting research with nurses as participants presents several issues for them, including the time needed to participate in the research, the competing commitments for clinical practice, the political and environmental climate, and recruitment itself. To report on research studies conducted by the authors at a tertiary teaching hospital, to show the lessons learned when recruiting nurses to participate in nursing research. The authors discuss factors that supported recruitment of nurses in these studies, including the use of the personal touch and multiple recruitment strategies in a single study. Videos and photography facilitate interdisciplinary research and can be a valuable means of non-verbal data collection, especially with participants affected by disabilities, and can support research methods, such as the use of questionnaires. Recruiting nurses for research can be challenging. We suggest that researchers consider using more than one recruitment strategy when recruiting nurse participants. Recruitment is more successful if researchers align the aim(s) of the research with nurse's concerns and contexts. ©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  20. Re-examining definitions of spirituality in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Katia Garcia; Koenig, Harold G

    2013-12-01

    To discuss the definition of spirituality and its limitations for nursing research. It proposes a definition that will capture more accurately the role of spirituality in health outcomes. Studies have increasingly examined spirituality in nursing research as a coping mechanism attenuating the negative impact of traumatic stress on mental health. Existing definitions of spirituality in nursing research include elements of positive emotional states (meaning, purpose, general well-being) which confound mental health outcomes. Medline and CINAHL databases were searched from 2007-2011 for research articles examining spirituality definitions and measures used by nurse researchers. An analysis of the definitions of spirituality in nursing research reveals inconsistencies and confounding mental health concepts. The authors propose defining spirituality in the context of religious involvement when conducting research, while using a broader definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. They argue such definition provides a more appropriate method of measuring this concept in research aimed at evaluating mental health outcomes while preserving the currently used patient-defined definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. A consistent definition of spirituality in nursing research evaluating mental health outcomes, distinct from 'spiritual care' in a clinical setting, is essential to avoid tautological results that are meaningless. Appropriate definitions will enable nursing researchers to more clearly identify resilience mechanisms and improved health outcomes in those exposed to traumatic stress. A definition of spirituality that focuses on religious involvement provides a more uniform and consistent measure for evaluating mental health outcomes in nursing research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Introduction To The Special Section: The American Psychiatric Association's Research Agenda For The DSM-V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widiger, Thomas A; Simonsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    of the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. This article provides the historical background for and a brief description of the first conference, which was concerned with the research that would help move the field toward a dimensional classification...... of personality disorder. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved) (from the journal abstract)...

  2. Forensic Nursing State of the Science: Research and Practice Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Stacy A; Koetting, Cathy; Thimsen, Kathi; Downing, Nancy; Porta, Carolyn; Hardy, Peggy; Valentine, Julie L; Finn, Cris; Engebretson, Joan

    The International Association of Forensic Nurses (IAFN) is the only nursing organization advancing the forensic nursing specialty. The organization seeks to advance the profession, and one mechanism for doing so is development of a research agenda. The purpose of this action-based research study was to aid in the development of a forensic nursing research agenda. The study was carried out in two integral stages: (a) focus groups with IAFN members attending the annual conference and (b) reviewing posted IAFN member listserv material. The findings of this study identified similar gaps of other nursing specialties experiencing "growing pains," including role confusion and variation in educational preparation. Findings from this study will inform development of the IAFN 5-year research agenda to advance forensic nursing science and evidence-based practice.

  3. Research Priorities in Neonatal and Pediatric Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaíla Corrêa Castral

    2014-03-01

    • Implement the participation of Brazilian scientific societies in establishing health care policies, guidelines and protocols, creating consensus committees. Furthermore, it is important to highlight the ABEn recommendations presented during the 65th Brazilian Nursing Congress, which took place in October of 2013 in Rio de Janeiro, particularly regarding the development of strategies to meet the National Curriculum Guidelines for Nursing Undergraduate Courses, especially concerning the development, participation and application of research and other types of knowledge production that aim at improving the quality of professional practice. Therefore, this number of the Revista Eletrônica de Enfermagem has five original articles that are relevant for Pediatric and Neonatal Nursing. The studies address themes such as nursing diagnosis in children with respiratory infections, child immunization, childhood vulnerability, factors related to peripheral vascular trauma in children, and using case studies to teach diagnostic thinking. The findings are relevant for the implementation of more effective interventions, thus improving the quality of health care delivered to newborns, children and their family.     REFERENCE 1. Carvalho V. Linhas de pesquisa e prioridades de enfermagem: proposta com distinção gnoseológica para o agrupamento da produção científica de pós-graduação em enfermagem. Esc. Anna Nery. 2002;6(1:145-54. 2. Lansky S, França E. Mortalidade infantil neonatal no Brasil: situação, tendências e perspectivas. In: Rede Interagencial de Informações para Saúde. Demografia e Saúde: contribuição para análise de situação e tendências [Internet]. Brasília: OPAS; 2009 [acesso em: 20 mar 2014]. p. 83-112. Disponível em: http://www.ripsa.org.br/local/docsonline/6/7/276-livro_demografia_e_saude_WEB.pdf. 3. Ministério da Saúde. Plano Nacional de Saúde–PNS:2012-2015. Brasília (Brasil: Ministério da Saúde;  2011 [acesso em: 20 mar 2014

  4. Effect of nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients - an interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    nurses are the health professionals spending most time directly with the patient and very few studies investigate nurses’ role and potential in improving the appropriateness of medication. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of educating nurses in general pharmacology...

  5. Integrative review of international nursing research in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M; Wei, L; Liu, H; Tang, L

    2009-03-01

    Nursing research in Mainland China is divided into two parts: domestic nursing research, comprising all publications in Chinese; and international nursing research, comprising all publications in English. Domestic nursing research has been developing rapidly, demonstrated by the increase in new national or regional journals and publications. However, little is known about the extent of international research. To outline the development of international nursing research publications in Mainland China and to provide suggestions for future development. All of the papers were retrieved from PubMed. The key search phase was 'China or P.R.China NOT Hong Kong NOT Taiwan NOT Macao [AD]', with the limits of 'English', 'nursing journals' as well as the published date up to '2007/09/30'. PubMed recorded 57 English papers that were originally conducted in Mainland China during the search period from 1989 to 30 September 2007. Thirty-seven of the total 57 (65%) publications were contributed by Beijing, Shanghai and Hubei. Forty-four of the 57 publications were conducted with collaborators from Hong Kong, the USA, the UK and Canada. Thirteen publications were funded by international societies, while only three were funded by the Chinese government. The research topics mainly focused on clinical research, nursing education and nursing management. This study indicates that international nursing research has been growing slowly in Mainland China along with provincial variations. The suggestions to improve nursing research include the reform of nursing education, the enhancement of the collaboration with the international societies and the establishment of research priorities.

  6. Statistical process control in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polit, Denise F; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2012-02-01

    In intervention studies in which randomization to groups is not possible, researchers typically use quasi-experimental designs. Time series designs are strong quasi-experimental designs but are seldom used, perhaps because of technical and analytic hurdles. Statistical process control (SPC) is an alternative analytic approach to testing hypotheses about intervention effects using data collected over time. SPC, like traditional statistical methods, is a tool for understanding variation and involves the construction of control charts that distinguish between normal, random fluctuations (common cause variation), and statistically significant special cause variation that can result from an innovation. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of SPC and to illustrate its use in a study of a nursing practice improvement intervention. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Social-psychiatric research in Germany--a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbé, Raoul; Flammer, Erich; Borbé, Susanne; Müller, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    This study aims at analysing content, authorship, type of journal and associated institution of scientific contributions on social psychiatry in 16 German-speaking journals. In order to detect development and change in respect to the aspects mentioned, two time periods are compared systematically (1997-1998/2007-2008). The authors selected all original papers in 16 journals from German-speaking countries along common definitions of social psychiatry. These definitions are made transparent in the study. The systematic comparison of the named time periods resulted in equal numbers of papers contributed. The major part of the publications under study has been contributed by authors associated with universities. Content-wise, articles on matters discussed in the recent past and including topics like migration, subjectivity, parent-child care are increasing. Research on social psychiatry in German-speaking countries today is mainly related to research departments at university clinics. The impact of large centres of psychiatry however is declining. Content-wise, matters at stake during the reform period of psychiatry in German-speaking countries in the 1970 s and 1980 s are of less relevance today. Researches now tend to address research topics more closely related to what can be named patient-centred care. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

  8. Role-player expectations regarding the education of nursing research

    OpenAIRE

    SCD Zeelie

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on role player expectations regarding the education of nursing research. The importance of the role player expectations are two-fold: firstly as a factor in the external environment influencing and guiding the formulation phase of the development of standards and secondly, due to the clear indications of problems regarding nursing research in the nursing profession in literature. The role player expectations were elicited using a qualitative, exploratory and contextual de...

  9. Interventions for comorbid problem gambling and psychiatric disorders: Advancing a developing field of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, N A; Merkouris, S S; Lorains, F K

    2016-07-01

    Despite significant psychiatric comorbidity in problem gambling, there is little evidence on which to base treatment recommendations for subpopulations of problem gamblers with comorbid psychiatric disorders. This mini-review draws on two separate systematic searches to identify possible interventions for comorbid problem gambling and psychiatric disorders, highlight the gaps in the currently available evidence base, and stimulate further research in this area. In this mini-review, only 21 studies that have conducted post-hoc analyses to explore the influence of psychiatric disorders or problem gambling subtypes on gambling outcomes from different types of treatment were identified. The findings of these studies suggest that most gambling treatments are not contraindicated by psychiatric disorders. Moreover, only 6 randomized studies comparing the efficacy of interventions targeted towards specific comorbidity subgroups with a control/comparison group were identified. The results of these studies provide preliminary evidence for modified dialectical behavior therapy for comorbid substance use, the addition of naltrexone to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for comorbid alcohol use problems, and the addition of N-acetylcysteine to tobacco support programs and imaginal desensitisation/motivational interviewing for comorbid nicotine dependence. They also suggest that lithium for comorbid bipolar disorder, escitalopram for comorbid anxiety disorders, and the addition of CBT to standard drug treatment for comorbid schizophrenia may be effective. Future research evaluating interventions sequenced according to disorder severity or the functional relationship between the gambling behavior and comorbid symptomatology, identifying psychiatric disorders as moderators of the efficacy of problem gambling interventions, and evaluating interventions matched to client comorbidity could advance this immature field of study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enrollment Challenges in Critical Care Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Mary Lou; Middleton, Aurea; Deaton, Lara; Bennett, Melody; Talbert, Steven; Penoyer, Daleen

    2017-09-01

    Enrollment challenges for critical care research are common. Contributing factors include short enrollment windows, the crisis nature of critical illness, lack of research staff, unavailable legal proxy, family dynamics, and language barriers. To describe enrollment statistics for an ongoing critical care nursing trial, barriers to recruitment, and strategies to enhance enrollment. Two years' worth of recruitment and enrollment data from an oral care intervention trial in critically ill adults receiving mechanical ventilation at 1 hospital were analyzed. Recruitment logs include number of patients screened, eligible, enrolled, and declined and patients' sex, race, and ethnicity. Target enrollment (15.5 patients per month) was based on experience and historical data. Strategies implemented to promote enrollment included providing study personnel at least 18 hours per day for 7 days per week, regular rounds, communication with direct care staff, and Spanish consent processes. In 2 years, 6963 patients were screened; 1551 (22%) were eligible. Consent was sought from 366 (24% of eligible patients). Enrollment averaged 13.3 patients per month (86% of projected target). The main factor impeding enrollment was unavailability of a legal proxy to provide consent (88%). The refusal rates of white (11%), black (13%), and Hispanic (16%) patients did not differ significantly. However, those classified as Asian or as more than 1 race declined significantly more often (35%) than did white or black patients (P = .02). Unavailability of a legal proxy within a short enrollment window was the major challenge to enrollment. Various factors influenced consent decisions. Clinical study design requires more conservative estimates. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  11. A Successful Model for Clinical Training in Child/Adolescent Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Graduate Psychiatric Advanced Practice Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Pamela; Hart Abney, Beverly G; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    2017-08-01

    Graduate faculty in advanced practice nursing programs seek to provide clinical training in psychotherapy for psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP) students and prepare them for practice with patients across the lifespan, including children and adolescents. To develop a clinical training model for child/adolescent cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) that is adaptable to all graduate nursing programs including online, classroom, and blended programs. Clinical training included a didactic 4-hour workshop and 7 small group practice sessions utilizing Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment (COPE), a manualized CBT program for teens. Students completed post-clinical training evaluations. Using qualitative design, responses to the open-ended questions were analyzed and common themes identified. One hundred seven PMHNP students completed evaluations. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) therapeutic understanding of adapting CBT for children and adolescents, (b) therapeutic skills and techniques for use with children/adolescents, (c) improved level of confidence through participation in the CBT program, and (d) therapeutic benefits of being in a group. Positive PMHNP student evaluations indicated that this clinical training model is feasible both online and face-to-face and acceptable for providing clinical training in CBT for children and adolescents.

  12. [A research of students' experience of nursing skills in clinical practice of adult nursing (acute period)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Yuki; Muroya, Kazuko

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to find out the state of nursing skill education and tools available to the students in their clinical practice of adult nursing (acute period). The research was carried out between 2005 and 2007, and the subjects were 111 third or fourth degree nursing students who had finished the clinical practice of adult nursing (acute period). The research method was to measure the degree of learning experience and self-appraisal during clinical practice of adult nursing (acute period). This research covered 11 areas of nursing study and 50 items in nursing skills which consisted of "fundamental nursing skills which students do in clinical and practical training", suggested by the investigative commission on the shape of nursing skills by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, and the basic nursing skill of new graduates which was determined. The result showed that there had been more learning experience during the clinical practice of management of safety, prevention of infection, support of cleaning and changing clothes and observation of symptoms and function of the body. However, there had been less learning experience in support of evacuation and help of breathing and circulation. The result also showed that there was a significant positive correlation between the learning experience in the clinical practice and self-appraisal of the 8 nursing study areas, whereas there was none in the 3 areas of support of eating, support of cleaning and changing clothes and help of breathing and circulation. From the research, it is concluded that it is necessary to devise ways and means to increase the application of nursing skills by the nursing students in clinical practice.

  13. Research and Its Relationship to Nurse Education: Focus and Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Examination of two British mental health journals and a government document on the future of nursing found a lack of focus on clinical research and little reference to the role of research and development in practice. The increasing importance of evidence-based practice demands a strategy for developing nurses' capacity to understand, undertake,…

  14. Opinions on a strategy to promote nurses\\' health research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is the second article in a series of three articles on a strategy to promote nurses' health research contribution in South Africa. This article describes a Delphi study that was conducted to explore the panel of experts' opinions on nurses' health research contribution and to develop a strategy to promote this contribution.

  15. Psychiatric, Psychological, and Social Determinants of Health in the Nurses' Health Study Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel-Fitzgerald, Claudia; Chen, Ying; Singh, Ankura; Okereke, Olivia I; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2016-09-01

    To review the contribution of the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS) on factors that influence mental and physical health. Narrative review of all published articles using data from the NHS, the NHS II, and the Growing Up Today Study focusing on mental health conditions (e.g., depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety) and psychosocial resources and stressors (e.g., job strain, interpersonal violence, social relationships, sexual orientation) between 1990 and 2016. Studies have considered a broad array of determinants (e.g., genes, biomarkers, air pollution) and consequent behavioral and disease-related outcomes (e.g., body weight, smoking, cardiometabolic diseases, cancer, autism). Findings suggest anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, childhood violence, caregiver burden, and job insecurity may increase the risk of coronary heart disease and diabetes, whereas findings with cancer are mixed. This work directly affects public health actions, as demonstrated by recent inclusion of a gender expression measure in state surveys. The NHS cohorts have produced novel and influential research on the interplay of psychological and social factors with health. Psychological and social variables are important contributors to the maintenance or decline of physical and mental health.

  16. Barriers and facilitators to evidence-based nursing in Colombia: perspectives of nurse educators, nurse researchers and graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruyn, Rebecca R; Ochoa-Marín, Sandra Catalina; Semenic, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    To identify and describe the perceptions of nursing researchers, educators, and graduate students regarding the barriers to, and facilitators for, EBN in Medellín, Colombia. Using a qualitative descriptive design, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 participants associated with a large university faculty of nursing in Medellín, and one member of the National Association of Nurses. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the interview transcripts. Several barriers to EBN were reported, including: lack of recognition of nursing as an autonomous profession; a lack of incentives for nurses to pursue advanced education or engage in research; limited availability and utility of nursing evidence; and a lack of communication between academic and clinical practice environments. Perceived facilitators included an increase in nurses pursuing advanced education opportunities; the current healthcare accreditation process; access to international research and research collaborations; and clinical and research partnerships between universities and clinical institutions. Effective implementation of evidence-based nursing practices is a necessity to translate the vast amount of health-related research, knowledge, and experience into positive changes in healthcare quality.

  17. Barriers and Facilitators to Evidence-Based Nursing in Colombia: Perspectives of Nurse Educators, Nurse Researchers and Graduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca R. DeBruyn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify and describe the perceptions of nursing researchers, educators, and graduate students regarding the barriers to, and facilitators for, EBN in Medellín, Colombia. Methodology. Using a qualitative descriptive design, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 participants associated with a large university faculty of nursing in Medellín, and one member of the National Association of Nurses. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the interview transcripts. Results. Several barriers to EBN were reported, including: lack of recognition of nursing as an autonomous profession; a lack of incentives for nurses to pursue advanced education or engage in research; limited availability and utility of nursing evidence; and a lack of communication between academic and clinical practice environments. Perceived facilitators included an increase in nurses pursuing advanced education opportunities; the current healthcare accreditation process; access to international research and research collaborations; and clinical and research partnerships between universities and clinical institutions. Conclusion. Effective implementation of evidence-based nursing practices is a necessity to translate the vast amount of health-related research, knowledge, and experience into positive changes in healthcare quality.

  18. Trends in nursing ethics research: Mapping the literature production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blažun Vošner, Helena; Železnik, Danica; Kokol, Peter; Vošner, Janez; Završnik, Jernej

    2017-12-01

    There have been a number of debates in the field of nursing ethics. Researchers have focused on various aspects of nursing ethics, such as professional ethics, professional, nursing and ethical values. Within this research, a variety of literature reviews have been conducted, but to the best of our knowledge, bibliometric mapping has not yet been used. This article aims to analyse the production of literature within nursing ethics research. In order to examine publishing patterns, we focused on publishing dynamics, prolific research entities and the most-cited articles. We additionally visualised the content of the literature using a novel mixed-method approach, combining bibliometric analysis and mapping with thematic analysis. Ethical considerations: In our study, ethical review was not required. A total of 1416 information sources were found in the Scopus database. Overall, literature production has increased; however, in recent years, the quantity of published material has begun to decrease. The most prolific countries are the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada, and the most prolific source titles are Nursing Ethics, Journal of Advanced Nursing and Nursing Times. Lately, research in the field of nursing ethics has been focused more on life care (providing for the basic needs of older residents), moral distress and community nursing. The dynamics of research literature production showed an exponential rise in the number of published information sources - a rise which started in the period between 1974 and 1998. Since that period, the trend has stabilised, which might indicate that nursing ethics research is starting a transition to a mature phase. The innovative use of bibliometric analysis and mapping, together with thematic analysis, is a useful tool for analysis of research production in the field of nursing ethics. The results presented can be an excellent starting point for literature reviews and more exhaustive data, information and knowledge

  19. The use of focused ethnography in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Edward Venzon; Higginbottom, Gina

    2013-03-01

    To provide an overview of the relevance and strengths of focused ethnography in nursing research. The paper provides descriptions of focused ethnography and discusses using exemplars to show how focused ethnographies can enhance and understand nursing practice. Orthodox ethnographic approaches may not always be suitable or desirable for research in diverse nursing contexts. Focused ethnography has emerged as a promising method for applying ethnography to a distinct issue or shared experience in cultures or sub-cultures and in specific settings, rather than throughout entire communities. Unfortunately, there is limited guidance on using focused ethnography, particularly as applied to nursing research. Research studies performed by nurses using focused ethnography are summarised to show how they fulfilled three main purposes of the genre in nursing research. Additional citations are provided to help demonstrate the versatility of focused ethnography in exploring distinct problems in a specific context in different populations and groups of people. The unique role that nurses play in health care, coupled with their skills in enquiry, can contribute to the further development of the discipline. Focused ethnography offers an opportunity to gain a better understanding and appreciation of nursing as a profession, and the role it plays in society. Focused ethnography has emerged as a relevant research methodology that can be used by nurse researchers to understand specific societal issues that affect different facets of nursing practice. As nurse researchers endeavour to understand experiences in light of their health and life situations, focused ethnography enables them to understand the interrelationship between people and their environments in the society in which they live.

  20. The Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzemer, William L; Méndez, Marta Rivero; Portillo, Carmen; Padilla, Geraldine; Cuca, Yvette; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the partnership between the schools of nursing at the University of California San Francisco and the University of Puerto Rico to address the need for nursing research on HIV/AIDS health disparities. The partnership led to the creation of the Nursing Research Center on HIV/AIDS Health Disparities with funding from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research. We provide background information on the disproportionate impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on racial and ethnic minorities, describe the major predictors of health disparities in persons at risk for or diagnosed with HIV/AIDS using the Outcomes Model for Health Care Research, and outline the major components of the Nursing Research Center. The center's goal is to improve health outcomes for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS by enhancing the knowledge base for HIV/AIDS care.

  1. Getting grounded: using Glaserian grounded theory to conduct nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Cheri Ann

    2010-03-01

    Glaserian grounded theory is a powerful research methodology for understanding client behaviour in a particular area. It is therefore especially relevant for nurse researchers. Nurse researchers use grounded theory more frequently than other qualitative analysis research methods because of its ability to provide insight into clients' experiences and to make a positive impact. However, there is much confusion about the use of grounded theory.The author delineates key components of grounded theory methodology, areas of concern, and the resulting implications for nursing knowledge development. Knowledge gained from Glaserian grounded theory research can be used to institute measures for enhancing client-nurse relationships, improving quality of care, and ultimately improving client quality of life. In addition, it can serve to expand disciplinary knowledge in nursing because the resulting substantive theory is a middle-range theory that can be subjected to later quantitative testing.

  2. Treatment of anxiety disorders by psychiatrists from the American Psychiatric Practice Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Sorsdahl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent in the United States, and if untreated, result in a number of negative outcomes. This study aimed to investigate psychiatrists' current treatment practices for patients with anxiety disorders in the United States. Methods: Psychiatrist-reported data from the 1997 and 1999 American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education Practice Research Network (PRN Study of Psychiatric Patients and Treatments (SPPT were examined, focusing on patients diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Information related to diagnostic and clinical features and treatments provided were obtained. Results: Anxiety disorders remain underdiagnosed and undertreated, since only 11.4% of the sample received a principal diagnosis of an anxiety disorder in a real world setting. Posttraumatic stress disorder was associated with particularly high comorbidity and disability, and social anxiety disorder was relatively rarely diagnosed and treated. Although combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy was commonly used to treat anxiety disorders, anxiolytics were more commonly prescribed than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. Conclusions: These data provide a picture of diagnosis and practice patterns across a range of psychiatric settings and suggest that anxiety disorders, despite being among the most prevalent of psychiatric disorders remain underdiagnosed and undertreated particularly in respect of the use of psychotherapeutic interventions.

  3. An exploration of nursing research perceptions of registered nurses engaging in research activities at a metropolitan hospital in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gemma; Duggan, Ravani; Boldy, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    To explore perceptions about nursing research of registered nurses (RNs) who were engaged in research activities at a metropolitan hospital in Western Australia. In order to improve RNs' research engagement and promote evidence-based practice, Nurse Research Consultants (NRCs) were appointed jointly by the study hospital and a local university. This joint appointment commenced in 2004 in the hospital's emergency department. Early findings indicated that the NRC role was effective in assisting registered nurses with research activities and hence the NRC role was expanded to all areas of the hospital. However, no formal investigation had been carried out to explore the effect of the NRC role on RNs' engagement with nursing research across the hospital. A qualitative interview process. Ten RN participants from the adult and paediatric wards were interviewed. Audio-recorded data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was undertaken. Four main themes were identified, namely: perceptions of nursing research, perceived enablers, perceived barriers and improving research engagement. There was some overlap with some sub-themes being linked with more than one theme. This appeared to be due to differing levels of research education and research engagement. 6pc some of the RNs that participated in this study were experienced in the conduct of research, finding adequate support from NRCs in the workplace, whilst others experienced barriers limiting their involvement in nursing research activities. These barriers could be reduced with additional education, support, improved communication, time and opportunities to undertake research activities.

  4. Nursing research priorities in internal medicine nursing practice: an Italian Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Massimo, D S; Catania, G; Bertolin, A; Croso, A; Gatta, C; Dal Molin, A

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop an effective and accountable nursing practice is necessary to launch research projects through coordinated studies and one of the main strategies to achieve this goal is to define research priorities. he aim of this study is define the nursing priority research in Internal Medicine and explore the possibility to define the nursing priority research in Internal Medicine. This is an observational study using a three-round Delphi method. Fifty-five nurses (77%) completed all three rounds. Two hundred eighty-four research priorities were recorded, organized in eighty areas. The technical - care and organized - management are the areas in which were identify more priorities. The top five priorities, identify as the most important, suggest the attention of Italian nurses in care of patients, management and in safe-care.

  5. Mixing methodology, nursing theory and research design for a practice model of district nursing advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Frances M; Fitzgerald, Les; Rae, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    To highlight philosophical and theoretical considerations for planning a mixed methods research design that can inform a practice model to guide rural district nursing end of life care. Conceptual models of nursing in the community are general and lack guidance for rural district nursing care. A combination of pragmatism and nurse agency theory can provide a framework for ethical considerations in mixed methods research in the private world of rural district end of life care. Reflection on experience gathered in a two-stage qualitative research phase, involving rural district nurses who use advocacy successfully, can inform a quantitative phase for testing and complementing the data. Ongoing data analysis and integration result in generalisable inferences to achieve the research objective. Mixed methods research that creatively combines philosophical and theoretical elements to guide design in the particular ethical situation of community end of life care can be used to explore an emerging field of interest and test the findings for evidence to guide quality nursing practice. Combining philosophy and nursing theory to guide mixed methods research design increases the opportunity for sound research outcomes that can inform a nursing model of care.

  6. Mental Health Nurses' Experiences of Caring for Suicidal Patients in Psychiatric Wards: An Emotional Endeavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Julia; Knizek, Birthe Loa; Hjelmeland, Heidi

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate mental health nurses' experiences of recognizing and responding to suicidal behavior/self-harm and dealing with the emotional challenges in the care of potentially suicidal inpatients. Interview data of eight mental health nurses were analyzed by systematic text condensation. The participants reported alertness to patients' suicidal cues, relieving psychological pain and inspiring hope. Various emotions are evoked by suicidal behavior. Mental health nurses seem to regulate their emotions and emotional expressions, and balance involvement and distance to provide good care of patients and themselves. Mental health nurses have an important role and should receive sufficient formal support. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role Expectations for United States Air Force Psychiatric Clinical Nurse Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    performing psychotherapy. They found a positive correlation between educational level and openness to PCNS psychotherapists . Further, nurse educators were most...as a professional colleague on the mental health multidisciplinary team, setting standards for inpatient mental healtn nursing care, and educating...one behavior not identified to be characteristic of the PCNS role was, "serves as subordinate member of the mental nealth multidisciplinary team." .°I j

  8. Conducting Nursing Research to Advance and Inform Health Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Edward, Jean

    2016-11-01

    The primary roles of nurse scientists in conducting health policy research are to increase knowledge in the discipline and provide evidence for informing and advancing health policies with the goal of improving the health outcomes of society. Health policy research informs, characterizes, explains, or tests hypotheses by employing a variety of research designs. Health policy research focuses on improving the access to care, the quality and cost of care, and the efficiency with which care is delivered. In this article, we explain how nurses might envision their research in a policy process framework, describe research designs that nurse researchers might use to inform and advance health policies, and provide examples of research conducted by nurse researchers to explicate key concepts in the policy process framework. Health policies are well informed and advanced when nurse researchers have a good understanding of the political process. The policy process framework provides a context for improving the focus and design of research and better explicating the connection between research evidence and policy. Nurses should focus their research on addressing problems of importance that are on the healthcare agenda, work with interdisciplinary teams of researchers, synthesize, and widely disseminate results.

  9. Incidence and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence on Nursing Staffs Caring for Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Jane Chiu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This one-year follow-up study determined the incidence and risk factors of workplace violence against nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital. The cohort members had a website to report events whenever they came across violence. A total of 971 events were reported. The incidence rates of physical violence, verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 1.7, 3.7, 0.2, 0.3, and 0 per staff-year, respectively. Young age, female sex, lower education, shorter duration of employment, and high level of anxiety of staff seemed to be the determinants of violence. Pre-placement education should focus on these staff to reduce workplace violence.

  10. Adverse incidents, patient flow and nursing workforce variables on acute psychiatric wards: the Tompkins Acute Ward Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Allan, Teresa; Simpson, Alan; Nijman, Henk; Warren, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Adverse incidents (violence, self-harm and absconding) can cause significant harm to patients and staff, are difficult to predict, and are driving an increase in security measures and defensive practice. To explore the relationship between adverse incidents on acute psychiatric wards, admissions and nursing workforce variables. A retrospective analysis of officially collected data covering a period of 30 months on 14 acute wards at three hospitals. This data included 69 serious untoward incidents. Adverse incidents were more likely during and after weeks of high numbers of male admissions, during weeks when other incidents also occurred, and during weeks of high regular staff absence through leave and vacancy. It may be possible to predict adverse incidents. Careful staff management and deployment may reduce the risks.

  11. The Problem of Competing Clinical and Research Goals in the Conduct of Clinical Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dover, Leslie J.

    Because the science of nursing is still at an early stage of development, nurses involved in clinical research often find that no appropriate measures are available to sample the theoretical construct of interest. Researchers often must design and test new instruments before proceeding to test theory. A study of the effect of nurse-client…

  12. Promoting the legitimacy and agency of new graduate nurses' participation in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matikainen, Mary Ann

    2017-06-01

    This paper explores the legitimacy and agency of new graduate mental health nurses to participate in research activities as a regular part of their professional nursing role. There is a wealth of literature describing personal and organisational factors that act as barriers to nurses' engagement in research and overcoming these barriers remains a challenge for health organisations. Some new graduate nurses are well positioned to contribute to research and yet the literature has given little attention to this specific cohort. This paper will show how facilitating new graduates' participation in research benefits the new graduate and the health service. New graduates learn research skills from experienced researchers and this ensures a sustainable future workforce of researchers. Employers who support staff to pursue professional challenges such as research are more likely to generate organisational commitment and loyalty amongst staff.

  13. Review of a nursing research report. Young people with depression: review of a nursing research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Janay

    2013-01-01

    McCann's et al. (2012) research study revealed several adverse effects that depression can have on young adults. The findings showed that depression in young adults can be life-threatening if not treated (McCann et al., 2012). One implication for evidenced-based nursing practice would be to educate family and friends on the signs of depression and how to respond to them. A suggestion for future research would be to conduct a study showing the effectiveness of different treatment methods (e.g., therapy, medications) on adolescent depression.

  14. Variation of Kozinets' framework and application to nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witney, Cynthia; Hendricks, Joyce; Cope, Vicki

    2016-05-01

    Online communities are new sites for undertaking research, with their textual interactions providing a rich source of data in real time. 'Ethnonetnography' is a research methodology based on ethnography that can be used in these online communities. In this study, the researcher and a specialist breast care nurse (SBCN) were immersed in the online community, adding to patients' breast cancer care and providing a nursing research component to the community. To examine Kozinets' ( 2010 ) framework for ethnonetnography and how it may be varied for use in a purpose-built, disease-specific, online support community. The online community provided an area where members could communicate with each other. Kozinets' ( 2010 ) framework was varied in that the research was carried out in a purpose-built community opf which an SBCN was a member who could provide support and advice. The application of the ethnonetnographic methodology has wide implications for clinical nursing practice and research. Ethnonetnography can be used to study disease-specific communities in a focused manner and can provide immediate benefits through the inclusion of an expert nurse and contemporaneous application of research findings to patient care. With ethical permission and the permission of online community members, nurse researchers can enter already established online communities. Ethnonetnography is ideally suited to nursing research as it provides the immediacy of evidence-based interaction with an expert nurse. These real-time responses improve support for those experiencing a critical life event.

  15. Research on a 'drug-centred' approach to psychiatric drug treatment: assessing the impact of mental and behavioural alterations produced by psychiatric drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieff, J

    2017-10-12

    This article explores an alternative understanding of how psychiatric drugs work that is referred to as the drug-centred model of drug action. Unlike the current disease-centred model, which suggests that psychiatric drugs work by correcting an underlying brain abnormality, the drug-centred model emphasises how psychiatric drugs affect mental states and behaviour by modifying normal brain processes. The alterations produced may impact on the emotional and behavioural problems that constitute the symptoms of mental disorders. Arguments are put forward that justify the consideration of the drug-centred model. The research necessary to support the prescription of drugs according to such a model is explored. Evidence from neurochemistry and comparative drug trials do not confirm the disease-centred model of drug action. Since psychiatric drugs are recognised to have mind- and behaviour-altering properties, the drug-centred model constitutes a plausible alternative. The drug-centred model suggests that research is needed to identify all the alterations produced by various sorts of drugs, both acute and long term, and how these might interact with the symptoms and problems associated with different mental disorders. This requires detailed animal and volunteer studies and data from patients prescribed drug treatment long term, along with placebo-controlled and comparative trials that look at the overall impact of drug-induced alterations on well-being and functioning as well as symptoms. Research is also needed on alternative ways of fulfilling the function of drug treatment. The moral aspect of using drugs to modify behaviour rather than treat disease needs honest and transparent consideration. It is hoped this discussion will encourage the psychiatric and pharmaceutical research community to provide more of the information that is required to use psychiatric drugs safely and effectively.

  16. Building capacity for the conduct of nursing research at a Veterans Administration hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Cynthia H; Schumacher, Sandra; Roiland, Rachel; Royer, Heather; Roberts, Tonya

    2015-05-01

    Evidence is the bedrock of nursing practice, and nursing research is the key source for this evidence. In this article, we draw distinctions between the use and the conduct of nursing research and provide a perspective for how the conduct of nursing research in a Veterans Administration hospital can build an organization's capacity for nursing research.

  17. Clinical nursing and midwifery research: grey literature in African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C; Dohrn, J; Omoni, G; Malata, A; Klopper, H; Larson, E

    2016-03-01

    This study reviewed grey literature to assess clinical nursing and midwifery research conducted in southern and eastern African countries over the past decade. The shortage of published nursing research from African countries severely limits the ability of practicing nurses and midwives to base clinical decisions on solid evidence. However, little is known regarding unpublished or unindexed clinical research ('grey literature'), a potentially rich source of information. Identifying these sources may reveal resources to assist nurses in providing evidence-based care. This scoping review of grey literature on clinical nursing and midwifery research in southern and eastern African countries helped to identify gaps in research and assess whether these gaps differ from published research. Systematic searches of grey literature were performed. Research was included if it was conducted by nurses in 1 of 25 southern or eastern African countries, between 2004 and 2014 and included patient outcomes. Data were extracted on location, institution, research topic, institutional connections and author information. Chi-square tests were performed to compare differences between indexed and non-indexed literature. We found 262 studies by 287 authors from 17 southern and eastern African countries covering 13 topics. Although all topics were also found in indexed literature and there were statistically significant differences between the number of times, fewer topics were covered in grey literature vs. indexed. Patient satisfaction and experience and traditional health practices were more likely to be published, whereas chronic disease, assault and paediatric-related research were less often published. Generally, there is a paucity of clinical nursing research in this region. This could reflect the shortage of nurses prepared to conduct research in this region. Nurses may find additional resources for evidence in the grey literature. A complete understanding of the state of nursing

  18. "The role of oxytocin in psychiatric disorders: A review of biological and therapeutic research findings"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David; Fallon, Daniel; Hill, Michael; Frazier, Jean A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin is a peptide hormone integral in parturition, milk let-down, and maternal behaviors that has been demonstrated in animal studies to be important in the formation of pair bonds and in social behaviors. This hormone is increasingly recognized as an important regulator of human social behaviors, including social decision making, evaluating and responding to social stimuli, mediating social interactions, and forming social memories. In addition, oxytocin is intricately involved in a broad array of neuropsychiatric functions, and may be a common factor important in multiple psychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders. This review article examines the extant literature on the evidence for oxytocin dysfunction in a variety of psychiatric disorders and highlights the need for further research to understand the complex role of the oxytocin system in psychiatric disease to pave the way for developing new therapeutic modalities. Articles were selected that involved human participants with various psychiatric disorders, either comparing oxytocin biology to healthy controls or examining the effects of exogenous oxytocin administration. PMID:24651556

  19. The role of oxytocin in psychiatric disorders: a review of biological and therapeutic research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David M; Fallon, Daniel; Hill, Michael; Frazier, Jean A

    2013-01-01

    After participating in this educational activity, the physician should be better able to 1. Identify the biological role of oxytocin in forming attachments. 2. Evaluate the relationship between various neuropsychiatric disorders and oxytocin. 3. Identify clinical implications of using oxytocin to treat various neuropsychiatric disorders. Oxytocin is a peptide hormone integral in parturition, milk letdown, and maternal behaviors that has been demonstrated in animal studies to be important in the formation of pair bonds and in social behaviors. This hormone is increasingly recognized as an important regulator of human social behaviors, including social decision making, evaluating and responding to social stimuli, mediating social interactions, and forming social memories. In addition, oxytocin is intricately involved in a broad array of neuropsychiatric functions and may be a common factor important in multiple psychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, and mood and anxiety disorders. This review article examines the extant literature on the evidence for oxytocin dysfunction in a variety of psychiatric disorders and highlights the need for further research to understand the complex role of the oxytocin system in psychiatric disease and thus pave the way for developing new therapeutic modalities. Articles were selected that involved human participants with various psychiatric disorders and that either compared oxytocin biology to healthy controls or examined the effects of exogenous oxytocin administration.

  20. Predictors of Improvement in Critical Thinking Skills among Nursing Students in an Online Graduate Nursing Research Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine predictors of improvement in critical thinking skills among online graduate nursing students in a graduate nursing research course. Thirty-five students who had taken an online Nursing research course within the prior 12 months and who were currently enrolled in the online graduate Nursing program at…

  1. Nursing Across the Lifespan: Implications of Lifecourse Theory for Nursing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Randi A; Blair, Lisa M; Schlegel, Emma C; McGovern, Colleen M; Nist, Marliese Dion; Sealschott, Stephanie; Arcoleo, Kimberly

    Despite the lifecourse focus of nursing clinical care, nursing research largely remains cross-sectional or process-oriented within silos determined by patient characteristics such as age, acuity, or disease process. Incorporating interdisciplinary lifecourse theory into pediatric nursing research provides the opportunity to expand nursing theories and research beyond practice, age, and disease silos. One such theory is the Lifecourse Health Development (LCHD) framework. LCHD takes a more expansive view of health development from preconception through old age based on the premise that health is a consequence of transactions between genetic, biological, behavioral, social, and economic contexts that change as a child develops over time (Halfon & Hochstein, 2002). LCHD also explains how intergenerational influences and prevention during early life help predict health development and disease over the lifespan. The preventive and lifecourse focus of LCHD is well-aligned with the lifespan wellness foci of pediatric nurses. The purpose of this article is to introduce pediatric nurse researchers to LCHD and discuss proposed augmentations and implications related to expanding LCHD into pediatric nursing research. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of a researcher designated music intervention on hospitalised psychiatric patients with different levels of anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chyn-Yng; Miao, Nae-Fang; Lee, Tso-Ying; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Yang, Hui-Ling; Chen, Wen-Chun; Chung, Min-Huey; Liao, Yuan-Mei; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a music intervention on hospitalised psychiatric patients with different levels of anxiety. In clinical practice, psychiatric inpatients and nurses routinely suffer from anxiety. A music intervention may possibly be useful, but knowledge as to how useful and how effective it is in patients with different levels of anxiety is limited. The study design was a three-group, repeated-measures experimental study. Subjects were 22 psychiatric patients who were divided into three groups based on their level of anxiety. They listened to 20 minutes of music each day for 10 days and were assessed using the Beck Anxiety Inventory before and after the music intervention and at a one-week follow-up; an electroencephalogram and finger temperature were monitored before and during the music intervention. Anxiety levels of all three groups showed a significant difference (p = 0·0339) after the intervention. The difference alpha and beta electroencephalogram percentages for all three groups showed a significant difference (p = 0·04; p = 0·01). The finger temperature showed a non-significant difference (p = 0·41). A music intervention can effectively alleviate the anxiety of hospitalised psychiatric patients who suffer from all levels of anxiety. The study recommends a practice in alleviating anxiety. Effective lower-cost interventions to reduce anxiety in psychiatric inpatient settings would be of interest to nurses and benefit patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Development of the TabacoQuest app for computerization of data collection on smoking in psychiatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Renata Marques de; Duarte, Alexandre Freitas; Alves, Domingos; Furegato, Antonia Regina Ferreira

    2016-08-29

    to develop a mobile app for research on the use of tobacco among psychiatric patients and the general population. applied research with the technological development of an app for data collection on an Android tablet. For its development, we considered three criteria: data security, benefits for participants and optimization of the time of researchers. We performed tests with twenty fictitious participants and a final test with six pilots. the app collects data, stores them in the database of the tablet and export then to an Excel spreadsheet. calculator, stopwatch, offline operation, branching logic, field validation and automatic tabulation. the app prevents human error, increases the quality of the data by validating them during the interview, allows the performing of automatic tabulation and makes the interviews less tiring. Its success may encourage the use of this and other computational resources by nurses as a research tool. desenvolver aplicativo mobile para pesquisa sobre o uso de tabaco entre pacientes psiquiátricos e a população geral. pesquisa aplicada com o desenvolvimento tecnológico de um aplicativo para coleta de dados em tablet Android. Para seu desenvolvimento, consideraram-se três critérios: segurança dos dados, benefícios para os participantes e otimização do tempo dos pesquisadores. Testes com 20 participantes fictícios e teste final com seis pilotos. o aplicativo coleta os dados, armazena-os no banco de dados do tablet e os exporta para planilha Excel. Recursos: calculadora; cronômetro; funcionamento off-line, lógica de ramificação, validação de campos e tabulação automática. o aplicativo previne erros humanos e aumenta a qualidade dos dados ao validá-los durante a entrevista, permite realizar tabulação automática e torna as entrevistas menos cansativas. Seu sucesso poderá incentivar o uso desse e outros recursos computacionais pelos enfermeiros, como ferramenta de pesquisa. desarrollar aplicativo móvil para hacer

  4. Admiral nursing competency project: practice development and action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewing, Jan; Traynor, Victoria

    2005-07-01

    Admiral Nurses are specialist dementia care nurses working in the community with carers of those who have a dementia. The aim of the competency project (2000-2003) was threefold. Firstly to work collaboratively with these specialist nurses to facilitate the development a competency framework that reflects the needs of the Admiral Nursing Service. Secondly, to provide a way to structure evidence demonstrating evolving competency. Thirdly, to specifically enable the nurses to demonstrate evidence of achieving the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council's Higher Level Practice standard. The two complementary approaches of emancipatory action research and systematic practice development were adopted. Methods were taken from action research and systematic practice development approaches with an emphasis on promoting and enabling enlightenment, critical reflection, ownership and creating the best conditions for long-term commitment to the competency framework. The main outcome from this project was the development of a specialist nursing competency framework. The Admiral Nurses' Competency Framework is made up of a set of eight core competencies with three levels of competency statements, loosely structured around the Higher Level Practice standard, and guidance documentation to illustrate how work-based evidence can be generated to demonstrate competence. There were also process-derived outcomes associated with combining systematic practice development with emancipatory action research that had an impact on the culture. The main outcomes here were that practitioners engaged in and experienced learning about how to research their own practice and the consequences of doing this. They also learnt about specialist nursing practice more widely than Admiral Nursing. Finally, there was some increase in awareness about the culture within their teams and organizations. The final competency framework reflects the needs of the service, is owned by the majority of practitioners and

  5. A beginner's guide to ethnographic observation in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Tiffany

    2017-03-22

    Background Observation is mentioned in most ethnographic textbooks, but specific details about how it should be conducted and the practicalities to be considered in ethnographic nursing research are not always explicit. This paper explores the experiences of and challenges faced by a novice nurse researcher who used observation to collect data. Aim To provide a novice researcher's perspective of observation in ethnographic nursing research and to highlight the associated challenges. Discussion Challenges that arose in observation began with determining which perspective to take, followed by rehearsing observation, developing and maintaining a constructive relationship with the observation site, being aware of the influence of the observer, managing interactions between the observed and the observer, and responding to ethical issues. Conclusion Novice nurse researchers considering using observation to collect data should be aware of the potential challenges they might encounter. Implications for practice The information presented in this paper will enable novice researchers to anticipate these issues and develop strategies to prevent or address them.

  6. The relationships among personality, social support, and resilience of abused nurses at emergency rooms and psychiatric wards in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsiu-Fen; Chang, Shu-Chen; Wang, Hsiu-Hung

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the authors in this study was to identify factors associated with resilience that helped abused nurses face and cope with violent events. The data for this cross-sectional study were collected from June 2013 to December 2013; 272 participants were recruited from emergency rooms and psychiatric wards in four hospitals in central Taiwan. Among these participants, 230 (84.6%) met the inclusion criterion and completed all questionnaires; 69 (30%) of them reported having experienced only verbal violence; 46 (20%) reported having experienced only physical violence, and 115 (50%) reported having experienced a combination of verbal and physical violence. The following were positively associated with resilience score: having a college education or greater (exp((β)()) = 1.045, p = .018), extraversion (exp((β)()) = 1.012 per unit increase in the score, p support (exp((β)()) = 1.004 per unit increase in the score, p = .031), peer support (exp((β)()) = 1.008 per unit increase in the score, p = .006), and lower level of neuroticism (exp((β)()) = 0.983 per unit increase in the score, p resilience was explained by the variables assessed. Adequate support and advanced education are important for abused nurses to enhance their resilience.

  7. A case for the use of autoethnography in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ashley L

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the basis for and potential usefulness of autoethnography as a research method in nursing. While qualitative research in nursing has traditionally involved the researcher taking an objective stance, autoethnography, with roots in the social sciences, is an emerging method that examines the researcher's own experience in a cultural context. Discussion paper. Data sources from 1979-2013 in the CINAHL, Medline and PsycInfo databases were drawn on including articles from nursing and social science journals on autoethnography and related narrative-based approaches. Autoethnography is based on the assumption that reality is multifaceted and the role of culture and context is crucial in understanding human experience. The reader is engaged through the evocation of emotion and the stimulation of reflection. While autoethnography has thus far been little used in the discipline of nursing, it is a methodology that offers novel insights and an opportunity to examine the impact of nurses' personal and professional cultural identity on their practice. Through the use of a subjective lens, autoethnography gives nurses the opportunity to tell stories that would otherwise not be heard. It involves a courageous laying bare of the self to gain new cultural understandings and it offers the potential for nurses to learn from the experiences and reflections of other nurses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Integrating nurse researchers in clinical practice – a challenging, but necessary task for nurse leaders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kjerholt, Mette; Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher

    2016-01-01

    nursing, including integrating nurse researchers in ANP positions. Methods A collective case study including three ANPs took place at a large regional hospital in Denmark. The cases were first analysed by focusing on the generic features, functions and skills of ANPs, and second by focusing...

  9. Swedish nurses' perception of nursing research and its implementation in clinical practice: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohman, Doris M; Ericsson, Terese; Borglin, Gunilla

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, nursing research is seen as an integral part of professional nursing although implementing knowledge derived from nursing research into the practice setting is still problematic. Current research, conducted mainly with a descriptive quantitative design, highlights the struggle experienced by Registered Nurses (RNs) to use and implement research findings in clinical practice. Therefore, the aim of this naturalistic inquiry was to explore nurses' perception of nursing research and its implementation in a clinical context. A qualitative approach was chosen, and four focus group discussions were conducted. The groups comprised a total of 16 RNs (three men and 13 women) working in a secondary care setting. The transcribed texts were analysed, inspired by Burnard's description of content analysis. The texts were interpreted as representing three predominant themes: scholastic, individual and contextual influences highlighted as influential components impacting on the RNs' views on research and its implementation as well as on their readiness to accept and support it. However, the most influential aspect permeating our themes was their educational background--the type of qualification they held. In general, the RNs with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing viewed research and the implementation of knowledge in practice more favourably than those RNs with a diploma. Our findings, although based on a small qualitative study, are congruent with others, indicating that further research is warranted concerning the impact of education on RNs' views of nursing research and its implementation. Hence, it might well be that the RNs' educational point of departure needs to be stressed more than what so far have been anticipated. In the meanwhile, it is possible that a number of strategies could be tested to promote a more favourable view in these issues and where the nursing education has the possibility to influence this endeavour. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of

  10. Innovative strategies for teaching nursing research in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Shwu-Ru; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Chang, Chia-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is imperative in clinical settings because it bridges the gap between research findings and clinical practice. Promoting nursing student interest and enthusiasm for research is therefore crucial when teaching nursing research. The aim of thus study was to develop innovative teaching strategies that increase nursing students' interests and engagement in research. This study employed a descriptive, pretest-posttest, quasiexperimental design with 103 participants in the experimental group and 106 in the control group. The Attitudes toward Research Questionnaire, Classroom Engagement Scale, Self-Directed Learning Instrument, Nursing Eight Core Competencies Scale, Value of Teams survey, and a research knowledge test were applied to evaluate the outcomes of the innovative teaching strategies. Scores for the research knowledge test were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group in posttest 1 and posttest 2. After the intervention, participants in the experimental group exhibited higher scores on attitudes toward research, eight core competencies in nursing,value of teams, classroom engagement, and self-directed learning than participants in the control group. Students in the experimental group perceived a lower degree of pressure and higher degrees of interest, enjoyment, and acceptance of the research course than students in the control group. This study confirmed that using innovative teaching strategies in nursing research courses enhances student interest and enthusiasm about evidence-based practice.

  11. Meaning in Life: Translating Nursing Concepts to Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce J. Fitzpatrick, PhD, RN, FAAN

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available It is proposed that individuals who find meaning in their lives experience a higher level of health and wellness. In this paper, research focused on life meaning is described. This program of research includes studies of life meaning from the individual person and/or patient perspective and studies of the meaningfulness of nurses' professional work life. Translations of the theoretical concepts into research and professional nursing interventions are described.

  12. Views of Black nurses toward genetic research and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Young, Yolanda M; Spruill, Ida J

    2013-06-01

    To describe views and beliefs that Black nurses hold regarding several conceptual areas of genetic research and testing. Data were generated using a descriptive, cross-sectional design. The sample consisted of 384 Black nurses attending the 2009 annual conference of the National Black Nurses Association in Las Vegas, Nevada. The chi-squared test was used to evaluate group differences by education level, functional area, age, and gender. One half of the Black nurses surveyed believed the potential for the discriminative misuse of genetic information against minority populations exists. However, 84% of these nurses believed the possibility of information misuse should not be used as a barrier to participation in genetic research and testing by the Black populace. Black nurses expressed concerns about the potential for discriminatory use of genetic information gleaned from research and testing. Yet, Black nurses recognize the importance of racial-ethnic minority participation in genetic research and testing. Participation in genetic research and testing by diverse populations will provide opportunities to improve the healthcare delivery system and aid the eradication of health disparities. More research is needed to clarify factors that contribute to the bifurcation of importance for participation, reluctance to participate, and what interventions might reduce reluctance. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Validation study of the early onset schizophrenia diagnosis in the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernal, Ditte Lammers; Stenstrøm, Anne Dorte; Staal, Nina

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess (1) the concordance and validity of schizophrenia register diagnoses among children and adolescents (early onset schizophrenia = EOS) in the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register (DPCRR), and (2) the validity of clinical record schizophrenia diagnoses...... in inpatient settings, EOS diagnoses are reliable and valid for register-based research. Schizophrenia diagnosed in children and adolescents in outpatient settings were found to have a high number of false-positives, both due to registration errors and diagnostic practice. Utilizing this knowledge......, it is possible to reduce the number of false-positives in register-based research of EOS....

  14. Research teaching in learning disability nursing: Exploring the views of student and registered learning disability nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northway, Ruth; Parker, Michelle; James, Neil; Davies, Lynsey; Johnson, Kaye; Wilson, Sally

    2015-12-01

    Whilst there is a need to develop the research base within learning disability nursing it is also significant that currently there is little published data as to how research is taught to this group of nurses. To increase understanding of how research is currently taught to learning disability nurses within the UK. A survey design was used. The research was undertaken at a conference held in the UK in March 2014. 310 learning disability nurses attending the conference of which 212 completed the free text question. This comprised student nurses (n=158), registered nurses working in practice settings (n=25) and registered nurses working in educational institutions (n=24). Five participants did not specify their background. Participants were invited to complete a questionnaire that included a free text question regarding the teaching of research to learning disability nurses: it is the responses to this question that are reported in this paper. Responses were transcribed and thematically analysed. Eight themes emerged: Teaching approach--the good and the bad; finding the right level; right from the start; we need more time; generic versus specialist; there's not enough; getting research into practice; and what should we focus on? Variations exist in terms of the timing of research education, the teaching approaches used, and hence the quality of student experience. Of particular concern is the apparent gap between research teaching and the use of research in practice, and the reported lack of support for research within practice settings. However, enthusiasm for research is evident and hence recommendations are made both to enhance teaching and to strengthen links with practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bourdieu's theory of practice and its potential in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhynas, Sarah J

    2005-04-01

    This paper seeks to consider the utility of Bourdieu's "Theory of Practice" in nursing, and considers specifically its use as a framework for research exploring nurses' conceptualizations of illness and the patients in their care. Bourdieu's work uses the concepts of field, capital and habitus to explain interactions within the social world. This paper describes these concepts and their relationship with nursing is discussed using dementia care as an example. The work of French scholar Pierre Bourdieu has contributed to debates throughout the social sciences, but has had relatively little attention in the nursing literature. Pierre Bourdieu's work developed against a backdrop of change in the academic world. The emergence of the social sciences and the debate around objective and subjective styles of research were influential in the development of his "Theory of Practice". The importance of the conceptualization process is discussed, and the considerable potential influence of conceptualization on patient care is highlighted. Reflexivity is a cornerstone of Bourdieu's work, and is an important feature of nursing research. Examples of health care research using his work as a framework are discussed, and some of the challenges of the approach are outlined. The use of Bourdieu's "Theory of Practice" as a research framework could allow nurse researchers to explore the interactions of nurses with the structures, agents and symbols of illness within the field of care. This work could enhance understanding of how nurses view and react to patients in their care, and promote the development of practice innovations and policy change. The theory may, therefore, have much to offer future nursing research.

  16. Narrative Pedagogy: Transforming Nursing Education Through 15 Years of Research in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironside, Pamela M

    This article provides a review of current disciplinary understanding of Narrative Pedagogy and describes the implications for ongoing transformation in nursing education. Narrative Pedagogy has been enacted and investigated by teachers around the world for more than 15 years. Few nursing educational innovations or pedagogies in nursing have been adopted in such an array of settings/levels. A review of the nursing literature was conducted to locate reports of research on and teaching innovations derived from Narrative Pedagogy. Narrative Pedagogy has an extensive and longitudinal body of research describing how the approach contributes to the educational transformation the discipline seeks. Narrative Pedagogy and the growing literature describing how it is enacted provides a way for teachers and students to persist in questioning their current understanding of nursing, the ways they think about the situations they encounter, and how their practice can best be learned.

  17. Nurse Research Experiences and Attitudes Toward the Conduct of Intensive Care Research: A Questionnaire Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Orla M; Dale, Craig; Mehta, Sangeeta; Pinto, Ruxandra; Rose, Louise

    2016-01-01

    To characterize ICU nurses' research experience, work environments, and attitudes toward clinical research in critically ill adults and children. Cross-sectional survey. Eight (seven adult and one pediatric) academic ICUs affiliated with the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group. Four hundred eighty-two ICU nurses. None. Response rate was 56%. Most participants had over 6 years of ICU experience (61%) and held a baccalaureate nursing degree (57%). Most participants (63%) had provided care for patients receiving research study procedures more than five times in the past 12 months and agreed that research leads to improved care for the critically ill (78%) and eligible patients should be approached for research participation (78%). Few perceived practicalities of nursing care are considered in study design (20%); 41% agreed that research studies increases nursing workload. Few participants reported receiving adequate information about study progress (24%) or findings (26%). Principal factor analysis identified three factors each in the environmental and attitudinal domains. Linear regression models demonstrated that positive relationships between researchers and clinicians were associated with favorable perceptions of research impact on nursing care (p research acceptability (p research (p research (p research acceptability (p study protocol development and/or data analysis was associated with less favorable attitudes about nursing engagement in research (p research on nursing care (p research-intensive ICUs, nurses frequently care for research participants and believe ICU research is important. Inclusion of nurses in study protocol development, improved communication of study progress and findings, and investigation of research-related nursing workload are warranted. Such interventions will support intervention fidelity and data reliability during study conduct and translation of evidence into practice on study completion.

  18. Five-Year Bibliometric Review of Genomic Nursing Science Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Janet K; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; DeBerg, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    This bibliometric review profiles the focus, dissemination, and impact of genomic nursing science articles from 2010 to 2014. Data-based genomic nursing articles by nursing authors and articles by non-nurse principal investigators funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research were categorized into the Genomic Nursing Science Blueprint nursing areas. Bibliometric content analysis was used. A total of 197 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 60.3% were on biologic plausibility, 12.1% on client self-management, 11.1% on decision making or decision support, 8.1% on family, and 4.0% on communication, with the remaining 4.0% of articles focused on other topics. Few (11.6%) addressed healthcare disparities in the study purpose. Thirty-four references (17.2%) were cited 10 or more times. Research-based genomic nursing science articles are in the discovery phase of inquiry. All topics were investigated in more than one country. Healthcare disparities were addressed in few studies. Research findings from interdisciplinary teams were disseminated beyond nursing audiences, with findings addressing biologic discovery, decision making or support, and family being cited most frequently. Gaps in the reviewed articles included cross-cutting themes, ethics, and clinical utility. Interdisciplinary research is needed to document clinical and system outcomes of genomic nursing science implementation in health care. Although the review identifies areas that are encountered in clinical practice, relevance to practice will depend on evaluation of findings and subsequent development of clinical guidelines. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS RESEARCH AND ITS APPLICATION TO NURSING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Su-Yeon Park

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This in-depth integrative literature review aimed to investigate comparative effectiveness research (CER methodologies applicable to nursing research and to propose a CER design relevant to nursing education. Integration and synthesis were conducted from August 20 to December 15, 2013 and from October 20 to December 05, 2015 using electronic databases and refereed published books. The key words were “comparative effectiveness research,” “education,” “patient outcomes,” “effectiveness,” “cost-effectiveness,” and “efficiency.” All selected literatures were initially scrutinized by the principal investigator in terms of scientific rigor and then synthesized on an ongoing basis. CER methodologies in nursing research were presented to be significant in terms of enabling the distinctiveness of the nursing profession to stand out. Three CER methodologies applicable to nursing research—a Pragmatic Clinical Trial, Observational Comparative Effectiveness Research and Cost Effectiveness Research—revealed each of their distinguishable strengths and weaknesses compared to the Randomized Controlled Trial. For ethical considerations, the importance of ensuring “equipoise” was identified. Lastly, in a head to head comparison of two nursing education programs, a single blind, randomized crossover study design was proposed as a type of Pragmatic Clinical Trial utilizing cost-utility analysis. A mixed method Analysis of Covariance and a Doubly Multivariate Repeated Analysis of Covariance were suggested as relevant statistical analyses. Considering that CER is still inchoate in nursing research and nurse scientists’ endeavors to address the gap are urgent, this study is compelling in that it proposed a rigorous CER design not only directly applicable to nursing education, but also to other disciplines in education.

  20. "Providing structure" as a psychiatric nursing intervention: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, L Amar; Nugter, Annet; Goossens, Peter J J; van Achterberg, Theo

    2013-10-01

    The focus is on a nursing intervention called "providing structure" (PS). This label does not exist in the Nursing Interventions Classification. The following three questions were asked: (a) How is PS defined? (b) What are the goals of PS? and (c) What is the evidence regarding the effectiveness of PS? A systematic literature review. Forty articles, predominantly qualitative studies of PS, were selected for review. Regarding PS, three elements were mentioned: to impose and maintain rules and limits; to assess the condition of the patient; and to interact with the patient. The goals for PS related to patient security, making expectations explicit, and recovering from illness. Major findings were reviewed, but little was found about the effectiveness of PS. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. NIH's National Institute of Nursing Research Is Changing Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues NIH's National Institute of Nursing Research Is Changing Lives Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. From ...

  2. Narrative in nursing research: an overview of three approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Briege; Proudfoot, Denise; Corbally, Melissa

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to present and discuss three popular narrative research approaches which have been successfully used by the authors in nursing research. Examples of each approach are offered to illustrate potential application in healthcare contexts. The creation, function and interpretation of narratives are of increasing interest to nurse researchers worldwide. Currently a variety of narrative research approaches are used to explore how people make sense of experience. While this diversity adds to the richness and scope of the methodology, practitioners new to narrative research may struggle in determining which approach best suits their research purposes and contexts. This discussion paper presents the philosophical basis, methodology, strengths and challenges of the following three commonly used narrative approaches: Murray's Narrative Framework, the Biographical Narrative Interpretive Method and Arts-Based Narrative Methods. Data sources dating from 1934-2014 were used. These included seminal texts and articles from nursing and social science journals on narrative and narrative research found in the CINAHL, Medline and PsycInfo databases. This discussion offers clarity and guidance to nurse researchers who are considering/ using narrative research methods to enquire into the storied nature of human experience and sense making processes. Employing a specific narrative research approach requires close attention to the 'fit' of the research question/context with the particular method under consideration. While sharing some narrative commonalities, each of these three methods enables the emergence of unique analytic and interpretive perspectives about stories relevant to nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Nurses' Attitudes about Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Care: What Research Tells Us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jo Anne

    1995-01-01

    Review of research on nurses' attitudes about AIDS reveals a misconception that negative attitudes prevail. Continued focus on negative attitudes might steer nurses away from AIDS care. Research should emphasize what nurses need to learn about AIDS. (SK)

  4. Geriatric Hospital Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Research Utilization and Empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunwook Kang, RN, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: This study found that RNs in geriatric hospitals perceived that interpreting and understanding research reports in English was the greatest barrier to the use of research findings. Administrators and nurse managers of geriatric hospitals need to provide RNs with opportunities to participate in research-related activities and to empower RNs in order to facilitate research utilization.

  5. Qualitative case study methodology in nursing research: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Susan; Jack, Susan

    2009-06-01

    This paper is a report of an integrative review conducted to critically analyse the contemporary use of qualitative case study methodology in nursing research. Increasing complexity in health care and increasing use of case study in nursing research support the need for current examination of this methodology. In 2007, a search for case study research (published 2005-2007) indexed in the CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Sociological Abstracts and SCOPUS databases was conducted. A sample of 42 case study research papers met the inclusion criteria. Whittemore and Knafl's integrative review method guided the analysis. Confusion exists about the name, nature and use of case study. This methodology, including terminology and concepts, is often invisible in qualitative study titles and abstracts. Case study is an exclusive methodology and an adjunct to exploring particular aspects of phenomena under investigation in larger or mixed-methods studies. A high quality of case study exists in nursing research. Judicious selection and diligent application of literature review methods promote the development of nursing science. Case study is becoming entrenched in the nursing research lexicon as a well-accepted methodology for studying phenomena in health and social care, and its growing use warrants continued appraisal to promote nursing knowledge development. Attention to all case study elements, process and publication is important in promoting authenticity, methodological quality and visibility.

  6. Teaching qualitative research as a means of socialization to nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Daniella; Tamir, Batya; Man, Michal

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present article is to present a model for teaching qualitative research as part of nursing education. The uniqueness of the course model is that it seeks to combine two objectives: (1) initial familiarization of the students with the clinical-nursing environment and the role of the nurse; and (2) understanding the qualitative research approach and inculcation of basic qualitative research skills. The article describes how teaching two central genres in qualitative research - ethnographic and narrative research - constitutes a way of teaching the important skills, concepts, and values of the nursing profession. The article presents the model's structure, details its principal stages, and explains the rationale of each stage. It also presents the central findings of an evaluation of the model's implementation in eight groups over a two-year period. In this way the article seeks to contribute to nursing education literature in general, and to those engaged in clinical training and teaching qualitative research in nursing education in particular. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Role-player expectations regarding the education of nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelie, S C; Bornman, J E; Botes, A C

    2003-12-01

    This article reports on role player expectations regarding the education of nursing research. The importance of the role player expectations are two-fold: firstly as a factor in the external environment influencing and guiding the formulation phase of the development of standards and secondly, due to the clear indications of problems regarding nursing research in the nursing profession in literature. The role player expectations were elicited using a qualitative, exploratory and contextual design. The role player population included nurse educators, nurses in managerial, clinical and research positions, students and the medical profession. The data was gathered using the naïve sketches and qualitative data analysis was done using Morse & Field's approach (1996:103-107) in combination with Tesch's data analysis approach as cited by Creswell (1994:154-156). Sixty initial categories were narrowed down to six final categories, which are the research learning programme, personnel, students, departmental policies, funding and support systems. The role player expectations were elicited as part of a research study aiming tot develop a self-evaluation system for quality assurance in nursing research and as such, the role player expectations plays a pivotal role in the development of standards for the self-evaluation system.

  8. Championing person-first language: a call to psychiatric mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mary E; Pease, Elizabeth A; Lambert, Kris; Hickman, Diane R; Robinson, Ora; McCoy, Kathleen T; Barut, Jennifer K; Musker, Kathleen M; Olive, Dana; Noll, Connie; Ramirez, Jeffery; Cogliser, Dawn; King, Joan Kenerson

    2013-01-01

    At the heart of recovery-oriented psychiatric mental health care are the dignity and respect of each person and the ways in which helping professionals convey a person's uniqueness, strengths, abilities, and needs. "Person-first language" is a form of linguistic expression relying on words that reflect awareness, a sense of dignity, and positive attitudes about people with disabilities. As such, person-first language places emphasis on the person first rather than the disability (e.g., "person with schizophrenia" rather than "a schizophrenic"). This article champions the use of person-first language as a foundation for recovery-oriented practice and enhanced collaborative treatment environments that foster respect, human dignity, and hope.

  9. Stimulating student interest in nursing research: a program pairing students with practicing clinician researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, Susan; Burns, Suzanne; Horn, Heather

    2009-04-01

    Teaching nursing research to baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students can be challenging for nurse educators. The content of research courses often is dry and seemingly irrelevant to BSN students who are focused on more concrete tasks, such as passing clinical and academic courses. Through our search for creative ways to bring energy, excitement, passion, purpose, and reality to students' views of nursing research, we designed a program in which hospital nurses involved in clinical research projects mentored students in the clinical environment. Students were asked to perform literature reviews, collect and analyze data, and help with poster presentations. Student evaluations at the end of the program were positive, and analysis of pretest and posttest scores indicated student interest in nursing research increased significantly (p = 0.00).

  10. Nurse Delegation in Home Care: Research Guiding Policy Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather M; Farnham, Jennifer; Reinhard, Susan C

    2016-09-01

    The current study evaluated nurse delegation in home care, a pilot program introduced in 2007 in New Jersey to promote home care options for consumers needing assistance with medical/nursing tasks. Findings on readiness for the program, barriers and facilitating factors, experience with the program, and recommendations are summarized and presented. Methods included surveys and interviews with participants in nurse delegation, observations of planning and implementation meetings, and review meeting minutes. Major findings were no negative outcomes for consumers, improvements in quality of life and quality of care for consumers, high readiness and increasing satisfaction with experience in delegation, perception of nurse delegation in home care as a valued option, and the challenges of ensuring adequate staffing. Subsequent changes in regulation in New Jersey are underway, translating this research into policy. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(9), 7-15.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. [The most cited themes in the research in the field of Mental Health: analyses of six international nursing and medical journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunico, Laura; Fredo, Susanna; Bernini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The review aimed to identify and analyse the future development on the topic by analysing the main themes discussed in number of scientific journal focused on Mental Health both by nurses and physicians.. 4 international journals focused on Mental health and psychiatry International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, American Journal of Psychiatry, Australian and New Zeland Journal of Psychiatry as well as two journal focused generically on health, Journal of Advanced Nursing and Lancet were scrutinized. We have analysed the papers of 2012-2015 for the specialised journals and last and first 6 months of 2012 and 2013 and 2014-2015 for the generic. Editorials, comments and contributions regarding theoretical models were exluded. From the analysis we identified 9 themes and for each theme the pertinent category. For the diagnostic grouping we used the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision. A trend in research about mood disorders, schizophrenia and addictions and comorbidity emerged according to the 2099 abstracts analysed. Within medical research antidepressants were the most studied psychotropic medication and cognitive behaviour therapy was the most studied psychotherapy. Within nursing research: the nurse-patient relationship, adherence and monitoring of pharmacological therapy, the treatment planning and the working environment, the nursing training and its efficacy. The clinical research trials were twice as frequent in the medical versus nursing research where qualitative research prevails. The research challenge will be to find a new paradigm fit for the future psychiatry having at its disposition the patient's genoma, and needing to routinely use biomarkers for a personalised therapy. A further challenge might be the promotion of interprofessional research between doctors and nurses and the acquisition of new competences of health professionals needed to tackle the

  12. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity and psychological adaptation of the nurses in a structured SARS caring unit during outbreak: a prospective and periodic assessment study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tung-Ping; Lien, Te-Cheng; Yang, Chih-Yi; Su, Yiet Ling; Wang, Jia-Horng; Tsai, Sing-Ling; Yin, Jeo-Chen

    2007-01-01

    To assess the rapidly changing psychological status of nurses during the acute phase of the 2003 SARS outbreak, we conducted a prospective and periodic evaluation of psychiatric morbidity and psychological adaptation among nurses in SARS units and non-SARS units. Nurse participants were from two SARS units (regular SARS [N=44] and SARS ICU [N=26]) and two non-SARS units (Neurology [N=15] and CCU [N=17]). Participants periodically self-evaluated their depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, sleep disturbance, attitude towards SARS and family support. Results showed that depression (38.5% vs. 3.1%) and insomnia (37% vs. 9.7%) were, respectively, greater in the SARS unit nurses than the non-SARS unit nurses. No difference between these two groups was found in the prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms (33% vs. 18.7%), yet, three unit subjects (SARS ICU, SARS regular and Neurology) had significantly higher rate than those in CCU (29.7% vs. 11.8%, respectively) (pregular SARS unit. Occurrence of psychiatric symptoms was linked to direct exposure to SARS patient care, previous mood disorder history, younger age and perceived negative feelings. Positive coping attitude and strong social and family support may have protected against acute stress. In conclusion, the psychological impact on the caring staffs facing future bio-disaster will be minimized with lowered risk factors and a safer and more structured work environment.

  13. Ricoeur's hermeneutic phenomenology: an implication for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Andreas; Papadopoulos, I Rena; Beadsmoore, Alan

    2008-12-01

    Researchers and educators are increasingly implementing qualitative research methods to investigate issues of concern and interest. Hermeneutics has risen as an option for the qualitative research paradigm particularly after the 1970s. The precedence of the sciences that have applied hermeneutics as their approach to investigation is provided with special reference to nursing. In the nursing science, hermeneutics have been used extensively as a qualitative research method to investigate a variety of issues, through the lived experiences of the participants. In this paper, we introduce important aspects of the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur and we discuss the reasons why we have applied this approach in our study titled 'Quality Nursing Care: perspectives of patients with cancer and the nursing response'. The arguments that are presented here can be generalised to fit other areas of Nursing Science. Through this paper our aim is not only to familiarise the reader with Ricoeur's work, but also to arrive at an appreciation of his philosophy as a methodological approach for future nursing research.

  14. A study on clinical nursing research trends and hotspots based on bibliometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Fan Han

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was conducted to understand the trends and research hotspots of clinical nursing in China and abroad, thereby to provide guidance for nursing practice and studies. Methods: We retrieved clinical nursing literature (excluding literature related to psychological nursing and traditional Chinese medicine nursing cited in Wanfang Data (www.wanfangdata.com.cn and PubMed between 2007 and 2015 and subsequently performed bibliometric analyses on article volume, journal, clustering of high-frequency keywords, and co-occurrence of keywords. Results: A total of 10374 publications, excluding those related to psychological nursing, were retrieved via a PubMed search. The literature displayed a rising trend in terms of annual publication volume. The journal distribution of clinical nursing publications overall was consistent with Bradford's Law. The main contents of clinical nursing literature between 2007 and 2009 included: (1 studies on effects of the midwife and midwifery methods for natural childbirth; (2 studies on emergency nursing care; (3 studies on dementia care; (4 studies on bandage dressing in trauma nursing; and (5 studies on quality of life in cancer patients nursing. The main contents of clinical nursing literature between 2010 and 2012 included: (1 studies on obstetric nurse–patient relationships; (2 studies on patients' medical team in stroke nursing; (3 studies on cancer nursing methods; (4 studies on nursing patients with trauma related to urinary incontinence; and (5 studies on the quality of life of caregivers of dementia patients. The main contents of clinical nursing literature between 2013 and 2015 included (1 studies on skin care and bandaging in trauma nursing; (2 studies on evidence-based nursing in AIDS care; (3 studies on nurses' role in obstetric nurse–patient relationships; studies on cancer nursing methods; (4 studies on nursing for Alzheimer's disease and dementia; and (5 studies on caregivers

  15. The 2014-2018 Oncology Nursing Society Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobf, M Tish; Cooley, Mary E; Duffy, Sonia; Doorenbos, Ardith; Eaton, Linda; Given, Barbara; Mayer, Deborah K; McCorkle, Ruth; Miaskowski, Christine; Mitchell, Sandra; Sherwood, Paula; Bender, Catherine; Cataldo, Janine; Hershey, Denise; Katapodi, Maria; Menon, Usha; Schumacher, Karen; Sun, Virginia; Von Ah, Diane; LoBiondo-Wood, Geri; Mallory, Gail

    2015-09-01

    To identify priority areas of research for the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Research Agenda for 2014-2018, consistent with ONS's mission to promote excellence in oncology nursing and quality cancer care
. Review of the literature, 2013 ONS Research Priorities Survey, National Institute of Nursing Research, and the National Cancer Institute research foci
. Multimethod consensus-building approach by content leaders and content experts of the ONS Research Agenda Project Team
. The 2014-2018 Research Agenda Project Team identified eight high-priority research areas: symptoms, late effects of cancer treatment and survivorship care, palliative and end-of-life care, self-management, aging, family and caregivers, improving healthcare systems, and risk reduction. In addition, four cross-cutting themes were identified: biomarkers, bioinformatics, comparative effectiveness research, and dissemination and implementation science. The Research Agenda is a synthesis of the state of the science in cancer and identifies gaps and directions for the conduct and dissemination of research. Oncology nurses can use the agenda to inform clinical practice, develop research proposals, inform policy makers, support interdisciplinary research efforts, and promote scientist and clinician collaborations in targeted patient-centered research
.

  16. Research Utilization among Nurses at a Teaching Hospital in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albanus Kyalo Mutisya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the era of evidence based practice (EBP, health care delivery should be grounded on new or validated knowledge and evidence from research. The aim of the study was to assess research utilization by nurses and the influencing factors at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH, the largest teaching hospital in Kenya. Methods: The study employed a descriptive design that utilized both quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection. It incorporated the Barriers to Research Utilization Scale. It was conducted in six specialized care areas at KNH. Data was collected using questionnaires, Focus Group Discussion and in-depth interviews. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 13 and qualitative data analyzed using themes. Results: The study found that 20.6% of the nurses were participating in research related to their work and 53.6% of these were implementing research findings to practice. Over 2/3 (70.5% of the respondents were basing their evidence for practice on the knowledge gained during their nursing school. The three greatest barriers to research utilization were that research reports are not readily available (68.7%, unclear implications for practice (66.5% and inadequate facilities for implementation (66.4%.Conclusion: It is recommended that sensitization trainings on nursing research/ utilization of findings in nursing practice be established to create awareness, motivate and enhance nurses’ abilities and also facilities should be provided to enable implementation.

  17. Assesment of psychosocial work conditions of nurses at selected hospital wards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rotter, Iwona; Kemicer-Chmielewska, Ewa; Lipa, Paweł; Kotwas, Artur; Jurczak, Anna; Laszczyńska, Maria; Karakiewicz, Beata

    2014-01-01

    .... The purpose of the work was the assessment of psychosocial working conditions of nurses. The research included 388 nurses working at surgical wards, medical treatment wards, and psychiatric wards...

  18. An introduction to a postmodern approach to nursing research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discourse analysis is introduced as a Poststructuralist and Social Constructionist ";approach"; to nursing research developing within the postmodern line of thought. A qualitative exploratory research design was chosen that explored specific Poststructuralist and Social Constructionist literature on research by means of an ...

  19. A randomized controlled clinical trial of a nurse-led structured psychosocial intervention program for people with first-onset mental illness in psychiatric outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wai-Tong; Bressington, Daniel

    2015-09-30

    This study aimed to test the effectiveness of a nurse-led structured psychosocial intervention program in Chinese patients with first-onset mental illness. A single-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial design was used. The study involved 180 participants with mild to moderate-severe symptoms of psychotic or mood disorders who were newly referred to two psychiatric outpatient clinics in Hong Kong. Patients were randomly assigned to either an eight-session nurse-led psychosocial intervention program (plus usual care) or usual psychiatric outpatient care (both n=90). The primary outcome was psychiatric symptoms. Outcomes were measured at recruitment, one week and 12 months post-intervention. Patients in the psychosocial intervention group reported statistically significant improvements in symptoms compared to treatment as usual. There were also significant improvements in illness insight and perceived quality of life and reduction in length of re-hospitalizations over the 12-month follow-up. The findings provide evidence that the nurse-led psychosocial intervention program resulted in improved health outcomes in Chinese patients with first-onset mental illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Main topics in transcultural psychiatric research in the Netherlands during the past decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Cornelis J; van Dijk, Rob

    2013-12-01

    The population of the Netherlands has become increasingly diverse in terms of ethnicity and religion, and anti-immigrant attitudes have become more apparent. At the same time, interest in issues linked to transcultural psychiatry has grown steadily. The purpose of this article is to describe the most important results in Dutch transcultural psychiatric research in the last decade and to discuss their relationship with relevant social and political developments in the Netherlands. All relevant PhD theses (N = 27) between 2000 and 2011 were selected. Screening of Dutch journals in the field of transcultural psychiatry and medical anthropology and a PubMed query yielded additional publications. Forensic and addiction psychiatry were excluded from this review. The results of the review indicate three main topics: (a) the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and their relation to migration issues as social defeat and ethnic density, showing considerable intra- and interethnic differences in predictors and prevalence rates, (b) the social position of refugees and asylum seekers, and its effect on mental health, showing especially high risk among asylum seekers, and (c) the patterns of health-seeking behaviour and use of mental health services, showing a differentiated picture among various migrant groups. Anthropological research brought additional knowledge on all the above topics. The overall conclusion is that transcultural psychiatric research in the Netherlands has made a giant leap since the turn of the century. The results are of international importance and invite redefinition of the relationship between migration and mental health, and reconsideration of its underlying mechanisms in multiethnic societies.

  1. [Archaeology and genealogy as methodological options of nursing research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Rosemeiry Capriata de Souza; Ramos, Flavia Regina Souza

    2003-01-01

    This article is based on the historical contextualization about the development of research in nursing, presents the categories/lines of interest that support the human knowledge applied in the Doctorate Thesis in Nursing in Brazil, points out the archeological and genealogical methods proposed by Michel Foucault, and their possibility to make more difficult the day-to-day tasks of the nursing profession Whether in Institutions, Public Policies, Health Reform, and Vocational Training, in the attempt to understand which strategies, challenges, knowledge base, and practices have influenced the building of the subjects.

  2. Mixed-Methods Research in the Discipline of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Cheryl Tatano; Harrison, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    In this review article, we examined the prevalence and characteristics of 294 mixed-methods studies in the discipline of nursing. Creswell and Plano Clark's typology was most frequently used along with concurrent timing. Bivariate statistics was most often the highest level of statistics reported in the results. As for qualitative data analysis, content analysis was most frequently used. The majority of nurse researchers did not specifically address the purpose, paradigm, typology, priority, timing, interaction, or integration of their mixed-methods studies. Strategies are suggested for improving the design, conduct, and reporting of mixed-methods studies in the discipline of nursing.

  3. Ethical considerations in international nursing research: a report from the International Centre for Nursing Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Ethical issues in international nursing research are identified and the perspectives o International Centre for Nursing Ethics are offered in an effort to develop an international consensus of ethical behaviour in research. First, theoretical issues are reviewed, then initial conditions for ethical conduct are defined, and protocol design and procedure considerations are examined. A concerted effort is made to identify and avoid a western bias. Broad guiding principles for designing and reviewing research are offered: (1) respect for persons; (2) beneficence; (3) justice; (4) respect for community; and (5) contextual caring. A collaborative model of the researcher-participant relationship is suggested and discussed.

  4. Use and development of teaching technologies presented in nursing research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pétala Tuani Candido de Oliveira Salvador

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: characterizing teaching technologies used or developed in nursing dissertations and theses in Brazil. Methods: a documentary research that had data collection sourced from directories of theses and dissertations available on the website of the Brazilian Nursing Association, from Volumes Nineteen (XIX (2001 to Twenty-one (XXI (2013. Results: of 6346 studies, 18 (0.28% used or developed teaching technologies, composed of the following categories: use of conceptual map; use of games; development of Virtual Learning Environment; development of educational materials; development of Distance Education courses; and artifact development. Conclusion: national research on the development and use of teaching technology in nursing are still insufficient, especially in the North and Northeast. Multiple benefits of the use of teaching technologies in nursing and learning environments were highlighted, not only for students and professionals, but also for patients.

  5. Culture as a predictor of resistance to change: a study of competing values in a psychiatric nursing context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Catrin; Åström, Sture; Kauffeldt, Anders; Helldin, Lars; Carlström, Eric

    2014-02-01

    It is well known that a conservative organizational culture can hinder the implementation of new organizational models. Prior to introducing something new it is important to identify the culture within the organization. This paper sets out to detect the feasibility of reform in a psychiatric clinic in a Swedish hospital prior to implementation of a new working method - a structured tool based on the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health. A survey consisting of two instruments - an organizational values questionnaire (OVQ) and a resistance to change scale (RTC) - was distributed to registered and assistant nurses at the clinic. The association between the organizational subcultures and resistance to change was investigated with regression analysis. The results revealed that the dominating cultures in the outpatient centers and hospital wards were characterized by human relation properties such as flexibility, cohesion, belongingness, and trust. The mean resistance to change was low, but the subscale of cognitive rigidity was dominant, reflecting a tendency to avoid alternative ideas and perspectives. An instrument like the one employed in the study could be a useful tool for diagnosing the likelihood of extensive and costly interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Research lessons from implementing a national nursing workforce study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, T; Brzyski, P; Kózka, M; Squires, A; Przewoźniak, L; Cisek, M; Gajda, K; Gabryś, T; Ogarek, M

    2015-09-01

    National nursing workforce studies are important for evidence-based policymaking to improve nursing human resources globally. Survey instrument translation and contextual adaptation along with level of experience of the research team are key factors that will influence study implementation and results in countries new to health workforce studies. This study's aim was to describe the pre-data collection instrument adaptation challenges when designing the first national nursing workforce study in Poland while participating in the Nurse Forecasting: Human Resources Planning in Nursing project. A descriptive analysis of the pre-data collection phase of the study. Instrument adaptation was conducted through a two-phase content validity indexing process and pilot testing from 2009 to September 2010 in preparation for primary study implementation in December 2010. Means of both content validation phases were compared with pilot study results to assess for significant patterns in the data. The initial review demonstrated that the instrument had poor level of cross-cultural relevance and multiple translation issues. After revising the translation and re-evaluating using the same process, instrument scores improved significantly. Pilot study results showed floor and ceiling effects on relevance score correlations in each phase of the study. The cross-cultural adaptation process was developed specifically for this study and is, therefore, new. It may require additional replication to further enhance the method. The approach used by the Polish team helped identify potential problems early in the study. The critical step improved the rigour of the results and improved comparability for between countries analyses, conserving both money and resources. This approach is advised for cross-cultural adaptation of instruments to be used in national nursing workforce studies. Countries seeking to conduct national nursing workforce surveys to improve nursing human resources policies may

  7. Hospital restructuring and nursing leadership: a journey from research question to research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta G

    2006-01-01

    The 1990s brought new fiscal realities to healthcare, leading to nursing job loss estimates in tens of thousands following widespread hospital restructuring to manage costs and improve efficiency. This research aimed at examining (a) how multiple episodes of hospital restructuring leading to layoff of nurses affected nurses who remained employed and (b) whether and how nursing leadership mitigated or intensified the negative effects of hospital restructuring on nurses. This dissertation comprised 3 empirical studies leading to 5 publications. The first study was a systematic literature review; the second and third used structural equation modeling to develop and test theoretical models addressing nursing practice environments and effects of hospital restructuring on nurses. The combined findings in this dissertation illustrate that hospital restructuring had significant negative physical/emotional health effects on nurses who remained employed. Nurses who worked for resonant (emotionally intelligent) leadership reported positive health and well-being, and opportunities to provide quality patient care. Nurses who worked for dissonant leadership reported greater negative effects of hospital restructuring. These findings led to a beginning theory of relational energy--a mechanism of mitigation whereby resonant nursing leaders invest energy into collaborative relationships with nurses, thereby positively influencing health and well-being, and, ultimately, outcomes for patients.

  8. Beyond trauma-focused psychiatric epidemiology: bridging research and practice with war-affected populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kenneth E; Kulkarni, Madhur; Kushner, Hallie

    2006-10-01

    This article examines the centrality of trauma-focused psychiatric epidemiology (TFPE) in research with war-affected populations. The authors question the utility of the dominant focus on posttraumatic stress disorder and other disorders of Western psychiatry, and they identify a set of critical research foci related to mental health work with communities affected by political violence. Core assumptions of TFPE and its roots in logical positivism and the biomedical model of contemporary psychiatry are explored. The authors suggest that an alternative framework--social constructivism--can serve as a bridge between researchers and practitioners by helping to refocus research efforts in ways that are conceptually and methodologically more attuned to the needs of war-affected communities and those working to address their mental health needs. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Nurses’ Research Behavior and Barriers to Research Utilization Into Clinical Nursing Practice: a Closer Look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratios Athanasakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is widely accepted that utilization of the best-known research evidence in nursing practice entails improvement of nursing care received by patients and strengthening of nursing profession.Aim: The aim of this paper was the review of nurses’ research behavior and the barriers that nurses meet in order to utilize research evidence into clinical nursing practice.Methodology: There has been conducted a literature search in Pubmed and Science Direct libraries, using specific search terms. An important inclusion criterion for the studies was the use of barriers to research utilization scale (BRUS, along or combined with another instrument.Results: A total of 37 original papers included in the present article. A table of the top five barriers to research utilization scale has been conducted. Data from the table indicate that the existence of barriers to incorporation of evidence into practice comes mainly from clinical settings characteristics. In addition, issues about nursing education, nurses’ research and reading habits, facilitators of research utilization and their relevance for nursing staff and clinical practice are also discussed.Conclusions: Since the barriers to research utilization are well identified in the nursing literature and there is a wealth of information on this subject, the next step is to find ways to overcome them and value the impact of the relevant interventions towards research utilization behavior.

  10. The Hope Research Community of Practice: Building Advanced Practice Nurses' Research Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeen, Janet; Kirkpatrick, Helen; Doyle, Winnifred

    2017-09-01

    Background Clinical nurses have multiple challenges in conducting high-quality nursing research to inform practice. Theoretically, the development of a community of practice on nursing research centered on the concept of hope is an approach that may address some of the challenges. Purpose This article describes the delivery and evaluation of a hope research community of practice (HRCoP) approach to facilitate research expertise in a group of advanced practice nurses in one hospital. It addressed the question: Does the establishment of a HRCoP for master's prepared nurses increase their confidence and competence in leading nursing research? Method Using interpretive descriptive qualitative research methodology, five participants were interviewed about their experiences within the HRCoP and facilitators engaged in participant observation. Results At 13 months, only four of the original seven participants remained in the HRCoP. While all participants discussed positive impacts of participation, they identified challenges of having protected time to complete their individual research projects, despite having administrative support to do so. Progress on individual research projects varied. Conclusion Nurse-led research remains a challenge for practicing nurses despite participating in an evidence-based HRCoP. Lessons learned from this project can be useful to other academic clinical partnerships.

  11. Towards Effective Management in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing: The Dangers and Consequences of Micromanagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Hungerford, Catherine; Lopez, Violeta; Cutcliffe, John R

    2015-06-01

    Micromanagement refers to a management style that involves managers exercising control over team members, teams, and also organizations, particularly in relation to the minutiae or minor details of day-to-day operations. While there is no single reason why some managers may choose to micromanage, many micromanagers exhibit similar behavioral traits, a consequence of perfectionism and/or underlying insecurities. In the culture of high performance that characterizes many contemporary mental health contexts, micromanagement also provides one way by which teams can be driven to achieve targets. However, over time, micromanagement leads to reductions in staff morale, creativity, and productivity; and increases in staff turnover. This paper provides an overview of micromanagement, including points of consideration for managers interested in reflecting on their management styles, and strategies for mental health nurses who find themselves working for a micromanager.

  12. Learning constraint. Exploring nurses' narratives of psychiatric work in the early years of French community psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckes, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    This article uses narrative analysis to understand how mental health professionals working in a pilot experiment in community psychiatry in France between 1960 and 1980 made sense of their work experiences. Based on a collection of essays written by these professionals as part of their training as well as on other archival materials, the article explores writing practices in post-war French psychiatry as ways of constructing and negotiating moral commitments to work. The first three sections of the article give some background on mental health nursing in France in the immediate post-war period. The subsequent three sections examine how the professionals elaborated on their experiences in their writings, focusing on three different levels: first, the narrative voice used in the essays; second, the learning processes described by trainees; and finally, the ways in which they negotiated discursively the requirement to do emotionally well at work.

  13. Mixed-methods research in nursing - a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, Valentina; Bagnasco, Annamaria; Aleo, Giuseppe; Timmins, Fiona; Barisone, Michela; Bianchi, Monica; Pellegrini, Ramona; Sasso, Loredana

    2017-10-01

    To review the use of mixed-methods research in nursing with a particular focus on the extent to which current practice informs nurse researchers. It also aimed to highlight gaps in current knowledge, understanding and reporting of this type of research. Mixed-methods research is becoming increasingly popular among nurses and healthcare professionals. Emergent findings from this type of research are very useful for nurses in practice. The combination of both quantitative and qualitative methods provides a scientific base for practice but also richness from the qualitative enquiry. However, at the same time mixed-methods research is underdeveloped. This study identified mixed-methods research papers and critically evaluated their usefulness for research practice. To support the analysis, we performed a two-stage search using CINAHL to find papers with titles that included the key term 'mixed method'. An analysis of studies that used mixed-methods research revealed some inconsistencies in application and reporting. Attempts to use two distinct research methods in these studies often meant that one or both aspects had limitations. Overall methods were applied in a less rigorous way. This has implications for providing somewhat limited direction for novice researchers. There is also potential for application of evidence in healthcare practice that limited validity. This study highlights current gaps in knowledge, understanding and reporting of mixed-methods research. While these methods are useful to gain insight into clinical problems nurses lack guidance with this type of research. This study revealed that the guidance provided by current mixed-methods research is inconsistent and incomplete and this compounds the lack of available direction. There is an urgent need to develop robust guidelines for using mixed-methods research so that findings may be critically implemented in practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Information and research needs of acute-care clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spath, M; Buttlar, L

    1996-01-01

    The majority of nurses surveyed used the library on a regular but limited basis to obtain information needed in caring for or making decisions about their patients. A minority indicated that the libraries in their own institutions totally met their information needs. In fact, only 4% depended on the library to stay abreast of new information and developments in the field. Many of the nurses had their own journal subscriptions, which could account in part for the limited use of libraries and the popularity of the professional journal as the key information source. This finding correlates with the research of Binger and Huntsman, who found that 95% of staff development educators relied on professional journal literature to keep up with current information in the field, and only 45% regularly monitored indexing-and-abstracting services. The present study also revealed that nurses seek information from colleagues more than from any other source, supporting the findings of Corcoran-Perry and Graves. Further research is necessary to clarify why nurses use libraries on a limited basis. It appears, as Bunyan and Lutz contend, that a more aggressive approach to marketing the library to nurses is needed. Further research should include an assessment of how the library can meet the information needs of nurses for both research and patient care. Options to be considered include offering library orientation sessions for new staff nurses, providing current-awareness services by circulating photocopied table-of-contents pages, sending out reviews of new monographs, inviting nurses to submit search requests on a topic, scheduling seminars and workshops that teach CD-ROM and online search strategies, and providing information about electronic databases covering topics related to nursing. Information on databases may be particularly important in light of the present study's finding that databases available in CD-ROM format are consulted very little. Nursing education programs should

  15. Scientific fraud: definitions, policies, and implications for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chop, R M; Silva, M C

    1991-01-01

    Scientific research typically has been founded on high ethical standards established by researchers in academia and health care research institutions. Scientific fraud, an act of deception or misrepresentation of one's own work, violates these ethical standards. It can take the form of plagiarism, falsification of data, and irresponsible authorship. Scientific fraud has been attributed to misdirected attempts to attain high levels of personal and professional success. Researchers so prone commit scientific fraud in a search for promotion, status, tenure, and the obtaining of research grants. To divert scientific fraud, three recommendations are suggested: (1) socialize prospective nurse researchers into an atmosphere where intellectual and professional integrity prevail; (2) have established nurse researchers serve as role models and mentors who can educate the neophyte researcher about the ethics of research, including scientific fraud; and (3) emphasize and reward quality in research and publications, rather than quantity.

  16. Language barriers and qualitative nursing research: methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, A

    2008-09-01

    This review of the literature synthesizes methodological recommendations for the use of translators and interpreters in cross-language qualitative research. Cross-language qualitative research involves the use of interpreters and translators to mediate a language barrier between researchers and participants. Qualitative nurse researchers successfully address language barriers between themselves and their participants when they systematically plan for how they will use interpreters and translators throughout the research process. Experienced qualitative researchers recognize that translators can generate qualitative data through translation processes and by participating in data analysis. Failure to address language barriers and the methodological challenges they present threatens the credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability of cross-language qualitative nursing research. Through a synthesis of the cross-language qualitative methods literature, this article reviews the basics of language competence, translator and interpreter qualifications, and roles for each kind of qualitative research approach. Methodological and ethical considerations are also provided. By systematically addressing the methodological challenges cross-language research presents, nurse researchers can produce better evidence for nursing practice and policy making when working across different language groups. Findings from qualitative studies will also accurately represent the experiences of the participants without concern that the meaning was lost in translation.

  17. Choosing phenomenology as a guiding philosophy for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matua, Gerald Amandu

    2015-03-01

    To provide an overview of important methodological considerations that nurse researchers need to adhere to when choosing phenomenology as a guiding philosophy and research method. Phenomenology is a major philosophy and research method in the humanities, human sciences and arts disciplines with a central goal of describing people's experiences. However, many nurse researchers continue to grapple with methodological issues related to their choice of phenomenological method. The author conducted online and manual searches of relevant research books and electronic databases. Using an integrative method, peer-reviewed research and discussion papers published between January 1990 and December 2011 and listed in the CINAHL, Science Direct, PubMed and Google Scholar databases were reviewed. In addition, textbooks that addressed research methodologies such as phenomenology were used. Although phenomenology is widely used today to broaden understanding of human phenomena relevant to nursing practice, nurse researchers often fail to adhere to acceptable scientific and phenomenological standards. Cognisant of these challenges, researchers are expected to indicate in their work the focus of their investigations, designs, and approaches to collecting and analysing data. They are also expected to present their findings in an evocative and expressive manner. Choosing phenomenology requires researchers to understand it as a philosophy, including basic assumptions and tenets of phenomenology as a research method. This awareness enables researchers, especially novices, to make important methodological decisions, particularly those necessary to indicate the study's scientific rigour and phenomenological validity. This paper adds to the discussion of phenomenology as a guiding philosophy for nursing research. It aims to guide new researchers on important methodological decisions they need to make to safeguard their study's scientific rigour and phenomenological validity.

  18. The Development of a Regional Nursing History Collection: Its Relevance to Practice, Education, and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezel, Linda F.; Linebach, Laura M.

    1991-01-01

    The Nursing History Collection at the University of Missouri-Kansas City preserves artifacts and memorabilia of regional nursing history. Such collections are essential to practice, education, and research in nursing. (SK)

  19. A Delphi study of district nursing research priorities in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annells, Merilyn; Deroche, Monique; Koch, Tina; Lewin, Gill; Lucke, Jayne

    2005-02-01

    This study, using a Delphi approach, sought the opinion of a self-selected panel of 320 district nurses regarding research priorities for district nursing in Australia. Over three rounds of questionnaires, the 419 research clinical problem areas requiring research as suggested by the panel were each rated in importance by the panel and then ranked through analysis from high to low average rating scores, thereby, whittling down the list to the top 15% (68) research questions and to a final list of the top 10 research priorities overall. Research questions focusing on discharge planning are dominant in these top 10 priorities, with documentation issues the second most common focus. Other foci in the top 10 priorities are staffing, aged care, palliative care, and assessment. The organization-specific top 10 research priorities focus on wound care, funding, education, and communication issues. Additionally, the top 68 priorities, which are either finitely practice-based or contextual-issues research questions, were categorized into 20 themes. The results will hopefully lead to scarce human and financial resources being directed to practice-relevant research programs that will facilitate improved health for district nursing (primarily home-nursing) clients in Australia and elsewhere.

  20. Nursing research and HIV infection: state-of-the-science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldrick, B A; Baigis, J A; Larsen, J; Lemert, J L

    2000-01-01

    To provide an update of the nursing research literature on HIV infection and to develop an HIV/AIDS database using arcs computer software. Nursing research literature from 1986 through 1997 on human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) was reviewed. With an emphasis on client-focused research, 246 studies were entered into the arcs HIV/AIDS database. Analysis of over 1,000 citations in the HIV/AIDS nursing research literature over the past decade indicated that 22% (n = 219) of the nursing studies were client- or patient-focused; 29% (n = 292) were risk-group focused; and 49% (n = 492) were provider-focused. Of the 246 studies entered into the arcs HIV/AIDS database, 88 (35.7%) were classified in the psychologic domain, 65 (26.4%) in the physiologic domain, 24 (9.7%) in the behavioral domain, and 25 (10%) in the social domain. In addition, 17 (6.9%) of the studies were classified in the quality of life domain, and 27 (10.9%) in the stage of HIV disease domain. The majority (53%) of the 246 studies (n = 131) were correlational, 86 (35%) were descriptive, and 29 (12%) had experimental or quasi-experimental designs. Although nursing studies have described some of the problems that affect HIV-infected people, further research is needed, particularly related to clinical interventions.

  1. Servant leadership in nursing: a framework for developing sustainable research capacity in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the current professional climate, research activities are highly valued with nurses in all sectors actively encouraged to participate. However, working environments for many nurses are such that it can be difficult to privilege research activities in any sustained way. A number of organisational challenges coalesce to impede participation in research activities, including limited resources, lack of skills, knowledge and opportunities, and a culture of individualism. Strong, effective research leadership is essential to help mediate some of these negative aspects of organisational life, and promote creative environments to facilitate the development of research capacity. Servant leadership is a service-oriented approach that focuses on valuing and developing people, and offers a participatory and collaborative framework within which to build creative and productive research communities. Such communities can encourage connectedness between people, deepen the capacity for supportive collegiality, and foster a holistic social learning milieu to support researchers of all levels, including early career researchers and research higher degree candidates.

  2. Transnationalism: A Framework for Advancing Nursing Research With Contemporary Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S; Boutain, Doris M; Mohammed, Selina A

    2016-01-01

    This article advances nursing research by presenting transnationalism as a framework for inquiry with contemporary immigrants. Transnationalism occurs when immigrants maintain relationships that transcend the geographical borders of their origin and host countries. Immigrants use those relationships to experience health differently within concurrent socioeconomic, political, and cultural contexts than national situated populations. Nurse researchers are called upon to consider these trans-border relationships when exploring the health of contemporary immigrants. Such consideration is needed to develop relevant research designs, methods, analysis, and dissemination strategies.

  3. The benefits of computer-mediated communication in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Leah; Jackson, Debra; O'Brien, Louise; Peters, Kathleen

    2008-08-01

    Use of the Internet, and the opportunity to utilise computer-mediated communication (CMC) provides new alternatives for nurse researchers to collect data. The use of CMC for research purposes is advantageous for both researchers and participants. Through this mode of communication, recruitment of participants can be enhanced through reaching individuals who are geographically distant, and nurses have the opportunity to provide participants with true anonymity, which may be beneficial when exploring sensitive issues. This paper explores the existing literature and draws on healthcare studies that have used CMC as a data collection tool.

  4. The cookie experiment revisited: broadened dimensions for teaching nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison-Beedy, D; Côté-Arsenault, D

    2000-01-01

    Nurse educators face the ongoing challenge of presenting increasingly complex nursing research methods to undergraduate and graduate students. The cookie experiment, a unique teaching strategy developed more than a decade ago by Thiel, has been refined and expanded to include hands-on quantitative and qualitative components while also serving as a way to lessen students'phobias about research. This creative and effective teaching strategy provides a user-friendly format that can be adapted as needed to present both basic and complex research concepts. The authors present this teaching strategy and discuss its applicability to undergraduate and graduate courses.

  5. Critical appraisal of rigour in interpretive phenomenological nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witt, Lorna; Ploeg, Jenny

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports a critical review of published nursing research for expressions of rigour in interpretive phenomenology, and a new framework of rigour specific to this methodology is proposed. The rigour of interpretive phenomenology is an important nursing research methods issue that has direct implications for the legitimacy of nursing science. The use of a generic set of qualitative criteria of rigour for interpretive phenomenological studies is problematic because it is philosophically inconsistent with the methodology and creates obstacles to full expression of rigour in such studies. A critical review was conducted of the published theoretical interpretive phenomenological nursing literature from 1994 to 2004 and the expressions of rigour in this literature identified. We used three sources to inform the derivation of a proposed framework of expressions of rigour for interpretive phenomenology: the phenomenological scholar van Manen, the theoretical interpretive phenomenological nursing literature, and Madison's criteria of rigour for hermeneutic phenomenology. The nursing literature reveals a broad range of criteria for judging the rigour of interpretive phenomenological research. The proposed framework for evaluating rigour in this kind of research contains the following five expressions: balanced integration, openness, concreteness, resonance, and actualization. Balanced integration refers to the intertwining of philosophical concepts in the study methods and findings and a balance between the voices of study participants and the philosophical explanation. Openness is related to a systematic, explicit process of accounting for the multiple decisions made throughout the study process. Concreteness relates to usefulness for practice of study findings. Resonance encompasses the experiential or felt effect of reading study findings upon the reader. Finally, actualization refers to the future realization of the resonance of study findings. Adoption of this

  6. The impact of using standardized patients in psychiatric cases on the levels of motivation and perceived learning of the nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikoc, Gamze; Ozcan, Celale Tangul; Elcin, Melih

    2017-04-01

    The use of standardized patients is not very common in psychiatric nursing education and there has been no study conducted in Turkey. This study evaluated the impact of using standardized patients in psychiatric cases on the levels of motivation and perceived learning of the nursing students. This manuscript addressed the quantitative aspect of a doctoral thesis study in which both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. A pre-test and post-test were employed in the quantitative analysis in a randomized and controlled study design. The motivation scores, and interim and post-test scores for perceived learning were higher in the experimental group compared to pre-test scores and the scores of the control group. The students in the experimental group reported that they felt more competent about practical training in clinical psychiatry, as well as in performing interviews with patients having mental problems, and reported less anxiety about performing an interview when compared to students in the control group. It is considered that the inclusion of standardized patient methodology in the nursing education curriculum in order to improve the knowledge level and skills of students would be beneficial in the training of mental health nurses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Research: An Essential Skill of a Graduate Nurse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenkinsop, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Research training helps nursing students develop the following: planning, communication, and analytic skills; self-confidence; ethical awareness; self-awareness; reflection; and understanding of validity and reliability. Instructors should be aware that student research has the potential to violate patients' rights and can yield low-quality…

  8. Systematic review as a research method in postgraduate nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In South Africa, there appears to be poor understanding about using a systematic review as an acceptable research method in post-graduate nursing education. The lack of understanding may result in research supervisors being unable to guide post-graduate students, such as masters and doctoral students, in using the ...

  9. Achieving Full Scope of Practice Readiness Using Evidence for Psychotherapy Teaching in Web and Hybrid Approaches in Psychiatric Mental Health Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kathleen T

    2018-01-01

    Radical changes in role, education, and practice have affected how education of advance practice nurses and practice deliverables occur. This article examines the effects of distance education upon the teaching/learning of psychotherapy in integrating Web-based technology and platforms. With the advent and proliferation of online programs of study, the question begs: How do distance-linked programs successfully introduce, practice, and supervise one-to-one and group psychotherapy training? By employing evidence-based education strategies, technology, and strong interpersonal skills and evidence-based therapies, a charter Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Doctor of Nursing Practice program paved an innovative and successful path. In that program, they prepared their students for full scope of practice, upon graduation, inclusive of psychotherapy as well as the other highly demanding and compressed requirements of the 3-year program. This article explores that journey and its recommendations for application derived from this 2010 cohort. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Journal club: Integrating research awareness into postgraduate nurse training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Davis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence-based nursing requires nurses to maintain an awareness of recently published research findings to integrate into their clinical practice. In the South African setting keeping up with recent literature has additional challenges, including the diversity of nurses’ home language, geographically foreign origins of published work, and limited economic resources. Students enrolled in a postgraduate programme came from various paediatric settings and displayed limited awareness of nursing literature as an evidence base for practice.Objectives: The study aimed to design and introduce a journal club as an educational strategy into the postgraduate programmes in children’s nursing at the University of Cape Town (UCT, and then to refine the way it is used to best serve programme outcomes and facilitate student learning whilst still being an enjoyable activity.Method: An action research methodology using successive cycles of ‘assess-plan-act-observe’ was used to design, implement and refine the structure of a journal club within the postgraduate diploma programme over four academic years. Six educators actively tracked and reflected on journal club sessions, and then analysed findings during and after each annual cycle to plan improvement and increasing programme alignment.Results: Considerable refinement of the intervention included changing how it was structured, the preparation required by both students and educators, the article selection process and the intervention’s alignment with other learning activities in the programme.Conclusion: Journal club facilitated an increase in student awareness and reading of nursing literature, offering the opportunity to consider application of published research to current nursing practice. Another benefit was enabling students to become familiar with the specialised and technical language of research, children’s nursing and the critical care of children and neonates, by speaking

  11. Role-player expectations regarding the education of nursing research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCD Zeelie

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on role player expectations regarding the education of nursing research. The importance of the role player expectations are two-fold: firstly as a factor in the external environment influencing and guiding the formulation phase of the development of standards and secondly, due to the clear indications of problems regarding nursing research in the nursing profession in literature. The role player expectations were elicited using a qualitative, exploratory and contextual design. The role player population included nurse educators, nurses in managerial, clinical and research positions, students and the medical profession. The data was gathered using the naïve sketches and qualitative data analysis was done using Morse & Field’s approach (1996:103-107 in combination with Tesch’s data analysis approach as cited by Creswell (1994:154-156. Sixty initial categories were narrowed down to six final categories, which are the research learning programme, personnel, students, departmental policies, funding and support systems.

  12. Hermeneutic phenomenology: philosophical perspectives and current use in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annells, M

    1996-04-01

    The wise choice of the postmodern tradition of hermeneutic phenomenology for nursing research is partly dependent upon an awareness of that tradition's base of philosophical hermeneutics. The origins of this philosophy within the work of Heidegger and especially Gadamer are detailed with an explanation of some major concepts intrinsic to their hermeneutic writings. Subsequently an analysis is offered of the ontological, epistemological and methodological perspectives of the tradition which is considered thereby to reside within an interpretivist/constructivist paradigm of inquiry. The contemporary use within the discipline of nursing of hermeneutic phenomenology is discussed, and the growing trend for using the tradition, across continents, is identified. However the question is posed as to whether all such research is accurately identified as belonging to the tradition. A further analysis suggests that hermeneutic phenomenology will increasingly be applied to the research of nursing phenomena.

  13. Report of an innovative research program for baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheil, E P; Crain, H

    1992-10-01

    In summary, an innovative low-cost way to teach undergraduate students about research and to socialize students into attending research conferences has been developed. It is not perfect yet, but with time, critical students, and responsive research-productive faculty, each program should improve. It is not surprising that sophomore students do not achieve the objectives at the same level as older students. As students move closer to the "real" world of nursing practice and develop increasing sophistication about nursing in general and research in particular, they are, hopefully, more knowledgeable consumers of nursing research. What is particularly satisfying to the planners of those Research Days is that through the experience of attending Undergraduate Research Day at various points in their educational progress, students are socialized into discussing research. Additionally, they seemed to develop some degree of comfort with this aspect of their future nursing role. The RN and former student panel participants normalized research involvement for the student attendees. Panel member stories about their mistakes and successes made students realize that nursing investigations need not be the sole property of those with doctoral degrees. A serendipitous outcome of these programs was an increased awareness by students of the specific research project in which their teachers were engaged. Students informally reported a feeling of pride and reflected accomplishment. The importance of timing in offering such programs should not have been a surprise at this urban commuter university. Unwittingly, in scheduling the Friday afternoon program the planners ignored the initial consideration that the program not impose financial hardship on students.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Using a synthesised technique for grounded theory in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Yu; Boore, Jennifer Rp

    2009-08-01

    To introduce a synthesised technique for using grounded theory in nursing research. Nursing increasingly uses grounded theory for a broadened perspective on nursing practice and research. Nurse researchers have choices in how to choose and use grounded theory as a research method. These choices come from a deep understanding of the different versions of grounded theory, including Glaser's classic grounded theory and Strauss and Corbin's later approach. Grounded theory related literature review was conducted. This is a methodological review paper. Nursing researchers intent on using a grounded theory methodology should pay attention to the theoretical discussions including theoretical sampling, theoretical sensitivity, constant comparative methods and asking questions, keeping memoranda diagramming, identification of a core category and a resultant explanatory theory. A synthesised approach is developed for use, based on Strauss and Corbin's style of sampling and memoranda writing, but selecting theoretical coding families, that differ from the paradigm model of Strauss and Corbin, from the wide range suggested by Glaser. This led to the development of a multi-step synthesised approach to grounded theory data analysis based on the works of Glaser, Charmaz and Strauss and Corbin. The use of this synthesised approach provides a true reflection of Glaser's idea of 'emergence of theory from the data' and Strauss and Corbin's style of sampling and memoranda writing is employed. This multi-step synthesised method of data analysis maintains the philosophical perspective of grounded theory. This method indicates how grounded theory has developed, where it might go next in nursing research and how it may continue to evolve.

  15. Child and adolescent experience of and satisfaction with psychiatric care: a critical review of the research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering, P

    2010-02-01

    This review paper contributes to better understanding of child and adolescent perception of quality of psychiatric care and should therefore be of interests for those who are concerned with the development and improvement of psychiatric care. * The review shows that the concept of patient satisfaction in child and adolescent psychiatric care is still underdeveloped and that few valid instruments have been developed to measure the concept. * The review helps to clarify the concept of adolescent satisfaction with psychiatric care by indentifying the universal components of the concept. * The paper concludes that children's perception of quality of care differs from their parents' and that quality assessment of children and adolescents needs to be heeded. Abstract Users' perspectives ought to be a determining factor for assessing the quality of psychiatric care and hence their perspectives need to be thoroughly understood. There is a lack of comprehensive knowledge of how children and adolescents perceive the quality of their psychiatric care. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to critically review and synthesize findings from research on youth experience and satisfaction with psychiatric care. The review finds that knowledge about youth perception of quality of care is scattered and that few researchers consider previous findings. There are few valid instruments to measure child and adolescent patient satisfaction and few studies have considered these users' perceptions. These few studies indicate that adolescents' satisfaction has three universal components: satisfaction with environment and the organization of services; with user-caregiver relationship; and with treatment outcome. However, instruments that only use these factors lack sensitivity, while instruments that measure specific components of services capture differences in satisfaction between user groups. The review shows that parents and children have different mental care needs, and that the

  16. The nurse rostering problem: from operational research to organizational reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Robert G

    2014-04-01

    To examine the practical applicability of the 'hard' and 'soft' constraints associated with the 'nurse rostering problem' as defined in operations management research literature and thereby investigate the objectivity of the rostering process. In practice, rostering nursing staff is often unrecognized, unrewarded and undervalued; yet, despite four decades of research, operations management has little to offer in terms of faster, safer, fairer or more effective rosters. This paper contrasts the theoretical perceptions of roster 'constraints' with the subjective, often political, rules governing practical rosters. Using both qualitative and quantitative data, this inductive study compares the practical process of rostering with that theorized in the nurse rostering problem. This research spanned 4 years examining the rosters from 28 wards in 14 hospitals. Interviews with senior nursing staff regarding staff levels and with ward managers regarding rules defining the roster were complemented by analysis of actual roster data to establish the number and type of unfilled shifts and rule breakages. Interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis and roster data were evaluated using the HealthRoster™ e-rostering system. Often the rules governing how nursing staff are scheduled are undocumented, tacit and informal. Furthermore, the roster process can be highly politicized, leading to forms of 'information anarchy' or 'information feudalism' on the ward. Hospital managers must understand that roster design has a major impact on ward performance and must develop clear roster policies that define staff levels, skill mix, shift patterns and the rules used in preparing the roster. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Clinical significance in nursing research: A discussion and descriptive analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polit, Denise F

    2017-08-01

    It is widely understood that statistical significance should not be equated with clinical significance, but the topic of clinical significance has not received much attention in the nursing literature. By contrast, interest in conceptualizing and operationalizing clinical significance has been a "hot topic" in other health care fields for several decades. The major purpose of this paper is to briefly describe recent advances in defining and quantifying clinical significance. The overview covers both group-level indicators of clinical significance (e.g., effect size indexes), and individual-level benchmarks (e.g., the minimal important change index). A secondary purpose is to describe the extent to which developments in clinical significance have penetrated the nursing literature. A descriptive analysis of a sample of primary research articles published in three high-impact nursing research journals in 2016 was undertaken. A total of 362 articles were electronically searched for terms relating to statistical and clinical significance. Of the 362 articles, 261 were reports of quantitative studies, the vast majority of which (93%) included a formal evaluation of the statistical significance of the results. By contrast, the term "clinical significance" or related surrogate terms were found in only 33 papers, and most often the term was used informally, without explicit definition or assessment. Raising consciousness about clinical significance should be an important priority among nurse researchers. Several recommendations are offered to improve the visibility and salience of clinical significance in nursing science. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Difficult encounters with psychiatric patients: a South Texas Psychiatry practice-based research network (PBRN) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Randall V; Salazar, Ricardo; Martinez, Cervando; Gelfond, Stephen D; Deuter, Melissa; Hayes, Holly G; Ketchum, Norma; Pollock, Brad H

    2012-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of difficult psychiatrist-patient interactions of 20 psychiatrists in the South Texas Psychiatric practice-based research network, determine what characteristics were associated with "difficult" patients, and compare findings with previous studies in primary care. During a 2-month observational study, psychiatrists collected patient information on setting, demographics, diagnoses, and medications and rated the patients using the Difficult Doctor-Patient Relationship Questionnaire, which had previously been used and validated in the primary care setting. A total of 905 valid data cards were collected. Difficult patients were identified in 15% of the sample. Diagnoses of schizophrenia, alcohol/substance abuse, and personality disorder were associated with difficulty. Psychiatrists least burdened by difficult patients were older and in a solo practice and worked 51 to 55 hours per week. This cross-sectional study demonstrates that psychiatrists encounter difficult patients at a rate (15%) similar to that of primary care physicians. Mentoring programs and structured treatment interventions for the most difficult patient groups may assist all physicians who treat psychiatric patients, whether in specialty, family medicine, or other primary care settings.

  19. Linking aims, paradigm and method in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Catherine; Hunter, Andrew; Meskell, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    To explore the use of paradigms as ontological and philosophical guides for conducting PhD research. A paradigm can help to bridge the aims of a study and the methods to achieve them. However, choosing a paradigm can be challenging for doctoral researchers: there can be ambiguity about which paradigm is suitable for a particular research question and there is a lack of guidance on how to shape the research process for a chosen paradigm. The authors discuss three paradigms used in PhD nursing research: post-positivism, interpretivism and pragmatism. They compare each paradigm in relation to its ontology, epistemology and methodology, and present three examples of PhD nursing research studies to illustrate how research can be conducted using these paradigms in the context of the research aims and methods. The commonalities and differences between the paradigms and their uses are highlighted. Creativity and flexibility are important when deciding on a paradigm. However, consistency and transparency are also needed to ensure the quality and rigour necessary for conducting nursing research. When choosing a suitable paradigm, the researcher should ensure that the ontology, epistemology and methodology of the paradigm are manifest in the methods and research strategies employed.

  20. Unpacking action research and implementation science: Implications for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Mary; O' Leary, Denise; Coghlan, David

    2017-11-03

    The aim of this study was to unpack the key concepts of action research and implementation science thereby enabling appropriate use of these methods in nursing. A key issue in action research is not so much the methodology employed to gather data/evidence but who decides the research agenda and who benefits from it. Implementation science is a way to ensure that evidence is translated into practice. The question arises as to how action research and implementation may be understood in relation to one another in nursing. Discussion Paper DATA SOURCES: This discussion paper is based on our own experiences and offers an exploration of action research and implementation science with the aim of clarifying what each involves and what synergies, if any, exist between them. Using action research to secure the voice of patients in their own care is essential to delivering quality nursing care. Using implementation science frameworks to get research evidence into practice is effective. Familiarity with both these concepts may enable their improved use and have a positive impact on quality of care. There is a tension between action researchers and the protagonists of implementation science related to perceived "trade offs" between what constitutes "science" and the necessity of community participation. Nevertheless, the use of an implementation science framework in an action research approach can reduce the research practice time lag and action research provides sound theoretical and philosophical underpinnings that can be used by those in the implementation science field. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Spirituality in Nursing: An Overview of Research Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Martins

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality has been widely considered important for patients’ health and for healthcare practice and is related to connectedness, meaning in life, and transcendence. Research concerning spirituality is growing rapidly, and the implementation of spiritual care should be based on evidence. This literature review aims to describe the methods that have been used in nursing research focusing on spirituality. The electronic search on databases through EBSCOhost identified 2091 citations, and a total of 231 studies were included. The methods used in research on spirituality in nursing are mostly quantitative (52.4%, but some are qualitative (42.8% and mixed (4.8%. Regarding the quantitative research, most studies are observational (90.9%, and these are mainly descriptive (82.7% and correlational (17.3%. Most studies used a cross-sectional design (98.7%, and few used longitudinal design (1.3%. The qualitative research is descriptive (39.4%, phenomenological (26.3%, and grounded theory (14.1%. Research on spirituality in nursing is based on both main paradigms (quantitative and qualitative, but also on mixed methods. Studies have mainly been conducted using cross-sectional designs when compared to longitudinal designs. The latter seem to constitute a gap in nursing knowledge and evidence regarding the changes of spirituality over time, which is particularly important for nurses’ delivery of spiritual care.

  2. Strategies for promoting the scientific integrity of nursing research in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Roseann

    2010-01-01

    Magnet hospitals were surveyed to determine the processes used to promote the integrity of nursing research conducted in clinical settings. Results indicated that four central processes, institutional review board review, nursing research council review, nursing research mentorship, and reliance on personal and professional values, were used to educate, monitor, and oversee the integrity of research conducted by bedside nurse scientists. Staff development educators are challenged to provide instruction regarding the process of nursing research and all elements of scientific integrity. Research is needed to test the effectiveness of the processes identified in this investigation in promoting the quality and integrity of nursing research conducted in clinical settings.

  3. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL) in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvrud, Christian; Nonstad, Kåre; Palmstierna, Tom

    2009-04-16

    Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors.

  4. Comparison of methodologic quality and study/report characteristics between quantitative clinical nursing and nursing education research articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Barbara St Pierre; Nicholas, Jennifer; Kurrus, Jeffrey E

    2013-01-01

    To compare the methodologic quality and study/report characteristics between quantitative clinical nursing and nursing education research articles. The methodologic quality of quantitative nursing education research needs to advance to a higher level. Clinical research can provide guidance for nursing education to reach this level. One hundred quantitative clinical research articles from-high impact journals published in 2007 and 37 education research articles from high impact journals published in 2006 to 2007 were chosen for analysis. Clinical articles had significantly higher quality scores than education articles in three domains: number of institutions studied, type of data, and outcomes. The findings indicate three ways in which nursing education researchers can strengthen the methodologic quality of their quantitative research. With this approach, greater funding may be secured for advancing the science of nursing education.

  5. Education, practice, and research in nursing terminology: gaps, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H-A; Cho, I

    2009-01-01

    To provide an overview of nursing terminology education, research, and clinical use, to identify and analyze any gaps therein, and to propose ways to close those gaps. We conducted an extensive Internet and literature search to establish the current status of nursing terminology education, research, and clinical use. We also surveyed 40 experts in nursing terminology from 15 countries to obtain more detailed information on nursing terminology education and clinical use. We found that there are gaps in nursing terminology education, research, and use, with the area of research being the most advanced. Nursing terminology is not taught widely in either informatics or nursing programs. Where it is taught, it constitutes only up to several hours of an informatics or nursing course. Research into nursing terminology has been very active, focusing mainly on the development and evaluation/validation of nursing terminology, using reference terminology models, and mapping between these and nursing terminologies. However, little research has been carried out on the use of nursing terminologies in clinical information systems. In addition, there are very few systems in which a standardized nursing terminology has been implemented. In order to close the gaps in nursing terminology education, research, and clinical use, qualified personnel are required to educate potential users as to the importance of terminology-based information systems for semantic interoperability. In addition, more research is required into the implementation of nursing terminologies in information systems, and we must demonstrate the usefulness and effectiveness of nursing terminology-based information systems.

  6. Cultural competence and holistic practice: implications for nursing education, practice, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Western society is becoming increasingly diverse in its cultural, ethnic, linguistic, and religious composition and this has implications for nursing education, practice, and research. Although the healthcare setting is becoming increasingly multicultural, nurses often lack "cultural competence." Incorporating cultural competence in nursing curricula, organizational policy, and research programs will help prepare nurses for multicultural practice environments.

  7. Development of a School Nursing Research Agenda in Florida: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Shirley C.; Barry, Charlotte D.

    2006-01-01

    Research is important to the image, visibility, and viability of school nursing. Each state school nursing association should evaluate member commitment to school nursing research based on their unique set of financial, educational, and organizational resources. A 3-round Delphi study was conducted in which Florida school nurses identified…

  8. The Effect of the Psychiatric Nursing Approach Based on the Tidal Model on Coping and Self-esteem in People with Alcohol Dependency: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaşan, Ayşegül; Çam, Olcay

    2017-06-01

    People with alcohol dependency have lower self-esteem than controls and when their alcohol use increases, their self-esteem decreases. Coping skills in alcohol related issues are predicted to reduce vulnerability to relapse. It is important to adapt care to individual needs so as to prevent a return to the cycle of alcohol use. The Tidal Model focuses on providing support and services to people who need to live a constructive life. The aim of the randomized study was to determine the effect of the psychiatric nursing approach based on the Tidal Model on coping and self-esteem in people with alcohol dependency. The study was semi-experimental in design with a control group, and was conducted on 36 individuals (18 experimental, 18 control). An experimental and a control group were formed by assigning persons to each group using the stratified randomization technique in the order in which they were admitted to hospital. The Coping Inventory (COPE) and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (CSEI) were used as measurement instruments. The measurement instruments were applied before the application and three months after the application. In addition to routine treatment and follow-up, the psychiatric nursing approach based on the Tidal Model was applied to the experimental group in the One-to-One Sessions. The psychiatric nursing approach based on the Tidal Model is an approach which is effective in increasing the scores of people with alcohol dependency in positive reinterpretation and growth, active coping, restraint, emotional social support and planning and reducing their scores in behavioral disengagement. It was seen that self-esteem rose, but the difference from the control group did not reach significance. The psychiatric nursing approach based on the Tidal Model has an effect on people with alcohol dependency in maintaining their abstinence. The results of the study may provide practices on a theoretical basis for improving coping behaviors and self-esteem and

  9. Ethical issues and challenges in pressure ulcer research - the research nurses' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jimmy; Blundell, Sally; McGinnis, Elizabeth

    2012-11-01

    This paper explores the issues faced by research nurses in pressure ulcer research through reflection on our own practice and subsequently addresses these issues through critical appraisal of the existing literature. A critical reflection framework which provided an opportunity for group reflection and reflexivity was adopted to guide our reflection. Focus questions were formulated based on our reflections and used to inform our literature review. Keywords used in the literature review search included 'research nurse', ethical principles, ethical issues and reflection. A formal tool was used to appraise normative ethics articles. Reflection on our practice in pressure ulcer research identified four main issues: informed consent, confidentiality, methodological uncertainties and more generally the ethical dilemma of the conflict between our accountability and responsibility to the patients and obligations to the research studies. The notion of 'power relations' was found to permeate our practice as research nurses at all level. Six normative ethics papers were retrieved and critically appraised to aid our personal and professional learning and development in the conduct of ethical practice as research nurses in pressure ulcer research through the theory of practice which other research nurses and/or nurse researchers used in other disciplines. Four main ethical challenges and the issue of power relation were highlighted. Our reflection and the appraisal of the literature provided us the necessary knowledge and skills to better navigate these ethical challenges in the future. Copyright © 2012 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Using Framework Analysis in nursing research: a worked example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Deborah J; Furber, Christine; Tierney, Stephanie; Swallow, Veronica

    2013-11-01

    To demonstrate Framework Analysis using a worked example and to illustrate how criticisms of qualitative data analysis including issues of clarity and transparency can be addressed. Critics of the analysis of qualitative data sometimes cite lack of clarity and transparency about analytical procedures; this can deter nurse researchers from undertaking qualitative studies. Framework Analysis is flexible, systematic, and rigorous, offering clarity, transparency, an audit trail, an option for theme-based and case-based analysis and for readily retrievable data. This paper offers further explanation of the process undertaken which is illustrated with a worked example. Data were collected from 31 nursing students in 2009 using semi-structured interviews. The data collected are not reported directly here but used as a worked example for the five steps of Framework Analysis. Suggestions are provided to guide researchers through essential steps in undertaking Framework Analysis. The benefits and limitations of Framework Analysis are discussed. Nurses increasingly use qualitative research methods and need to use an analysis approach that offers transparency and rigour which Framework Analysis can provide. Nurse researchers may find the detailed critique of Framework Analysis presented in this paper a useful resource when designing and conducting qualitative studies. Qualitative data analysis presents challenges in relation to the volume and complexity of data obtained and the need to present an 'audit trail' for those using the research findings. Framework Analysis is an appropriate, rigorous and systematic method for undertaking qualitative analysis. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Nursing informatics, ethics and decisions: implications for translational research

    OpenAIRE

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Dowie, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Nursing informatics, ethics and decisions: implications for translational research Objective: To introduce, in the multi-disciplinary contexts of clinical decision making and policy formation, a theory-based decision-analytic framework for the transparent forward translation of research into practice which can simultaneously identify and communicate the needs for backward translation from practice to research.Method:Web-based decision analytic software is used to demonstrate how the weights f...

  12. The myth of induction in qualitative nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdahl, Elisabeth; Berterö, Carina M

    2015-04-01

    In nursing today, it remains unclear what constitutes a good foundation for qualitative scientific inquiry. There is a tendency to define qualitative research as a form of inductive inquiry; deductive practice is seldom discussed, and when it is, this usually occurs in the context of data analysis. We will look at how the terms 'induction' and 'deduction' are used in qualitative nursing science and by qualitative research theorists, and relate these uses to the traditional definitions of these terms by Popper and other philosophers of science. We will also question the assertion that qualitative research is or should be inductive. The position we defend here is that qualitative research should use deductive methods. We also see a need to understand the difference between the creative process needed to create theory and the justification of a theory. Our position is that misunderstandings regarding the philosophy of science and the role of inductive and deductive logic and science are still harming the development of nursing theory and science. The purpose of this article is to discuss and reflect upon inductive and deductive views of science as well as inductive and deductive analyses in qualitative research. We start by describing inductive and deductive methods and logic from a philosophy of science perspective, and we examine how the concepts of induction and deduction are often described and used in qualitative methods and nursing research. Finally, we attempt to provide a theoretical perspective that reconciles the misunderstandings regarding induction and deduction. Our conclusion is that openness towards deductive thinking and testing hypotheses is needed in qualitative nursing research. We must also realize that strict induction will not create theory; to generate theory, a creative leap is needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Improving the quality of nursing documentation: An action research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisha M. Okaisu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Documentation is an important function of professional nursing practise. In spite of numerous improvement efforts globally, inadequate documentation continues to be reported as nurse authors investigate barriers and challenges. Objectives: The project aimed to improve nurses’ documentation of their patient assessments at the CURE Children’s Hospital of Uganda in order to enhance the quality of nursing practise. Method: An action research methodology, using repeated cycles of planning, intervention, reflection and modification, was used to establish best practise approaches in this context for improving nurses’ efficacy in documenting assessments in the patient record. The researchers gathered data from chart audits, literature reviews and key informant interviews. Through analysis and critical reflection, these data informed three cycles of systems and practise modifications to improve the quality of documentation. Results: The initial cycle revealed that staff training alone was insufficient to achievethe project goal. To achieve improved documentation, broader changes were necessary, including building a critical mass of competent staff, redesigned orientation and continuing education, documentation form redesign, changes in nurse skill mix, and continuous leadership support. Conclusion: Improving nursing documentation involved complex challenges in this setting and demanded multiple approaches. Evidence-based practise was the foundation of changes in systems required to produce visible improvement in practise. The involved role of leadership in these efforts was very important.

  14. Applying the psychoneuroimmunology framework to nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkweather, Angela; Witek-Janusek, Linda; Mathews, Herbert L

    2005-02-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) provides a distinct perspective regarding the interrelatedness of the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. PNI explicates the possible means by which behavior and emotion can influence immune function. Moreover, PNI explains the means by which the immune system affects the nervous system and affects psychological response. The interactions among these systems are mediated at the molecular level by cytokines and hormones produced by cells of not just the immune but also the nervous and endocrine systems. These cytokines and hormones affect endocrine and neuronal processes that, in turn, affect mood, emotions, personal perception, as well as the immune response. Analysis of the effect of cytokines and hormones at the molecular, cellular, and peripheral level is under intense investigation. Such analysis will lead to a better understanding of the connections among the psychological, neurological, and immunological systems. This understanding will provide for a holistic perspective upon which better health care can be provided, discomfort minimized, and disease prevented. The use of such a perspective in neuroscience nursing investigation can elicit novel approaches to care.

  15. A nurse-physician co-leadership model in psychiatric hospitals: results of a survey among leading staff members in three sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Tilman; Goebel, Rita; Rieger, Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    In three psychiatric hospitals in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, a physician-nurse shared leadership model was implemented in 1997 by the hospital management. The whole hospital, departments, and single wards are led each by a leadership team consisting of a physician, psychologist or social worker and a nurse, being responsible for organization, staff, and budgets. The consequences for staff opinion in leadership positions were evaluated. All 165 leading staff members of all professional groups were anonymously interviewed with a questionnaire containing 45 items regarding their satisfaction with this new leadership model. The response rate was 79.4%. Overall, the leading staff members were satisfied with the shared leadership model both in their own clinical practice and in general. Non-medical staff members were significantly more in favour of several aspects of shared leadership than physicians, but even the latter reported to be generally satisfied. However, both professional groups estimated leading positions to be only modestly attractive. The results yield some evidence that the change from traditional leadership models to the physician-nurse shared leadership model may have advantages in the management of psychiatric hospitals.

  16. Randomized Clinical Trial of the Effectiveness of a Home-Based Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurse Intervention: Outcomes for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy P. Hanrahan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with serious mental illness have greater risk for contracting HIV, multiple morbidities, and die 25 years younger than the general population. This high need and high cost subgroup face unique barriers to accessing required health care in the current health care system. The effectiveness of an advanced practice nurse model of care management was assessed in a four-year random controlled trial. Results are reported in this paper. In a four-year random controlled trial, a total of 238 community-dwelling individuals with HIV and serious mental illness (SMI were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n=128 or to a control group (n=110. Over 12 months, the intervention group received care management from advanced practice psychiatric nurse, and the control group received usual care. The intervention group showed significant improvement in depression (P=.012 and the physical component of health-related quality of life (P=.03 from baseline to 12 months. The advanced practice psychiatric nurse intervention is a model of care that holds promise for a higher quality of care and outcomes for this vulnerable population.

  17. Health trajectory research: a call to action for nursing science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henly, Susan J; Wyman, Jean F; Gaugler, Joseph E

    2011-01-01

    The focus of health trajectory research is study of health over time for individual persons, families, or communities. The person-focused, time-based perspective reflects health as it is experienced over the life course and maps directly onto processes of care, contributing to ease in translation of results to practice. The agenda focuses on theoretical and empirical components needed to (a) build health trajectory science; (b) develop the scientific workforce to conduct health trajectory research; (c) integrate health trajectory research with other critical, emerging areas of nursing science (genomics and genetics, informatics, dynamic systems and communication); and (d) apply health trajectory research across the life span and continuum of care. Agenda items point the way toward a reorientation of nursing research that incorporates and emphasizes understanding of individual health trajectories.

  18. Caught between a rock and a hard place: An intrinsic single case study of nurse researchers' experiences of the presence of a nursing research culture in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-11-30

    To explore how nurse researchers in clinical positions experience the presence of a nursing research culture in clinical practice. Higher demands in the hospitals for increasing the quality of patient care engender a higher demand for the skills of health professionals and evidence-based practice. However, the utilisation of nursing research in clinical practice is still limited. Intrinsic single case study design underlined by a constructivist perspective. Data were produced through a focus group interview with seven nurse researchers employed in clinical practice in two university hospitals in Zealand, Denmark, to capture the intrinsic aspects of the concept of nursing research culture in the context of clinical practice. A thematic analysis was conducted based on Braun and Clarke's theoretical guideline. "Caught between a rock and a hard place" was constructed as the main theme describing how nurse researchers in clinical positions experience the presence of a nursing research culture in clinical practice. The main theme was supported by three subthemes: Minimal academic tradition affects nursing research; Minimal recognition from physicians affects nursing research; and Moving towards a research culture. The nurse researchers in this study did not experience the presence of a nursing research culture in clinical practice, however; they called for more attention on removing barriers against research utilisation, promotion of applied research and interdisciplinary research collaboration, and passionate management support. The results of this case study show the pressure which nurse researchers employed in clinical practice are exposed to, and give examples on how to accommodate the further development of a nursing research culture in clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Ruptured thought: rupture as a critical attitude to nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beedholm, Kirsten; Lomborg, Kirsten; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce the notion of ‘rupture’ from the French philosopher Michel Foucault, whose studies of discourse and governmentality have become prominent within nursing research during the last 25 years. We argue that a rupture perspective can be helpful for identifying and maintaining a critical potential within nursing research. The paper begins by introducing rupture as an inheritance from the French epistemological tradition. It then describes how rupture appears in Foucault's works, as both an overall philosophical approach and as an analytic tool in his historical studies. Two examples of analytical applications of rupture are elaborated. In the first example, rupture has inspired us to make an effort to seek alternatives to mainstream conceptions of the phenomenon under study. In the second example, inspired by Foucault's work on discontinuity, we construct a framework for historical epochs in nursing history. The paper concludes by discussing the potential of the notion of rupture as a response to the methodological concerns regarding the use of Foucault-inspired discourse analysis within nursing research. We agree with the critique of Cheek that the critical potential of discourse analysis is at risk of being undermined by research that tends to convert the approach into a fixed method.

  20. Nurses' attitude to reading research articles and their perception of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... attitude to reading research articles and their utilization in nursing practice was conducted in University College Hospital (UCH) and Adeoyo Maternity Teaching Hospital (AMTH) both in the city of Ibadan, Nigeria. Data were collected through a 50-item-structured questionnaire using purposive sampling technique to select ...

  1. An introduction to a postmodern approach to nursing research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discourse analysis is introduced as a Poststructuralist and Social Constructionist ";approach"; to nursing research developing within the postmodern line of ... Vanweë logistiese redes word in hierdie artikel slegs inleidende gedagtes oor diskoers-analise as benadering tot kwalitatiewe, refleksiewe verpleegnavorsing ...

  2. The potential impact of gender stereotypes for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C

    1996-11-01

    The move towards evidence-based health care has meant an increasing pressure on paramedical professionals to become more research aware and research active. However, despite various initiatives designed to encourage research, there remains within nursing a notable paucity of relevant published research. While numerous explanations have been put forward in an attempt to account for this shortfall, they have tended to focus on structural/organizational barriers rather than difficulties located at the individual level. However, Hicks, in studies of midwives and nurse managers suggests that one critical perspective may be the stereotypes and assumptions associated with the nursing profession, these being so diametrically opposed to the core skills required of researchers that they operate as a natural deterrent to research activities of any sort. Embedded within this theory is the notion of gender roles, which are archetypally feminine for nursing yet archetypally masculine for research. However, Hicks' studies, which were both variants of Asch's Central Trait Theory, focused on women both as the hypothetical subject of the exercise involved and as participants. If research is bound up with gender attributions in the way she suggests, it would be necessary to ask if this is still relevant when the gender of the hypothetical figure at the centre of the study is changed. To this end, the present study was conducted which, apart from the modification just highlighted, was a replication of Hicks' earlier studies. In brief, two groups of participants rated a hypothetical male candidate for a nursing post along 15 bipolar dimensions. The candidate had been described by his referee using six adjectives, of which five were identical for each group. However, the final phrase used to describe the first group's candidate was "good clinician' while for the second group it was "good researcher'. The ratings given by the two groups along the 15 dimensions were then compared. It was

  3. Reading Nursing Research: Easy as ABCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Kathleen; Kelly, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Professional practice is built on sound knowledge specific to each discipline. This knowledge is developed and validated through a process of scientific investigation or research. However, lack of knowledge about the research process acts as a barrier to applying evidence-based practice within the school setting. Understanding the components that…

  4. A review of Indian research on co-occurring cannabis use disorders& psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Singh

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: A review of Indian literature on cannabis use and its association with psychiatric disorders indicates a high co-prevalence of psychotic disorders, especially in vulnerable individuals as well as high rates of co-occurrence of other psychiatric comorbidities. However, there is limited focus on exploring the aetiological association between cannabis use and psychiatric disorders; understanding the neurobiology of this association and management-related issues.

  5. Grounded theory in nursing research: Part 3--Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Terence V; Clark, Eileen

    2003-01-01

    In the first article in this series, the methodological characteristics of grounded theory were examined (McCann and Clark 2003a). In the second article, a critique was presented of the methodology, with particular reference to the approaches of Glaser, and Strauss and Corbin (McCann and Clark 2003b). In this, the final article in the series, Terence McCann and Eileen Clark illustrate how to apply the methodology to nursing research using the example of McCann's Australian study (McCann and Baker 2001) of how community mental health nurses promote wellness with clients who are experiencing an early episode of psychotic illness.

  6. Cultural concepts of distress and psychiatric disorders: literature review and research recommendations for global mental health epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrt, Brandon A; Rasmussen, Andrew; Kaiser, Bonnie N; Haroz, Emily E; Maharjan, Sujen M; Mutamba, Byamah B; de Jong, Joop T V M; Hinton, Devon E

    2014-04-01

    Burgeoning global mental health endeavors have renewed debates about cultural applicability of psychiatric categories. This study's goal is to review strengths and limitations of literature comparing psychiatric categories with cultural concepts of distress (CCD) such as cultural syndromes, culture-bound syndromes, and idioms of distress. The Systematic Assessment of Quality in Observational Research (SAQOR) was adapted based on cultural psychiatry principles to develop a Cultural Psychiatry Epidemiology version (SAQOR-CPE), which was used to rate quality of quantitative studies comparing CCD and psychiatric categories. A meta-analysis was performed for each psychiatric category. Forty-five studies met inclusion criteria, with 18 782 unique participants. Primary objectives of the studies included comparing CCD and psychiatric disorders (51%), assessing risk factors for CCD (18%) and instrument validation (16%). Only 27% of studies met SAQOR-CPE criteria for medium quality, with the remainder low or very low quality. Only 29% of studies employed representative samples, 53% used validated outcome measures, 44% included function assessments and 44% controlled for confounding. Meta-analyses for anxiety, depression, PTSD and somatization revealed high heterogeneity (I(2) > 75%). Only general psychological distress had low heterogeneity (I(2) = 8%) with a summary effect odds ratio of 5.39 (95% CI 4.71-6.17). Associations between CCD and psychiatric disorders were influenced by methodological issues, such as validation designs (β = 16.27, 95%CI 12.75-19.79) and use of CCD multi-item checklists (β = 6.10, 95%CI 1.89-10.31). Higher quality studies demonstrated weaker associations of CCD and psychiatric disorders. Cultural concepts of distress are not inherently unamenable to epidemiological study. However, poor study quality impedes conceptual advancement and service application. With improved study design and reporting using guidelines such as the SAQOR-CPE, CCD research

  7. Cultivating a culture of research in nursing through a journal club for leaders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To describe whether an action learning-inspired journal club for nurse leaders can develop the leaders' self-perceived competences to support a research culture in clinical nursing practice. BACKGROUND: Development of clinical research capacity and nurse leaders with the requisite competences...... competences to support nursing research culture in their departments. They stated that the action learning approach and the competences of the facilitator were key factors in this outcome. CONCLUSIONS: An action learning-inspired journal club for nurse leaders can be useful and meaningful to nurse leaders...... in developing leadership competences. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: As an approach in journal club for nurse leaders, action learning can develop nurse leaders' competence to support a research culture, and thus ensure evidence-based nursing is practised....

  8. Sampling Methods in Cardiovascular Nursing Research: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandola, Damanpreet; Banner, Davina; O'Keefe-McCarthy, Sheila; Jassal, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular nursing research covers a wide array of topics from health services to psychosocial patient experiences. The selection of specific participant samples is an important part of the research design and process. The sampling strategy employed is of utmost importance to ensure that a representative sample of participants is chosen. There are two main categories of sampling methods: probability and non-probability. Probability sampling is the random selection of elements from the population, where each element of the population has an equal and independent chance of being included in the sample. There are five main types of probability sampling including simple random sampling, systematic sampling, stratified sampling, cluster sampling, and multi-stage sampling. Non-probability sampling methods are those in which elements are chosen through non-random methods for inclusion into the research study and include convenience sampling, purposive sampling, and snowball sampling. Each approach offers distinct advantages and disadvantages and must be considered critically. In this research column, we provide an introduction to these key sampling techniques and draw on examples from the cardiovascular research. Understanding the differences in sampling techniques may aid nurses in effective appraisal of research literature and provide a reference pointfor nurses who engage in cardiovascular research.

  9. A bibliometric analysis of research on nursing models in countries other than China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Fan Han

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Research on nursing models in countries other than China is relatively mature and stable with a broader view, but it has shown a declining trend in recent years. It emphasizes both theory and practice, with research content tending to be structured into four modules, i.e., nursing education, administration, clinical practice, and theoretical research. Community nursing models may become a key research direction in the international research on nursing models in the future.

  10. [Psychiatry of the life span?--relevance of age in psychiatric research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Claudia; Motzek, Tom

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine to what extent studies published in two German journals took the age of their sample into consideration. All publications of the two journals were viewed. Only empirical research papers were included. It was then assessed whether they included information on age of the sample and, if that was the case, the studies were further categorized as only giving descriptive sample information, reporting age-specific results of dependent variables or using age as a predictor in regression analyses. Furthermore, the age range covered was assessed. 88 % of all studies included information on age. Of those, about half only provided descriptive information on the age of the study sample, while more than one third used the age variable as a predictor in multivariate models. Few studies reported age-specific outcomes. Main focus of research was on adult populations aged 18 to 65. Only few studies concentrated on children and adolescents. In light of demographic change and age specificity of psychological disorders, it will be necessary to further differentiate and report age-specific results of psychiatric research. A change in what is considered normative aging and developmental tasks for certain age groups calls for further research in those age groups. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Educating for the Future: A National Survey of Nursing Deans about Need and Demand for Nurse Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwen, Laurie N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A national survey of deans and directors of schools of nursing (n=434) was conducted to determine their opinions about the differing research foci that graduates of nursing doctoral programs should possess. They recommended diverse research foci for current and future researchers and indicated optimism about future funding. (Author/JOW)

  12. Journal Clubs: Engaging Clinical Nurses and Midwives in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alannah L; Brown, Janie A

    2018-03-01

    It is essential that nurses and midwives can understand and critically evaluate research to ensure the delivery of high-quality evidence-based care. Journal clubs are an educational method that helps to develop research capacity and assist with bridging the gap between research and clinical practice. To maintain competence and remain current with the latest evidence, a commitment to continuing professional education is required. This article describes how a successful journal club led to clinical nurses identifying a gap in their own practice, which resulted in a research project being conducted by the members of the journal club. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(3):141-144. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Quality of reporting randomized controlled trials in cancer nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia-Wen; Sward, Katherine A; Beck, Susan L; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide high-level evidence for evidence-based practice (EBP). The quality of RCTs has a substantial influence on providing reliable knowledge for EBP. Little is known about the quality of RCT reporting in cancer nursing. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of reporting in published cancer nursing RCTs from 1984 to 2010. A total of 227 RCTs in cancer nursing published in English-language journals and indexed in PubMed or Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were reviewed using the Jadad scale, key methodologic index (KMI), and the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) checklist to assess the quality of reporting methodological aspects of research and the overall quality of reporting RCTs. Adherence to reporting metrics was relatively low, based on the Jadad score (M = 1.94 out of 5, SD = 1.01), KMI scores (M = 0.84 out of 3, SD = .87), and adherence to CONSORT checklist items (M =16.92 out of 37, SD = 4.03). Only 11 of 37 items in the CONSORT checklist were reported in 80% or more of the studies reviewed. The quality of reporting showed some improvement over time. Adherence to reporting metrics for cancer nursing RCTs was suboptimal, and further efforts are needed to improve both methodology reporting and overall reporting. Journals are encouraged to adopt the CONSORT checklist to influence the quality of RCT reports.

  14. 78 FR 7794 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel, Palliative Care Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed...: Mario Rinaudo, MD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Review, National Institute of Nursing Research...

  15. Cultivating a culture of research in nursing through a journal club for leaders: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2018-01-01

    To describe whether an action learning-inspired journal club for nurse leaders can develop the leaders' self-perceived competences to support a research culture in clinical nursing practice. Development of clinical research capacity and nurse leaders with the requisite competences are key factors in evidence-based health care practice. This study describes how nurse leaders at a large regional hospital took part in a journal club for nurse leaders, with a view to developing their competences to support a nursing research culture in their departments. A pilot study using a multimethod approach to evaluate the journal club for nurse leaders. Four nurse leaders participated in the journal club for nurse leaders. Content analysis on the data was performed. Data revealed that participation in journal club for nurse leaders gave the leaders a feeling of increased competences to support nursing research culture in their departments. They stated that the action learning approach and the competences of the facilitator were key factors in this outcome. An action learning-inspired journal club for nurse leaders can be useful and meaningful to nurse leaders in developing leadership competences. As an approach in journal club for nurse leaders, action learning can develop nurse leaders' competence to support a research culture, and thus ensure evidence-based nursing is practised. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Impact factor evolution of nursing research journals: 2009 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Macarena C; Guerrero-Martín, Jorge; González-Morales, Borja; Pérez-Civantos, Demetrio V; Carreto-Lemus, Maria A; Durán-Gómez, Noelia

    The use of bibliometric indicators (impact factor [IF], impact index, h-index, etc.) is now believed to be a fundamental measure of the quality of scientific research output. In this context, the presence of scientific nursing journals in international databases and the factors influencing their impact ratings is being widely analyzed. The aim of this study was to analyze the presence of scientific nursing journals in international databases and track the changes in their IF. A secondary analysis was carried out on data for the years 2009 to 2014 held in the JCR database (subject category: nursing). Additionally, the presence of scientific nursing journals in Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, and SJR was analyzed. During the period studied, the number of journals indexed in the JCR under the nursing subject category increased from 70 in 2009 (mean IF: 0.99, standard deviation: 0.53) to 115 in 2014 (mean IF: 1.04, standard deviation: 0.42), of which only 70 were listed for the full six years. Although mean IF showed an upward trend throughout this time, no statistically significant differences were found in the variations to this figure. Although IF and other bibliometric indicators have their limitations, it is nonetheless true that bibliometry is now the most widely used tool for evaluating scientific output in all disciplines, including nursing, highlighting the importance of being familiar with how they are calculated and their significance when deciding the journal or journals in which to publish the results of our research. That said, it is also necessary to consider other possible alternative ways of assessing the quality and impact of scientific contributions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Statistical challenges in nursing education and research: an expert panel consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Matthew J; Higgins, Melinda; Schwartz, Todd A; Staggs, Vincent S

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes an expert panel discussion, "Statistical Challenges in Nursing Research," conducted at the 2013 Joint Statistical Meetings. The panel consisted of doctorally prepared statisticians with faculty appointments in United States-based academic nursing programs. The discussion centered on challenges concerning the use of statistics in nursing education and research. Five domains were identified, including perceptions about statistics, statisticians' roles and responsibilities, interdisciplinary collaboration between statisticians and nurse investigators, statistics education, and the use of statistics in the nursing literature.

  18. Evaluation of observational research reports published in Turkish nursing journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaçam, Z; Şen, E; Yildirim, B

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this literature-based descriptive study was to examine the reporting of the observational research studies published in peer-reviewed nursing journals in Turkey. Eleven peer-reviewed nursing journals printed on a regular basis in Turkey between 2007 and 2012 were selected. These journals were searched for observational research studies, and 502 studies were selected and examined by using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology Statement. Of the 502 studies, 495 were cross-sectional, 3 were cohort, and 4 were case controlled. Summary and introduction and aim sections were sufficient in most of the studies. The methods sections of the reports were mostly not reported: 64.3% of the reports did not indicate eligibility/inclusion criteria; sampling method, 67.0%; possible sources of bias, 99.2%; ways to reach sample size, 92.6%. In the results section, the number of individuals participating in each stage of the studies (44.0%) and in other analyses made (39.2%) was not reported. In the discussion section, a main comment about research findings was partly made (97.4%), and limitations of the studies and possible sources of bias were not written in 99.0% of the studies. This study clearly revealed that the observational research studies published in nursing journals in Turkey did not fulfil the important criteria and needed to be improved. Information obtained from this study can contribute to improvement of the quality of reporting observational studies in nursing and thus using obtained findings in practice. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  19. An integrative review of South African cancer nursing research published from 2002–2012

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johanna Maree; Shelley Schmollgruber

    2014-01-01

    Background: This integrative review aimed to quantify the publication output of South African cancer nursing research conducted between 2002 and 2012 and to identify key trends relevant to cancer nurse researchers. Objectives...

  20. Military nursing research by students at the Graduate School of Nursing Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Faye G; Levine, Eugene; Sylvia, Barbara; Kelley, Patricia W; Saba, Virginia; Tenenbaum, Samantha

    2005-03-01

    Military nursing research has had a long and productive history. Today, much of this research is conducted under two programs, the TriService Nursing Research Program and the Graduate School of Nursing (GSN), both located at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. This article will discuss the 150 military nursing research projects carried out by students at the GSN since its founding in 1992. Although most projects have been small in scope, they have obtained useful results. Some projects have served as the basis for larger-scale research studies, receiving funding from the TriService Nursing Research Program. Reports of all projects are available in an online database and some have been published in professional journals. This review concludes that the research produced by GSN students has been beneficial to students and to the military health system.