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Sample records for psychiatric nurses association

  1. [The attitudes nurses working at psychiatric hospitals in Turkey have towards forensic psychiatric patients and the associated factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baysan Arabacı, Leyla; Çam, M Olcay

    2013-01-01

    To determine the attitudes nurses working at psychiatric hospitals in Turkey have towards forensic psychiatric patients and the associated factors. This cross-sectional study included 620 nurses working at 8 psychiatric hospitals in Turkey that completed ≥80% of the Nurses' Attitudes Towards Forensic Psychiatric Patients Scale (NAFPPS). Data were evaluated based on number-percentage distribution, and the relationship between variables was examined via t-test, variance analysis, and correlation analysis. Mean age of the nurses was 34.37 ± 7.48 years and 79.4% were female. Mean NAFPPS total and subscale scores were as follows: Xtotal = 69.07 ± 12.46 (max: 125); Xfeelingthreatened = 15.98 ± 3.61 (max: 30); Xtrust = 20.49 ± 5.24 (max: 20); Xsocialdistance = 10.45 ± 3.33 (max: 20); Xwillingnesstoprovidecare = 22.31 ± 4.25 (max: 40). Gender, place of employment, method of obtaining current position, employment status, level of satisfaction working as a psychiatric nurse, history of providing treatment to forensic psychiatric patients, having knowledge of Turkish laws regarding the treatment of forensic psychiatric patients, and thinking that nurses should treat forensic psychiatric patients were correlated with the nurses' attitudes towards forensic psychiatric patients, whereas age, marital status, place of longest residence, level of education, duration of working in the profession, and duration at current hospital were not. Despite the fact that the nurses working at 8 psychiatric hospitals in Turkey considered forensic psychiatric patients threatening, didn't trust them, and had a tendency to be socially distant with them, they had a moderate level of willingness to provide them proper care.

  2. American Psychiatric Nurses Association-Transitions in Practice Certificate Program: Bridging the Knowledge Gap in Caring for Psychiatric Patients Within the General Nursing Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susie M; Black, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to publicize an important new Web-based educational program. Recognizing the growing gap in psychiatric-mental health knowledge and the need to better prepare new graduates and nurses transitioning from other service lines into psychiatric inpatient nursing settings, the American Psychiatric Nurses Association developed a 15-hour, modularized curriculum to provide foundational psychiatric-mental health knowledge. This modularized curriculum, called American Psychiatric Nurses Association Transitions in Practice (ATP) focuses on the knowledge and skills to insure the success of nurses new to psychiatric-mental health nursing settings and to improve the overall care for persons with mental health and substance use disorders. The ATP program is also proving to be useful content for nurses in emergency departments, hospitals, and other health settings to improve their care of patients with psychiatric and mental health needs. A summary of the program modules and a toolkit with suggested measures for nurses, patients, and agency outcomes is described. Feedback from participants completing the ATP program within the first 6 months is overwhelmingly positive and holds promise for widespread application across a variety of health care settings.

  3. Encopresis: a guide for psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Lyons T

    2009-10-01

    Encopresis is an elimination disorder that involves symptoms of fecal incontinence in children. It affects an estimated 1.5% to 7.5% of children ages 6 to 12 and accounts for approximately 3% to 6% of psychiatric referrals. The etiology of encopresis is thought to be related to physiologic problems such as constipation; however, it is also a psychiatric diagnosis and anecdotally may have some association with psychiatric problems. Publications on this association and publications directed toward psychiatric nurses are limited. Encopresis is typically treated with nutritional and medical management along with behavioral modification. Psychiatric nurses working with patients who have encopresis in inpatient settings will have unique concerns and challenges. This article gives an overview of published literature from the past 10 years on the etiology and treatment of encopresis. Specific suggestions for inpatient psychiatric nurses based on published literature and the author's professional experience are provided.

  4. Job satisfaction in psychiatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, M; Cowman, S

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, mental health services across Europe have undergone major organizational change with a move from institutional to community care. In such a context, the impact of change on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses has received little attention in the literature. This paper reports on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses and data were collected in 2003. The population of qualified psychiatric nurses (n = 800) working in a defined geographical health board area was surveyed. Methodological triangulation with a between-methods approach was used in the study. Data were collected on job satisfaction using a questionnaire adopted from the Occupational Stress Indicator. A response rate of 346 (43%) was obtained. Focus groups were used to collect qualitative data. Factors influencing levels of job satisfaction predominantly related to the nurses work location. Other factors influencing job satisfaction included choice of work location, work routine, off duty/staff allocation arrangements, teamwork and working environment. The results of the study highlight to employers of psychiatric nurses the importance of work location, including the value of facilitating staff with choices in their working environment, which may influence the recruitment and retention of nurses in mental health services.

  5. Patient Aggression and the Wellbeing of Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekurinen, Virve; Willman, Laura; Virtanen, Marianna; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Välimäki, Maritta

    2017-10-18

    Wellbeing of nurses is associated with patient aggression. Little is known about the differences in these associations between nurses working in different specialties. We aimed to estimate and compare the prevalence of patient aggression and the associations between patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses in psychiatric and non-psychiatric specialties (medical and surgical, and emergency medicine). A sample of 5288 nurses (923 psychiatric nurses, 4070 medical and surgical nurses, 295 emergency nurses) participated in the study. Subjective measures were used to assess both the occurrence of patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses (self-rated health, sleep disturbances, psychological distress and perceived work ability). Binary logistic regression with interaction terms was used to compare the associations between patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses. Psychiatric nurses reported all types of patient aggression more frequently than medical and surgical nurses, whereas nurses working in emergency settings reported physical violence and verbal aggression more frequently than psychiatric nurses. Psychiatric nurses reported poor self-rated health and reduced work ability more frequently than both of the non-psychiatric nursing groups, whereas medical and surgical nurses reported psychological distress and sleep disturbances more often. Psychiatric nurses who had experienced at least one type of patient aggression or mental abuse in the previous year, were less likely to suffer from psychological distress and sleep disturbances compared to medical and surgical nurses. Psychiatric nurses who had experienced physical assaults and armed threats were less likely to suffer from sleep disturbances compared to nurses working in emergency settings. Compared to medical and surgical nurses, psychiatric nurses face patient aggression more often, but certain types of aggression are more common in emergency settings. Psychiatric nurses have worse subjective

  6. Workplace culture in psychiatric nursing described by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurjenluoma, K; Rantanen, A; McCormack, B; Slater, P; Hahtela, N; Suominen, T

    2017-12-01

    This study looks to describe the workplace culture from the viewpoints of stress, job satisfaction and practice environment. Data were collected from nurses (n = 109) using a web-based survey, The Person-Centred Nursing Index, from two purposefully selected hospital districts in Finland. Data were statistically analysed. Nurses described their workplace culture in slightly positive terms. Nurses only occasionally experienced stress (mean = 2.56, SD = 0.55) and were fairly satisfied with their job (mean = 4.75, SD = 0.66) and their practice environment (mean = 4.42, SD = 0.81). Demographic variables such as the nurses' age, length of time in nursing, time at their present hospital, working shifts and their use of patient restriction were more frequently associated with their perceived workplace culture. Older nurses and those with a longer work history in the nursing profession tended to be more satisfied with their workplace culture in psychiatric nursing. Young and/or newly graduated nurses felt more negatively on their workplace culture; this issue should be recognised and addressed with appropriate support and mentoring. Nurses who used restrictive measures were more often less satisfied with their workplace culture. Continuous efforts are needed to reduce the use of coercive measures, which challenge also the managers to support nursing practice to be more person-centred. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Stress levels of psychiatric nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looff, P.C. de; Kuijpers, E.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2014-01-01

    During a total of 30 shifts, the arousal levels of 10 psychiatric nurses were assessed while working on a (forensic) psychiatric admissions ward. Arousal was assessed by means of a small device (wristband) by which the Skin Conductance Level (SCL) of the participating nurses was monitored. Each

  8. Nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    Background : Potential inappropiate prescribing (IP) is associated with higher mortality, morbidity and risk of hospitalization. Potential IP has only been investigated in elderly populations and never in a psychiatric setting or a general population. Registered nurses are the healthprofessionals...

  9. The nursing process in crisis-oriented psychiatric home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, J; Dingemans, C A; Dassen, T W

    1997-08-01

    Crisis-oriented psychiatric home care is a recent development in the Dutch mental health care system. Because of the difference between psychiatric care in the home and in the hospital, an action research project was initiated. This project was directed at the nursing process and the nurses' role and skills in psychiatric home care. The main goal of the project was to describe and to standardize nursing diagnoses and interventions used in crisis-oriented and long-term psychiatric home care. The development of supporting methods of assessment and intervention were also important aspects of this project. In this article a crisis-oriented psychiatric home care programme and the first developmental research activities within this programme are described. To support the nursing process, the development of a nursing record and an assessment-format, based on Gordon's Functional Health Patterns (FHP), took place. By means of content analysis of 61 nursing records, the most frequently stated nursing diagnoses, based upon the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA) taxonomy, were identified. The psychiatric diagnostic categories of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) were also collected. The most common categories found were those of mood disorders and schizophrenia or psychotic disorders. Seventy-five per cent of the nursing diagnoses showed up within four FHP: role-relationship, coping-stress tolerance, self-perception/self-concept and activity-exercise. The nursing diagnosis of 'ineffective individual coping' was stated most frequently. This is not surprising because of the similarities in the definitions of this nursing diagnosis and the concept of 'crisis' to which the psychiatric home care programme is oriented. Further research activities will be focused on standardization of nursing diagnosis and the interventions that nurses undertake in this type of care.

  10. A modern history of psychiatric-mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Laura C; Scharer, Kathleen M

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the progression of developments in psychiatric-mental health nursing from the 1960s to the present. The 1960s were a time of shortage of psychiatric APRNs, with legislation expanding the availability of mental health services. We find ourselves in a similar time with 7 million new health insurance enrollees, because of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The expansion of health insurance coverage comes at a time when some colleges of nursing are closing master's programs in psychiatric-mental health, in lieu of the DNP mandate from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Is history repeating itself? Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cyberbullying: implications for the psychiatric nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Lindsey M; Hubbard, Grace B

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to inform and educate psychiatric nurse practitioners about the pervasiveness of the rapidly increasing problem of cyberbullying. As more children and adolescents obtain access to the Internet, mobile devices, and social networking sites, the exposure to bullying in the virtual format increases. Cyberbullying is a growing public health concern and can affect mental health and school performance. Cyberbullying often results in a range of psychiatric symptoms and has been linked to suicide attempts and completions. The psychiatric nurse practitioner is uniquely prepared to provide a range of interventions for patients, families, and communities who have experienced cyberbullying. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Technological Advances in Psychiatric Nursing: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, Andrea C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and treating mental illness has improved in many ways as a result of the fast pace of technological advances. The technologies that have the greatest potential impact are those that (1) increase the knowledge of how the brain functions and changes based on interventions, (2) have the potential to personalize interventions based on understanding genetic factors of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, and (3) use information technology to provide treatment in the absence of an adequate mental health workforce. Technologies are explored for psychiatric nurses to consider. Psychiatric nurses are encouraged to consider the experiences of psychiatric patients, including poor health, stigmatization, and suffering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Care systematization in psychiatric nursing within the psychiatric reform context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirdes, A; Kantorski, L P

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to approach care systematization in psychiatric nursing in two psychiatric disorder patients who attended 'Nossa Casa', São Lourenço do Sul, RS, Brazil. Nossa Casa services psychiatric patients in the community, focussing on: (i) permanence in their environment, allowing patients to remain close to their families and social spheres; (ii) integral attendance to meet individual needs; (iii) respecting individual differences; (iv) rehabilitation practices; and (v) social reinsertion. Concepts and assumptions of the psychiatric reform and the Irving's nursing process were used as theoretical-methodological references to elaborate this systematization. A therapeutic project for the psychiatric patient was elaborated, in accordance with the interdisciplinary proposal accepted by Nossa Casa. Interdisciplinary team intervention, guided by a previously discussed common orientation and defined through an individualized therapeutic project, allowed for an effective process of psychosocial rehabilitation. The authors concluded that a therapeutic project based on the mentioned premises leads to consistent, comprehensive, dialectical and ethical assistance in mental health, thereby reinstating the citizenship of psychiatric patients.

  14. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.L.I.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.E.; Jansen, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatienaggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff members

  15. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.; Jansen, G.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatient aggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this "Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale" (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff

  16. Job satisfaction and intent to leave among psychiatric nurses: closed versus open wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Alexander; Kagan, Ilya

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate: (a) the association between socio-demographic variables, job satisfaction and intent to leave among hospital psychiatric nurses, and (b) the differences in the above between psychiatric nurses working on closed and open wards. After receiving ethical approval, a convenience sample of 52 (70% of total nursing staff) was drawn from psychiatric nurses in a large Israeli psychiatric hospital (95% response rate). The sample completed anonymously a self-administered structured questionnaire. A negative correlation was found between job satisfaction and intent to leave and between age, all categories of seniority, and intent to leave. Closed-ward nurses reported a higher intent to leave psychiatric nursing. Nurses under 35 reported a significantly higher intent to leave psychiatric nursing than nurses over 35. Job satisfaction was significantly higher among full-time nurses than part-time. Psychiatric hospitals need to pay attention to all factors associated with workers' readiness to leave. Given the widespread shortage of nurses, it is especially important that they address the relatively low job satisfaction of both younger and part-time nurses, and the particular stresses that closed-ward nurses work under. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding psychiatric nursing care with nonsuicidal self-harming patients in acute psychiatric admission units: the views of psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Aine; Gijbels, Harry

    2006-08-01

    Self-harm in the absence of suicidal intent is an underexplored area in psychiatric nursing research. This article reports on findings of a study undertaken in two acute psychiatric admission units in Ireland. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the practices of psychiatric nurses in relation to people who self-harm but who are not considered suicidal. Semistructured interviews were held with eight psychiatric nurses. Content analysis revealed several themes, some of which will be presented and discussed in this article, namely, the participants' understanding of self-harm, their approach to care, and factors in the acute psychiatric admission setting, which impacted on their care. Recommendations for further research are offered.

  18. Psychiatric Nursing Care for Adult Survivors of Child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yvonne van der Zalm; Willem Nugteren; Thóra Hafsteinsdóttir; Cokky van der Venne; Nienke Kool; prof Berno van Meijel

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to

  19. Stress among employees in psychiatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urška Nemec

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evidence suggests that stressful situations are frequent in the field of psychiatry and that professionals working in this speciality are more prone to stress. Stressful situations may be compounded by ignoring the principles and strategies of therapeutic communication in all interactions with patients. The purpose of the research was to determine the presence of stress among the nursing team members. Methods: The research is based on a quantitative methodology; the data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. The sample consisted of 73 nurses working in a special social welfare institution (n = 37 and in a psychiatric hospital (n = 36. The survey was conducted in the first half of the year 2016. Descriptive statistics and chi-square test were used. Results: The list of stress factors most frequently reported by the participants include low pay (n = 40, 55 %, poor interpersonal relationships in the workplace (n = 23, 32 %, and the sense of insecurity due to unpredictable behaviour of patients (n = 32, 44 %. One fifth of the respondents are regularly subjected to patient physical violence and psychological abuse in the workplace (n = 14, 19 % and a large majority (n = 53, 72.5 % are frequently exposed to dangerous situations. The respondents are not fully aware of the crucial importance of therapeutic communication with the patients (n = 38, 52 %. Discussion and conclusion: It is impossible to completely avoid stressful situations in psychiatric settings. Psychiatric nurses should possess good communication skills and the ability to develop good interpersonal relationships.

  20. Nurses' work-related stress in China: a comparison between psychiatric and general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yun-Ke; Xiang, Yu-Tao; An, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing; Zeng, Jiao-Ying; Ungvari, Gabor S; Newhouse, Robin; Yu, Doris S F; Lai, Kelly Y C; Ding, Yan-Ming; Yu, Liuyang; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Chiu, Helen F K

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the level of work-related stress in nurses in China.This study compared the level of work-related stress between female nurses working in psychiatric and general hospitals in China. A descriptive comparative cross-sectional design was used.A consecutive sample of nurses from two psychiatric hospitals (N = 297) and a medical unit (N = 408) of a general hospital completed a written survey including socio-demographic data and a measure of work-related stress (Nurse Stress Inventory). Compared to the nurses working in the general hospital, those working in the psychiatric setting had a higher level of stress in the domains of working environment and resources (p working experience, and working in psychiatric hospitals were associated with high work-related stress (b = .2, p work-related stress, specific stress management workshops and effective staff supportive initiatives for Chinese nurses are warranted.

  1. Respect in forensic psychiatric nurse-patient relationships: a practical compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Donald N; Peter, Elizabeth; Gallop, Ruth; Angus, Jan E; Liaschenko, Joan

    2011-03-01

    The context of forensic psychiatric nursing is distinct from other psychiatric settings as, it involves placement of patients in secure environments with restrictions determined by the courts. Previous literature has identified that nurses morally struggle with respecting patients who have committed heinous offences, which can lead to the patient being depersonalized and dehumanized. Although respect is fundamental to ethical nursing practice, it has not been adequately explored conceptually or empirically. As a result, little knowledge exists that identifies how nurses develop, maintain, and express respect for patients. The purpose of this study is to analyze the concept of respect systematically, from a forensic psychiatric nurse's perspective using the qualitative methodology of focused ethnography. Forensic psychiatric nurses were recruited from two medium secure forensic rehabilitation units. In the first interview, 13 registered nurses (RNs) and two registered practical nurses (RPNs) participated, and although all informants were invited to the second interview, six RNs were lost to follow-up. Despite this loss, saturation was achieved and the data were interpreted through a feminist philosophical lens. Respect was influenced by factors categorized into four themes: (1) emotive-cognitive reactions, (2) nonjudgmental approach, (3) social identity and power, and (4) context. The data from the themes indicate that forensic psychiatric nurses strike a practical compromise, in their understanding and enactment of respect in therapeutic relationships with forensic psychiatric patients. © 2011 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  2. Multidisciplinary, Nurse-Led Psychiatric Consultation in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Study in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekkoek, Bauke; van Baarsen, Carlijn; Steenbeek, Mirella

    2016-07-01

    To determine the effects of multidisciplinary, nurse-led psychiatric consultation on behavioral problems of nursing home residents. Residents often suffer from psychiatric symptoms, while staff psychiatric expertise varies. A pre-post study was conducted in seven homes using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Nursing Home version (NPI-NH). In 71 consultations during 18 months, 56-75% of residents suffered from agitation/aggression, depression, anxiety, and disinhibition. Post-intervention (n = 54), frequency, and severity of psychiatric symptoms were significantly and clinically meaningfully reduced. Also, staff suffered from less work stress. Nurse-led psychiatric consultation is valuable to both nursing home residents and staff. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Relationship between occupational stress and depression among psychiatric nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Kaori; Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Danjo, Kazuma; Furukori, Hanako; Sato, Yasushi; Tomita, Tetsu; Fujii, Akira; Nakagam, Taku; Sasaki, Masahide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing is a stressful area of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to examine occupational stress among psychiatric nurses in Japan. In this cross-sectional study, 238 psychiatric nurses were recruited from 7 hospitals. Data regarding the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire (GJSQ), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Health Practice Index (HPI) were obtained via self-report questionnaires. After adjusting for all the variables, CES-D scores were associated with job stress, but social support reduced the effect of stress on depression among psychiatric nurses. However, the interpretation of these results was hampered by the lack of data concerning important occupational factors, such as working position, personal income, and working hours. Further longitudinal investigation into the factors associated with depression may yield useful information for administrative and psychological interventions.

  4. Nurses' attitudes toward ethical issues in psychiatric inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Nurhan

    2014-05-01

    Nursing is an occupation that deals with humans and relies upon human relationships. Nursing care, which is an important component of these relationships, involves protection, forbearance, attention, and worry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ethical beliefs of psychiatric nurses and ethical problems encountered. The study design was descriptive and cross-sectional. RESEARCH CONTEXT: Methods comprised of a questionnaire administered to psychiatric nurses (n=202) from five psychiatric hospitals in Istanbul, Turkey, instruction in psychiatric nursing ethics, discussion of reported ethical problems by nursing focus groups, and analysis of questionnaires and reports by academicians with clinical experience. PARTICIPANTS consist of the nurses who volunteered to take part in the study from the five psychiatric hospitals (n=202), which were selected with cluster sampling method. Ethical considerations: Written informed consent of each participant was taken prior to the study. The results indicated that nurses needed additional education in psychiatric ethics. Insufficient personnel, excessive workload, working conditions, lack of supervision, and in-service training were identified as leading to unethical behaviors. Ethical code or nursing care -related problems included (a) neglect, (b) rude/careless behavior, (c) disrespect of patient rights and human dignity, (d) bystander apathy, (e) lack of proper communication, (f) stigmatization, (g) authoritarian attitude/intimidation, (h) physical interventions during restraint, (i) manipulation by reactive emotions, (j) not asking for permission, (k) disrespect of privacy, (l) dishonesty or lack of clarity, (m) exposure to unhealthy physical conditions, and (n) violation of confidence. The results indicate that ethical codes of nursing in psychiatric inpatient units are inadequate and standards of care are poor. In order to address those issues, large-scale research needs to be conducted in psychiatric nursing with a

  5. Violence against psychiatric nurses: sensitive research as science and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Marilyn Lewis; Zeiss, Robert; Rierdan, Jill

    2006-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses are frequent victims of workplace violence, much of which is perpetrated by patients. In a review of literature on prevalence, perpetrators, and impact of violence on psychiatric nurses, we note that workplace violence is a virtually normative experience for the nurse, rather than a rare occurrence. Verbal violence and sexual harassment, like physical violence, are common experiences; in contrast to physical violence, these are often initiated by co-workers. The emotional impact of violence on psychiatric nurses is studied less often than frequency of exposure; we discuss hypotheses for this paucity of relevant research. Finally, we reflect on the implications of current research, concluding with recommendations for future research on violence against psychiatric nurses. In particular, we elaborate on the role of violence research in the healthcare setting as "sensitive research"--a research process that in itself may have both direct and indirect beneficial effects for the nursing profession.

  6. Utilizing Ericksonian hypnosis in psychiatric-mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahourek, Rothlyn P

    2002-01-01

    Ericksonian hypnosis conceptual framework. To acquaint psychiatric-mental health nurses with hypnotic principles and how these can be integrated into their practice. Published literature and author's clinical experience. Ericksonian hypnosis offers an array of potential interventions for psychiatric-mental health nurses to integrate into their practices in a framework familiar to nurses: holism, honoring and respecting individuality, and capitalizing on an individual's strengths.

  7. [Insomnia associated with psychiatric disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Konno, Chisato; Furihata, Ryuji; Osaki, Koichi; Uchiyama, Makoto

    2009-08-01

    Most psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, mood disorders, or neurotic disorders are associated with sleep disorders of various kinds, among which insomnia is most prevalent and important in psychiatric practice. Almost all patients suffering from major depression complain of insomnia. Pharmacological treatment of insomnia associated with major depression shortens the duration to achieve remission of depression. Insomnia has been recently reported to be a risk factor for depression. In patients with schizophrenia, insomnia is often an early indicator of the aggravation of psychotic symptoms. Electroencephalographic sleep studies have also revealed sleep abnormalities characteristic to mood disorders, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders. A shortened REM sleep latency has been regarded as a biological marker of depression. Reduced amount of deep non-REM sleep has been reported to be correlated with negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Recently, REM sleep abnormalities were found in teenagers having post-traumatic stress disorder after a boat accident. Although these facts indicate that insomnia plays an important role in the development of psychiatric disorders, there are few hypotheses explaining the cause and effect of insomnia in these disorders. Here, we reviewed recent articles on insomnia associated with psychiatric disorders together with their clinical managements.

  8. Forensic psychiatric nursing: skills and competencies: II clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, T; Coyle, D; Lovell, A

    2008-03-01

    This study reports on research undertaken to identify the skills and competencies of forensic psychiatric nurses working in secure psychiatric services in the UK. The rationale for this research is the lack of clarity in the role definition of nurses working in these environments and the specific content that may underscore the curriculum for training forensic nurses. Over 3300 questionnaires were distributed to forensic psychiatric nurses, non-forensic psychiatric nurses and other disciplines and information obtained on (1) the perceived clinical problems that give forensic nurses the most difficulty; (2) the skills best suited to overcome those problems; and (3) the priority aspects of clinical nursing care that needs to be developed. A 35% response rate was obtained with 1019 forensic psychiatric nurses, 110 non-forensic psychiatric nurses and 43 other disciplines. The results highlighted a 'top ten' list of main problems with possible solutions and main areas for development. The conclusions drawn include a focus on skills and competencies regarding the management of personality disorders and the management of violence and aggression.

  9. Forensic psychiatric nursing: skills and competencies: I role dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, T; Lovell, A; Coyle, D

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the skills and competencies of forensic psychiatric nurses from the perspective of three groups: (A) forensic psychiatric nurses; (B) non-forensic psychiatric nurses; and (C) other disciplines. A national survey of forensic psychiatric services in the UK was conducted, and information gathered on the perceived skills and competencies in this growing field of psychiatric practice. From 3360 questionnaires, 1172 were returned, making a response rate of 35%. The results indicate a small discrepancy between forensic nurses' and non-forensic nurses' perceptions of the role constructs of forensic practice. However, a larger difference was noted between nurses' perceptions and other disciplines' perceptions of the constituent parts to forensic psychiatric nursing. Nurses tended to focus on personal qualities both in relation to themselves and the patients, while the other disciplines focused on organizational structures both in defining the role and in the resolution of perceived deficits. The findings have implications for multidisciplinary working, as well as policy formulation and curriculum development in terms of the skills and competencies of forensic nurse training.

  10. Factors Relating to Self-Efficacy Among Psychiatric Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Hironori; Kobayashi, Mako; Odachi, Ryo; Yamane, Toshie

    This study aimed to clarify the factors related to self-efficacy experienced by psychiatric nurses. Analysis of qualitative descriptive data from a free self-description questionnaire administered to 16 psychiatric nurses working in psychiatric hospitals revealed 24 codes across the following 8 categories as factors that increase self-efficacy: A1. possibility of practical use in nursing, A2. nursing judgment, A3. improvement of psychiatric symptoms, A4. the patients presenting a positive attitude, A5. building a relationship of trust with the patients, A6. building a relationship of trust with other nurses, A7. work progressing according to plan and A8. team medical practice. Twenty-five codes across the following 10 categories were identified as factors that decrease self-efficacy: B1. lack of communication, B2. uncertainty in caregiving, B3. recurrence of psychiatric symptoms, B4. feeling overpowered by a patient, B5. sense of being too busy to work adequately, B6. difficulty in bringing about self-improvement, B7. sense of loss regarding one's role as a nurse, B8. lack of physical strength, B9. mechanical performance of nursing and B10. fluctuating view of nursing due to mistakes. These factors require intervention for psychiatric nurses' self-efficacy.

  11. Depression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feely, M; Long, A

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a theory of connectivity, which was formulated from the findings of a Classical Grounded Theory study that was designed to capture a sample of people's perceptions of living with depression or caring for individuals with depression. Data were collected from: (1) a focus group consisting of people with depression (n = 7), of which five were patients in the community and two were nurses; (2) one-to-one interviews with patients in the community (n = 5) and nurses (n = 5), three of whom had experienced depression from both sides of the caring process; and (3) two 'happy accident' focus groups (n = 25; n = 18) comprising of healthcare workers with a shared understanding of depression. Purposeful sampling was used initially. Thereafter, in keeping with one of the key tenets of grounded theory, theoretical sampling was used until theoretical saturation occurred. Data were analysed using the constant comparative approach together with the NVivo qualitative analysis software package. The core category that emerged was 'connectivity' relating to the connections and disconnections, which people make in their lives. Six key categories emerged all of which were integrated with the core category. Hence, connectivity provided a significant platform for understanding and responding to the life experience of depression. They were: (1) life encounters on the journey to naming; (2) depression: What's in a name? The silent thief; (3) tentative steps to health care; (4) connective encounters and challenges; (5) connecting with self; and (6) self-connection maintenance. Subsequently, a theory, 'Depression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivity', surfaced from the overall findings. We argue that this theory of connectivity provides a framework that people working in the field of holistic treatment and care could use to better understand and respond to the life experience of people living with depression.

  12. Governing the captives: forensic psychiatric nursing in corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Dave

    2005-01-01

    TOPIC/PROBLEM: Since 1978, the federal inmates of Canada serving time have had access to a full range of psychiatric care within the carceral system. Five psychiatric units are part of the Federal Correctional Services. Nursing practice in forensic psychiatry opens up new horizons in nursing. This complex professional nursing practice involves the coupling of two contradictory socio-professional mandates: to punish and to provide care. The purpose of this article is to present the results of a grounded theory doctoral study realized in a multi-level security psychiatric ward of the Canadian Federal Penitentiary System. The theoretical work of the late French philosopher, Michel Foucault, and those of sociologist, Erving Goffman, are used to illuminate the qualitative data that emerged from the author's fieldwork. A Foucauldian perspective allows us to understand the way forensic psychiatric nursing is involved in the governance of mentally ill criminals through a vast array of power techniques (sovereign, disciplinary, and pastoral) which posited nurses as "subjects of power". These nurses are also "objects of power" in that nursing practice is constrained by formal and informal regulations of the penitentiary context. As an object of "governmental technologies", the nursing staff becomes the body onto which a process of conforming to the customs of the correctional milieu is dictated and inscribed. The results of this qualitative research, from a nursing perspective, are the first of their kind to be reported in Canada since the creation of the Regional Psychiatric Correctional Units in 1978.

  13. Different Places, Different Ideas: Reimagining Practice in American Psychiatric Nursing After World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kylie M

    2018-01-01

    In 1952, Hildegard Peplau published her textbook Interpersonal Relations in Nursing: A Conceptual Frame of Reference for Psychodynamic Nursing. This was the same year the American Psychiatric Association (APA) published the first edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (1st ed.; DSM-I; APA). These events occurred in the context of a rapidly changing policy and practice environment in the United States after World War II, where the passing of the National Mental Health Act in 1946 released vast amounts of funding for the establishment of the National Institute of Mental Health and the development of advanced educational programs for the mental health professions including nursing. This article explores the work of two nurse leaders, Hildegard Peplau and Dorothy Mereness, as they developed their respective graduate psychiatric nursing programs and sought to create new knowledge for psychiatric nursing that would facilitate the development of advanced nursing practice. Both nurses had strong ideas about what they felt this practice should look like and developed distinct and particular approaches to their respective programs. This reflected a common belief that it was only through nurse-led education that psychiatric nursing could shape its own practice and control its own future. At the same time, there are similarities in the thinking of Peplau and Mereness that demonstrate the link between the specific social context of mental health immediately after World War II and the development of modern psychiatric nursing. Psychiatric nurses were able to gain significant control of their own education and practice after the war, but this was not without a struggle and some limitations, which continue to impact on the profession today.

  14. Job satisfaction and resilience in psychiatric nurses: A study at the Institute of Mental Health, Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhimin; Gangaram, Poornima; Xie, Huiting; Chua, Stephanie; Ong, Samantha Bee Cheng; Koh, Sioh Eng

    2017-12-01

    Job satisfaction ranks highly as one of the main factors influencing turnover rates among nurses. Mental health nursing has been reported to be a particularly stressful specialty, yet little is known about the level of job satisfaction among psychiatric nurses in Singapore. Resilience is defined as a means of adapting to stress at the workplace, and could serve as a factor influencing job satisfaction. The present study aimed to explore the current level of job satisfaction among psychiatric nurses working in the only tertiary psychiatric institution in Singapore, the influencing factors, and the relationship between resilience and job satisfaction. A survey questionnaire consisting of the following was administered to all eligible nurses working in the Institute of Mental Health between the period of 16-24 December 2014: (i) The McCloskey and Mueller Satisfaction Scale; (ii) The Resilience Scale; and (iii) sociodemographic data form. A total of 874 nurses were eligible for participation in the study, and a total of 748 nurses responded, totalling 85.6% response. A mean satisfaction score of 95.21 and mean resilience score of 125.74 were obtained. Mean satisfaction and resilience scores were the highest for nurses with longer working experience and those of older age. A positive and significant association between satisfaction and resilience scores (P = 0.001) was obtained. Psychiatric nurses in Singapore are generally satisfied with their job, but this can be further improved with the strengthening of personal resilience. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. [Being personal: the development of community psychiatric mental health nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Shu-Jen; Lee, Shu-Hong

    2009-08-01

    Community psychiatric mental health nursing care emphasizes humanistic values and focuses on serving patient and family needs. In Taiwan, such care is delivered largely as part of patient discharge care plans and hospital / community based service models. Issues involved underscore the importance of operating an effective and integrated transfer system, the role and function of nurses and training in relevant competencies (Shiau, Huang & Lin, 2005). This article again emphasizes the importance of 'being personal' in the development of community psychiatric mental health nursing in Taiwan. Critical issues to consider include humanization, empowerment, nursing competencies, regulations, relating on a personal level, and facilitating empowerment and enlightenment on the healing process.

  16. Epigenetics: An Emerging Framework for Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSocio, Janiece E

    2016-07-01

    The aims of this paper are to synthesize and report research findings from neuroscience and epigenetics that contribute to an emerging explanatory framework for advanced practice psychiatric nursing. Discoveries in neuroscience and epigenetics reveal synergistic mechanisms that support the integration of psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, and psychoeducation in practice. Advanced practice psychiatric nurses will benefit from an expanded knowledge base in neuroscience and epigenetics that informs and explains the scientific rationale for our integrated practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Field trials of the phenomena of concern for psychiatric/mental health nursing: proposed methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, H S

    1989-10-01

    An important step in the development of the American Nurses' Association (ANA) Task Force's Classification of Phenomena of Concern for Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing is a plan for conducting field trials to determine interrater diagnostic reliability using the classification system. The ANA Task Force identified field testing as stage two in a three-stage process for completion of our work. In this article, we identify methodologic directions that will allow us to answer two important questions. First, what is the interrater reliability of the system of psychiatric nursing diagnoses when applied to clients by psychiatric/mental health nurse clinicians in their practice, and second, how do the clinicians who use this system view its usefulness for planning and evaluating nursing care?

  18. Nurses' perceptions of and participation in continuing nursing education: results from a study of psychiatric hospital nurses in Bahrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Majid, Sadeeka; Al-Majed, Hashmiya; Rakovski, Cyril S; Otten, Rebecca A

    2012-05-01

    Although many psychiatric hospital nurses in Bahrain attend at least one continuing nursing education (CNE) activity per year, many others do not. This study explored these nurses' perceptions of CNE and factors that promote or hinder participation in CNE activities. A descriptive design was used to gather data from a convenience sample of 200 nurses working at the psychiatric hospital in Bahrain. Nurses believed that CNE improved the quality of patient care and patient outcomes, increased nurses' knowledge and skills, and kept them current with advances in nursing. Participation in CNE was hindered by unavailability of CNE activities related to psychiatric nursing. The majority of nurses had positive perceptions of CNE. Their participation was hindered by unavailability of CNE activities related to psychiatric nursing. Those responsible for planning continuing education in Bahrain should consider these findings when planning future CNE activities. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Nurses' information retrieval skills in psychiatric hospitals - are the requirements for evidence-based practice fulfilled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Hätönen, Heli

    2010-01-01

    Nursing professionals have long recognized the importance to practice of research and the value of research evidence. Nurses still do not use research findings in practice. The purpose of this paper was to describe nurses' skills in using literature databases and the Internet in psychiatric hospitals and associations of nurses' gender, age, and job position with their information retrieval skills. The study was carried out in 2004 among nursing staff (N=183) on nine acute psychiatric wards in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland (n=180, response rate 98%). The Finnish version of the European Computer Driving Licence test (ECDL) was used as a data collection instrument. The study showed that there were clear deficits in information retrieval skills among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. Thus, nurses' competence does not support the realization of evidence-based practice in the hospitals. Therefore, it is important to increase nurses' information retrieval skills by tailoring continuing education modules. It would be also advisable to develop centralized systems for the internal dissemination of research findings for the use of nursing staff.

  20. Anxiety levels in employees and students in psychiatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urban Bole

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several research finding indicate that nursing care professionals are often faced with situations which may lead to anxiety. The aim of the present research was to determine the prevalence and typical signs of anxiety among nursing employees and nursing students in psychiatric settings. Methods: The Burns Anxiety Inventory was used as an assessment tool to measure anxiety. The research sample consisted of 242 participants. The data collected were processed by the descriptive statistics, Leveneʹs test, the ANOVA statistical test, the Welchʹs t-test, and the post hoc analysis. Pearsonʹs correlation coefficient was used to measure the strength of the association between the variables. Results: The results of the current study show that nearly half of the participants experience anxiety, but the differences were noted as regards their anxiety thoughts (p = 0.039. Anxiety feelings are more prevalent in female students (p = 0.046. Habitual smokers (p = 0.030 and casual smokers (p = 0.020 are more likely to develop anxious feelings and physical signs of anxiety. The anxiety signs are also more pronounced in the respondents with self-assessed lower economic status (p = 0.001 and poor self-rated health (p = 0.0001. Discussion and conclusion: The professionals and students in psychiatric nursing often encounter situations conducive to the development of anxiety. Further studies on the current topic are therefore recommended to design adequate educational programmes to timely recognise anxiety symptoms and to implement mutual and self-help measure.

  1. [Nursing perspective on psychiatric care in Ivory Coast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Dan

    2017-05-01

    Michaël Bilson is a nurse at the psychiatric hospital of Bingerville, in Ivory Coast. Here, he describes his mission supporting the National Health Worker Training Institute. It is the only nurse training school in Ivory Coast. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. [Subjective glance in ethics and attitudes in psychiatric nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädle-Deininger, Hilde

    2014-07-01

    Patients with psychiatric problems have the right to receive qualified and humane psychiatric nursing. To meet these requirements nurses should reflect on their daily practice and whether they support clients in respect of autonomy, empowerment and recovery or only meet the requirements of the institution and well-worn routines. The Code of Ethics for Nurses (International Council of Nurses [ICN] and the four principles of Beauchamp and Childress [respect of autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence and justice]) help nurses to decide in their daily work on the narrow line between autonomy and treating the patient like a child. Emphasis is laid on the nurses' duty to influence the political development in health services. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Therapeutic abortion: the psychiatric nurse as therapist, liaison, and consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahourek, R; Tower, M

    1971-01-01

    It is noted that as abortion becomes an accepted medical practice, more nurses will be involved in the treatment and counseling of the therapeutic abortion patient. The authors, psychiatric nurses in a Colorado comprehensive urban mental health center, became involved in the treatment of the therapeutic abortion patient with the passing of the State's liberalized 1967 abortion law. As they became involved with all aspects of therapeutic abortion patients' care, they identified 3 specific roles for the psychiatric nurse: 1) providing direct They treatment, 2) providing liaison service and promoting continuity of care for the patient, and 3) providing consultation service to the staff involved with the patient. As the psychiatric nurses shared their own mixed feelings about abortion with the obstetrical staff, the staff began to feel less guilty and less alone with their feelings. The became more involved with the patients and benefited them more.

  4. Tangled ruptures: discursive changes in Danish psychiatric nursing 1965-75

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, N

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing and psychiatric nurses have been referred to in various ways over the course of history. These articulations reflect and constitute the ways in which nursing is comprehended during specific periods. A rupture in these descriptions and conceptions of Danish psychiatric nursing ...

  5. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Psychiatric Nursing in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Yoshinaga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric nurses have played a significant role in disseminating cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in Western countries; however, in Japan, the application, practice, efficiency, and quality control of CBT in the psychiatric nursing field are unclear. This study conducted a literature review to assess the current status of CBT practice and research in psychiatric nursing in Japan. Three English databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO and two Japanese databases (Ichushi-Web and CiNii were searched with predetermined keywords. Fifty-five articles met eligibility criteria: 46 case studies and 9 comparative studies. It was found that CBT took place primarily in inpatient settings and targeted schizophrenia and mood disorders. Although there were only a few comparative studies, each concluded that CBT was effective. However, CBT recipients and outcome measures were diverse, and nurses were not the only CBT practitioners in most reports. Only a few articles included the description of CBT training and supervision. This literature review clarified the current status of CBT in psychiatric nursing in Japan and identified important implications for future practice and research: performing CBT in a variety of settings and for a wide range of psychiatric disorders, conducting randomized controlled trials, and establishing pre- and postqualification training system.

  6. Interrelationship between core interventions and core competencies of forensic psychiatric nursing in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkanen, Helena; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Kinnunen, Juha

    2011-03-01

    The importance of core competencies (CC) and their relationship to core interventions in clinical practice guidelines on schizophrenia (CPGS), and the abilities to master these competencies were studied among registered nurses (RN) and practical mental nurses (PMN) in a forensic psychiatric setting. Data were collected from RNs, PMNs, and managers of all five forensic psychiatric facilities in Finland. The research material was obtained by using a 360-degree feedback method. The response rate was 68% (N = 428). The differences between the nurse groups were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) regarding the importance of and ability to master the following CCs: (1) pharmacotherapy, (2) knowledge in forensic psychiatry and violent behavior, (3) the treatment of violent patients, (4) processing patient's and own emotion, and (5) need-adapted treatment of the patient. Overall, RNs exceeded PMNs in mastering the CCs, however the principles of the CPGS were not achieved within the current resources in Finland. In summary, RNs, rather than PMNs, should be recruited for work in forensic psychiatric nursing, although a considerable amount of specific training would still be required to achieve competence. Implications of our research indicate that all nurses working in this area need to receive further education in forensic psychiatry and in forensic psychiatric nursing. © 2011 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  7. Psychiatric Nurses' Attitudes Towards Violent Behaviour: A Brazilian Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Maraína Gomes Pires Fernandes; de Vargas, Divane

    2018-02-13

    This study examines nurses' attitudes towards violent behaviour and the management of aggressiveness. A convenience sample of 185 nurses working in psychiatric urgent care and emergency services in Brazil responded to the MAVAS-BR. The results show that nurses' attitudes are more reflective of the external and situational models of violent behaviour and the use of control methods to manage aggressiveness. The mapping of this phenomenon using the same tools in a different context from those traditionally studied while observing similar results suggests a pattern of attitudes towards violent behaviour and the management of aggressiveness among nurses around the world.

  8. American Nephrology Nurses' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join/Renew Jobs Contact Corporate Shop American Nephrology Nurses Association About ANNA Association About ANNA Strategic Plan ... CExpress Events National Events Chapter / Local Events Nephrology Nurses Week ANNA Education Modules CKD Modules Education Services ...

  9. Cross-cultural differences in psychiatric nurses' attitudes to inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Gerard J.; Middel, Berry; Dassen, Theodoor; Reijneveld, Menno S A

    Little is currently known about the attitudes of psychiatric nurses toward patient aggression, particularly from an international perspective. Attitudes toward patient aggression of psychiatric nurses from five European countries were investigated using a recently developed and tested attitude

  10. Psychiatric Nurses' Views on Caring: Patients and Canine Companions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Camille

    2017-03-01

    Psychiatric nurses are expert care providers for individuals with mental health needs. The art of caring spans across multiple species, is important to understand, and is universal whether intentions are toward individuals or animals. Pets are often cared for and viewed as family members. The current research examined psychiatric nurses' views on the similarities and differences of caring for patients and their pet dogs. Twenty-five nurses were interviewed. Similarities of caring for patients and canines included trusting relationships, companionship, daily basic needs, and improved communication through monitored body language. Differences in caring included personal expectations, unconditional love, and professional boundaries. Understanding the concepts of caring for patients and pet dogs will provide the opportunity for insight into familial versus professional relationships, improve communication with others, and strengthen the human-animal bond. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(3), 46-52.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Existentialism as a theoretical basis for counselling in psychiatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnard, P

    1989-06-01

    Counselling is increasingly described in the literature as an important part of the psychiatric nurse's role. Often, the type of counselling described in that literature is of the client-centered type developed by Carl Rogers. This report outlines the philsophical position known as existentialism and offers suggestions as to how that philosophy may be used to develop a more vigorous and more egalitarian approach to counselling in nursing.

  12. Psychiatric Nursing's Role in Child Abuse: Prevention, Recognition, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Erin

    2017-11-01

    Child abuse affects hundreds of thousands of children in the United States each year. The effects from maltreatment extend beyond the physical injuries-the lasting effects on the child's mental health can be lifelong. Psychiatric nurses have a vital role to play in the prevention, recognition, and treatment of child abuse. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(11), 16-20.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Correlation between Anger and Job Motivation among Psychiatric Nurses in Kashan Psychiatric Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouchaki E.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: In general, nurses who work in department of psychiatric are in fact interacting with emotional disorders of patients once providing their care services. higher levels of job motivation and satisfaction can markedly foster service improvement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between anger and job motivation in nurses of a psychiatric hospital. Instrument & Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive research in 2014, all 50 psychiatry nurses working at Kargarnejad Hospital of Kashan City, Iran, were entirely studied. A demographical questionnaire, the Anger Multiple Scale and the Job Motivation Scale were used for data gathering. Data were analyzed by SPSS 19 software using Pearson correlation coefficient. Findings: The mean score of anger was 3.01±0.36 and of job motivation was 1.70±0.86. There was a significant relationship between job motivation and the number of family members and conditions of employment of nurses (p=0.001. There was a significant inverse relationship between scores of anger and job motivation of psychiatry nurses of the hospital (r=-0.712; p=0.001. Conclusion: There is a relationship between anger and job motivation in nurses of Kashan Psychiatric hospital.

  14. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Integrative holism in psychiatric-mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahourek, Rothlyn P

    2008-10-01

    In this era of high-tech care, many Americans seek more holistic approaches and alternative and complementary treatments for health problems, including mental illness. Psychiatric-mental health (PMH) nurses need to be aware of these approaches as they assess clients, maintain a holistic approach, and in some cases, provide skilled, specific modalities. This article reviews holistic philosophy and integrative approaches relevant to PMH nurses. The emphasis is that whichever modality PMH nurses practice, a holistic framework is essential for providing optimal PMH care.

  16. Millennial Students' Preferred Methods for Learning Concepts in Psychiatric Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Janet K

    2015-09-01

    The current longitudinal, descriptive, and correlational study explored which traditional teaching strategies can engage Millennial students and adequately prepare them for the ultimate test of nursing competence: the National Council Licensure Examination. The study comprised a convenience sample of 40 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a psychiatric nursing course. The students were exposed to a variety of traditional (e.g., PowerPoint(®)-guided lectures) and nontraditional (e.g., concept maps, group activities) teaching and learning strategies, and rated their effectiveness. The students' scores on the final examination demonstrated that student learning outcomes met or exceeded national benchmarks. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Psychiatric consultations and the management of associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychiatric consultations and the management of associated comorbid medical conditions in a regional referral hospital. NSZ Tema, ABR Janse van Rensburg. Abstract. Background. Psychiatrists are often called upon to evaluate patients with a medical condition and psychiatric symptoms, either as a complication thereof or ...

  18. Experiences of psychiatric nurses exposed to hostility from patients in a forensic ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tema, T R; Poggenpoel, M; Myburgh, C P H

    2011-10-01

    Hostile behaviour is becoming a way of life in South Africa. Hostility prevails at all settings, including in the health sector. In a forensic ward psychiatric nurses are subjected to hostile behaviour by the patients. The aim of the present study was to explore and describe the psychiatric nurses' experiences of hostile behaviour by patients in a forensic ward and make recommendations for nurse managers to empower these psychiatric nurses to cope with the patients' aggression. Qualitative, in-depth, phenomenological interviews were conducted with nine psychiatric nurses exposed to hostility from patients in a forensic ward. Recommendations were derived from the results from nurse managers to assist psychiatric nurses. It became apparent from the findings that psychiatric nurses in a forensic ward work in a stressful environment. Hostile behaviour in the forensic ward is consistently experienced by the psychiatric nurses as hindering therapeutic relationships. The psychiatric nurses experienced being disempowered. Psychiatric nurses experience hostile behaviour by patients in a forensic ward as disempowering. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSE MANAGEMENT: Nurse managers can facilitate psychiatric nurses' empowerment by providing them access to: information, support, resources, opportunity and growth. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Emergency Nurses Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... menu Join ENA Today! Membership in the Emergency Nurses Association offers a variety of benefits and allows ... a part of more than 42,000 emergency nurses working together to promote safe practice and safe ...

  20. Internal predictors of burnout in psychiatric nurses: An Indian study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudraprosad Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research has not adequately focused on the issue of burnout in Psychiatric nurses, despite the fact that they suffer considerable stress in their work. Till date no study has been conducted on burnout among psychiatric nurses in India. Further, there is a particular lack of research in internal variables predicting burnout in them. Aims: To determine whether there are any internal psychological factors relevant to burnout in psychiatric nurses in India. Materials and Methods: We recruited 101 psychiatric nurses scoring less than two in General Health Questionnaire, version 12 (GHQ-12 from two psychiatric hospitals after obtaining informed consent. All subjects filled up a sociodemographic data sheet along with global adjustment scale, emotional maturity scale, PGI general well-being scale, locus of control scale, and Copenhagen burnout inventory (CBI. Correlations between burnout and sociodemographic/clinical variables were done by Pearson′s r or Spearman′s rho. Signi ficant variables were entered in a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis with total burnout score as dependent variable. Results: Age, duration of total period of nursing, prior military training, locus of control, sense of general well-being, adjustment capabilities, and emotional maturity had significant relation with burnout. Of them, emotional maturity was the most significant protective factors against burnout along with adjustment capabilities, sense of physical well-being, and military training in decreasing significance. Together they explained 41% variation in total burnout score which is significant at <0.001 level. An internal locus of control was inversely correlated with burnout, but failed to predict it in regression analysis. Conclusion: Emotional maturity, adjustability, sense of general physical well-being as well as prior military training significantly predicted lower burnout. Of them, emotional maturity was the most important predictor

  1. Internal predictors of burnout in psychiatric nurses: An Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rudraprosad; Chatterjee, Arunima; Chaudhury, Suprakash

    2012-07-01

    Research has not adequately focused on the issue of burnout in Psychiatric nurses, despite the fact that they suffer considerable stress in their work. Till date no study has been conducted on burnout among psychiatric nurses in India. Further, there is a particular lack of research in internal variables predicting burnout in them. To determine whether there are any internal psychological factors relevant to burnout in psychiatric nurses in India. We recruited 101 psychiatric nurses scoring less than two in General Health Questionnaire, version 12 (GHQ-12) from two psychiatric hospitals after obtaining informed consent. All subjects filled up a sociodemographic data sheet along with global adjustment scale, emotional maturity scale, PGI general well-being scale, locus of control scale, and Copenhagen burnout inventory (CBI). Correlations between burnout and sociodemographic/clinical variables were done by Pearson's r or Spearman's rho. Signi ficant variables were entered in a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis with total burnout score as dependent variable. Age, duration of total period of nursing, prior military training, locus of control, sense of general well-being, adjustment capabilities, and emotional maturity had significant relation with burnout. Of them, emotional maturity was the most significant protective factors against burnout along with adjustment capabilities, sense of physical well-being, and military training in decreasing significance. Together they explained 41% variation in total burnout score which is significant at Emotional maturity, adjustability, sense of general physical well-being as well as prior military training significantly predicted lower burnout. Of them, emotional maturity was the most important predictor. Internal locus of control was also correlated with lower burnout.

  2. Nurses of the psychiatric service as the specific occupational group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimentova I.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for psychiatric services in modern health care system will increase due to the growth in number of mental diseases. The role of nurses in prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of mental illness has a number of features. These features are related to care of patients with high level of aggressiveness, behavioral deviations, and problems in self-service. Differences in procedure practice and communicative space specialize and make narrower the nurses' professional practice in psychiatry and determine appearance of specific mechanisms and norms bound up with the necessity of supervision of patients while respecting their rights. Personnel's oversight functions, deviant behavior of patients, high degree of closure of psychiatric medical institutions — are the reasons for specialization of nurses' professional group in psychiatry, forming special mechanisms of maintaining tolerance to patients in professional sphere of this community.

  3. Introducing Psychiatric Care into Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakauye, Kenneth M.; Camp, Cameron J.

    1992-01-01

    Consultation-liaison psychiatry program in teaching nursing home helped implement six guiding principles, including make patient human to the staff; assume no behavior is random; look for depression or psychosis as source of problems; reduce medications and medication doses; create more homelike environment; and use conditions in which learning…

  4. Critical Cases Faced by Mental Health Nurses and Assistant Nurses in Psychiatric Hospitals in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evmorfia Koukia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric Nurses and nurses’ assistants working in an inpatient unit experience a significant number of critical cases. A small number of studies have explored which patients’ problems nurses perceive as ‘critical case or incident’ and particularly which interventions they choose. Aim: The aim of the research was 1. To identify the clinical problems that mental health nurses and assistant nurses characterize as critical 2. To report the main nursing interventions 3. To investigate the main person involved in the critical incident. Material-Method: Critical incident technique was used as a method of data collection. Content analysis was carried out in order nurses’ information to be categorized into subcategories. The sample consisted of 35 mental health nurses and nurses’ assistants who work in psychiatric acute inpatient wards.Results: Nurses identified ten types of critical incidents. They noted violence (verbal, physical by patients and psychotic symptoms to be the most critical situations. Nurses were the main person involved in these incidents. The study also described eight nursing interventions used by nurses when faced with critical events. Conclusions: The findings indicated that mental health nurses and assistant nurses working in acute inpatient wards are called to confront a variety of critical incidents in their every day practice. Further research is necessary to identify in-depth nursing interventions and decision-making used in these situations.

  5. Job satisfaction of nurses who work in private psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Keith R

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the job satisfaction of nurses who work in private psychiatric hospitals. In 1998 and 1999 an anonymous employee satisfaction survey was completed by all 3,024 employees of 39 for-profit psychiatric hospitals owned by the same hospital corporation. Of this total, 546 were registered nurses (RNs). Generally RNs reported fair levels of satisfaction. They reported high levels of pride in their hospitals but low levels of satisfaction with the parent company. Differences in satisfaction were noted as a function of work shift, supervisory role, work setting, and tenure. RNs were less satisfied than employees in all other hospital job classifications. RNs' low level of satisfaction relative to other positions is concerning.

  6. Patient participation: causing moral stress in psychiatric nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Trine-Lise; Hanssen, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore psychiatric nurses' experiences and perspectives regarding patient participation. Patient participation is an ambiguous, complex and poorly defined concept with practical/clinical, organisational, legal and ethical aspects, some of which in psychiatric units may cause ethical predicaments and moral stress in nurses, for instance when moral caring acts are thwarted by constraints. An explorative quantitative pilot study was conducted at a psychiatric subacute unit through three focus group interviews with a total of nine participants. A thematic analytic approach was chosen. Preliminary empirical findings were discussed with participants before the final data analysis. Ethical research guidelines were followed. Patient participation is a difficult ideal to realise because of vagueness of aim and content. What was regarded as patient participation differed. Some interviewees held that patients may have a say within the framework of restraints while others saw patient participation as superficial. The interviewees describe themselves as patient's spokespersons and contributing to patients participating in their treatment as a great responsibility. They felt squeezed between their ethical values and the 'system'. They found themselves in a negotiator role trying to collaborate with both the doctors and the patients. Privatisation of a political ideal makes nurses vulnerable to burn out and moral distress. Nurses have a particular ethical responsibility towards vulnerable patients, and may themselves be vulnerable when caught in situations where their professional and moral values are threatened. Unclear concepts make for unclear division of responsibility. Patient participation is often a neglected value in current psychiatric treatment philosophy. When healthcare workers' ethical sensibilities are compromised, this may result in moral stress. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Psychiatric nursing care for adult survivors of child maltreatment: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zalm, Y.C.; Nugteren, W.A.; Hafsteinsdottir, T.B.; van der Venne, C.G.J.M.; Kool, N.; van Meijel, B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. Conclusions: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to ask

  8. Psychiatric disorders associated with Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratek, Agnieszka; Koźmin-Burzyńska, Agnieszka; Górniak, Eliza; Krysta, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Cushing's syndrome is the term used to describe a set of symptoms associated with hypercortisolism, which in most cases is caused by hypophysial microadenoma over-secreting adrenocorticotropic hormone. This endocrine disorder is often associated with psychiatric comorbidities. The most important include mood disorders, psychotic disorders, cognitive dysfunctions and anxiety disorders. The aim of this article was to review the prevalence, symptoms and consequences of psychiatric disorders in the course of Cushing's syndrome. We therefore performed a literature search using the following keywords: Cushing's syndrome and psychosis, Cushing's syndrome and mental disorders, Cushing's syndrome and depression, Cushing's syndrome and anxiety. The most prevalent psychiatric comorbidity of Cushing's syndrome is depression. Psychiatric manifestations can precede the onset of full-blown Cushing's syndrome and therefore be misdiagnosed. Despite the fact that treatment of the underlying endocrine disease in most cases alleviates psychiatric symptoms, the loss of brain volume persists. It is important to be alert to the symptoms of hypercortisolism in psychiatric patients to avoid misdiagnosis and enable them receiving adequate treatment.

  9. Differences in job stress experienced by female and male Japanese psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Hironori; Abe, Hiroshi; Omori, Hisamitsu; Matsuo, Hisae; Masaki, Otsubo; Ishida, Yasushi; Katoh, Takahiko

    2014-10-01

    In psychiatric nursing, female nurses tend to spend more time building rapport with patients and developing cooperative working relationships with colleagues; they encounter more sexual harassment by patients. In contrast, male nurses respond to aggressive patients and tend to resist physically caring for female patients; they encounter more physical and verbal assault from patients. These gender differences might result in differences in job-related stress. We quantitatively examined gender differences in psychiatric nurses' job stress. The Psychiatric Nurse Job Stressor Scale and the Stress Reaction Scale of the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire were administered to 159 female and 85 male Japanese psychiatric nurses. The results indicated that female nurses had significantly higher stress levels than males related to psychiatric nursing ability, attitude towards nursing, and stress reactions of fatigue and anxiety. Moreover, the factors affecting stress reactions differed somewhat between sexes. In particular, male nurses reported that greater irritability was affected by patients' attitudes. Their anxiety and somatic symptoms were affected by their attitude towards nursing, and depressed mood was affected by psychiatric nursing ability. Knowledge of these differences can lead to better mental health-care interventions for psychiatric nurses. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. The lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimenyimana, E; Poggenpoel, M; Myburgh, C; van Niekerk, V

    2009-09-01

    Caring for good people is difficult enough; to care for people who are either aggressive or violent is even more difficult. This is what psychiatric nurses working in the psychiatric institution in which research was done are exposed to on a daily basis. The aim of the research was to explore and describe the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, and contextual study design was utilised. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and naïve sketches. Tesch 's (Creswell, 2004: 256) method of open coding and an independent coder were utilised for data analysis. This study shed some light on the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. The findings show that the level of violence and aggression to which psychiatric nurses are exposed is overwhelming and the consequences are alarming. The contributing factors to this violence and aggression are: the mental status and the conditions in which patients are admitted; the staff shortage; the lack of support among the members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT); and the lack of structured and comprehensive orientation among newly appointed staff members. As a result, psychiatric nurses are emotionally, psychologically, and physically affected. They then respond with the following emotions and behaviour: fear, anger, frustration, despair, hopelessness and helplessness, substance abuse, absenteeism, retaliation and the development of an "I don't care" attitude.

  11. The guideline "consultation psychiatry" of the Netherlands Psychiatric Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leentjens, A.F.G.; Boenink, A.D.; Sno, H.N.; Strack van Schijndel, R.J.M.; Croonenborg, van J.J.; Everdingen, van J.J.E.; Feltz - Cornelis, van der C.M.; Laan, van der S.; Marwijk, van H.W.J.; Os, T.W.D.P. Van

    2009-01-01

    Background: In 2008, the Netherlands Psychiatric Association authorized a guideline "consultation psychiatry." Aim: To set a standard for psychiatric consultations in nonpsychiatric settings. The main objective of the guideline is to answer three questions: Is psychiatric consultation effective and,

  12. Nurses' experience and attitudes towards inpatient aggression on psychiatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Tomagová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the incidence rate of forms of inpatient aggression towards nurses who working on psychiatric wards; to identify their attitude to patient aggression, to the factors that condition the occurrence and management of aggression. To determine the differences between nurses in relation to educational training aimed at the issue of patient aggression. Design: Quantitative cross-sectional study. Methods: Selection of respondents was deliberate. The sample comprised 223 nurses with an average of 21.27 (± 11.41 years of clinical practice. Data collection was implemented by means of the self-assessment scales: Violence and Aggression of Patients Scale (VAPS, Attitude Towards Aggression Scale (ATAS, The Management of Aggression and Violence Attitude Scale-Likert (MAVAS-L. Results: 98.58% experienced inpatient aggression in the course of the previous year. Negative attitudes to patient aggression predominated in the sample. Nurses expressed strongest agreement with the idea that internal factors foster patient aggression. Regarding methods of aggression management, nurses expressed strongest agreement with the use of medical therapy and restraints. They held a neutral attitude towards the use of non-physical methods. The age of nurses had an effect on how strongly they agreed with the importance of internal factors in prompting patient aggression and with the use of medical therapy and restraints. Conclusion: A high percentage of nurses have had personal experience of various forms of patient aggression. Negative attitudes to aggression predominated in our sample of nurses, emphasizing the influence of internal factors. The attitude of nurses towards patient aggression influences the selection of aggression management strategies.

  13. [The status of the psychiatric nurse as a guarantor in Taiwan: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Man; Sun, Fan-Ko

    2013-12-01

    Psychiatric nurses have a special obligation and legal duty as guarantor against criminal negligence. The guarantor role and medical negligence in psychiatric nursing are topics that have been neglected in Taiwan. (1) Identify the status of psychiatric nurses as guarantors; (2) Understand the causal relationship in a legal context between this status and Non-Genuine Omission in the current case; (3) Understand the facts and the dispute in the current case. (4) Explore the reasons why the psychiatric nurse was convicted for criminal negligence in the current case. A literature review and case study were used to analyze the high court criminal judgment and sentence reconsideration of the first instance No. 122 (2005). (1) Psychiatric nurses hold two guarantor roles in Taiwan. One role is as legally protected interest guarantor and the other is as supervisors' dangerous source guarantor. (2) The three sources of guarantor status relevant to the current case are: nurses' voluntary commitments; medical contract; duty of care of supervisors. (3) In this case, the psychiatric nurse did not discharge her obligations as guarantor and failed to prevent the patient from committing suicide. Negligence resulted in patient death and the psychiatric nurse was found guilty. In order to prevent criminal acts, psychiatric nurses should gain a better understanding of their status as guarantor and the obligations entailed in this status. This article is intended to assist psychiatric nurses understand their responsibilities under current laws.

  14. Team climate and attitudes toward information and communication technology among nurses on acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Anttila, Minna; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the association of team climate with attitudes toward information and communication technology among nursing staff working on acute psychiatric wards. Background: Implementation of ICT applications in nursing practice brings new operating models to work environments, which may affect experienced team climate on hospital wards. Method: Descriptive survey was used as a study design. Team climate was measured by the Finnish modification of the Team Climate Inventory, and attitudes toward ICT by Burkes' questionnaire. The nursing staff (N = 181, n = 146) on nine acute psychiatric wards participated in the study. Results: It is not self-evident that experienced team climate associates with attitudes toward ICT, but there are some positive relationships between perceived team climate and ICT attitudes. The study showed that nurses' motivation to use ICT had statistically significant connections with experienced team climate, participative safety (p = 0.021), support for innovation (p = 0.042) and task orientation (p = 0.042). Conclusion: The results suggest that asserting team climate and supporting innovative operations may lead to more positive attitudes toward ICT. It is, in particular, possible to influence nurses' motivation to use ICT. More attention should be paid to psychosocial factors such as group education and co-operation at work when ICT applications are implemented in nursing.

  15. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  16. Frequency and risk factors of workplace violence on psychiatric nurses and its impact on their quality of life in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jiao-Ying; An, Feng-Rong; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Qi, Yun-Ke; Ungvari, Gabor S; Newhouse, Robin; Yu, Doris S F; Lai, Kelly Y C; Yu, Liu-Yang; Ding, Yan-Ming; Tang, Wai-Kwong; Wu, Ping-Ping; Hou, Zhi-Jiaolong; Chiu, Helen F K

    2013-12-15

    This study examined the frequency of violence on nurses in Chinese psychiatric hospitals and explored its risk factors and impact on nurses' quality of life (QOL). A survey was conducted with 387 frontline psychiatric nurses in China. Information about experience of workplace violence in the past 6 months, type of workplace violence, and demographic characteristics was collected by a questionnaire. Altogether 319 (82.4%) of 387 nurses reported having experienced at least one type of violent event in the past 6 months. The prevalence of sexual assault, physical and verbal harassment was 18.6%, 61.5% and 78.6%, respectively. Compared to those with no exposure to violence, nurses who were exposed to violence had lower QOL in both the physical and mental domains. Significant predictors of violence against nurses are male sex, receiving college level or higher education and working on rotating duty were independently associated with high risk of violence. Workplace violence against psychiatric nurses commonly occurs in China. Considering the deleterious effects of violence, comprehensive strategies from the perspective of nursing education and training, organizational policy, patient care and staff support are recommended to promote occupational safety in psychiatric settings in China. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Career Choice and Longevity in U.S. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Robbi K; Diefenbeck, Cynthia A; Brown, Carlton G

    2015-06-01

    The demand for mental health services in the United States taxes the existing care continuum and is projected to increase as federal initiatives such as the Affordable Care Act and mental health parity improve access to, and coverage for, mental health services. Quality health care providers, such as psychiatric-mental health nurses, are needed to bolster the mental health system. Prior research has focused on the unpopularity of psychiatric nursing as a career choice for nursing students. The purpose of this study is to understand how seasoned psychiatric nurses came to choose and remain in the specialty; descriptive phenomenology is used. In a face-to-face interview, eight registered nurses described their experiences with psychiatric nursing as a student, their entry into psychiatric nursing, and factors related to their longevity in the specialty. Giorgi's Existential Phenomenological Research Method was employed to analyze the interview data. Three themes emerged related to career choice: Interest Developed Prior to or While in Nursing School, Personal Relevance, and Validation of Potential. Three themes emerged related to retention: Overcoming Stereotypes to Develop Career Pride, Positive Team Dynamics, and Remaining Hopeful. Nurse educators play an important role in identifying talent, validating capability, enhancing interest, and increasing students' confidence to pursue a psychiatric nursing career, while nursing administrators and clinical specialists play a key role in retention. Findings also stimulate pertinent questions surrounding the long-term viability of the psychiatric-mental health nursing specialty.

  18. A risk to himself: attitudes toward psychiatric patients and choice of psychosocial strategies among nurses in medical-surgical units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeela, Pádraig; Scott, P Anne; Treacy, Margaret; Hyde, Abbey; O'Mahony, Rebecca

    2012-04-01

    Psychiatric patients are liable to stereotyping by healthcare providers. We explored attitudes toward caring for psychiatric patients among 13 nurses working in general hospitals in Ireland. Participants thought aloud in response to a simulated patient case and described a critical incident of a patient for whom they had cared. Two attitudinal orientations were identified that correspond to stereotypical depictions of risk and vulnerability. The nurses described psychosocial care strategies that were pragmatic rather than authentically person-centered, with particular associations between risk-oriented attitudes and directive nursing care. Nurses had expectations likely to impede relationship building and collaborative care. Implications arising include the need for improved knowledge about psychiatric conditions and for access to professional development in targeted therapeutic communication skills. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Association of Oxidative Stress with Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Waseem; Noreen, Hamsa; Castro-Gomes, Vitor; Mohammadzai, Imdadullah; da Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira; Landeira-Fernandez, J

    2016-01-01

    When concentrations of both reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species exceed the antioxidative capability of an organism, the cells undergo oxidative impairment. Impairments in membrane integrity and lipid and protein oxidation, protein mutilation, DNA damage, and neuronal dysfunction are some of the fundamental consequences of oxidative stress. The purpose of this work was to review the associations between oxidative stress and psychological disorders. The search terms were the following: "oxidative stress and affective disorders," "free radicals and neurodegenerative disorders," "oxidative stress and psychological disorders," "oxidative stress, free radicals, and psychiatric disorders," and "association of oxidative stress." These search terms were used in conjunction with each of the diagnostic categories of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and World Health Organization's International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. Genetic, pharmacological, biochemical, and preclinical therapeutic studies, case reports, and clinical trials were selected to explore the molecular aspects of psychological disorders that are associated with oxidative stress. We identified a broad spectrum of 83 degenerative syndromes and psychiatric disorders that were associated with oxidative stress. The multi-dimensional information identified herein supports the role of oxidative stress in various psychiatric disorders. We discuss the results from the perspective of developing novel therapeutic interventions.

  20. American Nurses Association Nursing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standards Nursing Quality Ethics / Genetics & Genomics Code of Ethics Workplace Safety / Safe Patient Handling Needlestick Prevention Environmental Health Policy & Advocacy / Take Action Position Statements Member ...

  1. Psychiatric hospital nursing staff's experiences of participating in group-based clinical supervision:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Angel, Sanne; Traynor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Group-based clinical supervision is commonly offered as a stress-reducing intervention in psychiatric settings, but nurses often feel ambivalent about participating. This study aimed at exploring psychiatric nurses' experiences of participating in groupbased supervision and identifying psychosocial...... reasons for their ambivalence. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 psychiatric nurses at a Danish university hospital. The results indicated that participation in clinical supervision was difficult for the nurses because of an uncomfortable exposure to the professional community. The sense...... of exposure was caused by the particular interactional organisation during the sessions, which brought to light pre-existing but covert conflicts among the nurses....

  2. Differences between Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses' family-focused practice in adult mental health services

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grant, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric nurses\\' practice with parents who have mental illness, their children and families is an important issue internationally. This study provides a comparison of Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses\\' family-focused practices in adult mental health services. Three hundred and forty three nurses across Ireland and 155 from Australia completed the Family Focused Mental Health Practice Questionnaire. Cross-country comparisons revealed significant differences, in terms of family-focused skill, knowledge, confidence and practice. Australian psychiatric nurses engaged in higher family-focused practice compared to Irish nurses. The comparative differences between countries may be attributable to differences in training, workplace support and policy.

  3. Is it possible to strengthen psychiatric nursing staff's clinical supervision?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of a meta-supervision intervention in terms of participation, effectiveness and benefits of clinical supervision of psychiatric nursing staff. BACKGROUND: Clinical supervision is regarded as a central component in developing mental health nursing practices, but the evidence...... an intervention group (n = 40) receiving the meta-supervision in addition to attending usual supervision or to a control group (n = 43) attending usual supervision. METHODS: Self-reported questionnaire measures of clinical supervision effectiveness and benefits were collected at base line in January 2012...... and at follow-up completed in February 2013. In addition, a prospective registration of clinical supervision participation was carried out over 3 months subsequent to the intervention. RESULTS: The main result was that it was possible to motivate staff in the intervention group to participate significantly more...

  4. Psychiatric boarding incidence, duration, and associated factors in United States emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Jason M; Fee, Christopher; Cooper, Bruce A; Rankin, Sally H; Blegen, Mary A

    2015-01-01

    Boarding, especially among psychiatric patients, has been characterized as a significant cause of ED crowding, but no quantitative analysis has described boarding nationally. This study determines the incidence, duration, and factors associated with ED boarding in the United States. 2008 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey ED data were stratified by visit type (psychiatric vs. non-psychiatric), boarding status, and patient and hospital characteristics. Boarding was defined as a visit with an ED length of stay >6 hours, and boarding time as ED length of stay minus 6 hours. Pearson's chi-square tests describe hospital and patient characteristics stratified by boarding status. Multilevel multivariable logistic and linear regressions determine associations with boarding and boarding time. While 11% of all ED patients boarded, 21.5% of all psychiatric ED patients boarded. Boarding was also more prolonged for psychiatric ED patients. Controlling for confounders, odds of boarding for psychiatric patients were 4.78 (2.63-8.66) times higher than non-psychiatric, and psychiatric patients boarded 2.78 (1.91-3.64) hours longer than non-psychiatric. US EDs experienced high proportions and durations of boarding with psychiatric patients disproportionately affected. Additional research concerning mental health care services and legislation may be required to address ED psychiatric patient boarding. Copyright © 2015 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Occupational stress, coping strategies, and psychological-related outcomes of nurses working in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Abd Alhadi; Elsayed, Sonia; Tumah, Hussein

    2018-02-25

    Psychiatric nurses experience a wide range of stressful events, evolving from the care of violent, aggressive patients, recurrent relapse, and poor prognosis of mental disorders. The aim of the study was to assess workplace stress, coping strategies, and levels of depression among psychiatric nurses. A descriptive correlation design was conducted on psychiatric nurses working in mental health settings Port-Said, Egypt. Data were collected from 70 nurses at a mental health hospital. The results revealed that psychiatric nurses had moderate levels of work-related stress and depression, and exhibiting different coping strategies. Stress and depression are prevalent among psychiatric nurses. Implementing programs aimed at teaching them how to deal with stress at work and improving their coping strategies and problem-solving skills are recommended. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The community psychiatric nurse in primary care: an economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gournay, K; Brooking, J

    1995-10-01

    Community psychiatric nurses (CPNs) in the United Kingdom are increasingly working in primary health care settings with less serious mental health problems. This paper describes an economic evaluation of their work using a randomized controlled trial in which 231 patients were assigned to continuing general practitioner care or one of two conditions of CPN intervention. This is only the third systematic economic analysis of community mental health nursing in the UK and the first carried out by mental health nurses. Various costs to patients, their families and the health care system were determined. Results showed that patients receiving CPN intervention experienced less absence from work and that this resulted in a net benefit. However, the cost per quality adjusted life year for intervening with this group of patients was probably several times more than for intervening with the seriously mentally ill. Therefore, if one considers both the clinical and economic results of the study, taken together with the recent results of the review of mental health nursing, there seems little justification for CPNs continuing to work in this area.

  7. Comparing Mental Illness Stigma among Nurses in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahimi Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stigma can complicate people’s mental health problems by affecting different sides of personal life, increasing negative attitudes, causing discriminatory behavior towards them, and reducing the chances of recovery and returning to normal life. This research aims to compare the stigma of mental illness among nurses working in psychiatric and non-psychiatric wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. A total of 240 nurses participated in this descriptive and analytic study. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI Scale, which is a 40-item self-report questionnaire. All data were analyzed using SPSS 13. The majority of nurses have a medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness, and there is no significant relation between the type of wards and mean stigma scores. After eliminating factors such as mental illness in nurses and their families, it seems that only working with people with mental illness in psychiatric wards is not enough to create a positive attitude toward them. Additionally, the less physical activity and taking advantage of legal benefits of work hardship for psychiatric nurses, low income, and stigma toward psychiatric nursing, probably may make a difference in inclining to work in psychiatry ward between the two groups in spite of relatively equal stigma scores.

  8. Negotiating clinical knowledge:a field study of psychiatric nurses' everyday communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Nursing practices at psychiatric hospitals have changed significantly over the last decades. In this paper, everyday nursing practices were interpreted in light of these institutional changes. The objective was to examine how mental health nurses' production of clinical knowledge was influenced b...... knowledge influenced processes of clinical decision-making among the nurses as the game added to a distorted widening of a 'fictional distance' between patients and the representations produced by the nurses.......Nursing practices at psychiatric hospitals have changed significantly over the last decades. In this paper, everyday nursing practices were interpreted in light of these institutional changes. The objective was to examine how mental health nurses' production of clinical knowledge was influenced...... by the particular social relations on hospital wards. Empirical data stemming from an extended fieldwork at two Danish psychiatric hospital wards were interpreted using interactionistic theory and the metaphor: 'the game of clinical knowledge'. The results indicated that the nurses' production of clinical knowledge...

  9. Community psychiatric nursing in the Netherlands: a survey of a thriving but threatened profession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekkoek, B.W.; Meijel, B.K.G. van; Schene, A.H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the Dutch community psychiatric nursing profession. In spite of their large numbers, estimated at 2900, Dutch community psychiatric nurses (CPNs) have contributed little to the international literature. The history of the profession reveals a

  10. Association between psychiatric symptoms and erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Giovanni; Ricca, Valdo; Bandini, Elisa; Mannucci, Edoardo; Petrone, Luisa; Fisher, Alessandra D; Lotti, Francesco; Balercia, Giancarlo; Faravelli, Carlo; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario

    2008-02-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is often associated with a wide array of psychiatric symptoms, although few studies systematically address their specific association with ED determinants. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between ED (as assessed by SIEDY Structured Interview, a 13-item tool which identifies and quantifies the contribution of organic, relational, and intrapsychic domains of ED) and different psychopathological symptoms (as assessed by the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire, a self-reported test for the screening of mental disorders in a nonpsychiatric setting). A consecutive series of 1,388 (mean age 51 +/- 13 years) male patients with ED was studied. Several hormonal and biochemical parameters were investigated, along with SIEDY Interview and the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire. Psychiatric symptoms resulted differentially associated with SIEDY domains. Depressive and phobic-anxiety symptoms were associated with the relational domain, somatization with the organic one, while free-floating anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and phobic symptoms were significantly related with higher intrapsychic SIEDY scores. In addition, relevant depressive symptomatology was associated with hypogonadism, the presence of low frequency of intercourse, hypoactive sexual desire (HSD), and conflictual relationships within the couple and the family. Patients with high free-floating anxiety symptoms were younger, and complained of an unsatisfactory work and a conflictual relationship within family. Conversely, subjects with higher phobic anxious symptoms displayed a more robust relational functioning. Similar results were observed in subjects with obsessive-compulsive symptoms, who also reported a lower prevalence of HSD. Finally, subjects with somatization symptoms showed the worst erectile function. The main value of this study is that it alters various clinicians' belief that many psychiatric symptoms can be found among ED patients. Systematic testing of

  11. The Competencies, Roles and Scope of Practice of Advanced Psychiatric Nursing in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Wardani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The graduate advanced psychiatric nursing (psychiatric nursing specialist from master degree in Indonesia are about 70 nurses, 67 nurses were graduated from University of Indonesia. They are working at mental health services and educational setting around Indonesia and yet seem not ready to perform some specific advanced competencies in clinical area. The mastery on mental health assessment, neurochemical perspectives, medical management and psychotherapy have not yet performed by the psychiatric nurse specialist in the clinical area or community.To have those competencies and its performances, therefore the curriculum in a psychiatric nursing graduate program must include advanced courses in physiopsychology, psychopathology, advanced psychopharmacology, neurobehavioral science, advanced mental health assessment, and advanced treatment interventions such as psychotherapy and prescription and management of psychotropic medications as their core and major courses in the curriculum. Those courses should be performed in their clinical practice courses or other related learning experiences. When those qualifications are met, then they are competent to be called advanced psychiatric nurse.As advanced practice registered nurses, the advanced psychiatric nurses should be able to demonstrate their direct expertise and roles in advanced mental health assessment, diagnostic evaluation, psychopharmacology management, psychotherapy with individuals, group and families, case management, millieu management, liason and counselling from prevention, promotion until psychiatric rehabilitation. Meanwhile the skill such as psycho-education, teaching, unit management, research and staff development can be added as their indirect roles.

  12. The lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bimenyimana

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Caring for good people is difficult enough; to care for people who are either aggressive or violent is even more difficult. This is what psychiatric nurses working in the psychiatric institution in which research was done are exposed to on a daily basis. The aim of the research was to explore and describe the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, and contextual study design was utilised. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and naïve sketches. Tesch’s (Creswell, 2004:256 method of open coding and an independent coder were utilised for data analysis. This study shed some light on the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. The findings show that the level of violence and aggression to which psychiatric nurses are exposed is overwhelming and the consequences are alarming. The contributing factors to this violence and aggression are: the mental status and the conditions in which patients are admitted; the staff shortage; the lack of support among the members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT; and the lack of structured and comprehensive orientation among newly appointed staff members. As a result, psychiatric nurses are emotionally, psychologically, and physically affected. They then respond with the following emotions and behaviour: fear, anger, frustration, despair, hopelessness and helplessness, substance abuse, absenteeism, retaliation and the development of an “I don’t care” attitude.

  13. Physical and mechanical restraint in psychiatric units: Perceptions and experiences of nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedana, Kelly Graziani Giacchero; da Silva, Danielle Maria; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena; Giacon, Bianca Cristina Ciccone; Zanetti, Ana Carolina Guidorizzi; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Borges, Tatiana Longo

    2018-06-01

    Physical restraint in psychiatric units is a common practice but extremely controversial and poorly evaluated by methodologically appropriate investigations. The cultural issues and professionals' perceptions and attitudes are substantial contributors to the frequency of restraint that tend to be elevated. Aim In this qualitative study, we aimed to understand the experiences and perceptions of nursing staff regarding physical restraint in psychiatric units. Through theoretical sampling, 29 nurses from two Brazilian psychiatric units participated in the study. Data were collected from 2014 to 2016 from individual interviews and analyzed through thematic analysis, employing theoretical presuppositions of symbolic interactionism. Physical restraint was considered unpleasant, challenging, risky, and associated with dilemmas and conflicts. The nursing staff was often exposed to the risks and injuries related to restraint. Professionals sought strategies to reduce restraint-related damages, but still considered it necessary due to the lack of effective options to control aggressive behavior. This study provides additional perspectives about physical restraint and reveals the need for safer, humanized and appropriate methods for the care of aggressive patients that consider the real needs and rights of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Constructivism applied to psychiatric-mental health nursing: an alternative to supplement traditional clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoux Hampton, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    With the popularity of accelerated pre-licensure nursing programmes and the growth in nursing student enrolments, traditional clinical education continues to be a challenge to deliver. Nursing faculty members are required to develop and implement educational innovations that achieve effective learning outcomes, while using fewer resources. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the effectiveness of a constructivism-based learning project to achieve specific learning outcomes and to supplement approximately 30 clinical hours in a psychiatric-mental health nursing course. Students participated in a 10-week, multistage project that examined life histories, treatment resources, and evidence-based practice, as applied to a single individual with a mental illness. Students reported increased understanding of mental health and illness, developed personal relevance associated with the knowledge gained, and learned to problem solve with regard to nursing care of individuals diagnosed with mental illness. For many students, there also appeared to be a reduction in stigmatized attitudes towards mental illness. Constructivism-based learning is a promising alternative to supplement clinical hours, while effectively achieving learning outcomes. Future research is needed to further validate the use of this method for the learning of course content, as well as the reduction of stigma. © 2011 The Author. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. [Applying the human dignity ideals of Confucianism and Kant to psychiatric nursing: from theory to practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Hsiu; Lee, Shui-Chuen; Lee, Shu-Chen

    2012-04-01

    Literature articles and clinical observation suggest disease and environmental factors as primary causes of the low self-esteem and stigmatization that typify most psychiatric patients. These patients are at risk of injury when subjected to inappropriate physical restraint. Hospital staffs, including nurses, are in immediate and close contact with psychiatric patients. Mencius's and Kant's thoughts on human dignity can enhance reflections on clinical nursing practices. Mencius's belief that preserving life is not the most desirable thing and death is not the most hated thing can help nurses realize the human dignity of psychiatric patients by understanding that, as an unrighteous act is more detestable than death, the meaning and value of righteousness are greater than life itself. In light of Kant's views on human dignity, nurses should treat patients as goals rather than means. Exploring such ideas can raise nursing quality, restore a positive sense of humanity to psychiatric patients, and develop nursing values and meaning to a higher plane.

  16. Empathy toward Patients with Mental Illness among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Impact of a Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Marwa Abd El-Gawad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an ability and skill that can be learned and developed through appropriate education and practice. While the importance of nurses' empathy is widely acknowledged, little is known about the impact of passing through the psychiatric nursing and mental health educational experience at the Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University on…

  17. Psychiatric wards with locked doors--advantages and disadvantages according to nurses and mental health nurse assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, K; von Knorring, L; von Essen, L

    2006-04-01

    To describe nurses' and mental health nurse assistants' perceptions of advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door. Psychiatric staff sometimes needs to protect patients from harming themselves or others. To keep the entrance door locked may help staff to achieve this goal. How locked entrance doors at psychiatric wards are experienced by staff, working on these wards, has been investigated to a very limited extent. The study was explorative and descriptive. Audio taped, semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions about advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door, were conducted with 20 nurses and 20 mental health nurse assistants. Data were analyzed with content analysis. A content analysis revealed eight categories of advantages and 18 categories of disadvantages. Most advantages mentioned by nurses and mental health nurse assistants were categorized as providing staff with control over patients, providing patients with a secure and efficient care and protecting patients and staff against 'the outside'. Most disadvantages mentioned by nurses were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, making patients feel dependent and creating a non-caring environment. Most disadvantages mentioned by mental health nurse assistants were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, causing emotional problems for patients, making staff's power obvious and forcing patients to adapt to other patients' needs. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants mentioned more disadvantages than advantages and nurses mentioned more disadvantages than mental health nurse assistants. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants perceive a number of advantages and disadvantages for themselves, patients and significant others with a locked door at a psychiatric ward. Most of these concern patients' experiences. It is important for

  18. Nurse practice environment, workload, burnout, job outcomes, and quality of care in psychiatric hospitals: a structural equation model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Clarke, Sean; Willems, Riet; Mondelaers, Mieke

    2013-07-01

    To study the relationships between nurse practice environment, workload, burnout, job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care in psychiatric hospital staff. Nurses' practice environments in general hospitals have been extensively investigated. Potential variations across practice settings, for instance in psychiatric hospitals, have been much less studied. A cross-sectional design with a survey. A structural equation model previously tested in acute hospitals was evaluated using survey data from a sample of 357 registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and non-registered caregivers from two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium between December 2010-April 2011. The model included paths between practice environment dimensions and outcome variables, with burnout in a mediating position. A workload measure was also tested as a potential mediator between the practice environment and outcome variables. An improved model, slightly modified from the one validated earlier in samples of acute care nurses, was confirmed. This model explained 50% and 38% of the variance in job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care respectively. In addition, workload was found to play a mediating role in accounting for job outcomes and significantly improved a model that ultimately explained 60% of the variance in these variables. In psychiatric hospitals as in general hospitals, nurse-physician relationship and other organizational dimensions such as nursing and hospital management were closely associated with perceptions of workload and with burnout and job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and nurse-reported quality of care. Mechanisms linking key variables and differences across settings in these relationships merit attention by managers and researchers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Psychiatric nursing menbers' reflections on participating in group-based clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Angel, Sanne; Traynor, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a report of an interview study exploring psychiatric hospital nursing staff members' reflections on participating in supervision. Clinical supervision is a pedagogical process designed to direct, develop, and support clinical nurses. Participation rates in clinical supervision...... they influence participation rates. Twenty-two psychiatric hospital nursing staff members were interviewed with a semistructured interview guide. Interview transcripts were interpreted by means of Ricoeur's hermeneutic method. The respondents understood clinical supervision to be beneficial, but with very...

  20. Inpatient aggression and work stress: comparing civil and forensic psychiatric nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joyce Yan

    2017-01-01

    In their daily work, psychiatric nurses are subjected to patient-perpetrated verbal and physical aggression. They manage a high level of work stress. As compared to their colleagues working in civil settings, forensic psychiatric nurses may experience different rates of patient aggression and work stress. Such experiences have implications for the mental health and productivity of nursing staff. In inpatient settings, homicide by a patient is a rare event. Representing the most severe f...

  1. Evaluating psychiatric nursing competencies applied to emergency settings: A pilot role delineation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Joanna J; Bell, Janice F; Siegel, Elena O; Ward, Deborah H

    2016-03-01

    Despite increasing emergency department (ED) use for psychiatric emergencies, limited evidence exists to clearly identify the competencies necessary of emergency nurses to care for this population. 1. To define the specialized skill and knowledge of emergency nurses by examining the frequency with which recommended psychiatric nursing competencies are performed in the ED setting. 2. To assess emergency nurses' rankings of importance and self-efficacy related to recommended psychiatric nursing competencies in order to explore their relevance to emergency nursing. Emergency nurses (n = 75) completed a survey ranking the frequency, importance and self-efficacy of 15 psychiatric nursing competencies. Data analysis revealed competency relevance and regression analysis demonstrated factors that may contribute to self-efficacy. Nurses reported performing psychiatric competencies frequently (mean scores of 0.64 to 3.04). Importance rankings were highest (mean scores of 1.81 to 3.67). Self-efficacy mean scores ranged from 0.89 to 3.47. Frequency and importance of activities predicted higher self-efficacy scores. Younger age and competencies often, and existing competencies appear applicable. As frequency and importance of competencies influence self-efficacy, practice and interventions to underscore the importance of competencies may improve self-efficacy. Younger and less experienced nurses might require more support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring an Emotional Intelligence Model With Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Traci T

    A lack of emotional skills may affect a nurse's personal well-being and have negative effects on patient outcomes. To compare psychiatric-mental health nurses' (PMHN) scores on the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to a normed population and compare the emotional intelligence (EI) scores of PMHNs using two tools, MSCEIT and Self-Rated Emotional Intelligence Scale (SREIS). Comparative descriptive and correlational study. PMHNs in the study had a higher mean EI compared with that of 5,000 participants in the normed MSCEIT sample. Significant weak correlations were seen between the perceiving and understanding emotion branches of the MSCEIT and SREIS. The current study added data about a sample of PMHN's EI levels in the United States, which may encourage dialog about EI among PMHNs. Future research is needed to examine the relationship between self-report EI tools (e.g., SREIS) and performance tools (e.g., MSCEIT) to determine if they are measuring the same construct.

  3. Factors related to job burnout among nurses in the Razi Psychiatric Hospital, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Omid; Habibi, Kamelia; Arab Ghahestany, Davood; Sayadnasiri, Mohammad; Armoon, Bahram; Khan, Vida; Fattah Moghadam, Ladan

    2018-03-03

    Background One of the most prevalent problems in work places that is considered as an important risk factor for the health of the employee is job burnout (JB). JB could be harmful to employees, their families and society. Therefore, decreasing JB among individuals and determining factors associated with it is important to improve the working environment and prevent its negative outcomes. This study aims to elicit the conditions and factors that cause job burnout among nurses of the Razi Psychiatric Hospital, Iran. Methods This study was a descriptive correlational and cross-sectional survey which the demographic and occupational burnout variables of nurses were measured. The study was conducted from January to April 2016. Accordingly, with a type I error probability of 0.05 and a power of 0.80, the sample size was determined to be 100 nurses for each group (men and women). Then, 200 were selected in the Razi Psychiatric Hospital (of whom approx. 60% worked in a rotating shift schedule). The data were collected in two phases: the first step was created by the authors, including gathering demographic data with questionnaire such as gender, age, marital status, education level, years of professional experience, hours of overtime working per month, shift schedules, and their working hospitals and wards. The second step was the Maslach burnout inventory (MBI), human services survey (HSS) version, developed by Maslach and Jackson to assess the three dimensions of burnout. Descriptive statistics (frequency distribution) were used for integrating the demographic variables. Additionally, logistical regression was applied to realize the association between demographic characteristics with the job burnout in SPSS software V.19. Results Our findings indicated that age, hours of work per week, nursing skills, management experience and work experiences accounted for 30% of the variance of depersonalization. Formal employment was significantly associated with emotional exhaustion

  4. [Narrative research on the meaning of professional development in the psychiatric nurse profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-Chun

    2011-08-01

    The extensive clinical experience of senior nurses is a valuable resource to assist new nurses to prepare for their professional future in the clinical environment. This study employed the professional life narratives of psychiatric nurses in Taiwan to establish professional meaning and create a development image for Taiwan psychiatric nurses. This study used a narrative approach to interview a psychiatric nurse with nearly thirty years of clinical experience. Researchers analyzed findings and constructed a new meaningful vision in light of social and cultural changes. Results identified three periods, namely Enlightenment, Shaping, and Spiritual Care. Enlightenment focuses on the nurse as a helper; Shaping focuses on the fundamental need for nurses; and Transmitting focuses on spiritual care. These periods outline a development image for psychiatric care in which effectiveness of care shifts from "individual" to "professional". The significance of caring for psychiatric patients should be perceived through shaping, which is generated by social interaction. This case study may be applied to enhance psychiatric nursing education.

  5. Model for investigating the benefits of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to test a model for analysing the possible benefits of clinical supervision. The model suggested a pathway from participation to effectiveness to benefits of clinical supervision, and included possible influences of individual and workplace factors. The study sample was 136 nursing staff members in permanent employment on nine general psychiatric wards and at four community mental health centres at a Danish psychiatric university hospital. Data were collected by means of a set of questionnaires. Participation in clinical supervision was associated with the effectiveness of clinical supervision, as measured by the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS). Furthermore, MCSS scores were associated with benefits, such as increased job satisfaction, vitality, rational coping and less stress, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization. Multivariate analyses indicated that certain individual and workplace factors were related to subscales of the MCSS, as well as some of the benefits. The study supported the suggested model, but methodological limitations apply. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  6. Nurse-directed care model in a psychiatric hospital: a model for clinical accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E-Morris, Marlene; Caldwell, Barbara; Mencher, Kathleen J; Grogan, Kimberly; Judge-Gorny, Margaret; Patterson, Zelda; Christopher, Terrian; Smith, Russell C; McQuaide, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The focus on recovery for persons with severe and persistent mental illness is leading state psychiatric hospitals to transform their method of care delivery. This article describes a quality improvement project involving a hospital's administration and multidisciplinary state-university affiliation that collaborated in the development and implementation of a nursing care delivery model in a state psychiatric hospital. The quality improvement project team instituted a new model to promote the hospital's vision of wellness and recovery through utilization of the therapeutic relationship and greater clinical accountability. Implementation of the model was accomplished in 2 phases: first, the establishment of a structure to lay the groundwork for accountability and, second, the development of a mechanism to provide a clinical supervision process for staff in their work with clients. Effectiveness of the model was assessed by surveys conducted at baseline and after implementation. Results indicated improvement in clinical practices and client living environment. As a secondary outcome, these improvements appeared to be associated with increased safety on the units evidenced by reduction in incidents of seclusion and restraint. Restructuring of the service delivery system of care so that clients are the center of clinical focus improves safety and can enhance the staff's attention to work with clients on their recovery. The role of the advanced practice nurse can influence the recovery of clients in state psychiatric hospitals. Future research should consider the impact on clients and their perceptions of the new service models.

  7. Advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners' ideas and needs for supervision in private practice in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temane, Annie M; Poggenpoel, Marie; Myburgh, Chris P H

    2014-04-07

    Supervision forms an integral part of psychiatric nursing. The value of clinicalsupervision has been demonstrated widely in research. Despite efforts made toward advancedpsychiatric nursing, supervision seems to be non-existent in this field. The aim of this study was to explore and describe advanced psychiatric nursepractitioners' ideas and needs with regard to supervision in private practice in order tocontribute to the new efforts made in advanced psychiatric nursing in South Africa. A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory, and contextual design using a phenomenological approach as research method was utilised in this study. A purposive sampling was used. Eight advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice described their ideas and needs for supervision during phenomenological interviews. Tesch's method of open coding was utilised to analyse data. After data analysis the findings were recontextualised within literature. The data analysis generated the following themes - that the supervisor should have or possess: (a) professional competencies, (b) personal competencies and (c) specificfacilitative communication skills. The findings indicated that there was a need for supervision of advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice in South Africa. This study indicates that there is need for supervision and competent supervisors in private practice. Supervision can be beneficial with regard to developing a culture of support for advanced psychiatric practitioners in private practice and also psychiatric nurse practitioners.

  8. Prevalence of substance use and association with psychiatric illness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of substance use among inpatients of a Psychiatric Hospital in Uyo, Nigeria, to determine the association with onset of psychiatric illness. A total of 124 inpatients admitted into a Psychiatric Unit of the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital were assessed for substance ...

  9. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Wann-Hansson, Christine; Eklund, Mona

    2011-06-16

    The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  10. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  11. An Analysis of Canadian Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing through the Junctures of History, Gender, Nursing Education, and Quality of Work Life in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A society that values mental health and helps people live enjoyable and meaningful lives is a clear aspiration echoed throughout our Canadian health care system. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has put forth a framework for a mental health strategy with goals that reflect the virtue of optimal mental health for all Canadians (Mental Health Commission Canada, 2009). Canadian nurses, the largest group of health care workers, have a vital role in achieving these goals. In Canada, two-thirds of those who experience mental health problems do not receive mental health services (Statistics Canada, 2003). Through a gendered, critical, and sociological perspective the goal of this paper is to further understand how the past has shaped the present state of psychiatric mental health nursing (PMHN). This integrative literature review offers a depiction of Canadian PMHN in light of the intersections of history, gender, education, and quality of nursing work life. Fourteen articles were selected, which provide a partial reflection of contemporary Canadian PMHN. Findings include the association between gender and professional status, inconsistencies in psychiatric nursing education, and the limitations for Canadian nurse practitioners to advance the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner. PMID:23710367

  12. Pragmatism rules: the intervention and prevention strategies used by psychiatric nurses working with non-suicidal self-harming individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, A

    2007-02-01

    Self harm in the absence of expressed suicidal intent is an under explored area in psychiatric nursing research. This paper reports on findings of a study undertaken in two acute psychiatric inpatient units in Ireland. The purpose of the study was to gain an understanding of the practices of psychiatric nurses in relation to people who self harm, but who are not considered suicidal. Semi structured interviews were held with eight psychiatric nurses. Content analysis revealed several themes. For the purpose of this paper the prevention and intervention strategies psychiatric nurses engage in when working with non-suicidal self harming individuals are presented. Recommendations for further research are offered.

  13. From the front lines to the home front: a history of the development of psychiatric nursing in the U.S. during the World War II era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Christine M

    2008-07-01

    During World War II, psychiatric nurses learned valuable lessons on how to deal with the traumas of war. Using psychohistorical inquiry, this historian examined primary and secondary sources, beyond the facts and dates associated with historical events, to understand why and how psychiatric nurse pioneers developed therapeutic techniques to address the psychosocial and physical needs of combatants. Not only is the story told about the hardships endured as nurses ministered to soldiers, but their attitudes, beliefs, and emotions, that is, how they felt and what they thought about their circumstances, are explored. In this study the lived experiences of two psychiatric nurses, Votta and Peplau, are contrasted to explicate how knowledge development improved care and how this knowledge had an impact on the home front in nursing practice and education, as well as in mental institutions and society, long after the war was won.

  14. The working experiences of novice psychiatric nurses in Taiwanese culture: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, B J; Huang, X Y; Cheng, J F; Wei, S J; Lin, M J

    2014-08-01

    Novice psychiatric nurses experience heavy workloads, insufficient training and support in Taiwan. The aim of this study was to understand the working experiences of novice psychiatric nurses during their first year in a clinical setting. A qualitative phenomenological approach, using semi-structured face-to-face interviews was used. Narratives were analyzed using Colaizzi's seven-step method. Data saturation was reached after interviews were conducted with 15 nurses based on the purposive sampling. Four themes and eight sub-themes were identified: struggling (lacking a sense of security and competency), emulating (learning the process of interaction with clients and families, learning an appropriate role from nursing staff), prevailing (developing core competency, creating a therapeutic environment) and belonging (coping with the job, becoming a part of the psychiatric nursing staff). The findings from this study demonstrate that nurses are often inadequately prepared for psychiatric nursing. They have little understanding of mental illness, are unable to communicate appropriately with clients and struggle to cope with the conditions. Our study supports the importance for helping nurses to improve their essential knowledge and skills for coping with the job and providing good quality care, particularly in the first year. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. To do good might hurt bad : Exploring nurses' understanding and approach to suffering in forensic psychiatric settings

    OpenAIRE

    Vincze, M.; Fredriksson, L.; Wiklund Gustin, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Patients in forensic psychiatric settings not only have to deal with their mental illness, but also memories of criminal activities and being involuntarily hospitalized. The aim of the present study was to explore how nurses working in forensic psychiatric services understand and approach patients' experiences of suffering. Data were generated by semistructured interviews with psychiatric nurses from two different forensic psychiatric units in Sweden. Data were analysed by means of a hermeneu...

  16. [Psychiatric consultations for nursing-home residents: aspects and course of such consultations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbeek, M; van Baarsen, C; Koekkoek, B

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms occur frequently in nursing-home residents. The psychiatric expertise and support available to residents vary from one nursing home to another. International studies show that psychiatric consultations can be effective, but in the Netherlands very little research has been done on this topic. To list the types of psychiatric problems and symptoms for which consultations are requested and to determine whether a psychiatric consultation can have positive results for nursing-home residents and staff. The psychiatric consultations requested were tabulated and were analysed. Details of 71 psychiatric consultations were recorded. The percentage of women (average age 74 years) was slightly higher than the percentage of men. More than 75% of the patients suffered from agitation/aggression or irritability, 65% suffered from depression, 63% from anxiety and 56% from dysinhibition. A post-intervention assessment was performed in 54 patients (76%). In this group psychiatric symptoms were found to be greatly reduced, with regard to both frequency and severity. In addition, nursing staff seemed to suffer less of the stress and strain in their work. The patients for whom a consultation was requested seemed to suffer from serious psychiatric symptoms and were often aggressive. It was possible to achieve substantial progress as a result of a simple intervention. A possible explanation for this effect is probably the nature of the psychiatric consultation used; it was structured, multi-disciplinary and time-consuming. However, since no control group was involved, it is impossible to say with certainty that the reduction in symptoms can be attributed solely to the consultation.

  17. Gender, politics, and regionalism: factors in the evolution of registered psychiatric nursing in Manitoba, 1920-1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, psychiatric nursing care is provided by two kinds of nurses. East of Manitoba, it is provided by registered nurses who may or may not have specialized psychiatric nursing education. In the four western provinces, a distinct professional group, registered psychiatric nurses, also provide care. Saskatchewan was the first province to achieve distinct legislation, in 1948, followed by British Columbia in 1951, Alberta in 1955, and Manitoba in 1960. Several factors coalesced to sway Manitoba to adopt the distinct profession model. First, there was little interest by the general nursing body in mental hospital nursing. Second, the other three western provinces had formed a Canadian Council of Psychiatric Nursing that encouraged mental hospital attendants and nurses in Manitoba. Third, a group of male attendants took on leadership roles supported by the mental hospital superintendents. Finally, Manitoba was culturally and geographically more aligned with western than eastern Canada.

  18. Neurological and Psychiatric Diseases and Their Unique Cognitive Profiles: Implications for Nursing Practice and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, David E.; Dodson, Joan E.; Watkins, Jason; Kennedy, Bridgett H.; Keltner, Norman L.

    2013-01-01

    To successfully negotiate and interact with one’s environment, optimal cognitive functioning is needed. Unfortunately, many neurological and psychiatric diseases impede certain cognitive abilities such as executive functioning or speed of processing; this can produce a poor fit between the patient and the cognitive demands of his or her environment. Such non-dementia diseases include bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression, and anxiety disorders, just to name a few. Each of these diseases negatively affects particular areas of the brain, resulting in distinct cognitive profiles (e.g., deficits in executive functioning but normal speed of processing as seen in schizophrenia). In fact, it is from these cognitive deficits in which such behavioral and emotional symptoms may manifest (e.g., delusions, paranoia). This article highlights the distinct cognitive profiles of such common neurological and psychiatric diseases. An understanding of such disease-specific cognitive profiles can assist nurses in providing care to patients by knowing what cognitive deficits are associated with each disease and how these cognitive deficits impact everyday functioning and social interactions. Implications for nursing practice and research are posited within the framework of cognitive reserve and neuroplasticity. PMID:23422693

  19. Cross-cultural differences in psychiatric nurses' attitudes to inpatient aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gerard J; Middel, Berry; Dassen, Theo W N; Reijneveld, Menno S A

    2006-04-01

    Little is currently known about the attitudes of psychiatric nurses toward patient aggression, particularly from an international perspective. Attitudes toward patient aggression of psychiatric nurses from five European countries were investigated using a recently developed and tested attitude scale. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 1,769 student nurses and psychiatric nurses. Regression analysis was performed to identify personal and occupational characteristics of the respondents able to predict their attitude toward aggression. Analysis of variance was used to identify significant differences in attitudes between and among countries. Attitude was predicted by sex, contractual status (full vs. part time), and the type of ward on which subjects worked. With one exception (communicative attitude), attitudes differed across countries. More research on attitude formation is needed to determine which factors account for these differences.

  20. Occupational stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, K; McDonald, N

    2015-04-01

    Burnout negatively impacts the delivery of mental health services. Psychiatric nurses face stressors that are distinct from other nursing specialities. The research was conducted in Ireland and captured a relatively large sample of respondents. The results compared the stressors, coping strategies and burnout levels between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses. Occupational stress can negatively impact on the well-being of psychiatric nurses, which in turn can lead to poor client care. There is a dearth of published research conducted in Ireland that examines stress within the discipline. A between-groups study, undertaken in February 2011, investigated stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region. Sixty-nine participants (8 males and 61 females), aged between 18 to 60 years voluntarily completed the Mental Health Professional Stress Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the PsychNurse Methods of Coping Scale. The findings revealed that nurses were operating in a moderately stressful environment. Stressors focused on organizational issues as opposed to client issues. The main stressors identified were lack of resources, workload and organizational structures/processes. Both groups reported average levels of emotional exhaustion, low levels of depersonalization and average levels of personal accomplishment. A Mann-Whitney U-test and Independent Samples t-test found significant differences between hospital and community-based nurses regarding depersonalization and personal accomplishment, respectively. Hospital nurses reported higher depersonalization scores, and community nurses had a greater sense of personal accomplishment. The personal accomplishment scores of hospital nurses were below mental health professional norms. No significant differences emerged regarding coping strategies. Avoidant coping strategies were favoured by both groups. It is recommended that interventions

  1. The Effect of Spiritual Intelligence Training on Job Satisfaction of Psychiatric Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Heydari, Abbas; Meshkinyazd, Ali; Soudmand, Parvaneh

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Nurses are the most important staff in the health care system, thus, their job satisfaction is important in nursing management. The present study aimed at determining the impact of teaching spiritual intelligence on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses.Methods: The participants were divided into 2 groups by random allocation. Data were collected in 3 stages of before intervention, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks post intervention using Brayfield & Rother Job Satisfaction Questionnai...

  2. The guideline "consultation psychiatry" of the Netherlands Psychiatric Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leentjens, Albert F G; Boenink, Annette D; Sno, Herman N; Strack van Schijndel, Rob J M; van Croonenborg, Joyce J; van Everdingen, Jannes J E; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; van der Laan, Niels C; van Marwijk, Harm; van Os, Titus W D P

    2009-06-01

    In 2008, the Netherlands Psychiatric Association authorized a guideline "consultation psychiatry." To set a standard for psychiatric consultations in nonpsychiatric settings. The main objective of the guideline is to answer three questions: Is psychiatric consultation effective and, if so, which forms are most effective? How should a psychiatric consultations be performed? What increases adherence to recommendations given by the consulting psychiatrist? Systematic literature review. Both in general practice and in hospital settings psychiatric consultation is effective. In primary care, the effectiveness of psychiatric consultation is almost exclusively studied in the setting of "collaborative care." Procedural guidance is given on how to perform a psychiatric consultation. In this guidance, psychiatric consultation is explicitly looked upon as a complex activity that requires a broad frame of reference and adequate medical and pharmacological expertise and experience and one that should be performed by doctors. Investing in a good relation with the general practitioner, and the use of a "consultation letter" increased efficacy in general practice. In the hospital setting, investing in liaison activities and an active psychiatric follow-up of consultations increased adherence to advice. Psychiatric consultations are effective and constitute a useful contribution to the patients' treatment. With setting a standard consultations will become more transparent and checkable. It is hoped that this will increase the quality of consultation psychiatry.

  3. Effect of Complex Working Conditions on Nurses Who Exert Coercive Measures in Forensic Psychiatric Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Niclas; Salzmann-Erikson, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Nurses who exert coercive measures on patients within psychiatric care are emotionally affected. However, research on their working conditions and environment is limited. The purpose of the current study was to describe nurses' experiences and thoughts concerning the exertion of coercive measures in forensic psychiatric care. The investigation was a qualitative interview study using unstructured interviews; data were analyzed with inductive content analysis. Results described participants' thoughts and experiences of coercive measures from four main categories: (a) acting against the patients' will, (b) reasoning about ethical justifications, (c) feelings of compassion, and (d) the need for debriefing. The current study illuminates the working conditions of nurses who exert coercive measures in clinical practice with patients who have a long-term relationship with severe symptomatology. The findings are important to further discuss how nurses and leaders can promote a healthier working environment. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(9), 37-43.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported sources of knowledge for practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yadav, B L

    2012-02-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an approach to health care in which health professionals use the best evidence available to guide their clinical decisions and practice. Evidence is drawn from a range of sources, including published research, educational content and practical experience. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the sources of knowledge or evidence for practice used by psychiatric nurses in Ireland. The paper is part of a larger study, which also investigated barriers, facilitators and level of skills in achieving EBP among Irish psychiatric nurses. Data were collected in a postal survey of a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. The findings revealed that the majority of survey respondents based their practice on information which was derived from interactions with patients, from their personal experience and from information shared by colleagues and members of the multidisciplinary team, in preference to published sources of empirically derived evidence. These findings are consistent with those of the previous similar studies among general nurses and suggest that Irish psychiatric nurses face similar challenges to their general nursing counterparts in attaining of EBP.

  5. How Patients and Nurses Experience an Open Versus an Enclosed Nursing Station on an Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattell, Mona; Bartlett, Robin; Beres, Kyle; Southard, Kelly; Bell, Claire; Judge, Christine A; Duke, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The inpatient environment is a critical space for nurses and patients in psychiatric settings. In this article, we describe nurses' and patients' perceptions of the inpatient environment both before the removal of a Plexiglas enclosure around a nurses' station and after its removal. Nurses had mixed feelings about the enclosure, reporting that it provided for confidentiality and a concentrated work space but also acknowledged the challenge of the barrier for communication with their patients. Patients unanimously preferred the nurses' station without the barrier, reporting increased feelings of freedom, safety, and connection with the nurses after its removal. It is important to consider the implications of environmental decisions in inpatient settings in order to promote a healthy workplace and healing environment for all community members. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Safety in psychiatric inpatient care: The impact of risk management culture on mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemon, Allie; Jenkins, Emily; Bungay, Vicky

    2017-10-01

    The discourse of safety has informed the care of individuals with mental illness through institutionalization and into modern psychiatric nursing practices. Confinement arose from safety: out of both societal stigma and fear for public safety, as well as benevolently paternalistic aims to protect individuals from self-harm. In this paper, we argue that within current psychiatric inpatient environments, safety is maintained as the predominant value, and risk management is the cornerstone of nursing care. Practices that accord with this value are legitimized and perpetuated through the safety discourse, despite evidence refuting their efficacy, and patient perspectives demonstrating harm. To illustrate this growing concern in mental health nursing care, we provide four exemplars of risk management strategies utilized in psychiatric inpatient settings: close observations, seclusion, door locking and defensive nursing practice. The use of these strategies demonstrates the necessity to shift perspectives on safety and risk in nursing care. We suggest that to re-centre meaningful support and treatment of clients, nurses should provide individualized, flexible care that incorporates safety measures while also fundamentally re-evaluating the risk management culture that gives rise to and legitimizes harmful practices. © 2017 The Authors Nursing Inquiry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Burnout in psychiatric nursing: examining the interplay of autonomy, leadership style, and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madathil, Renee; Heck, Nicholas C; Schuldberg, David

    2014-06-01

    It is important to consider ways in which nurses can be protected from experiencing the effects of burnout. This study examined the relationships between leadership style of psychiatric nurse supervisors, work role autonomy, and psychological distress in relation to psychiatric nurse burnout. Eighty-nine psychiatric nurses from Montana and New York hospitals completed an online survey that assessed their work-related experiences. Overall, results of this study indicate that the participants were experiencing high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization when compared to a normative sample of mental health workers. Results also showed that leadership style and work role autonomy are likely to be environmental factors that protect against burnout in nurses. Finally, it was shown that the relationship between depressive symptoms and the burnout component of personal accomplishment may be influenced by nurses' perceptions of the leadership style in their work environment. These findings are important because nurse supervisor leadership styles and amount of autonomy are characteristics of the work environment that may be amenable to change through training and intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical Simulation in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing: Post-Graduation Follow Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Mary LuAnne; Hermanns, Melinda; Crawley, Bill

    2016-10-01

    In psychiatric-mental health, creating an innovative strategy to help students learn content that may not be frequently seen in a clinical setting is challenging. Thus, simulation helps narrow this gap. Using Kirkpatrick and Kirkpatrick's model of evaluation to guide the current study, faculty contacted baccalaureate nursing program graduates who completed a psychiatric-mental health clinical simulation scenario featuring a hanging suicide and wrist cutting suicide attempt scenario in the "Behind the Door" series as part of the clinical component of their undergraduate psychiatric-mental health course. Eleven nurses responded to a survey regarding their post-graduate encounters with these types of clinical situations, and their perception of recall and application of knowledge and skills acquired during the simulation experience to the clinical situation. Nursing graduates' responses are expressed through three major themes: emotional, contextual/behavioral, and assessment outcomes. Data from the survey indicate that nursing graduates perceived the "Behind the Door" simulations as beneficial to nursing practice. This perception is important in evaluating knowledge transfer from a simulation experience as a student into application in nursing practice. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(10), 40-45.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. [Self-Reflection From Group Dialogue: The Lived Experience of Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2015-08-01

    Self-reflection is an essential element of reflective practice for group facilitators. However, this element typically exists largely at the personal level and is not addressed in group dialogues of nurses. The purpose of this study was to explore the self-reflection of psychiatric nurses in a supervision group. A phenomenological approach was used to investigate the dialogues across 12 sessions in terms of discussion content and the reflective journals of the psychiatric nurse participants. The findings showed that two forms of self-reflection included: Embodied self-reflection derived from the physical sensibility and discursive self-reflection derived from the group dialogues. The embodied and discursive self-reflections promote self-awareness in nurses. The embodiment and initiation in the group facilitates the process of self-becoming through the group dialogue, which promotes self-examination and self-direction in healthcare professionals.

  10. Becoming a Specialist Nurse in Psychiatric Mental Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södergren, Ulrika; Benjaminson, Carin; Mattsson, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Background: Specialist nurse students are upon graduation certified to have increased their professional competence to an advanced level. But how do specialist nurse students themselves experience and understand their professional competence and its development upon graduation? This is what this study aims at describing. Method: This study has a…

  11. Verbal and social interactions in Swedish forensic psychiatric nursing care as perceived by the patients and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Mikael; Brunt, David

    2006-06-01

    Patients and nurses in a Swedish forensic psychiatric unit filled in a questionnaire Verbal and Social Interactions designed to survey patients' and nurses' views on the frequency and importance of nursing interactions in forensic psychiatric care. The patients perceived the 'supportive/encouraging interactions' and the 'reality orientation interactions' as the most frequent interactions and the 'supportive/encouraging interactions' and the 'social skills training' as the most important interactions. The nurses perceived the 'supportive/encouraging interactions' and the 'practical skills training' as the most frequent and the 'supportive/encouraging interactions', 'interpretative interactions' and the 'practical skills training' as the most important interactions. There were significant differences between patients' and nurses' perceptions about the frequency of all the different groups of interactions, but greater agreement as to the importance. In general, the patients perceived that the interactions occurred less frequently than the nurses. The differences between patients' and nurses' perceptions on the interactions as well as the clinical implications of these differences are discussed.

  12. Lived experiences of student nurses caring for intellectually disabled people in a public psychiatric institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Temane

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring for intellectually disabled people can be demanding for student nurses who are novices in the nursing profession. To ensure that quality nursing care is provided, student nurses should have an understanding of and a positive attitude towards intellectually disabled people. Nursing intellectually disabled people can be a challenge for the student nurses. Therefore, student nurses need to be able to deal with challenges of caring for intellectually disabled people. Objective: This article aims to explore and describe experiences of student nurses caring for intellectually disabled people in a public psychiatric institution. Design and method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Data were collected through individual in-depth phenomenological interviews, naïve sketches and field notes. Thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the collected data. Results were contextualised within the literature and measures to ensure trustworthiness were adhered to. Ethical principals were also applied throughout the research process. Results: Five themes emerged from the data. Student nurses experienced a profoundly unsettling impact on their whole being when caring for intellectually disabled people; they developed a sense of compassion and a new way of looking at life, and experienced a need for certain physical, mental and spiritual needs to be met. Conclusion: From the results, it is evident that student nurses were challenged in caring for intellectually disabled people. However, they developed a sense of awareness that intellectually disabled people have a need to be cared for like any other person. Keywords: experiences, student nurses, caring, intellectually disabled people, public psychiatric institution

  13. Exploring the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice: stories from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Teresa; Howie, Linsey

    2011-08-01

    Psychiatric nurses interested in extending their interpersonal and psychotherapeutic skills sometimes undertake postgraduate training in gestalt therapy. Little is known about how this new knowledge and psychotherapeutic skill base informs their practice. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative study that aimed to explore the influence of gestalt therapy training on psychiatric nursing practice. Within a framework of narrative inquiry, four psychiatric nurses trained in gestalt therapy were invited to tell their stories of training in a gestalt approach to therapy, and recount their experiences of how it influenced their practice. In keeping with narrative analysis methods, the research findings were presented as a collection of four stories. Eight themes were derived from a thematic analysis conducted within and across the four stories. The discussion of the themes encapsulates the similarities and differences across the storied collection, providing a community and cultural context for understanding the individual stories. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Violence as psychosocial risk in the work of psychiatric nurses and management strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Santos Scozzafave

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the presence of violence as psychosocial risk from the perception of nurses in a psychiatric hospital, as well as the management strategies implemented to address this risk. Methods: Qualitative study with 25 nurses working in a psychiatric hospital. Data collection was carried out from November 2014 to January 2015 through semi-structured interviews. The data were analyzed and organized into thematic categories following three stages: pre-analysis, exploration of the material and treatment of the results obtained. Participants were identified by the letter "E" and received sequential Arabic numeral numbers, thus guaranteeing the anonymity of the speeches. Thus, they were referenced from E1 to E25. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the University of São Paulo at Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing, Brazil. Results: Violence exists in the everyday routine of psychiatric nurses, with the presence of scratches, pinches, kicks, pushes, squeezes against the wall, biting, aggression with the use of objects, among others, and the management strategies consist in appeals to the family, the cinema, music, reading, exercise, therapy, religion. Conclusion: It is important that preventive measures be adopted aimed at promoting safety in the workplace. The discussion on actions to improve the training and practices of nurses working in the mental health area are also important. Keywords: Violence; psychotherapy; emotion; occupational psychiatry; others psychosocial techniques/treatments

  15. Effect of nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients - an interventional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    will contribute with information regarding the effect of pharmacological training of nurses and possibly improve medication safety for psychiatric patients. Results from this study could serve as evidence, when hospital management makes decisions on how to accede the need for medication reviews as part...... nurses are the health professionals spending most time directly with the patient and very few studies investigate nurses’ role and potential in improving the appropriateness of medication. Therefore, the main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of educating nurses in general pharmacology...... and conducting systematic medication reviews using computer based screening. The effect is evaluated in a controlled interventional study. METHODS: An interventional study including 2 acute psychiatric wards. In one ward nurses’ will receive pharmacological training and the other ward will function as a control...

  16. Motivational interviewing: a valuable tool for the psychiatric advanced practice nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karzenowski, Abby; Puskar, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is well known and respected by many health care professionals. Developed by Miller and Rollnick (2002) , it is a way to promote behavior change from within and resolve ambivalence. MI is individualized and is most commonly used in the psychiatric setting; it is a valuable tool for the Psychiatric Advanced Nurse Practice Nurse. There are many resources that talk about what MI is and the principles used to apply it. However, there is little information about how to incorporate MI into a clinical case. This article provides a summary of articles related to MI and discusses two case studies using MI and why advanced practice nurses should use MI with their patients.

  17. Job Stress and Self-Efficacy among Psychiatric Nursing Working in Mental Health Hospitals at Cairo, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Rania. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nursing stress is considered a problem that affects the practice worldwide. Job stress is a harmful response physically and emotionally when the nurses' skills, resources, and needs could not fulfill the requirement of the job. This study was aimed to assess job stress and self-efficacy among psychiatric nursing working in mental health hospitals…

  18. Psychiatric nursing teaching at the Ana Nery School in the first half of the 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique da Silva Carvalho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the teaching of psychiatric nursing at Ana Néri Nursing School (EAN, between 1925 and 1954. Methodology: Socio-historical research whose sources were written documents and the oral statement of an ex-professor. The documentary analysis technique was used for data treatment. Results: For 27 years, the EAN did not introduce students into the psychiatric field due to the mental illness stigma, offering only theoretical disciplines, which were taught by physicians. Later there were theoretical disciplines with practical training in the classroom, and then theoretical disciplines with practice in psychiatric hospitals, taught by nurses. In conclusion, the law 775/49 lead the EAN to qualify a professor and initiate the reformulation of the nursing care provided at the Institute of Psychiatry of the University of Brazil, so as to adjust it to serve as a practical field and a model for teaching psychiatric nursing in Brazil.

  19. Factors associated with students' orientations to nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhanen, L; Janhonen, S

    2000-05-01

    Factors associated with students' orientations to nursing This paper presents the results of a study focusing on the factors associated with orientations to nursing. Students' orientations to nursing have not as yet been a focus of nursing research. In some other professions, however, professional orientation has been associated with learning motivation and study performance, and has been seen as a predictor of work satisfaction. In this study, students' orientations to nursing were defined in terms of caring, nursing expertise and life orientation. The hypothesis of whether students' pre-educational experiences of nursing, gender, choice of nursing specialty, problems with nursing studies and intention to stay in nursing were associated with different orientations was tested. The extent to which students were orientated to caring, nursing expertise and their own life was also examined. The orientation to nursing measurement tool, which has been developed on the basis of a qualitative study, was used to collect the data. Nurse teachers collected the data from nursing students (n=184) who were studying in three different nursing programmes in Finland. Non-parametric assessments (Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis test) of the differences between the students' orientations were carried out. A majority of the students were highly life-orientated, and two-thirds had average nursing expertise or caring orientation scores. The results supported the study hypothesis of an association between students' orientations and their gender, choice of nursing speciality, problems with nursing studies and intention to stay in nursing. However, the hypothesis of an association between students' pre-educational nursing experiences and orientation to nursing was not supported. The contradictions between students' orientation to nursing and the philosophy of nursing underlying the study programme may be a source of motivational problems and dissatisfaction with nursing education

  20. Juvenile mental health courts for adjudicated youth: role implications for child and adolescent psychiatric mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burriss, F Antoinette; Breland-Noble, Alfiee M; Webster, Joe L; Soto, Jose A

    2011-05-01

    Juvenile mental health courts for adjudicated youth. To describe the role of psychiatric nurses in reducing mental health disparities for adjudicated youth via juvenile mental health courts. ISI Web of Knowledge; Sage Journals Online; HighWire; PubMed; Google Scholar and Wiley Online Library and websites for psychiatric nursing organizations. Years included: 2000-2010. Juvenile mental health courts may provide a positive and effective alternative to incarceration for youth with mental health problems with psychiatric nurses playing a key role in program implementation. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A systematic review of the psychiatric/mental health nursing research literature 1982-1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonge, O; Austin, W; Qiuping, P Z; Wacko, M; Wilson, S; Zaleski, J

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of quantitative psychiatric/mental health nursing research articles published in English between 1982 and 1992, worldwide. Criteria for selection of articles included nurse authorship or co-authorship, use of a quantitative design and pertinence to an aspect of the nursing process with psychiatric/mental health patients. One hundred and ninety-four articles met these criteria. The quality of each article was assessed by two nurse experts using Duffy's Research Appraisal Checklist (RAC). Forty-six point nine per cent of the articles were rated as superior, 50% as average and 3.1% as below average. Other findings identified journals that published research articles, countries in which research was completed, applicability of funding and qualifications of the authors. The major implications of this study are that nurses can be directed to superior articles; more publication of research by nurse authors is warranted, research is being completed with little financial support, highly rated research publications tend to get funding and editorial policies affect the quality of publication.

  2. Compassion Fatigue in Psychiatric Nursing: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Uslu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a systematic compilation study which aimed to determine whether psychiatry nurses were fatigue of compassion, or not. The screening of several databases revealed four articles fulfilling inclusion criteria of the study. While three of the articles examined were descriptive; one was in cross-sectional pattern. Along the inclusion criterions, no any Turkish article was determined regarding the subject. In these articles, compassion fatigue concept has usually been considered with “compassion satisfaction and burnout” concepts. According to the findings of aforesaid articles, it was determined that compassion satisfaction of psychiatry nurses was at low level; that their compassion fatigue and burnout levels were high; and as well that they showed post-traumatic stress symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(4.000: 421-420

  3. Student nurses' learning processes in interaction with psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Linda

    2011-01-01

    descriptive approach was chosen. The theoretical framework includes Jarvis’ concept of ‘disjuncture’, because it offers a theoretical way of understanding the empirical phenomenon of ‘non-routine-situations’. Heller’s concept of ‘everyday life activities’ is also drawn on, for its contribution......When the Danish government converted the national practice-oriented nursing qualification from a vocational course to a bachelor’s degree in 2002, the clinical training component was scaled back. Accordingly, mentors needed to optimise students’ learning from this curtailed clinical practice...... participant which takes place just after the researcher’s observation of the participant in interaction with a patient. The role of the researcher is to be a catalyst for the reflection. Using qualitative content analysis, a model of student nurses learning processes, termed the ‘Windmill of Learning...

  4. Associations between Polygenic Risk for Psychiatric Disorders and Substance Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Caitlin E; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Hartz, Sarah M; Lynskey, Michael T; Nelson, Elliot C; Bierut, Laura J; Bogdan, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence of substantial comorbidity between psychiatric disorders and substance involvement, the extent to which common genetic factors contribute to their co-occurrence remains understudied. In the current study, we tested for associations between polygenic risk for psychiatric disorders and substance involvement (i.e., ranging from ever-use to severe dependence) among 2573 non-Hispanic European-American participants from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment. Polygenic risk scores (PRS) for cross-disorder psychopathology (CROSS) were generated based on the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's Cross-Disorder meta-analysis and then tested for associations with a factor representing general liability to alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, nicotine, and opioid involvement (GENSUB). Follow-up analyses evaluated specific associations between each of the five psychiatric disorders which comprised CROSS-attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (AUT), bipolar disorder (BIP), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ)-and involvement with each component substance included in GENSUB. CROSS PRS explained 1.10% of variance in GENSUB in our sample (p cannabis use, (B) MDD PRS and severe cocaine dependence, (C) SCZ PRS and non-problem cannabis use and severe cannabis dependence, and (D) SCZ PRS and severe cocaine dependence. These results suggest that shared covariance from common genetic variation contributes to psychiatric and substance involvement comorbidity.

  5. Age at fatherhood: heritability and associations with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frans, E M; Lichtenstein, P; Hultman, C M; Kuja-Halkola, R

    2016-10-01

    Advancing paternal age has been linked to psychiatric disorders. These associations might be caused by the increased number of de novo mutations transmitted to offspring of older men. It has also been suggested that the associations are confounded by a genetic liability for psychiatric disorders in parents. The aim of this study was to indirectly test the confounding hypotheses by examining if there is a genetic component to advancing paternal age and if men with a genetic liability for psychiatric disorders have children at older ages. We examined the genetic component to advancing paternal age by utilizing the twin model in a cohort of male twins (N = 14 679). We also studied ages at childbirth in men with or without schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and/or autism spectrum disorder. Ages were examined in: (1) healthy men, (2) affected men, (3) healthy men with an affected sibling, (4) men with healthy spouses, (5) men with affected spouses, and (6) men with healthy spouses with an affected sibling. The twin analyses showed that late fatherhood is under genetic influence (heritability = 0.33). However, affected men or men with affected spouses did not have children at older ages. The same was found for healthy individuals with affected siblings. Instead, these men were generally having children at younger ages. Although there is a genetic component influencing late fatherhood, our data suggest that the associations are not explained by psychiatric disorders or a genetic liability for psychiatric disorders in the parent.

  6. Psychiatric morbidity in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivioja, Jouko; Själin, Mikael; Lindgren, Urban

    2004-06-01

    Prospective cohort with age- and gender-matched controls. To compare psychiatric morbidity between two groups: patients having chronic symptoms after a whiplash injury and patients who recovered completely. Psychiatric morbidity may influence the outcome of somatic diseases, and it has been suggested that psychological factors are often involved in the development of chronic symptoms after whiplash injuries, but there is no study assessing psychiatric morbidity in whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. We studied a consecutive sample of 278 patients with a whiplash injury. Eighty-five had persisting neck pain after 1 year, and 38 of these participated in this study. For each patient with chronic neck pain at the 1 year follow-up, a gender- and age-matched recovered patient was selected from the study cohort of 278 cases. Psychiatric morbidity was determined using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). The interview was conducted at 1 year after the accident (360 days, SD 2 days). The chronic WAD group had a significantly (P factor for chronic symptoms after a whiplash injury. The development of chronic symptoms after awhiplash injury seems to be associated with psychiatric vulnerability.

  7. A study of psychiatric nurses' beliefs and attitudes about work safety and assaults in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Hülya; Buzlu, Sevim

    2006-01-01

    In Turkey, the cultural structure effects the gender roles in the society, and women are subject to violence in an intense manner both inside the family and in their workplaces. In nursing, which is still defined as a woman's job in our country, it is possible to encounter many aggressive and threatening behaviours. Knowing no geographical borders, aggression leads to dissatisfaction and alienation with the profession for the nurses working at the psychiatric institutions in Turkey, thus aggression is a significant health risk in physical, psychological and social dimensions. The research was carried out with 162 randomly selected nurses working in the psychiatric institutions in Istanbul using the Attitudes Toward Patient Physical Assault Questionnaire. It has been determined that nurses' rate of exposure to verbal/physical assault by the patients and their relatives is high and that they experience an intense uncertainty and conflict, especially in legal issues, and that the duration of working in the psychiatry clinics effects attitudes toward the assaults. It is concluded that the nurses working at the psychiatry clinics in Turkey are under risk in regards to safety and they need protection and support, both in emotional and in legal terms.

  8. Secondary Traumatization in Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses: Validation of Five Key Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Grace B; Beeber, Linda; Eves, Erin

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate five concepts central to secondary traumatization (ST) using narratives of psychiatric mental health advanced practice nurses. The study was designed as a directed content analysis of narrative notes (N-30). Consistency was found between narrative notes and the concepts. This study revealed that exposure and vulnerability precede empathic engagement, reaction, and alteration/transformation. The bidirectional outcome of alteration/transformation suggested that conditions leading to ST could have a positive outcome. Failure to recognize symptoms of ST and provide reflective supervision may compromise the nurse's ability to maintain a work-life balance and provide quality patient care. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The process of knowledge transference: a matter concerning of teaching of psychiatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís de Mello Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: To identify the strategies used by teachers to share the contents of Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health; to describe the stages of knowledge sharing in light of the knowledge transfer process. Method: Qualitative, descriptive-exploratory research of the case study type, carried out with six teachers and 23 students, data production was by semi-structured interview and focus group. For the data analysis, the SECI knowledge conversion model was used: socialization, externalization, combination and internalization. Results: Teachers made socialization and externalization, but did not make clear the assessment and teaching-learning strategies. The combination was completed, but the internalization was unfinished, despite suggesting an attempt to reach it. Conclusion: The feasibility and applicability of the knowledge transfer process to the teaching of Psychiatric Nursing were confirmed.

  10. Development of a Questionnaire to Assess Nursing Competencies for the Care of People with Psychiatric Disabilities in a Hospital Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Danjun; Li, Hongyao; Meng, Lu; Zhong, Gengkun

    2018-02-19

    The recovery of people with psychiatric disabilities requires high-quality nursing care. However, the existing research on the nursing competencies needed for caring for people with psychiatric disabilities have been based on a narrow competency framework. By adopting a broader competency framework, this study aimed to find the competencies needed for the nursing care of people with psychiatric disabilities in a hospital environment. Accordingly, a questionnaire will be developed to measure these competences. First, a literature review and interviews with psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, and people with psychiatric disabilities were conducted to develop the pool of competency items. Second, a pilot study was conducted to review the initial pool of items. Finally, a survey of 581 psychiatric nurses was used to conduct a series of principal component analyses to explore the structure of the questionnaire. The 17-item questionnaire included 5 factors, which accounted for 68.60% of the total variance: sense of responsibility, vocational identification, agreeableness, cooperation capacity, and carefulness; the Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.85, 0.85, 0.74, 0.80, and 0.77, respectively. Most of the competencies belonged to attitudes, values, and traits, which were overlooked in previous studies. The questionnaire has satisfactory internal reliability and structural validity, and could contribute some to the selection of the psychiatric workforce.

  11. Cultivating future nurse leaders with student nurses associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akans, Merlana; Harrington, Maura; McCash, John; Childs, Ashlyn; Gripentrog, Jessica; Cole, Sharon; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Searing, Kimberly; Fuehr, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Student nurses associations (SNAs) assist in developing tomorrow's nurse leaders. In this article, executive board members of an SNA in a traditional baccalaureate nursing program at a public regional university recounted common themes in their participation in an SNA. These broad themes included leadership, mentorship and communication, all which foster professional development through the acquisition of specific knowledge, skills and experiences. © 2013 AWHONN.

  12. Effectiveness of liaison psychiatric nursing in older medical inpatients with depression: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullum, Sarah; Tucker, Sue; Todd, Chris; Brayne, Carol

    2007-07-01

    To compare liaison psychiatric nursing with usual medical care in the management of older medical inpatients who screen positive for depression. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Medical wards of UK district general hospital in rural East Anglia. One hundred and thirty-eight medical inpatients aged 65+ screened positive on the 15-item geriatric depression scale (GDS). One hundred and twenty-one out of 138 screen positives entered the trial (58/121 fulfilled criteria for depressive disorder at baseline). (i) A liaison psychiatric nurse assessed participants, formulated a care plan for treatment of their depression, ensured its implementation through liaison with appropriate agencies, and monitored participants' mood and response to treatment for up to 12 weeks. (ii) Usual treatment by hospital and primary care staff. ICD-10 depressive disorder, change in GDS-15 score, quality-adjusted life weeks (QALWs) and patient satisfaction rating. Eighty-six out of 121 participants completed the 16-week trial. Participants in the intervention group were more satisfied with their care, but no significant differences in depressive disorder, depression rating or QALWs gained were found between groups. However, there was a trend towards improvement in the intervention group and effect sizes were higher in the subgroup with depressive disorder. This study is the first RCT to evaluate liaison psychiatric nursing specifically for depression in older medical inpatients; the findings suggest improvement in mental health and quality of life, but a larger trial is required to provide convincing evidence.

  13. Genomewide Association Studies: History, Rationale, and Prospects for Psychiatric Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cichon, S.; Craddock, N.; Daly, M.J.; Faraone, S.V.; Gejman, P.V.; Kelsoe, J.; Lehner, T.; Levinson, D.F.; Moran, A.P.; Sklar, P.; Sullivan, P.F.; Boomsma, D.I.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Posthuma, D.; Willemsen, G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors conducted a review of the history and empirical basis of genomewide association studies (GWAS), the rationale for GWAS of psychiatric disorders, results to date, limitations, and plans for GWAS meta-analyses. Method: A literature review was carried out, power and other issues

  14. Genomewide association studies: history, rationale, and prospects for psychiatric disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, B.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Cichon, S.; Craddock, N.; Daly, M.; Faraone, S.V.; Gejman, P.V.; Kelsoe, J.; Lehner, T.; Levinson, D.F.; Moran, A.; Sklar, P.; Sullivan, P.F.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors conducted a review of the history and empirical basis of genomewide association studies (GWAS), the rationale for GWAS of psychiatric disorders, results to date, limitations, and plans for GWAS meta-analyses. METHOD: A literature review was carried out, power and other issues

  15. Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Release Patients & Families About Serious Illness Certified Nurses are Everywhere Advocacy Palliative Nursing Summit Recent Activity ... Principles State Ambassadors Advocacy Resources Healthcare Resources Certified Nurses Day Certified Nurses are Everywhere Certification is Transformational ...

  16. American Association of Occupational Health Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Health & Safety Journal Awards & Recognition Occupational Health Nurses Week Member Discounts Monthly Newsletter Foundation About the ... 1, 2018. The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. is the primary association for the largest ...

  17. Experiences of frontline nursing staff on workplace safety and occupational health hazards in two psychiatric hospitals in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Robert Kaba; Poku, Kwabena Adu

    2018-06-06

    Psychiatric hospitals need safe working environments to promote productivity at the workplace. Even though occupational health and safety is not completely new to the corporate society, its scope is largely limited to the manufacturing/processing industries which are perceived to pose greater dangers to workers than the health sector. This paper sought to explore the experiences of frontline nursing personnel on the occupational health and safety conditions in two psychiatric hospitals in Ghana. This is an exploratory cross-sectional study among 296 nurses and nurse-assistants in Accra (n = 164) and Pantang (n = 132) psychiatric hospitals using the proportional stratified random sampling technique. Multivariate Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression test was conducted to ascertain the determinants of staff exposure to occupational health hazards and the frequency of exposure to these occupational health hazards on daily basis. Knowledge levels on occupational health hazards was high in Accra and Pantang psychiatric hospitals (i.e. 92 and 81% respectively), but barely 44% of the 296 interviewed staff in the two hospitals said they reported their most recent exposure to an occupational health hazard to hospital management. It was found that staff who worked for more years on the ward had higher likelihood of exposure to occupational health hazards than those who worked for lesser years (p = 0.002). The category of occupational health hazards reported most were the physical health hazards. Psychosocial hazards were the least reported health hazards. Frequency of exposure to occupational health hazards on daily basis was positively associated with work schedules of staff particularly, staff on routine day schedule (Coef = 4.49, p = 0.011) and those who alternated between day and night schedules (Coef = 4.48, p = 0.010). Occupational health and safety conditions in the two hospitals were found to be generally poor. Even though majority of

  18. [Management of insomnia and hypersomnia associated with psychiatric disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Makoto; Suzuki, Masahiro; Konno, Chisato; Furihata, Ryuji; Osaki, Koichi; Konno, Michiko; Takahashi, Sakae

    2010-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, mood disorders, or neurotic disorders are associated with sleep disorders of various kinds, among which insomnia is most prevalent and important in psychiatric practice. Almost all patients suffering from major depression complain of insomnia. Pharmacological treatment of insomnia associated with major depression shortens the duration to achieve remission of depression. Insomnia has been recently reported to be a risk factor for depression. Hypersomnia is also a major sleep problem in patient suffering from depression. There have been no clinical guide to treat the symptoms of hypersomnia in depression, but some clinical trials treating them with NDRI or adjunctive administration of psychostimulants. In patients with schizophrenia, insomnia is often an early indicator of the aggravation of psychotic symptoms. Electroencephalographic sleep studies have also revealed sleep abnormalities characteristic to mood disorders, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders. A shortened REM sleep latency has been regarded as a biological marker of depression. Reduced amount of deep Non-REM sleep has been reported to be correlated with negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Recently, REM sleep abnormalities were found in teenagers having post-traumatic stress disorder after a boat accident. Although these facts indicate that insomnia plays an important role in the development of psychiatric disorders, there are few hypotheses explaining the cause and effect of insomnia in these disorders. Here, we reviewed recent articles on insomnia and hypersomnia associated with psychiatric disorders together with their clinical managements.

  19. Attitudes of Psychiatric Nurses about the Request for Euthanasia on the Basis of Unbearable Mental Suffering(UMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc De Hert

    Full Text Available When psychiatric patients express a wish for euthanasia, this should first and foremost be interpreted as a cry for help. Due to their close day-to-day relationship, psychiatric nurses may play an important and central role in responding to such requests. However, little is known about nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia motivated by unbearable mental suffering.The aim of this study was to provide insight into the attitudes and actions taken by psychiatric nurses when confronted with a patient's euthanasia request based on unbearable mental suffering (UMS.A questionnaire was sent to 11 psychiatric hospitals in the Flemish part of Belgium.The overall response rate was 70% (N = 627. Psychiatric nurses were frequently confronted with a request for euthanasia, either directly (N = 329, 53% or through a colleague (N = 427, 69%. A majority (N = 536, 84% did not object to euthanasia in a psychiatrically ill population with UMS. Confounding factors were the psychiatric diagnosis and the type of ward where the nurses were working. Most participants acknowledged a lack of knowledge and skills to adequately address the euthanasia request (N = 434, 71%. Nearly unanimously (N = 618, 99%, study participants indicated that dealing with euthanasia requests and other end-of-life issues should be part of the formal training of nurses.The results highlight the need for ethically sound and comprehensive provision of care. Psychiatric nurses play an important role in dealing with the complex issue of requests for euthanasia. There is also a need for education, training and clear guidelines on the level of health care organizations.

  20. Attitudes of Psychiatric Nurses about the Request for Euthanasia on the Basis of Unbearable Mental Suffering(UMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hert, Marc; Van Bos, Liesbet; Sweers, Kim; Wampers, Martien; De Lepeleire, Jan; Correll, Christophe U

    2015-01-01

    When psychiatric patients express a wish for euthanasia, this should first and foremost be interpreted as a cry for help. Due to their close day-to-day relationship, psychiatric nurses may play an important and central role in responding to such requests. However, little is known about nurses' attitudes towards euthanasia motivated by unbearable mental suffering. The aim of this study was to provide insight into the attitudes and actions taken by psychiatric nurses when confronted with a patient's euthanasia request based on unbearable mental suffering (UMS). A questionnaire was sent to 11 psychiatric hospitals in the Flemish part of Belgium. The overall response rate was 70% (N = 627). Psychiatric nurses were frequently confronted with a request for euthanasia, either directly (N = 329, 53%) or through a colleague (N = 427, 69%). A majority (N = 536, 84%) did not object to euthanasia in a psychiatrically ill population with UMS. Confounding factors were the psychiatric diagnosis and the type of ward where the nurses were working. Most participants acknowledged a lack of knowledge and skills to adequately address the euthanasia request (N = 434, 71%). Nearly unanimously (N = 618, 99%), study participants indicated that dealing with euthanasia requests and other end-of-life issues should be part of the formal training of nurses. The results highlight the need for ethically sound and comprehensive provision of care. Psychiatric nurses play an important role in dealing with the complex issue of requests for euthanasia. There is also a need for education, training and clear guidelines on the level of health care organizations.

  1. 'Violence is not part of our job': a thematic analysis of psychiatric mental health nurses' experiences of patient assaults from a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Maria; Glue, Paul; Carlyle, Dave

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes psychiatric mental health nurses' (PMHN) experiences of patient assaults within mental healthcare settings using a thematic analytical approach. The aim of the study was to explore and describe psychiatric mental health nurses' experiences of patient assaults. The major findings of the study related to the nature and impact of assaults and supportive strategies associated with violence perpetrated by patients against psychiatric mental health nurses. Perpetrator risk factors for patients include mental health disorders, alcohol and drug use and the inability to deal with situational crises. The injuries sustained by nurses in the context of the study include lacerations, head injuries, dislocations and bruises. Psychological harm has also occurred, including quite severe mental health problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder. Protective strategies for combating negative consequences of workplace violence include practice of self-defence, social support and a supportive and consultative workplace culture with access to counselling services and assistance in all aspects, including finances. The paper concludes that while healthcare employers need to provide better support services to the healthcare professionals who are assaulted, the legal system also needs to acknowledge that assaults against nurses are a violation of human rights and violence should not to be tolerated as part of working in mental healthcare settings.

  2. Factors influencing adherence to standard precautions among nursing professionals in psychiatric hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Helena Piai-Morais

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Evaluate and correlate individual, work-related and organizational factors that influence adherence to standard precautions among nursing professionals of psychiatric hospitals in São Paulo. METHOD An exploratory cross-sectional study conducted with 35 nursing professionals, using the assessment tool for adherence to standard precautions through the Likert scale, ranging from 1 to 5. RESULTS Knowledge of the precautions received a high score (4.69; adherence received (3.86 and obstacles (3.78, while intermediaries and the scales of organizational factors received low scores (2.61. There was a strong correlation between the magnitude adherence scale and the personal protective equipment availability (r = 0.643; p = 0.000. The training scale for prevention of HIV exposure (p = 0.007 was statistically different between the nurses and nursing assistants. CONCLUSION The organizational factors negatively contributed to adherence to standard precautions, indicating that psychiatric institutions lack safe working conditions, ongoing training and management actions to control infections.

  3. Associations between Polygenic Risk for Psychiatric Disorders and Substance Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin E Carey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite evidence of substantial comorbidity between psychiatric disorders and substance involvement, the extent to which common genetic factors contribute to their co-occurrence remains understudied. In the current study, we tested for associations between polygenic risk for psychiatric disorders and substance involvement (i.e., ranging from ever-use to severe dependence among 2573 non-Hispanic European-American participants from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment. Polygenic risk scores (PRS for cross-disorder psychopathology (CROSS were generated based on the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium’s Cross-Disorder meta-analysis and then tested for associations with a factor representing general liability to alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, nicotine, and opioid involvement (GENSUB. Follow-up analyses evaluated specific associations between each of the 5 psychiatric disorders which comprised CROSS—attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, autism spectrum disorder (AUT, bipolar disorder (BIP, major depressive disorder (MDD, and schizophrenia (SCZ—and involvement with each component substance included in GENSUB. CROSS PRS explained 1.10% of variance in GENSUB in our sample (p<0.001. After correction for multiple testing in our follow-up analyses of polygenic risk for each individual disorder predicting involvement with each component substance, associations remained between: A MDD PRS and non-problem cannabis use, B MDD PRS and severe cocaine dependence, C SCZ PRS and non-problem cannabis use and severe cannabis dependence, and D SCZ PRS and severe cocaine dependence. These results suggest that shared covariance from common genetic variation contributes to psychiatric and substance involvement comorbidity.

  4. The association of cannabis use on inpatient psychiatric hospital outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylander, Melanie; Winston, Helena R; Medlin, Haley; Hull, Madelyne; Nussbaum, Abraham

    2018-01-01

    The associations between cannabis use and psychosis are well documented in numerous studies. There is a need to evaluate the impact of cannabis use on inpatient psychiatric utilization and outcomes. To evaluate the impact of cannabis use on psychiatric hospital outcomes. This study was conducted between April 20, 2015 and October 20, 2015. All patients (n = 120) admitted to Denver Health with psychotic symptoms were administered a urine toxicology screening testing for the presence of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH, the active metabolite of cannabis). Patients with positive tests were compared to those with negative tests on several measures, including length of stay, presence or lack of 30-day readmission, Brief Psychotic Rating Scale (BPRS) score, and use of antipsychotics and/or sedatives/anxiolytics. There were 120 patients. Twenty nine were women and 91 were men. Patients testing positive for THC-COOH had a shorter length of stay compared to patients testing negative for THC-COOH, after adjusting for age, prior psychiatric admissions, history of a psychotic-spectrum disorder, and comorbid additional substance use (p = 0.02). There were no differences in 30-day readmissions, 30-day post-discharge presentation to the Denver Health psychiatric emergency department, BPRS scores, and medication administration. Patients presenting with psychotic symptoms and cannabis use require shorter inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations. This study is the first to quantify this observation and highlights the need for future clinical decision-making tools that would ideally correlate cannabis use with the degree of potential need for expensive and scarce mental health resources, such as psychiatric hospitalization.

  5. Exploring registered Psychiatric Nurses' responses towards Service Users with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    This study explored registered psychiatric nurses\\' (RPNs\\') interactions and level of empathy towards service users with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD). A qualitative approach was used, and 17 RPNs were interviewed using a semistructured interview schedule incorporating the "staff-patient interaction response scale" (SPIRS). Four themes emerged following data analysis: "challenging and difficult," "manipulative, destructive and threatening behaviour," "preying on the vulnerable resulting in splitting staff and other service users," and "boundaries and structure." Additionally, low levels of empathy were evident in the majority of participants\\' responses to the SPIRS. The findings provide further insight on nurses\\' empathy responses and views on caring for service users with BPD and further evidence for the need for training and education for nurses in the care of service users diagnosed with BPD.

  6. Exploring Registered Psychiatric Nurses' Responses towards Service Users with a Diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget McGrath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored registered psychiatric nurses' (RPNs' interactions and level of empathy towards service users with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD. A qualitative approach was used, and 17 RPNs were interviewed using a semistructured interview schedule incorporating the “staff-patient interaction response scale” (SPIRS. Four themes emerged following data analysis: “challenging and difficult,” “manipulative, destructive and threatening behaviour,” “preying on the vulnerable resulting in splitting staff and other service users,” and “boundaries and structure.” Additionally, low levels of empathy were evident in the majority of participants' responses to the SPIRS. The findings provide further insight on nurses' empathy responses and views on caring for service users with BPD and further evidence for the need for training and education for nurses in the care of service users diagnosed with BPD.

  7. Transformational leadership practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Erin J; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Click, Elizabeth R; Krouse, Helene J; Clavelle, Joanne T

    2014-04-01

    This study describes the transformational leadership (TL) practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations (PNAs). Professional nursing associations are vehicles to provide educational opportunities for nurses as well as leadership opportunities for members. Little has been published about the leadership practices of PNA members. E-mail surveys of 448 nurse leaders in PNAs were conducted in 2013 using the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The top 2 TL practices of these nurse leaders were enabling others to act and encouraging the heart. Respondents with more leadership training reported higher TL practices. This is the 1st study to describe TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs. Results of this study show that nurse leaders of PNAs emulate practices of TL. Transformational leaders can mobilize and direct association members in reaching shared values, objectives, and outcomes. Understanding TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs are important to the future of nursing in order to enable nurses to lead change and advance health through these organizations.

  8. Infectious agents are associated with psychiatric diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lydia Krause

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several infectious agents in the environment that can cause persistent infections in the host. They usually cause their symptoms shortly after first infection and later persist as silent viruses and bacteria within the body. However, these chronic infections may play an important role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and Tourette’s syndrome (TS. We investigated the distribution of different neurotrophic infectious agents in TS, schizophrenia and controls. A total of 93 individuals were included (schizophrenic patients, Tourette patients and controls. We evaluated antibodies against cytomegalovirus (CMV, herpes-simplex virus (HSV, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma, Mycoplasma and Chlamydia trachomatis/pneumoniae. By comparing schizophrenia and TS, we found a higher prevalence of HSV (P=0.017 and CMV (P=0.017 antibodies in schizophrenic patients. Considering the relationship between schizophrenia, TS and healthy controls, we showed that there are associations for Chlamydia trachomatis (P=0.007, HSV (P=0.027 and CMV (P=0.029. When all measured viruses, bacteria and protozoa were combined, schizophrenic patients had a higher rate of antibodies to infectious agents than TS patients (P=0.049. Tourette and schizophrenic patients show a different vulnerability to infectious agents. Schizophrenic patients were found to have a higher susceptibility to viral infections than individuals with TS. This finding might point to a modification in special immune parameters in these diseases.

  9. Psychiatric disorders and obesity: A review of association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T M Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inconsistent evidence exists regarding the strength, direction, and moderators in the relationship between obesity and psychiatric disorders. Aim: This study aims to summarize the evidence on the association between psychiatric illness and obesity with particular attention to the strength and direction of association and also the possible moderators in each postulated link. Materials and Methods: Systematic electronic searches of MEDLINE through PubMed, ScienceDirect, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar were carried out from inception till October 2016. Generated abstracts were screened for eligibility to be included in the review. Study designs that evaluated the strength of relationship between obesity and psychiatric disorders were included in the study. Quality assessment of included studies was done using the Newcastle–Ottawa checklist tool. Results: From a total of 2424 search results, 21 eligible articles were identified and reviewed. These included studies on obesity and depression (n = 15, obesity and anxiety (four and one each on obesity and personality disorders, eating disorder (ED, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and alcohol use. Maximal evidence existed for the association between depression and obesity with longitudinal studies demonstrating a bidirectional link between the two conditions. The odds ratios (ORs were similar for developing depression in obesity (OR: 1.21–5.8 and vice versa (OR: 1.18–3.76 with a stronger association observed in women. For anxiety disorders, evidence was mostly cross-sectional, and associations were of modest magnitude (OR: 1.27–1.40. Among other disorders, obesity, and EDs appear to have a close link (OR: 4.5. Alcohol use appears to be a risk factor for obesity and not vice versa but only among women (OR: 3.84. Conclusion: Obesity and depression have a significant and bidirectional association. Evidence is modest for anxiety disorders and inadequate for other psychiatric

  10. Structured learning and self-reflection: strategies to decrease anxiety in the psychiatric mental health clinical nursing experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzer, Christine Anne; Zauderer, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to test a teaching-learning strategy to help nursing students decrease stress and anxiety that may be brought about by the psychiatric mental health clinical experience. Undergraduate nursing students are known to experience affective stress prior to their first psychiatric mental health clinical practicum. A stressful learning environment can affect the success of the student's clinical performance. Thirty nursing students participated in this study. A structured preclinical workshop combined with self-reflection provided insight into students' perceptions of the psychiatric mental health clinical experience. Overall, students reported that participating in the teaching-learning strategy and self-reflection helped mitigate Combining structured learning with self-reflection is a useful tool for helping nursing students increase self-awareness and ease anxiety that may interfere with learning.

  11. Issues in casemix funding for acute inpatient psychiatric services and their relevance to mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanker, S

    1996-09-01

    With increased recognition by government, health administrators, and clinicians of the need to simultaneously contain health expenditure, improve the productivity and efficiency of health services and maintain quality of patient care, applications of casemix funding have been advocated as an alternative means of financing acute hospital care. Currently in Australia, the Commonwealth's casemix development program is encouraging the States and Territories to participate in certain casemix initiatives. Acute psychiatric hospital care and treatment have been excluded from the initial stages of the implementation of casemix in recognition of a number of inherent obstacles or challenges affecting the utility and accuracy of casemix in funding the psychiatric sector. Despite anecdotal claims that the reduced length of stay that often occurs under casemix payment systems may negatively impact upon the quality of care and patient outcomes, to date little empirical research has been directed towards measuring the potential impact of psychiatric casemix on the quality of patient care. Psychiatry cannot afford to ignore the casemix debate on account of its current exclusion from the early phases of implementation. To do so is to run the risk of having casemix imposed at some later stage in the absence of consultation. In the meantime it is vital that mental health professionals, including nurses, participate in the development and implementation of casemix, and contribute to research aimed at increasing or maximizing the relevance of casemix to the funding of psychiatric services.

  12. Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported barriers, facilitators and skills for developing evidence-based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yadav, B L

    2012-03-01

    Evidence-based practice places an emphasis on integration of clinical expertise with available best evidence, patient\\'s clinical information and preferences, and with local health resources. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the barriers, facilitators and skills in developing evidence-based practice among psychiatric nurses in Ireland. A postal survey was conducted among a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses and survey data were collected using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. Respondents reported that insufficient time to find and read research reports and insufficient resources to change practice were the greatest barriers to the development of evidence-based practice. Practice development coordinators were perceived as the most supportive resource for changing practice. Using the Internet to search for information was the highest-rated skill and using research evidence to change practice was the lowest-rated skill for developing evidence-based practice. Nurses\\' precursor skills for developing evidence-based practice, such as database searching and information retrieval, may be insufficient in themselves for promoting evidence-based practice if they cannot find evidence relating to their particular field of practice or if they do not have the time, resources and supports to develop their practice in response to evidence.

  13. Association of Electroconvulsive Therapy With Psychiatric Readmissions in US Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Eric P; Jahn, Danielle R; Regenold, William T; Case, Brady G

    2017-08-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered the most efficacious treatment available for individuals with severe affective disorders, ECT's availability is limited and declining, suggesting that information about the population-level effects of ECT is needed. To examine whether inpatient treatment with ECT is associated with a reduction in 30-day psychiatric readmission risk in a large, multistate sample of inpatients with severe affective disorders. A quasi-experimental instrumental variables probit model of the association correlation of ECT administration with patient risk of 30-day readmission was estimated using observational, longitudinal data on hospital inpatient discharges from US general hospitals in 9 states. From a population-based sample of 490 252 psychiatric inpatients, a sample was drawn that consisted of 162 691 individuals with a principal diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, or schizoaffective disorder. The key instrumental variable used in the analysis was ECT prevalence in the prior calendar year at the treating hospital. To examine whether ECT's association with readmissions was heterogeneous across population subgroups, analyses included interactions of ECT with age group, sex, race/ethnicity, and diagnosis group. The study was conducted from August 27, 2015, to March 7, 2017. Readmission within 30 days of being discharged. Overall, 2486 of the 162 691 inpatients (1.5%) underwent ECT during their index admission. Compared with other inpatients, those who received ECT were older (mean [SD], 56.8 [16.5] vs 45.9 [16.5] years; P Electroconvulsive therapy may be associated with reduced short-term psychiatric inpatient readmissions among psychiatric inpatients with severe affective disorders. This potential population health effect may be overlooked in US hospitals' current decision making regarding the availability of ECT.

  14. Administration of medication to use when needed and the care of psychiatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly da Silva Rocha Estrela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study aimed to analyze the clinical criteria used for the administration of prescribed medications for use when needed (SOS; and discuss the implication of the findings in this research to clinical psychiatric nursing. The records of female patients admitted to a psychiatric institution in the city of Rio de Janeiro, in the time frame from May to June 2009, were analyzed. In the 38 patient records, 16 prescriptions for medications SOS were found. The mean age of patients was around 45-55 years with a clinical diagnosis of Bipolar Mood Disorder. The medication category most prescribed as SOS was of benzodiazepines, followed by antipsychotics. It was noticed a tendency to not valuing the administration of medication in SOS notes. The study points out the importance to establish clinical criteria to indicate the need, or not, to administer prescribed SOS medications.

  15. Knowledge and Attitude Towards Pharmacological Management of Acute Agitation: A Survey of Psychiatrists, Psychiatry Residents, and Psychiatric Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangu, KeumbÔh; Ifeanyi, Adaora; Velusamy, Mayurapriya; Dar, Sara; Shah, Nurun; Ezeobele, Ifeoma E; Okusaga, Olaoluwa O

    2017-06-01

    The authors compared the current knowledge and attitude of psychiatrists, psychiatry residents, and psychiatric nurses towards the pharmacological management of acute agitation. Questionnaires were electronically distributed to all attending psychiatrists, psychiatry residents, and psychiatric nurses who were either employed by the University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences or were staff at a 250-bed affiliated Psychiatric Hospital. Where possible, Fisher's exact test was used to compare responses to questions based on designation. Of the 250 questionnaires distributed, 112 were returned (response rate of 44.8%), of which 64 (57.1%) were psychiatric nurses, 27 (24.1%) were attending psychiatrists, and 21 (18.8%) were psychiatry residents. A significantly higher percentage of attending psychiatrists and psychiatric nurses compared to psychiatry residents thought that newer second- generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are not as effective as older first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) for managing acute agitation (55.6, 48.4, and 9.5% respectively, p = 0.008). The combination of intramuscular haloperidol, lorazepam, and diphenhydramine was the most preferred option chosen by all designations for the psychopharmacological management of severe agitation. Furthermore, a larger percentage of the psychiatric nurses, in comparison to attending psychiatrists, also chose the combination of intramuscular chlorpromazine, lorazepam, and diphenhydramine as an option for managing severe agitation; no psychiatry resident chose this option. Knowledge of evidence-based psychopharmacological management of agitation differs among attending psychiatrists, psychiatry residents and psychiatric nurses. Although the management of agitation should be individualized and context specific, monotherapy should be considered first where applicable.

  16. Developing an evidence-based curriculum designed to help psychiatric nurses learn to use computers and the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Välimäki, Maritta; Jakobsson, Tiina; Pitkänen, Anneli

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the systematic process in which an evidence-based approach was used to develop a curriculum designed to support the computer and Internet skills of nurses in psychiatric hospitals in Finland. The pressure on organizations to have skilled and motivated nurses who use modern information and communication technology in health care organizations has increased due to rapid technology development at the international and national levels. However, less frequently has the development of those computer education curricula been based on evidence-based knowledge. First, we identified psychiatric nurses' learning experiences and barriers to computer use by examining written essays. Second, nurses' computer skills were surveyed. Last, evidence from the literature was scrutinized to find effective methods that can be used to teach and learn computer use in health care. This information was integrated and used for the development process of an education curriculum designed to support nurses' computer and Internet skills.

  17. Nurses Writing about Psychiatric Nurses' Involvement in Killings during the Nazi Era: A Preliminary Discourse Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Colin A; McAllister, Margaret; Crowther, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Nurses actively killed people in Nazi Europe between 1939 and 1945. The so-called ‘science of eugenics’ underpinned Nazi ideology, used to further the Nazi racist agenda. Edicts sanctioned selection and medically supervised killing of people, and nurses, principally in mental hospitals, participated in the killing of between 100–300 thousand patients. Erroneously termed ‘euthanasia', there were three phases: the initial programme involving children, the T4 adult programme, and ‘wild euthanasia'. Unofficial killings also took place before 1939. This paper uses discourse analysis to map and analyse published texts which explore the role of nurses in Nazi Germany. The aim is to identify its characteristics as a body of literature, to note strengths and weaknesses, emphases and silences, and to note aspects that need further exploration. It acknowledges that how these events are to be understood and represented in contemporary discourse constitutes a significant problem for historians of nursing.

  18. Communication of nursing students in listening to patients in a psychiatric hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Lengruber de Azevedo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Qualitative exploratory and descriptive study with the aim of analyzing the communication of nursing students in the listening to patients in mental suffering admitted in a psychiatric hospital. The study was carried out from April to May 2013, with 23 nursing students regularly enrolled in a public higher education institution in the Southeast of Brazil. The data were collected based on artistic production and interviews, analyzed and categorized according to their thematic content. Proxemic nonverbal communication was unanimously indicated by the students based on personal-body position of face, neck, and, shoulders adopted in the listening to patients in mental suffering. The conscious use of proxemics favored clinical reasoning, improving interaction and listening in speech and thought disorders. Attentive, effective, and affective listening demands availability, control of fear, tension, anxiety, and insecurity.

  19. Exposure to violence: associations with psychiatric disorders in Brazilian youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago M. Fidalgo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The effects of exposure to violent events in adolescence have not been sufficiently studied in middle-income countries such as Brazil. The aims of this study are to investigate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among 12-year-olds in two neighborhoods with different socioeconomic status (SES levels in São Paulo and to examine the influence of previous violent events and SES on the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Methods: Students from nine public schools in two neighborhoods of São Paulo were recruited. Students and parents answered questions about demographic characteristics, SES, urbanicity and violent experiences. All participants completed the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS to obtain DSM-IV diagnoses. The data were analyzed using weighted logistic regression with neighborhood stratification after adjusting for neighborhood characteristics, gender, SES and previous traumatic events. Results: The sample included 180 individuals, of whom 61.3% were from low SES and 39.3% had experienced a traumatic event. The weighted prevalence of psychiatric disorders was 21.7%. Having experienced a traumatic event and having low SES were associated with having an internalizing (adjusted OR = 5.46; 2.17-13.74 or externalizing disorder (adjusted OR = 4.33; 1.85-10.15. Conclusions: Investment in reducing SES inequalities and preventing violent events during childhood may improve the mental health of youths from low SES backgrounds.

  20. The Effect of Spiritual Intelligence Training on Job Satisfaction of Psychiatric Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Heydari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nurses are the most important staff in the health care system, thus, their job satisfaction is important in nursing management. The present study aimed at determining the impact of teaching spiritual intelligence on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses.Methods: The participants were divided into 2 groups by random allocation. Data were collected in 3 stages of before intervention, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks post intervention using Brayfield & Rother Job Satisfaction Questionnaire.Results:  The results of this study revealed that the mean score of job satisfaction in the experimental group was 65.5±9.9 in the pre intervention stage, which increased to 69.8±6.3 one month after the intervention and to 72.5±8.9 in 2 months after the intervention, and it was significantly more than that of the control group.Conclusions: The job satisfaction rate of the control group decreased admirably in both 1 month and 2 months after the intervention stage. Thus, spiritual intelligence training is an effective method to increase job satisfaction, and it is suggested that managers consider spiritual intelligence training to increase job satisfaction in nurses

  1. The Effect of Spiritual Intelligence Training on Job Satisfaction of Psychiatric Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Abbas; Meshkinyazd, Ali; Soudmand, Parvaneh

    2017-04-01

    Objective: Nurses are the most important staff in the health care system, thus, their job satisfaction is important in nursing management. The present study aimed at determining the impact of teaching spiritual intelligence on the job satisfaction of psychiatric nurses. Method: The participants were divided into 2 groups by random allocation. Data were collected in 3 stages of before intervention, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks post intervention using Brayfield & Rother Job Satisfaction Questionnaire. Results: The results of this study revealed that the mean score of job satisfaction in the experimental group was 65.5±9.9 in the pre intervention stage, which increased to 69.8±6.3 one month after the intervention and to 72.5±8.9 in 2 months after the intervention, and it was significantly more than that of the control group. Conclusion: The job satisfaction rate of the control group decreased admirably in both 1 month and 2 months after the intervention stage. Thus, spiritual intelligence training is an effective method to increase job satisfaction, and it is suggested that managers consider spiritual intelligence training to increase job satisfaction in nurses.

  2. [The Psychosocial Adaptation Process of Psychiatric Nurses Working in Community Mental Health Centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, So Young

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to verify psychosocial issues faced by psychiatric and community mental health nurse practitioners (PCMHNP) working in community mental health centers, and to identify the adaptation processes used to resolve the issues. Data were collected through in-depth interviews between December 2013 and August 2014. Participants were 11 PCMHNP working in community mental health centers. Analysis was done using the grounded theory methodology. The first question was "How did you start working at a community mental health center; what were the difficulties you faced during your employment and how did you resolve them?" The core category was 'regulating within relationships.' The adaptation process was categorized into three sequential stages: 'nesting,' 'hanging around the nest,' and 'settling into the nest.' Various action/interaction strategies were employed in these stages. The adaptation results from using these strategies were 'psychiatric nursing within life' and 'a long way to go.' The results of this study are significant as they aid in understanding the psychosocial adaptation processes of PCMHNP working in community mental health centers, and indicate areas to be addressed in the future in order for PCMHNP to fulfill their professional role in the local community.

  3. The use of computer assisted technology to enhance student psychiatric nurses learning during a practice placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Margaret; Higgins, Agnes

    2003-06-01

    Despite the available literature that identifies the value of integrating computer-assisted learning into the curriculum, psychiatric nurse education lags behind in this area of curriculum development. The purpose of this paper is to report on a pilot project involving the use of a computer assisted learning (CAL) interactive multimedia (IMM) package called 'Admissions,' as a self-directed learning tool with two-second year psychiatric nursing students. The students were on a practice placement in an Irish mental health service. The aim of using the multimedia resource was to augment the students' learning during their practice placement and enable them to re-examine the issue of psychosis from a multiplicity of perspectives. This paper provides a brief description of the interactive multimedia package, together with a discussion on the support offered to the students during its use. experiential taxonomy is used as a framework to guide the discussion on the learning and evaluation process used. Feedback from the students suggests that the CAL package is easy to use, informative and promoted independence and self-directed study.

  4. The American Psychiatric Association's resource document on guidelines for psychiatric fitness-for-duty evaluations of physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfang, Stuart A; Faulkner, Larry R; Fromson, John A; Gendel, Michael H

    2005-01-01

    The psychiatric evaluation of a physician's fitness for duty is an undertaking that is both important to patients' well-being and to the physician-subject of the evaluation. It is necessary that psychiatrists who agree to perform such evaluations proceed in a careful and thorough manner. This document was developed to provide general guidance to the psychiatric evaluators in these situations. It was prepared by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) Council on Psychiatry and Law and Corresponding Committee on Physician Health, Illness, and Impairment, of which the authors are members. The Resource Document was approved by the APA Joint Reference Committee in June 2004. APA Resource Documents do not represent official policy of the American Psychiatric Association. This Resource Document was edited to conform to Journal style and has therefore been modified slightly from the original document approved by the APA.

  5. Finding Inspiration From the Philosophy of Maurice Merleau-Ponty for the Practice of Psychiatric-mental Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sandra P

    2018-06-01

    The philosophy of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, a unique blend of existentialism and phenomenology, deserves to be better known in psychiatric-mental health nursing. This philosophy is particularly pertinent to the contemporary recovery movement that seeks to dispel the therapeutic nihilism regarding conditions such as schizophrenia, borderline personality, and substance use disorders. This paper provides an overview of Merleau-Ponty's life and work, with emphasis on selected elements of his philosophy that are inspirational for the clinical practice of psychiatric-mental health nursing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Implementation of evidence on the nurse-patient relationship in psychiatric wards through a mixed method design: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Poyato, Antonio R; Delgado-Hito, Pilar; Suárez-Pérez, Raquel; Leyva-Moral, Juan M; Aceña-Domínguez, Rosa; Carreras-Salvador, Regina; Roldán-Merino, Juan F; Lluch-Canut, Teresa; Montesó-Curto, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses are aware of the importance of the therapeutic relationship in psychiatric units. Nevertheless, a review of the scientific evidence indicates that theoretical knowledge alone is insufficient to establish an adequate therapeutic alliance. Therefore, strategies are required to promote changes to enhance the establishment of the working relationship. The aims of the study are to generate changes in how nurses establish the therapeutic relationship in acute psychiatric units, based on participative action research and to evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of evidence through this method. The study will use a mixed method design. Qualitative methodology, through participative action research, will be employed to implement scientific evidence on the therapeutic relationship. A quasi-experimental, one-group, pre-test/post-test design will also be used to quantitatively measure the effectiveness of the implementation of the evidence. Participants will consist of nurses and patients from two psychiatric units in Barcelona. Nurses will be selected by theoretical sampling, and patients assigned to each nurses will be selected by consecutive sampling. Qualitative data will be gathered through discussion groups and field diaries. Quantitative data will be collected through the Working Alliance Inventory and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Qualitative data will be analysed through the technique of content analysis and quantitative data through descriptive and inferential statistics. This study will help to understand the process of change in a nursing team working in an inpatient psychiatric ward and will allow nurses to generate knowledge, identify difficulties, and establish strategies to implement change, as well as to assess whether the quality of the care they provide shows a qualitative improvement.

  7. Patient safety on psychiatric wards: A cross-sectional, multilevel study of factors influencing nurses' willingness to share power and responsibility with patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalle, Joeri; Malfait, Simon; Eeckloo, Kristof; Colman, Roos; Beeckman, Dimitri; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Van Hecke, Ann

    2018-04-01

    The World Health Organization highlights the need for more patient participation in patient safety. In mental health care, psychiatric nurses are in a frontline position to support this evolution. The aim of the present study was to investigate the demographic and contextual factors that influence the willingness of psychiatric nurses to share power and responsibility with patients concerning patient safety. The patient participation culture tool for inpatient psychiatric wards was completed by 705 nurses employed in 173 psychiatric wards within 37 hospitals. Multilevel modelling was used to analyse the self-reported data. The acceptance of a role wherein nurses share power and responsibility with patients concerning patient safety is influenced by the nurses' sex, age, perceived competence, perceived support, and type of ward. To support nurses in fulfilling their role in patient participation, patient participation-specific basic and continuing education should be provided. Managers and supervisors should recognize and fulfil their facilitating role in patient participation by offering support to nurses. Special attention is needed for young nurses and nurses on closed psychiatric wards, because these particular groups report being less willing to accept a new role. Ward characteristics that restrict patient participation should be challenged so that these become more patient participation stimulating. More research is needed to explore the willingness and ability of psychiatric nurses to engage in collaborative safety management with patients who have specific conditions, such as suicidal ideation and emotional harm. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. Factors associated with family violence by persons with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrum, Travis; Solomon, Phyllis L

    2016-10-30

    Family violence by persons with psychiatric disorders (PD) is a highly under-researched area. The primary objective of the present analysis was to identify perpetrator, victim, and interaction/relationship factors associated with this phenomenon. The secondary objective was to examine the extent to which the relationship between caregiving and family violence was mediated by limit-setting practices used towards relatives with PD. 573 adults across the U.S. with an adult relative with PD completed an online survey. Multivariate logistic regression was performed examining the association of factors with the occurrence of family violence. Mediation was assessed with Sobel testing. Family violence was significantly associated with the following factors: perpetrator-income, illegal drug use, psychiatric hospitalization, treatment attendance, and use of medications; victim-age, employment status, income, and mental health status; interaction/relationship-parental relationship, co-residence, use of limit-setting practices, representative payeeship, and unofficial money management. Mediation was statistically significant. Increasing access to mental health and/or substance abuse treatment may decrease the risk of family violence. Interventions may benefit from attempting to decrease/modify the use of limit-setting practices. Where family representative payeeship or unofficial money management exists, it is advisable for practitioners to assess and address financial coercion and promote greater collaboration in financial decision-making. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Using Participatory Action Research to Develop a Working Model That Enhances Psychiatric Nurses' Professionalism: The Architecture of Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin

    2017-11-01

    Ward rules in psychiatric care aim to promote safety for both patients and staff. Simultaneously, ward rules are associated with increased patient violence, leading to neither a safe work environment nor a safe caring environment. Although ward rules are routinely used, few studies have explicitly accounted for their impact. To describe the process of a team development project considering ward rule issues, and to develop a working model to empower staff in their daily in-patient psychiatric nursing practices. The design of this study is explorative and descriptive. Participatory action research methodology was applied to understand ward rules. Data consists of audio-recorded group discussions, observations and field notes, together creating a data set of 556 text pages. More than 100 specific ward rules were identified. In this process, the word rules was relinquished in favor of adopting the term principles, since rules are inconsistent with a caring ideology. A linguistic transition led to the development of a framework embracing the (1) Principle of Safety, (2) Principle of Structure and (3) Principle of Interplay. The principles were linked to normative guidelines and applied ethical theories: deontology, consequentialism and ethics of care. The work model reminded staff about the principles, empowered their professional decision-making, decreased collegial conflicts because of increased acceptance for individual decisions, and, in general, improved well-being at work. Furthermore, the work model also empowered staff to find support for their decisions based on principles that are grounded in the ethics of totality.

  10. Current Trends in Associate Degree Nursing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Elaine Grant

    This study was designed to ascertain current trends in associate degree nursing programs and to discover innovative ideas and techniques which could be applied to the existing program at Miami-Dade Community College (Florida). Data was compiled from interviews with representatives of ten associate degree nursing programs in six states. Information…

  11. To do good might hurt bad: exploring nurses' understanding and approach to suffering in forensic psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, Mattias; Fredriksson, Lennart; Wiklund Gustin, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Patients in forensic psychiatric settings not only have to deal with their mental illness, but also memories of criminal activities and being involuntarily hospitalized. The aim of the present study was to explore how nurses working in forensic psychiatric services understand and approach patients' experiences of suffering. Data were generated by semistructured interviews with psychiatric nurses from two different forensic psychiatric units in Sweden. Data were analysed by means of a hermeneutic approach inspired by Ricoeur's hermeneutics. The findings are reflected in four main themes: (i) ignoring suffering; (ii) explaining suffering as a natural and inevitable part of daily life in the forensic context; (iii) ascribing meaning to suffering; and, (iv) being present in suffering. To engage in alleviating suffering is a struggle that demands courage and the strength to reflect on its character and consequences. To encounter suffering means that nurses are not only confronted with patients' suffering, but also their own reactions to those patients. If suffering is not recognized or encountered, there is a risk that actions may have a negative impact on patients. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Comparing the Obvious: Interactional characteristics of staff in acute mental health nursing and forensic psychiatric nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bradley, Stephen K.; Hounsgaard, Lise

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on and compares two separate studies of the interactional characteristics of forensic mental health staff and acute mental health staff as they interact with inpatients, respectively. Both studies were conducted using participant observation, along with informal and formal...... interviews. Findings show that both acute and forensic mental health nursing practice is characterized by two overriding themes; ‘trust and relationship-enabling care’ and ‘behavior and perception-corrective care.’ The comparison of the two studies shows no major differences in the characteristics of staff...

  13. Organizational culture of a psychiatric hospital and resilience of nursing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi; Gaioli, Cheila Cristina Leonardo de Oliveira; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques; Mininel, Vivian Aline; Vegro, Thamiris Cavazzani

    2016-01-01

    to analyze the organizational culture of a psychiatric hospital and identify the capacity of resilience of nursing workers. quantitative research. For data collection, were used the Brazilian Instrument for Evaluation of Organizational Culture (IBACO - Instrumento Brasileiro para Avaliação da Cultura Organizacional) and the Resilience Scale (RS). participants reported the existence of centralization of power and devaluation of workers, despite recognizing the existence of collaboration at work and practices for improving interpersonal relations. In relation to the capacity of resilience, 50% of workers showed high level, and 42.9% a medium level of resilience. The correlation tests revealed negative values between the IBACO and RS domains, indicating that the lower the appreciation of individuals in the institution, the greater their capacity of resilience. the organizational values reflect the work organization model in the institution that devalues the workers' needs and requires greater capacity of resilience.

  14. Exploring Organizational Barriers to Strengthening Clinical Supervision of Psychiatric Nursing Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This article reports findings from a longitudinal controlled intervention study of 115 psychiatric nursing staff. The twofold objective of the study was: (a) To test whether the intervention could increase clinical supervision participation and effectiveness of existing supervision practices, and...... in the experienced effectiveness of supervision. It is concluded that organizational support is an imperative for implementation of clinical supervision......., and (b) To explore organizational constraints to implementation of these strengthened practices. Questionnaire responses and registration of participation in clinical supervision were registered prior and subsequent to the intervention consisting of an action learning oriented reflection on staff......'s existing clinical supervision practices. Major organizational changes in the intervention group during the study period obstructed the implementation of strengthened clinical supervision practices, but offered an opportunity for studying the influences of organizational constraints. The main findings were...

  15. What is cyberbullying & how can psychiatric-mental health nurses recognize it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan G; Godfrey, Alice J

    2011-10-01

    Cyberbullying is an emerging issue within our society, particularly among adolescents. The phenomenon is similar to traditional bullying in that it is hurtful, repetitive behavior involving a power imbalance, often causing psychosocial issues. With the availability of cell phones, Internet, and video gaming systems, adolescents are constantly plugged into technology and therefore at risk of being a victim or a perpetrator of cyberbullying. Both physical and mental health problems can result from cyberbullying, which, in turn, can affect an adolescent's performance in school and other crucial areas of life. Legal action is an option, but many times the law is not clear. Psychiatric-mental health nurses are in a position to help educate children about resources to prevent or cope with cyberbullying in a way that will help not only the patients themselves but also parents, teachers, school administrators, and the community. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Oral hygiene and oral flora evaluation in psychiatric patients in nursing homes in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, A Z; Yanik, K; Celenk, P; Unal-Erzurumlu, Z; Yilmaz, H; Bulut, N

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization has stated that psychiatric patients are a group of people who have oral and dental illnesses. The aims of this study were to document the oral hygiene of individuals with chronic psychiatric illness, to determine the extraoral and intraoral findings, to detect the dominant microorganisms in oral flora, and to inform clinicians of these findings. The study included 100 patients (69 men and 31 women) with different psychiatric illnesses living in a nursing home. They were 19-96 years old (median, 48 years). The participants completed a questionnaire about patients' oral health. They underwent extraoral and intraoral examinations. Two swab samples were obtained from the oral mucosa of these patients. Gram preparations were analyzed for leukocytes, bacteria, and yeast. Chi-square test and z-test were used. All patients (100%) had the necessary equipment for oral hygiene; however, many (43%) patients had poor oral hygiene. There was a high prevalence of xerostomia (56%) and fissured tongue (61.4%) (among other tongue anomalies). The most commonly isolated microorganisms were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus0 (35.9%), Streptococcus spp. (30.3%), nondiphtheroid Bacilli (16.9%), Staphylococcus aureus (2.3%), Candida spp. (11.8%), and Gram-negative Bacilli (2.8%). The oral hygiene of most patients was insufficient. The presence of Gram-negative Bacilli growth in the oral flora can be explained by poor hand hygiene. These findings suggest that it is useful to educate individuals about oral hygiene and hand hygiene and to inform the staff and families about this issue.

  17. An American and Dutch partnership for psychiatric mental health advance nursing practice: nurturing a relationship across the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Lillian; Ezeobele, I Ezebuiro; Tetteroo, Marieke

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the challenges and rewards of developing and nurturing an international clinical psychiatric mental health advanced nursing practice exchange between the Netherlands and the United States. Since 1997, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands has been participating in international clinical experiences for their psychiatric mental health (PMH) advanced practice nursing students. The international experience is mandatory prior to graduation and is the first of its kind in Europe to mandate such a unique experience. This study sample included eight Dutch PMH advanced practice nursing students enrolled in a full-time master's in advanced nursing practice program. The descriptive study included reflective reports and one-on-one discussions over a 3-year period. With proper planning, an international nursing experience provides a unique opportunity for nurses to think beyond their own culture and healthcare system. Solving problems together through different perspectives creates opportunities for creative solutions. International partnerships within PMH advanced practice nursing promotes sharing of knowledge and solutions as patients and diseases have no border. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Association of 5-HTTLPR Polymorphism with the Nursing Diagnoses and the Achievement of Nursing Outcomes in Patients with Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokofieva, Margarita; Karadima, Georgia; Koukia, Evmorfia; Michou, Vassiliki; Kyprianidou, Chrysoula; Papageorgiou, Chrysovalantis V; Alexiadis, Evangelos; Constantoulakis, Pantelis; Dikeos, Dimitris

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether a 44-base-pair insertion/deletion polymorphism in the upstream regulatory region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) is associated with the nursing diagnoses and the achievement of the desired nursing outcomes in inpatients with major depression. Thirty five patients were evaluated. The nursing diagnoses of risk for suicide and imbalanced nutrition are reported less often in homozygotes of the high-expressing gene (L A ). Carriers of the low-expressing genes (L G or S) have a worse response to interventions which aim to increase low self-esteem, indicating that they may need more intensive care in order to achieve the desired outcome. Genetics in psychiatric nursing could help refine personalized care, however further studies with large sample sizes and multiple gene evaluations are needed.

  19. Associations between Pathological Gambling and Psychiatric Comorbidity among Help-Seeking Populations in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem gambling is complex and often comorbid with other mental health problems. Unfortunately, gambling studies on comorbid psychiatric disorders among Chinese communities are extremely limited. The objectives of this study were to (a determine the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders among treatment-seeking pathological gamblers; (b compare the demographic profiles and clinical features of pathological gamblers with and without comorbid psychiatric disorders; (c explore the associations between pathological gambling and psychiatric disorders and their temporal relationship. Participants (N=201 who sought gambling counseling were examined by making Axis-I diagnoses including mood disorders, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, substance use disorders, anxiety disorders, and adjustment disorder. Results showed that 63.7% of participants had lifetime comorbid psychiatric disorder. The most common comorbid psychiatric mental disorders were mood disorders, adjustment disorder, and substance use disorders. Pathological gamblers with psychiatric comorbidities were significantly more severe in psychopathology, psychosocial functioning impairment, and gambling problems than those without the disorders.

  20. Predictive and associated factors of psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Kate Rachel; Ponsford, Jennie Louise; Johnston, Lisa; Schönberger, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common and often debilitating following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there is little consensus within the literature regarding the risk factors for post-injury psychiatric disorders. A 1-year prospective study was conducted to examine which pre-injury, injury-related, and concurrent factors were associated with experiencing a psychiatric disorder, diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders, at 1 year post-injury. Participants were 122 adults with TBI and 88 proxy informants. Psychiatric disorders were common both pre-injury (54.1%) and at 12 months post-injury (45.9%). Results of regression analyses indicated individuals without a pre-injury psychiatric disorder or psychiatric symptomatology in the acute post-injury period were less likely to have a psychiatric disorder at 12 months post-injury. These findings confirm the importance of pre-injury history for the prediction of post-injury psychiatric disorders. Limb injury also emerged as a useful early indicator of later psychiatric disorder. Post-injury psychiatric disorders were associated with concurrent unemployment, pain, poor quality of life, and use of unproductive coping skills. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Celiac Disease Is Associated with Childhood Psychiatric Disorders: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butwicka, Agnieszka; Lichtenstein, Paul; Frisén, Louise; Almqvist, Catarina; Larsson, Henrik; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-05-01

    To determine the risk of future childhood psychiatric disorders in celiac disease, assess the association between previous psychiatric disorders and celiac disease in children, and investigate the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders in siblings of celiac disease probands. This was a nationwide registry-based matched cohort study in Sweden with 10 903 children (aged celiac disease and 12 710 of their siblings. We assessed the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders (any psychiatric disorder, psychotic disorder, mood disorder, anxiety disorder, eating disorder, psychoactive substance misuse, behavioral disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD], autism spectrum disorder [ASD], and intellectual disability). HRs of future psychiatric disorders in children with celiac disease and their siblings was estimated by Cox regression. The association between previous diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder and current celiac disease was assessed using logistic regression. Compared with the general population, children with celiac disease had a 1.4-fold greater risk of future psychiatric disorders. Childhood celiac disease was identified as a risk factor for mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, behavioral disorders, ADHD, ASD, and intellectual disability. In addition, a previous diagnosis of a mood, eating, or behavioral disorder was more common before the diagnosis of celiac disease. In contrast, siblings of celiac disease probands were at no increased risk of any of the investigated psychiatric disorders. Children with celiac disease are at increased risk for most psychiatric disorders, apparently owing to the biological and/or psychological effects of celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder: rate of referral for neurorehabilitation and psychiatric co-morbidity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Herlihy, D

    2012-04-01

    Despite advances in antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected patients continue to present with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) which may be associated with significant psychiatric co-morbidity. We audited our patients with HAND referred for psychiatric assessment against the National Service Framework guidelines that they should receive neurorehabilitation. We found that despite these patients posing a risk to themselves and others due to poor insight and medication adherence, high rates of psychiatric co-morbidity and severely challenging behaviour, few were referred for neurorehabilitation. We recommend that clear referral pathways for psychiatric intervention and neurorehabilitation are established in HIV treatment centres.

  3. Adverse Psychiatric Effects Associated with Herbal Weight-Loss Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saverio Bersani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and overeating are among the most prevalent health concerns worldwide and individuals are increasingly using performance and image-enhancing drugs (PIEDs as an easy and fast way to control their weight. Among these, herbal weight-loss products (HWLPs often attract users due to their health claims, assumed safety, easy availability, affordable price, extensive marketing, and the perceived lack of need for professional oversight. Reports suggest that certain HWLPs may lead to onset or exacerbation of psychiatric disturbances. Here we review the available evidence on psychiatric adverse effects of HWLPs due to their intrinsic toxicity and potential for interaction with psychiatric medications.

  4. Queering the relationship between evidence-based mental health and psychiatric diagnosis: Some implications for international mental health nurse curricular development

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Alec; Zeeman, Laetitia; Aranda, Kay

    2015-01-01

    We critique EB mental healthcare’s relationship with psychiatric diagnosis from a queer paradigm position. We sketch out some initial principles that will hopefully stimulate and contribute to the advancement of mental health nurse educational curricula internationally. This will help bring mental health nurse education more in-line with contemporary developments in narrative psychiatry and formulation as an emerging alternative to psychiatric diagnosis in UK clinical psychology.

  5. Association of nail biting and psychiatric disorders in children and their parents in a psychiatrically referred sample of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanizadeh Ahmad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nail biting (NB is a very common unwanted behavior. The majority of children are motivated to stop NB and have already tried to stop it, but are generally unsuccessful in doing so. It is a difficult behavior to modify or treat. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of co-morbid psychiatric disorders in a clinical sample of children with NB who present at a child and adolescent mental healthcare outpatient clinic and the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in their parents. Method A consecutive sample of 450 referred children was examined for NB and 63 (14% were found to have NB. The children and adolescents with nail biting and their parents were interviewed according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. They were also asked about lip biting, head banging, skin biting, and hair pulling behaviors. Results Nail biting is common amongst children and adolescents referred to a child and adolescent mental health clinic. The most common co-morbid psychiatric disorders in these children were attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (74.6%, oppositional defiant disorder (36%, separation anxiety disorder (20.6%, enuresis (15.6%, tic disorder (12.7% and obsessive compulsive disorder (11.1%. The rates of major depressive disorder, mental retardation, and pervasive developmental disorder were 6.7%, 9.5%, 3.2%, respectively. There was no association between the age of onset of nail biting and the co-morbid psychiatric disorder. Severity and frequency of NB were not associated with any co-morbid psychiatric disorder. About 56.8% of the mothers and 45.9% of the fathers were suffering from at least one psychiatric disorder. The most common psychiatric disorder found in these parents was major depression. Conclusion Nail biting presents in a significant proportion of referrals to a mental healthcare clinic setting. Nail biting should be routinely looked for and asked for in the child and adolescent mental healthcare setting

  6. [The triad configuration, humanist-existential-personal: a theoretical and methodological approach to psychiatric and mental health nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietta, E P

    1995-01-01

    The author establishes a research line based on a theoretical-methodological referential for the qualitative investigation of psychiatric nursing and mental health. Aspects of humanist and existential philosophies and personalism were evaluated integrating them in a unique perspective. In order to maintain the scientific method of research in this referential the categorization process which will be adopted in this kind of investigation was explained.

  7. [Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders: diagnosis and pharmacological treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paslakis, G; Schredl, M; Alm, B; Sobanski, E

    2013-08-01

    Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterised by inattention and/or hyperactivity and impulsivity and is a frequent psychiatric disorder with childhood onset. In addition to core symptoms, patients often experience associated symptoms like emotional dysregulation or low self-esteem and suffer from comorbid disorders, particularly depressive episodes, substance abuse, anxiety or sleep disorders. It is recommended to include associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders in the diagnostic set-up and in the treatment plan. Comorbid psychiatric disorders should be addressed with disorder-specific therapies while associated symptoms also often improve with treatment of the ADHD core symptoms. The most impairing psychiatric disorder should be treated first. This review presents recommendations for differential diagnosis and treatment of adult ADHD with associated symptoms and comorbid psychiatric disorders with respect to internationally published guidelines, clinical trials and expert opinions. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. [The Development of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing in Taiwan: Reflection From the Perspective of Recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Biau; Tsai, Sing-Ling

    2017-06-01

    Evidence-based nursing science has identified psychological recovery, partnership, and medication adherence as factors that have influenced the development of mental health care. This article discusses the process by which mental health care has developed from a medical / rehabilitation-focused model to a model that focuses on patient empowerment. The current model aims to assist patients to achieve self-awareness and to develop coping skills that enhance their motivation to transform. Medical advances have improved the control of psychiatric symptoms. Following the introduction of 2nd generation antipsychotics, patients were invited to establish decisions related to these prescription medications. Under the principles of patient-centered service, Taiwanese mental health professionals have changed their relationship with patients from a therapeutic model to a mutual-partnership model. Furthermore, investigations of the therapeutic care of patients with mental illness have used the needs of patients as their starting point and emphasized various aspects of patient and caregiver needs. Taiwanese mental health professionals are searching for a model of mental health care that is superior to the traditional operative framework of medical authority.

  9. Organizational model of ensuring safety and quality of treatment of aggressive psychiatric patients in mental health nursing in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Gabrovec

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The paper presents the organizational measures for managing violence in psychiatric settings and the study that introduces the preliminary success rate of the proposed model. Methods: For the purpose of this study a non-experimental sampling method was employed using a structured questionnaire as a data collection instrument. The sample covered the personnel most frequently exposed to violence namely, the nursing staff in closed and/or intensive psychiatric units in 5 Slovenian psychiatric hospitals, 3 psychiatric homes and 2 special education, and work and care centres. The data were statistically analysed with the SPSS v20 software package, with p < 0.05 indicating statistical significance. Results: The practical part of the functional training was conducted between 2010 and 2013 in specific psychiatric hospitals and wards. In a study carried out in 2013, preliminary results indicating the success rate of the proposed model were obtained. Discussion and conclusions: Health care workers in psychiatry are responsible for providing safe and high quality treatment even in cases of aggressive outbursts, but they lack the necessary functional knowledge to cope with aggression in the workplace. The paper presents an organizational model for ensuring the safety of the patients and the quality of their treatment in case of an aggressive outburst, along with the presentation of the required functional training.

  10. Culture as a predictor of resistance to change: a study of competing values in a psychiatric nursing context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Catrin; Åström, Sture; Kauffeldt, Anders; Helldin, Lars; Carlström, Eric

    2014-02-01

    It is well known that a conservative organizational culture can hinder the implementation of new organizational models. Prior to introducing something new it is important to identify the culture within the organization. This paper sets out to detect the feasibility of reform in a psychiatric clinic in a Swedish hospital prior to implementation of a new working method - a structured tool based on the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health. A survey consisting of two instruments - an organizational values questionnaire (OVQ) and a resistance to change scale (RTC) - was distributed to registered and assistant nurses at the clinic. The association between the organizational subcultures and resistance to change was investigated with regression analysis. The results revealed that the dominating cultures in the outpatient centers and hospital wards were characterized by human relation properties such as flexibility, cohesion, belongingness, and trust. The mean resistance to change was low, but the subscale of cognitive rigidity was dominant, reflecting a tendency to avoid alternative ideas and perspectives. An instrument like the one employed in the study could be a useful tool for diagnosing the likelihood of extensive and costly interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Crack and Cocaine Use among Adolescents in Psychiatric Treatment: Associations with HIV Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolou-Shams, Marina; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W. Tarantino, Nicholas; Brown, Larry K.

    2010-01-01

    Crack and cocaine use among adults has been associated with co-occurring psychiatric disorders as well as other drug use and unprotected sex. However, this issue is relatively unstudied in adolescents. This study collected data from 282 adolescents (mean age = 14.9 years) treated in intensive psychiatric treatment settings to understand the…

  12. Pattern of psychiatric morbidity among theft offenders remanded or referred for psychiatric evaluation and factors associated with reoffence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lai Gwen; Bharat, Saluja; Dani, Dhaval Kirti

    2013-06-01

    In Singapore, theft and related crimes constitute more than 50% of all reported crime, and are the most common offences committed by accused persons remanded to the Institute of Mental Health (IMH), Singapore. There is a need for better understanding of the forensic psychiatric aspects of such offenders. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among theft offenders remanded or referred for forensic assessment in 2010, compare the differences between first-time and repeat theft offenders, and identify the factors associated with reoffence. Forensic evaluations of inpatient and outpatient theft offenders that were conducted at IMH in the year 2010 were retrieved and reviewed. The sociodemographic and clinical data of first-time and repeat theft offenders were collected and compared using Student's t-test and chi-square test for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Multivariate regression was used to identify the factors that were predictive of repeat offence. Overall, 10% of offenders had no mental illness. Substance use disorders, mood disorders and psychotic disorders were the most common diagnoses. Psychotic disorders were significantly less common in repeat offenders. Repeat offenders also tended to have a history of conduct problems in childhood. Noncompliance with psychiatric treatment was positively associated with repeat offence, while psychotic disorders were negatively associated. The pattern of psychiatric morbidity among theft offenders in Singapore has changed over the last ten years. Kleptomania remains rare. Significant differences between first-time and repeat offenders have implications on the treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of theft offenders in Singapore.

  13. The effects of a non-smoking policy on nursing staff smoking behaviour and attitudes in a psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloor, R N; Meeson, L; Crome, I B

    2006-04-01

    The UK Department of Health required that by April 2001, all NHS bodies would have implemented a smoking policy. It has been suggested that the best demonstration a hospital can make of its commitment to health is to ban smoking on its premises. This paper reports on an evaluation of the effectiveness of a non-smoking policy in a newly opened NHS psychiatric hospital. Questionnaires were sent to all 156 nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital to assess the effectiveness of the policy in terms of staff smoking behaviour, attitudes to the restriction and compliance with the policy. Of the 156 questionnaires distributed, 92 (58%) were returned; smokers, former smokers and those who have never smoked were quite evenly represented at 34.78%, 34.78% and 30.43%, respectively. Of eight critical success factors for the policy, only one, staff not smoking in Trust public areas, had been achieved. A non-smoking policy was generally accepted as necessary by nursing staff working in a mental health setting. Staff felt that the policy was not effective in motivating smoking nurses to stop and that insufficient support was given to these nurses. The study highlights the importance of introducing staff support systems as an integral part of smoking policies and the role of counterintuitive behaviour in the effectiveness of smoking policy introduction in healthcare settings.

  14. The Milieu Manager: A Nursing Staffing Strategy to Reduce Observer Use in the Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Patrick; Dearholt, Sandra; Cooper, Mary; Herzke, John; Johnson, Erin; Parks, Joyce; Sullivan, Patricia; Taylor, Karin F; Rohde, Judith

    Rising acuity levels in inpatient settings have led to growing reliance on observers and increased the cost of care. Minimizing use of observers, maintaining quality and safety of care, and improving bed access, without increasing cost. Nursing staff on two inpatient psychiatric units at an academic medical center pilot-tested the use of a "milieu manager" to address rising patient acuity and growing reliance on observers. Nursing cost, occupancy, discharge volume, unit closures, observer expense, and incremental nursing costs were tracked. Staff satisfaction and reported patient behavioral/safety events were assessed. The pilot initiatives ran for 8 months. Unit/bed closures fell to zero on both units. Occupancy, patient days, and discharges increased. Incremental nursing cost was offset by reduction in observer expense and by revenue from increases in occupancy and patient days. Staff work satisfaction improved and measures of patient safety were unchanged. The intervention was effective in reducing observation expense and improved occupancy and patient days while maintaining patient safety, representing a cost-effective and safe approach for management of acuity on inpatient psychiatric units.

  15. Association of the nurse work environment with nurse incivility in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica G; Morin, Karen H; Lake, Eileen T

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether nurse coworker incivility is associated with the nurse work environment, defined as organisational characteristics that promote nurse autonomy. Workplace incivility can negatively affect nurses, hospitals and patients. Plentiful evidence documents that nurses working in better nurse work environments have improved job and health outcomes. There is minimal knowledge about how nurse coworker incivility relates to the United States nurse work environment. Quantitative, cross-sectional. Data were collected through online surveys of registered nurses in a southwestern United States health system. The survey content included the National Quality Forum-endorsed Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and the Workplace Incivility Scale. Data analyses were descriptive and correlational. Mean levels of incivility were low in this sample of 233 staff nurses. Incivility occurred 'sporadically' (mean = 0.58; range 0.00-5.29). The nurse work environment was rated highly (mean = 3.10; range of 1.00-4.00). The nurse work environment was significantly inversely associated with coworker incivility. The nurse manager qualities were the principal factor of the nurse work environment associated with incivility. Supportive nurse managers reduce coworker incivility. Nurse managers can shape nurse work environments to prevent nurse incivility. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Personality traits of nurses and organizational climate in relation to the use of coercion in psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Tomasz; Baranowski, Piotr

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the personality traits of nurses and the organizational climate in psychiatric wards affecting the frequency of the use of coercion. The study applied a descriptive, longitudinal design based on a 1-year prospective observation. The best predictor for the initiation of coercion by nursing personnel was a low score on the Creative Personality Factor Scale in Adjective Check List and the low score in the area of Leadership in Kolb's Organizing Climate Questionnaire (KOQC). The best predictor for decisions to use coercion was the low score in the area Requirements in the KOQC, whereas the best predictors for the participation in coercion were a high value for Leadership area and a low value for Requirements area in KOQC. The nursing personnel should be given frequent practical and theoretical training regarding the use of coercion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Reasons for psychiatric consultation referrals in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia: a comparison with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kat, M.G.; Zuidema, S.U.; Ploeg, T. van der; Kalisvaart, K.J.; Gool, W.A. van; Eikelenboom, P.; Jonghe, J.F. de

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study psychiatric consultation referrals of nursing home patients with dementia and to compare referral reasons with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. METHODS: This is part of a cross-sectional study of 787 patients residing in 14 nursing homes in the

  18. "We Have to Be Satisfied with the Scraps": South African Nurses' Experiences of Care on Adult Psychiatric Intellectual Disability Inpatient Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capri, Charlotte; Buckle, Chanellé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migrating nursing labour inadvertently reinforces South Africa's care drain, contributes to a global care crisis and forces us to reconsider migration motivation. This paper highlights issues that complicate psychiatric intellectual disability nursing care and identifies loci for change in an attempt to redress this care challenge.…

  19. Reasons for psychiatric consultation referrals in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia: a comparison with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kat, Martin G.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Kalisvaart, Kees J.; van Gool, Willem A.; Eikelenboom, Piet; de Jonghe, Jos F. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study psychiatric consultation referrals of nursing home patients with dementia and to compare referral reasons with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods This is part of a cross-sectional study of 787 patients residing in 14 nursing homes in the

  20. Reasons for psychiatric consultation referrals in Dutch nursing home patients with dementia: a comparison with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kat, M.G.; Zuidema, S.U.; van der Ploeg, T.; Kalisvaart, K.J.; van Gool, W.A.; Eikelenboom, P.; de Jonghe, J.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study psychiatric consultation referrals of nursing home patients with dementia and to compare referral reasons with normative data on prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Methods: This is part of a cross-sectional study of 787 patients residing in 14 nursing homes in the

  1. AGGRESSION IN PSYCHIATRY - A QUALITATIVE STUDY FOCUSING ON THE CHARACTERIZATION AND PERCEPTION OF PATIENT AGGRESSION BY NURSES WORKING ON PSYCHIATRIC-WARDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FINNEMA, EJ; DASSEN, T; HALFENS, R

    The present study focuses on the characterization and perception of patient aggression by nurses working in a psychiatric hospital in The Netherlands. Data have been collected by interviewing nurses working on open and closed wards. The results have been compared and related to the existing

  2. Education evolution: a historical perspective of associate degree nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsolini-Hain, Liana; Waters, Verle

    2009-05-01

    Exploring the inception and growth of associate degree nursing education informs our understanding of what led to such explosive growth so that most of the nursing workforce is currently educated at the associate degree level. The success of associate degree nursing programs led to many divisive years in nursing education of differentiation of practice debates that were hardly productive. Work world practices and patient needs are creating pressures on community colleges to join forces with universities to increase the percentage of baccalaureate-educated nurses. Associate degree nursing education continues to evolve to meet the demands of a higher educated nursing workforce.

  3. Association Between Allergies and Psychiatric Disorders in Patients Undergoing Invasive Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, Dwight; Wu, Stephanie E; Oklu, Rahmi; Erinjeri, Joseph; Deipolyi, Amy R

    Associations between allergies and psychiatric disorders have been reported in the context of depression and suicide; psychiatric disorders may affect pain perception. To investigate the relationship of allergies with psychiatric disorders and pain perception in the context of invasive procedures, specifically during tunneled hemodialysis catheter placement. We identified 89 patients (51 men, 38 women), mean age 66 years (range: 23-96), who underwent tunneled hemodialysis catheter placement (1/2014-2/2015), recording numeric rating scale pain scores, medications, psychiatric history, allergies, and smoking status. Of 89 patients, 47 patients had no allergies, and 42 had ≥1 allergy. Patients with allergies were more likely to have a pre-existing psychiatric disorder compared to those without allergies, odds ratio 2.6 (95% CI: 1.0-6.8). Having allergies did not affect procedural sedation or postprocedural pain scores. Multiple logistic regression with age, sex, smoking, presence of allergies, psychiatric history, inpatient/outpatient status, procedure time, and procedural sedation administration as inputs and postprocedural pain as the outcome showed that the only independent predictor was receiving procedural sedation (P = 0.005). Findings corroborate anecdotal reports of allergies as a marker for psychiatric history. However, having allergies was not associated with increased pain or need for more sedation. Further studies could prospectively assess whether allergies and psychiatric disorders affect patient/doctor perceptions beyond pain during invasive procedures. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Men and masculinities in forensic psychiatric care: an interview study concerning male nurses' experiences of working with male caregivers and male patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpula, Esa; Ekstrand, Per

    2009-09-01

    Forensic psychiatric care is largely populated by men--as patients, caregivers, and nurses. Previous research has not focused on the meaning of gender in this context. The aim of this study is to analyse male nurses' experiences of working with male caregivers and attending to male patients in forensic psychiatric care. Data were collected through interviews with six male nurses. The results consist of five themes. Protection and defence are key aspects of care and male caregivers gain status and authority through their physical strength. This could hamper caring and provide male caregivers with a superior position in the department.

  5. Competence to consent to voluntary psychiatric hospitalization: a test of a standard proposed by APA. American Psychiatric Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, B C; Appelbaum, P S; Grisso, T

    1998-09-01

    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's 1990 decision in Zinermon v. Burch, renewed attention has been given to capacities patients must have to be considered competent to consent to voluntary hospitalization. An American Psychiatric Association (APA) task force suggested that strong policy interests support the establishment of a low threshold for competence in this situation. The study examined whether, as previous research suggested, patients would have difficulty meeting even this lenient standard. One hundred voluntarily hospitalized psychiatric patients were read two brief paragraphs, one explaining the purposes of psychiatric hospitalization and and the other explaining policies for discharge. The paragraphs' readability measured about eighth-grade level. After each paragraph, participants were read two sets of questions, one testing recall of the presented information and the other testing recognition of the information in a true-false format. The scores of patients grouped by selected demographic and clinical variables were compared. The vast majority of patients were able to comprehend the information that the APA task force suggested was relevant to their decision. However, a subgroup of patients who were initially admitted involuntarily had significantly poorer performance and may constitute a group who need special educational efforts focused on the consequences of voluntary admission.

  6. [Factors associated with cross-nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Seehausen, Mariana Pujól; Oliveira, Maria Inês Couto de; Boccolini, Cristiano Siqueira

    2017-05-01

    This article aims to estimate the prevalence and analyze the factors associated with cross-nursing. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 with interviews with a representative sample of mothers of infants less than one-year-old (n' = 695) attended in nine primary health units in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Sociodemographic characteristics were studied; pregnancy, childbirth and primary care assistance; maternal habits and baby features. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) were obtained by Poisson Regression, retaining variables associated with the outcome in the final model (p ≤ 0.05). Cross-nursing was practiced by 29.4% of the mothers. Most practitioner mothers were relatives or friends. The following variables were directly associated with cross-nursing: being an adolescent mother (PR' = 1.595), smoking (PR' = 1.396), alcohol consumption (PR' = 1.613), inappropriate baby feeding habits (PR' = 1.371) and infant's age in months (PR' = 1.066). Maternal formal employment was inversely associated with the practice (PR' = 0.579). Cross-nursing has a relevant prevalence among mothers assisted by primary health care units in Rio de Janeiro City. This issue should be addressed, especially among the most vulnerable groups, due to the association with adolescence and with unhealthy habits.

  7. Correlates of Stress and Coping among Jordanian Nursing Students during Clinical Practice in Psychiatric/Mental Health Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

    2016-10-01

    Training in psychiatric settings is stressful for nursing students. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations between the students' characteristics, their stress degrees, stressors and types of coping strategies they experience during training in psychiatric course. A descriptive, correlational, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five undergraduate nursing students were recruited randomly from five Jordanian universities. Self-report questionnaires were administered at the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. The findings showed that students who utilized avoidance or transference strategies reported high stress degrees. Moreover, the results showed that those students who were in the fourth year, with a low family income, who avoid extracurricular activities, with a low academic grade or who registered in other clinical course(s) reported high stress degrees. These findings present a worthy data for the clinical instructors that facilitate students training in psychiatric settings and promote their psychosocial well-being. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Association between childhood abuse and psychiatric morbidities among hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshirod Kumar Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood abuse has been linked with increased risk of adult psychiatric disorders including major depression, substance abuse, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and personality disorders. However, only a few from India attempted to study long-term consequences of childhood abuse. Our study aimed to understand the role of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse along with psychiatric co-morbidities in hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to psychiatric inpatient services in the age group of 14-45 years for the 1 st time were evaluated for a history of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse on the basis of retrospective chart review. Semi-structured Performa was used to evaluate the patient with a history of child abuse, and they were diagnosed according to International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnostic criteria. Result: The prevalence of child abuse in our inpatient services was 43.29%; emotional abuse (61.9% was most commonly reported among patient followed by physical (21.43% and sexual abuse (16.67%. We observed a significant difference in terms of length of hospital stay between abuse (10.29 ± 6.01 days and nonabuse group (5.90 ± 2.43 days (t = 4.902, df = 95, P < 0.0001. The boys experienced physical abuse at a younger age (7.43 ± 2.50 years than girls (13.50 ± 0.70 years. The sexual abuse and emotional abuse were reported at a younger age in girls than boys. We found high prevalence of substance use disorders (40.47%, psychosis (19.04%, and mood disorder (28.57% among abuse group. Conclusions: The study findings highlight the developing importance of the different forms of abuse on adult psychiatric diagnosis in India. The abused patients are at high risk of the development of psychiatric disorder than the nonabuse group. The increased length of hospitalization among abused group reflects severity and complexity of child abuse. The early detection of social factors

  9. Psychiatric comorbidity in children and youth with epilepsy: An association with executive dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfstad, Kristin Å; Torgersen, Halvor; Van Roy, Betty; Hessen, Erik; Hansen, Berit Hjelde; Henning, Oliver; Clench-Aas, Jocelyne; Mowinckel, Petter; Gjerstad, Leif; Lossius, Morten I

    2016-03-01

    Psychopathology in children and youth with epilepsy has previously been related to executive dysfunction, but the nature of the association is uncertain. We sought to explore risk factors for psychiatric disorders in children and youth with epilepsy, with emphasis on executive dysfunction, along with seizure-related and psychosocial factors. The cohort consisted of one hundred and one consecutive patients aged 10-19 years with focal (n=52) or genetic generalized (n=49) epilepsy. All were screened for psychiatric symptoms, using part of an extensive questionnaire, the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) for both patients and their parents. Participants scoring in the borderline or abnormal range on the SDQ received a psychiatric interview (Kiddie-SADS-PL). All participants underwent a neuropsychological examination, and those with general cognitive abilities (IQ)epilepsy-related or psychosocial factors were not significantly associated with psychiatric disorders. Multiple factors are associated with psychiatric problems in children and youth with epilepsy. In this study, executive dysfunction, male gender, and early epilepsy onset were independent risk factors for having a psychiatric disorder. An evaluation of psychiatric and cognitive problems is important to enable a positive long-term outcome in childhood epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  11. Evaluating the American Nurses Association's arguments against nurse participation in assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelstein, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This discussion paper critically assesses the American Nurses Association's stated arguments against nurse participation in assisted suicide, as found in its current (2013) position statement. Seven distinct arguments can be gleaned from the American Nurses Association's statement, based on (1) the American Nurses Association's Code of Ethics with Interpretive Statements and its injunction against nurses acting with the sole intent to end life, (2) the risks of abuse and misuse of assisted suicide, (3) nursing's social contract or covenant with society, (4) the contention that nurses must not harm their patients, (5) the sanctity of life, (6) the traditions of nursing, and (7) the fundamental goals of nursing. Each of these arguments is evaluated, and none are found to be convincing. This is crucial because the American Nurses Association's official stance on nurse participation in assisted suicide can have significant consequences for the well-being of nurses who care for patients in jurisdictions in which assisted suicide is legally available. The American Nurses Association should therefore have a strong and convincing justification for opposing the practice, if it is to take such a position. That it fails to evince such a justification in its official statement on the matter places a burden on the American Nurses Association to more strongly justify its position, or else abandon its stance against nurse participation in assisted suicide.

  12. Development of a computer-aided clinical patient education system to provide appropriate individual nursing care for psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2012-06-01

    A lot of researches have proven that health education can help patients to maintain and improve their health. And it also shortens the time staying in hospital to save medication resource. Because the patients are willing to get healthcare knowledge to enhance the ability of self-care, they pay more attention to the health education. In Taiwan, the clinical nurses play an important role in patient education, and the health education take most time in their daily work. Such work includes the collection, production and delivery of education materials. To generate the correct and customized health education material is the key of success of patient education. In this study, we established a computer-aided health education contents generating system for psychiatric patients by integrating the databases for disease, medicine and nursing knowledge to assist nurse generating the customized health education document suitable for different patients. This system was evaluated by clinical nurses in usability and feasibility. This system is helpful for nurse to carry out the clinical health education to patients and further to encourage patient to pay attention to self-health.

  13. Medication Administration: Measuring Associate Degree Nursing Student Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    The American Nurse Association's (ANA) provisions outline the commitment expected of nurses to protect the community from harm. Medication administration coincides with patient safety as a compelling obligation in nursing practice. The study's purpose was to examine retention of medication safety knowledge among first year nursing students, after…

  14. Pre-existing psychiatric disorder in the burn patient is associated with worse outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Alexandra; Al Youha, Sarah; Samargandi, Osama A; Paletz, Justin

    2017-08-01

    To compare patient and burn characteristics between patients who had a pre-existing psychiatric diagnosis and patients who did not in a Burn Unit at an academic hospital. Psychosocial issues are common in patients recovering from a burn; however, little is known regarding hospital course and discharge outcomes in patients with a pre-existing psychiatric diagnosis presenting with a burn. Baseline medical comorbidities of burn patients have been shown to be a significant risk for in-hospital mortality. A retrospective chart review of 479 consecutive patients admitted to the Burn Unit of an academic hospital in Halifax, Nova Scotia between March 2nd 1995 and June 1st 2013 was performed. Extensive data regarding patient and burn characteristics and outcomes was collected. Patients with and without pre-existing psychiatric diagnoses at the time of hospital admission were compared. Sixty-three (13%) patients had a psychiatric diagnosis, with the most common being depression (52%). Forty-percent (n=25/63) of these patients had multiple pre-existing psychiatric diagnoses. Patients with a psychiatric diagnosis had a greater total-body-surface-area (TBSA)% covered by a third-degree burn (p=0.001), and were more likely to have an inhalation injury (pBurn Unit (p=0.01). The risk of death in burn patients with pre-existing psychiatric disorders was about three times the risk of death in patients with no psychiatric disorders when adjusting for other potential confounders (95% CI, 1.13-9.10; p-value 0.03). Presence of a pre-existing psychiatric disorder in the burn patient was associated with worse outcomes and was a significant predictor of death. Psychiatric diagnoses should be identified early in burn treatment and efforts should be made to ensure a comprehensive approach to inpatient support and patient discharge to reduce unfavorable burn outcomes and placement issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Associations Among Nursing Work Environment and Health-Promoting Behaviors of Nurses and Nursing Performance Quality: A Multilevel Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyeonmi; Han, Kihye

    2018-05-14

    This study aimed to determine the relationships among the unit-level nursing work environment and individual-level health-promoting behaviors of hospital nurses in South Korea and their perceived nursing performance quality. This study used a cross-sectional design. Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires from 432 nurses in 57 units at five hospitals in South Korea. Nursing performance quality, nursing work environment, and health-promoting behaviors were measured using the Six Dimension Scale of Nursing Performance, Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, and Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II, respectively. Nurses working in units with nurse managers who were characterized by better ability and by quality leadership, and who provided more support to nurses exhibited significantly greater health responsibility and physical activity. Nurses working with sufficient staffing and resources reported better stress management. Positive collegial nurse-physician relationships in units were significantly associated with more healthy eating among nurses. Nurses working in units with sufficient staffing and resources, and who had a higher level of spiritual growth and health responsibility, were more likely to perceive their nursing performance quality as being higher. To improve the quality of nursing practice, hospitals should focus on helping nurses maintain healthy lifestyles, as well as improving their working conditions in South Korea. Organizational support for adequate human resources and materials, mutual cooperation among nurses and physicians, and workplace health-promotion interventions for spiritual growth and health responsibility are needed. Organizational efforts to provide sufficient staffing and resources, boost the development of personal resources among nurses, and promote nurses' responsibility for their own health could be effective strategies for improving nursing performance quality and patient outcomes. © 2018 Sigma

  16. Incidence and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence on Nursing Staffs Caring for Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Sun, Yu-Hua; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Chiu, Hsien-Jane

    2009-01-01

    This one-year follow-up study determined the incidence and risk factors of workplace violence against nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital. The cohort members had a website to report events whenever they came across violence. A total of 971 events were reported. The incidence rates of physical violence, verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 1.7, 3.7, 0.2, 0.3, and 0 per staff-year, respectively. Young age, female sex, lower education, shorter duratio...

  17. Examining the impact of modality and learning style preferences on recall of psychiatric nursing and pharmacology terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Patience S; Willis, Jana; Peters, Michelle L; O'Toole, Robin S

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of this experimental research study was to explore how modality and learning style preferences impact non-prescribing, first-year Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) students' recall of vocabulary. Independent t-test results indicated a statistically significant mean difference in short-term recall of pharmacological and psychiatric terms, with learners receiving visual text instruction recalling significantly more vocabulary than learners receiving audio text instruction. A correlation was not found between learning preferences and vocabulary recall. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Walking a fine line: managing the tensions associated with medication non-adherence in an acute inpatient psychiatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnveld, Anne-Marie; Crowe, Marie

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use a phenomenological methodology to examine mental health nurses' experiences of administering medications to patients who were non-adherent in an acute inpatient service. There is a large body of literature focused on exploring the issue of non-adherence to prescribed medication, but there is very little examining this from mental health nurses' perspectives. Many of the medications prescribed for patients diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder have serious side effects and limited efficacy. Mental health nurses in acute inpatient environments are regularly confronted with the difficulties inherent in the conflicting roles associated with the need to maintain therapeutic relationships and the expectation that they ensure patients take their medications. This is a qualitative study exploring mental health nurses' descriptions of managing medication adherence in an acute inpatient unit. The interpretive phenomenological methodology of Van Manen (Researching Lived Experience: Human Science for an Action Sensitive Pedagogy, 1990) was used in this study to capture the experiences of a group of nurses. This research process involves a dynamic interplay between the following six research activities: (1) turning to the nature of the lived experience; (2) investigating the experience as we live it; (3) reflecting on essential themes; (4) a description of the phenomenon through the art of writing and rewriting; (5) maintaining a strong and oriented pedagogical relation to the phenomenon; and (6) balancing the research context by considering parts and whole. Four themes emerged from the existential analysis that described the mental health nurses' experiences: doing the job for doctors (relationality); stopping and listening (temporality); stepping in (corporeality); and walking a fine line (spatiality). It is proposed that models of therapeutic interventions offering alternative or conjunctive treatment to medications could be incorporated into

  19. Creating tomorrow's leaders today: the Emerging Nurse Leaders Program of the Texas Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, Susan; Wieck, Lynn; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S; Light, Kathleen M; Jordan, Clair

    2010-06-01

    The Texas Nurses Association initiated an Emerging Nurse Leaders Program as an approach to engaging new nurses in the leadership of the professional association. This article explains the program's origin, the commitment of the Texas Nurses Association to this process, the implementation of the plan, and the discussions that launched a new way of connecting leaders across generations. Further, it is an approach that any professional organization can use to encourage the involvement of new leaders.

  20. American Nurses Association. position statement on assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Nurses, individually and collectively, have an obligation to provide comprehensive and compassionate end-of-life care which includes the promotion of comfort and the relief of pain and, at times, forgoing life-sustaining treatments. The American Nurses Association (ANA) believes that the nurse should not participate in assisted suicide. Such an act is in violation of the Code for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (Code for Nurses) and the ethical traditions of the profession.

  1. Mood changes after indoor tanning among college women: associations with psychiatric/addictive symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Heckman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Indoor tanning (IT has been linked with psychiatric and addictive symptoms, and frequent tanning may indicate tanning dependence (addiction. The current study evaluated the effects of an IT episode on mood states and the association of these effects with psychiatric and addictive symptoms among young adult female indoor tanners. One-hundred thirty-nine female university students aged 18-25 years who had indoor tanned completed an online survey including the Positive and Negative Affects Scales and a standardized psychiatric interview (the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview via telephone. Psychiatric and addictive symptoms were relatively common among these young adult female indoor tanners. Overall, participants reported significant decreases in both negative (upset, scared, irritable, nervous, jittery, afraid and positive (feeling interested mood states after their most recent tanning episode. Multivariable linear regression analyses showed that more frequent indoor tanning in the past month and symptoms of illicit drug use disorders were associated with decreases in negative mood, and symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder were associated with a decrease in feeling interested. In summary, indoor tanners report relatively high rates of psychiatric and substance use symptoms, including symptoms of tanning dependence, and indoor tanning appears to alter mood. Women with certain substance use and psychiatric characteristics may be more vulnerable to such mood changes after tanning indoors. Further research is needed to clarify the relationships among these variables.

  2. Associations between problematic gaming and psychiatric symptoms among adolescents in two samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlin, Sofia; Åslund, Cecilia; Hellström, Charlotta; Nilsson, Kent W

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate associations between problematic gaming and psychiatric symptoms among adolescents. Data from adolescents in the SALVe cohort, including adolescents in Västmanland who were born in 1997 and 1999 (N=1868; 1034 girls), and data from consecutive adolescent psychiatric outpatients in Västmanland (N=242; 169 girls) were analyzed. Adolescents self-rated on the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT), Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale Adolescent version (ASRS-A), Depression Self-Rating Scale Adolescent version (DSRS-A), Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS), and psychotic-like experiences (PLEs). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed, and adjusted for sex, age, study population, school bullying, family maltreatment, and interactions by sex, with two-way interactions between psychiatric measurements. Boys had higher self-rated problematic gaming in both samples, whereas girls self-rated higher in all psychiatric domains. Boys had more than eight times the probability, odds ratio (OR), of having problematic gaming. Symptoms of ADHD, depression and anxiety were associated with ORs of 2.43 (95% CI 1.44-4.11), 2.47 (95% CI 1.44-4.25), and 2.06 (95% CI 1.27-3.33), respectively, in relation to coexisting problematic gaming. Problematic gaming was associated with psychiatric symptoms in adolescents; when problematic gaming is considered, the probability of coexisting psychiatric symptoms should also be considered, and vice versa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sleep problems in children and adolescents with epilepsy: Associations with psychiatric comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Berit Hjelde; Alfstad, Kristin Å; van Roy, Betty; Henning, Oliver; Lossius, Morten I

    2016-09-01

    Sleep problems are common in pediatric epilepsy and may influence seizure control, daytime functioning, and overall quality of life. Knowledge of factors contributing to sleep problems is likely to improve treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between psychiatric comorbidity and parent-reported and self-reported sleep problems in a sample of children and adolescents with epilepsy. Participants were children and adolescents (N=94), aged 10-19years, with generalized or focal epilepsy who had been referred to a tertiary epilepsy treatment center in Norway. Participants underwent a thorough clinical assessment and 24h of EEG registration. Information on sleep problems was obtained from parents using the Children's Sleep Habit Questionnaire (CSHQ) and from self-reporting using the Sleep Self-Report (SSR) questionnaire. Psychiatric diagnoses were established using the semistructured psychiatric interview Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia - Present and Lifetime Version (Kiddie-SADS-PL). Both the total and subdomain CSHQ and SSR scores were high in comparison with scores from population-based samples. Having one or more psychiatric disorder(s) was significantly associated with elevated scores on both the CSHQ and the SSR. With the exception of parent-reported parasomnias, associations between sleep problems and psychiatric disorders remained significant after adjusting for relevant epilepsy variables. Psychiatric comorbidity explained about one-third of the variance of the reported sleep problems in children and adolescents with epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gender differences in the associations between past-year gambling problems and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rani A; Potenza, Marc N

    2008-03-01

    Psychiatric disorders frequently co-occur with pathological gambling. The extent to which co-occurence extends to subsyndromal levels of gambling or differs between women and men is incompletely understood. To examine whether the association between psychiatric disorders and past-year gambling problems is stronger in women than men. Data from the national epidemiological survey of alcoholism and related disorders (NESARC) (n = 43,093) were analyzed. Increasing severity of past-year gambling problems was associated with increasing odds of most past-year Axis I and lifetime Axis II disorders, regardless of gender. Associations between gambling problems and major depression, dysthymia, panic disorder, and nicotine dependence were statistically stronger in women than in men. A severity-related association exists between past-year gambling problems and psychiatric disorders. The stronger associations in women suggest that gambling research, prevention and treatment efforts consider gender differences.

  5. The impact of political transition on psychiatric nursing--a case study of twentieth-century Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Ann J

    2006-12-01

    Using psychiatric nursing education and practice as a case study, this paper examines how the achievement of independence by a nation impacts significantly on the organisations, structures and service provision within that country. Furthermore, it sheds light on how an emerging nation is required to engage in a series of 'trade-offs' between priorities in an attempt to ensure progress towards the greater visioning goals such as the (re)establishing of a national cultural identity, freedom to practice religious beliefs and enhanced economic and practical benefits for all citizens. In the case of Irish psychiatric nursing, the achievement of independence resulted in a diminishing of earlier initiatives related to training and ultimately in a prolonged period of retrenchment, due primarily to competitive pressures and to imposed cultural influences and belief systems. The lesson from this Irish case study indicates that the initial phase of national autonomy can, of necessity, lead to a number of sacrifices as part of the realisation of self-governance and determination; and that this is a necessary prerequisite to gaining the strength to enable a much more confident progression into the future.

  6. Factors associated with psychiatric symptoms and psychiatric disorders in ethnic minority youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, Marcia; Doreleijers, Theo; van Domburgh, Lieke; Veling, Wim

    2016-01-01

    While ethnic diversity is increasing in many countries, ethnic minority youth is less likely to be reached, effectively treated and retained by youth mental health care compared to majority youth. Improving understanding of factors associated with mental health problems within socially disadvantaged

  7. A statistical perspective on association studies of psychiatric disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldager, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Gene-gene (GxG) and gene-environment (GxE) interactions likely play an important role in the aetiology of complex diseases like psychiatric disorders. Thus, we aim at investigating methodological aspects of and apply methods from statistical genetics taking interactions into account. In addition we...... genes and maternal infection by virus. Paper 3 presents the initial steps (mainly data construction) of an ongoing simulation study aiming at guiding decisions by comparing methods for GxE interaction analysis including both traditional two-step logistic regression, exhaustive searches using efficient...... these markers. However, the validity of the identified haplotypes is also checked by inferring phased haplotypes from genotypes. Haplotype analysis is also used in paper 5 which is otherwise an example of a focused approach to narrow down a previously found signal to search for more precise positions of disease...

  8. Factors associated with problematic drug use among psychiatric outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi-Webster, Clarissa Mendonça; Gherardi-Donato, Edilaine Cristina da Silva

    2016-11-28

    to examine the factors associated with problematic drug use among psychiatric outpatients. a cross-sectional study was carried out in two mental health services. Eligible individuals were patients of these mental health services, who used them within the data collection period. Instruments: standardized questionnaire with sociodemographic, social network, social harm, and clinical information; Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test; Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale. Statistical analysis was performed using parametric statistics considering a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Study participants were 243 patients, with 53.9% of these presenting problematic drug use. the most important independent predictors of problematic drug use were marital status (OR = 0.491), religious practice (OR = 0.449), satisfaction with financial situation (OR = 0.469), having suffered discrimination (OR = 3.821) and practicing sports activities in previous 12 months (OR = 2.25). the variables found to be predictors were those related to the social context of the patient, there, it is recommended that mental health services valorize psychosocial actions, seeking to know the social support network of patients, their modes of socialization, their financial needs, and their experiences of life and suffering. analisar os fatores associados ao consumo problemático de droga entre pacientes psiquiátricos ambulatoriais. estudo transversal em dois serviços de saúde mental. Foram considerados indivíduos elegíveis os usuários desses serviços de saúde mental, que os utilizaram dentro do período de coleta de dados. Instrumentos: Questionário padronizado sobre dados sociodemográficos, redes sociais, prejuízos sociais e informações clínicas; Teste de Triagem do Envolvimento com Álcool, Cigarro e outras Substâncias (ASSIST); Escala de Impulsividade de Barratt; e Escala de Avaliação de Reajustamento Social de Holmes e Rahe. A análise estat

  9. The Psychiatric Association of Bosnia-Herzegovina--distinctive role in national and international framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Račetović, Goran

    2012-10-01

    Following the initiative and after preparation that lasted about a year, a national association of experts dealing with psychiatry has been formed in our country named Psychiatric Association of Bosnia-Herzegovina (PABH). On March 17th 2008 PABH was formally started with its work that would be since 2009 been actively promoted and profiling as one of the best organized professional associations in B-H. Recognition on the international level and the active role of the PABH were substantially achieved in 2010 in the World (WPA), and from 2011 in European (EPA) Psychiatric Association. The Third Congress of Psychiatrists of B-H with International participation is the first in a series of future Congresses organized by PABH. This retrospective review describes the development and significance of the PABH both nationally and internationally through the documentation and archives of the PABH. The PABH is included in major psychiatric events in the country (active participation in the organization, logistics and scientific programme) and experts from our country are involved in an increasing number of international professional bodies. The PABH is the leading psychiatric association B-H, an active member of the largest and most important international organizations, with a continuous increase of the number of members who recognize the importance, relevance and quality of the PABH and further progress in its development and tendencies to harmonize psychiatric practice in the country and internationally.

  10. American Nurses Association Position Statement on guidelines for commercial support of continuing nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The attached guidelines on "Commercial Support of Continuing Nursing Education" have been developed by the American Nurses Association (ANA) to assist/guide nursing continuing educators who wish to utilize the resources of corporations to provide continuing education programs. These guidelines enable the provider to maintain a balance between the need for industry-supported dissemination of scientific information and promotional activities which meet the requirements of law, as well as professional standards of the American Nurses Association.

  11. American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influencing Sleep in the ICU Explore Explore New Nurses Experienced Nurses Educators/Managers Advanced Practice Membership As a new ... More CSI Academy AACN CSI Academy develops staff nurses as leaders and change agents who drive improved ...

  12. The association between Internet addiction and psychiatric disorder: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, C H; Yen, J Y; Yen, C F; Chen, C S; Chen, C C

    2012-01-01

    Internet addiction is a newly emergent disorder. It has been found to be associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders. Information about such coexisting psychiatric disorders is essential to understand the mechanism of Internet addiction. In this review, we have recruited articles mentioning coexisting psychiatric disorders of Internet addiction from the PubMed database as at November 3, 2009. We describe the updated results for such disorders of Internet addiction, which include substance use disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, hostility, and social anxiety disorder. We also provide discussion for possible mechanisms accounting for the coexistence of psychiatric disorders and Internet addiction. The review might suggest that combined psychiatric disorders mentioned above should be evaluated and treated to prevent their deteriorating effect on the prognosis of Internet addiction. On the other hand, Internet addiction should be paid more attention to when treating people with these coexisting psychiatric disorders of Internet addiction. Additionally, we also suggest future necessary research directions that could provide further important information for the understanding of this issue. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychiatric Evaluation of the Agitated Patient: Consensus Statement of the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry Project BETA Psychiatric Evaluation Workgroup

    OpenAIRE

    Stowell, Keith R; Florence, Peter; Harman, Herbert J; Glick, Rachel L

    2012-01-01

    It is difficult to fully assess an agitated patient, and the complete psychiatric evaluation usually cannot be completed until the patient is calm enough to participate in a psychiatric interview. Nonetheless, emergency clinicians must perform an initial mental status screening to begin this process as soon as the agitated patient presents to an emergency setting. For this reason, the psychiatric evaluation of the agitated patient can be thought of as a 2-step process. First, a brief evaluati...

  14. Role Expectations for United States Air Force Psychiatric Clinical Nurse Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    perspective of symbolic interactionism . Symbolic interactionism provides a matrix within which to understand how humans perceive and interact with the...theoretical framework for understanding role theory in this study is that tradition in social psychology derived from symbolic interactionism (Clayton...influence of the clinical nurse specialist. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 6(l), 53-63. Blumer, H. (1969). Symbolic interactionism : Perspective and

  15. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dushlaine, Colm; Rossin, Lizzy; Lee, Phil H.; Duncan, Laramie; Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Newhouse, Stephen; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Nurnberger, John I.; Lee, S. Hong; Faraone, Stephen V.; Perlis, Roy H.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Thapar, Anita; Goddard, Michael E.; Witte, John S.; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A.; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Anttila, Verneri; Arking, Dan E.; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H.; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Bailey, Anthony J.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayes, Monica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Bruggeman, Richard; Nolen, Willem A.; Penninx, Brenda W.

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from

  16. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Dushlaine, Colm; Rossin, Lizzy; Lee, Phil H.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from ...

  17. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dushlaine, Colm; Rossin, Lizzy; Lee, Phil H.; Duncan, Laramie; Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Newhouse, Stephen; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Nurnberger, John I.; Lee, S. Hong; Faraone, Stephen V.; Perlis, Roy H.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Thapar, Anita; Goddard, Michael E.; Witte, John S.; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A.; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Anttila, Verneri; Arking, Dan E.; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H.; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Bailey, Anthony J.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayés, Mònica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Black, Donald W.; de Haan, Lieuwe; Linszen, Don H.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from

  18. Forensic and non-forensic psychiatric nursing skills and competencies for psychopathic and personality disordered patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Matt; Mason, Tom

    2012-12-01

    To understand better the skills and competencies for forensic and non-forensic nursing of psychopathic and personality disordered patients. In the UK, there has been growing interest in service provision for this client group, but with little research to support the nursing skills required. A non-experimental design, using a postal survey to 990 forensic and 500 non-forensic nurses. An information gathering schedule was used to generate data about the most desirable skills and competencies and least desirable weaknesses and nursing attributes to nurse this group. The results for the forensic nurses. Main strengths and skills: being firm, setting limits and defining boundaries. Main weaknesses: inability to engage, inability to resolve conflict and impatience. Main skills and competencies: being non-threatening, non-judgemental and able to expect anything. Least desirable qualities: over-reacting, being judgemental and over-confrontational. The results for the non-forensic nurses. Main strengths and skills: being non-judgemental, listening skills and good risk assessment. Main weaknesses: frustration with the system, a fear of aggression and no skills to engage. Main skills and competencies: being open-minded, non-judgemental and forming relationships. Least desirable qualities: a supercilious attitude, cynicism and being judgemental. The results highlight the importance of forming therapeutic relationships as the bedrock of both forensic and non-forensic nursing, and they also highlight the important differences with regard to the significance of therapeutic action and therapeutic verbal interaction. The provision of better care for this client group will rely on appropriate training for nurses. This research highlights the need for training that supports the development of engagement skills, communication skills and an ability to use reflection in action as a means of providing therapeutic care. It also highlights the different emphasis on the use of these skills

  19. Refocusing on physical health: Community psychiatric nurses' perceptions of using enhanced health checks for people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressington, Daniel; Mui, Jolene; Wells, Harvey; Chien, Wai Tong; Lam, Claire; White, Jacquie; Gray, Richard

    2016-06-01

    In the present qualitative, descriptive study, we explored Hong Kong community psychiatric nurses' (CPN) perceptions of using comprehensive physical health checks for service users diagnosed with severe mental illness (SMI). Research interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 11 CPN in order to explore their perceptions about the use of the Health Improvement Profile (HIP) over a 1-year period. Interview data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The analysis revealed that the majority of CPN appreciated the comprehensive focus on the physical health of their clients and reported positive changes in their clinical practice. Many of them observed an increase in the motivation of their clients to improve their physical health, and also noted observable benefits in service users' well-being. The use of the HIP also helped the CPN identify implementation barriers, and highlighted areas of the tool that required modifications to suit the local cultural and clinical context. To our knowledge, this is the first study conducted in an Asian mental health service that explores nurses' views about using comprehensive health checks for people with SMI. The findings suggest that such approaches are viewed as being acceptable, feasible, and potentially beneficial in the community mental health setting. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Perpetration of gross human rights violations in South Africa: association with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J; Williams, Stacey L; Jackson, Pamela B; Seedat, Soraya; Myer, Landon; Herman, Allen; Williams, David R

    2009-05-01

    A nationally representative study of psychiatric disorders in South Africa provided an opportunity to study the association between perpetration of human rights violations (HRVs) during apartheid and psychiatric disorder. Prior work has suggested an association between perpetration and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but this remains controversial. Subjects reported on their perpetration of human rights violations, purposeful injury, accidental injury and domestic violence. Lifetime and 12-month prevalence of DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th edition) disorders were assessed with Version 3.0 of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0). Socio-demographic characteristics of these groups were calculated. Odds ratios for the association between the major categories of psychiatric disorders and perpetration were assessed. HRV perpetrators were more likely to be male, black and more educated, while perpetrators of domestic violence (DV) were more likely to be female, older, married, less educated and with lower income. HRV perpetration was associated with lifetime and 12-month anxiety and substance use disorders, particularly PTSD. Purposeful and DV perpetration were associated with lifetime and 12-month history of all categories of disorders, whereas accidental perpetration was associated most strongly with mood disorders. Socio-demographic profiles of perpetrators of HRV and DV in South Africa differ. While the causal relationship between perpetration and psychiatric disorders deserves further study, it is possible that some HRV and DV perpetrators were themselves once victims. The association between accidental perpetration and mood disorder also deserves further attention.

  1. Psychiatric Evaluation of the Agitated Patient: Consensus Statement of the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry Project BETA Psychiatric Evaluation Workgroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith R. Stowell

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to fully assess an agitated patient, and the complete psychiatric evaluation usually cannot be completed until the patient is calm enough to participate in a psychiatric interview. Nonetheless, emergency clinicians must perform an initial mental status screening to begin this process as soon as the agitated patient presents to an emergency service. For this reason, the psychiatric evaluation of the agitated patient can be thought of as a two-step process. First a brief evaluation must be aimed at determining the most likely cause of agitation, so as to guide preliminary interventions to calm the patient. Once the patient is calmed, more extensive psychiatric assessment can be completed. The goal of the emergency assessment of the psychiatric patient is not necessarily to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Rather, ascertaining a differential diagnosis, determining safety, and developing an appropriate treatment and disposition plan are the goals of the assessment. This article will summarize what components of the psychiatric assessment can and should be done at the time the agitated patient presents. The complete psychiatric evaluation of the patient whose agitation has been treated successfully is beyond the scope of this paper and Project BETA, but will be outlined briefly to give the reader an understanding of what a full psychiatric assessment would entail. Other issues related to the assessment of the agitated patient in the emergency setting will also be discussed. [West J Emerg Med. 2012;13(1:11–16.

  2. Psychiatric evaluation of the agitated patient: consensus statement of the american association for emergency psychiatry project Beta psychiatric evaluation workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Keith R; Florence, Peter; Harman, Herbert J; Glick, Rachel L

    2012-02-01

    It is difficult to fully assess an agitated patient, and the complete psychiatric evaluation usually cannot be completed until the patient is calm enough to participate in a psychiatric interview. Nonetheless, emergency clinicians must perform an initial mental status screening to begin this process as soon as the agitated patient presents to an emergency setting. For this reason, the psychiatric evaluation of the agitated patient can be thought of as a 2-step process. First, a brief evaluation must be aimed at determining the most likely cause of agitation, so as to guide preliminary interventions to calm the patient. Once the patient is calmed, more extensive psychiatric assessment can be completed. The goal of the emergency assessment of the psychiatric patient is not necessarily to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Rather, ascertaining a differential diagnosis, determining safety, and developing an appropriate treatment and disposition plan are the goals of the assessment. This article will summarize what components of the psychiatric assessment can and should be done at the time the agitated patient presents to the emergency setting. The complete psychiatric evaluation of the patient whose agitation has been treated successfully is beyond the scope of this article and Project BETA (Best practices in Evaluation and Treatment of Agitation), but will be outlined briefly to give the reader an understanding of what a full psychiatric assessment would entail. Other issues related to the assessment of the agitated patient in the emergency setting will also be discussed.

  3. Adverse incidents, patient flow and nursing variables on acute psychiatric wards: the Tompkins Acute Ward study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Simpson, A.; Warren, J.; Allan, T.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Adverse incidents (violence, self-harm and absconding) can cause significant harm to patients and staff, are difficult to predict, and are driving an increase in security measures and defensive practice. Aims: To explore the relationship between adverse incidents on acute psychiatric

  4. Creation of an American Holistic Nurses Association research consultation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sue; Clingerman, Evelyn; Zahourek, Rothlyn P; Mariano, Carla; Lange, Bernadette

    2012-12-01

    A goal of the American Holistic Nurses Association (AHNA) Research Committee is to prepare holistic nurses to conduct holistic nursing research. This article describes the creation of a Research Consultation Program and how the knowledge gained from the program will contribute to the development of a formal research mentor program.

  5. Predictive Factors associated with Death of Elderly in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwol Sung, PhD, RN

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Dyspnea, problematic behaviors, and ADL data were identified as the key factors associated with death among nursing home residents. Future plans for the prediction of death among nursing home residents can be made by nursing staff, factoring in these identified variables, to ensure more comfortable conditions and more responsive care.

  6. The association of psychiatric disorders and HIV infection in the correctional setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Jacques; Ducate, Suzanne; Pulvino, John; Bradshaw, Patrick; Murray, Owen; Olvera, Rene

    2003-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders, such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and depression, have been associated with both HIV-associated risk behaviors and HIV infection. While the US prison population is reported to exhibit elevated rates of HIV/AIDS and most psychiatric disorders, scarce information currently exists on the association of these conditions in the prison setting. The present study examined the association of six major psychiatric disorders with HIV infection in one of the nation's largest prison populations. The study population consisted of 336,668 Texas Department of Criminal Justice inmates who were incarcerated for any duration between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2001. Information on medical conditions and sociodemographic factors was obtained from an institution-wide medical information system. Inmates diagnosed with HIV infection exhibited elevated rates of major depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and non-schizophrenic psychotic disorder. These rates persisted in stratified analyses and in a multivariate analysis that statistically adjusted for gender, race, and age category. The present cross-sectional study's finding of a positive association between HIV infection and psychiatric diagnoses among inmates holds both clinical and public health relevance. It will be important for future investigations to prospectively assess the underlying mechanisms of these associations in the correctional setting.

  7. Impulse control disorders are associated with multiple psychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, Elina; Kaasinen, Valtteri; Siri, Chiara; Martikainen, Kirsti; Cilia, Roberto; Niemelä, Solja; Joutsa, Juho

    2014-01-01

    Impulse control disorders can have serious adverse consequences to the life of a patient with Parkinson's disease. Although impulse control disorders are common, a possible psychiatric comorbidity has not been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate the psychiatric symptoms exhibited by Parkinson's disease patients with impulse control disorders. The study was conducted as a postal survey to patients in the registry of the Finnish Parkinson Association. A total of 290 Parkinson's disease patients were evaluated for impulse control disorders using the Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease. Psychiatric symptoms were systematically screened using the Symptom Checklist 90. We found that 108 of the evaluated patients had one or more impulse control disorders. Patients with impulse control disorders had markedly higher scores for symptoms of psychoticism (Bonferroni corrected p disorder (p impulse control disorders. Impulse control disorders were shown to be independently associated with these symptoms. Patients with multiple impulse control disorders had higher scores for depression and obsessive-compulsive symptoms when compared with patients that exhibited only one impulse control disorder. COUNCLUSIONS: Our results confirm the previous observations that impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease are linked with multiple psychiatric symptoms, including psychoticism, interpersonal sensitivity, obsessive-compulsive symptoms and depression. Clinicians treating these patients should acknowledge the concomitant psychiatric symptoms.

  8. Associations between Familial Rates of Psychiatric Disorders and De Novo Genetic Mutations in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyleen Luhrs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the confluence of genetic and familial risk factors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD with distinct de novo genetic events. We hypothesized that gene-disrupting mutations would be associated with reduced rates of familial psychiatric disorders relative to structural mutations. Participants included families of children with ASD in four groups: de novo duplication copy number variations (DUP, n=62, de novo deletion copy number variations (DEL, n=74, de novo likely gene-disrupting mutations (LGDM, n=267, and children without a known genetic etiology (NON, n=2111. Familial rates of psychiatric disorders were calculated from semistructured interviews. Results indicated overall increased rates of psychiatric disorders in DUP families compared to DEL and LGDM families, specific to paternal psychiatric histories, and particularly evident for depressive disorders. Higher rates of depressive disorders in maternal psychiatric histories were observed overall compared to paternal histories and higher rates of anxiety disorders were observed in paternal histories for LGDM families compared to DUP families. These findings support the notion of an additive contribution of genetic etiology and familial factors are associated with ASD risk and highlight critical need for continued work targeting these relationships.

  9. Predictive Factors associated with Death of Elderly in Nursing Homes

    OpenAIRE

    Kiwol Sung, PhD, RN

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: An increasing elderly population reflects a great need for readily accessible, clinically useful methods to identify mortality-related factors in nursing home residents. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with the deaths of nursing home residents. Methods: Data was collected from a Minimal Data Set of 195 elderly nursing home residents, followed by analysis of demographic factors, disease and nursing condition factors, Activities of Daily Living (ADL), co...

  10. The exploration of in-service training needs of psychiatric nurses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-10

    Oct 10, 2014 ... Background: New research findings, changes in legislation and the use of information technology .... physical interventions used by the medical-surgical nurse. .... views about the topic of discussion (Burns & Grove 2005:543;.

  11. Advanced Nursing Education: Critical Factors That Influence Diploma and Associate Degree Nurses to Advance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhie-Anderson, Rose Lavine

    The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of the social processes associated with the decision of diploma and associate degree nurses to advance academically. Advanced nursing education needs to be pursued along the continuum of the nursing career path. This education process is indispensable to the role of nurses as educator, manager, nurse leader, and researcher who will effect policy changes, assume leadership roles as revolutionary thinkers, and implement paradigmatic shifts. Data were collected from two groups of participants using face-to-face, semistructured interviews. Group 1 consisted of diploma and associate degree nurses; Group 2 consisted of baccalaureate, masters, and doctoral degree nurses who have progressed academically. Emerging from the thick, rich data were core categories of rewarding, motivating, and supporting as critical factors that influence professional advancement. This qualitative study elucidated that professional advancement was the social process that grounds. The emergent theory was the theory of professional advancement.

  12. Incidence and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence on Nursing Staffs Caring for Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Jane Chiu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This one-year follow-up study determined the incidence and risk factors of workplace violence against nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital. The cohort members had a website to report events whenever they came across violence. A total of 971 events were reported. The incidence rates of physical violence, verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 1.7, 3.7, 0.2, 0.3, and 0 per staff-year, respectively. Young age, female sex, lower education, shorter duration of employment, and high level of anxiety of staff seemed to be the determinants of violence. Pre-placement education should focus on these staff to reduce workplace violence.

  13. Development of the TabacoQuest app for computerization of data collection on smoking in psychiatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Marques de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to develop a mobile app for research on the use of tobacco among psychiatric patients and the general population. Method: applied research with the technological development of an app for data collection on an Android tablet. For its development, we considered three criteria: data security, benefits for participants and optimization of the time of researchers. We performed tests with twenty fictitious participants and a final test with six pilots. Results: the app collects data, stores them in the database of the tablet and export then to an Excel spreadsheet. Resources: calculator, stopwatch, offline operation, branching logic, field validation and automatic tabulation. Conclusion: the app prevents human error, increases the quality of the data by validating them during the interview, allows the performing of automatic tabulation and makes the interviews less tiring. Its success may encourage the use of this and other computational resources by nurses as a research tool.

  14. Incidence and risk factors of workplace violence on nursing staffs caring for chronic psychiatric patients in taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Sun, Yu-Hua; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Chiu, Hsien-Jane

    2009-11-01

    This one-year follow-up study determined the incidence and risk factors of workplace violence against nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital. The cohort members had a website to report events whenever they came across violence. A total of 971 events were reported. The incidence rates of physical violence, verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 1.7, 3.7, 0.2, 0.3, and 0 per staff-year, respectively. Young age, female sex, lower education, shorter duration of employment, and high level of anxiety of staff seemed to be the determinants of violence. Pre-placement education should focus on these staff to reduce workplace violence.

  15. Tobacco industry influence on the definition of tobacco related disorders by the American Psychiatric Association

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, M; Bitton, A; Glantz, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, third edition (DSM-III), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in 1980, included the first official definitions by the APA of tobacco dependence and tobacco withdrawal. Tobacco industry efforts to influence the DSM-III were investigated.

  16. Introduction To The Special Section: The American Psychiatric Association's Research Agenda For The DSM-V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widiger, Thomas A; Simonsen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    of the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. This article provides the historical background for and a brief description of the first conference, which was concerned with the research that would help move the field toward a dimensional classification...... of personality disorder. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved) (from the journal abstract)...

  17. Associations between Relational Aggression, Depression, and Suicidal Ideation in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fite, Paula J.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani; Preddy, Teresa M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined relations between relational aggression, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation in a child clinical population. Participants included 276 children (M age = 9.55 years; 69% Male) who were admitted to a child psychiatric inpatient facility. Findings suggested that relational aggression was associated with depressive…

  18. Validation of candidate genes associated with cardiovascular risk factors in psychiatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windemuth, Andreas; de Leon, Jose; Goethe, John W.; Schwartz, Harold I.; Woolley, Stephen; Susce, Margaret; Kocherla, Mohan; Bogaard, Kali; Holford, Theodore R.; Seip, Richard L.; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants predictive of cardiovascular risk factors in a psychiatric population treated with second generation antipsychotics (SGA). 924 patients undergoing treatment for severe mental illness at four US hospitals were genotyped at 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Patients were assessed for fasting serum lipid (low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDLc], high density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDLc], and triglycerides) and obesity phenotypes (body mass index, BMI). Thirteen candidate genes from previous studies of the same phenotypes in non-psychiatric populations were tested for association. We confirmed 8 of the 13 candidate genes at the 95% confidence level. An increased genetic effect size was observed for triglycerides in the psychiatric population compared to that in the cardiovascular population. PMID:21851846

  19. Familiality of Psychiatric Disorders and Risk of Postpartum Psychiatric Episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Anna E; Maegbaek, Merete L; Liu, Xiaoqin

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Postpartum psychiatric disorders are common and morbid complications of pregnancy. The authors sought to evaluate how family history of psychiatric disorders is associated with postpartum psychiatric disorders in proband mothers with and without a prior psychiatric history by assessing...

  20. [Lato sensu post-graduation in psychiatric nursing and mental health: history, institutional context, and actors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olschowsky, Agnes; da Silva, Graciette Borges

    2003-01-01

    The theme of this study is "latu sensu" post-graduation teaching in nursing psychiatry and mental health in EE/UFRGS and EERP/USP nursing schools. In this study we characterize this courses and the profile of its professors. Through the analysis of the teaching plans, programs and documents of the specialization courses, as well as through the analysis of semi-structured interviews, we obtained data regarding the history and structure of these courses, which were pioneers and motivators of the specialized education in this field. The characterization of the courses will be done through the presentation of its timetable, number of disciplines, professional titles, and development of the professors involved, in order to show how psychiatry nursing and mental health teaching has been constituted.

  1. Exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation from mobile telephony and the association with psychiatric symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Denize Francisca da; Barros, Warley Rocha; Almeida, Maria da Conceição Chagas de; Rêgo, Marco Antônio Vasconcelos

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone base stations and psychiatric symptoms. In a cross-sectional study in Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil, 440 individuals were interviewed. Psychiatric complaints and diagnoses were the dependent variables and distance from the individual's residence to the base station was considered the main independent variable. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess confounding. An association was observed between psychiatric symptoms and residential proximity to the base station and different forms of mobile phone use (making calls with weak signal coverage, keeping the mobile phone close to the body, having two or more chips, and never turning off the phone while sleeping), and with the use of other electronic devices. The study concluded that exposure to electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone base stations and other electronic devices was associated with psychiatric symptoms, independently of gender, schooling, and smoking status. The adoption of precautionary measures to reduce such exposure is recommended.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and associated factors among psychiatric patients in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, South West Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaye, Sintayehu; Bekele, Shiferaw; Tolessa, Daniel; Cheneke, Waqtola

    2018-04-24

    Metabolic syndrome is a multisystem disorder which coined to describe the recognized clustering of metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and abnormalities of glucose homeostasis. To assess the prevalence and associated factors of metabolic syndrome among psychiatric patients in Jimma University Specialized Hospital. This study was conducted at Jimma University Specialized hospital psychiatric ward from May 15 to July 16, 2015. A cross-sectional study design and consecutive sampling technique were used. A single population proportion formula was used to include a total of 360 psychiatric patients. An interview administered structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic and some clinical data. Anthropometric data were collected based on standard guild line for anthropometric measurement. Five milliliter of venous blood was collected from ante-cubital fossa after overnight fasting for 8 h. Semi-automated clinical chemistry analyzer (Temis Linear) was used for biochemical laboratory analysis. Data analysis was performed by using SPSS version-20 software. Binary and multiple logistic regressions were used to identify the association between dependent and independent variables. P value less than 0.05 was taken as statistically significant association. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among psychiatric patients was 28.9%. Age greater than 30 years old (AOR: 5.2, CI: 2.3, 11.8, P. value metabolic syndrome among diabetic patients in the study area. The other independent variables such as family history of hypertension, chewing chat, Psychotropic drugs, duration of treatment, regularly eating fruits and vegetables had no statistically significant association with metabolic syndrome (P. value > 0.05). There was high prevalence of metabolic syndrome among the psychiatric patients. Therefore; close assessment, management and treatment of metabolic syndrome among patients with psychiatry problem is

  3. Associations of specific psychiatric disorders with isolated focal dystonia, and monogenic and idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Susanne; Hagenah, Johann; Rumpf, Hans-Jürgen; Meyer, Christian; John, Ulrich; Bäumer, Tobias; Brüggemann, Norbert; Kasten, Meike; Münchau, Alexander; Klein, Christine; Lencer, Rebekka

    2017-06-01

    Comorbidity of psychiatric disorders in patients with movement disorders is common. Often, psychiatric symptoms manifest before the onset of the movement disorder, thus not representing a mere reaction to its burden. How the disease mechanisms of psychiatric and movement disorders are related is still poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare prevalence rates of specific psychiatric disorders between different movement disorders including isolated focal dystonia (IFD, N = 91), monogenic Parkinson's disease (PD, N = 41), idiopathic PD (N = 45), and a sample from a Northern Germany general population (TACOS Study; N = 4075). Our results indicate an odds ratio (OR) of 2.6 [confidence interval (CI) 1.7-4.0] for general axis I disorders in IFD, an OR of 2.5 (CI 1.4-4.7) in monogenic PD, and an OR of 1.4 (CI 0.8-2.6) in idiopathic PD. More specifically, the monogenic PD group showed the highest ORs for affective disorders including depression (OR = 4.9), bipolar disorder (OR = 17.4), and hypomanic episodes (OR = 17.0), whereas IFD expressed the highest rates of anxiety disorders (OR = 3.3). Psychotic symptoms were only observed in the PD groups but not in IFD. Our findings underline the notion that psychiatric disorders are part of the phenotypic spectrum of movement disorders. Moreover, they suggest that IFD, monogenic PD, and idiopathic PD are associated with specific psychiatric disorders indicating disturbances in a different neural circuitry for sensorimotor control.

  4. Eradicating Barriers to Mental Health Care Through Integrated Service Models: Contemporary Perspectives for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Horace; Alexander, Vinette

    2016-06-01

    There has been renewed, global interest in developing new and transformative models of facilitating access to high-quality, cost-effective, and individually-centered health care for severe mentally-ill (SMI) persons of diverse racial/ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. However, in our present-day health-service delivery systems, scholars have identified layers of barriers to widespread dispersal of well-needed mental health care both nationally and internationally. It is crucial that contemporary models directed at eradicating barriers to mental health services are interdisciplinary in context, design, scope, sequence, and best-practice standards. Contextually, nurses are well-positioned to influence the incorporation and integration of new concepts into operationally interdisciplinary, evidence-based care models with measurable outcomes. The aim of this concept paper is to use the available evidence to contextually explicate how the blended roles of psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing can be influential in eradicating barriers to care and services for SMI persons through the integrated principles of collaboration, integration and service expansion across health, socioeconomic, and community systems. A large body of literature proposes that any best-practice standards aimed at eliminating barriers to the health care needs of SMI persons require systematic, well-coordinated interdisciplinary partnerships through evidence-based, high-quality, person-centered, and outcome-driven processes. Transforming the conceptual models of collaboration, integration and service expansion could be revolutionary in how care and services are coordinated and dispersed to populations across disadvantaged communities. Building on their longstanding commitment to individual and community care approaches, and their pivotal roles in research, education, leadership, practice, and legislative processes; PMH nurses are well-positioned to be both influential and instrumental in

  5. Continuing education for psychiatrists: report on Canadian Psychiatric Association questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M G; Toews, J; Lundgren, J M

    1981-08-01

    This report on the CPA Questionnaire on Continuing Education represents the answers of a sample of 485 of the 1,360 certified psychiatrists belonging to the Association. A total of 72.6% of the sample lived in urban centres with populations greater than 200,000; 28.9% worked in solo practice, but only 7.4% worked in settings where no other psychiatrists were present. The amount of time spent in continuing education activities was found to vary inversely with the distance that had to be travelled to major educational centres. Nevertheless, there were no psychiatrists that did not partake in some continuing education activities. Ninety-three percent read journals, 99% went to meetings, and 96% used consultation with other psychiatrists; 99% stated that these activities were useful. The favourite methods were reading and consultation. Eighty percent of the sample spent more than 41 hours per month in continuing education activities. Sixty-five percent stated that they would like a voluntary credit award system instituted. It is concluded that Canadian psychiatrists do spend a great deal of time in continuing education activities and believe that this is of value to their professional work.

  6. The association between nurse staffing and omissions in nursing care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter; Recio-Saucedo, Alejandra; Dall'Ora, Chiara; Briggs, Jim; Maruotti, Antonello; Meredith, Paul; Smith, Gary B; Ball, Jane

    2018-03-08

    To identify nursing care most frequently missed in acute adult inpatient wards and to determine evidence for the association of missed care with nurse staffing. Research has established associations between nurse staffing levels and adverse patient outcomes including in-hospital mortality. However, the causal nature of this relationship is uncertain and omissions of nursing care (referred as missed care, care left undone or rationed care) have been proposed as a factor which may provide a more direct indicator of nurse staffing adequacy. Systematic review. We searched the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Embase and Medline for quantitative studies of associations between staffing and missed care. We searched key journals, personal libraries and reference lists of articles. Two reviewers independently selected studies. Quality appraisal was based on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence quality appraisal checklist for studies reporting correlations and associations. Data were abstracted on study design, missed care prevalence and measures of association. Synthesis was narrative. Eighteen studies gave subjective reports of missed care. Seventy-five per cent or more nurses reported omitting some care. Fourteen studies found low nurse staffing levels were significantly associated with higher reports of missed care. There was little evidence that adding support workers to the team reduced missed care. Low Registered Nurse staffing is associated with reports of missed nursing care in hospitals. Missed care is a promising indicator of nurse staffing adequacy. The extent to which the relationships observed represent actual failures, is yet to be investigated. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Associations between the social organization of communities and psychiatric disorders in rural Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axinn, William G; Ghimire, Dirgha J; Williams, Nathalie E; Scott, Kate M

    2015-10-01

    We provide rare evidence of factors producing psychiatric variation in a general population sample from rural South Asia. The setting is particularly useful for demonstrating that variations in the social organization of communities, often difficult to observe in rich countries, are associated with important variations in mental health. Clinically validated survey measures are used to document variation in psychiatric disorders among 401 adults. This sample is chosen from a systematic sample of the general population of rural Nepal, in a community-level-controlled comparison design. Multilevel logistic regression is used to estimate multivariate models of the association between community-level nonfamily social organization and individual-level psychiatric disorders. Schools, markets, health services and social support groups each substantially reduce the odds of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), intermittent explosive disorder and anxiety disorders. Associations between schools, health services and social support groups and depression are statistically significant and independent of each other. The association between access to markets and PTSD is statistically significant and independent of other social organization and support groups. Community integration of some nonfamily social organizations promotes mental health in ways that may go unobserved in settings with many such organizations. More research on the mechanisms producing these associations is likely to reveal potential avenues for public policy and programs to improve mental health in the general population.

  8. Championing person-first language: a call to psychiatric mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mary E; Pease, Elizabeth A; Lambert, Kris; Hickman, Diane R; Robinson, Ora; McCoy, Kathleen T; Barut, Jennifer K; Musker, Kathleen M; Olive, Dana; Noll, Connie; Ramirez, Jeffery; Cogliser, Dawn; King, Joan Kenerson

    2013-01-01

    At the heart of recovery-oriented psychiatric mental health care are the dignity and respect of each person and the ways in which helping professionals convey a person's uniqueness, strengths, abilities, and needs. "Person-first language" is a form of linguistic expression relying on words that reflect awareness, a sense of dignity, and positive attitudes about people with disabilities. As such, person-first language places emphasis on the person first rather than the disability (e.g., "person with schizophrenia" rather than "a schizophrenic"). This article champions the use of person-first language as a foundation for recovery-oriented practice and enhanced collaborative treatment environments that foster respect, human dignity, and hope.

  9. Characteristics associated with family money management for persons with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrum, Travis

    2018-05-11

    Persons with psychiatric disorders (PD) commonly have their money officially or unofficially managed by others, with money managers most commonly being family members. (i) Identify characteristics of persons with PD, adult family members, and interactions with each other significantly associated with family money management (FMM). (ii) Identify significant differences in aforementioned characteristics between official versus unofficial FMM. Five hundred and seventy-three adults residing in USA with an adult relative with PD completed a survey. Among persons with PD, FMM was positively associated with lower income, diagnosis of schizophrenia/schizoaffective or bipolar disorder, psychiatric hospitalization, and arrest history. FMM was negatively associated with family members having a mental health diagnosis. FMM was positively associated with interaction characteristics of co-residence, financial assistance, caregiving, and use of limit-setting practices. Compared to official FMM, when unofficial FMM was present, persons with PD were less likely to have been psychiatrically hospitalized or to have regularly attended mental health treatment. When unofficial FMM was present, adult family members were less likely to be a parent of the person with PD. Practitioners should assess the level of burden experienced by family money managers and assess and address with family money managers the use of limit-setting practices.

  10. Association of the 5-HTT gene-linked promoter region (5-HTTLPR polymorphism with psychiatric disorders: review of psychopathology and pharmacotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenna GA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available George A Kenna1, Nick Roder-Hanna2, Lorenzo Leggio3, William H Zywiak4, James Clifford5, Steven Edwards3, John A Kenna6, Jessica Shoaff1, Robert M Swift11Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University, Providence; 2College of Pharmacy, University of Rhode Island, Kingston; 3Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Department of Community Health, Brown University, Providence; 4Butler Hospital, Providence, RI; 5Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavior Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA; 6College of Nursing, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, USAAbstract: Serotonin (5-HT regulates important biological and psychological processes including mood, and may be associated with the development of several psychiatric disorders. An association between psychopathology and genes that regulate 5-HT neurotransmission is a robust area of research. Identification of the genes responsible for the predisposition, development, and pharmacological response of various psychiatric disorders is crucial to the advancement of our understanding of their underlying neurobiology. This review highlights research investigating 5-HT transporter (5-HTTLPR polymorphism, because studies investigating the impact of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism have demonstrated significant associations with many psychiatric disorders. Decreased transcriptional activity of the S allele (“risk allele” may be associated with a heightened amygdala response leading to anxiety-related personality traits, major depressive disorder, suicide attempts, and bipolar disorder. By contrast, increased transcriptional activity of the L allele is considered protective for depression but is also associated with completed suicide, nicotine dependence, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. For some disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder, the research suggests that treatment

  11. Workplace Violence and its Associated Factors among Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manisha; Bhandari, Tulsi Ram; Dangal, Ganesh

    2018-01-01

    Workplace violence among nurses is prevalent worldwide. If nurses become aware of the workplace violence and its risk factors then only they can protect themselves. This study assessed the prevalence of workplace violence and its associated factors among nurses in Pokhara, Nepal. A hospital-based descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in Pokhara. The required sample size of the study was 200 nurses. We adopted self-administered questionnaire developed by International Labor Office, International Council of Nurses, World Health Organization (WHO), and Public Services International. Out of 21 hospitals of Pokhara, we selected five hospitals using simple random sampling method. The number of nurses in each hospital was fixed proportionately considering the total number of employed nurses. Individual nurses were selected on the first meet first basis to gain the required number. Two-thirds (64.5%) nurses experienced some type of violence in the last six months at their workplace. The proportion of verbal violence was higher (61.5%) compared to the physical (15.5%) and sexual violence (9%). Most perpetrators of the violence were the relatives of patients and hospital employees. Age of nurses and working stations had statistically significant association with workplace violence (p-value Workplace violence among nurses is a noteworthy problem in Pokhara whereas nearly two-thirds of nurses faced some type of violence in last six months. It is an urge to widen awareness level of nurses on the violence thus, they can take precaution themselves and ask hospital administration and other stakeholders to address the workplace violence.

  12. Sluggish cognitive tempo is associated with suicide risk in psychiatrically hospitalized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stephen P; Withrow, Amanda R; Stoppelbein, Laura; Luebbe, Aaron M; Fite, Paula J; Greening, Leilani

    2016-12-01

    Although identified as a significant public health concern, few studies have examined correlates of suicide risk in school-aged children. Recent studies show a relation between sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptoms and a range of adverse outcomes linked to suicidal ideation, including depression, emotion dysregulation, lowered self-esteem, and peer problems/social withdrawal, yet no study to date has examined SCT in relation to suicide risk. We tested the hypothesis that SCT would be associated with suicide risk in a sample of 95 psychiatrically hospitalized children (74% male; 62% black) between the ages of 8 and 12 (M = 10.01, SD = 1.50). Parents completed measures of their child's psychiatric symptoms, including SCT and depression, as well as a measure of their own psychopathology. Children completed measures assessing loneliness and depression. Both parents and children completed measures of suicide risk. White children reported greater suicide risk than nonwhite children. After controlling for demographic characteristics, loneliness, parental psychopathology, and correlated psychiatric symptoms, including both parent- and child self-reported depressive symptoms, SCT remained uniquely associated with children's suicide risk. Results were consistent across both parent and child measures of suicide risk. This multi-informant study provides strong preliminary support for an association between SCT symptoms and suicide risk in psychiatrically hospitalized children, above and beyond loneliness, depression, and demographic characteristics. Findings are discussed in the context of the interpersonal theory of suicide. Additional studies are needed to replicate and extend these findings, with a particular need for studies that examine the cognitive processes and daydreaming content of individuals displaying elevated SCT symptomatology. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  13. Comparing Efficacy of Implementing Two Teaching Methods Contract Learning and Traditional Instruction on Clinical Skills of Nursing Students in Psychiatric Wards of Hospitals of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Mohtashami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: A learning contract is defined as a written agreement between teacher and student which makes explicit what a learner will do to achieve specified learning outcomes.Learning contracts have been used as a teaching and learning strategy for both undergraduate and graduate nursing students in many countries.Methods : This research is a quasi-experimental study that compares effect of two different teaching methods , Contract learning and traditional on clinical skills for a group of nursing students who were in fourth year of study in a pre-registration bachelor of nursing degree program in Tehran . A learning contract was implemented as a learning tool in the students clinical placement in psychiatric nursing .Data were connected from questionnaires , interviews and clinical evaluation papers with students .Results : The results showed that students agreed that there was an increase in students autonomy and motivation in learning with the use of learning contract . It also increased the sharing between students and clinical instructors.Conclusion : According to the findings of this study , contract learning is considered beneficial to students learning and has the potential to be used in clinical learning .Key words : NURSING STUDENTS, LEARNING CONTRACTS , TRADITIONAL METHOD , MOTIVATION , AUTONOMY, PSYCHIATRIC WARDS .

  14. Bullying Victimization (Being Bullied) Among Adolescents Referred for Urgent Psychiatric Consultation: Prevalence and Association With Suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Nazanin; Roberts, Nasreen; Sutton, Chloe; Axas, Nicholas; Repetti, Leanne

    2015-10-01

    To examine the prevalence of bullying victimization among adolescents referred for urgent psychiatric consultation, to study the association between bullying victimization and suicidality, and to examine the relation between different types of bullying and suicidality. A retrospective chart review was conducted for all adolescents referred to a hospital-based urgent consultation clinic. Our study sample consisted of adolescents with a history of bullying victimization. The Research Ethics Board of Queen's University provided approval. Data analysis was conducted using SPSS (IBM SPSS Inc, Armonk, NY). Chi-square tests were used for sex, suicidal ideation, history of physical and sexual abuse, and time and type of bullying, and an independent sample t test was used for age. The prevalence of bullying victimization was 48.5% (182 of 375). There was a significant association between being bullied and suicidal ideation (P = 0.01), and between sex and suicidal ideation (P ≤ 0.001). Victims of cyberbullying reported more suicidal ideation than those who experienced physical or verbal bullying (P = 0.04). Bullying victimization, especially cyberbullying, is associated with increased risk of suicidal ideation among adolescents referred for psychiatric risk assessment. The detailed history of the type and duration of bullying experienced by the victims should be considered when conducting a psychiatric risk assessment.

  15. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  16. Substance Use Among Nurses and Nursing Students: A Joint Position Statement of the Emergency Nurses Association and the International Nurses Society on Addictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobbe, Stephen; Crowley, Melanie

    Alcohol and other substance use by nurses potentially places patients, the public, and nurses themselves at risk for serious injury or death. Nursing students are also at risk for problems related to substance use. When viewed and treated as a chronic medical illness, treatment outcomes for substance use disorders are comparable with those of other diseases and can result in lasting benefits. Professional monitoring programs that employ an alternative-to-discipline approach have been shown to be effective in the treatment of health professionals with substance use disorders and are considered a standard for recovery, with high rates of completion and return to practice. It is the position of the Emergency Nurses Association and the International Nurses Society on Addictions that 1. health care facilities provide education to nurses and other employees regarding alcohol and other drug use and establish policies, procedures, and practices to promote safe, supportive, drug-free workplaces; 2. health care facilities and schools of nursing adopt alternative-to-discipline approaches to treating nurses and nursing students with substance use disorders, with stated goals of retention, rehabilitation, and reentry into safe, professional practice; 3. drug diversion, in the context of personal use, is viewed primarily as a symptom of a serious and treatable disease and not exclusively as a crime; and 4. nurses and nursing students are aware of the risks associated with substance use, impaired practice, and drug diversion and have the responsibility and means to report suspected or actual concerns.

  17. Comparing assessments of the decision-making competencies of psychiatric inpatients as provided by physicians, nurses, relatives and an assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin Er, Rahime; Sehiralti, Mine

    2014-07-01

    To compare assessments of the decision-making competencies of psychiatric inpatients as provided by physicians, nurses, relatives and an assessment tool. This study was carried out at the psychiatry clinic of Kocaeli University Hospital from June 2007 to February 2008. The decision-making competence of the 83 patients who participated in the study was assessed by physicians, nurses, relatives and MacCAT-T. Of the 83 patients, the relatives of 73.8% of them, including the parents of 47.7%, were interviewed during the study. A moderately good consistency between the competency assessments of the nurses versus those of the physicians, but a poor consistency between the assessments of the physicians and nurses versus those of the patients' relatives, was determined. The differences in the competency assessment obtained with the MacCAT-T versus the evaluations of the physicians, nurses and patients' relatives were statistically significant. Our findings demonstrate those physicians, nurses and the patients' relatives have difficulty in identifying patients lacking decision-making competence. Therefore, an objective competence assessment tool should be used along with the assessments of physicians and nurses, both of whom can provide clinical data, as well as those of relatives, who can offer insights into the patient's moral values and expectations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Gender-related differences in the associations between sexual impulsivity and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erez, Galit; Pilver, Corey E; Potenza, Marc N

    2014-08-01

    Sexual impulsivity (SI) has been associated with conditions that have substantial public health costs, such as sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancies. However, SI has not been examined systematically with respect to its relationships to psychopathology. We aimed to investigate associations between SI and psychopathology, including gender-related differences. We performed a secondary data analysis of Wave-2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a national sample of 34,653 adults in the United States. DSM-IV-based diagnoses of mood, anxiety, drug and personality disorders were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Scheduled DSM-IV Version. The prevalence of SI was considerable (14.7%), with greater acknowledgment by men than women (18.9% versus 10.9%; p women and men, SI was positively associated with most Axis-I and Axis-II psychiatric disorders (OR range: Women, Axis-I:1.89-6.14, Axis-II:2.10-10.02; Men, Axis-I:1.92-6.21, Axis-II:1.63-6.05). Significant gender-related differences were observed. Among women as compared to men, SI was more strongly associated with social phobia, alcohol abuse/dependence, and paranoid, schizotypal, antisocial, borderline, narcissistic, avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality disorders. The robust associations between SI and psychopathology across genders suggest the need for screening and interventions related to SI for individuals with psychiatric concerns. The stronger associations between SI and psychopathology among women as compared to men emphasize the importance of a gender-oriented perspective in targeting SI. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the extent to SI predates, postdates or co-occurs with specific psychiatric conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. How American Nurses Association Code of Ethics informs genetic/genomic nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tluczek, Audrey; Twal, Marie E; Beamer, Laura Curr; Burton, Candace W; Darmofal, Leslie; Kracun, Mary; Zanni, Karen L; Turner, Martha

    2018-01-01

    Members of the Ethics and Public Policy Committee of the International Society of Nurses in Genetics prepared this article to assist nurses in interpreting the American Nurses Association (2015) Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements (Code) within the context of genetics/genomics. The Code explicates the nursing profession's norms and responsibilities in managing ethical issues. The nearly ubiquitous application of genetic/genomic technologies in healthcare poses unique ethical challenges for nursing. Therefore, authors conducted literature searches that drew from various professional resources to elucidate implications of the code in genetic/genomic nursing practice, education, research, and public policy. We contend that the revised Code coupled with the application of genomic technologies to healthcare creates moral obligations for nurses to continually refresh their knowledge and capacities to translate genetic/genomic research into evidence-based practice, assure the ethical conduct of scientific inquiry, and continually develop or revise national/international guidelines that protect the rights of individuals and populations within the context of genetics/genomics. Thus, nurses have an ethical responsibility to remain knowledgeable about advances in genetics/genomics and incorporate emergent evidence into their work.

  20. Predictive factors associated with death of elderly in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Kiwol

    2014-06-01

    An increasing elderly population reflects a great need for readily accessible, clinically useful methods to identify mortality-related factors in nursing home residents. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with the deaths of nursing home residents. Data was collected from a Minimal Data Set of 195 elderly nursing home residents, followed by analysis of demographic factors, disease and nursing condition factors, Activities of Daily Living (ADL), cognitive function, behavioral patterns, and dysfunctional status. Major factors associated with death among nursing home residents were identified as dyspnea (odds ratio [OR] = 4.88), problematic behaviors (OR = 3.95), and ADL (OR = 3.61). These variables accounted for 31.1% of the variance in death. Dyspnea, problematic behaviors, and ADL data were identified as the key factors associated with death among nursing home residents. Future plans for the prediction of death among nursing home residents can be made by nursing staff, factoring in these identified variables, to ensure more comfortable conditions and more responsive care. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Position statement. Restructuring, work redesign, and the job and career security of registered nurses. American Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The American Nurses Association (ANA) is committed to safeguarding the public, protecting and advancing the careers of professional nurses, supporting individual and collective efforts by registered nurses to protect their clients and enhancing the professional development and job security of registered nurses. As the nation's health care system is restructured, ANA is actively engaged in initiatives to strengthen the economic and general welfare of registered nurses, the safety and care for the public, and, in partnership with the state nurses associations (SNAs), oppose efforts to replace registered nurses with inappropriate substitutes.

  2. The impact of using standardized patients in psychiatric cases on the levels of motivation and perceived learning of the nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikoc, Gamze; Ozcan, Celale Tangul; Elcin, Melih

    2017-04-01

    The use of standardized patients is not very common in psychiatric nursing education and there has been no study conducted in Turkey. This study evaluated the impact of using standardized patients in psychiatric cases on the levels of motivation and perceived learning of the nursing students. This manuscript addressed the quantitative aspect of a doctoral thesis study in which both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. A pre-test and post-test were employed in the quantitative analysis in a randomized and controlled study design. The motivation scores, and interim and post-test scores for perceived learning were higher in the experimental group compared to pre-test scores and the scores of the control group. The students in the experimental group reported that they felt more competent about practical training in clinical psychiatry, as well as in performing interviews with patients having mental problems, and reported less anxiety about performing an interview when compared to students in the control group. It is considered that the inclusion of standardized patient methodology in the nursing education curriculum in order to improve the knowledge level and skills of students would be beneficial in the training of mental health nurses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Teaching and Practicing Caring in the Classroom: Students' Responses to a Self-Awareness Intervention in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Shik; Patterson, Kathleen T

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the assumption that caring could be taught by nurse educators in the classroom environment and that learning to be self-aware in a mindful state would facilitate students to listen more closely to their inner spirit, which would affect caring behaviors. A convenience sample of 238 students in the Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing course in a baccalaureate program was obtained from 2007 to 2011. At the beginning of each class and throughout the semester, self-awareness was explained to the students, a reflection statement was read, and students were asked to take two minutes of quiet time, with their eyes closed. At the end of each semester, an author-composed Self-Awareness Questionnaire and Measurement Scale was administered to consenting students to assess whether self-awareness led to caring behaviors. Students' responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Findings were positive and supported the assumption that self-awareness and silence positively affected caring behaviors in nursing students in their psychiatric nursing rotation.

  4. Are ataques de nervios in Puerto Rican children associated with psychiatric disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnaccia, Peter J; Martinez, Igda; Ramirez, Rafael; Canino, Glorisa

    2005-11-01

    To provide the first empirical analysis of a cultural syndrome in children by examining the prevalence and psychiatric correlates of ataques de nervios in an epidemiological study of the mental health of children in Puerto Rico. Probability samples of caretakers of children 4-17 years old in the community (N = 1,892; response rate: 90%) and in clinical services (N = 761; response rate 72%) were administered structured interviews to assess the presence and correlates of ataques de nervios. Nine percent of children in the community sample and 26% of children in the clinical sample had a reported history of an ataque de nervios. In contrast to the overall community and clinical samples, which had more boys in them, the ataque de nervios groups in both samples had more girls in them. Family history of ataques de nervios was associated with ataques de nervios in children in both samples. Across a wide range of depression, anxiety, and disruptive disorders, children who reported an ataque de nervios were more likely to meet research criteria for psychiatric disorder in both samples. Ataques de nervios are a frequently reported cultural syndrome among children in Puerto Rico. Adolescent girls are more likely to report this experience. Ataques de nervios have a significant relationship with psychiatric disorder and impairment in Puerto Rican children.

  5. Factors associated with the self-perceived ability of nursing staff to remain working until retirement: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; van der Hoek, Lucas S; Francke, Anneke L

    2015-09-02

    It is important to learn how employers in European countries can prevent nursing staff from changing occupation or taking early retirement in order to counteract expected nursing shortages. However, to date research on nursing staff's ability to remain working until retirement age has been limited. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the associations between different job and organisational characteristics, job satisfaction, occupational commitment and the self-perceived ability to continue working in the current line of work until the official retirement age. The questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study included 730 nursing staff members employed in Dutch hospitals, nursing homes, organisations for psychiatric care, homes for the elderly, care organisations for disabled people and home care organisations (mean age: 48; 89% female). Linear and logistic regression analyses and mediation analyses were applied to test hypothesised associations. Reducing work pressure and increasing appreciation by senior management in particular have positive consequences for nursing staff's self-perceived ability to continue working until the official retirement age. The job and organisational characteristics of autonomy, work pressure, supportive leadership, educational opportunities, communication within the organisation and appreciation of nursing staff by senior management together have substantial impact on nursing staff's job satisfaction. Job satisfaction in turn is related to the self-perceived ability to continue working until the retirement age. However, job satisfaction mainly summarises the joint effect of job and organisational characteristics and has no supplementary effect on the self-perceived ability to continue working. Employers should primarily focus on work pressure and the appreciation of nursing staff by senior management in order to retain nursing staff even as they get older.

  6. Therapeutic doll play in the treatment of a severely impaired psychiatric inpatient: dramatic clinical improvements with a nontraditional nursing intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Shira; Hanchuk, Hilary; Nelson, Marjorie

    2015-05-01

    Interest has grown in the use of doll therapy, particularly in geropsychiatric and dementia care settings. In a long-term state psychiatric hospital, a dollhouse-play activity was implemented in an effort to engage an acutely disturbed, middle-aged woman undergoing medication trials and whose symptoms had been refractory to conventional treatments. A schedule of nondirective dollhouse-play activities was implemented over an 8-week period. Measures of behavioral change were tracked. Dramatic clinical improvements were seen, including significant reductions in verbal and physical aggression, use of as-needed medications, and need for close one-to-one monitoring. Improvements were seen prior to achievement of therapeutic drug levels. The patient was successfully discharged from the hospital. Doll play has recently been associated with clinical benefits in the care of patients with dementia and has long been deployed in childhood mental health treatment. The current findings suggest doll play may have applications as a time-limited intervention in the treatment of major psychiatric disorders in adults and warrants consideration when achieving therapeutic alliance has proven particularly challenging. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Achieving Full Scope of Practice Readiness Using Evidence for Psychotherapy Teaching in Web and Hybrid Approaches in Psychiatric Mental Health Advanced Practice Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kathleen T

    2018-01-01

    Radical changes in role, education, and practice have affected how education of advance practice nurses and practice deliverables occur. This article examines the effects of distance education upon the teaching/learning of psychotherapy in integrating Web-based technology and platforms. With the advent and proliferation of online programs of study, the question begs: How do distance-linked programs successfully introduce, practice, and supervise one-to-one and group psychotherapy training? By employing evidence-based education strategies, technology, and strong interpersonal skills and evidence-based therapies, a charter Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Doctor of Nursing Practice program paved an innovative and successful path. In that program, they prepared their students for full scope of practice, upon graduation, inclusive of psychotherapy as well as the other highly demanding and compressed requirements of the 3-year program. This article explores that journey and its recommendations for application derived from this 2010 cohort. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Review and analysis of the review results of Taiwan nurses association nursing projects (2011~2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Yin; Chen, Yu-Chih; Huang, Kuang-Chi; Huang, Jui-Lan; Lee, Tso-Ying

    2015-04-01

    Nursing projects are a key part of N4 professional competency training for nursing personnel. Low passage rates for these projects have been shown to negatively affect the intent of nursing personnel to advance further in the nursing ladder system. This study analyzes the scores for nursing projects between 2011 and 2013, the passage rate for these projects, and the differences in passage rates between different types of projects. This retrospective and descriptive study collected data on nursing projects conducted under the auspices of the Taiwan Nurses Association between 2011 and 2013. Furthermore, the comments of reviewers on 100 nursing projects were randomly selected and subjected to content analysis. A total of 3,359 nursing projects were examined. Eliminating unqualified nursing projects left a total of 3,246 projects for the dataset. A total of 1,099 projects were scored with passing grades, giving a passing rate of 33.9%. The authors of these passing projects worked primarily in northern Taiwan, worked in medical centers, and worked in intensive care departments. The projects submitted by authors in central Taiwan had the highest average score and passing rate, while those living in offshore islands had the lowest average score and passing rate. Most of the project topics belonged to the category: "improvement of nursing service skills or quality" (77.3%). Items with the lowest scores were: validation of questions, analysis of the current situation, and evaluation of results. The topics of nursing projects did not relate significantly to passing rate. However, years of experience, geographic location of hospital, level of institution, and department each had a statistically significant impact on the passage rate. A content analysis of reviewer comments was used to extract common problems. Most of the positive comments were related to the category of "literature review and reference", while most of the negative comments were related to the categories of

  9. Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice: National Association of School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) developed the Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice to reflect current school nurse practice. The Framework of practice was introduced in June 2015, and feedback was requested and obtained from practicing school nurses in a variety of ways. The final version of the Framework is introduced in this article. This article updates (and replaces) the articles in the July 2015 NASN School Nurse related to the Framework. Central to the Framework is student-centered nursing care that occurs within the context of the students' family and school community. Surrounding the student, family, and school community are the nonhierarchical, overlapping key principles of Care Coordination, Leadership, Quality Improvement, and Community/Public Health.These principles are surrounded by the fifth principle, Standards of Practice, which is foundational for evidence-based and clinically competent quality care. Each of these principles is further defined by practice components. Suggestions are provided regarding how the Framework can be used in a variety of settings to articulate and prioritize school nursing practice. The ultimate goal is to provide a resource to guide school nurses in their practice to help students be healthy, safe, and ready to learn. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Ringleader bullying: association with psychopathic narcissism and theory of mind among child psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellwagen, Kurt K; Kerig, Patricia K

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the association of ringleader bullying with psychopathic traits and theory of mind among 100 youth aged 10-15 (62 boys and 38 girls) receiving inpatient psychiatric services at a state facility. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated a positive association between ringleader bullying and psychopathic narcissism, and a significant interaction effect between narcissism and theory of mind. More specifically, narcissism moderated the relationship between theory of mind and ringleader bullying such that theory of mind was positively associated with ringleader bullying when levels of narcissism were high, and theory of mind was negatively associated ringleader bullying when levels of narcissism were low. The discussion of these results focuses on the importance of developing effective treatment techniques for youth whose bullying behavior is associated with narcissistic features and social acuity.

  11. Gender differences in the association of agitation and suicide attempts among psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Craig J; Hitschfeld, Mario J; Palmer, Brian A; Schak, Kathryn M; Roberge, Erika M; Lineberry, Timothy W

    2014-01-01

    To determine if the relationship of agitation with suicide ideation and suicide attempts differed between men and women. Self-reported severity of agitation and other suicide risk factors was obtained from 7698 consecutive patients during admission for inpatient psychiatric treatment during a 5-year period. Agitation was highest among men with a history of suicide attempts. Agitation was significantly associated with frequency of suicide ideation and history of suicide attempt, but the gender-by-suicide interaction was only significant as a predictor of suicide attempt history. For men, agitation was associated with significantly increased risk for suicide attempt, but for women, agitation was not associated with risk for suicide attempt history. Results were unchanged when analyses were repeated among the subgroup of patients with suicide ideation. Agitation is associated with history of suicide attempt among male but not female psychiatric inpatients. Agitation differentiates between those men who have only thought about suicide and those who have made suicide attempts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular epidemiology of Shigella flexneri in a long-stay psychiatric nursing center during 2001 to 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Ching; Ko, Ching-Fen; Lu, Cheng-Hsiung; Tseng, Yi-Hsiung

    2005-03-01

    With six separate wards accommodating more than 1,600 patients, V Nursing Center (VNC) is a long-stay psychiatric nursing center in eastern Taiwan. During 2001 to 2003, 39 shigellosis cases occurred in VNC. Different from the notion that most cases of shigellosis are caused by Shigella sonnei, all except one of these cases were caused by S. flexneri, with the remaining one caused by an S. sonnei isolate. O-antigen serotyping showed that the 38 S. flexneri strains were of either type 1a (n = 20) or 4a (n = 18), two less prevalent serotypes in Taiwan. NotI-based pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses performed with 8 type 1a non-VNC strains and 9 type 4a non-VNC strains isolated from 1996 to 2003 for comparison divided the 28 type 1a strains and the 27 type 4a strains into 7 and 10 subtypes, designated subtypes P1A to P1G and subtypes P4A to P4J, respectively. Subtypes P1A and P4A, which appeared in three consecutive years in VNC as well as outside of VNC, are the most prevalent subtypes. Analyses of the relatedness of the VNC strains on the basis of the banding patterns grouped the type 1a and 4a strains into four and five clusters, respectively. All except one of the type 1a strains had 95% similarity, indicating that they had a common parent, whereas the type 4a strains had similarities that ranged from 77 to 93%, suggesting that they were of diverse origins. In two of the outbreaks, less related subtypes of the type 4a strains were found in the same VNC wards in consecutive years, suggesting the possible existence of different subtypes in VNC all the time. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed that all except one of the S. flexneri strains were sensitive to at least seven antibiotics; the remaining isolate was sensitive to three antibiotics. The data from the latter tests should be helpful for selection of proper treatments for S. flexneri infections in Taiwan.

  13. Depression and coronary heart disease: recommendations for screening, referral, and treatment: a science advisory from the American Heart Association Prevention Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing, Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Epidemiology and Prevention, and Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research: endorsed by the American Psychiatric Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Judith H; Bigger, J Thomas; Blumenthal, James A; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Kaufmann, Peter G; Lespérance, François; Mark, Daniel B; Sheps, David S; Taylor, C Barr; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2008-10-21

    Depression is commonly present in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and is independently associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Screening tests for depressive symptoms should be applied to identify patients who may require further assessment and treatment. This multispecialty consensus document reviews the evidence linking depression with CHD and provides recommendations for healthcare providers for the assessment, referral, and treatment of depression.

  14. Attitudes towards people with mental illness among psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, involved family members and the general population in a large city in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bin; Fan, Ni; Nie, Sha; Zhang, Minglin; Huang, Xini; He, Hongbo; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Stigma towards people with mental illness is believed to be widespread in low and middle income countries. This study assessed the attitudes towards people with mental illness among psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, involved family members of patients in a psychiatric facility and the general public using a standard 43-item survey (N = 535). Exploratory factor analysis identified four distinctive attitudes which were then compared using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) among the four groups, all with ties to the largest psychiatric facility in Guangzhou, China, adjusting for sociodemographic differences. Four uncorrelated factors expressed preferences for 1) community-based treatment, social integration and a biopsychosocial model of causation, 2) direct personal relationships with people with mental illness, 3) a lack of fear and positive views of personal interactions with people with mental illness, 4) disbelief in superstitious explanations of mental illness. Statistically significant differences favored community-based treatment and biopsychosocial causation (factor 1) among professional groups (psychiatrists and nurses) as compared with family members and the general public (p problems of their relatives and support in their care.

  15. A novel 3q29 deletion associated with autism, intellectual disability, psychiatric disorders, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biamino, Elisa; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Belligni, Elga Fabia; Keller, Roberto; Riberi, Evelise; Gandione, Marina; Calcia, Alessandro; Mancini, Cecilia; Giorgio, Elisa; Cavalieri, Simona; Pappi, Patrizia; Talarico, Flavia; Fea, Antonio M; De Rubeis, Silvia; Cirillo Silengo, Margherita; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Brusco, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has been associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including intellectual disability/developmental delay (ID/DD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). Often, individuals carrying the same pathogenic CNV display high clinical variability. By array-CGH analysis, we identified a novel familial 3q29 deletion (1.36 Mb), centromeric to the 3q29 deletion region, which manifests with variable expressivity. The deletion was identified in a 3-year-old girl diagnosed with ID/DD and autism and segregated in six family members, all affected by severe psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, major depression, anxiety disorder, and personality disorder. All individuals carrying the deletion were overweight or obese, and anomalies compatible with optic atrophy were observed in three out of four cases examined. Amongst the 10 genes encompassed by the deletion, the haploinsufficiency of Optic Atrophy 1 (OPA1), associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy, is likely responsible for the ophthalmological anomalies. We hypothesize that the haploinsufficiency of ATPase type 13A4 (ATP13A4) and/or Hairy/Enhancer of Split Drosophila homolog 1 (HES1) contribute to the neuropsychiatric phenotype, while HES1 deletion might underlie the overweight/obesity. In conclusion, we propose a novel contiguous gene syndrome due to a proximal 3q29 deletion variably associated with autism, ID/DD, psychiatric traits and overweight/obesity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The Effect of the Psychiatric Nursing Approach Based on the Tidal Model on Coping and Self-esteem in People with Alcohol Dependency: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaşan, Ayşegül; Çam, Olcay

    2017-06-01

    People with alcohol dependency have lower self-esteem than controls and when their alcohol use increases, their self-esteem decreases. Coping skills in alcohol related issues are predicted to reduce vulnerability to relapse. It is important to adapt care to individual needs so as to prevent a return to the cycle of alcohol use. The Tidal Model focuses on providing support and services to people who need to live a constructive life. The aim of the randomized study was to determine the effect of the psychiatric nursing approach based on the Tidal Model on coping and self-esteem in people with alcohol dependency. The study was semi-experimental in design with a control group, and was conducted on 36 individuals (18 experimental, 18 control). An experimental and a control group were formed by assigning persons to each group using the stratified randomization technique in the order in which they were admitted to hospital. The Coping Inventory (COPE) and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (CSEI) were used as measurement instruments. The measurement instruments were applied before the application and three months after the application. In addition to routine treatment and follow-up, the psychiatric nursing approach based on the Tidal Model was applied to the experimental group in the One-to-One Sessions. The psychiatric nursing approach based on the Tidal Model is an approach which is effective in increasing the scores of people with alcohol dependency in positive reinterpretation and growth, active coping, restraint, emotional social support and planning and reducing their scores in behavioral disengagement. It was seen that self-esteem rose, but the difference from the control group did not reach significance. The psychiatric nursing approach based on the Tidal Model has an effect on people with alcohol dependency in maintaining their abstinence. The results of the study may provide practices on a theoretical basis for improving coping behaviors and self-esteem and

  17. Strategies for Improving Nursing Students' Mental Health Clinical Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroning, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness is a huge problem many people face in the U.S. and around the world. The American Psychiatric Nurses Association indicates there is a shortage of nurses in every level and role in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Raising up a generation of nurses who want to work with the mentally ill is a challenge for nurse educators. The use of role playing and simulation in the learning lab prior to entering the clinical setting and reflective journaling in the clinical rotation can improve undergraduate nursing students' mental health clinical experience.

  18. Survey of factors associated with nurses' perception of patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun A; Lee, Sui Jin; Choi, Go Un

    2011-01-01

    To describe the nurses' perception of hospital organization related to cultural issues on the safety of the patient and reporting medical errors. In addition, to identify factors associated with the safety of the patient and the nurse. A survey conducted during December 2008-Jannuary 2009, with 126 nurses using the Korean version of the AHRQ patient safety survey, a self-report 5-point Likert scale. Stata 10.0 was used for descriptive analysis, ANOVA (Analysis of variance) and logistic regression. National Cancer Center in Korea. The means for a working environment related to patient safety was 3.4 (±0.62). The associated factors of duration were at a present hospital, a special area, and direct contact with patients. Among organizational culture factors related to patient safety, the means were 3.81(±0.54) for the boss/manager's perception of patient safety and 3.37(±0.49) for the cooperation/collaboration between units. The frequent number of errors reported by nurses were 1~2(22.2%) times over the past 12 months. For incidence reporting, the items that the 'nurses perceived for communication among clinicians as fair' had a means of 3.23(±0.40) and the 'overall evaluation of patient safety was a good' 3.34(±0.73). The nurses' perception of cooperation and collaboration between units were associated with the direct contact between the patient and the nurse. The frequency of incidence reporting was associated with the duration of working hours at the present hospital and also their work experience. The nurses' perception of hospital environment, organizational culture, and incidence reporting was above average and mostly associated with organizational culture.

  19. Situational Factors Associated With Burnout Among Emergency Department Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Jose Andres; Olson, DaiWai M; Thu, Hlaing Sue; Stutzman, Sonja E

    2017-06-01

    Emergency departments are high-stress environments for patients and clinicians. As part of the clinical team, nurses experience this stress daily and are subject to high levels of burnout, which has been shown to lead to hypertension, depression, and anxiety. Presence of these diseases may also contribute to burnout, creating a cycle of stress and illness. This prospective qualitative study used a phenomenological approach to better understand factors associated with burnout among emergency department nurses. Burnout manifests itself in multiple modes, can affect nurses' decisions to leave the profession, and must be addressed to mitigate the phenomenon.

  20. Association between Nurses' Education about Research and Their Research Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, Lynn; Brown, G. Ted

    2003-01-01

    Responses from 178 of 528 pediatric nurses showed that higher education levels or courses in research design and use were associated with positive attitudes toward research. Higher education levels were associated with self-reported research use; completing research-related courses was not independently associated with higher research use.…

  1. Randomized Clinical Trial of the Effectiveness of a Home-Based Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurse Intervention: Outcomes for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Wu, Evan; Kelly, Deena; Aiken, Linda H.; Blank, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with serious mental illness have greater risk for contracting HIV, multiple morbidities, and die 25 years younger than the general population. This high need and high cost subgroup face unique barriers to accessing required health care in the current health care system. The effectiveness of an advanced practice nurse model of care management was assessed in a four-year random controlled trial. Results are reported in this paper. In a four-year random controlled trial, a total of 238 community-dwelling individuals with HIV and serious mental illness (SMI) were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n=128) or to a control group (n=110). Over 12 months, the intervention group received care management from advanced practice psychiatric nurse, and the control group received usual care. The intervention group showed significant improvement in depression (P=.012) and the physical component of health-related quality of life (P=.03) from baseline to 12 months. The advanced practice psychiatric nurse intervention is a model of care that holds promise for a higher quality of care and outcomes for this vulnerable population. PMID:21935499

  2. Model for investigating the benefits of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2011-01-01

    with the effectiveness of clinical supervision, as measured by the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS). Furthermore, MCSS scores were associated with benefits, such as increased job satisfaction, vitality, rational coping and less stress, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization. Multivariate analyses......The objective of this study was to test a model for analysing the possible benefits of clinical supervision. The model suggested a pathway from participation to effectiveness to benefits of clinical supervision, and included possible influences of individual and workplace factors. The study sample...

  3. The association between psychiatric disorders and work-related problems among subway drivers in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Eun; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul; Park, Jong-Ik; Lee, Hae Woo; Lee, Jongin; Byun, Junsu; Yim, Hyeon Woo

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to find the prevalence and occupational risk factors for major psychiatric disorders among subway drivers in South Korea. Of all 998 current subway drivers, 995 participated in this study. The Korean version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (K-CIDI 2.1) was administered by trained interviewers to diagnose psychiatric disorders in all participants. The questions on socio-demographic characteristics and working conditions included some questions related to a person under train (PUT) experience and work-related problems. One-year prevalence and lifetime prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and panic disorder were diagnosed through the interview. The standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) of these three disorders were calculated in the sample of subway drivers using the 2011 Korean National Epidemiologic Survey data as a basis. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to determine the association between work-related factors and the prevalence of the psychiatric disorders. The standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) for a 1-year prevalence of MDD and PTSD among subway drivers were 1.1 (95% CI 0.7-1.7) and 5.6 (95% CI 3.1-8.8), respectively. Conflict with passengers was significantly associated with an increased risk for both MDD and PTSD in 1-year and in lifetime prevalence. Experiencing a sudden stop due to an emergency bell increased the risk of the lifetime prevalence of MDD (OR 2.61, 95% CI 1.14-6.97) and PTSD (OR 7.53, 95% CI 1.77-32.02). The risk of PTSD significantly increased among drivers who once experienced a near accident in terms of both the 1-year prevalence (OR 8.81, 95% CI 1.96-39.3) and the lifetime prevalence (OR 6.36, 95% CI 2.40-16.90). PTSD and panic disorder were more prevalent among subway drivers than in the general population. We found that having a conflict with passengers, a near accident, and a breakdown while driving can be risk factors for psychiatric

  4. Psychosocial and Psychiatric Factors Associated with Adolescent Suicide: A Case-Control Psychological Autopsy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portzky, Gwendolyn; Audenaert, Kurt; van Heeringen, Kees

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of psychosocial and psychiatric risk factors of adolescent suicide by means of a case-control psychological autopsy study. Relatives and other informants of 19 suicide victims and 19 matched psychiatric controls were interviewed by means of a semi-structured interview schedule. Psychiatric controls included…

  5. Headache complaints associated with psychiatric comorbidity in a population-based sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benseñor I.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency at which people complain of any type of headache, and its relationship with sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in São Paulo, Brazil. A three-step cluster sampling method was used to select 1,464 subjects aged 18 years or older. They were mainly from families of middle and upper socioeconomic levels living in the catchment area of Instituto de Psiquiatria. However, this area also contains some slums and shantytowns. The subjects were interviewed using the Brazilian version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 1.1. (CIDI 1.1 by a lay trained interviewer. Answers to CIDI 1.1 questions allowed us to classify people according to their psychiatric condition and their headaches based on their own ideas about the nature of their illness. The lifetime prevalence of "a lot of problems with" headache was 37.4% (76.2% of which were attributed to use of medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, and 23.8% attributed to nervousness, tension or mental illness. The odds ratio (OR for headache among participants with "nervousness, tension or mental illness" was elevated for depressive episodes (OR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.4, dysthymia (OR, 3.4; 95%CI, 1.6-7.4 and generalized anxiety disorder (OR, 4.3; 95%CI, 2.1-8.6, when compared with patients without headache. For "a lot of problems with" headaches attributed to medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, the risk was also increased for dysthymia but not for generalized anxiety disorder. These data show a high association between headache and chronic psychiatric disorders in this Brazilian population sample.

  6. Association between work ability and fatigue in Brazilian nursing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fabio José; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres; Martinez, Maria Carmen; Mininel, Vivian Aline; Ratier, Ana Paula Pelegrini

    2015-01-01

    Impaired work ability is associated with work-related illnesses, early retirement and rising pension costs. To investigate the association between work ability and fatigue in nursing workers. Cross-sectional study conducted with 100 nursing workers from two inpatient units at a public teaching hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The data were collected by means of a socio-demographic profile questionnaire, Work Ability Index (WAI) and Chalder Fatigue Scale. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive and analytical statistical methods, tests of association and multiple linear regression. The study population was mainly composed of women (88% ), exhibited a high educational level (76% ), average age 39.4 years old (SD = 9.5) and 15 years of professional experience, on average. The average score on WAI was good (39.4 points, SD = 6.0) but surprisingly, 35% of the participants exhibited moderate to poor work ability. Fatigue was found in 52% of the participants. The score on WAI decreased in association with fatigue (p work in the same workplace (p = 0.001), as well as among nursing technicians compared to nurses (p = 0.040). Fatigue, longer length of work in the same workplace and work category nursing technician were associated with decreased work ability, which emphasizes the need for investment in health and quality of work life.

  7. Using evidence-integrated e-learning to enhance case management continuing education for psychiatric nurses: a randomised controlled trial with follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-I; Rong, Jiin-Ru; Liu, Chieh-Yu

    2014-11-01

    E-learning is a flexible strategy to improve nurses' knowledge of case management, but there are methodological limitations in previous research into the effectiveness of such programs. To describe the development and effectiveness of an evidence-integrated e-learning program in case management continuing education for Taiwanese psychiatric nurses. Multiple methods were adopted to develop the program and a randomised controlled trial with repeated measures was employed to evaluate it. The e-learning program was developed in four stages: (1) systematic review of literature; (2) needs assessment through a national survey and focus group; (3) development of learning materials; and (4) pilot test. Following program development, psychiatric nurses were recruited and randomly allocated into an experimental or comparison group. The experimental group participated in an e-learning continuing education program. The case management knowledge index with sufficient reliability and validity and a satisfaction survey were used to determine the outcomes. A generalised estimating equation was used to assess the difference between the 2 groups before, after, and at 3 months follow-up. The learning material comprised 5 simulated learning modules, self-assessment questions, learning cases, sharing experiences, and learning resources. A total of 200 participants completed the 3 measurements. Knowledge scores in the experimental group significantly exceeded those in the comparison group after the program and at the 3-month follow-up. Participants reported positive learning perceptions. The program provides an evidence-based educational resource for nursing continuing education in case management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Medicaid Reimbursement for School Nursing Services: A Position Paper of the National Association of State School Nurse Consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This statement of the National Association of State School Nurse Consultants lists those school nursing services and procedures the organization believes should be reimbursable by Medicaid to school districts. Identified services are in the areas of case finding, nursing care procedures, care coordination, patient/student counseling, and emergency…

  9. Transition from High School to Associate Degree Nursing Education: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathy Jessee

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is facing a critical shortage and retention of nursing students is of paramount importance. Much research has been completed related to retention in nursing education and student success, but there is very little in current literature related to issues associated with the transition from high school to associate degree nursing (ADN)…

  10. Nursing Associated Medication Errors: Are Internationally Educated Nurses Different from U.S. Educated Nurses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay J. Shen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors can be detrimental to patient safety and contribute to additional costs in healthcare. The United States has seen a steady increase in internationally-educated nurses (IENs entering the nursing workforce. The current study builds upon the existing research examining the relationship between IENs and medication errors by controlling for confounding factors and testing whether IENs were more likely to make multiple medication errors compared to USENs. This study was a quasi-case control study. The 2006 and 2010 medication error incident data from hospital risk management departments were used. The final sample was 1,773, representing 788 registered nurse in the case group and 985 registered nurses in the control group. Multivariable analyses were conducted to examine single medication error, multiple errors, and consequence of medication errors, in comparing the IENs to USENs. IENs tended to have multiple errors more often than USENs in 2006 (31.7% for IENs and 20.5% for USENs, p = 0.03, but these differences became marginally significant after combining both years of data and completing the multivariable models adjusting for covariates (Odds ratio = 1.38, p = 0.06. No significant differences in making a single error and medication error consequences were observed between IENs and USENs. Although no significant differences between IENs and USENs in having medication error incidents were observed, IENs might be more likely to have multiple medication error incidents in a year compared to USENs. Policies that encourage targeted orientation addressing implicit belief systems about the nursing role and explains patient safety expectations as well as procedures for medication administration may be beneficial for IENs. Supportive leadership that is culturally competent, ensures ongoing continuing education in pharmacology, and provides culturally appropriate incentives for self-reporting medication errors are important.

  11. The Psychiatric Patient as a Health Resource Consumer: Costs Associated with Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva-Sevilla, Carmen; Gonzalez-Moral, Maria Luisa; Tolosa-Perez, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical practice protocols should consider both the psychological criteria related to a patient’s satisfaction as a consumer of health services and the economic criteria to allocate resources efficiently. An electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) program was implemented in our hospital to treat psychiatric patients. The main objective of this study was to determine the cost associated with the ECT sessions implemented in our hospital between 2008 and 2014. A secondary objective was to calculate the cost of sessions that were considered ineffective, defined as those sessions in which electrical convulsion did not reach the preset threshold duration, in order to identify possible ways of saving money and improving satisfaction among psychiatric patients receiving ECT. Methods: A descriptive analysis of the direct health costs related to ECT from the perspective of the public health system between 2008 and 2014 was performed using a retrospective chart review. All of the costs are in euros (2011) and were discounted at a rate of 3%. Based on the base case, a sensitivity analysis of the changes of those variables showing the greatest uncertainty was performed. Results: Seventy-six patients received 853 sessions of ECT. The cumulative cost of these sessions was €1409528.63, and 92.9% of this cost corresponded to the hospital stay. A total of €420732.57 (29.8%) was inefficiently spent on 269 ineffective sessions. A sensitivity analysis of the economic data showed stable results to changes in the variables of uncertainty. Conclusion: The efficiency of ECT in the context outlined here could be increased by discerning a way to shorten the associated hospital stay and by reducing the number of ineffective sessions performed. PMID:27303347

  12. Evaluation of factors associated with psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamisawa, Atsumi; Narumoto, Jin; Yokota, Isao; Fukui, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Patient dropout from treatment can lead to a deterioration in clinical condition, thereby increasing the need for more intensive therapy that incurs substantial social and economic losses. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan. We retrospectively examined the medical charts of new psychiatric patients who were diagnosed with either a mood disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, code: F3) or an anxiety disorder (F4) in the outpatient clinic at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Hospital in Kyoto, Japan, between April 2010 and March 2013. The baseline characteristics of the patients (age, sex, Global Assessment of Functioning score, Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness score, education, occupation, marital status, duration of treatment, and prior treatment history), treating psychiatrist experience in years, and sex concordance between the patients and their treating psychiatrists were analyzed using Cox regression models. From among 1,626 eligible new patients during the study period, 532 patients were enrolled in the study (F3: n=176; F4: n=356). The dropout rate was 35.7%, which was similar to that of previous studies. Higher educational level, being married, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores were associated with a lower dropout rate. Although psychiatrist experience was not significantly associated with patient dropout in the multivariate analysis, patients treated by less experienced psychiatrists had a higher hazard ratio for dropout (1.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.94-1.85). In order to reduce the dropout rate, special focus should be placed on patients with the factors identified in this study, and young psychiatrists should undergo further education to foster adherence.

  13. Position statement. The right to accept or reject an assignment. American Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The American Nurses Association (ANA) believes that nurses should reject assignment that puts patients or themselves in serious, immediate jeopardy. ANA supports the nurses obligation to reject an assignment in these situations even where there is not a specific legal protection for rejecting such an assignment. The professional obligations to the nurse to safeguard clients are grounded in the ethical norms of the profession, the Standards of Clinical Nursing Practice and state nurse practice acts.

  14. Age is associated with latent tuberculosis in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naesinee Chaiear

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate risk factors for developing latent tuberculosis (LTB in Thai nurses. Methods: A comparison study was conducted at Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand. Clinical factors were compared between persons with tuberculin conversion and those without tuberculin conversion identified by tuberculin skin test. Results: There were 173 eligible persons with the LTB (34.7%. There were five workplaces where participants worked regularly including the general ward, surgical ward, pediatric ward, medical ward and critical care ward. In a multivariate model, two factors were significantly associated with LTB including age and history of tuberculosis in colleagues. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval of both variables were 1.056 (1.004–1.104 and 0.202 (0.044– 0.941. Conclusions: Older age is associated with latent tuberculosis in nurses. LTB should be screened routinely and treated if diagnosed for nurses.

  15. Ventilator-associated pneumonia: clinical significance and implications for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grap, M J; Munro, C L

    1997-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second most common nosocomial infection in the United States and the leading cause of death from nosocomial infections. Intubation and mechanical ventilation greatly increase the risk of bacterial pneumonia. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) occurs in a patient treated with mechanical ventilation, and it is neither present nor developing at the time of intubation; it is a serious problem--with significant morbidity and mortality rates. Aspiration of bacteria from the oropharynx, leakage of contaminated secretions around the endotracheal tube, patient position, and cross-contamination from respiratory equipment and health care providers are important factors in the development of VAP. Nurses caring for patients treated with mechanical ventilation must recognize risk factors and include strategies for reducing these factors as part of their nursing care. This article summarizes the literature related to VAP: its incidence, associated factors, diagnosis, and current therapies, with an emphasis on nursing implications in the care of these patients.

  16. Nurse uniform wearing practices and associated factors among nurses working in Northwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional institution based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desta, Etaferahu Alamaw; Gebrie, Mignote Hailu; Dachew, Berihun Assefa

    2015-01-01

    Wearing uniforms help in the formation of professional identity in healthcare. It fosters a strong self image and professional identity which can lead to good confidence and better performance in nursing practice. However, most nurses in Ethiopia are not wearing nursing uniforms and the reasons remain unclear. Therefore, the aim of this research is to assess nurse uniform wearing practices among nurses and factors associated with such practice in hospitals in Northwest Ethiopia. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to April, 2014 in five hospitals located in Northwest Ethiopia. A total 459 nurses participated in the study. Data was collected using a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were analyzed in order to characterize the study population. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression models were fitted. Odds ratios with 95 % confidence intervals were computed to identify factors associated with nursing uniform practice. Nurse uniform wearing practice was found to be 49.2 % of the total sample size. Around 35 % of the respondents that did not implement nurse uniform wearing practices stated that there was no specific uniform for nurses recommended by hospital management. In addition to this, nurse uniform wearing practices were positively associated with being female [AOR = 1.58, 95 % CI (1.02, 2.44)], studying nursing by choice [AOR =3.16, 95 % CI (2.03, 4.92)], and the appeal of nursing uniforms to nurses [AOR = 3.43 95 % CI (1.96, 5.98)]. Nurse uniform wearing practices were not exceptionally prevalent in Northwest Ethiopian hospitals. However, encouraging students to pursue interest-based careers and implementing a nurse uniform wearing policy may have the potential to improve such practices.

  17. Association between workaholism and sleep problems among hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Kazumi; Shimazu, Akihito; Kawakami, Norito; Takahashi, Masaya; Nakata, Akinori; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the association between workaholism, the tendency to work excessively hard in a compulsive fashion, and sleep problems among Japanese nurses. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 600 nurses from 2 university hospitals in Japan using a self-reported questionnaire on workaholism, sleep, job-related variables (i.e., job demands, job control, and worksite support), and demographic variables. A total of 394 nurses returned the questionnaire (response rate=65.7%) and complete data from 312 female nurses were used for analyses (final coverage rate=52.0%). Workaholics, as measured using the Japanese version of the Dutch Workaholism Scale, were defined as those having high scores on both the "work excessively" and "work compulsively" subscales. Logistic regression analyses revealed that workaholics had higher risks for sleep problems in terms of subjective sleep insufficiency, excessive daytime sleepiness at work, difficulty awakening in the morning, and feeling tired when waking up in the morning (odds ratios [OR] of 4.40, 3.18, 3.48, and 4.61, respectively, p<0.05). These remained significant even after adjusting for demographic and job-related variables (OR 3.41, 5.36, 2.56, and 2.77, respectively). However, no significant associations were found between workaholism and insomnia symptoms. These results suggest that workaholic nurses had higher risks for impaired awakening, insufficient sleep, and workplace sleepiness.

  18. Neuropsychological Impairment and Its Association with Violence Risk in Japanese Forensic Psychiatric Patients: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishinaka, Hirofumi; Nakane, Jun; Nagata, Takako; Imai, Atsushi; Kuroki, Noriomi; Sakikawa, Noriko; Omori, Mayu; Kuroda, Osamu; Hirabayashi, Naotsugu; Igarashi, Yoshito; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the legislation directing treatment of offenders with psychiatric disorders was enacted in 2005. Neuropsychological impairment is highly related to functional outcomes in patients with psychiatric disorders, and several studies have suggested an association between neuropsychological impairment and violent behaviors. However, there have been no studies of neuropsychological impairment in forensic patients covered by the Japanese legislation. This study is designed to examine the neuropsychological characteristics of forensic patients in comparison to healthy controls and to assess the relationship between neuropsychological impairment and violence risk. Seventy-one forensic patients with psychiatric disorders and 54 healthy controls (matched by age, gender, and education) were enrolled. The CogState Battery (CSB) consisting of eight cognitive domains, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to test emotion-based decision making, and psychological measures of violence risk including psychopathy were used. Forensic patients exhibited poorer performances on all CSB subtests and the IGT than controls. For each group, partial correlational analyses indicated that poor IGT performance was related to psychopathy, especially antisocial behavior. In forensic patients, the CSB composite score was associated with risk factors for future violent behavior, including stress and noncompliance with remediation attempts. Forensic patients with psychiatric disorders exhibit a wide range of neuropsychological impairments, and these findings suggest that neuropsychological impairment may increase the risk of violent behavior. Therefore, the treatment of neuropsychological impairment in forensic patients with psychiatric disorders is necessary to improve functional outcomes as well as to prevent violence.

  19. Neuropsychological Impairment and Its Association with Violence Risk in Japanese Forensic Psychiatric Patients: A Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Nishinaka

    Full Text Available In Japan, the legislation directing treatment of offenders with psychiatric disorders was enacted in 2005. Neuropsychological impairment is highly related to functional outcomes in patients with psychiatric disorders, and several studies have suggested an association between neuropsychological impairment and violent behaviors. However, there have been no studies of neuropsychological impairment in forensic patients covered by the Japanese legislation. This study is designed to examine the neuropsychological characteristics of forensic patients in comparison to healthy controls and to assess the relationship between neuropsychological impairment and violence risk.Seventy-one forensic patients with psychiatric disorders and 54 healthy controls (matched by age, gender, and education were enrolled. The CogState Battery (CSB consisting of eight cognitive domains, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT to test emotion-based decision making, and psychological measures of violence risk including psychopathy were used.Forensic patients exhibited poorer performances on all CSB subtests and the IGT than controls. For each group, partial correlational analyses indicated that poor IGT performance was related to psychopathy, especially antisocial behavior. In forensic patients, the CSB composite score was associated with risk factors for future violent behavior, including stress and noncompliance with remediation attempts.Forensic patients with psychiatric disorders exhibit a wide range of neuropsychological impairments, and these findings suggest that neuropsychological impairment may increase the risk of violent behavior. Therefore, the treatment of neuropsychological impairment in forensic patients with psychiatric disorders is necessary to improve functional outcomes as well as to prevent violence.

  20. Understanding Jordanian Psychiatric Nurses’ Smoking Behaviors: A Grounded Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaldoun M. Aldiabat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Smoking is prevalent in psychiatric facilities among staff and patients. However, there have been few studies of how contextual factors in specific cultures influence rates of smoking and the health promotion role of psychiatric nurses. This paper reports the findings of a classical grounded theory study conducted to understand how contextual factors in the workplace influences the smoking behaviors of Jordanian psychiatric nurses (JPNs. Method. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with a sample of eight male JPNs smokers at a psychiatric facility in Amman, Jordan. Findings. Constant comparative analysis identified becoming a heavy smoker as a psychosocial process characterized by four sub-categories: normalization of smoking; living in ambiguity; experiencing workplace conflict; and, facing up to workplace stressors. Conclusion. Specific contextual workplace factors require targeted smoking cessation interventions if JPNs are to receive the help they need to reduce health risks associated with heavy smoking.

  1. Development of the TabacoQuest app for computerization of data collection on smoking in psychiatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Renata Marques de; Duarte, Alexandre Freitas; Alves, Domingos; Furegato, Antonia Regina Ferreira

    2016-08-29

    to develop a mobile app for research on the use of tobacco among psychiatric patients and the general population. applied research with the technological development of an app for data collection on an Android tablet. For its development, we considered three criteria: data security, benefits for participants and optimization of the time of researchers. We performed tests with twenty fictitious participants and a final test with six pilots. the app collects data, stores them in the database of the tablet and export then to an Excel spreadsheet. calculator, stopwatch, offline operation, branching logic, field validation and automatic tabulation. the app prevents human error, increases the quality of the data by validating them during the interview, allows the performing of automatic tabulation and makes the interviews less tiring. Its success may encourage the use of this and other computational resources by nurses as a research tool. desenvolver aplicativo mobile para pesquisa sobre o uso de tabaco entre pacientes psiquiátricos e a população geral. pesquisa aplicada com o desenvolvimento tecnológico de um aplicativo para coleta de dados em tablet Android. Para seu desenvolvimento, consideraram-se três critérios: segurança dos dados, benefícios para os participantes e otimização do tempo dos pesquisadores. Testes com 20 participantes fictícios e teste final com seis pilotos. o aplicativo coleta os dados, armazena-os no banco de dados do tablet e os exporta para planilha Excel. Recursos: calculadora; cronômetro; funcionamento off-line, lógica de ramificação, validação de campos e tabulação automática. o aplicativo previne erros humanos e aumenta a qualidade dos dados ao validá-los durante a entrevista, permite realizar tabulação automática e torna as entrevistas menos cansativas. Seu sucesso poderá incentivar o uso desse e outros recursos computacionais pelos enfermeiros, como ferramenta de pesquisa. desarrollar aplicativo móvil para hacer

  2. Internalized stigma among psychiatric outpatients: Associations with quality of life, functioning, hope and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Louisa; Pang, Shirlene; Lau, Ying Wen; Jeyagurunathan, Anitha; Satghare, Pratika; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Lim, Susan; Poh, Chee Lien; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2016-12-30

    This study aimed to: (i) determine the prevalence, socio-demographic and clinical correlates of internalized stigma and (ii) explore the association between internalized stigma and quality of life, general functioning, hope and self-esteem, among a multi-ethnic Asian population of patients with mental disorders. This cross-sectional, survey recruited adult patients (n=280) who were seeking treatment at outpatient and affiliated clinics of the only tertiary psychiatric hospital in Singapore. Internalized stigma was measured using the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale. 43.6% experienced moderate to high internalized stigma. After making adjustments in multiple logistic regression analysis, results revealed there were no significant socio-demographic or clinical correlates relating to internalized stigma. Individual logistic regression models found a negative relationship between quality of life, self-esteem, general functioning and internalized stigma whereby lower scores were associated with higher internalized stigma. In the final regression model, which included all psychosocial variables together, self-esteem was the only variable significantly and negatively associated with internalized stigma. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of the role internalized stigma plays in patients with mental illness, and the impact it can have on psychosocial aspects of their lives. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Trends in suicide risk associated with hospitalized psychiatric illness: a case-control study based on danish longitudinal registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ping; Nordentoft, Merete; Hansen Høyer, Eyd

    2006-01-01

    longitudinal registers. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: This study shows that the reduction in suicide rate is generally faster among individuals with a history of psychiatric admission than among individuals without such a history. However, this substantial reduction...... at the time of suicide or the index date, the reduction in suicide rate is relatively slower. Such trends hold for all diagnostic groups. Further analyses stratified by age indicate that the faster reduction in suicide rate associated with history of hospitalized psychiatric illness is more pronounced among...

  4. Becoming a psychiatric/mental health nurse in the UK: a qualitative study exploring processes of identity formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, John; Lakeman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Identity studies are well established across the social science literature with mental health nursing beginning to offer evidenced insights into what may, or may not, constitute key identity performances. For mental health nursing these performances remain contested, both from within the profession and from international contexts that favour generic constructions of mental health. This paper offers findings from a qualitative study that focused upon the process of how mental health nursing identity development is influenced, rather than what that identity may or may not be. These findings highlight that mental health nurses (MHNs) not only form their identity around service user centred education and training, but that many also use the education as a means to leave the profession. Through highlighting the impact of informal education (i.e., through work), formal education, and training upon the formation of mental health nursing identity, nurses are potentially alerted to the importance of clinically focussed mental health being prominent within curricula, rewarding mental health nursing skills specialisation, and the importance of the role of the service user in mental health nurse education and, hence, identity formation.

  5. Associations and Costs of Parental Symptoms of Psychiatric Distress in a Multi-Diagnosis Group of Children with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, S.; Paul, L.; Loney, P.; Ye, C.; Wong, M.; Browne, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Families supporting children with complex needs are significantly more distressed and economically disadvantaged than families of children without disability and delay. What is not known is the associations and costs of parental psychiatric distress within a multi-diagnosis group of special needs children. Methods: In this…

  6. The association between intelligence scores and family history of psychiatric disorder in schizophrenia patients, their siblings and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.; Derks, E.M.; Bruggeman, R.; Cahn, W.; de Haan, L.; Kahn, R.; Krabbendam, L.; Linzen, D.; Myin-Germeys, I.; van Os, J.; Wiersma, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background:The degree of intellectual impairment in schizophrenia patients and their relatives has been suggested to be associated with the degree of familial loading for schizophrenia. Since other psychiatric disorders are also more present in relatives of schizophrenia patients, the definition of

  7. The association between intelligence scores and family history of psychiatric disorder in schizophrenia patients, their siblings and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Kim H. W.; Derks, Eske M.; Kahn, René S.; Linszen, Don; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2013-01-01

    The degree of intellectual impairment in schizophrenia patients and their relatives has been suggested to be associated with the degree of familial loading for schizophrenia. Since other psychiatric disorders are also more present in relatives of schizophrenia patients, the definition of family

  8. Association of psychiatric co-morbidity and efficacy of treatment in chronic daily headache in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity in patients of chronic daily headache (CDH and compare the efficacy of treatment between various type of headache associated with psychiatric co-morbidity. Materials and Methods: Prospective case control cohort study, 92 consecutive patients of CDH meeting eligibility criteria. The diagnosis of various subtypes of CDH was made according to the IHS criteria. Age, sex, educational, marital and socioeconomic status, matched controls were also selected. Patients were evaluated with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI scale at the time of enrolment and at 3 months. Results: CDH accounted for 28% of all headache patients. The mean age of presentation was 30.2 ± 10.3 years, male: Female ratio of 28:64 and mean duration of 4.56 ± 0.56 years. Chronic migraine (CM accounted for 59 patients, chronic tension type headache (CTTH 22 patients, new daily persistent headache (NDPH 3 patients and miscellaneous 8 patients. Psychiatric co-morbidity was present in 53.3% patients with CDH, and was more common in CM (62.7% as compared to CTTH (36.4%. Single psychiatric co-morbidity was seen in 26 patients, while 23 patients had multiple co-morbidity. Major depressive episode, anxiety disorder, agoraphobia and dysthymia were significant psychiatric co-morbidities. Patients with CM were treated with topiramate or divalproex sodium ER and CTTH were treated with amitriptyline. 55 patients came for follow up at 3 months, improvement in headache was seen in 29 patients. Conclusion: Psychiatric co-morbidity was present in more than 50% patients with CDH and its presence along with a duration of ≥2 years was associated with a poor response to treatment.

  9. Sleep problems and suicide associated with mood instability in the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, 2007

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    McDonald, Keltie C; Saunders, Kate EA; Geddes, John R

    2018-01-01

    Objective Mood instability is common in the general population. Mood instability is a precursor to mental illness and associated with a range of negative health outcomes. Sleep disturbance appears to be closely linked with mood instability. This study assesses the association between mood instability and sleep disturbance and the link with suicidal ideation and behaviour in a general population sample in England. Method The Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey, 2007 collected detailed information about mental health symptoms and correlates in a representative sample of adult household residents living in England (n = 7303). Mood instability was assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-II. Sleep problems were defined as sleeping more than usual or less than usual during the past month. Other dependent variables included medication use and suicidal ideation and behaviour (response rate 57%). Generalized linear modelling was used to estimate the prevalence of mood instability and sleep problems. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. All estimates were weighted. Results The prevalence of mood instability was 14.7% (95% confidence interval [13.6%, 15.7%]). Sleep problems occurred in 69.8% (95% confidence interval: [66.6%, 73.1%]) of those with mood instability versus 37.6% (95% confidence interval: [36.2%, 39.1%]) of those without mood instability. The use of sedating and non-sedating medications did not influence the association. Sleep problems were significantly associated with suicidal ideation and behaviour even after adjusting for mood instability. Conclusion Sleep problems are highly prevalent in the general population, particularly among those with mood instability. Sleep problems are strongly associated with suicidal ideation and behaviour. Treatments that target risk and maintenance factors that transcend diagnostic boundaries, such as therapies that target sleep disturbance, may be particularly valuable for preventing and

  10. Emerging psychiatric syndromes associated with antivoltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies.

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    Prüss, Harald; Lennox, Belinda R

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies against the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) were first recognised as having a potential pathogenic role in disorders of the central nervous system in 2001, with VGKC antibodies described in patients with limbic encephalitis, and the subsequent seminal paper describing the clinical phenotype and immunotherapy treatment responsiveness in 13 patients with VGKC antibodies and limbic encephalitis in 2004. These initial case descriptions were of a progressive neuropsychiatric syndrome with abnormalities of mood, sleep and cognition recognised alongside the neurological symptoms of seizures and autonomic instability. The clinical syndromes associated with VGKC complex (VGKCC) antibodies have broadened considerably over the last 15 years, with multiple cases of more restricted 'formes fruste' presentations associated with VGKCC antibodies being described. However, the relevance of antibodies in these cases has remained controversial. The understanding of the pathogenic nature of VGKC antibodies has further advanced since 2010 with the discovery that VGKC antibodies are not usually antibodies against the VGKC subunits themselves, but instead to proteins that are complexed with the potassium channel, in particular leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated protein 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2). Antibodies against these proteins have been associated with particular, although overlapping, clinical phenotypes, each also including neuropsychiatric features. Our aim is to critically review the association between VGKCC, LGI1 and Caspr2 antibodies with isolated psychiatric presentations-with a focus on cognitive impairment, mood disorders and psychosis. We recommend that screening for VGKCC, LGI1 and Caspr2 antibodies be considered for those with neuropsychiatric presentations. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Police referrals at the psychiatric emergency service in Taiwan.

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    Wang, Jen-Pang; Wu, Chia-Yi; Chiu, Chih-Chiang; Yang, Tsu-Hui; Liu, Tzong-Hsien; Chou, Pesus

    2015-12-01

    The police are the frontline workers in crisis situations involving patients with severe mental illness and act as a primary referral source for psychiatric emergency services (PES) in the community. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution and characteristics of police referral among psychiatric patients in Taiwan. The study cohort consisted of patients who visited the PES of Taipei City Psychiatric Center from January 2009 to December 2010. The associations between the factors of demographics, clinical characteristics, and psychiatric service utilization and police referral were evaluated. Among the 7656 psychiatric emergency visits, 3029 (39.6%) were referred by the police. These patients referred by police were more likely to be male and aged between 30 to 49 years. Clinical factors related to police referrals including a higher triage assessment level, chief problems included violence, disturbance, substance use, less anxiety, and a diagnosis of unspecified psychosis. The triage assessment level and chief problems assessed by nurses were major predictors. These patients tended to be referred from the catchment area and during the nighttime shift, were discharged during the daytime shift, and stayed longer in the PES. Disposition arrangements such as discharge against medical advice and involuntary admission were also associated with police referrals. Patients referred by the police to the PES were those with more severe psychiatric problems and illnesses assessed by psychiatric nurses and psychiatrists. They tended to have more complex service utilization at the PES. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Psychiatric consultations and the management of associated comorbid medical conditions in a regional referral hospital

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    Nkokone S Z Tema

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Psychiatrists are often called upon to evaluate patients with a medical condition and psychiatric symptoms, either as a complication thereof or initial presenting symptoms. There are often grey areas with regard to neuropsychiatric disorders in which psychiatrists and specialists from other clinical disciplines would need to co-manage or share ideas on the comprehensive treatment of a presenting patient. Objectives. This study was undertaken to provide a demographic and clinical profile of all patients consulted by the consultation-liaison psychiatry (CLP service at the Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH in Johannesburg, and to describe the clinical management of patients admitted with a diagnosis of a mental disorder associated with a comorbid medical condition, including delirium, dementia and a mood or psychotic disorder due to a general medical condition. Methods. A retrospective record review of all patients referred to the HJH CLP team over a 6-month period. Results. A total of 884 routine and emergency consultations were done for 662 patients (males n=305; females n=357 between the ages of 13 and 90 years who were referred from various other clinical departments. The most common documented reason for referral was a request for assessment (n=182; 27.5%, which consisted of mental state assessment, reconsultation and assessing capacity. A total of 63 patients (10.0% of cases consulted were admitted to either the medical or psychiatric wards with a confirmed diagnosis of delirium, dementia and/or a mood or psychotic disorder due to a general medical condition (although admission wards were identified in 55 files only. The medical wards admitted the majority (n=37; 67.3% mostly for delirium (n=28; 50.9%. HIV was identified as the most common systemic aetiological factor (n=23; 67.7%. Conclusion. In this study, a female patient between 31 and 45 years of age was slightly more likely to be referred to the HJH CLP service for assessment, and

  13. Evaluation of factors associated with psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan

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    Minamisawa A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atsumi Minamisawa,1 Jin Narumoto,1 Isao Yokota,2 Kenji Fukui1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan Background: Patient dropout from treatment can lead to a deterioration in clinical condition, thereby increasing the need for more intensive therapy that incurs substantial social and economic losses. The aim of this study was to identify factors related to psychiatric patient dropout at a university outpatient clinic in Japan.Methods: We retrospectively examined the medical charts of new psychiatric patients who were diagnosed with either a mood disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, code: F3 or an anxiety disorder (F4 in the outpatient clinic at Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Hospital in Kyoto, Japan, between April 2010 and March 2013. The baseline characteristics of the patients (age, sex, Global Assessment of Functioning score, Clinical Global Impression–Severity of Illness score, education, occupation, marital status, duration of treatment, and prior treatment history, treating psychiatrist experience in years, and sex concordance between the patients and their treating psychiatrists were analyzed using Cox regression models.Results: From among 1,626 eligible new patients during the study period, 532 patients were enrolled in the study (F3: n=176; F4: n=356. The dropout rate was 35.7%, which was similar to that of previous studies. Higher educational level, being married, and lower Global Assessment of Functioning scores were associated with a lower dropout rate. Although psychiatrist experience was not significantly associated with patient dropout in the multivariate analysis, patients treated by less experienced psychiatrists had a higher hazard ratio for dropout (1.31; 95% confidence interval: 0.94–1.85.Conclusion: In order to reduce the dropout rate, special focus should be placed on

  14. Nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in psychiatric in-patient care: Patient and staff experiences.

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    Salberg, Johanna; Folke, Fredrik; Ekselius, Lisa; Öster, Caisa

    2018-02-15

    A promising intervention in mental health in-patient care is behavioural activation (BA). Interventions based on BA can be used by mental health nurses and other staff members. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' and staff members' experiences of a nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in mental health in-patient care. The intervention was implemented at three adult acute general mental health in-patient wards in a public hospital setting in Sweden. A self-administrated questionnaire, completed by 84 patients and 34 nurses and nurse assistants, was administered, and nonparametric data analysed using descriptive statistics. Our findings revealed that both patients and nursing staff ranked nursing care and care environment as important aspects in the recovery process. Patients and staff members reported overall positive experiences of the group sessions. Patients with higher frequencies of attendance and patients satisfied with overall care had a more positive attitude towards the intervention. A more positive experience of being a group leader was reported by staff members who had been leading groups more than ten times. The most common impeding factor during implementation, reported by staff members, was a negative attitude to change. Conducive factors were having support from a psychologist and the perception that patients were showing interest. These positive experiences reported by patients and nursing staff, combined with previous research in this field, are taking us one step further in evaluating group sessions based on BA as a meaningful nursing intervention in mental health in-patient care. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. The Gut-Brain Axis in Healthy Females: Lack of Significant Association between Microbial Composition and Diversity with Psychiatric Measures.

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    Susan C Kleiman

    Full Text Available This study examined associations between the composition and diversity of the intestinal microbiota and measures of depression, anxiety, eating disorder psychopathology, stress, and personality in a group of healthy adult females.Female participants (n = 91 ages 19-50 years with BMI 18.5-25 kg/m2 were recruited from central North Carolina between July 2014 and March 2015. Participants provided a single fecal sample and completed an online psychiatric questionnaire that included five measures: (i Beck Anxiety Inventory; (ii Beck Depression Inventory-II; (iii Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire; (iv Perceived Stress Scale; and (v Mini International Personality Item Pool. Bacterial composition and diversity were characterized by Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and associations were examined using Kendall's tau-b correlation coefficient, in conjunction with Benjamini and Hochberg's False Discovery Rate procedure.We found no significant associations between microbial markers of gut composition and diversity and scores on psychiatric measures of anxiety, depression, eating-related thoughts and behaviors, stress, or personality in a large cohort of healthy adult females.This study was the first specifically to examine associations between the intestinal microbiota and psychiatric measures in healthy females, and based on 16S rRNA taxonomic abundances and diversity measures, our results do not suggest a strong role for the enteric microbe-gut-brain axis in normal variation on responses to psychiatric measures in this population. However, the role of the intestinal microbiota in the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness may be limited to more severe psychopathology.

  16. Association of the Nurse Work Environment, Collective Efficacy, and Missed Care.

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    Smith, Jessica G; Morin, Karen H; Wallace, Leigh E; Lake, Eileen T

    2018-06-01

    Missed nursing care is a significant threat to quality patient care. Promoting collective efficacy within nurse work environments could decrease missed care. The purpose was to understand how missed care is associated with nurse work environments and collective efficacy of hospital staff nurses. A cross-sectional, convenience sample was obtained through online surveys from registered nurses working at five southwestern U.S. hospitals. Descriptive, correlational, regression, and path analyses were conducted ( N = 233). The percentage of nurses who reported that at least one care activity was missed frequently or always was 94%. Mouth care (36.0% of nurses) and ambulation (35.3%) were missed frequently or always. Nurse work environments and collective efficacy were moderately, positively correlated. Nurse work environments and collective efficacy were associated with less missed care (χ 2 = 10.714, p = .0054). Fostering collective efficacy in the nurse work environment could reduce missed care and improve patient outcomes.

  17. The association between daily concentrations of air pollution and visits to a psychiatric emergency unit: a case-crossover study.

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    Oudin, Anna; Åström, Daniel Oudin; Asplund, Peter; Steingrimsson, Steinn; Szabo, Zoltan; Carlsen, Hanne Krage

    2018-01-10

    Air pollution is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Experimental studies, and a few epidemiological studies, suggest that air pollution may cause acute exacerbation of psychiatric disorders, and even increase the rate of suicide attempts, but epidemiological studies on air pollution in association with psychiatric disorders are still few. Our aim was to investigate associations between daily fluctuations in air pollution concentrations and the daily number of visits to a psychiatric emergency unit. Data from Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden, on the daily number of visits to the Psychiatric emergency unit were combined with daily data on monitored concentrations of respirable particulate matter(PM 10 ), ozone(O 3 ), nitrogen dioxides(NO 2 ) and temperature between 1st July 2012 and 31st December 2016. We used a case-crossover design to analyze data with conditional Poisson regression models allowing for over-dispersion. We stratified data on season. Visits increased with increasing PM 10 levels during the warmer season (April to September) in both single-pollutant and two-pollutant models. For example, an increase of 3.6% (95% Confidence Interval, CI, 0.4-7.0%) was observed with a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM 10 adjusted for NO 2 . In the three-pollutant models (adjusting for NO 2 and O 3 simultaneously) the increase was 3.3% (95% CI, -0.2-6.9). There were no clear associations between the outcome and NO 2 , O 3 , or PM 10 during the colder season (October to March). Ambient air particle concentrations were associated with the number of visits to the Psychiatric emergency unit in the warm season. The results were only borderline statistically significant in the fully adjusted (three-pollutant) models in this small study. The observation could be interpreted as indicative of air pollution as either exacerbating an underlying psychiatric disorder, or increasing mental distress, even in areas with comparatively low levels of

  18. Perceptions of diagnostic labels in forensic psychiatric practice: a survey of differences between nurses and other disciplines.

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    Mason, Tom; Caulfield, Mike; Hall, Rebecca; Melling, Kat

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports on a study of nurses' and non-nurses' perceptions of labels of mental illness and personality disorder in forensic services in the UK. The objectives of the study were to establish if differences in perceptions existed within, and between, the two groups of professionals. The research method was a survey design with 1,200 questionnaires distributed to nurses and 300 to other professionals in disciplines on forensic units in the UK, with response rates of 34.6% and 43%, respectively. The target population included clinical health care staff who had patient contact, including nurses, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and occupational therapists. The results indicate that there are statistically significant differences within both nursing and non-nursing groups and also between the groups in relation to a "management" perspective for individuals labelled with a personality disorder and a "clinical" focus for individuals who are labelled as mentally ill. This paper adds research into the arena of forensic mental health in relation to the diagnostic labels of mental illness and personality disorders. It also adds evidence of a clinical response or a management response to such diagnostic labels which may impact on the practice of forensic psychiatry.

  19. Nurse entrepreneurs' well-being at work and associated factors.

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    Sankelo, Merja; Akerblad, Leena

    2009-11-01

    This study describes the well-being at work of nurse entrepreneurs and owner-managers of social care companies in Finland from the vantage point of health and working capacity, general coping and job satisfaction and identifies factors associated with well-being. In recent years, increasing numbers of nurses have been starting up in business in the social care sector. As yet, there has been only limited research into their well-being at work. Survey. This study was conducted as part of a questionnaire survey among 335 social care entrepreneurs with different educational backgrounds. The sample for the study reported here consisted of those respondents who had a registered nurse degree (n = 84). The data were analysed by SPSS statistical software. Most of the respondents rated their physical, mental, financial and social situation and working capacity as good. Less than half of the respondents had experienced stress during the past year. Over half felt their coping efficacy was better than it had been shortly after starting up in business. The respondents' resources were consumed and strengthened by a range of different work-related factors. The majority were satisfied with their job as an entrepreneur. Several background factors were associated with the results. Most of the nurse entrepreneurs reported being content with their well-being at work. Nevertheless, the results also highlighted factors that could and should be addressed to improve the well-being at work of entrepreneurs who struggle to cope. The results provide useful information for the development of entrepreneurial training for nurses, for the design and provision of occupational health care services and for the enrichment of the content of the entrepreneur's job.

  20. Neurofeedback Training for Psychiatric Disorders Associated with Criminal Offending: A Review

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    Sandra Fielenbach

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEffective treatment interventions for criminal offenders are necessary to reduce risk of criminal recidivism. Evidence about deviant electroencephalographic (EEG-frequencies underlying disorders found in criminal offenders is accumulating. Yet, treatment modalities, such as neurofeedback, are rarely applied in the forensic psychiatric domain. Since offenders usually have multiple disorders, difficulties adhering to long-term treatment modalities, and are highly vulnerable for psychiatric decompensation, more information about neurofeedback training protocols, number of sessions, and expected symptom reduction is necessary before it can be successfully used in offender populations.MethodStudies were analyzed that used neurofeedback in adult criminal offenders, and in disorders these patients present with. Specifically aggression, violence, recidivism, offending, psychopathy, schizophrenia, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, substance-use disorder (SUD, and cluster B personality disorders were included. Only studies that reported changes in EEG-frequencies posttreatment (increase/decrease/no change in EEG amplitude/power were included.ResultsDatabases Psychinfo and Pubmed were searched in the period 1990–2017 according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses, resulting in a total of 10 studies. Studies in which neurofeedback was applied in ADHD (N = 3, SUD (N = 3, schizophrenia (N = 3, and psychopathy (N = 1 could be identified. No studies could be identified for neurofeedback applied in cluster B personality disorders, aggression, violence, or recidivism in criminal offenders. For all treatment populations and neurofeedback protocols, number of sessions varied greatly. Changes in behavioral levels ranged from no improvements to significant symptom reduction after neurofeedback training. The results are also mixed concerning posttreatment changes in targeted EEG

  1. Report of the American Psychiatric Association Task Force on Treatment of Gender Identity Disorder.

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    Byne, William; Bradley, Susan J; Coleman, Eli; Eyler, A Evan; Green, Richard; Menvielle, Edgardo J; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F L; Pleak, Richard R; Tompkins, D Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Both the diagnosis and treatment of Gender Identity Disorder (GID) are controversial. Although linked, they are separate issues and the DSM does not evaluate treatments. The Board of Trustees (BOT) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), therefore, formed a Task Force charged to perform a critical review of the literature on the treatment of GID at different ages, to assess the quality of evidence pertaining to treatment, and to prepare a report that included an opinion as to whether or not sufficient credible literature exists for development of treatment recommendations by the APA. The literature on treatment of gender dysphoria in individuals with disorders of sex development was also assessed. The completed report was accepted by the BOT on September 11, 2011. The quality of evidence pertaining to most aspects of treatment in all subgroups was determined to be low; however, areas of broad clinical consensus were identified and were deemed sufficient to support recommendations for treatment in all subgroups. With subjective improvement as the primary outcome measure, current evidence was judged sufficient to support recommendations for adults in the form of an evidence-based APA Practice Guideline with gaps in the empirical data supplemented by clinical consensus. The report recommends that the APA take steps beyond drafting treatment recommendations. These include issuing position statements to clarify the APA's position regarding the medical necessity of treatments for GID, the ethical bounds of treatments of gender variant minors, and the rights of persons of any age who are gender variant, transgender or transsexual.

  2. Association Between Substance Use Diagnoses and Psychiatric Disorders in an Adolescent and Young Adult Clinic-Based Population.

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    Welsh, Justine Wittenauer; Knight, John R; Hou, Sherry Shu-Yeu; Malowney, Monica; Schram, Patricia; Sherritt, Lon; Boyd, J Wesley

    2017-06-01

    Adolescents with substance use disorders are more likely to have a current psychiatric disorder. However, when compared with the adult literature, there is relatively limited information regarding the specific co-occurrence of certain mental health diagnoses and substance use disorders in adolescents. The objectives of this study were to build on the previous literature regarding mental health diagnoses and different types of substance use disorders in adolescents, as well as explore the differences, if any, between groupings of mental health diagnosis and type of substance used. Data were extracted from the clinical records of 483 individuals aged 11-24 years referred for an evaluation at the Adolescent Substance Abuse Program at Boston Children's Hospital. According to DSM-IV-Text Revision criteria, individuals received diagnoses of substance abuse or dependence and any additional psychiatric disorders. Problematic use was included within the sample for greater power analysis. A multivariable logistic regression model estimated the association between psychiatric diagnosis and substance use while adjusting for covariates including age and gender. Multiple significant associations were found, including having any anxiety-related diagnosis and opioid use (odds ratio [OR] = 2.23, p < .001), generalized anxiety disorder and opioids (OR = 3.42, p = .008), cocaine and post-traumatic stress disorder (OR = 3.61, p = .01), and marijuana and externalizing behavior disorders (OR = 2.10, p = .024). Our study found multiple significant associations between specific substances and certain co-occurring psychiatric disorders. The use of office screening systems to efficiently identify these youths should be a part of routine medical and psychiatric care. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychiatric comorbidity, red flag behaviors, and associated outcomes among office-based buprenorphine patients following Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Arthur R; Tofighi, Babak; Rotrosen, John; Lee, Joshua D; Grossman, Ellie

    2014-04-01

    In October 2012, Bellevue Hospital Center (Bellevue) in New York City was temporarily closed as a result of Hurricane Sandy, the largest hurricane in US history. Bellevue's primary care office-based buprenorphine program was temporarily closed and later relocated to an affiliate public hospital. Previous research indicates that the relationships between disaster exposure, substance use patterns, psychiatric symptoms, and mental health services utilization is complex, with often conflicting findings regarding post-event outcomes (on the individual and community level) and antecedent risk factors. In general, increased use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs is associated with both greater disaster exposure and the development or exacerbation of other psychiatric symptoms and need for treatment. To date, there is limited published information regarding post-disaster outcomes among patients enrolled in office-based buprenorphine treatment, as the treatment modality has only been relatively approved recently. Patients enrolled in the buprenorphine program at the time of the storm were surveyed for self-reported buprenorphine adherence and illicit substance and alcohol use, as well as disaster-related personal consequences and psychiatric sequelae post-storm. Baseline demographic characteristics and insurance status were available from the medical record. Analysis was descriptive (counts and proportions) and qualitative, coding open-ended responses for emergent themes. There were 132 patients enrolled in the program at the time of the storm; of those, 91 were contacted and 89 completed the survey. Almost half of respondents reported disruption of their buprenorphine supply. Unexpectedly, patients with psychiatric comorbidity were no more likely to report increased use/relapse as a result. Rather, major risk factors associated with increased use or relapse post-storm were: (1) shorter length of time in treatment, (2) exposure to storm losses such as buprenorphine

  4. Association of Self-reported Impulsivity to Nonsuicidal Self-Injury, Suicidality, and Mortality in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

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    Alasaarela, Lauri; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Riipinen, Pirkko

    2017-05-01

    This study examines the association of self-reported impulsivity to nonsuicidal self-injury, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and completed suicides in a clinical sample of 508 Finnish adolescents (aged 12-17) treated in psychiatric inpatient care between April 2001 and March 2006. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime interview was used to gather information on psychiatric disorders, impulsivity, and suicidality of the adolescents. Mortality data were obtained from the national cause of death register. In adolescent girls, impulsivity was significantly associated with suicidal ideation and attempts and completed suicides in adolescent boys. Of adolescent boys with impulsivity, 10.4% had died by suicide during the follow-up time. For preventive purposes, health care professionals are encouraged asked adolescents targeted questions about impulsivity and to consider the associated risk of suicidality identified in this study.

  5. Social networks, social support and psychiatric symptoms: social determinants and associations within a multicultural community population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Natasha; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Hotopf, Matthew; Hatch, Stephani L

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about how social networks and social support are distributed within diverse communities and how different types of each are associated with a range of psychiatric symptoms. This study aims to address such shortcomings by: (1) describing the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of social networks and social support in a multicultural population and (2) examining how each is associated with multiple mental health outcomes. Data is drawn from the South East London Community Health Study; a cross-sectional study of 1,698 adults conducted between 2008 and 2010. The findings demonstrate variation in social networks and social support by socio-demographic factors. Ethnic minority groups reported larger family networks but less perceived instrumental support. Older individuals and migrant groups reported lower levels of particular network and support types. Individuals from lower socioeconomic groups tended to report less social networks and support across the indicators measured. Perceived emotional and instrumental support, family and friend network size emerged as protective factors for common mental disorder, personality dysfunction and psychotic experiences. In contrast, both social networks and social support appear less relevant for hazardous alcohol use. The findings both confirm established knowledge that social networks and social support exert differential effects on mental health and furthermore suggest that the particular type of social support may be important. In contrast, different types of social network appear to impact upon poor mental health in a more uniform way. Future psychosocial strategies promoting mental health should consider which social groups are vulnerable to reduced social networks and poor social support and which diagnostic groups may benefit most.

  6. Medication adherence in schizophrenia: The role of insight, therapeutic alliance and perceived trauma associated with psychiatric care.

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    Tessier, Arnaud; Boyer, Laurent; Husky, Mathilde; Baylé, Franck; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Misdrahi, David

    2017-11-01

    Medication non adherence in schizophrenia is a major cause of relapse and hospitalization and remains for clinicians an important challenge. This study investigates the associations between insight, therapeutic alliance, perceived trauma related to psychiatric treatment and medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia. In this multicenter study, 72 patients were assessed regarding symptomatology, self-reported adherence with medication, insight, medication side-effects, therapeutic alliance and perceived trauma related to psychiatric treatment. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to test predicted paths among these variables. The data fit a model in which medication adherence was directly predicted by insight, therapeutic alliance and perceived trauma related to psychiatric treatment. Perceived trauma moderates the role of insight on medication adherence. The final model showed good fit, based on four reliable indices. Greater adherence was correlated with higher insight, higher therapeutic alliance and lower perceived trauma. These three variables appear to be important determinants of patient's medication adherence. Medication adherence could be enhanced by reducing perceived trauma and by increasing insight. The need for mental health providers to acknowledge patients' potentially traumatic experience with psychiatric treatment and the need to encourage greater involvement in care are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of Healthy Food Intake with Psychiatric Distress in Children and Adolescents: the CASPIAN-IV study

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    Hoda Zahedi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthy dietary habits are known as a key factor for improving brain functions and cognitive ability in children and adolescents. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association of healthy food consumption with mental health in Iranian children and adolescents.Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from the fourth national school-based surveillance survey entitled CASPIAN-IV study. In this study, 14880 children and adolescents aged 6-18 years were selected by multistage, cluster sampling method from rural and urban areas. The students and their parents completed two sets of questionnaires. The psychiatric distress included depression, worry, insomnia, anxiety, aggression, confusion, and worthless and the violent behaviors comprised of physical fight, victim and bully. The healthy foods included fresh fruits, dried fruits, vegetables and dairy products.Results: The participants include 13,486 students from elementary, intermediate and high school degree. The prevalence of psychiatric distress was significantly higher among high school students, while violent behaviors were more prevalent in the middle school students. According to the multivariate model (model IV, the risk of psychiatric distress was significantly lower in students with daily consumption of fresh fruits, vegetables and milk. In addition, those with daily consumption of vegetables and milk had significantly lower risk for violent behaviors.Conclusion: Consumption of healthy foods may reduce the risk of psychiatric distress and violent behaviors. Therefore, in addition to its benefits, increasing healthy food consumption among children and adolescents can be useful in preventing mental health disorders.

  8. Work-related musculoskeletal risks associated with nurses and nursing assistants handling overweight and obese patients: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang D; Brings, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Nurses and nursing assistants are susceptible to work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injuries (WMSDs) due to the increase in overweight and obese patients they are handling on a daily basis. This study aimed to review work-related musculoskeletal hazards and risks associated with handling overweight and obese patients, and summarize the recommended interventions to mitigate musculoskeletal concerns among nurses and nursing assistants. Approximately 350 publications were initially screened and 22 refereed articles were used to synthesize for this study on the bases of inclusion/exclusion relevance and strength of evidence on overweight or obese patient handling. Evidence suggested that the work-related musculoskeletal risks among nurses and nursing assistants included sprains/strains, low back pain, wrist, knee and shoulder injuries. The findings indicated that the WMSD risks increased when nurses and nursing assistants were manually moving or lifting patients, especially when the patients were overweight or obese. The recommended solutions included the lifting/transfer equipment and devices, ergonomic assessments and controls, no-lift policies, and training and education. To alleviate the risk of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries among nurses and nursing assistants handling overweight or obese patients, additional research and development into what safe patient handling interventions suit this growing population needs to be addressed.

  9. Factors associated with recidivism at a South African forensic psychiatric hospital

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    Nirvana Morgan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study examines common factors associated with recidivism among state patients at a South African forensic psychiatric hospital. More specifically, demographic, clinical and criminological factors of a recidivist group are compared to a non-recidivist group with the intention of understanding to what extent these factors might determine the likelihood of re-offending. Method: A retrospective case file review of 293 inpatients and a random selection of 120 outpatients was conducted. For the purpose of the study, a patient was classified as a recidivist if an additional charge or act of violence was added to the file while the patient was on leave of absence in the community. Of the inpatients, only those who met the criteria for recidivism were included in the study. All 120 randomly selected outpatients were included. Demographic, clinical and criminological data were captured for all patients. Results: Eighty recidivists were compared with 100 non-recidivists. Using the × 2 and Fischer’s exact test, substance-use disorder, antisocial personality disorder, an index offence of assault and in-ward adverse events were found to be associated with recidivism (p < 0.05. Using logistic regression analysis, the odds of recidivism in a patient with an index offence of assault was 8.4 times of those who did not commit assault as an index offence (95.0% CI 1.6–43.1. The odds of recidivism for patients with cannabis use was 2.8 (95.0% CI 1.3–6.0 and for patients with in-ward adverse sexual behaviour was 17.2 (95.0% CI 2.0–150. Conclusion: Substance-use disorder and antisocial personality disorder are associated with higher risk for recidivism. This study also highlights that a less serious offence such as assault had a higher association with recidivism. Patients noted to display adverse sexual behaviour in the ward pose a potentially high risk for re-offence. Important criminal history factors and certain clinical factors could not

  10. Associations between self-rated mental health and psychiatric disorders among older adults: do racial/ethnic differences exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Giyeon; DeCoster, Jamie; Chiriboga, David A; Jang, Yuri; Allen, Rebecca S; Parmelee, Patricia

    2011-05-01

    [corrected] This study examined racial/ethnic differences in the association between self-rated mental health (SRMH) and psychiatric disorders among community-dwelling older adults in the United States. Cross-sectional analyses of nationally representative data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (2001-2003). In-person household interviews. Older adults aged 60 and older (N = 1,840), including non-Hispanic Whites (N = 351), Blacks (N = 826), Hispanics (N = 406), and Asians (N = 257). SRMH was measured with a single item, "How would you rate your own mental health?" Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), diagnoses for mood and anxiety disorders were measured with the World Health Organization's World Mental Health version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Results from logistic regression analyses showed significant main effects of both SRMH and race/ethnicity on the presence of mood and anxiety disorders: people who have poor SRMH and are non-Hispanic Whites were more likely to have mood and anxiety disorders. There were also significant interaction effects between SRMH and race/ethnicity, such that the relation of SRMH with diagnoses of psychiatric disorders was strongest in non-Hispanic Whites. Racial/ethnic variations were found in the relationship between self-perception of mental health and DSM-IV psychiatric disorders. The findings suggest the need to develop race/ethnicity-specific strategies to screen psychiatric disorders in diverse elderly populations. Future studies are needed to investigate possible reasons for the racial/ethnic group differences.

  11. The association of Mediterranean diet and exercise modifications with anthropometric parameters in a psychiatric community population: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaria Di Lorenzo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Weight gain and related metabolic syndrome (MS are major current issues in public health. MS consists of abdominal fat, atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic state, and accounts for both cardiovascular diseases and type II diabetes mellitus risk factors. Patients affected by psychiatric illness present a prevalence of 35–40% of MS. Many studies have shown that Mediterranean diet is associated with the reduction of mortality due to cardiovascular and malignant diseases, potentially preventing both obesity and type II diabetes mellitus. Our pilot study explores the effects of a 12-month healthy lifestyle program (Mediterranean diet and mild physical activity on metabolic and anthropometric parameters of patients affected by chronic psychiatric disorders who live in a psychiatric community facility. A Mediterranean diet was provided by a senior nutritional clinician and adapted by two dieticians, according to the needs and preferences of the community population. Concomitantly, a program of moderate physical activity, consisting in 30-min walks on level ground 4days a week, and psycho-educational group sessions with educational and therapeutic purposes were implemented. The metabolic and anthropometric parameters of our patients improved after both 6 (T6 and 12 (T12 months. Body Max Index was statistically significantly reduced at T6 and T12, with patients perceiving good quality of life. These positive outcomes suggest that a low-cost healthy lifestyle program can produce good adherence and feasibility even among patients with chronic psychiatric diseases, reducing their risk for MS, cardiovascular diseases and other complications. Keywords: Weight gain and metabolic syndrome, Antipsychotic drugs, Chronic psychiatric disorders, Rehabilitative community, Mediterranean diet and mild physical activity

  12. Tobacco industry influence on the definition of tobacco related disorders by the American Psychiatric Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, M D; Bitton, A; Glantz, S A

    2005-10-01

    The Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, third edition (DSM-III), published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) in 1980, included the first official definitions by the APA of tobacco dependence and tobacco withdrawal. Tobacco industry efforts to influence the DSM-III were investigated. Searches of previously secret tobacco industry documents, primarily the University of California San Francisco Legacy Tobacco Documents Library and British American Tobacco collections. Additional information was collected through discussions with editors of DSM-III, and library and general internet searches. The tobacco companies regarded the inclusion of tobacco dependence as a diagnosis in DSM-III as an adverse event. It worked to influence the content of the DSM-III and its impact following publication. These efforts included public statements and private lobbying of DSM-III editors and high ranking APA officers by prominent US psychiatrists with undisclosed ties to the tobacco industry. Following publication of DSM-III, tobacco companies contracted with two US professors of psychiatry to organise a conference and publish a monograph detailing controversies surrounding DSM-III. The tobacco industry and its allies lobbied to narrow the definition of tobacco dependence in serial revisions of DSM-III. Following publication of DSM-III, the industry took steps to try to mitigate its impact. These actions mirror industry tactics to influence medical research and policy in various contexts worldwide. Such tactics slow the spread of a professional and public understanding of smoking and health that otherwise would reduce smoking, smoking induced disease, and tobacco company profits.

  13. The Rise of Mental Health Nursing : A History of Psychiatric Care in Dutch Asylums, 1890-1920

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, Geertje

    2003-01-01

    The Rise of Mental Health Nursing onderzoekt de tegenstrijdigheden in de op het ziekenhuis georiënteerde inrichtingszorg, die rond 1900 opkwam. Bovendien illustreert het boek de sociale complexiteit van de psychiatrische zorg. Op basis van archiefmateriaal uit vier Nederlandse psychiatrische

  14. Does 'Time Together' increase quality of interaction and decrease stress? A study protocol of a multisite nursing intervention in psychiatric inpatient care, using a mixed method approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Jenny; Lindgren, Britt-Marie; Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren; Ringnér, Anders

    2017-08-28

    Despite the long-known significance of the nurse-patient relationship, research in psychiatric inpatient care still reports unfulfilled expectations of, and difficulties in, interactions and relationships between patients and staff. Interventions that create structures to allow quality interactions between patients and staff are needed to solve these problems. The aim of this project is to test effects of the nursing intervention Time Together and to evaluate the intervention process. This is a multisite study with a single-system experimental design using frequent measures. The primary outcomes are quality interactions for patients and perceived stress for staff. Secondary outcomes are levels of symptoms of anxiety and depression for patients and stress of conscience for staff. A process evaluation is performed to describe contextual factors and experiences. Data are collected using questionnaires, participant observations and semistructured interviews. For analysis of quantitative data, both visual and statistical methods will be used. Qualitative data will be analysed using qualitative content analysis. Ethical approval was granted by the Ethical Review Board in the region (Dnr 2016/339-31). The findings will contribute to the development of nursing interventions in general, but more specifically to the development of the intervention. This is relevant both nationally and internationally as similar interventions are needed but sparse. The findings will be disseminated through conference presentations and peer-reviewed publications. NCT02981563. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. A profile of perceived stress factors among nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Conradie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients experience unique stress factors that can influence their personal well-being and work performance. Objectives: To compile a profile of stress factors experienced by nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex (FSPC. Methods: This descriptive study included 89 nursing staff members from this environment. A questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic information and determine personal and occupational stressors. The data were summarised by frequencies and percentages (categorical variables and means or percentiles (numerical variables. Results: Most participants were aged between 46 and 55 (41.2%, female (93.2% and black (93.2%, and 76.7% had children or dependant minors. The main stressors among participants were pressure providing financially for their children and dependant minors (71.2%, caring for them (39.4% and fearing them moving away (25.8%. Occupational stressors included high workload (66.3%, lack of decision-making by superiors (58.1%, underpayment (53.5%, endangerment of physical health (52.3% and safety (50.0%, working hours (51.2%, pressure of expectations from superiors (48.8%, uncertainty of employment (48.8%, work responsibilities (47.7% and perceiving that skills and training were not appreciated. They experienced stress regarding health issues such as hyper- and hypotension (35.3%. Because of stress 34.5% of participants took leave, 34.5% developed depression and 14.3% had panic attacks. Conclusion: Most of the respondents experienced personal and occupational stress that influenced their health, which poses serious challenges for the management of the FSPC. Security should be upgraded, medical and psychological support for the staff and care facilities for their dependants should be provided, and financial problems experienced by these staff members should be addressed. The workload of

  16. Association of the World War II Finnish Evacuation of Children With Psychiatric Hospitalization in the Next Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavirta, Torsten; Santavirta, Nina; Gilman, Stephen E

    2018-01-01

    Although there is evidence that adverse childhood experiences are associated with worse mental health in adulthood, scarce evidence is available regarding an emerging concern that the next generation might also be affected. To compare the risk of psychiatric hospitalization in cousins whose parents were vs were not exposed to the Finnish evacuation policy that involved a mean 2-year stay with a Swedish foster family. This multigenerational, population-based cohort study of Finnish individuals and their siblings born between January 1, 1933, and December 31, 1944, analyzed the association of evacuee status as a child during World War II in the first generation with the risk of psychiatric hospitalization among offspring in the second generation. Evacuee status during World War II was determined using the Finnish National Archive's registry of participants in the Finnish evacuation. Data on evacuee status were linked to the psychiatric diagnoses in the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register from January 1, 1971, through December 31, 2012, for offspring (n = 93 391) born between January 1, 1950, and December 31, 2010. Sex-specific Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios for risk of psychiatric hospitalization during the follow-up period. Because offspring of evacuees and their nonevacuated siblings are cousins, the Cox proportional hazards regression models included fixed effects to adjust for confounding factors in families. Data analysis was performed from June 15, 2016, to August 26, 2017. Parental participation in the evacuation during World War II (coded 1 for parents who were evacuated and placed in foster care and 0 for those not evacuated). Offspring's initial admission to the hospital for a psychiatric disorder, obtained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register from January 1, 1971, through December 31, 2012. Of the 93 391 study persons, 45 955 (49.2%) were women and 47 436 (50.8) were men; mean (SD) age in

  17. Factors associated with relapse in schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    increases the economic burden on health care systems because of its associated morbidity .... Depression in schizophrenia has been associated with higher rates of relapse ... The researchers approached the psychiatric nursing staff of mental.

  18. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonstad Kåre

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Methods Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. Results The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusion Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors.

  19. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL) in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvrud, Christian; Nonstad, Kåre; Palmstierna, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Background Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Methods Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. Results The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Conclusion Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors. PMID:19371413

  20. Pressure ulcers and their associated factors in nursing home inmates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akea, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    To assess pressure ulcers and the associated risk factors, among the individuals who stayed at Yozgat Rehabilitation Care Center in Turkey. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Yozgat Rehabilitation Care Center, Turkey, from August to September 2011. Methodology: One hundred and seventy five individuals participated in the study who received care at the above nursing home and agreed to participate in the study. The data were collected with an information form of descriptive characteristics (the form included a total of 15 questions asked to get information about socio-demographic characteristics) and Braden risk assessment scale. For the data evaluation, Mann-Whitney U-test, Krushall-Wallis Variance analysis, Logistic Regression analysis were used. Statistical significance was defined by a probability level of p < 0.05. Results: The mean score of Braden risk assessment scale of the individuals was 15.0 +- 3.3 and 16.0% were under very high risk. Nine (5.1%) had pressure ulcers. The average duration of stay was 2.17 +- 0.80 years. Participants who were underweight, had lived at the rehabilitation center for a longer time, and were fed on regime 1, had a higher risk of developing pressure ulcers (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Individuals who stayed in nursing home were under very high risk of pressure ulcer. Pressure ulcers are preventable by the elimination of some risk factors and good nursing care. Such individuals should be periodically assessed in terms of risk. (author)

  1. Are Ataques de Nerviosa in Puerto Rican Children Associated with Psychiatric Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnaccia, Peter J.; Martinez, Igda; Ramirez, Rafael; Canino, Glorisa

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To provide the first empirical analysis of a cultural syndrome in children by examining the prevalence and psychiatric correlates of ataques de nervios in an epidemiological study of the mental health of children in Puerto Rico. Method: Probability samples of caretakers of children 4-17 years old in the community (N = 1,892; response…

  2. Factors Associated with Nursing Activities in Humanitarian Aid and Disaster Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Norihito; Inoue, Satoshi; Shimanoe, Chisato; Shibayama, Kaoru; Shinchi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Although nurses play an important role in humanitarian aid and disaster relief (HA/DR), little is known about the nursing activities that are performed in HA/DR. We aimed to clarify the nursing activities performed by Japanese nurses in HA/DR and to examine the factors associated with the frequency of nursing activities. Methods A self-administered questionnaire survey was completed by 147 nurses with HA/DR experience. The survey extracted information on demographic characteristics, past experience (e.g., disaster medical training experience, HA/DR experience), circumstances surrounding their dispatched to HA/DR (e.g., team size, disaster type, post-disaster phase, mission term), and the frequency of nursing activities performed under HA/DR. The frequency of nursing activities was rated on a 5-point Likert scale. Evaluation of nursing activities was conducted based on the “nursing activity score”, which represents the frequency of each nursing activity. Factors related to the nursing activity score were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Nurses were involved in 27 nursing activities in HA/DR, 10 of which were performed frequently. On analysis, factors significantly associated with nursing activity score were nursing license as a registered nurse (OR 7.79, 95% CI 2.95–20.57), two or more experiences with disaster medical training (OR 2.90 95%, CI 1.12–7.49) and a post-disaster phase of three weeks or longer (OR 8.77, 95% CI 2.59–29.67). Conclusions These results will contribute to the design of evidence-based disaster medical training that improves the quality of nursing activities. PMID:26959351

  3. A Multiple Comparison Case Study of Factors Related to Success of Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieting, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    The nursing profession is facing a serious shortage of registered nurses based on current numbers, projected retirements, and estimates of future need. Nursing schools accept the largest numbers of students that they are able to accommodate, but many of these students do not complete the programs; this is especially true for associate degree…

  4. Prevalence and factors associated with minor psychiatric disorders in hospital housekeeping workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconato, Cintia da Silva; Magnago, Ana Carolina de Souza; Magnago, Tânia Solange Bosi de Souza; Dalmolin, Graziele de Lima; Andolhe, Rafaela; Tavares, Juliana Petri

    2017-06-12

    Investigating the prevalence and factors associated with minor psychiatric disorders (MPDs) in Hospital housekeeping workers. A cross-sectional study carried out in 2013 with workers from the cleaning service of a public university hospital in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Data were collected through a form containing sociodemographic, occupational, habits and health variables. The Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20 was used in order to evaluate MPDs. The study population consisted of 161 workers. The overall prevalence of suspected MPD was 29.3%. The chances of suspected MPDs were higher in workers with Effort-Reward Imbalance, those who did not have time or who occasionally had time for leisure activities, and those taking medications. The prevalence of MPDs was similar to that found in the literature for health workers. Therefore, we consider it important to include these workers in institutional programs for continuing health education. Investigar a prevalência e os fatores associados aos Distúrbios Psíquicos Menores (DPMs) em trabalhadores do Serviço Hospitalar de Limpeza. Estudo transversal, realizado em 2013, com trabalhadores do serviço de limpeza de um hospital universitário público do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Os dados foram coletados por meio de um formulário contendo variáveis sociodemográficas, laborais, hábitos e saúde. Para avaliação dos DPMs utilizou-se do Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20. A população do estudo foi composta pelos 161 trabalhadores. A prevalência global para suspeição de DPM foi de 29,3%. As chances de suspeição de DPMs foram maiores nos trabalhadores em Desequilíbrio Esforço-Recompensa, nos que não tinham ou às vezes tinham tempo para o lazer e naqueles que faziam uso de medicação. A prevalência de DPMs assemelhou-se à encontrada na literatura em trabalhadores da área saúde. Portanto, considera-se importante a inclusão desses trabalhadores em programas institucionais de educação permanente em saúde.

  5. Early nurse attrition in New Zealand and associated policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, L; Clendon, J

    2018-03-01

    To examine the factors contributing to nurses choosing to exit the nursing profession before retirement age. Population growth, ageing and growing demand for health services mean increased demand for nurses. Better retention could help meet this demand, yet little work has been done in New Zealand to understand early attrition. An online survey of registered and enrolled nurses and nurse practitioners who had left nursing was used. This study reports analysis of responses from 285 ex-nurses aged under 55. The primary reasons nurses left the profession were as follows: workplace concerns; personal challenges; career factors; family reasons; lack of confidence; leaving for overseas; unwillingness to complete educational requirements; poor work-life balance; and inability to find suitable nursing work. Most nurses discussed their intentions to leave with a family member or manager and most reported gaining transferrable skills through nursing. Nurses leave for many reasons. Implementing positive practice environments and individualized approaches to retaining staff may help reduce this attrition. Generational changes in the nature of work and careers mean that nurses may continue to leave the profession sooner than anticipated by policymakers. If the nursing workforce is to be able to meet projected need, education, recruitment and retention policies must urgently address issues leading to early attrition. In particular, policies improving the wider environmental context of nursing practice and ensuring that working environments are safe and nurses are well supported must be developed and implemented. Equally, national nursing workforce planning must take into account that nursing is no longer viewed as a career for life. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  6. Strengthening the Uganda nurses' and midwives' association for a motivated workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuyderduin, A; Obuni, J D; McQuide, P A

    2010-12-01

    The Ugandan Association of Nurses and Midwives (UNANM) is a dynamic proactive community. This survey of nurses, both members and non-members of the association, was implemented in April 2007. It was the first phase of a programme-funded Capacity Project/USAID to strengthen professional associations as part of a strategy to retain nurses. To better understand the needs and strengths of the association and to develop policy recommendations on how to strengthen the UNANM to retain nurses in the health sector. Three hundred self-completion questionnaires were distributed, of which 217 (72%) were returned. The participants were 126 non-members and 91 members of the UNANM. Just over a third of the 91 members rated the UNANM to be very effective in promoting nursing (35%) and information sharing (36%). Non-members want to receive nursing information from the UNANM (89%) and were less critical of the UNANM than members. Respondents were interested in counselling training (83%), research capacity building (80%) and sharing best practice (74%). Nurses under 30 years (12%) look to more experienced peers for guidance on coping in a stressful profession. The nurses lack continuing professional development, mentoring and networking opportunities. Tangible support for communication, nurse education and research is needed and will stimulate the development of nursing in Uganda. Most nurses do not have the means to pay for training, research or travel to attend professional meetings. Motivation to stay in nursing and quality of care can increase through investing in nursing, and this support can be channelled through associations such as the UNANM. © 2010 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2010 International Council of Nurses.

  7. Neurofeedback Training for Psychiatric Disorders Associated with Criminal Offending: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Fielenbach; Sandra Fielenbach; Franc C. L. Donkers; Marinus Spreen; Harmke A. Visser; Stefan Bogaerts; Stefan Bogaerts

    2018-01-01

    BackgroundEffective treatment interventions for criminal offenders are necessary to reduce risk of criminal recidivism. Evidence about deviant electroencephalographic (EEG)-frequencies underlying disorders found in criminal offenders is accumulating. Yet, treatment modalities, such as neurofeedback, are rarely applied in the forensic psychiatric domain. Since offenders usually have multiple disorders, difficulties adhering to long-term treatment modalities, and are highly vulnerable for psych...

  8. Evaluation of an inpatient psychiatric hospital physician education program and adherence to American Diabetes Association practice recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koffarnus, Robin L; Mican, Lisa M; Lopez, Debra A; Barner, Jamie C

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated adherence to American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendations for diabetes monitoring following an educational intervention for physicians in an inpatient psychiatric hospital. This retrospective chart review was conducted in an inpatient psychiatric institution from July 1, 2010-January 15, 2011. A total of 120 subjects (60 subjects each in the pre- and post-intervention groups) meeting the inclusion criteria served as the study sample. Included subjects were admitted and discharged from an inpatient psychiatric institution within 90 days prior to (pre-intervention) and following (post-intervention) the physician education program. The medical staff was presented an educational program intervention, consisting of a 30 minute overview of the ADA 2010 Standards of Care recommendations and distribution of laminated treatment reminders. Electronic grouped order sets for patients with diabetes were also created and implemented. The primary outcome was change (pre-intervention to post-intervention) in frequency of hemoglobin A1c documentation on admission following the intervention. Secondary outcomes included the change in frequency of documentation of fasting plasma glucose, serum creatinine, urine creatinine/microalbumin ratio (UMA), fasting lipid profile (FLP), and change in days on sliding scale insulin. Regarding change in frequency of documentation of A1c values on admission, chi-square analysis revealed a significant increase from pre-intervention to post-intervention period of 30% (n = 18) to 61.7% (n = 37), respectively (p = 0.0005). Documentation of FLP also significantly increased [73.3% vs. 91.7% (p = 0.0082)]. There were no significant differences in the documentation of fasting plasma glucose, serum creatinine, and UMA or days treated with sliding scale insulin. The physician education program was successful in increasing the assessment of A1c values and lipid profiles for patients with diabetes mellitus in a psychiatric

  9. Psychological capital mediates the association between nurses' practice environment and work engagement among Chinese male nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokang Pan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aims to investigate the environmental and individual factors contributing to male nurses' psychological well-being and to explore the psychological mechanisms that may explain the links between nurses' practice environment and work engagement, thereby presenting the implications for nurse managers. Methods: A total of 161 male nurses from three tertiary first-class hospitals in Changsha City in China participated in the study. We collected the data using the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, the Psychological Capital Questionnaire, and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale. Results: Scores of male nurses' practice environment (2.88 ± 0.31, psychological capital (4.42 ± 0.62, and work engagement (3.17 ± 1.39 were all above the midpoint; however, the subscales “the nursing staffing and resources adequacy” (2.72 ± 0.48, “hope” (4.33 ± 0.72, and “dedication” (2.96 ± 1.61scored lowest. Nurses' practice environment and psychological capital positively predicted nurses' work engagement; psychological capital fully mediated the influence of nurses' practice environment on work engagement. Conclusions: Creating a supportive nursing practice environment can increase male nurses' work engagement by developing their psychological capital. Nurse managers can then provide reasonable workload and pathways for male nurses to achieve goals, thereby fostering their hope. Keywords: Male nurses, Nurses' practice environment, Psychological capital, Work engagement

  10. Psychiatric disorder associated with vacuum-assisted breast biopsy clip placement: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zografos George C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vacuum-assisted breast biopsy is a minimally invasive technique that has been used increasingly in the treatment of mammographically detected, non-palpable breast lesions. Clip placement at the biopsy site is standard practice after vacuum-assisted breast biopsy. Case presentation We present the case of a 62-year-old woman with suspicious microcalcifications in her left breast. The patient was informed about vacuum-assisted breast biopsy, including clip placement. During the course of taking the patient's history, she communicated excellently, her demeanor was normal, she disclosed no intake of psychiatric medication and had not been diagnosed with any psychiatric disorders. Subsequently, the patient underwent vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (11 G under local anesthesia. A clip was placed at the biopsy site. The pathological diagnosis was of sclerosing adenosis. At the 6-month mammographic follow-up, the radiologist mentioned the existence of the metallic clip in her breast. Subsequently, the woman presented complaining about "being spied [upon] by an implanted clip in [her] breast" and repeatedly requested the removal of the clip. The patient was referred to the specialized psychiatrist of our breast unit for evaluation. The Mental State Examination found that systematized paranoid ideas of persecutory type dominated her daily routines. At the time, she believed that the implanted clip was one of several pieces of equipment being used to keep her under surveillance, the other equipment being her telephone, cameras and television. Quite surprisingly, she had never had a consultation with a mental health professional. The patient appeared depressed and her insight into her condition was impaired. The prevalent diagnosis was schizotypal disorder, whereas the differential diagnosis comprised delusional disorder of persecutory type, affective disorder with psychotic features or comorbid delusional disorder with major depression

  11. Nurses' leadership styles in the ICU: association with personal and professional profile and workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsanelli, Alexandre Pazetto; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm; Whitaker, Iveth Yamaguchi

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to explore the association between nurses' leadership styles and personal and professional nursing profile and workload. The sample consisted of seven nurses and seven nursing technicians who were grouped into pairs. At the end of three months, nurses were queried regarding what leadership style would be adopted when the nursing technician under their evaluation delivered care to patients admitted to the ICU. Relevant data was analyzed by applying descriptive statistics, Tukey's multiple comparison test and Student's t-test (pleadership styles chosen by nurses (p>0.05). The determine, persuade, and share leadership styles prevailed. However, whenever the nursing workload peaked, the determine and persuade styles were used (p<0.05).

  12. Hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity.......Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity....

  13. Impact of Support Services on Associate Level Nursing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby-Parker, Michelle N.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the research was to show the impact of the implementation of support services on admissions and graduation from nursing programs. The use of support services has been linked to higher levels of success in nursing students in the classroom and the work place. As nursing schools experience pressure to increase the student capacity to…

  14. Violence, Burnout and Minor Psychiatric Disorders in Hospital Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Dal Pai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Identifying the violence suffered by the health team workers and their association with Burnout and minor psychiatric disorders. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 269 health team professionals of a public hospital in southern Brazil. Data were collected through the use of the Survey Questionnaire: Workplace Violence in the Health Sector, Maslach Inventory Burnout and Self-Report Questionnaire. RESULTS Workplace violence struck 63.2% of workers, prevailing mostly in women (p = 0.001, among nursing auxiliaries/technicians (p=0.014 and was associated with minor psychiatric disorders (p<0.05, as exposure to different forms of violence increased the chances of these disorders by 60% (CI 95%: 1.2-2.1. The three Burnout dimensions were also associated to violence at work (p<0.05. CONCLUSION Health workers experience violence in the workplace and this exposure is associated with Burnout symptoms and minor psychiatric disorders.

  15. Violence, Burnout and Minor Psychiatric Disorders in Hospital Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Dal Pai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Identifying the violence suffered by the health team workers and their association with Burnout and minor psychiatric disorders. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 269 health team professionals of a public hospital in southern Brazil. Data were collected through the use of the Survey Questionnaire: Workplace Violence in the Health Sector, Maslach Inventory Burnout and Self-Report Questionnaire. RESULTS Workplace violence struck 63.2% of workers, prevailing mostly in women (p = 0.001, among nursing auxiliaries/technicians (p=0.014 and was associated with minor psychiatric disorders (p<0.05, as exposure to different forms of violence increased the chances of these disorders by 60% (CI 95%: 1.2-2.1. The three Burnout dimensions were also associated to violence at work (p<0.05. CONCLUSION Health workers experience violence in the workplace and this exposure is associated with Burnout symptoms and minor psychiatric disorders.

  16. Reversible dementia: two nursing home patients with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reintjes, Wesley; Romijn, Marloes D M; Hollander, Daan; Ter Bruggen, Jan P; van Marum, Rob J

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (VGKC-LE) is a rare disease that is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for medical practitioners. Two patients with VGKC-LE, both developing dementia are presented. Following treatment, both patients showed remarkable cognitive and functional improvement enabling them to leave the psychogeriatric nursing homes they both were admitted to. Patients with VGKC-LE can have a major cognitive and functional improvement even after a diagnostic delay of more than 1 year. Medical practitioners who treat patients with unexplained cognitive decline, epileptic seizures, or psychiatric symptoms should be aware of LE as an underlying rare cause. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with professional competence and work-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, Olivia; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Isoaho, Hannu; Meretoja, Riitta

    2016-01-01

    To explore newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with their self-assessed professional competence and other work-related factors. As a factor affecting nurse turnover, newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its associations with work-related factors needs exploring to retain adequate workforce. Nurses' commitment has mainly been studied as organisational commitment, but newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment and its association with work-related factors needs further studying. This study used descriptive, cross-sectional, correlation design. A convenience sample of 318 newly graduated nurses in Finland participated responding to an electronic questionnaire. Statistical software, NCSS version 9, was used in data analysis. Frequencies, percentages, ranges, means and standard deviations summarised the data. Multivariate Analyses of Variance estimated associations between occupational commitment and work-related variables. IBM SPSS Amos version 22 estimated the model fit of Occupational Commitment Scale and Nurse Competence Scale. Newly graduated nurses' occupational commitment was good, affective commitment reaching the highest mean score. There was a significant difference between the nurse groups in favour of nurses at higher competence levels in all subscales except in limited alternatives occupational commitment. Multivariate analyses revealed significant associations between subscales of commitment and competence, turnover intentions, job satisfaction, earlier professional education and work sector, competence counting only through affective dimension. The association between occupational commitment and low turnover intentions and satisfaction with nursing occupation was strong. Higher general competence indicated higher overall occupational commitment. Managers' recognition of the influence of all dimensions of occupational commitment in newly graduated nurses' professional development is important. Follow

  18. Association between shift work and severity of depressive symptoms among female nurses: the Korea Nurses' Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hea Young; Kim, Mi Sun; Kim, OkSoo; Lee, Il-Hyun; Kim, Han-Kyoul

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of depression and the relationship between shift work and depression severity among female nurses in South Korea. Shift work has been associated with higher risks of depressive symptoms, but there is a dearth of research on nurses, particularly investigating the severity of depressive symptoms. Quantitative data including survey response from 9789 participants were analysed. Statistical analysis included descriptive, Spearman's correlation and multivariable ordinal logistic regression. The numbers of nurses according to the severity of depressive symptoms were 35.2% (n = 3445), 38.0% (n = 3716), 16.1% (n = 1578), 7.6% (n = 747) and 3.1% (n = 303) for normal, mild, moderate, severely moderate and severe level of depressive symptoms, respectively. After adjusting for sociodemographic and health behavioural factors, nurses who worked shifts had 1.519-times greater odds of experiencing a higher severity of depressive symptoms (OR = 1.519, CI = 1.380-1.674, P nurses who worked shifts and suggests that shift work may increase the severity of depressive symptoms among female nurses in South Korea. Nursing professionals, managers and health policy makers need to understand the factors influencing depressive symptoms and to use appropriate interventions based on the severity and not just the onset. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Liderança em enfermagem psiquiátrica Liderazgo en enfermería psiquiátrica Leadership in psychiatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina da Costa Machado

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O processo de liderança em enfermagem psiquiátrica é uma temática que deve ser cuidadosamente abordada e amplamente discutida. Contudo, poucas são as fontes científicas acerca do assunto. Assim sendo, buscou-se através deste ensaio refletir a liderança e as suas várias formas de abordagem em psiquiatria ao longo dos tempos, sendo possível certificar sua evolução. A assistência de qualidade deve ser o objetivo único e primordial e a liderança na enfermagem psquiátrica deve estar baseada no reconhecimento das necessidades desta clientela e nas qualidades de sua equipe. Este muitas vezes constitui um desafio para os profissionais enfermeiros, permitindo um maior crescimento profissional. E é justamente o preparo do profissional que auxiliará no bom andamento do tratamento do paciente psiquiátrico, alcançando um resultado satisfatórioEl proceso de liderazgo en enfermería psiquiátrica es un tema que debe ser cuidadosamente abordado y extensamente discutido. Sin embargo, pocas son las fuentes científicas referentes al tema. De esta manera, hubo una búsqueda a través de este trabajo sobre el liderazgo y sus varias formas de abordaje en psiquiatría a través de los tiempos, siendo posible certificar su evolución. La ayuda de calidad debe ser el único y primordial objetivo y el liderazgo del enfermero debe estar basada en el reconocimiento de las necesidades de la clientela y en las calidades del equipo. Tal reflexión muchas veces constituye un desafío para los enfermeros profesionales, permitiendole un crecimiento profesional mayor. Es exactamente la preparación del profesional que ayudará al buen curso del tratamiento del paciente psiquiátrico, alcanzando un resultado satisfactorio.The process of leadership in psychiatric nursing is a thematic that must be carefully boarded and be widely argued. However, few are the scientific sources concerning the subject. In this way, it was seek through this work reflecting the

  20. Detained Male Adolescent Offender's Emotional, Physical and Sexual Maltreatment Profiles and Their Associations to Psychiatric Disorders and Criminal Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebi, Marcel; Linhart, Susanne; Thun-Hohenstein, Leonhard; Bessler, Cornelia; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Plattner, Belinda

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyse patterns of emotional, physical and sexual maltreatment in detained male juvenile offenders using latent class analysis (LCA). The association of maltreatment related LCA profiles with psychopathology and criminal behaviors was also studied. LCA based on the items of the Child Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) assessing childhood emotional, physical, and sexual abuse was performed in a sample of 260 male adolescent offenders (mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.29 years). Chi square tests and general linear models were performed to assess the associations of CTQ profiles with categorical interview-based psychiatric disorders, dimensional Youth Self-Report problem scales, and officially registered offenses. LCA suggested a three class solution: (1) a no/mild trauma (NM; 76 %) (2) emotional and physical trauma (EP; 18 %) and (3) emotional, physical, and sexual trauma (EPS; 8 %). The classes EP and EPS were related to a variety of psychiatric disorders and self-reported mental health problems. Furthermore, EPS showed higher presence of a subsequent re-incarceration compared to NM. A majority of sexually abused juveniles also experienced emotional and physical abuse reflecting gravely disturbed family systems. Multiple abuse in childhood was associated with a broad variety of disorders including externalizing disorders and repeated criminal offending. Such findings indicate that trauma assessment is also relevant in externalizing youth. A comprehensive treatment approach for detained boys with multiple abuse experiences is required targeting both mental health needs and the reduction of criminal behaviors.

  1. Association of trauma-related disorders and dissociation with four idioms of distress among Latino psychiatric outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Raggio, Greer A; Peláez, Clara; Chen, Henian; Guarnaccia, Peter J

    2010-06-01

    Past research on idioms of distress among U.S. Latinos has revealed that ataque de nervios and altered perceptions, such as hearing and seeing things when alone, are independent markers of higher morbidity and mental health utilization despite having no one-to-one relationships with any single psychiatric diagnosis. It has been proposed that the idioms exert this effect because they are signs of distressing dissociative capacity associated with traumatic exposure. This study examines the relationships in an ethnically diverse Latino psychiatric outpatient sample (N = 230) among interpersonal trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder, dissociative capacity and four cultural idioms of distress associated with the popular overall category of nervios. We particularly explore how these relationships change with varied measures of traumatic exposure, including trauma severity and timing or persistence of trauma. A series of adjusted bivariate regressions assessed the matrix of associations between the idioms and the clinical variables. In this highly traumatized population, we identified a strong 'nexus' of associations between dissociation and three of the idioms: currently being ill with nerves, ataque de nervios and altered perceptions. These idioms were largely independent from PTSD and depression and were associated with trauma persistence and severity. A fourth idiom, being nervous since childhood, was not associated with any other variable and may represent a personality trait rather than a diagnosable condition. Our results validate the clinical utility of the construct of nervios as a set of specific idioms associated with dissociation that are useful markers of mental health need among Latinos independently of their association with clinical diagnoses.

  2. Chelsea, Pimlico and Belgravia District Nursing Association 1930-1939::A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Bliss, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The case study explores how the expansion of the health services during the interwar period impacted upon the status of district nursing and examines how being a voluntary service shaped district nursing associations. A range of primary sources were used; the Association Annual Reports, the Medical Officer for Health Annual Reports for the Borough of Chelsea, the Ministry of Health records, the archives of the Queen's Nursing Institute (QNI) and the Borough of Chelsea Council Minutes.The Medi...

  3. Comparison of nurse staffing based on changes in unit-level workload associated with patient churn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ronda G; Bobay, Kathleen L; Jolly, Nicholas A; Suby, Chrysmarie

    2015-04-01

    This analysis compares the staffing implications of three measures of nurse staffing requirements: midnight census, turnover adjustment based on length of stay, and volume of admissions, discharges and transfers. Midnight census is commonly used to determine registered nurse staffing. Unit-level workload increases with patient churn, the movement of patients in and out of the nursing unit. Failure to account for patient churn in staffing allocation impacts nurse workload and may result in adverse patient outcomes. Secondary data analysis of unit-level data from 32 hospitals, where nursing units are grouped into three unit-type categories: intensive care, intermediate care, and medical surgical. Midnight census alone did not account adequately for registered nurse workload intensity associated with patient churn. On average, units were staffed with a mixture of registered nurses and other nursing staff not always to budgeted levels. Adjusting for patient churn increases nurse staffing across all units and shifts. Use of the discharges and transfers adjustment to midnight census may be useful in adjusting RN staffing on a shift basis to account for patient churn. Nurse managers should understand the implications to nurse workload of various methods of calculating registered nurse staff requirements. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Exploring factors associated with the incidence of sexual harassment of hospital nurses by patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Yuri; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    To identify factors affecting nurse-perceived sexual harassment and specific types of patient sexual behavior experienced by Japanese nurses. Cross-sectional questionnaire study of Japanese hospital nurses. Self-administered questionnaires (N=600) were distributed to Japanese hospital nurses, and 464 were returned (response rate of 77.3%). Two instruments were used: one was for determining sexual harassment by patients, and the other was for determining specific types of patient behavior that had sexual connotations. Registered nurses were at a much higher risk of sexual harassment than were nurse assistants. In addition, registered nurses had a much more positive attitude toward gender equality compared with assistant nurses. A positive attitude toward gender equality mediated by a relatively high education level might be associated with increasing reports of sexual harassment. An increasing incidence of sexual harassment claims among nurses should prompt hospital organizations to take proper action against it. Education on gender equality was thus considered a long-term solution for reducing the sexual harassment of Japanese hospital nurses. Establishing a safer working environment could enable nurses to provide better care for patients and thereby promote the development of good relationships between nurses and patients.

  5. Variables Associated with the Use of Coercive Measures on Psychiatric Patients in Spanish Penitentiary Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Girela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the use of coercive medical measures (forced medication, isolation, and mechanical restraint in mentally ill inmates within two secure psychiatric hospitals (SPH and three regular prisons (RP in Spain. Variables related to adopted coercive measures were analyzed, such as type of measure, causes of indication, opinion of patient inmate, opinion of medical staff, and more frequent morbidity. A total of 209 patients (108 from SPH and 101 from RP were studied. Isolation (41.35% was the most frequent coercive measure, followed by mechanical restraint (33.17% and forced medication (25.48%. The type of center has some influence; specifically in RP there is less risk of isolation and restraint than in SPH. Not having had any previous imprisonment reduces isolation and restraint risk while increases the risk of forced medication, as well as previous admissions to psychiatric inpatient units does. Finally, the fact of having lived with a partner before imprisonment reduces the risk of forced medication and communication with the family decreases the risk of isolation. Patients subjected to a coercive measure exhibited a pronounced psychopathology and most of them had been subjected to such measures on previous occasions. The mere fact of external assessment of compliance with human rights slows down the incidence of coercive measures.

  6. Variables associated with the use of coercive measures on psychiatric patients in Spanish penitentiary centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girela, E; López, A; Ortega, L; De-Juan, J; Ruiz, F; Bosch, J I; Barrios, L F; Luna, J D; Torres-González, F

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the use of coercive medical measures (forced medication, isolation, and mechanical restraint) in mentally ill inmates within two secure psychiatric hospitals (SPH) and three regular prisons (RP) in Spain. Variables related to adopted coercive measures were analyzed, such as type of measure, causes of indication, opinion of patient inmate, opinion of medical staff, and more frequent morbidity. A total of 209 patients (108 from SPH and 101 from RP) were studied. Isolation (41.35%) was the most frequent coercive measure, followed by mechanical restraint (33.17%) and forced medication (25.48%). The type of center has some influence; specifically in RP there is less risk of isolation and restraint than in SPH. Not having had any previous imprisonment reduces isolation and restraint risk while increases the risk of forced medication, as well as previous admissions to psychiatric inpatient units does. Finally, the fact of having lived with a partner before imprisonment reduces the risk of forced medication and communication with the family decreases the risk of isolation. Patients subjected to a coercive measure exhibited a pronounced psychopathology and most of them had been subjected to such measures on previous occasions. The mere fact of external assessment of compliance with human rights slows down the incidence of coercive measures.

  7. [Event-related EEG potentials associated with error detection in psychiatric disorder: literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Lívia; Czobor, Pál

    2010-01-01

    Error-related bioelectric signals constitute a special subgroup of event-related potentials. Researchers have identified two evoked potential components to be closely related to error processing, namely error-related negativity (ERN) and error-positivity (Pe), and they linked these to specific cognitive functions. In our article first we give a brief description of these components, then based on the available literature, we review differences in error-related evoked potentials observed in patients across psychiatric disorders. The PubMed and Medline search engines were used in order to identify all relevant articles, published between 2000 and 2009. For the purpose of the current paper we reviewed publications summarizing results of clinical trials. Patients suffering from schizophrenia, anorexia nervosa or borderline personality disorder exhibited a decrease in the amplitude of error-negativity when compared with healthy controls, while in cases of depression and anxiety an increase in the amplitude has been observed. Some of the articles suggest specific personality variables, such as impulsivity, perfectionism, negative emotions or sensitivity to punishment to underlie these electrophysiological differences. Research in the field of error-related electric activity has come to the focus of psychiatry research only recently, thus the amount of available data is significantly limited. However, since this is a relatively new field of research, the results available at present are noteworthy and promising for future electrophysiological investigations in psychiatric disorders.

  8. ‘Care left undone’ during nursing shifts: associations with workload and perceived quality of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Jane E; Murrells, Trevor; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Morrow, Elizabeth; Griffiths, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence to show that lower nurse staffing levels in hospitals are associated with worse patient outcomes. One hypothesised mechanism is the omission of necessary nursing care caused by time pressure—‘missed care’. Aim To examine the nature and prevalence of care left undone by nurses in English National Health Service hospitals and to assess whether the number of missed care episodes is associated with nurse staffing levels and nurse ratings of the quality of nursing care and patient safety environment. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 2917 registered nurses working in 401 general medical/surgical wards in 46 general acute National Health Service hospitals in England. Results Most nurses (86%) reported that one or more care activity had been left undone due to lack of time on their last shift. Most frequently left undone were: comforting or talking with patients (66%), educating patients (52%) and developing/updating nursing care plans (47%). The number of patients per registered nurse was significantly associated with the incidence of ‘missed care’ (p<0.001). A mean of 7.8 activities per shift were left undone on wards that are rated as ‘failing’ on patient safety, compared with 2.4 where patient safety was rated as ‘excellent’ (p <0. 001). Conclusions Nurses working in English hospitals report that care is frequently left undone. Care not being delivered may be the reason low nurse staffing levels adversely affects quality and safety. Hospitals could use a nurse-rated assessment of ‘missed care’ as an early warning measure to identify wards with inadequate nurse staffing. PMID:23898215

  9. Recruitment and Retention of Hispanic Nursing Students: Through the Lens of Associate Degree Nursing Program Administrators and Hispanic Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handlos DeVoe, Debra Jean

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic population in the United States is changing and will constitute 30% of the population in 2050; however, the Hispanic registered nurse population is less than 3%. Cultural differences between patients and nurses may cause harm and a mistrust that can affect patient outcomes. A mixed methods convergent research study was done by an…

  10. Severity of psychiatric and physical problems is associated with lower quality of life in methadone patients in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, Shelly; van Crevel, Reinout; Hidayat, Teddy; Siregar, Ike M P; Achmad, Tri H; van der Ven, Andre J; De Jong, Cor A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) is to reduce the harm and to improve patients' quality of life (Qol). However, the Qol is also influenced by other co-occurring disorders. Data regarding the Qol and the co-occurrence of these disorders is lacking in low-middle income countries. We therefore describe the prevalence of physical, psychiatric, and drug abuse co-occurring disorders among MMT patients in Indonesia and determine the association between the severity of the co-occurring disorders and the Qol. Data were collected in 112 injection drug abusers (IDUs) attending a MMT program in West Java, Indonesia, using validated questionnaires, medical records and laboratory testing. For comparison, 154 IDUs not enrolled in MMT were recruited by respondent driven sampling. The most frequent co-occurring disorders were hepatitis C (92%), HIV (77%), benzodiazepine abuse (56%), and anxiety disorders (32%). IDUs in MMT had one (26%), two (47%), or three (27%) co-occurring disorders. Higher severity in psychiatric and physical problems was associated with poorer Qol. IDUs not enrolled in MMT had similar co-occurring problems. The prevalence of co-occurring disorders in IDUs in Indonesia is high and they influence their Qol. Therefore, comprehensive treatment, especially focusing on the common co-occurring disorders should be provided in MMT to improve the Qol. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  11. Exploration of large, rare copy number variants associated with psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders in individuals with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Zeynep; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Crowley, James J; Ancalade, NaEshia; Brandys, Marek K; van Elburg, Annemarie; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Adan, Roger A H; Hinney, Anke; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gratacos, Monica; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Escaramis, Georgia; Gonzalez, Juan R; Estivill, Xavier; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Sullivan, Patrick F; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-08-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious and heritable psychiatric disorder. To date, studies of copy number variants (CNVs) have been limited and inconclusive because of small sample sizes. We conducted a case-only genome-wide CNV survey in 1983 female AN cases included in the Genetic Consortium for Anorexia Nervosa. Following stringent quality control procedures, we investigated whether pathogenic CNVs in regions previously implicated in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders were present in AN cases. We observed two instances of the well-established pathogenic CNVs in AN cases. In addition, one case had a deletion in the 13q12 region, overlapping with a deletion reported previously in two AN cases. As a secondary aim, we also examined our sample for CNVs over 1 Mbp in size. Out of the 40 instances of such large CNVs that were not implicated previously for AN or neuropsychiatric phenotypes, two of them contained genes with previous neuropsychiatric associations, and only five of them had no associated reports in public CNV databases. Although ours is the largest study of its kind in AN, larger datasets are needed to comprehensively assess the role of CNVs in the etiology of AN.

  12. Evidence for the Existing American Nurses Association-Recognized Standardized Nursing Terminologies: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tastan, Sevinc; Linch, Graciele C. F.; Keenan, Gail M.; Stifter, Janet; McKinney, Dawn; Fahey, Linda; Dunn Lopez, Karen; Yao, Yingwei; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the state of the science for the five standardized nursing terminology sets in terms of level of evidence and study focus. Design Systematic Review. Data sources Keyword search of PubMed, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases from 1960s to March 19, 2012 revealed 1,257 publications. Review Methods From abstract review we removed duplicate articles, those not in English or with no identifiable standardized nursing terminology, and those with a low-level of evidence. From full text review of the remaining 312 articles, eight trained raters used a coding system to record standardized nursing terminology names, publication year, country, and study focus. Inter-rater reliability confirmed the level of evidence. We analyzed coded results. Results On average there were 4 studies per year between 1985 and 1995. The yearly number increased to 14 for the decade between 1996–2005, 21 between 2006–2010, and 25 in 2011. Investigators conducted the research in 27 countries. By evidence level for the 312 studies 72.4% were descriptive, 18.9% were observational, and 8.7% were intervention studies. Of the 312 reports, 72.1% focused on North American Nursing Diagnosis-International, Nursing Interventions Classification, Nursing Outcome Classification, or some combination of those three standardized nursing terminologies; 9.6% on Omaha System; 7.1% on International Classification for Nursing Practice; 1.6% on Clinical Care Classification/Home Health Care Classification; 1.6% on Perioperative Nursing Data Set; and 8.0% on two or more standardized nursing terminology sets. There were studies in all 10 foci categories including those focused on concept analysis/classification infrastructure (n = 43), the identification of the standardized nursing terminology concepts applicable to a health setting from registered nurses’ documentation (n = 54), mapping one terminology to another (n = 58), implementation of standardized nursing terminologies into electronic health

  13. Chelsea, Pimlico and Belgravia District Nursing Association 1930-1939: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Julie

    2017-07-02

    The case study explores how the expansion of the health services during the interwar period impacted upon the status of district nursing and examines how being a voluntary service shaped district nursing associations. A range of primary sources were used; the Association Annual Reports, the Medical Officer for Health Annual Reports for the Borough of Chelsea, the Ministry of Health records, the archives of the Queen's Nursing Institute (QNI) and the Borough of Chelsea Council Minutes. The Medical Officer for Health Reports and the Council minutes identify efforts to improve environmental factors that impacted upon health. These primary sources briefly note the contribution of the Association suggesting that it was integral to the health care provision but considered a constant. The impact of changes to the 1932 Sunday Entertainments Act provide an interesting juxtaposition between the acknowledged value of district nursing and the constant struggle to fundraise in order to provide home nursing. Throughout the 1930s the Association experienced staff shortages and challenges regarding recruitment. The complexities of payment for municipal health services following the 1929 Local Government Act contributed to the staffing challenges. The move to a block grant in 1938 provided increased stability with regards to income. The case study identifies a contradiction regarding the esteem and value placed upon district nursing associations providing home nursing and the constant challenge of resources. District nursing services face similar challenges and this is the 130 th anniversary of the Queen's Nursing Institute.

  14. Psychiatric symptom typology in a sample of youth receiving substance abuse treatment services: associations with self-reported child maltreatment and sexual risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshri, Assaf; Tubman, Jonathan G; Jaccard, James

    2011-11-01

    Latent profile analysis (LPA) was used to classify 394 adolescents undergoing substance use treatment, based on past year psychiatric symptoms. Relations between profile membership and (a) self-reported childhood maltreatment experiences and (b) current sexual risk behavior were examined. LPA generated three psychiatric symptom profiles: Low-, High- Alcohol-, and High- Internalizing Symptoms profiles. Analyses identified significant associations between profile membership and childhood sexual abuse and emotional neglect ratings, as well as co-occurring sex with substance use and unprotected intercourse. Profiles with elevated psychiatric symptom scores (e.g., internalizing problems, alcohol abuse and dependence symptoms) and more severe maltreatment histories reported higher scores for behavioral risk factors for HIV/STI exposure. Heterogeneity in psychiatric symptom patterns among youth receiving substance use treatment services, and prior histories of childhood maltreatment, have significant implications for the design and delivery of HIV/STI prevention programs to this population.

  15. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics: a reflection on the ethics of respect and human dignity with nurse as expert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Constance L

    2003-10-01

    The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses calls for the nurse to practice with compassion and respect for every individual. What are the ethics and challenges of practicing professional nursing with expertise and educating a new generation of nurses while incorporating the interpretive statements into practice? This column differentiates the traditional biomedical views on human dignity and respect while exploring the embedded ethics of respect and self-determination and what it truly means to be an expert of nursing from the theoretical perspective of the human becoming school of thought.

  16. Dyssomnias, parasomnias, and sleep disorders associated with medical and psychiatric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlen, G M; Stacy, C

    1994-03-01

    Sleep disorders can be intrinsic, as are insomnia or narcolepsy, or can be accounted for by external factors, such as noise, altitude, drug or alcohol abuse, or shift work. The arousal disorders, common in children, are usually benign and disappear by puberty. Sleep-wake transition disorders such as sleep starts are benign as well, and may occur at any age. The parasomnias comprise different entities such as nightmares, REM-sleep behavior disorder, sleep enuresis, and bruxism. Diagnosis and treatment often require a multidisciplinary approach. Virtually every psychiatric, neurologic, or medical disease, when of sufficient severity, leaves its specific fingerprint on sleep; some disorders, such as peptic ulcer disease, gastroesophageal reflux, or epilepsy, tend to be exacerbated during sleep. Fortunately, most sleep disorders are amenable to therapy, which can include counseling, sleep hygiene, withholding of an offending agent, behavioral therapy, light therapy, or cautious drug therapy.

  17. Nursing qualification and workforce for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Economic Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendi, Ferry; Nursalam, N; Kurniati, Anna; Gunawan, Joko

    2018-01-23

    International nurse migration among Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries has the potential to increase the effectiveness of health services and access for the ASEAN Economic Community. Providing equivalent nursing qualifications and licensure standards and increasing the availability of the nursing workforce has become a challenge for ASEAN members. The purpose of this study is: 1) to comparatively analyze information on nursing licensing examinations (NLE) across ASEAN countries; and 2) to present information on the human resources required for a successful nursing workforce. This study reviews all documents published on the subject within the ASEAN Economic Community. NLE systems exist in all ASEAN Member States (AMSs)s except Brunei, Vietnam, and Lao PDR. Nursing education systems also vary across ASEAN countries. Language as a means of general communication and nursing examinations also differs. The availability of a qualified health workforce at the regional level is above the threshold in some areas. However, at the national level, Indonesia, Myanmar, Cambodia, and Lao PDR fall below the threshold. Professional licensure requirements differ among ASEAN nurses as a part of the process to become a qualified nurse in host and source countries. Mutual Recognition Agreements on nursing services should address the differences in NLE requirements as well as the availability of nurses. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Associations of menopausal symptoms with job-related stress factors in nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Kazuyo; Uemura, Hirokazu; Yasui, Toshiyuki

    2014-09-01

    The main objective was to ascertain the typical menopausal symptoms and job-related stress factors in Japanese nurses during the menopausal transition, and the associations of menopausal symptoms with job-related stress. A supplementary objective was to determine whether there were any differences in menopausal symptoms and job-related stress factors among nurses in managerial positions. One thousand seven hundred female registered nurses aged 45-60 years who were working in hospitals in Japan were asked to complete a self-administered survey that included Greene's Climacteric Scale and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. The proportions of nurses who reported feelings of tiredness, irritability and difficulty in concentration were higher than the proportions with other menopausal symptoms. The proportions of nurses reporting feeling unhappy or depressed and having crying spells were higher among nurses in managerial positions than among other nurses. Stresses related to 'quantitative overload' on the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire among nurses in managerial positions were significantly greater than among nurses not in managerial positions, while stresses related to 'physical overload', 'job control', 'skill discretion', 'workplace environment' and 'job satisfaction' among nurses not in managerial positions were significantly greater than they were among nurses in managerial positions. Psychological symptoms were significantly correlated with poor job-related interpersonal relationships. Health care practitioners should be aware that menopausal symptoms are associated with job-related stress during the menopausal transition. Information on the differences in these associations between nurses in managerial positions and other nurses is important as it will allow their health care to be managed on a more individual basis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Determinants for the use of psychotropics among nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Uhrskov; Foldspang, A; Gulmann, N C

    2001-01-01

    's Activities of Daily Living (ADL), behavioural problems (Nursing Home Behavior Problem Scale), orientation, communication skills and if the resident had any psychiatric disorder. Multiple logistic regression was used to select the items that determined the use of psychotropics. Results Fifty-six percent......Purpose To characterise the prescription pattern of psychotropics in Danish nursing homes and to identify diagnostic, behavioural, cognitive and performance characteristics associated with prevalent psychotropic drug use. Methods Prescribed daily medication was recorded from nurses' files. Based...

  20. Job satisfaction, stress and burnout associated with haemodialysis nursing: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Bronwyn; Bonnet, Ann

    2010-12-01

    Job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout are linked to high rates of nurses leaving the profession, poor morale and poor patient outcomes. Haemodialysis (HD) nursing is uniquely characterised by the intense-prolonged interaction with patients who require complex technological care. A review of nine papers found that factors affecting job satisfaction were aspects of nursing care, organisational factors and length of time that a nurse has been working in nephrology nursing. Factors affecting job stress and burnout were due to interpersonal relationships with physicians, patient care activities, violence and abuse from patients, organisational factors and a lack of access to ongoing education. © 2010 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  1. Demographic factors associated with moral sensitivity among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Lützén, Kim

    2017-11-01

    Today's healthcare environment is often characterized by an ethically demanding work situation, and nursing students need to prepare to meet ethical challenges in their future role. Moral sensitivity is an important aspect of the ethical decision-making process, but little is known regarding nursing students' moral sensitivity and its possible development during nursing education. The aims of this study were to investigate moral sensitivity among nursing students, differences in moral sensitivity according to sample sub-group, and the relation between demographic characteristics of nursing students and moral sensitivity. A convenience sample of 299 nursing students from one university completed a questionnaire comprising questions about demographic information and the revised Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire. With the use of SPSS, non-parametric statistics, including logistic regression models, were used to investigate the relationship between demographic characteristics and moral sensitivity. Ethical considerations: The study followed the regulations according to the Swedish Ethical Review Act and was reviewed by the Ethics Committee of South-East Sweden. The findings showed that mean scores of nursing students' moral sensitivity were found in the middle to upper segment of the rating scale. Multivariate analysis showed that gender (odds ratio = 3.32), age (odds ratio = 2.09; 1.73), and parental status (odds ratio = 0.31) were of relevance to nursing students' moral sensitivity. Academic year was found to be unrelated to moral sensitivity. These demographic aspects should be considered when designing ethics education for nursing students. Future studies should continue to investigate moral sensitivity in nursing students, such as if and how various pedagogical strategies in ethics may contribute to moral sensitivity in nursing students.

  2. Whose life is it anyway? An exploration of five contemporary ethical issues that pertain to the psychiatric nursing care of the person who is suicidal: part one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutcliffe, John R; Links, Paul S

    2008-08-01

    It is self-evident that ethical issues are important topics for consideration for those involved in the care of the person who is suicidal. Nevertheless, despite the obvious relationship between Mental Health nurses and care of the person who is suicidal, such nurses have hitherto been mostly silent on these matters. As a result, this two-part paper focuses on a number of contemporary issues which might help inform the ethical discourse and resultant Mental Health nursing care of the person who is suicidal. Part one of this paper focuses on the issues: Whose life is it anyway? Harming of our bodies and the inconsistency in ethical responses and, Is suicide ever a reasonable thing to do? The authors find that this contemporary view within the suicidology academe and the corresponding legal position in most western (developed) countries is that the individual owns his/her own body. Yet given that contemporary mental healthcare policy and associated practice positions do not reflect view, this can easily lead to the scenario where a Mental Health nurse is faced with a major ethical dilemma, and the corresponding probability of moral distress. The authors also find that it is inaccurate to posit a simple positive correlation between the potential seriousness and/or extent of bodily harm and the degree of paternalistic removal of an individual's rights to personal body ownership. Lastly, the authors find that the relevant theoretical and ethical literature in this area suggests, at least for some and under certain conditions, suicide can be the right thing to do.

  3. Toxocara seroprevalence among clinically healthy individuals, pregnant women and psychiatric patients and associated risk factors in Shandong Province, Eastern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Toxocarosis is a widespread zoonosis caused by the ascarid nematodes Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati, which primarily infect dogs and cats, respectively. Most human infections with Toxocara are asymptomatic; however, some infected individuals may develop a serious illness and even death. Nevertheless, epidemiological knowledge regarding the prevalence and risks associated with Toxocara infection is limited in China. Therefore, we performed a cross-sectional pilot study and estimated the seroprevalence of Toxocara infection in humans in Shandong Province, eastern China for the first time, from June 2011 to July 2013, involving clinically healthy individuals, pregnant women and psychiatric patients, aiming to attract public attention to Toxocara infection.Seroprevalence of Toxocara was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on a cross-sectional study conducted in Qingdao and Weihai, Shandong Province, eastern China. Factors potentially associated with Toxocara infection were identified by logistic regression analysis. The overall Toxocara seroprevalence among the study population (n = 2866 was 12.25%, and a significantly higher seroprevalence in psychiatric patients (16.40%, 73/445 than that in clinically healthy individuals (13.07%, 187/1431 and pregnant women (9.19%, 91/990 was revealed. Univariate analyses suggested that keeping dogs at home (OR = 0.06, 95% CI 0.05-0.08, P<0.001, contact with cats and dogs (OR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.33-0.53, P<0.001 and exposure with soil (OR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.28-0.49, P<0.001 were risk factors associated with Toxocara infection.The present study revealed, for the first time, that human infection with Toxocara is common in eastern China, posing a significant public health concern. Increasing human and dog populations, population movements and climate change all will serve to increase the importance of this zoonosis. Further studies under controlled conditions are necessary to define potential

  4. Associations of professional quality of life and social support with health in clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chia-Yun; Yang, Mei-Sang; Leung, Wan; Liu, Yea-Ying; Huang, Hui-Wen; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2018-03-01

    To explore the associations of the professional quality of life and social support with health in nurses. Physical and mental health may be associated with absence from work among nurses. Few studies have explored the associations of professional quality of life and social support on the physical and mental health of nurses. This was a cross-sectional study. In total, 294 nurses were recruited from a hospital in Southern Taiwan. A self-report questionnaire was used to collect data. Burnout, secondary traumatic stress and social support from relatives or friends were important factors of physical and mental health. Interactions between support from relatives or friends and secondary traumatic stress are important factors in physical health. Reducing burnout and secondary traumatic stress is important for physical and mental health of nurses. Increasing social support from relatives or friends may be useful to reduce the negative effects of secondary traumatic stress on the physical health of nurses. Nurse managers could design interventions to reduce and prevent nurses from being influenced by burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Educating nurses to build effective social networks with relatives or friends and to seek support when experiencing secondary traumatic stress may also be needed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A Gadamerian Phenomenological Study Examining the Meaning of Having a Bachelor's Degree Expressed by Associate Degree Nurses (ADN) Who Educationally Transitioned to a Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing (BSN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauld, Jill Pierpont

    2017-01-01

    Since the inception of associate degree nursing programs, professional nursing conversations and debate have grappled with reckoning differences between the associate degree in nursing (ADN) and the bachelor's degree in nursing (BSN). Research reporting better patient outcomes with more baccalaureate prepared nurses has been a driving force for…

  6. American Association for Emergency Psychiatry Task Force on Medical Clearance of Adult Psychiatric Patients. Part II: Controversies over Medical Assessment, and Consensus Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Wilson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The emergency medical evaluation of psychiatric patients presenting to United States emergency departments (ED, usually termed “medical clearance,” often varies between EDs. A task force of the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry (AAEP, consisting of physicians from emergency medicine, physicians from psychiatry and a psychologist, was convened to form consensus recommendations for the medical evaluation of psychiatric patients presenting to U.S.EDs. Methods: The task force reviewed existing literature on the topic of medical evaluation of psychiatric patients in the ED and then combined this with expert consensus. Consensus was achieved by group discussion as well as iterative revisions of the written document. The document was reviewed and approved by the AAEP Board of Directors. Results: Eight recommendations were formulated. These recommendations cover various topics in emergency medical examination of psychiatric patients, including goals of medical screening in the ED, the identification of patients at low risk for co-existing medical disease, key elements in the ED evaluation of psychiatric patients including those with cognitive disorders, specific language replacing the term “medical clearance,” and the need for better science in this area. Conclusion: The evidence indicates that a thorough history and physical examination, including vital signs and mental status examination, are the minimum necessary elements in the evaluation of psychiatric patients. With respect to laboratory testing, the picture is less clear and much more controversial.

  7. American Association for Emergency Psychiatry Task Force on Medical Clearance of Adult Psychiatric Patients. Part II: Controversies over Medical Assessment, and Consensus Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael P; Nordstrom, Kimberly; Anderson, Eric L; Ng, Anthony T; Zun, Leslie S; Peltzer-Jones, Jennifer M; Allen, Michael H

    2017-06-01

    The emergency medical evaluation of psychiatric patients presenting to United States emergency departments (ED), usually termed "medical clearance," often varies between EDs. A task force of the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry (AAEP), consisting of physicians from emergency medicine, physicians from psychiatry and a psychologist, was convened to form consensus recommendations for the medical evaluation of psychiatric patients presenting to U.S.EDs. The task force reviewed existing literature on the topic of medical evaluation of psychiatric patients in the ED and then combined this with expert consensus. Consensus was achieved by group discussion as well as iterative revisions of the written document. The document was reviewed and approved by the AAEP Board of Directors. Eight recommendations were formulated. These recommendations cover various topics in emergency medical examination of psychiatric patients, including goals of medical screening in the ED, the identification of patients at low risk for co-existing medical disease, key elements in the ED evaluation of psychiatric patients including those with cognitive disorders, specific language replacing the term "medical clearance," and the need for better science in this area. The evidence indicates that a thorough history and physical examination, including vital signs and mental status examination, are the minimum necessary elements in the evaluation of psychiatric patients. With respect to laboratory testing, the picture is less clear and much more controversial.

  8. Ethical and legal challenges associated with disaster nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbari, Fatemeh; Hammad, Karen; Bahrami, Masoud; Aein, Fereshteh

    2015-06-01

    In disaster situations, nurses may face new and unfamiliar ethical and legal challenges not common in their everyday practice. The aim of this study was to explore Iranian nurses' experience of disaster response and their perception of the competencies required by nurses in this environment. This article discusses the findings of a descriptive study conducted in Iran in 2012. This research was conducted in Iran in 2012. Participants included 35 nurses who had experience in healthcare delivery following a disaster event in the past 10 years, either in a hospital or out-of-hospital context. This research study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. From this study, five themes emerged as areas that nurses require competence in to work effectively in the disaster setting. This article focusses on one theme, the ethical and legal issues that arise during disaster response. Within the theme of ethical and legal issues, two sub-themes emerged. (1) Professional ethics explores professional responsibility of nurses as well as sense of ethical obligation. (2) Adherence to law refers to nurses' familiarity with and observation of legal requirements. This article adds to a growing pool of literature which explores the role of nurses in disasters. The findings of this study emphasize the need for nurses working in the disaster setting to be aware of professional responsibilities and familiar with legal requirements and the challenges related to observing ethical responsibilities. In highlighting these issues, this article may provide a useful starting point for the development of an educational framework for preparing nurses and other health professionals to work in the disaster setting. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. MODEL OF EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT NURSE PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT BASED ON ASSOCIATION OF INDIVIDUAL CHARACTERISTIC, ORGANIZATION CHARACTERISTIC AND JOB CHARACTERISTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Margaretha Bogar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing care is integral part of health care and having important role in management of patient with emergency condition. The purpose of this research was to develop nurse performance improvement model based on individual, organization and job characteristics association in Emergency Department of RSUD dr TC Hillers Maumere. Method: This was an explanative survey by cross sectional approach held on July -August 2012. Respondents in this study were 22 nurses and 44 patients were obtained by purposive sampling technique. Data were analyzed by partial least square test and signi fi cant t value > 1.64 (alpha 10%. Result: Results showed that individual characteristic had effect on nurse performance (t = 7.59, organization characteristic had effect on nurse performance (t = 2.03 and job characteristic didn’t have effect on nurse performance (t = 0.88. Nurse performance had effect on patient satisfaction (t = 6.54 but nurse satisfaction didn’t have effect on nurse performance (t = 1.31, and nurse satisfaction didn’t have effect either on patient satisfaction (t = 0.94. Discussion: This research concluded that individual characteristics which in fl uence nurse performance in nursing care were ability and skill, experience, age, sex, attitude and motivation. Organization characteristic that influence nurse performance was reward while job characteristic that include job design and feedback didn’t influence nurse performance in nursing care. Nurse performance influenced patient satisfaction but nurse satisfaction didn’t influence patient satisfaction and nurse performance.

  10. Bilingual children referred for psychiatric services: associations of language disorders, language skills, and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toppelberg, Claudio O; Medrano, Laura; Peña Morgens, Liana; Nieto-Castañon, Alfonso

    2002-06-01

    To investigate (1) the prevalence of language deficits and disorders and (2) the relationship of bilingual language skills and psychopathology, in Spanish-English bilingual children referred for child and adolescent psychiatry services. Bilingual language skills, emotional/behavioral problems, sociodemographics, immigration variables, and nonverbal IQ were studied in 50 consecutively referred children. Estimated prevalence was high for language deficits (48%) and disorders (41%), with most cases (>79%) being of the mixed receptive-expressive type. In children with clinically significant emotional/behavioral problems, bilingual language skills were strongly and inversely correlated with problem scores, particularly global problems (r = -0.67, p or = -0.54; p language disorders and delays and (2) the close tie between poor language skills and emotional/behavioral problems. The data strongly suggest the clinical importance and feasibility of language assessment and the significance of receptive problems in bilingual children referred for psychiatric services. A safe approach is to fully assess language skills, rather than misattributing these children's language delays to normal bilingual acquisition processes.

  11. Animal Models of Speech and Vocal Communication Deficits Associated With Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Genevieve; Roberts, Todd F

    2016-01-01

    Disruptions in speech, language, and vocal communication are hallmarks of several neuropsychiatric disorders, most notably autism spectrum disorders. Historically, the use of animal models to dissect molecular pathways and connect them to behavioral endophenotypes in cognitive disorders has proven to be an effective approach for developing and testing disease-relevant therapeutics. The unique aspects of human language compared with vocal behaviors in other animals make such an approach potentially more challenging. However, the study of vocal learning in species with analogous brain circuits to humans may provide entry points for understanding this human-specific phenotype and diseases. We review animal models of vocal learning and vocal communication and specifically link phenotypes of psychiatric disorders to relevant model systems. Evolutionary constraints in the organization of neural circuits and synaptic plasticity result in similarities in the brain mechanisms for vocal learning and vocal communication. Comparative approaches and careful consideration of the behavioral limitations among different animal models can provide critical avenues for dissecting the molecular pathways underlying cognitive disorders that disrupt speech, language, and vocal communication. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Research and Development for a Course in Ethics in Nursing Practice for Community College Associate Degree Nursing Students. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Jeanette

    A project was undertaken to research and acquire the instructional sources needed for a course in ethics for community college associate degree nursing students and to develop such a course. Addressed in the individual units of the course were the following topics: bioethics and ethical decision making, basic ethical concepts and principles,…

  13. PROTECTING CHILDREN FROM ENVIRONMENTAL THREATS - A CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM FOR NURSES OF THE AMERICAN NURSES FOUNDATION/ASSOCIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The American Nurses Association/Foundation will develop online, in print and pre conference continuing education (CE) children's environmental health protection programs to meet the objective of the program. The first CE program is on school environments, the second on home and ...

  14. Nursing job satisfaction, certification and healthcare-associated infections in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boev, Christine; Xue, Ying; Ingersoll, Gail L

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between nursing job satisfaction and healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in adult critical care. Multilevel modelling was used to examine the relationship between nursing job satisfaction and two HAIs, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and central-line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). Units with nurses that reported satisfaction with organisational policies were associated with a 6.08 decrease in VAP (p=0.013) and units with nurses reporting favourable perception of task requirements were associated with a 7.02 decrease in VAP (.014). Positive perception of organisational policies was associated with lower rates of CLABSI (p=0.002). Unexpected findings include a positive relationship between perception of pay and autonomy and CLABSI as well as perception of interactions and VAP. Units with a higher proportion of Critical Care Registered Nurse (CCRN) certified nurses were associated with lower rates of both CLABSI (pjob satisfaction and HAIs in critical care, although some relationships were counterintuitive. A secondary finding included significant relationships between CCRN certified nurses and HAIs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The lived experience of participation in student nursing associations and leadership behaviors: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidus-Graham, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological research study was to obtain vivid descriptions of the lived experience of nurses who participated in a student nursing association (SNA) as students. Nursing graduates from five nursing programs in Long Island, New York were identified using a purposive sampling strategy. During individual interviews, the themes of the lived experiences of the participants emerged: (1) leadership: communication, collaboration and resolving conflict, (2) mentoring and mutual support, (3) empowerment and ability to change practice, (4) professionalism, (5) sense of teamwork, and (6) accountability and responsibility. Recommendations from the study included an orientation and mentoring of new students to the SNA by senior students and faculty. Additionally, nursing faculty could integrate SNA activities within the classroom and clinical settings to increase the awareness of the benefits of participation in a student nursing organization. Recommendations for future research include a different sample and use of different research designs.

  16. Psychiatric mental health evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Michael J

    2008-05-01

    This article is the first in a new column focusing on evidence-based practice (EBP) in psychiatric mental health nursing. The EBP movement was strongly influenced by a British epidemiologist, Dr. Cochrane, who advocated care based on randomized clinical controlled trials in the late 1900s. Although the majority of the EBP movement is directed toward developing clinical guidelines, the critical element focuses on the therapeutic relationship and clinical judgment associated with providing care. This column will address a clinical problem, define PICO questions, report knowledge base searches, and present existing evidence. Recommendations will be offered for potential interventions and suggestions for evaluating clinical outcomes. Nurses can no longer view clinical studies as academic exercises discarded on graduation and not applied to the clinical setting. Conscientiously applying what is known about treatments and interventions of ethical, if not legal, value is consistent with the professional definition of care. J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc, 2008; 14(2), 107-111. DOI: 10.1177/1078390308315798.

  17. Perceptions of Community of Associate Degree Nurse Learners in an RN-to-BSN Online Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebar, Cherie R.

    2010-01-01

    Registered Nurses (RNs), when educated in an Associate Degree (AD) program, learn in a face-to-face environment. Today's preferred standard of education for RNs is to achieve a minimum of a Bachelor's degree. For convenience while they continue working, numerous AD-prepared nurses seek online education to complete their Bachelor of Science in…

  18. Elucidating the association between the self-harm inventory and several borderline personality measures in an inpatient psychiatric sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellbom, Martin; Sansone, Randy A; Songer, Douglas A

    2017-09-01

    The current study evaluated the utility of the self-harm inventory (SHI) as a proxy for and screening measure of borderline personality disorder (BPD) using several diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM)-based BPD measures as criteria. We used a sample of 145 psychiatric inpatients, who completed the SHI and a series of well-validated, DSM-based self-report measures of BPD. Using a series of latent trait and latent class analyses, we found that the SHI was substantially associated with a latent construct representing BPD, as well as differentiated latent classes of 'high' vs. 'low' BPD, with good accuracy. The SHI can serve as proxy for and a good screening measure for BPD, but future research needs to replicate these findings using structured interview-based measurement of BPD.

  19. Does educating nurses with ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention guidelines improve their compliance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloush, Sami M

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to compare the compliance with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP)-prevention guidelines between nurses who underwent an intensive educational program and those who did not, and to investigate other factors that influence nurses' compliance. A 2-group posttest design was used to examine the effect of the VAP-prevention guidelines education on nurses' compliance. Participants were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The overall nurses' compliance scores were moderate. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the nurses who received VAP education and those who did not (t[100] = -1.43; P = .15). The number of beds in the unit and the nurse-patient ratio were found to influence nurses' compliance. Education in VAP-prevention guidelines will not improve nurses' compliance unless other confounding factors, such as their workload, are controlled. It is imperative to reduce nurses' workload to improve their compliance and enhance the effectiveness of education. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Burnout and its association with resilience in nurses: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-Fang; Luo, Yuan-Hui; Lam, Louisa; Cross, Wendy; Plummer, Virginia; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and extent of burnout on nurses and its association with personal resilience. With the worldwide shortage of nurses, nurse burnout is considered one of the main contributing factors and has been the focus of studies in recent years. Given the well-documented high level of burnout among nurses, resilience is expected to be a significant predictor of nurse burnout. The association between burnout and resilience has not previously been investigated extensively. A cross-sectional survey design was selected. A total of 1,061 nurses from six separate three-level hospitals in Hunan Province, China, returned self-reported questionnaires from March-June 2015. Data were collected using a socio-demographic sheet, Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Nurses experienced severe burnout symptoms and showed a moderate level of resilience. Three metrics of burnout had significantly negative correlations with the total score and following variables of resilience. Linear regression analysis showed resilience, especially strength, demographic characteristics (exercise, alcohol use and marital status) and job characteristics (income per month, ratio of patients to nurses, shift work and professional rank) were the main predictors of the three metrics of burnout. The findings of this study may help nurse managers and hospital administrators to have a better understanding of nurse burnout and resilience. The significantly negative relationship between burnout symptoms and resilience has been demonstrated, and this informs the role of resilience in influencing burnout. Adaptable and effective interventions for improving resilience are needed to relieve nurses' burnout and reduce workplace stress. Moreover, nurse managers and hospital administrators should establish an effective management system to cultivate a healthy workplace and adopt positive attitudes and harmonious relationships. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  1. Perinatal and psychosocial circumstances associated with risk of attempted suicide, non-suicidal self-injury and psychiatric service use. A longitudinal study of young people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, Robert

    2011-11-18

    Abstract Background Past studies using large population based datasets link certain perinatal circumstances (birth weight, parity, etc) with mental health outcomes such as suicide, self-harm and psychiatric problems. Problematically, population datasets omit a number of social confounds. The aim of this study is to replicate past research linking perinatal circumstances and mental health (suicidality and use of psychiatric services) and to determine if such associations remain after adjusting for social circumstances. Methods A longitudinal school-based survey of 2157 young people (surveyed at age 11, 13, 15) followed up in early adulthood (age 19). At age 11 parents of participants provided information about perinatal circumstances (birth weight, birth complications, etc.) and psychiatric service use. Participants provided data about their mental health at age 15 (attempted suicide, suicidal thoughts) and at ages 19 (self-harm, psychiatric service use). In addition, data were collected about their social and psychosocial circumstances (gender, deprivation, religion, sexual behaviour, etc.). Results Predictably, social factors were linked to mental health outcomes. For example, those with same sex partners were more likely (OR 4.84) to self-harm than those without a same sex partner. With a single exception, in both unadjusted and adjusted models, perinatal circumstances were not or only marginally associated with mental health outcomes. The exception was the number of birth complications; young people with two or more complications were approximately 2-3 times more likely than those without complications to use psychiatric services. Conclusions While we failed to replicate results found using large population based datasets, some of our results are compatible with prior research findings. Further, evidence from this study supports the influence of perinatal circumstances (birth complications) on later psychiatric problems, or at least higher than expected contact

  2. Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment for non-psychotic chronic patients and nurses in outpatient mental health care: A controlled pilot study on feasibility and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekkoek, B.; van Meijel, B.; Schene, A.; Smit, A.; Kaasenbrood, A.; Hutschemaekers, G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In psychiatric care professionals perceive some patients as 'difficult', especially patients with long-term non-psychotic disorders. For these patients few evidence-based treatments exist. An intervention program, Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment (ICPT), was developed by the

  3. Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment for non-psychotic chronic patients and nurses in outpatient mental health care: A controlled pilot study on feasibility and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Koekkoek; G. Hutschemaekers; A. Smit; A. Schene; A. Kaasenbrood; prof Berno van Meijel

    2011-01-01

    In psychiatric care professionals perceive some patients as 'difficult', especially patients with long-term non-psychotic disorders. For these patients few evidence-based treatments exist. An intervention program, Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment (ICPT), was developed by the authors. It

  4. Nursing Student Loan Debt: A Secondary Analysis of the National Student Nurses' Association Annual Survey of New Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeg, Veronica D; Mancino, Diane J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe nursing student loan debt and financial choices from a secondary analysis of the National Student Nurses Association Annual New Graduate Survey. The findings in the secondary analysis show loan debt incurred by nursing students comparable to loan debt reported recently for all new college graduates in general. However, comparing types of programs and types of schools yielded clear variations. More than one-third of new graduates who reported having loans to repay were unemployed; more than one-quarter of those who worked part-time and one-quarter of those who worked full-time to finance their education were unemployed; and almost one-third of students whose parents had paid for their education were unemployed. New graduates from for-profit schools were more likely to report they had accumulated high debt to pay for school than all new graduates combined. Nursing students enter the job market with substantial financial debt that may impact their future. Educators and policymakers need to address these growing concerns to sustain a healthy supply of nurses.

  5. The clinical nurse leader: a comparative study of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing vision to role implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Marietta P; Barnett Lammon, Carol Ann; Williams, Eric S

    2011-01-01

    The clinical nurse leader (CNL) is a new nursing role developed from a series of discussions held by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) about revisions in nursing education that would prepare nurses with the competencies needed to work in the current and future health care system. The CNL is supposed to have a direct impact on clinical, functional, satisfaction, and cost outcomes. A number of health care organizations have adapted the role and integrated it into their unique clinical environment, but it remains unclear if the implementation is in line with the AACN's vision. This study investigated this question using the first cohort of graduates at a major university in the Southern United States. Of the 11 graduates, 8 responded to a questionnaire. Results support the idea that these new CNLs function largely in accord with the nine components of the CNL role outlined by the AACN. However, these results also show that different CNL role components are emphasized in different clinical settings. The results suggest that the CNL role as an advanced generalist role is a genuine innovation, rebutting some critiques. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Knowledge levels of intensive care nurses on prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akın Korhan, Esra; Hakverdioğlu Yönt, Gülendam; Parlar Kılıç, Serap; Uzelli, Derya

    2014-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia constitutes a significant concern for ventilated patients in the intensive care unit. This study was planned to evaluate the knowledge of nurses working in general intensive care units concerning evidence-based measures for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia. This study design is cross-sectional. It was carried out on nurses working in the general intensive care units of anesthiology and re-animation clinics. Collection of research data was performed by means of a Nurse Identification Form and a Form of Evidence-Based Knowledge concerning the Prevention of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia. Characterization statistics were shown by percentage, median and interquartile range. Chi-square and Wilcoxon tests and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used as appropriate. The median value of total points scored by nurses on the questionnaire was 4.00 ± 2.00. The difference between the nurses' education levels, duration of work experience and participation in in-service training programmes on ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention and the median value of their total scores on the questionnaire was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). The conclusion of the study was that critical care nurses' knowledge about ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention is poor. © 2013 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  7. A nurse manager succession planning model with associated empirical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titzer, Jennifer L; Shirey, Maria R; Hauck, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Perceptions of leadership and management competency after a formal nurse manager succession planning program were evaluated. A lack of strategic workforce planning and development of a leadership pipeline contributes to a predicted nurse manager shortage. To meet the anticipated needs for future leadership, evidence-based action is critical. A quasi-experimental mixed-methods, 1-group pretest/posttest research design was used. Nurses working in an acute care hospital were recruited for the study and selected using an objective evaluative process. Participant perceptions regarding their leadership and management competencies significantly increased after the leadership program. Program evaluations confirmed that participants found the program beneficial. One year after program completion, 100% of the program participants have been retained at the organization and 73% had transitioned to leadership roles. Succession planning and leadership development serve as beneficial and strategic mechanisms for identifying and developing high-potential individuals for leadership positions, contributing toward the future nursing leadership pipeline.

  8. Attitudes towards suicidal behaviour and associated factors among nursing professionals: A quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacchero Vedana, K G; Magrini, D F; Zanetti, A C G; Miasso, A I; Borges, T L; Dos Santos, M A

    2017-11-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Self-confident health professionals with positive and understanding attitudes can take better care of people with suicidal behaviour, but the factors associated with these attitudes are not known. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: The majority of nursing professionals had no experience or training in mental health or suicide. They were less self-confident and had more negative attitudes. Nurses and nursing assistants who worked before in mental health services were more understanding with people with suicidal behaviour. Nurses and nursing assistants who were working in prehospital services were less self-confident to taking care of people with suicidal behaviour. Some members of the nursing team had already seriously considered committing suicide. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The practicing, support and training in mental health may improve the nurses' attitudes and emotional competencies. It is important to know why few nurses had suicide-related training, despite the relevance of this issue. Training in mental health or suicide need to include attitudinal and emotional competencies. It is important to offer emotional support to emergency nursing professionals. Background The attitudes towards suicide of emergency nurses may affect the care provided. However, the factors associated with these attitudes remain unclear. Objective To investigate attitudes towards suicidal behaviour and associated factors among nursing professionals working in emergency settings. Methods A cross-sectional observational study including 28 nurses and 118 who were nursing assistants employed at two emergency services in Brazil was conducted. Data were collected in 2015 using a self-administered sociodemographic questionnaire and the Suicide Behavior Attitude Questionnaire (SBAQ). Results The majority of participants reported having no experience or training in mental health or suicide. They reported more negative feelings towards the

  9. Death of Dementia Patients in Psychiatric Hospitals and Regional Supply of Psychiatric Services: Study of the National Data from 1996 to 2014 in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Miharu; Niimura, Junko; Yamasaki, Syudo; Nishida, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    Japan designates psychiatric inpatient care for behavior management of individuals with dementia and for helping dementia patients discharge to home. However, there has been no examination of the effectiveness of this strategy. The present study investigated the association between dementia and the discharge destination of patients in psychiatric hospitals. Data from the National Patient Survey, which is a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of inpatient care, were used. The 96,420 patients with dementia or other mental illness who were discharged from psychiatric hospitals in September of every 3 years from 1996 to 2014 were included in analyses. Of the 96,420 discharged patients, 13,823 had dementia as the primary disease. Of the 13,823 dementia patients, 3,865 (28.0%) were discharged to home, 3,870 (28.0%) were admitted to a facility or other care settings, 3,574 (25.9%) were admitted to another hospital, and 2,514 (18.2%) died. Patients were more likely to die in psychiatric hospital if their primary disease was dementia, and they had resided in a region that provided fewer home visits for psychiatric nursing care or had available a larger number of psychiatric hospital beds per capita. Psychiatric inpatient care may be ineffective as a treatment for the challenging behaviors of dementia. A community mental health system for behavior management should be constructed in parallel with a reduction in the number of hospital beds allotted for psychiatric care.

  10. Poor work environments and nurse inexperience are associated with burnout, job dissatisfaction and quality deficits in Japanese hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai-Pak, Masako; Aiken, Linda H; Sloane, Douglas M; Poghosyan, Lusine

    2008-12-01

    To describe nurse burnout, job dissatisfaction and quality of care in Japanese hospitals and to determine how these outcomes are associated with work environment factors. Nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction are associated with poor nurse retention and uneven quality of care in other countries but comprehensive data have been lacking on Japan. Cross-sectional survey of 5956 staff nurses on 302 units in 19 acute hospitals in Japan. Nurses were provided information about years of experience, completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and reported on resource adequacy and working relations with doctors using the Nursing Work Index-Revised. Fifty-six per cent of nurses scored high on burnout, 60% were dissatisfied with their jobs and 59% ranked quality of care as only fair or poor. About one-third had fewer than four years of experience and more than two-thirds had less than 10. Only one in five nurses reported there were enough registered nurses to provide quality care and more than half reported that teamwork between nurses and physicians was lacking. The odds on high burnout, job dissatisfaction and poor-fair quality of care were twice as high in hospitals with 50% inexperienced nurses than with 20% inexperienced nurses and 40% higher in hospitals where nurses had less satisfactory relations with physicians. Nurses in poorly staffed hospitals were 50% more likely to exhibit burnout, twice as likely to be dissatisfied and 75% more likely to report poor or fair quality care than nurses in better staffed hospitals. Improved nurse staffing and working relationships with physicians may reduce nurse burnout, job dissatisfaction and low nurse-assessed quality of care. Staff nurses should engage supervisors and medical staff in discussions about retaining more experienced nurses at the bedside, implementing strategies to enhance clinical staffing and identifying ways to improve nurse-physician working relations.

  11. A review and meta-analysis of the patient factors associated with psychiatric in-patient aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dack, C; Ross, J; Papadopoulos, C; Stewart, D; Bowers, L

    2013-04-01

    To combine the results of earlier comparison studies of in-patient aggression to quantitatively assess the strength of the association between patient factors and i) aggressive behaviour,ii) repetitive aggressive behaviour. A systematic review and meta-analysis of empirical articles and reports of comparison studies of aggression and non-aggression within adult psychiatric in-patient settings. Factors that were significantly associated with in-patient aggression included being younger, male, involuntary admissions, not being married, a diagnosis of schizophrenia, a greater number of previous admissions, a history of violence, a history of self-destructive behaviour and a history of substance abuse. The only factors associated with repeated in-patient aggression were not being male, a history of violence and a history of substance abuse. By comparing aggressive with non-aggressive patients, important differences between the two populations may be highlighted. These differences may help staff improve predictions of which patients might become aggressive and enable steps to be taken to reduce an aggressive incident occurring using actuarial judgements. However, the associations found between these actuarial factors and aggression were small. It is therefore important for staff to consider dynamic factors such as a patient's current state and the context to reduce in-patient aggression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Pediatric nurses' perception of factors associated with caring self-efficacy: A qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Azam; Bahrami, Masoud; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Yousefy, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Nurses, who are considered to form the largest group of professional healthcare providers, face the challenge of maintaining, promoting, and providing quality nursing care and to prepare themselves to function confidently and to care effectively. Among the factors affecting nursing performance, self-efficacy has been expected to have the greatest influence. However, the concept of caring self-efficacy was not considered and no research has been done in this field in Iran. This study was conducted to explore and identify the factors described by pediatric nurses as related to caring self-efficacy. This is a qualitative study conducted through content analysis in 2013 in Iran. Twenty-four participants were selected through purposive sampling method from pediatric nurses and educators. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis method. The analysis of the interviews in this study led to the development of four main themes: (1) Professional knowledge of children caring, (2) experience, (3) caring motivation, and (4) efficient educational system as the factors influencing caring self-efficacy perception of pediatric nurses. This article presents the factors associated with the perception of caring self-efficacy in pediatric nurses' perspective. This finding can be used by nursing administrators and instructors, especially in the area of pediatric caring, to enhance nursing professional practice and the quality of pediatric caring.

  13. Compliance with therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C: associations with psychiatric symptoms, interpersonal problems, and mode of acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, M R; Schäfer, A; Csef, H; Faller, H; Mörk, H; Scheurlen, M

    2001-10-01

    Tolerance of interferon-a therapy for hepatitis C is often poor and medication is expensive. Compliance with diagnostic procedures and, even more important, with medical treatment is obviously critical to minimize the rate of dropouts and to maximize cost efficiency. Moreover, a good concordance with scheduled follow-ups is important for early recognition and treatment of interferon-associated side effects. Therefore, we investigated psychiatric symptoms, interpersonal problems, different modes of acquisition, and sociodemographic factors in HCV-infected patients as possible predictor variables of good versus poor compliance. In a longitudinal study, 74 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) who fulfilled the criteria for treatment with interferon (IFN)-alpha-2b with or without ribavirin were investigated prospectively to identify those at risk for poor compliance during IFN medication. To assess predictive factors, we used both IIP-C (Inventory of Interpersonal Problems) and SCL-90-R (Symptom Check List 90 Items Revised) as psychometric instruments. Sociodemographic and somatic variables as well as compliance during IFN therapy were also evaluated. Poor compliance before or during medication was demonstrated by 23% (N = 17) of HCV patients. Sociodemographic factors and mode of acquisition, particularly former intravenous drug (IVD) abuse were not significantly linked with compliance. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the subgroup of patients with compliance problems was best identified by both pretherapeutic psychiatric symptoms and interpersonal problems. Predictive value was best and significant for anger-hostility (P = 0.009), intrusive (P = 0.014), depression (P = 0.015), and phobic anxiety (P = 0.049). Adopting this statistical prediction model, sensitivity was 47.1%, but specificity reached 98.3%. In total, 86.5% of cases were classified correctly. In situations of unclear indication for IFN therapy, psychological variables assessment of before

  14. Social support and factors associated with self-efficacy among acute-care nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sophia H; Yu, Ya-Mei; Chang, Wen-Yin; Lin, Yen-Kuang

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the relationship of nurse practitioners' social support as well as other factors associated with perceived self-efficacy. There is a growing demand for nurse practitioners in Taiwan, for whom self-perceived efficacy is associated with performance. Nevertheless, research on the self-efficacy and social support of nurse practitioners is limited. This is a cross-sectional survey study. Questionnaires were distributed to nurse practitioners in seven hospitals in northern Taiwan from May 2015 to March 2016. In total, data from 335 (78% return rate) certified nurse practitioners were analysed. Social support was measured by the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ), and perceived self-efficacy was measured by the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE). Data were analysed by ANOVAs with post hoc test and multiple linear regression. The mean score for self-efficacy was 27.60 ± 6.17. Support scores were 11.574 ± 2.37 for supervisors, 12.795 ± 1.92 for coworkers and 64.07 ± 10.16 for family, friends and significant others. nurse practitioners in the high monthly salary group had significantly higher self-efficacy than nurse practitioners in the medium and low monthly salary group (F = 8.99; p Social support from coworkers (β = 0.18, p social support were found to contribute to nurse practitioners' self-efficacy. Thus, to enhance nurse practitioners' self-efficacy and work performance, nursing leaders should address these issues. The findings inform hospital administrators to be aware of the importance of salary in relation to nurse practitioners' perceptions of social support and self-efficacy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mixed methods research in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettles, A M; Creswell, J W; Zhang, W

    2011-08-01

    Mixed methods research is becoming more widely used in order to answer research questions and to investigate research problems in mental health and psychiatric nursing. However, two separate literature searches, one in Scotland and one in the USA, revealed that few mental health nursing studies identified mixed methods research in their titles. Many studies used the term 'embedded' but few studies identified in the literature were mixed methods embedded studies. The history, philosophical underpinnings, definition, types of mixed methods research and associated pragmatism are discussed, as well as the need for mixed methods research. Examples of mental health nursing mixed methods research are used to illustrate the different types of mixed methods: convergent parallel, embedded, explanatory and exploratory in their sequential and concurrent combinations. Implementing mixed methods research is also discussed briefly and the problem of identifying mixed methods research in mental and psychiatric nursing are discussed with some possible solutions to the problem proposed. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  16. Association of psychiatric history and type D personality with symptoms of anxiety, depression, and health status prior to ICD implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrenburg, Annemieke H; Kraaier, Karin; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Personality factors and psychiatric history may help explain individual differences in risk of psychological morbidity and poor health outcomes in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).......Personality factors and psychiatric history may help explain individual differences in risk of psychological morbidity and poor health outcomes in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)....

  17. Survey to child/adolescent psychiatry and developmental/behavioral pediatric training directors to expand psychiatric-mental health training to nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard H; O'Laughlen, Mary C; Kim, Joshua

    2017-06-01

    There is an ongoing shortage of child mental health professionals. Nurse practitioners (NPs) who completed behavioral and mental health training have proven that they can diagnose and manage many pediatric problems. To ask the training directors of both child/adolescent psychiatry (CAP) and developmental/behavioral pediatric (DBP) programs about their receptivity and willingness to give additional training for NPs who provide care to children with behavioral and mental health issues and examine the main obstacles to the development of such programs. A survey was sent to 151 CAP and DBP training directors in the United States. The return rate was 67% (N = 101). Only 12% expressed objection to the concept of additional NP training in CAP or DBP, but only 53% of training directors currently reported having sufficient faculty to do so. Some training directors reported already having advanced behavioral and mental health training programs for NPs (31%) and most (82%) would consider expanding, if funded. There is support for advanced training for NPs, but funding is needed to make this a reality. Expansion of such programs might rapidly improve accessibility and reduce waiting time of mental health providers for children and adolescents. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  18. Association of social skills with psychological distress among female nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Ayako; Odagiri, Yuko; Ohya, Yumiko; Suzuki, Ayako; Hirohata, Kayoko; Kosugi, Shotaro; Shimomitsu, Teruichi

    2011-01-01

    Nursing is a highly stressful occupation. Because nursing work involves interaction with patients and colleagues, competence in social skills may be a key issue in stress management among nurses. However, there are very few studies among nurses focused on social skills together with social support, both of which are important aspects of job stress. The aim of this study was to examine the interrelationships between social skills and social support with job stressors, problem-solving coping, and psychological distress among Japanese nurses. Data from a self-administered questionnaire of 1,197 female nurses who worked for 5 general hospitals in Japan were analyzed. Covariance structure analysis with structural equation modeling techniques showed that social skills and social support were positively related to each other, while they were negatively associated with psychological distress and job stressors, and positively associated with problem-solving coping. Furthermore, the direct association between social skills and psychological distress was stronger than the association between social support and psychological distress. These findings suggested that improving not only social support at work but also individual social skills is important for nurses' mental health.

  19. Factors associated with resident aggression toward caregivers in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Adelheid; Dassen, Theo; Kok, Gerjo; Needham, Ian; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2012-09-01

    Caregivers in nursing homes often experience aggressive behavior of residents. The aim of this study was to explore the caregivers' experiences with aggressive behavior from residents and to identify environmental factors as well as caregiver and resident characteristics related to aggressive behavior in Swiss nursing homes. A retrospective cross-sectional survey was conducted between November 2010 and April 2011 with a sample of caregivers working in various nursing homes in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. In total, 814 caregivers (response rate 51.8%) of 21 nursing homes participated in the study. Data were collected using the German version of the Survey of Violence Experienced by Staff (SOVES-G-R). Standard descriptive statistics were used to describe and summarize the date. To identify risk factors related to the experience of aggression by residents, multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied. The prevalence of participants reporting an aggressive incident during the 12-month period prior to data collection was 81.6%. Of these, 76.5% had experienced verbal aggression, 27.6% threats, and 54.0% physical aggression. The predictive variables in the multiple regression model for physical aggression were: staff education level (odds ratio [OR]= 1.82), gender (OR = 1.82), age ( 45 years: OR = 2.13), and confidence in managing physical aggression (OR = 1.49). The predictive variables for threatening behavior were staff education level (registered nurses vs. non-registered nurses: OR = 1.70; nonstudent vs. student: OR = 1.89) and age ( 45 years: OR = 2.04). Caregivers in nursing homes are at high risk for experiencing aggressive behavior. The identified risk factors are in line with earlier investigations, but some contradictory results also were observed. The high risk for registered nurses exposed to aggressive behavior and the increased risk for caregivers who feel confident in managing aggressive behavior cast a critical light on the content and

  20. Advancing nursing home practice: the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Debbie; Morley, John E; Rolland, Yves; Vellas, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the urgent need to improve the provision of long-term care, as well as the known variations in standards of nursing home care around the world, prompted the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology (IAGG), in association with the World Health Organization (WHO), to form a task force. This task force was charged with the identification of the key concerns, research priorities, and actions that would enhance the care provided to older people in nursing homes. Nurses are equipped with the knowledge to take a leadership role in the IAGG/WHO initiative, and the task force eagerly seeks their input. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimating the costs associated with malnutrition in Dutch nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Judith M M; Halfens, Ruud J G; Wilson, Lisa; Schols, Jos M G A

    2012-02-01

    Malnutrition in western health care involves a tremendous burden of illness. In this study the economic implications of malnutrition in Dutch nursing homes are investigated as part of the Health and Economic Impact of Malnutrition in Europe Study from the European Nutrition for Health Alliance. A questionnaire was developed, focussing on the additional time and resources spent to execute all relevant nutritional activities in nursing home patients with at risk of malnutrition or malnourished. Results were extrapolated on national level, based on the prevalence rates gathered within the national Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems 2009. The normal nutritional costs are 319 million Euro per year. The total additional costs of managing the problem of malnutrition in Dutch nursing homes involve 279 million Euro per year and are related to extra efforts in nutritional screening, monitoring and treatment. The extra costs for managing nursing home residents at risk of malnutrition are 8000 euro per patient and 10000 euro for malnourished patients. The extra costs related to malnutrition are a considerable burden for the nursing home sector and urge for preventive measures. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The "DGPPN-Cohort": A national collaboration initiative by the German Association for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (DGPPN) for establishing a large-scale cohort of psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Schmidt, Heike; Adler, Lothar; Aly, Chadiga; Anghelescu, Ion-George; Bauer, Michael; Baumgärtner, Jessica; Becker, Joachim; Bianco, Roswitha; Becker, Thomas; Bitter, Cosima; Bönsch, Dominikus; Buckow, Karoline; Budde, Monika; Bührig, Martin; Deckert, Jürgen; Demiroglu, Sara Y; Dietrich, Detlef; Dümpelmann, Michael; Engelhardt, Uta; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Feldhaus, Daniel; Figge, Christian; Folkerts, Here; Franz, Michael; Gade, Katrin; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Gruber, Oliver; Gullatz, Verena; Gusky, Linda; Heilbronner, Urs; Helbing, Krister; Hegerl, Ulrich; Heinz, Andreas; Hensch, Tilman; Hiemke, Christoph; Jäger, Markus; Jahn-Brodmann, Anke; Juckel, Georg; Kandulski, Franz; Kaschka, Wolfgang P; Kircher, Tilo; Koller, Manfred; Konrad, Carsten; Kornhuber, Johannes; Krause, Marina; Krug, Axel; Lee, Mahsa; Leweke, Markus; Lieb, Klaus; Mammes, Mechthild; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mühlbacher, Moritz; Müller, Matthias J; Nieratschker, Vanessa; Nierste, Barbara; Ohle, Jacqueline; Pfennig, Andrea; Pieper, Marlenna; Quade, Matthias; Reich-Erkelenz, Daniela; Reif, Andreas; Reitt, Markus; Reininghaus, Bernd; Reininghaus, Eva Z; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Rienhoff, Otto; Roser, Patrik; Rujescu, Dan; Schennach, Rebecca; Scherk, Harald; Schmauss, Max; Schneider, Frank; Schosser, Alexandra; Schott, Björn H; Schwab, Sybille G; Schwanke, Jens; Skrowny, Daniela; Spitzer, Carsten; Stierl, Sebastian; Stöckel, Judith; Stübner, Susanne; Thiel, Andreas; Volz, Hans-Peter; von Hagen, Martin; Walter, Henrik; Witt, Stephanie H; Wobrock, Thomas; Zielasek, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Jörg; Zitzelsberger, Antje; Maier, Wolfgang; Falkai, Peter G; Rietschel, Marcella; Schulze, Thomas G

    2013-12-01

    The German Association for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (DGPPN) has committed itself to establish a prospective national cohort of patients with major psychiatric disorders, the so-called DGPPN-Cohort. This project will enable the scientific exploitation of high-quality data and biomaterial from psychiatric patients for research. It will be set up using harmonised data sets and procedures for sample generation and guided by transparent rules for data access and data sharing regarding the central research database. While the main focus lies on biological research, it will be open to all kinds of scientific investigations, including epidemiological, clinical or health-service research.

  3. Stress-related anhedonia is associated with ventral striatum reactivity to reward and transdiagnostic psychiatric symptomatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Frías, Nadia S.; Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Michalski, Lindsay J.; Baranger, David A.A.; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Bogdan, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Background Early life stress (ELS) is consistently associated with increased risk for subsequent psychopathology. Individual differences in neural response to reward may confer vulnerability to stress-related psychopathology. Using data from the ongoing Duke Neurogenetics Study, the present study examined whether reward-related ventral striatum (VS) reactivity moderates the relationship between retrospectively reported ELS and anhedonic symptomatology. We further assessed whether individual differences in reward-related VS reactivity were associated with other depressive symptoms and problematic alcohol use via stress-related anhedonic symptoms and substance use-associated coping. Method Blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was collected while participants (n = 906) completed a card-guessing task, which robustly elicits VS reactivity. ELS, anhedonic symptoms, other depressive symptoms, coping behavior, and alcohol use behavior were assessed with self-report questionnaires. Linear regressions were run to examine whether VS reactivity moderated the relationship between ELS and anhedonic symptoms. Structural equation models examined whether this moderation was indirectly associated with other depression symptoms and problematic alcohol use through its association with anhedonia. Results Analyses of data from 820 participants passing quality control procedures revealed that the VS × ELS interaction was associated with anhedonic symptoms (p = 0.011). Moreover, structural equation models indirectly linked this interaction to non-anhedonic depression symptoms and problematic alcohol use through anhedonic symptoms and substance-related coping. Conclusions These findings suggest that reduced VS reactivity to reward is associated with increased risk for anhedonia in individuals exposed to ELS. Such stress-related anhedonia is further associated with other depressive symptoms and problematic alcohol use through substance-related coping

  4. Taking care of you and care for others: an analysis of the activity of the work of technical and nursing assistants of a psychiatric institution for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Davidson Passos; Moraes, Geraldo Fabiano de Souza; Mendes, Juliana Cristina de Lima

    2012-01-01

    Our objective in this study, the analysis of potential fields of risk management in nursing work in psychiatric care to adolescents and children, while settings that go from the relationship between technical and organizational determinants of work activity and the skills of operators. It was established focus on the work process of the Technical and Nursing Assistants to seek for response elements in an attempt to understand the health-disease process experienced by these workers. It was used for analysis and data collection, through the method of Ergonomic Work Analysis (EWA), fifteen workers of nursing staff - T&NA, between effectives and contractors, and the strategies of action and regulation of these workers in relation to the interface that they deal with. The results show that the workers are exposed to all charges in an intense and specific way, causing physical and mental wear, as it approaches the psychological distress, exposure to the psychic pressure, not only through contact with the object of work, but the complexity of these relationships that are involved in nursing staff.

  5. Characteristics of the Nursing Practice Environment Associated With Lower Unit-Level RN Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Brantley, Heather V; Park, Shin Hye; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine characteristics of the nursing practice environment associated with lower RN turnover. Identifying characteristics of the practice environment that contribute to lower RN turnover is important for meeting the national quality strategy priority of reducing healthcare costs. Data from 1002 adult care units in 162 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators participating hospitals were analyzed using multivariate linear regression. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index was used to measure practice environment characteristics. RN turnover was measured at the unit level. Nursing units with higher overall ratings of the nursing practice environment had lower rates of RN turnover. Units with higher RN perceived staffing and resource adequacy experienced significantly lower RN turnover. Unit managers and hospital administrators should consider RN perception of staffing and resource adequacy and the overall practice environment when developing targeted strategies for decreasing RN turnover.

  6. Factors associated with occupational exposure to biological material among nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrinho, Nádia Bruna da Silva; Malaguti-Toffano, Silmara Elaine; Reis, Renata Karina; Pereira, Fernanda Maria Vieira; Gir, Elucir

    2017-01-01

    to identify factors associated with occupational exposure to biological material among nursing professionals. a cross-sectional study was conducted in a high complexity hospital of a city in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Nursing professionals were interviewed from March to November 2015. All ethical aspects were observed. among the 226 professionals interviewed, 17.3% suffered occupational exposure to potentially contaminated biological material, with 61.5% being percutaneous. Factors such as age (p=0.003), professional experience in nursing (p=0.015), and experience at the institution (p=0.032) were associated with the accidents with biological material. most accidents with biological material among nursing professionals were percutaneous. Age, professional experience, and experience at the institution were considered factors associated with occupational exposure.

  7. Psychological Factors Associated with Emotional Distress among Palestinian Arabs from East Jerusalem Accessing Psychiatric Care in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakash, Ora; Nagar, Maayan; Levav, Itzhak; Danilovich, Eli; Abu-Tair, Mamoun; Podolsky, Grigory

    2016-01-01

    The Palestinian population residing in East Jerusalem is characterized by high rates of poverty and unemployment and is subject to discrimination in various forms, including infrastructure of mental health services. Little is known about the help seeking needs and practices of East Jerusalem residents. We examined socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of a consecutive sample Palestinian residents from East Jerusalem (N=50) who accessed a specially assigned psychiatric clinic in Israel. In addition, we examined the psychological factors associated with emotional distress among these service-users upon entry to care. Participants completed a survey in Arabic that included a socio-demographic questionnaire and measures assessing emotional distress, perceived exposure to discrimination and social support, and mental health stigma. Participants reported high levels of emotional distress. Female gender, low socioeconomic status, higher perceived exposure to discrimination and higher perceived social support were associated with increased emotional distress. Findings add to the scarce body of knowledge on specific mental health characteristics of East Jerusalem Palestinian residents.

  8. Psychosocial morbidity associated with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder in psychiatric out-patients: comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Ellison, William; Morgan, Theresa A; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy

    2015-10-01

    The morbidity associated with bipolar disorder is, in part, responsible for repeated calls for improved detection and recognition. No such commentary exists for the improved detection of borderline personality disorder. Clinical experience suggests that it is as disabling as bipolar disorder, but no study has directly compared the two disorders. To compare the levels of psychosocial morbidity in patients with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. Patients were assessed with semi-structured interviews. We compared 307 patients with DSM-IV borderline personality disorder but without bipolar disorder and 236 patients with bipolar disorder but without borderline personality disorder. The patients with borderline personality disorder less frequently were college graduates, were diagnosed with more comorbid disorders, more frequently had a history of substance use disorder, reported more suicidal ideation at the time of the evaluation, more frequently had attempted suicide, reported poorer social functioning and were rated lower on the Global Assessment of Functioning. There was no difference between the two patient groups in history of admission to psychiatric hospital or time missed from work during the past 5 years. The level of psychosocial morbidity associated with borderline personality disorder was as great as (or greater than) that experienced by patients with bipolar disorder. From a public health perspective, efforts to improve the detection and treatment of borderline personality disorder might be as important as efforts to improve the recognition and treatment of bipolar disorder. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  9. Is the burnout syndrome associated with elder mistreatment in nursing homes: results of a cross-sectional study among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberg, Marijana; Železnik, Danica; Meštrović, Tomislav; Ribić, Rosana; Kozina, Goran

    2017-09-26

    As this issue has not yet been addressed in Croatia, our aim was to explore the presence of the burnout syndrome in nurses and see how it is related to their perception of elder mistreatment in nursing homes and extended care units. The burnout syndrome was assessed in 171 nursing professionals with a standardised Maslach Burnout Inventory for Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) for three dimensions: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA). High EE was reported by 43.9 %, high DP by 22.2 %, and low PA by 39.8 % of the respondents. Their perception of elder abuse and neglect was investigated with two self-completion questionnaires. The answers suggest that elder mistreatment in Croatian nursing homes and extended care units is more common than expected: 55 % witnessed shouting at a resident in anger, 43 % insulting and swearing at a resident, 42 % force-feeding the resident, 39 % ignoring a resident when they called, and 38 % neglecting to turn or move a resident to prevent pressure sores. We also established associations between a number of questionnaire items on perceived abuse and neglect and the burnout syndrome dimensions and determined the items that predicted the type and level of burnout in our respondents. One way to avoid the pitfalls that lead to abuse and neglect is education in schools and at work. We believe our research could contribute to this end.

  10. Changes in Patient and Nurse Outcomes Associated with Magnet Hospital Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Sloane, Douglas M.; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Quinn, Lisa W.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Research has documented an association between Magnet hospitals and better outcomes for nurses and patients. However, little longitudinal evidence exists to support a causal link between Magnet recognition and outcomes. Objective To compare changes over time in surgical patient outcomes, nurse-reported quality, and nurse outcomes in a sample of hospitals that attained Magnet recognition between 1999 and 2007 with hospitals that remained non-Magnet. Research Design Retrospective, two-stage panel design using four secondary data sources. Subjects 136 Pennsylvania hospitals (11 “emerging” Magnets and 125 non-Magnets) Measures American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet recognition; risk-adjusted rates of surgical 30-day mortality and failure-to-rescue, nurse-reported quality measures, and nurse outcomes; the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index Methods Fixed effects difference models were used to compare changes in outcomes between emerging Magnet hospitals and hospitals that remained non-Magnet. Results Emerging Magnet hospitals demonstrated markedly greater improvements in their work environments than other hospitals. On average, the changes in 30-day surgical mortality and failure-to-rescue rates over the study period were more pronounced in emerging Magnet hospitals than in non-Magnet hospitals, by 2.4 fewer deaths per 1000 patients (pMagnet hospitals and non-Magnet hospitals were observed in nurse-reported quality of care and nurse outcomes. Conclusions In general, Magnet recognition is associated with significant improvements over time in the quality of the work environment, and in patient and nurse outcomes that exceed those of non-Magnet hospitals. PMID:25906016

  11. Factors associated with school nurses' HPV vaccine attitudes for school-aged youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany L; DiClemente, Ralph; Shepard, Allie L; Wilson, Kelly L; Fehr, Sara K

    2017-06-01

    School nurses are at the intersection of the healthcare and school communities, thus, they can be considered opinion leaders in providing health advice - including information about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine - to parents and students. This study examined school nurses' attitudes toward the HPV vaccine based on age, years as a school nurse, geographic location, urban vs. rural work setting, HPV and vaccine knowledge, perception of role as opinion leaders, and school district support in providing health education. Participants (n = 413) were systematically sampled from the National Association of School Nurses' membership and completed a web-based survey. Multiple regression was used to predict positive HPV vaccine attitudes. The model was statistically significant accounting for 50.8% of the variance (F [9, 400] = 45.96, p school nurses' positive attitudes towards HPV vaccine. Despite school nurses being seen as champions for adolescent vaccines, they need additional professional development to increase their HPV vaccine knowledge and attitudes to encourage parents and adolescents to consider the uptake of HPV vaccination. To engage school nurses' in promoting HPV vaccine uptake, interventions need to focus on increasing school nurses' perception of their role as opinion leaders for HPV vaccine and knowledge to increase positive attitudes towards HPV vaccination for youth.

  12. Factors associated with reporting nursing errors in Iran: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Fatemeh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reporting the professional errors for improving patient safety is considered essential not only in hospitals, but also in ambulatory care centers. Unfortunately, a great number of nurses, similar to most clinicians, do not report their errors. Therefore, the present study aimed to clarify the factors associated with reporting the nursing errors through the experiences of clinical nurses and nursing managers. Methods A total of 115 nurses working in the hospitals and specialized clinics affiliated to Tehran and Shiraz Universities of Medical Sciences, Iran participated in this qualitative study. The study data were collected through a semi-structured group discussion conducted in 17 sessions and analyzed by inductive content analysis approach. Results The main categories emerged in this study were: a general approaches of the nurses towards errors, b barriers in reporting the nursing errors, and c motivators in error reporting. Conclusion Error reporting provides extremely valuable information for preventing future errors and improving the patient safety. Overall, regarding motivators and barriers in reporting the nursing errors, it is necessary to enact regulations in which the ways of reporting the error and its constituent elements, such as the notion of the error, are clearly identified.

  13. Oxytocin Receptor Genetic and Epigenetic Variations: Association with Child Abuse and Adult Psychiatric Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smearman, Erica L.; Almli, Lynn M.; Conneely, Karen N.; Brody, Gene H.; Sales, Jessica M.; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J.; Smith, Alicia K.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood abuse can alter biological systems and increase risk for adult psychopathology. Epigenetic mechanisms, alterations in DNA structure that regulate the gene expression, are a potential mechanism underlying this risk. While abuse associates with methylation of certain genes, particularly those in the stress response system, no study to date…

  14. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  15. Associations between successful palliative cancer pathways and community nurse involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjoern; Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Most terminally ill cancer patients and their relatives wish that the patient dies at home. Community nurses (CNs) are often frontline workers in the patients' homes and CN involvement may be important in attaining successful palliative pathways at home.The aim of the present...

  16. The association between adjustment disorder diagnosed at psychiatric treatment facilities and completed suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradus, Jaimie L; Qin, Ping; Lincoln, Alisa K

    2010-01-01

    Adjustment disorder is a diagnosis given following a significant psychosocial stressor from which an individual has difficulty recovering. The individual's reaction to this event must exceed what would be observed among similar people experiencing the same stressor. Adjustment disorder is associa...... regression analyses revealed that those diagnosed with adjustment disorder had 12 times the rate of suicide as those without an adjustment disorder diagnosis, after controlling for history of depression diagnosis, marital status, income, and the matched factors....... is associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempt. However the association between adjustment disorder and completed suicide has yet to be examined. The current study is a population-based case control study examining this association in the population of Denmark aged 15 to 90 years. All suicides...... in Denmark from 1994 to 2006 were included, resulting in 9,612 cases. For each case, up to 30 controls were matched on gender, exact date of birth, and calendar time, yielding 199,306 controls. Adjustment disorder diagnosis was found in 7.6% of suicide cases and 0.52% of controls. Conditional logistic...

  17. Poor quality of life in Australian men: Cross-sectional associations with obesity, mobility, lifestyle and psychiatric symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L; Pasco, Julie A; Hosking, Sarah M; Dobbins, Amelia G; Williams, Lana J

    2017-09-01

    Despite their public health importance, little is known about associations between modifiable lifestyles, quality of life (QOL), and psychiatric symptoms in men. We investigated relationships between QOL, obesity, mobility and lifestyle in Australian men, including whether associations were mediated by anxiety and depression. A cross-sectional study of 893 men (aged 24-92 yrs) participating in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study: an age-stratified, population-based sample of men randomly recruited from the Barwon Statistical Division (BSD), in south-eastern Australia. Using a validated tool, QOL was measured in the domains of physical health, psychological health, social relationships and the environment. Anxiety and depression were ascertained using the Hospital Anxiety and Depressive Scale. Models were adjusted for age, clinical measures of obesity and mobility, and self-reported lifestyles, with adjustment made for anxiety and depression. Associations were observed between low mobility and lower psychological-related QOL (OR 0.70, 95%CI 0.53-0.93), and for smoking and low mobility with lower environment-related QOL (OR 0.48, 95%CI 0.27-0.84; OR 0.67, 95%CI 0.50-0.90, respectively). Age, anxiety and depression were independently associated with QOL in each domain. Independent of age, anxiety and depression, smoking and low mobility showed particularly strong effects on the likelihood of men reporting a lower satisfaction with their QOL. This information will inform the design of effective and equitable health policies, the allocation of resources toward unmet needs, and the development of strategic health-related plans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of sleep and fatigue with decision regret among critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Linda D; Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Engoren, Milo C

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inadequate sleep on clinical decisions may be important for patients in critical care units, who are often more vulnerable than patients in other units. Fatigued nurses are more likely than well-rested nurses to make faulty decisions that lead to decision regret, a negative cognitive emotion that occurs when the actual outcome differs from the desired or expected outcome. To examine the association between selected sleep variables, impairment due to fatigue, and clinical-decision self-efficacy and regret among critical care nurses. Decision regret was the primary outcome variable. Methods A nonexperimental, descriptive design and extant measures were used to obtain data from a random sample of full-time nurses. Binary logistic regression models were used to examine the association between sleep variables, fatigue, and clinical-decision self-efficacy and regret. The discrimination of the models was compared with the C statistic, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. A total of 605 nurses returned the questionnaires (17% response rate). Among these, decision regret was reported by 157 of 546 (29%). Nurses with decision regret reported more fatigue, more daytime sleepiness, less intershift recovery, and worse sleep quality than did nurses without decision regret. Being male, working a 12-hour shift, and clinical-decision satisfaction were significantly associated with decision regret (C statistic, 0.719; SE, 0.024). Nurses who experience impairments due to fatigue, loss of sleep, and inability to recover between shifts are more likely than unimpaired nurses to report decision regret.

  19. Association of hand and arm disinfection with asthma control in US nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Orianne; Varraso, Raphäelle; Boggs, Krislyn M; Descatha, Alexis; Henneberger, Paul K; Quinot, Catherine; Speizer, Frank E; Z