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Sample records for psychiatric nurse burnout

  1. Internal predictors of burnout in psychiatric nurses: An Indian study

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    Rudraprosad Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research has not adequately focused on the issue of burnout in Psychiatric nurses, despite the fact that they suffer considerable stress in their work. Till date no study has been conducted on burnout among psychiatric nurses in India. Further, there is a particular lack of research in internal variables predicting burnout in them. Aims: To determine whether there are any internal psychological factors relevant to burnout in psychiatric nurses in India. Materials and Methods: We recruited 101 psychiatric nurses scoring less than two in General Health Questionnaire, version 12 (GHQ-12 from two psychiatric hospitals after obtaining informed consent. All subjects filled up a sociodemographic data sheet along with global adjustment scale, emotional maturity scale, PGI general well-being scale, locus of control scale, and Copenhagen burnout inventory (CBI. Correlations between burnout and sociodemographic/clinical variables were done by Pearson′s r or Spearman′s rho. Signi ficant variables were entered in a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis with total burnout score as dependent variable. Results: Age, duration of total period of nursing, prior military training, locus of control, sense of general well-being, adjustment capabilities, and emotional maturity had significant relation with burnout. Of them, emotional maturity was the most significant protective factors against burnout along with adjustment capabilities, sense of physical well-being, and military training in decreasing significance. Together they explained 41% variation in total burnout score which is significant at <0.001 level. An internal locus of control was inversely correlated with burnout, but failed to predict it in regression analysis. Conclusion: Emotional maturity, adjustability, sense of general physical well-being as well as prior military training significantly predicted lower burnout. Of them, emotional maturity was the most important predictor

  2. Burnout of caregivers: a comparison between partners of psychiatric patients and nurses.

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    Angermeyer, Matthias C; Bull, Nadine; Bernert, Sebastian; Dietrich, Sandra; Kopf, Andrea

    2006-08-01

    Care of a person with mental illness involves multiple burdens, possibly leading to burnout. This study compares partners of persons with schizophrenia and depression with nursing staff based on dimensions of burnout. Nursing staff and partners of patients with schizophrenia or depression were consecutively recruited from psychiatric hospitals and interviewed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory. No significant differences were found in the three dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) for the two groups of caregivers. About one fourth of the respondents in both groups showed a high degree of burnout. Professional and nonprofessional caregivers face a similar degree of burden and need support to perform their caretaking tasks.

  3. Burnout in psychiatric nursing: examining the interplay of autonomy, leadership style, and depressive symptoms.

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    Madathil, Renee; Heck, Nicholas C; Schuldberg, David

    2014-06-01

    It is important to consider ways in which nurses can be protected from experiencing the effects of burnout. This study examined the relationships between leadership style of psychiatric nurse supervisors, work role autonomy, and psychological distress in relation to psychiatric nurse burnout. Eighty-nine psychiatric nurses from Montana and New York hospitals completed an online survey that assessed their work-related experiences. Overall, results of this study indicate that the participants were experiencing high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization when compared to a normative sample of mental health workers. Results also showed that leadership style and work role autonomy are likely to be environmental factors that protect against burnout in nurses. Finally, it was shown that the relationship between depressive symptoms and the burnout component of personal accomplishment may be influenced by nurses' perceptions of the leadership style in their work environment. These findings are important because nurse supervisor leadership styles and amount of autonomy are characteristics of the work environment that may be amenable to change through training and intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Occupational stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region.

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    McTiernan, K; McDonald, N

    2015-04-01

    Burnout negatively impacts the delivery of mental health services. Psychiatric nurses face stressors that are distinct from other nursing specialities. The research was conducted in Ireland and captured a relatively large sample of respondents. The results compared the stressors, coping strategies and burnout levels between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses. Occupational stress can negatively impact on the well-being of psychiatric nurses, which in turn can lead to poor client care. There is a dearth of published research conducted in Ireland that examines stress within the discipline. A between-groups study, undertaken in February 2011, investigated stressors, burnout and coping strategies between hospital and community-based psychiatric nurses in a Dublin region. Sixty-nine participants (8 males and 61 females), aged between 18 to 60 years voluntarily completed the Mental Health Professional Stress Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the PsychNurse Methods of Coping Scale. The findings revealed that nurses were operating in a moderately stressful environment. Stressors focused on organizational issues as opposed to client issues. The main stressors identified were lack of resources, workload and organizational structures/processes. Both groups reported average levels of emotional exhaustion, low levels of depersonalization and average levels of personal accomplishment. A Mann-Whitney U-test and Independent Samples t-test found significant differences between hospital and community-based nurses regarding depersonalization and personal accomplishment, respectively. Hospital nurses reported higher depersonalization scores, and community nurses had a greater sense of personal accomplishment. The personal accomplishment scores of hospital nurses were below mental health professional norms. No significant differences emerged regarding coping strategies. Avoidant coping strategies were favoured by both groups. It is recommended that interventions

  5. Burnout in nonhospital psychiatric residential facilities.

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    Pedrini, Laura; Magni, Laura Rosa; Giovannini, Caterina; Panetta, Valentina; Zacchi, Valeria; Rossi, Giuseppe; Placentino, Anna

    2009-11-01

    This study evaluated levels and risk factors of burnout in a sample of mental health professionals employed in nonhospital psychiatric residential facilities of northern Italy. Nurses, nurse assistants, and educators completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic variables, burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory), job characteristics (Job Diagnostic Survey), workload, relationships with colleagues, and support from supervising coordinators. A total of 202 (83% response rate) questionnaires were analyzed. Logistic linear regressions were used to estimate predictors of burnout dimensions. Burnout risk was widespread. Low feedback about job performance, poor support from coordinators, and young age predicted emotional exhaustion. Low feedback about job performance predicted feelings of depersonalization. Low task identity and young age predicted reduced feelings of personal accomplishment. Interventions to prevent burnout among employees should be developed. These include providing feedback about performance, clearly identifying the tasks of the job, and providing support.

  6. Nursing specialty and burnout.

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    Browning, Laura; Ryan, Carey S; Thomas, Scott; Greenberg, Martin; Rolniak, Susan

    2007-03-01

    We examined the relationship between perceived control and burnout among three nursing specialties: nurse practitioners, nurse managers, and emergency nurses. Survey data were collected from 228 nurses from 30 states. Findings indicated that emergency nurses had the least control and the highest burnout, whereas nurse practitioners had the most control and the least burnout. Mediational analyses showed that expected control, hostility, and stressor frequency explained differences between specialties in burnout. The implications of these findings for interventions that reduce burnout and promote nursing retention are discussed.

  7. Insomnia and burnout in Greek Nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kousloglou, Sa; Mouzas, Od; Bonotis, K; Roupa, Z; Vasilopoulos, A; Angelopoulos, Nv

    2014-01-01

    ....  The purpose of the study was to investigate the prevalence of insomnia and its relation with burnout levels in a group of nurses working in psychiatric, pediatric, internal medicine and surgery...

  8. Burnout in nursing residents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years...

  9. Burnout in nursing.

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    Patrick, Kent; Lavery, Judy F

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that organisational change can contribute to stress-related outcomes for workers. Burnout, one such stress-related outcome, has been conceptualised as a multidimensional construct consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and reduced personal accomplishment. Many health care organisations have undergone substantial organisational change over the last decade. The purpose of this study was to assess levels of burnout in nurses and to ascertain if there were individual or work characteristics that were associated with this syndrome. Randomised survey methodology. Registered nurses (Division 1) in Victoria who were ANF members. A random sample of 574 Victorian ANF nurse members. The assessment of levels of burnout in Victorian ANF nurse members and the identification of individual or work characteristics that may be associated with it. Victorian ANF nurse members exhibited lower depersonalisation and higher personal accomplishment compared to medical and overall normative data. Increasing age and fewer working hours were associated with lower levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation. Working overtime was positively associated with emotional exhaustion however further analyses demonstrated that those who worked overtime voluntarily did not differ from workers not working overtime. However feeling pressured/expected to work overtime was positively associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation. Victorian ANF nurse members were not experiencing high levels of burnout. However the study highlighted the need for health care management to recognise the importance of working reasonable hours and in particular, to understand the potential detrimental effect that having to work pressured or unexpected overtime has on staff.

  10. [Violence, Burnout and Minor Psychiatric Disorders in Hospital Work].

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    Pai, Daiane Dal; Lautert, Liana; Souza, Sônia Beatriz Cocaro de; Marziale, Maria Helena Palucci; Tavares, Juliana Petri

    2015-06-01

    Identifying the violence suffered by the health team workers and their association with Burnout and minor psychiatric disorders. Cross-sectional study with 269 health team professionals of a public hospital in southern Brazil. Data were collected through the use of the Survey Questionnaire: Workplace Violence in the Health Sector, Maslach Inventory Burnout and Self-Report Questionnaire. Workplace violence struck 63.2% of workers, prevailing mostly in women (p = 0.001), among nursing auxiliaries/technicians (p=0.014) and was associated with minor psychiatric disorders (pBurnout dimensions were also associated to violence at work (pworkers experience violence in the workplace and this exposure is associated with Burnout symptoms and minor psychiatric disorders.

  11. Violence, Burnout and Minor Psychiatric Disorders in Hospital Work

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    Daiane Dal Pai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Identifying the violence suffered by the health team workers and their association with Burnout and minor psychiatric disorders. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 269 health team professionals of a public hospital in southern Brazil. Data were collected through the use of the Survey Questionnaire: Workplace Violence in the Health Sector, Maslach Inventory Burnout and Self-Report Questionnaire. RESULTS Workplace violence struck 63.2% of workers, prevailing mostly in women (p = 0.001, among nursing auxiliaries/technicians (p=0.014 and was associated with minor psychiatric disorders (p<0.05, as exposure to different forms of violence increased the chances of these disorders by 60% (CI 95%: 1.2-2.1. The three Burnout dimensions were also associated to violence at work (p<0.05. CONCLUSION Health workers experience violence in the workplace and this exposure is associated with Burnout symptoms and minor psychiatric disorders.

  12. Violence, Burnout and Minor Psychiatric Disorders in Hospital Work

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    Daiane Dal Pai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Identifying the violence suffered by the health team workers and their association with Burnout and minor psychiatric disorders. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 269 health team professionals of a public hospital in southern Brazil. Data were collected through the use of the Survey Questionnaire: Workplace Violence in the Health Sector, Maslach Inventory Burnout and Self-Report Questionnaire. RESULTS Workplace violence struck 63.2% of workers, prevailing mostly in women (p = 0.001, among nursing auxiliaries/technicians (p=0.014 and was associated with minor psychiatric disorders (p<0.05, as exposure to different forms of violence increased the chances of these disorders by 60% (CI 95%: 1.2-2.1. The three Burnout dimensions were also associated to violence at work (p<0.05. CONCLUSION Health workers experience violence in the workplace and this exposure is associated with Burnout symptoms and minor psychiatric disorders.

  13. Nurses and burnout syndrome

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    Zarema Obradović

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The work of nurses is human. They help people in protection against diseases. Nurses are the largest group of health workers and all problems that appear in the health system are first recognized among them. Burnout syndrome appears among nurses very frequently. We present the leading factors for burnout among nurses in RMC „Dr Safet Mujic“ in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina.Methods: It is a cross sectional descriptive study. We used an anonymous questionnaire with 20 questions. Our sample was random with 30% of all nurses which were working in this Medical Center in January-February 2012.Results: In our study 77.9% nurses work in the hospital. 52% have over 16 years of work experience. 34.6% of examinees are satisfi ed with interpersonal relationships, 31.7 % are satisfi ed with relationships with the superior. Motivation for work have 51% of examinees, a big number comes unwilling on work.For 83.7% overtime work is the reason for dissatisfaction 71.2% examinees think that they can't make progress on work. A high percentage of examinees doesn't think about problems related to work outside working hours, a good sleep have 38.5% and 56.7% wakes up tired. Many of examinees are not satisfiedwith workplace, and 58.7% would like to change it.Conclusion: Nurses employed in RMC „Dr Safet Mujic“ Mostar are exposed to many factors during work which can cause the burnout syndrome. It is necessary to expand the study on a larger group of nurses and to implement the measures for reducing risks of burnout syndrome.

  14. "Burnout" in intensive care nurses.

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    Chen, S M; McMurray, A

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the relationship between burnout components and selected demographic variables in a group of intensive care unit nurses. This research hopes to heighten awareness of both intensive care nurses and hospital administrators of the importance of burnout in their work setting. A descriptive correlational study design was used to examine the extent of burnout according to selected demographic variables. Sixty-eight intensive care nurses from two hospitals and critical care courses at one university completed a demographic data form and the research questionnaire of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Statistical analysis included non-parametric tests. Study results indicated low to moderate levels of total component scores in all intensive care nurses and on all three subscales of the assessment instrument. Results also indicated that, in this sample, younger nurses (20-29 years of age), separated and divorced nurses, and staff who work full time in ICUs were the most prone to emotional exhaustion. These research findings recommend support for ICU nurses to prevent burnout in their work setting. Further research is necessary to examine what kinds of working environments (job related stress) are effective in mitigating burnout amongst staff in the intensive care field.

  15. Burnout and work environments of public health nurses involved in mental health care.

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    Imai, H; Nakao, H; Tsuchiya, M; Kuroda, Y; Katoh, T

    2004-09-01

    (1) To examine whether prevalence of burnout is higher among community psychiatric nurses working under recently introduced job specific work systems than among public health nurses (PHNs) engaged in other public health services. (2) To identify work environment factors potentially contributing to burnout. Two groups were examined. The psychiatric group comprised 525 PHNs primarily engaged in public mental health services at public health centres (PHCs) that had adopted the job specific work system. The control group comprised 525 PHNs primarily engaged in other health services. Pines' Burnout Scale was used to measure burnout. Respondents were classified by burnout score into three groups: A (mentally stable, no burnout); B (positive signs, risk of burnout); and C (burnout present, action required). Groups B and C were considered representative of "burnout". A questionnaire was also prepared to investigate systems for supporting PHNs working at PHCs and to define emergency mental health service factors contributing to burnout. Final respondents comprised 785 PHNs. Prevalence of burnout was significantly higher in the psychiatric group (59.2%) than in the control group (51.5%). Responses indicating lack of job control and increased annual frequency of emergency overtime services were significantly correlated with prevalence of burnout in the psychiatric group, but not in the control group. Prevalence of burnout is significantly higher for community psychiatric nurses than for PHNs engaged in other services. Overwork in emergency services and lack of job control appear to represent work environment factors contributing to burnout.

  16. [Burnout symptoms of cardiosurgery nurses].

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    Spławska, Kinga

    2013-08-01

    Changes in society, technological progress and time pressure cause irreversible changes in all health care professionals. Taking care of patient in severe condition can cause burnout syndrome among nurses. The aim of the study was to show the problem of burnout syndrome among nurses working in cardiac surgery ward. Those affect three main areas: psychological burnout syndrome, depersonalization, and job-related dissatisfaction. The study was conducted among 50 nurses working in The Intensive Cardiac Care Unit at the University Hospital of Lodz. Inquiry form used in the survey created the author. The study showed, that nurses working in specific specialties are affected by burnout syndrome. Despite knowledge of the causes and consequences of this condition majority of nurses fail to recognize symptoms and independently deal with them. In the opinion of the respondents the main factors causing burnout syndrome are: inadequate non-material and material compensation, interpersonal relationships with patients. As a result more than half of the respondents would like to change jobs or consider changing profession. Burnout syndrome was observed with a different intensivity and covers several areas in almost all surveyed nurses.

  17. Predictors of Burnout Among Nurses in Taiwan.

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    Lee, Huan-Fang; Yen, Miaofen; Fetzer, Susan; Chien, Tsair Wei

    2015-08-01

    Nurse burnout is a crucial issue for health care professionals and impacts nurse turnover and nursing shortages. Individual and situational factors are related to nurse burnout with predictors of burnout differing among cultures and health care systems. The predictors of nurse burnout in Asia, particularly Taiwan, are unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictors of burnout among a national sample of nurses in Taiwan. A secondary data analysis of a nationwide database investigated the predictors of burnout among 1,846 nurses in Taiwan. Hierarchical regression analysis determined the relationship between predictors and burnout. Predictors of Taiwanese nurse burnout were age, physical/psychological symptoms, job satisfaction, work engagement, and work environment. The most significant predictors were physical/psychological symptoms and work engagement. The variables explained 35, 39, and 18 % of the emotional exhaustion, personal accomplishment, and depersonalization variance for 54 % of the total variance of burnout. Individual characteristics and nurse self-awareness, especially work, engagement can impact Taiwanese nurses' burnout. Nurse burnout predictors provide administrators with information to develop strategies including education programs and support services to reduce nurse burnout.

  18. Occupational burnout among nursing personel

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    Sylwia Wieder-Huszla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Occupational stress and the related burnout syndrome is undoubtedly one of the most important challenges for public health. Objectives . The objective of the study was identifying occupational burnout among nurses. Material and methods . The questionnaire was responded by 408 professionally active male and female nurses, working in the territory of the West Pomeranian Voivodeship. In the evaluation of occupational burnout the standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI was applied. Results . Mean values of the level of occupational burnout for the study group amounted to 39.3 ± 30.9 with regard to emotional exhaustion, 30.64 ± 27.89 with respect to the depersonalization subscale and 66.26 ± 27.94 – the lowered level of job satisfaction. Conclusions . 1. The studied nursing personnel showed symptoms of occupational burnout in all dimensions of the syndrome, i.e. high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization as well as low job satisfaction. 2. Individuals with higher education scored lower on the emotional exhaustion scale. 3. Emotional exhaustion is influenced by workplace and position.

  19. Professional burnout among studying nurses

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    Olga Bielan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Burnout is a response to stress, the source of which is the situation at work. This phenomenon concerns mainly representatives of professions whose essence is to work with people, including doctors, nurses, paramedics and others; their close committed interactions with others constitute the core of professional activity and determine the success and development. Participants of the study were 281 students of extramural complementary nursing course at the University of Warmia and Mazury, mostly aged 40-60 years, employed in hospital wards and with employment contracts. In the study, the authors’ demographic questionnaire of structuralized interview and the MBI questionnaire, developed by Maslach and Jackson, in the Polish version by Pasikowski (2004, were used. The obtained results were statistically analysed. The performed analysis of burnout has confirmed that emotional exhaustion is associated with the length of employment, the number of days off and the number of institutions where nurses were employed. We did not observe, however, any correlation with these variables between depersonalisation and a sense of the lack of achievements. Furthermore, no dependence of the severity of the professional burnout symptoms on the surveyed groups’ age was found. It turned out that the persons working in shifts system felt much stronger depletion of emotion than nurses working in a daily system. It was also observed that nurses employed in hospitals felt much stronger symptoms in both areas of occupational burnout than those working in other institutions. Furthermore, it was not confirmed that the absence of the sense of achievement depended on where the respondents were employed. Taking into account the reference levels of the three dimensions of burnout acc. to MBI it was found out that most respondents were characterized by a low value within the emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation and a high value in terms of a sense of the lack of

  20. Prevalence of burnout among public health nurses in charge of mental health services and emergency care systems in Japan.

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    Imai, Hirohisa; Nakao, Hiroyuki; Nakagi, Yoshihiko; Niwata, Satoko; Sugioka, Yoshihiko; Itoh, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Takahiko

    2006-11-01

    The Community Health Act came into effect in 1997 in Japan. This act altered the work system for public health nurses (PHNs) in public health centers (PHCs) nationwide from region-specific to service-specific work. Such major changes to working environment in the new system seem to be exposing PHNs to various types of stress. The present study examined whether prevalence of burnout is higher among PHNs in charge of mental health services (psychiatric PHNs) than among PHNs in charge of other services (non-psychiatric PHNs), and whether attributes of emergency mental health care systems in communities are associated with increased prevalence of burnout. A questionnaire including the Pines burnout scale for measuring burnout was mailed to 525 psychiatric PHNs and 525 non-psychiatric PHNs. The 785 respondents included in the final analysis comprised 396 psychiatric PHNs and 389 non-psychiatric PHNs. Prevalence of burnout was significantly higher for psychiatric PHNs (59.2%) than for non-psychiatric PHNs (51.5%). When prevalence of burnout in each group was analyzed in relation to question responses regarding emergency service and patient referral systems, prevalence of burnout for psychiatric PHNs displayed significant correlations to frequency of cases requiring overtime emergency services, difficulties referring patients, and a feeling of "restriction". Prevalence of burnout is high among psychiatric PHNs, and inadequate emergency mental health service systems contribute to burnout among these nurses. Countermeasures for preventing such burnout should be taken as soon as possible.

  1. Nurse burnout and stress in the NICU.

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    Braithwaite, Mercedes

    2008-12-01

    The effects of nurse burnout and stress in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)-high levels of absenteeism, low morale, mental fatigue, and exhaustion-can have detrimental effects on neonatal care. Because of the nature of this highly specialized form of nursing, NICU nurses can experience high levels of psychologic and physical stress. Burnout is a response to workplace stress that results in emotional and mental exhaustion, depersonalization, and decreased sense of personal accomplishment. Job satisfaction, emotional support, and self-care are important components for preventing burnout in staff. Therefore, the implications regarding practice and nurse burnout in the NICU are clear. It is the responsibility of both individual nurses and administrative leaders to take the necessary steps to prevent nurse burnout. Preventing this phenomenon in the NICU can lead to better retention and recruitment rates and delivery of safe neonatal care.

  2. Job satisfaction and burnout among paediatric nurses.

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    Akman, Ozlem; Ozturk, Candan; Bektas, Murat; Ayar, Dijle; Armstrong, Merry A

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to determine factors of job satisfaction and burnout levels of paediatric nurses. A total of 165 nurses working in paediatric clinics completed the Minnesota job satisfaction scale and the Maslach burnout scale. Average scores of the emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation score were low, while personal accomplishment scores were high. A high level of job satisfaction, being married, increased age and a decreased number of assigned patients were significantly associated with a low level of burnout. Paediatric nurses experience burnout at significant levels. The most important variable that affected job satisfaction was income. The results of the study could guide development of strategies that might prevent or alleviate burnout of paediatric nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Burnout and productivity among Iranian nurses.

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    Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Negarandeh, Reza; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2009-09-01

    The concept of burnout describes a number of destructive aspects in the health-care system, especially in nursing. A descriptive study was carried out in order to investigate the relationship between burnout and productivity among 200 baccalaureate nurses working in educational hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Burnout and productivity questionnaires were employed and the data were analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The results showed that emotional exhaustion and depersonalization had significant negative correlations with productivity. Also, a significant positive correlation was found between personal accomplishment and productivity. Efforts to alleviate burnout among nurses should lead to an increased quality of patient care and improved quality of work life; if not, health-care systems will pay the price for nurses' burnout through the quality of services that they offer.

  4. Burnout contagion among intensive care nurses.

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    Bakker, Arnold B; Le Blanc, Pascale M; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2005-08-01

    This paper reports a study investigating whether burnout is contagious. Burnout has been recognized as a problem in intensive care units for a long time. Previous research has focused primarily on its organizational antecedents, such as excessive workload or high patient care demands, time pressure and intensive use of sophisticated technology. The present study took a totally different perspective by hypothesizing that--in intensive care units--burnout is communicated from one nurse to another. A questionnaire on work and well-being was completed by 1849 intensive care unit nurses working in one of 80 intensive care units in 12 different European countries in 1994. The results are being reported now because they formed part of a larger study that was only finally analysed recently. The questionnaire was translated from English to the language of each of these countries, and then back-translated to English. Respondents indicated the prevalence of burnout among their colleagues, and completed scales to assess working conditions and job burnout. Analysis of variance indicated that the between-unit variance on a measure of perceived burnout complaints among colleagues was statistically significant and substantially larger than the within-unit variance. This implies that there is considerable agreement (consensus) within intensive care units regarding the prevalence of burnout. In addition, the results of multilevel analyses showed that burnout complaints among colleagues in intensive care units made a statistically significant and unique contribution to explaining variance in individual nurses' and whole units' experiences of burnout, i.e. emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. Moreover, for both emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, perceived burnout complaints among colleagues was the most important predictor of burnout at the individual and unit levels, even after controlling for the impact of well-known organizational

  5. Nurse burnout and the working environment.

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    O'Mahony, Nuria

    2011-09-01

    This article examines levels of burnout experienced by emergency nurses and the characteristics of their work environment to determine if there is a relationship between the two. A literature review of recent articles on emergency nurses' burnout and contributing factors was undertaken. A quantitative study, in which nurses were asked to indicate the extent of their agreement with a series of statements on burnout and the working environment, was then undertaken, and the results were analysed to ascertain the extent to which the two topic are related. The results indicate that 52 per cent of nurses in an emergency department in Ireland experience high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, which are significantly related to the nature of their work environment. Improvements to the environment and to education are required to reduce the risk of nurses developing burnout in the future.

  6. Burnout in nephrology nurses in Israel.

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    Chayu, Tami; Kreitler, Shulamith

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine burnout in nephrology nurses working in Israel and explore its correlates in demographic characteristics, job aspects, and extra-professional activities. Total participants included 132 nurses of both genders working in different wards and clinics. They were administered a background information questionnaire and two burnout questionnaires (Maslach and Shirom-Melamed). The findings showed burnout was related to gender, religion, religious observance, number of children, major working place, role as nurse, domain of nephrology, size of unit, and seniority. It was reduced by engaging in sport and hobbies. Recommendations for reducing burnout include attention to special groups with high burnout and engaging in sports and hobbies.

  7. Nurse turnover: the mediating role of burnout.

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    Leiter, Michael P; Maslach, Christina

    2009-04-01

    This study tested whether the mediation model of burnout could predict nurses' turnover intentions. A better understanding of what factors support a commitment to a nursing career could inform both policies and workplace practices. The mediation model of burnout provides a way of linking the quality of a nurse's worklife to various outcomes, such as turnover. Data on areas of worklife, burnout, and turnover intentions were collected by surveying 667 Canadian nurses in the Atlantic Provinces. The findings supported the mediation model of burnout, in which areas of worklife predicted burnout, which in turn predicted turnover intentions. Cynicism was the key burnout dimension for turnover, and the most critical areas of worklife were value conflicts and inadequate rewards. The results of this study provide some new insights into how the intention of nurses to leave their job is related to particular aspects of their worklife and to burnout. These results suggest what may be the most appropriate areas to target for interventions to reduce the risk of nurses exiting early from their chosen career.

  8. The incidence of burnout in nursing practice

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    Ondriová Iveta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The burnout syndrome is significantly associated with nursing profession. Individuals suffering from the syndrome manifest important health problems. More information about prevalence and risk factors for burnout is needed to prevent the syndrome and to determine the most appropriate clinical interventions when the disorder appears.

  9. Stress and burnout among colorectal surgeons and colorectal nurse specialists working in the National Health Service.

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    Sharma, A; Sharp, D M; Walker, L G; Monson, J R T

    2008-05-01

    It has been suggested that changes to the organization of the National Health Service (NHS) and clinical practices in dealing with cancer are associated with increased stress and burnout in healthcare professionals. The aim of this study, therefore, was to evaluate stress and burnout in colorectal surgeons (surgeons) and colorectal clinical nurse specialists (nurses) working in the NHS. A list of all consultant surgeons and nurses was obtained from The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland. Participants were sent a questionnaire booklet consisting of standardized measures [General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Coping Questionnaire] and various ad hoc questions to obtain information about demographics, cancer workload and job satisfaction. Independent predictors of clinically significant distress and burnout were identified using logistic regression. Four hundred and fifty-five surgeons and 326 nurses were sent booklets. The response rate was 55.6% in surgeons and 54.3% in nurses. The mean age of the nurses was lower than that of surgeons (42.8 vs 47.7, P Coping strategies, especially those in which respondents isolated themselves from friends and family, were associated with higher psychiatric morbidity and burnout. Dissatisfaction with work, intention to retire early, intention to retire as soon as affordable and poor training in communication and management skills were also significantly associated with high GHQ scores and burnout in both groups. We found high levels of psychiatric morbidity and burnout in this national cohort of surgeons and nurses working in the NHS. However, psychiatric morbidity and burnout were unrelated to cancer workload. Nurses have lower burnout levels than surgeons and this may be related to their different working practices, responsibilities and management structure.

  10. Violence, Burnout and Minor Psychiatric Disorders in Hospital Work

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    Daiane Dal Pai; Liana Lautert; Sônia Beatriz Cocaro de Souza; Maria Helena Palucci Marziale; Juliana Petri Tavares

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Identifying the violence suffered by the health team workers and their association with Burnout and minor psychiatric disorders. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 269 health team professionals of a public hospital in southern Brazil. Data were collected through the use of the Survey Questionnaire: Workplace Violence in the Health Sector, Maslach Inventory Burnout and Self-Report Questionnaire. RESULTS Workplace violence struck 63.2% of workers, prevailing mostly in women (p = 0.001...

  11. The relationship between "compassion fatigue" and "burnout" among nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abbas Abbaszadeh; Arezo Elmi; Fariba Borhani; Reyhaneh Sefidkar

    2017-01-01

    .... It seems that there is a relationship between "compassion fatigue" and "burnout." If we can help reducing compassion fatigue and burnout among nurses, then we can take a step toward improving the quality of services in the field of nursing...

  12. Affect generated by social comparisons among nurses high and low in burnout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, BP; Ybema, JF; van der Zee, K

    The affective consequences of social comparison were examined in 2 field studies among nurses and related to the 3 dimensions of professional burnout: emotional exhaustion, reduced personal accomplishment, and depersonalization. Study 1 was conducted in a sample of 99 nurses of a psychiatric

  13. Conservation of resources theory in nurse burnout and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapanjaroensin, Aoyjai; Patrician, Patricia A; Vance, David E

    2017-11-01

    To examine how the Conservation of Resources theory explains burnout in the nursing profession. Burnout, which is an accumulation of work-related mental stress in people-oriented occupations, has been an issue of concern for decades for healthcare workers, especially nurses. Yet, few studies have examined a unified theory that explains the aetiology, progression and consequences of nurse burnout. This discussion article integrates current knowledge on nurse burnout using Conservation of Resources theory, which focuses on four resources (i.e., objects, conditions, personal characteristics and energy). The databases that were used in this study included CINAHL, PubMed and PsycINFO. All reviewed articles were published between January 2006 - June 2016. The Conservation of Resources theory explains that burnout will occur as a result of perceived or actual loss of these four resources. Furthermore, nurse burnout could affect work performance, leading to lower alertness and overall quality of care. Healthcare organizations and nursing administration should develop strategies to protect nurses from the threat of resource loss to decrease nurse burnout, which may improve nurse and patient safety. The Conservation of Resources theory can guide interventions to decrease burnout and future research that examines the relationship between professional nurse burnout and patient safety. The Conservation of Resources theory explains the aetiology, progression and consequences of nurse burnout. Future studies must explore whether nurse performance is a mediating factor between nurse burnout and patient safety. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Burnout in nurses working with cardiac patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Josefa Díaz-Muñoz Crespo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The burnout syndrome has been described as a frequent job-related health problem in nurses. This syndrome is characterized by emotional fatigue, low personal accomplishment and depersonalization. Its prevalence has not been specifically explored in nurses attending cardiac patients. We designed a prevalence study including nursing staff in a cardiologic hospital (ward and ICU. In addition to sociolaboral data, information regarding the dimensions of the Maslach Burnout Inventory were recorded. Only 50% of the 52 elegible nurses and allied professionals answered the questionnaires: 22 females, median age 41 years, most of them with couple (58% and children (61%; mean of work experience 15 years. 8% of the subjects showed high rates of emotional fatigue, despersonalization (31%and low grade of personal accomplishment (38,5%. No subjects met criteria for burnout. Emotional fatigue was more frequent in females, singles, with no children, allied and older professionals. Workers with no children and allied professionals showed higher rates of despersonalization. The personal accomplishment was higher in married and ICU personnel. The observed rate of burnout was low, although only 8% showed normal rates in all Maslach Burnout Inventory dimensions. The personal accomplishment dimension was the one more affected.

  15. Burnout and salutogenic functioning of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cilliers

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the nature of the relationship between burnout and salutogenic functioning, specifically sense of coherence, hardiness and learned resourcefulness. The measurement was done with the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Antonovsky, Kobasa and Rosenbaum questionnaires, administered on a sample of 105 registered general nurses. Correlations, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis are reported. The results indicate a significant negative correlation and a model of good fit, confirming a structural relationship between burnout and salutogenic functioning in its conceptualisation and its measurement. The nature of these relationships are discussed and recommendations are formulated towards more effective individual, group and organisational coping with and preventing of burnout.

  16. Team Building for Nurses Experiencing Burnout and Poor Morale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Kurpius, Sharon E.; Keim, Jeanmarie

    1994-01-01

    One group of professionals among whom stress and burnout are particularly prevalent is nurses. A study of inpatient nurses (n=20) and outpatient nurses (n=10) revealed that group team building was effective in improving both morale and job satisfaction while decreasing burnout among the higher-stress group of outpatient nurses. (JPS)

  17. The Relationship between Job Satisfaction and Burnout among Rehabilitation Personnel of Razi Psychiatric Hospital in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Haghighizadeh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The study about effective management dimensions in hospital staff performance is important. This study was done to survey the relationship between job satisfaction and burnout in the rehabilitation personnel of Razi Psychiatric Hospital in Tehran. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 77 subjects including psychometrics, general practitioners, specialists, nurses, social workers, occupational therapists and psychologists were selected randomly among rehabilitation staff in Razi Psychiatric Hospital in 2011. The data were collected using Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI and Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ.The data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation method. Results: Job satisfaction had an inverse relationship with "emotional exhaustion" and "depersonalization"(p<0.001, but there was not a significant relationship between "personal accomplishment" and "job satisfaction". The mean of emotional exhaustion was 68.18, depersonalization 68.4 and personal accomplishment 29.36. In addition, the results of this study showed that 36.6 percent of rehabilitation team employees in Razi Psychiatric Hospital were satisfied with their jobs. Conclusion: As the results show, it is necessary to perform further research to find the main reasons of intensifying job burnout and then reduce these critical factors leading to personnel dissatisfaction from their jobs and any probable consequence of this dissatisfaction.

  18. Psychometric properties of the Spanish Burnout Inventory among staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Monte, P R; Manzano-García, G

    2015-12-01

    The burnout syndrome contributes to the deterioration in the quality of personal life as well as lower quality practice in healthcare personnel. Researchers have been concerned about the psychometric limitations of some previous questionnaires designed to evaluate burnout. The Spanish Burnout Inventory was developed to address the problems associated with other instruments, but it has not yet been validated in staff nurses. This study provides evidence that the Spanish Burnout Inventory has adequate psychometric properties to estimate burnout in staff nurses. The Spanish Burnout Inventory offers a theoretical proposal to explain the different components of burnout. The Spanish Burnout Inventory provides researchers and practitioners with an expanded conceptualization of the burnout syndrome, which can facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of nursing professionals. Researchers have been concerned about the psychometric limitations of the some previous questionnaires designed to evaluate burnout. To address these problems associated with previous instruments, the Spanish Burnout Inventory (SBI) was developed. The instrument has not yet been validated in staff nurses. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the SBI. The sample consisted of 720 staff nurses from two Spanish general hospitals. The instrument is composed of 20 items distributed in four dimensions: Enthusiasm towards the job (five items), Psychological exhaustion (four items), Indolence (six items) and Guilt (five items). Data were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis. To assess the factorial validity of the SBI, four alternative models were tested. Results show that the four-factor model of the SBI has adequate psychometric properties for the study of burnout in staff nurses. This model fitted the data better than the alternative models. The study provides evidence of the adequate psychometric properties of a measure to evaluate burnout in nursing professionals. The

  19. Burnout and Humor Usage among Community College Nursing Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Laura A.

    2000-01-01

    Assesses the correlation of burnout among community college nursing faculty members and their use of humor to mediate academic stress related to burnout. Differences in burnout between high versus low humor usage respondents showed a higher sense of personal accomplishment with high humor usage. Of those with low humor usage, workload was related…

  20. Work environment, job satisfaction, stress and burnout among haemodialysis nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Bronwyn; Douglas, Clint; Bonner, Ann

    2015-07-01

    To examine the relationships among nurse and work characteristics, job satisfaction, stress, burnout and the work environment of haemodialysis nurses. Haemodialysis nursing is characterised by frequent and intense contact with patients in a complex and intense environment. A cross-sectional online survey of 417 haemodialysis nurses that included nurse and work characteristics, the Brisbane Practice Environment Measure, Index of Work Satisfaction, Nursing Stress Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Haemodialysis nurses reported an acceptable level of job satisfaction and perceived their work environment positively, although high levels of burnout were found. Nurses who were older and had worked in haemodialysis the longest had higher satisfaction levels, experienced less stress and lower levels of burnout than younger nurses. The in-centre type of haemodialysis unit had greater levels of stress and burnout than home training units. Greater satisfaction with the work environment was strongly correlated with job satisfaction, lower job stress and emotional exhaustion. Haemodialysis nurses experienced high levels of burnout even though their work environment was favourable and they had acceptable levels of job satisfaction. Targeted strategies are required to retain and avoid burnout in younger and less experienced nurses in this highly specialised field of nursing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Burnout and depressive symptoms in intensive care nurses: relationship analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Motta de Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the existence of a relationship between burnout and depressive symptoms among intensive care unit nursing staff. Method: A quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study with 91 intensive care nurses. Data collection used a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey, and the Beck Depression Inventory - I. The Pearson test verified the correlation between the burnout dimension score and the total score from the Beck Depression Inventory. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze whether there is an association between the diseases. Results: Burnout was presented by 14.29% of the nurses and 10.98% had symptoms of depression. The higher the level of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and the lower professional accomplishment, the greater the depressive symptoms. The association was significant between burnout and depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Nurses with burnout have a greater possibility of triggering depressive symptoms.

  2. Burnout and depressive symptoms in intensive care nurses: relationship analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Eduardo Motta de; Martino, Milva Maria Figueiredo De; França, Salomão Patrício de Souza

    2018-01-01

    To analyze the existence of a relationship between burnout and depressive symptoms among intensive care unit nursing staff. A quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study with 91 intensive care nurses. Data collection used a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey, and the Beck Depression Inventory - I. The Pearson test verified the correlation between the burnout dimension score and the total score from the Beck Depression Inventory. Fisher's exact test was used to analyze whether there is an association between the diseases. Burnout was presented by 14.29% of the nurses and 10.98% had symptoms of depression. The higher the level of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and the lower professional accomplishment, the greater the depressive symptoms. The association was significant between burnout and depressive symptoms. Nurses with burnout have a greater possibility of triggering depressive symptoms.

  3. Situational Factors Associated With Burnout Among Emergency Department Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Jose Andres; Olson, DaiWai M; Thu, Hlaing Sue; Stutzman, Sonja E

    2017-06-01

    Emergency departments are high-stress environments for patients and clinicians. As part of the clinical team, nurses experience this stress daily and are subject to high levels of burnout, which has been shown to lead to hypertension, depression, and anxiety. Presence of these diseases may also contribute to burnout, creating a cycle of stress and illness. This prospective qualitative study used a phenomenological approach to better understand factors associated with burnout among emergency department nurses. Burnout manifests itself in multiple modes, can affect nurses' decisions to leave the profession, and must be addressed to mitigate the phenomenon.

  4. Burnout and depressive symptoms in intensive care nurses: relationship analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vasconcelos, Eduardo Motta de; Martino, Milva Maria Figueiredo De; França, Salomão Patrício de Souza

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the existence of a relationship between burnout and depressive symptoms among intensive care unit nursing staff. Method: A quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study with 91 intensive care nurses. Data collection used a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey, and the Beck Depression Inventory - I. The Pearson test verified the correlation between the burnout dimension score and the total score from the Beck ...

  5. Correlation between workplace and occupational burnout syndrome in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Omid; Azizkhani, Reza; Basravi, Monem

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of nurses' workplace on burnout syndrome among nurses working in Isfahan's Alzahra Hospital as a reference and typical university affiliated hospital, in 2010. In this cross-sectional study, 100 nurses were randomly selected among those working in emergency, orthopedic, dialysis wards and intensive care unit (ICU). Required data on determination of occupational burnout rate among the nurses of these wards were collected using Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) standard and validated questionnaire. Nurses were selected using simple random sampling. The multivariate ANOVA analysis showed that occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in orthopedic and dialysis wards were significantly less than those of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU (P = 0.01). There was also no significant difference between occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU (P > 0.05). t-test showed that there was a difference between occupational burnout values of men and women, as these values for women were higher than those of men (P = 0.001). Results showed that occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU were significantly more than those of nurses working in orthopedic and dialysis wards.

  6. Relationship of nurse burnout with personality characteristics and coping behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizutani, Masahiro; Odagiri, Yuko; Ohya, Yumiko; Shimomitsu, Teruichi; Kristensen, Tage S; Maruta, Toshimasa; Iimori, Makio

    2008-08-01

    Burnout of nurses at university hospitals was analyzed in relation to their personality characteristics and coping behaviors. A self-administered questionnaire regarding burnout (the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory), work-related stressors (the Nursing Job Stressor Scale), personality characteristics (Short-Form Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised), and coping behaviors (the short Japanese version of Brief COPE) was used. We obtained answers from 778 nurses (response rate: 94.9%), and analyzed 707 female registered nurses. Multiple regression analysis showed that neuroticism was more closely related to personal, work-related, and client-related burnout than extroversion. Covariate structure analysis revealed that among the nurses with high neuroticism and low extroversion, client-related burnout was found to be correlated with stressors in relation to conflict with patients and with positive coping behaviors. Among the nurses with low neuroticism and high extroversion, client-related burnout correlated with the coping behavior of behavioral disengagement and conflict with patients. In both groups, an increase in quantitative workload was associated with a higher score for stressors arising from conflict with patients, leading to client-related burnout. These results suggest that acquisition of skills to cultivate appropriate coping behaviors might be useful for reducing client-related burnout in relation to nurses' personality characteristics. These findings need to be further endorsed by intervention studies.

  7. Correlation between workplace and occupational burnout syndrome in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Ahmadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to determine the effect of nurses′ workplace on burnout syndrome among nurses working in Isfahan′s Alzahra Hospital as a reference and typical university affiliated hospital, in 2010. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 100 nurses were randomly selected among those working in emergency, orthopedic, dialysis wards and intensive care unit (ICU. Required data on determination of occupational burnout rate among the nurses of these wards were collected using Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI standard and validated questionnaire. Nurses were selected using simple random sampling. Results: The multivariate ANOVA analysis showed that occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in orthopedic and dialysis wards were significantly less than those of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU (P0 = 0.01. There was also no significant difference between occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU ( P > 0.05. t-test showed that there was a difference between occupational burnout values of men and women, as these values for women were higher than those of men (P = 0.001. Conclusion: Results showed that occupational burnout mean values of nurses working in emergency ward and ICU were significantly more than those of nurses working in orthopedic and dialysis wards.

  8. Burnout in Belgian physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroeck, S; Van Gerven, E; De Witte, H; Vanhaecht, K; Godderis, L

    2017-09-06

    Burnout in healthcare is a worldwide problem. However, most studies focus narrowly on work-related factors and outcomes in one health profession or speciality. To investigate the prevalence of burnout and its association with job demands, job resources, individual well-being, work-related attitudes and behaviour in physicians and nurses across different specialties. Multi-centre cross-sectional study of physicians and nurses working in Belgian hospitals. An electronic questionnaire was used to assess job demands (e.g. workload), job resources (e.g. autonomy) and indicators of well-being, work-related attitudes and behaviours. Structural equation modelling was used to examine interrelationships between explanatory variables and outcomes. 1169 physicians and 4531 nurses participated; response rate 26%. High scores (>75th percentile in reference group of Dutch health care workers) were seen in 6% of the sample on three burnout dimensions (i.e. emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal competence) and in 13% for at least two dimensions. In contrast to the other dimensions, emotional exhaustion strongly related to almost all variables examined in the model. Positive associations were seen with workload, role conflicts, emotional burden and work-home interference and negative associations with learning and development opportunities and co-worker support. Emotional exhaustion correlated negatively with well-being, turnover intention, being prepared and able to work until retirement age, medication use, absenteeism and presenteeism. Work-related factors were critical correlates of emotional exhaustion, which strongly related to poor health and turnover intention. Randomized controlled trials are suggested to underpin the effectiveness of interventions tackling job stressors and promoting job resources.

  9. Burnout syndrome in nursing undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Inhauser Riceti Acioli Barboza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To classify nursing students on a socio-demographic basisin order to check whether they are acquainted with the meaning ofthe term burnout syndrome; to check for the presence of the burnoutsyndrome and assess its levels in undergraduate nurses. Methods:A cross-section study was carried out of 102 students at the NursingSchool of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. A questionnaire wasmade up by the authors and applied along with the Maslachs BurnoutInventory (MBI. Results: Ninety-five percent of students were female,aged 18 to 50 years, 86% were single and 51% reported having jobs.Most of the surveyed subjects were not acquainted with the termburnout syndrome. Out of the total of 39 students, 56.9% classified thedisease as being psychological and caused by professional stress. Asfor the mean MBI subscales, it was found that a relatively high mean(28.6% referred a low feeling of professional accomplishment, a low/moderate mean (23.09% were emotionally exhausted and (9.176%felt depersonalized, which intrinsically proves the absence of burnoutsyndrome in the sample. As for burnout dimensions, the findingsshowed that 73.5% are at a low/moderate level of emotional exhaustion;70.53% suffer from a low/moderate level of depersonalization; and 76%reported a high feeling of professional accomplishment. Conclusion:High means were found at the dimensions of reduced professionalaccomplishment, which calls for the need to intervene in the caseof these students so that they may recall their primary initiativeconcerning their professional choice.

  10. Burnout syndrome indices in Greek intensive care nursing personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikola, Maria N K; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D E; Mpouzika, Meropi; Lemonidou, Chrysoula

    2012-01-01

    Burnout symptoms in Greek intensive care unit (ICU) nurses have not been explored adequately. The aim of this descriptive, correlational study was to investigate the prevalence and intensity of burnout symptoms in Greek ICU nursing personnel and any potential associations with professional satisfaction, as well as with demographic, educational, and vocational characteristics. Findings showed that the overall burnout level reported by Greek ICU nursing personnel was at a moderate to high degree. The most pronounced symptom of burnout was depersonalization, whereas emotional exhaustion was found to be a strong predictor of job satisfaction. This is a factor connected with the nurses' intention to quit the job. It appears that work factors have a more powerful influence over the development of burnout in comparison to personality traits.

  11. Burnout and its relationship with personality factors in oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente-Solana, Emilia I; Gómez-Urquiza, José L; Cañadas, Gustavo R; Albendín-García, Luis; Ortega-Campos, Elena; Cañadas-De la Fuente, Guillermo A

    2017-10-01

    To assess burnout levels in oncology nurses, to evaluate at what stage of burnout suffering they are and to analyze the relationship between burnout with personality factors. A quantitative, observational, cross-sectional multicenter study was done. Oncology nurses (n = 101) from the Andalusian Health Service (Andalusia, Spain) were included. The main variables were personality factors, assessed with the NEO-FFI questionnaire, anxiety and depression, assessed with the Educational-Clinical Questionnaire: Anxiety and Depression, and burnout, evaluated with the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Student t-statistic was used for hypothesis contrasts and Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to establish the association between personality factors and burnout. According to the burnout phases model, 29.6% of the sample is in the most severe phases. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization are positively correlated with neuroticism and negatively correlated with agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion and openness. Personal accomplishment has a negative correlation with neuroticism and negative correlations with agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion and openness. Finally, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization have a positive correlation with anxiety and depression, while personal accomplishment has a negative correlation with anxiety and depression. A significant number of oncology nurses are in the most severe stages of burnout suffering. Personality factors have a key role in burnout development. The importance of personality factors in burnout development should be taken into account. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimism and proactive coping in relation to burnout among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuhsuan; Chan, Hsin-Ju

    2015-04-01

    The study investigated the three symptoms of burnout among hospital nurses and examined the buffering effects of optimism and proactive coping in relation to burnout. Nursing is a profession that can easily lead to burnout. Burnout has been one of the most investigated work outcomes in current research. Previous research has largely ignored the positive influence of individuals on job outcomes and has not tested a constructive framework that might facilitate interventions to prevent burnout. A cross-sectional survey of 314 staff nurses in general hospitals in Taiwan. Participants completed a set of questionnaires with demographic information. The findings suggested that higher levels of proactive coping behaviours and optimism were associated with lower levels of burnout. Optimism was found to have the strongest relationship with the decreased personal accomplishment of burnout. The findings of this study confirmed the importance of optimism and proactive coping in prevention of symptoms of burnout. The results of this study provided important recommendations regarding stress management interventions for health-care managers, nurses, psychologists and human resource staff in the reduction of burnout to promote mental health in an organisation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Job Burnout Reduces Hand Hygiene Compliance Among Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manomenidis, Georgios; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Montgomery, Anthony

    2017-10-13

    Health professional burnout has been associated with suboptimal care and reduced patient safety. However, the extent to which burnout influences hand hygiene compliance among health professionals has yet to be explored. The aim of the study was to examine whether job burnout reduces hand washing compliance among nursing staff. A diary study was conducted. Forty registered nurses working in a general city hospital in Thessaloniki, Greece, completed a questionnaire, while they were monitored for hand hygiene compliance following the World Health Organization protocol for hand hygiene assessment. Burnout was measured using validated items from the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Data were collected from September to October 2015. Multiple regression analysis showed that controlling for years in practice, burnout was negatively associated with hand hygiene compliance (R = 0.322, F(3,36) = 5.704, P burnout were less likely to comply with hand hygiene opportunities (b = - 3.72, 95% confidence interval = -5.94 to -1.51). This study showed that burnout contributes to suboptimal care by reducing compliance to hand hygiene among nurses. Given the crucial role of hand hygiene compliance for the prevention of in-hospital infections, this study highlights the need for interventions targeting the prevention of burnout among nursing staff.

  14. ENGAGEMENT AND BURNOUT AMONG NURSING AND PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS IN SLOVAKIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Škodová

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the differences in engagement and burnout syndrome in students of nursing/midwifery and psychology in Slovakia. Design: A cross-sectional design was used. Methods: 171 university students on a baccalaureate program participated in the research (90.9% females; age 20.6 ± 1.3; 80 psychology students, 91 nursing/midwifery students. The School Burnout Inventory (SBI and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES were employed as measurement methods. Results: A significant negative association between levels of burnout and engagement (R = 0.42; p < 0.01 was found. A linear regression model showed a significant effect of engagement on burnout (β = -0.34; 95% CI: -0.50; -0.19. However, the total explained variance was only 19.4%. Students of psychology scored higher in engagement compared to nursing and midwifery students (t = 6.89; p < 0.001. Conversely, midwifery and nursing students had higher levels of burnout compared to the group of psychology students (t = -4.55; p < 0,001. Conclusion: Nursing is considered to be a high risk profession in terms of development of burnout, which was demonstrated in this study by the higher burnout, and lower engagement levels in nursing and midwifery students. Higher attention to coping mechanisms for stress and burnout symptoms among students of healthcare professions is required in the school curriculum, especially in nursing programs. Keywords: burnout syndrome, engagement, students of nursing, midwifery, students of psychology, School Burnout Inventory (SBI, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES.

  15. Burnout Syndrome Among Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoc, Ayten; Yilmaz, Murvet; Alcalar, Nilufer; Esen, Bennur; Kayabasi, Hasan; Sit, Dede

    2016-11-01

    Burnout, a syndrome with 3 dimensions of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduction of personal accomplishment, is very common among hemodialysis nurses, while data are scarce regarding the prevalence of burnout syndrome (BS) among peritoneal dialysis (PD) nurses. This study aimed to assess and compare demographic and professional characteristics and burnout levels in hemodialysis and PD nurses, and to investigate factors that increase the level of burnout in dialysis nurses. A total of 171 nurses from 44 dialysis centers in Turkey were included in a cross-sectional survey study. Data were collected using a questionnaire defining the social and demographic characteristics and working conditions of the nurses as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory for assessment of burnout level. There was no significant difference in the level of burnout between the hemodialysis and PD nurses groups. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores were higher among the shift workers, nurses who had problems in interactions with the other team members, and those who wanted to leave the unit, as well as the nurses who would not attend training programs. In addition, male sex, younger age, limited working experience, more than 50 hours of working per week, and working in dialysis not by choice were associated with higher depersonalization scores. Personal accomplishment score was lower among the younger nurses who had problems in their interactions with the doctors, who would not regularly attend training programs, and who felt being medically inadequate. Improving working conditions and relations among colleagues, and also providing further dialysis education are necessary for minimizing burnout syndrome. Burnout reduction programs should mainly focus on younger professionals.

  16. Correlation between workplace and occupational burnout syndrome in nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Omid Ahmadi; Reza Azizkhani; Monem Basravi

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to determine the effect of nurses′ workplace on burnout syndrome among nurses working in Isfahan′s Alzahra Hospital as a reference and typical university affiliated hospital, in 2010. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 100 nurses were randomly selected among those working in emergency, orthopedic, dialysis wards and intensive care unit (ICU). Required data on determination of occupational burnout rate among the nurses of these wards ...

  17. Risk factors for burnout among caregivers working in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandelman, Nadia; Mazars, Thierry; Levy, Antonin

    2018-01-01

    (i) To assess the level of burnout in nursing home caregivers within a unique healthcare network in France and (ii) to evaluate potential risk factors in this population. Burnout syndrome occurs frequently among nursing home caregivers and has strong detrimental effects on the quality of health care for residents. We used an observational survey to study burnout in nursing home caregivers. The survey was used to quantify burnout level (Maslach Burnout Inventory) and potential risk factors and was implemented from October 2013-April 2014. A logistic regression was used to explore the association between burnout and its risk factors. Three hundred and sixty questionnaires were delivered to caregivers in 14 nursing homes within a unique healthcare network. The response rate was 37% (132/360), and 124/132 (94%) surveys were analysed. Caregiver burnout rate was 40% (49/124). Median age was 41 years (range, 20-70) and most caregivers were female. The most common profession (n = 54; 44%) was nurse caregiver and 90% (n = 112) had an antecedent of bullying by a resident. Risk factors identified were as follows: the presence of institutional protocols (death announcement [OR: 3.7] and pain assessment [OR: 2.8]), working in a profit-making establishment (OR: 2.6) and the antecedent of bullying by a resident (OR: 6.2). Factors most negatively associated with burnout included: practising pastimes (OR: 0.4) and working as a nurse (OR: 0.3). The only significant risk factor in the multivariate analysis was the antecedent of bullying by a resident (OR: 5.3). Several specific risk factors for burnout in nursing home caregivers were identified. In high-risk populations of healthcare professionals, screening and management of risk factors is crucial for preventing burnout. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Burnout syndrome in critical care nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncet, Marie Cécile; Toullic, Philippe; Papazian, Laurent; Kentish-Barnes, Nancy; Timsit, Jean-Francçois; Pochard, Frédéric; Chevret, Sylvie; Schlemmer, Benoît; Azoulay, Elie

    2007-04-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) associated with stress has been documented in health care professionals in many specialties. The intensive care unit (ICU) is a highly stressful environment. Little is known about BOS in critical care nursing staff. To identify determinants of BOS in critical care nurses. We conducted a questionnaire survey in France. Among 278 ICUs contacted for the study, 165 (59.4%) included 2,525 nursing staff members, of whom 2,392 returned questionnaires with complete Maslach Burnout Inventory data. Of the 2,392 respondents (82% female), 80% were nurses, 15% nursing assistants, and 5% head nurses. Severe BOS-related symptoms were identified in 790 (33%) respondents. By multivariate analysis, four domains were associated with severe BOS: (1) personal characteristics, such as age (odds ratio [OR], 0.97/yr; confidence interval [CI], 0.96-0.99; p=0.0008); (2) organizational factors, such as ability to choose days off (OR, 0.69; CI, 0.52-0.91; p=0.009) or participation in an ICU research group (OR, 0.74; CI, 0.56-0.97; p=0.03); (3) quality of working relations (1-10 scale), such as conflicts with patients (OR, 1.96; CI, 1.16-1.30; p=0.01), relationship with head nurse (OR, 0.92/point; CI, 0.86-0.98; p=0.02) or physicians (OR, 0.81; CI, 0.74-0.87; p=0.0001); and (4) end-of-life related factors, such as caring for a dying patient (OR, 1.39; CI, 1.04-1.85; p=0.02), and number of decisions to forego life-sustaining treatments in the last week (OR, 1.14; CI, 1.01-1.29; p=0.04). One-third of ICU nursing staff had severe BOS. Areas for improvement identified in our study include conflict prevention, participation in ICU research groups, and better management of end-of-life care. Interventional studies are needed to investigate these potentially preventive strategies.

  19. The effects of hazardous working conditions on burnout in Macau nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney X. Hu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Workplace environmental hazards increased the risk of burnout amongst clinical nurses in Macau. Better management of these factors may help to protect nursing staff and reduce the risk of burnout and attrition from the nursing profession.

  20. Stress levels of psychiatric nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looff, P.C. de; Kuijpers, E.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2014-01-01

    During a total of 30 shifts, the arousal levels of 10 psychiatric nurses were assessed while working on a (forensic) psychiatric admissions ward. Arousal was assessed by means of a small device (wristband) by which the Skin Conductance Level (SCL) of the participating nurses was monitored. Each

  1. Burnout Study of Clinical Nurses in Vietnam: Development of Job Burnout Model Based on Leiter and Maslach's Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Nguyen, Huong Thi; Kitaoka, Kazuyo; Sukigara, Masune; Thai, Anh Lan

    2018-02-08

    This study aimed to create a Vietnamese version of both the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) and Areas of Worklife Scale (AWS) to assess the burnout state of Vietnamese clinical nurses and to develop a causal model of burnout of clinical nurses. We conducted a descriptive design using a cross-sectional survey. The questionnaire was hand-divided directly by nursing departments to 500 clinical nurses in three hospitals. Vietnamese MBI-GS and AWS were then examined for reliability and validity. We used the revised exhaustion + 1 burnout classification to access burnout state. We performed path analysis to develop a Vietnamese causal model basing on the original model by Leiter and Maslach's theory. We found that both scales were reliable and valid for assessing burnout. Among nurse participants, the percentage of severe burnout was 0.7 %, burnout was 15.8% and 17.2% of nurses was exhausted. The best predictor of burnout was "on-duty work schedule" that clinical nurses have to work for 24 hours. In the causal model, we also found similarity and difference pathways in comparison with the original model. Vietnamese MBI-GS and AWS were applicable to research on occupational stress. Nearly one-fifth of Vietnamese clinical nurses were working in burnout state. The causal model suggested a range of factors resulting in burnout, it is necessary to consider the specific solution to prevent burnout problem. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Exploration of the burnout syndrome occurrence among mental health nurses in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikola, Maria N K; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth E D

    2013-12-01

    Nurses' work-related stress might be associated with psychiatric symptoms, leading to altered professional attitudes. The aim of this study was to explore the levels of burnout and associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms among Greek-Cypriot psychiatric-mental health nurses (PMHNs). A descriptive correlational design with cross-sectional comparisons was applied. A sample of 226 PMHNs was used. Participants reported low levels of burnout. However, 10% of them manifested clinically significant anxiety and depressive symptoms. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalization were associated with depressive (r=0.562, p<0.0001, and r=0.616, p<0.0001, respectively) and anxiety (r=0.394, p<0.0001, and r=0.448, p<0.0001, respectively) symptoms. Further research investigating the biological aetiopathology of these psychological alterations is warranted. © 2013.

  3. Depression, Burnout, and Perceptions of Control in Hospital Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Assessed depression, burnout, and perceived job control (PJC) in 162 nurses. Depression accounted for over 19% of variance associated with emotional exhaustion, and PJC accounted for another 6%. Perceptions of uncontrollability were significantly related to higher levels of depression and burnout. Analyses suggest that perceived uncontrollability…

  4. Burnout and psychological distress among nurses in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 210 nurses working in this health institution for symptoms of burnout and psychological distress. Results: High levels of burnout were identified in 42.9% of the respondents in the area of emotional exhaustion, 47.6% in the area of depersonalization and 53.8% in the area of reduced personal accomplishment, while 44.1% ...

  5. Nurse burnout: personal and environmental factors as predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Liu, Yanhui; Wang, Linlin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the level of burnout of clinical nurses and to examine the influence of personal and environmental factors on nurse burnout. A total of 717 full-time nurses from six hospitals in Tianjin, China, completed five questionnaires: a demographic questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and the Nurse Job Stressor Scale. The participants had moderate levels of emotional exhaustion (mean score 23.95 ± 11.11) and depersonalization (mean score 7.90 ± 6.58) and a high level of reduced personal accomplishment (mean score 27.51 ± 10.96). Both personal and environmental factors were correlated with nurse burnout; however, personal factors played bigger roles in predicting personal accomplishment, whereas environmental factors played bigger roles in predicting emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. In order to reduce nurse job burnout effectively, administrators should pay more attention to the improvement of nurses' self-efficacy and professional nursing practice environment and the reduction of stressors. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Evaluation of burnout and job satisfaction in marrow transplant nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molassiotis, A; Haberman, M

    1996-10-01

    The study examined incidence of burnout syndrome, psychopathology, and job satisfaction in bone marrow transplant nurses, in relation to existence of an informal psychosocial support programme for staff needs. Forty nurses participated in the study completing four standardised measures related to burnout, anxiety, depression, satisfaction with aspects of their job, and social support. Results indicated that burnout among these nurses was low, and high personal accomplishment from working with marrow transplant patients was the response of the majority. Job satisfaction was also found to be high, with outpatient nurses scoring significantly higher than inpatient nurses in most aspects of job satisfaction. One out of four subjects presented with the psychic manifestations of the anxiety neurosis, suggesting the stressfullness of the marrow transplant environment, which requires a high degree of responsibility and advanced nursing skills. Social support was not found to influence burnout, psychopathology, or job satisfaction. Presence of depression, low personal accomplishment, and dissatisfaction with pay were the variables predicting high emotional exhaustion, one of the main components of burnout. These results were suggestive of less burned out and more satisfied nurses compared to marrow transplant nurses working in environments with no formal or informal staff support programmes. This highlights the need for development of support services for the nursing staff, allowing them to ventilate their feelings, discuss issues of concern to them and seek professional support where necessary.

  7. Can sleep quality and burnout affect the job performance of shift-work nurses? A hospital cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Fabio; Mattei, Antonella; Notarnicola, Ippolito; Petrucci, Cristina; Lancia, Loreto

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate any possible relationship between sleep disorders, burnout and job performance in a shift-work population of nurses. Sleep disorders and burnout can affect the job performance of nurses in terms of efficiency, productivity, task execution speed and supervision, which can be compromised when work shifts are organized on a 24-hour schedule and when the shift itself is irregular. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted from August 2014 - January 2015 on a sample of 315 shift-work nurses across 39 wards in seven central Italian hospitals. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to detect the presence of sleep disorders, the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory was used to detect the presence of any possible type of burnout and the Job Performance Scale was used to measure job performance. Data analysis was mainly based on a multivariate logistic regression to identify variables significantly associated with investigated outcomes. On shift-work nurses' sleep quality and burnout correlated positively. The female gender and personal burnout were significantly associated with impaired sleep quality, while working in the psychiatric setting, working a long cycle shift pattern and experiencing daytime dysfunction were significantly associated with burnout. A significant negative association between patient-related burnout and job performance was observed. Specific characteristics of shift-work nurses can directly affect sleep quality and burnout and indirectly job performance. This evidence offers healthcare administrators opportunities to intervene with measures to promote nurse's health, well-being and safety. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Burnout in nursing staff: is there a relationship between depression and burnout?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovides, A; Fountoulakis, K N; Moysidou, C; Ierodiakonou, C

    1999-01-01

    There is evidence that burnout may be a clinical entity with pathological stress reaction features related to the inability in finding pleasure from work. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between burnout and depression. The study took place in the general hospital AHEPA of Thessaloniki. All members of the nursing staff (in total 368 subjects) took part. The protocol was self-reported and anonymous, in order to obtain as valid data as possible and included the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) to assess the level of burnout, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) to assess personality traits, and the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale to assess depressive symptomatology. The analysis revealed a weak but significant relationship between burnout and depression. Depression is a pervasive disorder that affects almost every aspect of the patient's life. On the contrary, burnout is, by definition, a syndrome restricted to the patient's professional environment. However, it seems that there may be two distinct types of burnout syndromes, of which the one comprising the majority of nurses has little or no common features with depression. The second type consists of individuals with a predisposition to develop burnout. The latter is characterized by more severe symptomatology, phenotypic similarity to depression and presumably common etiological mechanisms.

  9. Burnout, Engagement, and Organizational Culture: Differences between Physicians and Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijakoski, Dragan; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka; Basarovska, Vera; Montgomery, Anthony; Panagopoulou, Efharis; Stoleski, Sasho; Minov, Jordan

    2015-09-15

    Burnout results from a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal workplace stressors. The focus of research has been widened to job engagement. Purpose of the study was to examine associations between burnout, job engagement, work demands, and organisational culture (OC) and to demonstrate differences between physicians and nurses working in general hospital in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. Maslach Burnout Inventory and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were used for assessment of burnout and job engagement. Work demands and OC were measured with Hospital Experience Scale and Competing Values Framework, respectively. Higher scores of dedication, hierarchy OC, and organizational work demands were found in physicians. Nurses demonstrated higher scores of clan OC. Burnout negatively correlated with clan and market OC in physicians and nurses. Job engagement positively correlated with clan and market OC in nurses. Different work demands were related to different dimensions of burnout and/or job engagement. Our findings support job demands-resources (JD-R) model (Demerouti and Bakker). Data obtained can be used in implementation of specific organizational interventions in the hospital setting. Providing adequate JD-R interaction can lead to prevention of burnout in health professionals (HPs) and contribute positively to better job engagement in HPs and higher quality of patient care.

  10. Workroles of staff nurses in psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, E G; Shealy, A H; Kowalski, C; LaMont, J; Range, B A

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to operationalize Peplau's workroles of the psychiatric staff nurse. Thirty registered nurses audiotaped one-to-one interactions with 62 adult, child, and adolescent psychiatric patients. Content analysis was used to identify role behaviors and to identify roles that were different from those outlined by Peplau. The counselor role was the most frequently occurring primary workrole. Overlap was found between behaviors indicative of autocratic leader versus surrogate and those of resource person versus teacher. The findings supported Peplau's contention that the counselor role is central to the practice of psychiatric nursing.

  11. The relationship between burnout and mental health among nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdi masooleh F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burnout is one of the most important factors in reduced productivity in organizations and involves physical and mental signs, especially in the human service professions. The role of nurses in the healthcare system is vital and motivation to ensure health security is extremely important. We carried out this research to examine the relationship between burnout and mental health in the nursing staff of educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among 200 nurses selected via probable multistage sampling. We used three instruments in this study: 1 demographic questionnaire 2 General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28 and 3 Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI.Results: On the whole, using the MBI subscale, we found low levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and high levels of reduced sense of personal accomplishment, both in frequency and intensity. The prevalence of symptomatic samples in the GHQ-28 was 43%, and two variables, burnout and poor mental health, were related (p<0.001. Burnout was to be related to gender, age and years of work. The correlation between poor mental health and years of work as well as hours of work in a week were significant. Conclusions: Our results suggest that there is a strong correlation between poor mental health and burnout. Furthermore, the prevalence of symptomatic samples detected in our study using the GHQ-28 was much higher than that reported in studies of the general population. The high prevalence of symptomatic samples and high prevalence of burnout in the dimension of self accomplishment, especially in younger nurses, combined with the strong correlation between poor mental health and burnout all show that care should be taken to improve the stressful conditions that nurses face.

  12. [Prevalence of burnout syndrome in nurses in 2 Mexican hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer-Morales, Yusvisaret; Prince-Vélez, Roberto; Searcy-Bernal, Roberto; Compean-Saucedo, Bertha

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome in nursing staff in 2 different second level hospitals in the city of Mexicali, Baja California, Mexico. A cross-sectional study was conducted in all nursing staff (n = 698) in 2 second level hospitals (the Gynecology, Pediatrics and Family Medicine Hospital No. 31 and the General Specialist Hospital No. 30 in Mexicali). A stratified random sample was obtained from the 698 nurses, with a sample size of 184 nurses from each hospital. The Maslach Burn-out Inventory and a general questionnaire on demographic factors were used. Statistical analysis consisted of descriptive statistics and analysis of proportions using the chi-squared test. A total of 368 nurses were studied, of whom 345 (93.75%) were women. The mean age was 41.21 SD (standard deviation) = 6.59 years. The mean length of service was 15.87 (SD = 6.12) years. In both hospitals, the prevalence of burnout syndrome was 6.79% (25). Previous publications on burn-out have included studies performed in Mexico and in nurses in the emergency department of a tertiary hospital in Barcelona, as well as in other health care professionals. In comparison with these studies, the prevalence of burn-out observed in the present study was significantly lower.

  13. Ethical sensitivity, burnout, and job satisfaction in emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazoğlu, Cansu Atmaca; Koç, Zeliha

    2017-01-01

    Rising levels of burnout and decreasing job satisfaction can inhibit healthcare professionals from providing high-quality care due to a corresponding decrease in their ethical sensitivity. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the level of ethical sensitivity in emergency service nurses and their levels of burnout and job satisfaction. This research employed a descriptive and cross-sectional design. Participants and research context: This study was conducted with a sample of 236 nurses, all of whom worked in emergency service between 24 July 2015 and 28 April 2016. Data were collected using the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Minnesota Job Satisfaction Scale. Ethical considerations: This study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Review Board of Ondokuz Mayıs University. There was a weak and negative correlation (r = -0.158, p = 0.015) between Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire and Maslach Burnout Inventory scores. There was also a weak and negative correlation (r = -0.335, p Burnout Inventory and Minnesota Job Satisfaction Scale scores. Decreased job satisfaction and increased burnout levels among emergency service nurses might result in them indulging in improper practices, frequently facing ethical problems, and a decrease in the overall quality of service in hospitals. In order for emergency service nurses to recognize ethical problems and make the most accurate decisions, a high level of ethical sensitivity is critical. In this respect, it is suggested that continuing education after graduation and training programs should be organized.

  14. Burnout and Job Engagement in Emergency and Intensive Care Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentero, Piergiorgio; Dell'Olivo, Bianca

    Burnout phenomenon emerges from a constellation of factors which cannot be described in terms of cause-effect relationships. This study investigated levels of burnout in nurses working in Critical Care Units with a systemic approach, giving evidence of relation between nurses staff burnout and psychosocial workplace factors. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between job burnout in emergency and intensive care nurse with specific areas of work life in their organizations, using Maslach and Leiter work life model [23]. A cross-sectional survey was designed using the Italian version of the "Organizational Checkup System" in a sample of 180 Italian nurses. Results showed that high burnout levels were strongly related to high demands, low control, low fairness, lack of social support, and individual disagreement on values in the workplace. High professional efficacy levels were instead correlated to professional reward and leadership involvement. The article concludes by suggesting the possible areas for intervention in order to prevent job burnout and building job engagement.

  15. [A staff development model in psychiatric nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, D; Muller, M; Poggenpoel, M

    1995-03-01

    The nursing service manager is accountable for the quality of nursing care delivered in the nursing service. It is therefore important that the nursing service manager facilitates staff development in the nursing service. It is not only the nursing service manager's responsibility to make provision for staff development--the nurse also has a responsibility in this regard. He/she should purposefully make an effort to keep up to date with the latest developments. This article focuses on the co-responsibility of the psychiatric nurse and nursing service manager regarding staff development. A model for staff development is described, in accordance with the guidelines of Dickoff, James & Wiedenbach for theory development. An inductive approach was primarily followed to describe the provisional model, after which a literature study was employed to refine and purify the model. This model was exposed to expert evaluation, after which the final model for staff development of psychiatric nurses was described. Recommendations include the testing of certain hypotheses and utilisation of this model in psychiatric nursing practice.

  16. Burnout syndrome among multinational nurses working in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burnout syndrome among multinational nurses working in Saudi Arabia. ... This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of BS among a multinational nursing workforce in Saudi Arabia. Materials ... We believe that working conditions have to be improved to develop strategies to cope and alleviate stressful situations.

  17. Cyberbullying: implications for the psychiatric nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Lindsey M; Hubbard, Grace B

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to inform and educate psychiatric nurse practitioners about the pervasiveness of the rapidly increasing problem of cyberbullying. As more children and adolescents obtain access to the Internet, mobile devices, and social networking sites, the exposure to bullying in the virtual format increases. Cyberbullying is a growing public health concern and can affect mental health and school performance. Cyberbullying often results in a range of psychiatric symptoms and has been linked to suicide attempts and completions. The psychiatric nurse practitioner is uniquely prepared to provide a range of interventions for patients, families, and communities who have experienced cyberbullying. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Technological Advances in Psychiatric Nursing: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, Andrea C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and treating mental illness has improved in many ways as a result of the fast pace of technological advances. The technologies that have the greatest potential impact are those that (1) increase the knowledge of how the brain functions and changes based on interventions, (2) have the potential to personalize interventions based on understanding genetic factors of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, and (3) use information technology to provide treatment in the absence of an adequate mental health workforce. Technologies are explored for psychiatric nurses to consider. Psychiatric nurses are encouraged to consider the experiences of psychiatric patients, including poor health, stigmatization, and suffering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Burnout and perceived health in Critical Care nursing professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos Risquez, M I; Peñalver Hernández, F; Godoy Fernández, C

    2008-01-01

    To assess the level of burnout syndrome in a sample of critical care nursing professionals and analyze its relation with the perception of general health and other sociodemographic and work characteristics. Cross-sectional descriptive study. SITE: Intensive Care Unit of the University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia-Spain. Three evaluation tools were used. These included a sociodemographic and work survey, the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) questionnaires and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) in order to assess professional burnout and the general health condition perceived, respectively. Only 42 out of the 56 questionnaires included in the study were valid. This means an answering rate of 75%. The mean score obtained on the emotional tiredness dimension (25.45 6 11.15) stands out. About 42.9% of the sample presented psychological or psychosomatic symptoms that could require specialized care. Correlation between burnout and general health perception was statistically significant (r = 0.536; p burnout found was moderate to high among critical care nursing professionals. A total of 11.9% of the studied sample had a high score in the 3 dimensions of the burnout syndrome: emotional tiredness, depersonalization, and lack of personal job performance. Burnout and health levels found indicate high vulnerability in the sample studied and the need to establish prevention/intervention programs in this work context.

  20. Nurses' burnout and unmet nursing care needs of patients' relatives in a Turkish State Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekindal, Benian; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah; Pinar, Gul; Ozturk, Filiz; Alan, Sumeyra

    2012-02-01

    One of the biggest problems of work life today is burnout. With burnout, satisfaction of clients and service givers reduces. In this study, burnout levels of nurses working in the internal, surgical and intensive care units of a university hospital and the unmet needs of the patients' relatives related to nursing care were investigated. In the study, 225 nurses and 222 relatives of patients constituted the sample group of this study. Three separate forms were used in the study, namely, Nurse and Patient Relative Identification Form, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Nursing Services Satisfaction Inventory. In the study, burnout levels of the nurses were found to be high. Conditions like younger ages, scarcity of experience in the profession, lower levels of education, having chosen the profession and the unit they work in not willingly and working in environments like intensive care increase the burnout and as a result, expectations of the relatives of patients from nursing care are not fully met. Some suggestions have been made to make some regulations to prevent the burnout of nurses and to increase the satisfaction of relatives. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Active Intervention Can Decrease Burnout In Ed Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Rong; Ji, Hong; Li, Jianxin; Zhang, Liyao

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether active intervention can decrease job burnout and improve performance among ED nurses. This study was carried out in the emergency departments of 3 hospitals randomly selected from 8 comprehensive high-level hospitals in Jinan, China. A total of 102 nurses were enrolled and randomly divided into control and intervention groups. For 6 months, nurses in intervention groups were treated with ordinary treatment plus comprehensive management, whereas nurses in the control group were treated with ordinary management, respectively. Questionnaires were sent and collected at baseline and at the end of the study. The Student t test was used to evaluate the effect of comprehensive management in decreasing burnout. All ED nurses showed symptoms of job burnout at different levels. Our data indicated that comprehensive management significantly decreased emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (P burnout in ED nurses and contribute to relieving work-related stress and may further protect against potential mental health problems. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors of burnout among HIV nurses in the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwana Roomaney

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burnout has been implicated as one of the reasons for key healthcare personnel, such as nurses, leaving their profession, resulting in insufficient staff to attend to patients.Objective: We investigated the predictors of three dimensions of burnout, namely emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment, among nurses in South Africa attending to patients living with HIV.Method: Participants were recruited at a large tertiary hospital in the Western Cape region, with the help of the assistant director of nursing at the hospital. They completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Quantitative Workload Inventory, the Interpersonal Conflict at Work Scale, the Organisational Constraints Scale, the Death and Dying subscale of the Nursing Stress Scale, and the HIV and AIDS Stigma Instrument – Nurse.Results: We found elevated levels of burnout among the sample. Workload, job status and interpersonal conflict at work significantly explained more than one-third of the variance in emotional exhaustion (R² = 0.39, F(7, 102 = 9.28, p = 0.001. Interpersonal conflict, workload, organisational constraints and HIV stigma significantly explained depersonalisation (R² = 0.33, F(7, 102 = 7.22, p = 0.001. Job status and organisational constraints significantly predicted personal accomplishment (R² = 0.18, F(7, 102 = 3.12, p = 0.001.Conclusion: Factors such as workload, job status and interpersonal conflict in the work context, organisational constraints and stigma associated with HIV were found to be predictors of burnout in the sample of nurses. Our recommendations include developing and testing interventions aimed at reducing burnout among nurses, including reducing workload and creating conditions for less interpersonal conflict at work.

  3. Burnout syndrome in nurses in an Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino Eduardo dos Santos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify if nurses working in cardiac and general Intensive Care Units are subject to burnout, correlating it with demographic and occupational information. Methods: This is a descriptive exploratory, cross-sectional, prospective and correlational study utilizing  quantitative resources. The sample was composed of 34 nurses who answered the Maslach and Jackson inventory (MBI-HSS, which consists of 22 questions plus a questionnaire on demographic and occupational data. The study was carried out at a large private hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Rresults: Of 34 nurses, nine had high emotional exhaustion, nine high depersonalization, ten had a high score of reduced professional accomplishment (decreased personal fulfillment at work. Most nurses presented alterations in more than one dimension regarding burnout. Cconclusions: The majority of nurses presented burnout and there was a positive correlation between burnout and the variables: sex, advanced professional degrees, time working in nursing, workload and working at more than one hospital.

  4. Burnout, depression and job satisfaction in acute psychiatric and secure mental health settings

    OpenAIRE

    Chabinska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Chapter 1: Objective: The systematic review aimed to review the literature on burnout and its relationship to depression within the acute in-patient mental health services: psychiatric units and specifically, secure forensic mental health services. Methods: The review process included a systematic search across five databases (Medline, PsychINFO, Cinahl Plus, EMBASE and SCOPUS). Eligible studies included a cross-sectional design, using validated measures on burnout and de...

  5. Nurses' widespread job dissatisfaction, burnout, and frustration with health benefits signal problems for patient care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McHugh, Matthew D; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Cimiotti, Jeannie P; Sloane, Douglas M; Aiken, Linda H

    2011-01-01

    .... Examining survey data from 95,499 nurses, we found much higher job dissatisfaction and burnout among nurses who were directly caring for patients in hospitals and nursing homes than among nurses...

  6. Predictors of occupational burnout among nurses: a dominance analysis of job stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ji-Wei; Bai, Hua-Yu; Li, Jia-Huan; Lin, Ping-Zhen; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Cao, Feng-Lin

    2017-12-01

    To quantitatively compare dimensions of job stressors' effects on nurses' burnout. Nurses, a key group of health service providers, often experience stressors at work. Extensive research has examined the relationship between job stressors and burnout; however, less has specifically compared the effects of job stressor domains on nurses' burnout. A quantitative cross-sectional survey examined three general hospitals in Jinan, China. Participants were 602 nurses. We compared five potential stressors' ability to predict nurses' burnout using dominance analysis and assuming that each stressor was intercorrelated. Strong positive correlations were found between all five job stressors and burnout. Interpersonal relationships and management issues most strongly predicted participants' burnout (11·3% of average variance). Job stressors, and particularly interpersonal relationships and management issues, significantly predict nurses' job burnout. Understanding the relative effect of job stressors may help identify fruitful areas for intervention and improve nurse recruitment and retention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Job satisfaction, burnout and stress amongst nursing staff: a survey in two hospitals in Rome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabolli, S; Ianni, A; Renzi, C; Di Pietro, C; Puddu, P

    2006-01-01

    The job satisfaction and psychological well-being of health care workers may significantly influence the quality of care they provide. The aim of this study was to assess burnout and psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and depression, as well as evaluate job satisfaction among nurses working at the IDI-Sanità in Rome. Nurses (n = 545) were invited to answer an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire, which consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), and a validated questionnaire to examine job satisfaction. Descriptive analyses and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed. The section designed to evaluate job satisfaction was specifically examined by means of principal component factor analysis. Two hundred and forty-two nurses answered the questionnaire (response rate: 44%). Emotional exhaustion was observed in 38% of respondents. No significant difference was detected between mean values ( standard deviation) at each of the three MBI subscales and Italian normative data. About 33% of respondents showed a GHQ-12 score typical for disorders such as anxiety or depression. High levels of job satisfaction were found to be associated to a lower likelihood both of emotional exhaustion at MBI and psychiatric morbidity at GHQ-12. Factor analysis on items investigating job satisfaction identified 4 factors that globally accounted for 61% of the total variance. The factors obtained could represent possible targets for action aimed at improving nurse satisfaction.

  8. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Agism and burnout among nurses in long-term care facilities in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iecovich, Esther; Avivi, Michal

    2017-03-01

    The extent to which agism and professional qualifications are associated with nurses' burnout in long-term care facilities for older adults has been barely examined. This study is aimed to examine the extent to which agism, professional education, and geriatric training explain work burnout. The study included a convenience sample of 154 nurses working in 17 long-term care facilities in the Tel Aviv area in Israel. To examine agism, Kogan's Attitudes toward Old People Scale was used, and to probe burnout, the Maslach Burnout Inventory was used. Overall burnout was significantly explained by agism, nurses' professional education, length of working as a nurse, and type of facility ownership. When examining each dimension of burnout, agism was a significant predictor of depersonalization and personal achievement. Agism plays a role in overall burnout. Therefore, training programs that can combat agism can reduce burnout of nurses in long-term care facilities.

  10. Predictors of Burnout in Professional and Paraprofessional Nurses Working in Hospitals and Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jan; And Others

    Burnout is a phenomenon in which the cumulative effects of a stressful work environment gradually overwhelm the defenses of staff members, causing them to psychologically withdraw. To understand the experience of professional and paraprofessional nurses suffering from burnout requires a close examination of the environments in which they function.…

  11. Early career burnout among Dutch nurses: A process captured in a Rasch model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.A. de; Brouwers, A.; Schoot, T.; Pat-El, R.; Verboon, P.; Näring, G.W.B.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates burnout among Dutch nursing graduates as a process by testing a sequential-developmental model. A sample of 237 respondents was recruited from a population of Dutch early career nurses. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human

  12. Early career burnout among Dutch nurses : A process captured in a Rasch model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Jan Alexander; Brouwers, Andre; Schoot, Tineke; Pat-El, Ron; Verboon, Peter; Näring, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates burnout among Dutch nursing graduates as a process by testing a sequential-developmental model. A sample of 237 respondents was recruited from a population of Dutch early career nurses. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory Human

  13. The Influence of Selected Personality and Workplace Features on Burnout among Nurse Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilci, Sevgi; Erdogan, Vesile; Sozen, Emine

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of selected individual and situational features on burnout among nurse academics. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to assess the burnout levels of academics. The sample population comprised 94 female participant. The emotion exhaustion (EE) score of the nurse academics was 16.43[plus or minus]5.97,…

  14. Incivility from patients and their families: can organisational justice protect nurses from burnout?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Kristie L; Hammoud, Sammira

    2015-09-01

    To determine whether interpersonal and informational justice influence the association between daily experiences of incivility and burnout among nurses. Research has suggested that incivility is a concern for managers. Nurses regularly experience incivility, particularly from their patients and patients' families. Incivility, in turn, can increase symptoms of burnout. Seventy-five nurses provided data on interpersonal and informational justice within their organisation. During five working days, nurses completed a twice-daily survey assessing incivility and burnout. Hierarchical linear modelling analyses examined the main effects and interaction effects of the three variables on burnout. Incivility was positively associated with burnout. In addition, interpersonal justice strengthened the incivility-burnout relationship. Informational justice did not significantly affect the incivility-burnout relationship. Incivility is associated with more burnout. The work environment also influences burnout; when organisations provide informational justice, nurses experience less burnout. In organisations where interpersonal justice is high, nurses are more likely to experience burnout. Nursing managers can help employees by ensuring that management's decisions are transparent. In addition, managers should be aware that in organisations with higher interpersonal justice, nurses might be more likely to experience symptoms of burnout as a result of incivility from patients and their families. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Burnout em residentes de enfermagem Burnout en residentes de enfermería Burnout in nursing residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfábio Pimentel Franco

    2011-03-01

    Adultos y Pediátrica. Edad y especialidad se correlacionaron positivamente con Incompetencia/falta de Realización Profesional. Se identificó a un Residente de Enfermería con alteración en las tres sub-escalas del Maslach Burnout Inventory, caracterizándoselo como portador de Síndrome de Burnout. Los Residentes de Enfermería poseen perfiles de sufrimiento. Conocer tales factores puede minimizar los transtornos de salud de dichos trabajadores.Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  16. Burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, S A M; El-Sallamy, R M; El-Sherbiny, A A M; Kabbash, I A

    2016-03-15

    Little is known about professional burnout among health-care workers in Egypt. The current study aimed to reveal the extent of burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University and to identify some of its determinants. A cross-sectional study was carried out on all physicians (n = 266) and a systematic random sample of nurses (n = 284). Burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and its subscales. Most of the participants (66.0%)had a moderate level of burnout and 24.9% of them had high burnout. Multivariate analysis of variables affecting burnout showed that age, sex, frequency of exposure to work-related violence, years of experience, work burden, supervision and work activities were significant predictors of burnout among the respondents. The authors recommend health education interventions during pre-employment training programmes for prevention of burnout syndrome and periodic screening for early detection and management of burnout.

  17. Linking Nurse Leadership and Work Characteristics to Nurse Burnout and Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Heather Smith; Cunningham, Christopher J L

    2016-01-01

    Burnout and engagement are critical conditions affecting patient safety and the functioning of healthcare organizations; the areas of worklife model suggest that work environment characteristics may impact employee burnout and general worklife quality. The purpose was to present and test a conditional process model linking perceived transformational nurse leadership to nurse staff burnout and engagement via important work environment characteristics. Working nurses (N = 120) provided perceptions of the core study variables via Internet- or paper-based survey. The hypothesized model was tested using the PROCESS analysis tool, which enables simultaneous testing of multiple, parallel, indirect effects within the SPSS statistical package. Findings support the areas of worklife model and suggest that transformational leadership is strongly associated with work environment characteristics that are further linked to nurse burnout and engagement. Interestingly, different work characteristics appear to be critical channels through which transformational leadership impacts nurse burnout and engagement. There are several methodological and practical implications of this work for researchers and practitioners interested in preventing burnout and promoting occupational health within healthcare organizations. These implications are tied to the connections observed between transformational leadership, specific work environment characteristics, and burnout and engagement outcomes.

  18. Health Sector Reform, Emotional Exhaustion, and Nursing Burnout: A Retrospective Panel Study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadati, Ahmad Kalateh; Rahnavard, Farnaz; Heydari, Seyed Taghi; Hemmati, Soroor; Ebrahimzadeh, Najmeh; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri

    2017-10-01

    Nursing burnout is affected by various factors, including work overload. Since the inauguration of the Health Sector Evolution Plan (HSEP) in Iran in 2014, government hospitals have been required to provide health services to the public at all levels. This decision, however, has increased the volume of patients admitted to government hospitals. Because nurses are on the front line of health services, they are faced with a greater load of care provision. This study aimed to evaluate nursing burnout before and after HSEP in Iran, with an emphasis on the differences between government and private hospitals. This retrospective panel study used Maslach's burnout inventory to evaluate nursing burnout in 371 nurses working in government and private hospitals in Shiraz, Iran, before and 7 months after the health sector reform. Chi-square test and paired t test were used to compare burnout scores. The results showed that nursing burnout had changed significantly after HSEP was launched (p = .030). A more detailed assessment found that burnout and emotional exhaustion had both increased significantly in the government-hospital group (ps = .014 and .001, respectively). However, no significant change in burnout was found in the private-hospital group over the same period. The findings of this study indicate an increase in nursing burnout in government hospitals. An important issue in every health sector reform is nursing resource management, with a focus on burnout. Accordingly, policymakers should consider the work overload situation of nurses and work to prevent increased burnout, especially emotional exhaustion.

  19. Burnout and the provision of psychosocial care amongst Australian cancer nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmillan, Kirsty; Butow, Phyllis; Turner, Jane; Yates, Patsy; White, Kate; Lambert, Sylvie; Stephens, Moira; Lawsin, Catalina

    2016-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of burnout amongst Australian cancer nurses as well as investigate the systemic and individual factors associated with burnout, including training and supervision for nurses in psychosocial care. Burnout amongst cancer nurses can have serious consequences for the individual nurse, the hospital and patients. Psychosocial care has been demonstrated in many studies to reduce distress in cancer patients; however, previous studies have suggested that providing psychosocial care can be stressful if nurses feel they lack appropriate training. Psychosocial skill training and supervision may be a way of improving job satisfaction and reducing burnout amongst nurses. Two hundred and thirty cancer nurses were recruited between November 2010 and April 2011 and completed an online questionnaire. Burnout levels within this population were found to be below nursing norms. Adequacy of training and supervision, frequency of supervision and percentage of role spent managing psychosocial care were found to be associated with burnout. Workload, Control, Reward and Community were independent predictors of burnout, and nurses with a greater mismatch in these areas identified as having High levels of burnout. Strategies to reduce burnout include providing cancer nurses with a varied and sustainable workload, awarding financial and social recognition of efforts and encouraging nurses to develop a sense of control over their work. Providing regular training and supervision in psychosocial care that is perceived to be adequate may also assist in reducing burnout. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Head nurse leadership style with staff nurse burnout and job satisfaction in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, M L; Armstrong, G D; Drew, D J; Henly, S J

    1984-01-01

    Leadership style has been defined as a two-factor construct composed of "consideration" and "initiating structure." Research has suggested that these factors affect the behavior and attitude of subordinates. This study's purpose was to quantify the relationships of head nurse leadership style with self-reported staff nurse burnout and job satisfaction in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). Three instruments--the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire, the Tedium Scale, and the Leadership Opinion Questionnaire--were voluntarily completed by 283 registered nurses employed by 14 level-III NICUs in the United States. The leadership dimensions of consideration and structure were distinct (r = -.10). Staff nurse satisfaction and burnout were related (r = -.41). Head nurse consideration was clearly related to staff nurse satisfaction (r = -.55) and to a lesser extent to burnout (r = -.29). Initiating structure alone was not related to satisfaction or burnout. Aggregate perceptions of head nurse leadership were ranked across NICUs in order to classify the head nurses on consideration and structure. The 14 head nurses were separated into four groups: high consideration-high structure, high consideration-low structure, low consideration-high structure, and low consideration-low structure. Satisfaction and burnout of staff nurses in each of the leadership-style groups were then compared. Analysis of variance for satisfaction (F(3,279) = 3.10, p = .03) and burnout (F(3,279) = 3.90, p = .01) were both significant. For both satisfaction and burnout, the head nurse leadership classification of low consideration-high structure was most deviant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Demographics and Personality Factors Associated with Burnout among Nurses in a Singapore Tertiary Hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ang, Shin Yuh; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Ayre, Tracy Carol; Uthaman, Thendral; Fong, Kuan Yok; Tien, Choo Eng; Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip

    2016-01-01

      Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of burnout among nurses in Singapore and investigate the influence of demographic factors and personal characteristics on the burnout syndrome. Methods...

  2. Communal orientation and the burnout syndrome among nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, N.W.; Buunk, Abraham P.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, burnout symptoms (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment) were hypothesized to occur among male and female nurses who are low in communal orientation and feel they invest more in their relationships with patients than they receive in

  3. Demographics and Personality Factors Associated with Burnout among Nurses in a Singapore Tertiary Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Shin Yuh Ang; Satvinder S. Dhaliwal; Tracy Carol Ayre; Thendral Uthaman; Kuan Yok Fong; Choo Eng Tien; Huaqiong Zhou; Phillip Della

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of burnout among nurses in Singapore and investigate the influence of demographic factors and personal characteristics on the burnout syndrome. Methods. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted. All registered nurses working in Singapore General Hospital were approached to participate. A questionnaire eliciting data on demographics, burnout (measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI), and personality profile...

  4. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.; Jansen, G.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatient aggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this "Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale" (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff

  5. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.L.I.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.E.; Jansen, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatienaggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff members

  6. Determinants and prevalence of burnout in emergency nurses: a systematic review of 25 years of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaenssens, Jef; De Gucht, Véronique; Maes, Stan

    2015-02-01

    Burnout is an important problem in health care professionals and is associated with a decrease in occupational well-being and an increase in absenteeism, turnover and illness. Nurses are found to be vulnerable to burnout, but emergency nurses are even more so, since emergency nursing is characterized by unpredictability, overcrowding and continuous confrontation with a broad range of diseases, injuries and traumatic events. This systematic review aims (1) to explore the prevalence of burnout in emergency nurses and (2) to identify specific (individual and work related) determinants of burnout in this population. A systematic review of empirical quantitative studies on burnout in emergency nurses, published in English between 1989 and 2014. The databases NCBI PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, Informa HealthCare, Picarta, Cinahl and Scielo were searched. Seventeen studies were included in this review. On average 26% of the emergency nurses suffered from burnout. Individual factors such as demographic variables, personality characteristics and coping strategies were predictive of burnout. Work related factors such as exposure to traumatic events, job characteristics and organizational variables were also found to be determinants of burnout in this population. Burnout rates in emergency nurses are high. Job demands, job control, social support and exposure to traumatic events are determinants of burnout, as well as several organizational variables. As a consequence specific action targets for hospital management are formulated to prevent turnover and burnout in emergency nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of incivility in clinical practice settings on nursing student burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko-Mould, Yolanda; Laschinger, Heather K S

    2014-10-31

    To examine the relationship between nursing students' exposure to various forms of incivility in acute care practice settings and their experience of burnout. Given that staff nurses and new nurse graduates are experiencing incivility and burnout in the workplace, it is plausible that nursing students share similar experiences in professional practice settings. A cross-sectional survey design was used to assess Year 4 nursing students' (n=126) perceptions of their experiences of incivility and burnout in the clinical learning environment. Students completed instruments to assess frequency of uncivil behaviors experienced during the past six months from nursing staff, clinical instructors, and other health professionals in the acute care practice setting and to measure student burnout. Reported incidences of incivility in the practice setting were related to burnout. Higher rates of incivility, particularly from staff nurses, were associated with higher levels of both components of burnout (emotional exhaustion and cynicism).

  8. Burnout and its association with resilience in nurses: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-Fang; Luo, Yuan-Hui; Lam, Louisa; Cross, Wendy; Plummer, Virginia; Zhang, Jing-Ping

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and extent of burnout on nurses and its association with personal resilience. With the worldwide shortage of nurses, nurse burnout is considered one of the main contributing factors and has been the focus of studies in recent years. Given the well-documented high level of burnout among nurses, resilience is expected to be a significant predictor of nurse burnout. The association between burnout and resilience has not previously been investigated extensively. A cross-sectional survey design was selected. A total of 1,061 nurses from six separate three-level hospitals in Hunan Province, China, returned self-reported questionnaires from March-June 2015. Data were collected using a socio-demographic sheet, Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Nurses experienced severe burnout symptoms and showed a moderate level of resilience. Three metrics of burnout had significantly negative correlations with the total score and following variables of resilience. Linear regression analysis showed resilience, especially strength, demographic characteristics (exercise, alcohol use and marital status) and job characteristics (income per month, ratio of patients to nurses, shift work and professional rank) were the main predictors of the three metrics of burnout. The findings of this study may help nurse managers and hospital administrators to have a better understanding of nurse burnout and resilience. The significantly negative relationship between burnout symptoms and resilience has been demonstrated, and this informs the role of resilience in influencing burnout. Adaptable and effective interventions for improving resilience are needed to relieve nurses' burnout and reduce workplace stress. Moreover, nurse managers and hospital administrators should establish an effective management system to cultivate a healthy workplace and adopt positive attitudes and harmonious relationships. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons

  9. [Risk factors and burnout levels in Primary Care nurses: A systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Urquiza, Jose L; Monsalve-Reyes, Carolina S; San Luis-Costas, Concepción; Fernández-Castillo, Rafael; Aguayo-Estremera, Raimundo; Cañadas-de la Fuente, Guillermo A

    2017-02-01

    To determine the risk factors and levels of burnout in Primary Care nurses. A systematic review was performed. CINAHL, CUIDEN, LILACS, PubMed, ProQuest, ScienceDirect and Scopus databases were consulted. Search equations were 'burnout AND community health nursing' and 'burnout AND primary care nursing'. The search was performed in October 2015. The final sample was n=12 studies. Quantitative primary studies that used Maslach Burnout Inventory for burnout assessment in Primary Care nurses were included without restriction by publication date. The main variables were the mean and standard deviation of the three burnout dimensions, high, medium and low prevalence rates of each dimension, and socio-demographic, occupational and psychological variables that potentially influence burnout level. Studies show high prevalence rates, generally between 23% and 31%, of emotional exhaustion. The prevalence rates of high depersonalisation and low personal accomplishment show heterogeneity, varying between 8%-32% and 4%-92% of the sample, respectively. Studies show that older nurses with more seniority, anxiety and depression, among other variables, have higher burnout levels, while nurses with higher salary, high job satisfaction, organisational support, and good self-concept have less burnout. High emotional exhaustion is the main affected dimension of burnout in Primary Care nursing. There is heterogeneity in depersonalisation and personal accomplishment. Burnout must be prevented in these professionals, by increasing protective factors and monitoring its appearance in those with risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Nurse Burnout, Nurse-Reported Quality of Care, and Patient Outcomes in Thai Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantsupawat, Apiradee; Nantsupawat, Raymoul; Kunaviktikul, Wipada; Turale, Sue; Poghosyan, Lusine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of nurse burnout on nurse-reported quality of care and patient adverse events and outcomes in Thai hospitals. Cross-sectional analysis of data from 2,084 registered nurses working in 94 community hospitals across Thailand. Data were collected through survey questionnaire, including the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), which measures of nurse perceived quality of care and patient outcomes. Multiple logistic regression modeling was performed to explore associations between nurse burnout on quality of care and patient outcomes. Thirty-two percent of nurses reported high emotional exhaustion, 18% high depersonalization, and 35% low personal accomplishment. In addition, 16% of nurses rated quality of care on their work unit as fair or poor, 5% reported patient falls, 11% reported medication errors, and 14% reported infections. All three subscales of the MBI were associated with increased reporting of fair or poor quality of care, patient falls, medication errors, and infections. Every unit of increasing emotional exhaustion score was associated with a 2.63 times rise in reporting fair or poor quality of care, a 30% increase in patient falls, a 47% increase in medication errors, and a 32% increase in infection. Findings clearly indicate that nurse burnout is associated with increased odds of reporting negative patient outcomes. Implementing interventions to reduce nurse burnout is critical to improving patient care in Thai hospitals. Hospital administrators, nurse managers, and health leaders urgently need to create favorable work environments supporting nursing practice in order to reduce burnout and improve quality of care. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. [Burnout syndrome in licensed nurses. Approaches for a debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Ríos-Castillo, José Lauro; Barrios-Santiago, Pedro; Ocampo-Mancilla, Mariano; Avila-Rojas, Teresa Luzeldy

    2007-01-01

    The burnout syndrome (BS) is characterized by emotional fatigue, loss of personal identity and loss of personal realization feelings. BS is frequent among professionals that assist people (health care workers) and among those that have interpersonal contact; the occupational characteristics are among BS contributing factors. The objective was to ascertain BS prevalence among nurses affiliated to the San Luis Potosí General Hospital. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with a groups of nurses who gave their informed consent to participate. The Brief Questionnaire of Burnout version standardized for Mexico was used to collect the information. This version explores the following areas: emotional fatigue, loss of personal identity and personal realization. Also, participants answered three questionnaires about their socio-demographic characteristics, occupational satisfaction, family variables and emotional dysfunction. 70 licensed nurses participated. The BS was common among participants. Some variables related to BS were: age older than 30 years, being female, being married, housekeeping work, absenteeism due to illness, serious depression and occupational dissatisfaction. Nurses working at the emergency room and in critical care services had BS more often. The burnout syndrome has a high prevalence among licensed nurses. Interventions to decrease and to avert BS are needed.

  12. Effects of nurse work environment on job dissatisfaction, burnout, intention to leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantsupawat, A; Kunaviktikul, W; Nantsupawat, R; Wichaikhum, O-A; Thienthong, H; Poghosyan, L

    2017-03-01

    The nursing shortage is a critical issue in many countries. High turnover rates among nurses is contributing to the shortage, and job dissatisfaction, intention to leave, and burnout have been identified as some of the predictors of nurse turnover. A well-established body of evidence demonstrates that the work environment for nurses influences nurse job dissatisfaction, intention to leave, and burnout, but there never has been a study undertaken in Thailand to investigate this relationship. To investigate how work environment affects job dissatisfaction, burnout, and intention to leave among nurses in Thailand. The study used a cross-sectional survey to collect data from 1351 nurses working in 43 inpatient units in five university hospitals across Thailand. The participants completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and measures of job dissatisfaction and intention to leave. Logistical regression models assessed the association between work environment and nurse-reported job dissatisfaction, burnout, and intent to leave. Nurses working in university hospitals with better work environments had significantly less job dissatisfaction, intention to leave, and burnout. The nurse work environment is a significant feature contributing to nurse retention in Thai university hospitals. Improving the work environment for nurses may lead to lower levels of job dissatisfaction, intention to leave, and burnout. Focusing on these nurse outcomes can be used as a strategy to retain nurses in the healthcare system. Addressing the challenges of poor work environments requires coordinated action from policymakers and health managers. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  13. The professional paradigm of qualified psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, U A

    1995-10-01

    The main purpose of this research was to determine the professional paradigm of the qualified psychiatric nurse and the factors influencing the formation of this paradigm. The research was both explorative and descriptive, and both qualitative and quantitative methods were used. The research approach was deductive and based on the theory of paradigm of Törnebohm. The test persons comprised three groups: Swedish-speaking Finns, Swedes and Finns. In each group there were eight students in the final stages of their psychiatric nursing training. A total of 40 questionnaires were distributed to each group. The research revealed four different characteristic types of qualified psychiatric nurses: caring science oriented, partly caring science oriented, general humanist and finally the personality- and experience-oriented. The results also indicate that there is a discrepancy between will and ability within caring. This can partly be interpreted as an expression of the discrepancy between philosophical and ideological impressions and real acts but it may partly indicate a lack of information. Many informants had difficulty naming a theoretical frame of reference for their work and stating aspects of psychiatric caring that would be important to know but on which no information so far exists. Many informants expressed the need for more research and development but did not indicate the subjects.

  14. Prevalence of burnout among nurses in Iran: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, S; Karami Matin, B; Hajizadeh, M; Soroush, A; Nouri, B

    2018-01-30

    This study aimed to summarize the available information in the literature to make an accurate estimate of the prevalence of burnout among Iranian nurses. Burnout is a work-related stress syndrome that has negative impact on healthcare providers, patients and healthcare delivery systems. A comprehensive search of literature using international [PubMed, Scopus and the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)] and Iranian scientific data bases [Scientific Information Database (SID), IranMedex and Magiran] was conducted to identify English and Persian language studies, published between 2000 and 2016, that examined the prevalence of burnout among nurses in Iran. The I-squared test and Chi-squared-based Q-test suggested heterogeneity of reported prevalence among the qualified studies; thus, a random-effects model was applied to estimate the overall prevalence of burnout among nurses in Iran. Based on 21 selected articles with 4180 participants, the overall prevalence of burnout among Iranian nurses was estimated to be 36% [95% confidence interval (CI), 20-53%] in Iran. Meta-regression indicated that sample size and year of data collection, mean age of samples, female to male ratio and geographic regions were not statistically significantly associated with the prevalence of burnout. Also, based on Egger's test and funnel plot, there is no publication bias among studies included in the analysis. Professional burnout affects more than one-third of nursing staff in Iran; thus, effective interventions and strategies are required to reduce and prevent burnout among nurses. Due to the negative consequences of burnout on patients, nurses and organizations, nursing and healthcare managers should intervene to prevent and reduce burnout among nurses in Iran. Policy attention should focus on developing effective interventions to prevent and minimize the burden of burnout among nurses in Iran. Nurses' involvement in the policy-making process is crucial in the implementation of

  15. Burnout syndrome among undergraduate nursing students at a public university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; Lunardi, Valéria Lerch; Lunardi, Guilherme Lerch; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; da Silveira, Rosemary Silva; Vidal, Danielle Adriane Silveira

    2014-01-01

    to investigate the burnout syndrome and its relationship with demographic and academic variables among undergraduate nursing students at a public university in Southern Brazil. a quantitative study with 168 students, by applying an adaptation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Student Survey, validated for this study. We used descriptive and variance analysis of the data analysis. we found that students do not have the burnout syndrome, manifesting high average scores in Emotional Exhaustion, low in Disbelief and high in Professional Effectiveness; that younger students who perform leisure activities have greater Professional Effectiveness, unlike students in early grades with no extracurricular activities; combining work and studies negatively influenced only the Professional Effectiveness factor, while the intention of giving up influenced negatively Disbelief and Professional Effectiveness factors. the situations that lead students to Emotional Exhaustion need to be recognized, considering the specificity of their study environments.

  16. Burnout syndrome among undergraduate nursing students at a public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Geri Tomaschewski-Barlem

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to investigate the burnout syndrome and its relationship with demographic and academic variables among undergraduate nursing students at a public university in Southern Brazil.METHOD: a quantitative study with 168 students, by applying an adaptation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Student Survey, validated for this study. We used descriptive and variance analysis of the data analysis.RESULTS: we found that students do not have the burnout syndrome, manifesting high average scores in Emotional Exhaustion, low in Disbelief and high in Professional Effectiveness; that younger students who perform leisure activities have greater Professional Effectiveness, unlike students in early grades with no extracurricular activities; combining work and studies negatively influenced only the Professional Effectiveness factor, while the intention of giving up influenced negatively Disbelief and Professional Effectiveness factors.CONCLUSION: the situations that lead students to Emotional Exhaustion need to be recognized, considering the specificity of their study environments.

  17. How nurses can cope with stress and avoid burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Stephanie

    2014-11-01

    This article draws on a systematic literature review to identify stressors in emergency and trauma nursing settings, and their potential effects on staff. After a search of relevant databases, six articles were chosen and analysed, and the main causes of stress in the workplace for emergency and trauma nurses were identified. These stressors include work demands and lack of time, lack of managerial support, patient aggression and violence, and staff exposure to traumatic events. Their effects on nurses include burnout, compassion fatigue, somatic complaints, mental health problems and difficulties in life outside work. The article goes on to discuss the implications of the findings on practice.

  18. Patient safety and nursing: interface with stress and Burnout Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Cláudia Cristiane Filgueira Martins; Santos, Viviane Euzébia Pereira; Sousa, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    To analyze studies on stress, Burnout Syndrome, and patient safety in the scope of nursing care in the hospital environment. This was an integrative literature review. Data collection was performed in February 2016 in the following databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online - PubMed/MEDLINE, Latin American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences - LILACS. Ten scientific productions were selected, which listed that factors contributing to stress and Burnout Syndrome of nursing professionals are the work environment as a source of stress, and excessive workload as a source of failures. The analysis found that the stress and Burnout Syndrome experienced by these professionals lead to greater vulnerability and development of unsafe care, and factors such as lack of organizational support can contribute to prevent these failures. Analisar estudos que versam sobre o estresse e Síndrome de Burnout, bem como a segurança do paciente no âmbito da assistência de enfermagem no ambiente hospitalar. Tratou-se de uma revisão integrativa de literatura. O levantamento dos dados foi efetuado nas bases de dados Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online - PubMed / MEDLINE, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde -LILACS em fevereiro de 2016. Foram selecionadas10 produções científicas que apontaram que os fatores que contribuem para o estresse e a Síndrome de Burnout dos profissionais de enfermagem são o ambiente de trabalho como fonte de estresse e a carga de trabalho excessiva como geradora de falhas. A análise apontou que o estresse e a Síndrome de Burnout vivenciada por esses profissionais acarretam maior vulnerabilidade ao desenvolvimento de uma assistência insegura e que fatores como a falta de apoio organizacional podem contribuir para dirimir essas falhas.

  19. Factors Influencing Emergency Nurses' Burnout During an Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji Soo; Choi, Jeong Sil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Emergency department (ED) nurses suffer from persistent stress after experiencing the traumatic event of exposure to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), which can subsequently lead to burnout. This study aimed to assess ED nurses' burnout level during an outbreak of MERS-CoV and to identify influencing factors in order to provide basic information for lowering and preventing the level of burnout. Methods: Study participants were ED nurses working in eight hosp...

  20. Stress, coping and burn-out in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Chris

    2010-10-01

    To explore the relationship between sources of stress and psychological burn-out and to consider the moderating and mediating role played sources of stress and different coping resources on burn-out. Most research exploring sources of stress and coping in nursing students construes stress as psychological distress. Little research has considered those sources of stress likely to enhance well-being and, by implication, learning. A questionnaire was administered to 171 final year nursing students. Questions were asked which measured sources of stress when rated as likely to contribute to distress (a hassle) and rated as likely to help one achieve (an uplift). Support, control, self-efficacy and coping style were also measured, along with their potential moderating and mediating effect on burn-out. The sources of stress likely to lead to distress were more often predictors of well-being than sources of stress likely to lead to positive, eustress states. However, placement experience was an important source of stress likely to lead to eustress. Self-efficacy, dispositional control and support were other important predictors. Avoidance coping was the strongest predictor of burn-out and, even if used only occasionally, it can have an adverse effect on burn-out. Initiatives to promote support and self-efficacy are likely to have the more immediate benefits in enhancing student well-being. Nurse educators need to consider how course experiences contribute not just to potential distress but to eustress. How educators interact with their students and how they give feedback offers important opportunities to promote self-efficacy and provide valuable support. Peer support is a critical coping resource and can be bolstered through induction and through learning and teaching initiatives. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Resilience and burnout status among nurses working in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutluturkan, Sevinc; Sozeri, Elif; Uysal, Nese; Bay, Figen

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the resilience and burnout status of nurses working in the field of oncology. This descriptive study was conducted with 140 oncology nurses. The data were collected using a socio-demographic attributes form, Resilience Scale for Adults, and the Maslach's Burnout Inventory. Percentage ratios, mean and median values, Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test, correlation analysis, and multiple stepwise linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the data. The Maslach's Burnout Inventory total median score was 49.00. The emotional exhaustion median score was 24.00, the depersonalization median score was 9.00, and the personal accomplishment median score was 16.00. The Resilience Scale for Adults total median score was 134.00. The median resilience subscale scores, such as structural style, perception of future, family cohesion, self-perception, social competence, and social resources, were 16.00, 16.00, 24.00, 25, 23, and 31, respectively. A relationship existed between emotional exhaustion and perception of future; depersonalization and structured style and self-perception; and personal accomplishment and structured style, perception of future, and self-perception. Multiple stepwise linear regression analysis revealed a significant relationship between the number of years in the field and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores. Moreover, a significant relationship between structured style variables and personal accomplishment scores was observed. This study demonstrated the relationship between burnout and resilience situations among the oncology nurses. The results can be used to plan individual and organizational interventions to increase resilience and reduce the experience of burnout by developing measures such as improving communication skills, providing education on stress management and coping strategies, using social resources, and organizing programs that provide psychological support.

  2. Personal determinants of nurses' burnout in end of life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Georgeana; Barbosa, Filipe; Vieira, Margarida

    2014-10-01

    Our aim is to identify socio-demographic, professional exposure to dying, training degree and personal factors relevant to burnout dimensions in nurses coping with death issues. A sample of 360 nurses (response rate 70.6%) from internal medicine, oncology, haematology and palliative care departments of five health institutions answered to a socio-demographic and professional questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Death Attitude Profile Scale, Purpose in Life Test and Adult Attachment Scale. No significant differences were found between medical departments in burnout scores except when comparing those with palliative care department which showed significant lesser levels of emotional exhaustion (t = 2.71; p personal accomplishment (t = -2.24; p death attitude and by purpose in life, dependent attachment, years of professional experience and personal accomplishment by positive purpose on life and secure attachment. We conclude for the protective value of factors such as meaning and purpose in life, secure attachment and attitude towards death, through the various burnout dimensions that shows the need to develop under and postgraduate training strategies in these specific areas. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Burnout syndrome and suicide risk among primary care nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín; Maynegre-Santaulària, Montserrat; Pérez-Bartolomé, Meritxell; Alsina-Rodríguez, Marta; Quinta-Barbero, Roser; Granell-Navas, Sergi

    2010-01-01

    To observe the prevalence of the burnout syndrome and the relationship with suicide risk, self-esteem, anxiety and depression, in a sample of primary care nurses. Observational, cross-sectional and correlational study. The sample consisted of 146 nursing professionals, 131 women and 15 men, with an average age of 44.02 years (SD=10.89). Participants responded to a questionnaire which included the Spanish forms of the Maslach burnout inventory (MBI), the Plutchik Suicide Risk Scale (SR), the Kuwait University Anxiety Scale (KUAS), the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES). In the inferential statistical analysis, Pearson's r coefficients and multiple linear regression were calculated. Significant correlations between suicidal risk and anxiety, depression, self-esteem, emotional exhaustion and personal performance, were obtained. In the multiple regression analysis, depression was the main predictor of suicidal risk, followed by anxiety and emotional exhaustion. The scores obtained in burnout and suicidal risk were, in general, lower than those observed in other studies, emphasising the high level observed in personal performance, which reflects reasonable professional satisfaction. The results show the important role of working atmosphere and early recognition of mental disorders in burnout and suicidal risk prevention. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Nurses' Burnout: The Influence of Leader Empowering Behaviors, Work Conditions, and Demographic Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudallal, Rola H; Othman, Wafa'a M; Al Hassan, Nahid F

    2017-01-01

    Nurse burnout is a widespread phenomenon characterized by a reduction in nurses' energy that manifests in emotional exhaustion, lack of motivation, and feelings of frustration and may lead to reductions in work efficacy. This study was conducted to assess the level of burnout among Jordanian nurses and to investigate the influence of leader empowering behaviors (LEBs) on nurses' feelings of burnout in an endeavor to improve nursing work outcomes. A cross-sectional and correlational design was used. Leader Empowering Behaviors Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) were employed to collect data from 407 registered nurses, recruited from 11 hospitals in Jordan. The Jordanian nurses exhibited high levels of burnout as demonstrated by their high scores for Emotional Exhaustion (EE) and Depersonalization (DP) and moderate scores for Personal Accomplishment (PA). Factors related to work conditions, nurses' demographic traits, and LEBs were significantly correlated with the burnout categories. A stepwise regression model-exposed 4 factors predicted EE: hospital type, nurses' work shift, providing autonomy, and fostering participation in decision making. Gender, fostering participation in decision making, and department type were responsible for 5.9% of the DP variance, whereas facilitating goal attainment and nursing experience accounted for 8.3% of the PA variance. This study highlights the importance of the role of nurse leaders in improving work conditions and empowering and motivating nurses to decrease nurses' feelings of burnout, reduce turnover rates, and improve the quality of nursing care.

  5. Prevalence of burnout syndrome in clinical nurses at a hospital of excellence

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Vivian F; Filho, Celso F; Valenti, Vitor E; Ferreira, Marcelo; de Abreu, Luiz C; de Carvalho, Tatiana D; Xavier, Valdelias; de Oliveira Filho, JapyAngeli; Gregory, Pedro; Leão, Eliseth R; Francisco, Natascha G; Ferreira, Celso

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Burnout syndrome can be defined as long-term work stress resulting from the interaction between constant emotional pressure associated with intense interpersonal involvement for long periods of time and personal characteristics. We investigated the prevalence/propensity of Burnout syndrome in clinical nurses, and the factors related to Burnout syndrome-associated such as socio-demographic characteristics, work load, s...

  6. Burnout syndrome among multinational nurses working in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Turki, Haifa A; Al-Turki, Rasha A; Al-Dardas, Hiba A; Al-Gazal, Manal R; Al-Maghrabi, Ghada H; Al-Enizi, Nawal H; Ghareeb, Basema A

    2010-01-01

    Nursing Staff is reported to be under extreme state of stress, leading to burnout syndrome (BS). Most of the studies have been conducted among the nurses working in their home countries. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of BS among a multinational nursing workforce in Saudi Arabia. King Fahd University Hospital, AlKhobar, Saudi Arabia, is a tertiary care hospital employing 510 nurses of multinational workforce. Two hundred and fifty Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) individual-based questionnaires were distributed after modification to include the age, sex, marital status, nationality, unit working and number of years on the job. The data were entered in the database and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), version 14.0. A P value of nurses (77.2%) completed the questionnaire. Their average age was 34.46 ± 5.36 years. Forty-five percent (89) had high emotional exhaustion (EE) and 28.9% (57) had moderate suffering with EE. Staffs who were on the job for longer duration had a lesser frequency of EE (P ≤ 0.001). The frequency of depersonalization (DP) was 83 (42%) and was graded as high and 61 (30.8%) were moderately affected. Personal accomplishment (PA) was moderate to low in the majority of the nurses (71.5%). Married nurses were prone to EE (28.17 ± 12.1 versus 22.3 ± 9.6) than unmarried nurses (P = 0.003, CI 95% and OR 2.4). The nurses in the patients' wards and clinics were more emotionally exhausted with higher DP compared to nurses in the high stress and high activity areas (P nurses were significantly more prone to EE (27.3 ± 12.1 versus 21.6 ± 2.9) than Saudi nurses (P = 0.004; 95% CI: nursing staff at our hospital were in a state of burnout with high frequency of EE and DP. Only a quarter of the surveyed staff felt that they had some level of PA. Age and working away from their home countries were the important predictors in the development of BS in nurses. We believe that working conditions have to be

  7. Emotional intelligence as a moderator in the stress-burnout relationship: a questionnaire study on nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgens-Ekermans, Gina; Brand, Tamari

    2012-08-01

    To investigate inter-relationships between emotional intelligence (EI), work stress and burnout in a group of nurses in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. The moderating effect of EI in the stress-burnout relationship and group differences (nurses working in different wards) in burnout were also investigated. Stress and subsequent burnout commonly threaten the occupational health and well-being of nurses in South Africa and elsewhere. Developing EI in nurses may increase individual stress resistance and combat burnout. A cross-sectional research design with anonymous questionnaires was conducted. Self-report data were used. Survey data were collected from 122 nurses working in different wards at four hospitals from a private hospital group. The Swinburne University Emotional Intelligence Test, Sources of Work Stress Inventory and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used to measure EI, stress and burnout, respectively. Consistent inverse relationships between emotional control and management as dimensions of EI, and stress and burnout emerged. A differential effect of high vs. low EI on the stress-burnout relationship was evident. Workload and the work/family interface emerged as significant predictors of burnout. Respondents working in maternity, paediatric and ER wards reported more feelings of personal accomplishment than those working in general wards. Higher EI is significantly related with lower stress and burnout in a sample of South African nurses. The moderator effect of EI in the stress-burnout relationship suggests that enhanced EI may help diminish burnout development when chronic stress is experienced. EI developmental interventions, if introduced in nursing curricula, may increase emotional coping resources and enhanced social skills, which may benefit the long-term occupational health of nurses. This may be relevant in developing countries, where environmental stressors related to the organisational context (budget constraints) and wider social

  8. Psychiatric Nursing Care for Adult Survivors of Child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thóra van der Hafsteinsdóttir; Cokky van der Venne; Yvonne van der Zalm; Nienke Kool; Willem Nugteren; prof Berno van Meijel

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to

  9. A new look at nurse burnout: the effects of environmental uncertainty and social climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, D K; McDaniel, A M

    2001-02-01

    As healthcare organizations deal with changes in the external environment, uncertainty in the internal environment is created. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among environmental uncertainty, social climate, and burnout among staff nurses. Multiple regression analysis was used to explore relationships among study variables. Perceived environmental uncertainty predicted burnout among staff nurses, although there was no significant relationship between burnout and objective measures of unit activity. The social climate of the workplace was negatively associated with burnout. The authors concluded that social networks are important during times of change and uncertainty in the work environment; in other words, a supportive workplace can protect against burnout.

  10. Saudi Arabian Nurses. are they prone to burnout syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Turki, Haifa A

    2010-03-01

    To find out the prevalence of Burnout syndrome (BS) in Saudi nurses. This is a cross-sectional study involving 60 female Saudi nurses in the workforce of King Fahd University Hospital, Al-Khobar, which is a tertiary care center for the eastern province. Between May and August 2009, Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) individual-based questionnaire was distributed after modification to include age, marital status, unit working and number of years in service. We used the 3 MBI factors: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA) for analysis of BS. Thirty-seven nurses (61.6%) completed the survey. The average age was 28.102.07 years and the average duration of work was 27.367.2 months. Seventeen (45.9%) had high EE and 35.1% (13) had moderate frequency of EE. Depersonalization was high in 18 (48.6%) and moderate in 15 (40.5%). Emotional exhaustion was significantly common in the married group with a frequency of 31.912.1 versus 22.559.67 (p=0.01). The nurses working in high activity areas were more emotionally exhausted and depersonalized when compared with the nurses taking care of patients in the wards and out patients clinics (p=0.003). The findings show that Saudi nurses had a higher frequency of EE and DP, and most of them had low PA.

  11. Stress, coping and burn-out in nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To explore the relationship between sources of stress and psychological burn-out and to consider the moderating and mediating role played sources of stress and different coping resources on burn-out.Background: Most research exploring sources of stress and coping in nursing students construes stress as psychological distress. Little research has considered those sources of stress likely to enhance well-being and, by implication, learning.Method: A questionnaire was administered to 171 fi...

  12. Psychiatric nursing education in Nebraska: 1989-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, M D; Pierce, A; Roach, R; Shanahan, C; Loch, E

    1991-01-01

    The academic and clinical content of psychiatric nursing curricula in the registered nurse basic educational programs in Nebraska for academic year 1989-1990 was explored by the Nebraska Sub-group of the Nursing Curriculum and Training Task Force of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill. The review includes literature regarding the history, development, and future trends of psychiatric nursing; factors affecting nursing student attitudes toward psychiatric patients; basic content included in psychiatric and psychosocial nursing curricula; and concepts essential in working with the seriously, persistently mentally ill. Contrary to current trends in the United States, all Nebraska schools of nursing have a generic psychiatric nursing course taught by clinical specialists in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Hands-on clinical time spent with patients with psychiatric diagnoses as well as those with psychosocial needs varies from 84 to 200 hr per semester. Not all students are exposed to patients with severe and persistent mental illness. Fewer than 5% of Nebraska graduates choose psychiatric nursing as their area of practice. The authors express grave concern for the future of psychiatric nursing education. Implications for curriculum revision and replication studies are suggested.

  13. Relationship between Burnout Syndrome Symptoms and Self-Actualization Scores in Critical-Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Burnout Maslach and Pines (1978) conducted a survey to determine characteristics of burnout and ways of coping with it in mental health settings. They...AD-A158 128 UNCLASSIFIED REEATIONSHIP BETWEEN BURNOUT SVNDROHE SVHPTOHS AND SEEF-ACTUALIZATION SCO. . (U) AIR FORCE INST OF TECH MRIGHT-PATTERSON...RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BURNOUT SYNDROME SYMPTOMS AND SELF-ACTUALIZATION SCORES IN CRITICAL-CARE NURSES Pamela L. Smith, B.A., B.S.N. A Thesis Presented to

  14. Empathy and burnout: an analytic cross-sectional study among nurses and nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Paola; Guerra, Eleonora; Marcheselli, Luigi; Cunico, Laura; Di Lorenzo, Rosaria

    2015-09-09

    Empathy is an essential element of good nursing care associated with increased patient satisfaction. Burnout represents chronic occupational stress which diminishes interest in work and reduces patient safety and satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between empathy and burnout in nursing students and nurses. This cross-sectional research was conducted in a sample of 298 nurses and 115 nursing students. Socio-demographic and career information was collected. Balanced Emotional Empathy Scale (BEES) and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) were administered. Data were statistically analysed. 63% of our sample answered questionnaires (54% of nurses and 84% of students). The BEES global mean score was slightly inferior to empathy cut-off of 32. In the student group, two BEES dimension scores were statistically significantly higher than nurses (p=0.011 and p=0.007 respectively, t-test). Empathy was negatively related to age (p=0.001, ANOVA). Emotional exhaustion (EE) scores of MBI reported statistically significantly lower levels for students (pstudents (r=-0.307, pnurses (r=-0.245, pstudents (r=0.319, pnurses (r=0.266, pstudents showed superior empathy capacity in comparison to male students in all 5 dimensions of BEES (pnurses in only one dimension (p<0.001). Our data suggest empathy declines with age and career. High levels of empathy can be protective against burnout development, which, when presents, reduces empathy.

  15. The competencies of newly qualified psychiatric nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunice B Khoza

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This research report comprises part of a larger study, which endeavoured to identified the competencies of newly qualified nurses (NQNs as viewed by senior professional nurses (SPNs in the clinical units. This report concentrates only on the competencies of the NQNs working in the psychiatric nursing units. SPNs (N=29 from certain health services in the Northern Province (NP of the RSA, constituted the population for this research. A descriptive survey was used as a research approach to conduct this research. The fieldwork, entailing the distrib~ltiona nd collection of the questionnaires by a researcher, was done during a period of political and labour unrest in this area. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  16. Burnout among Novice Nurses : Motivation and Theories

    OpenAIRE

    加藤, 栄子; Kato, Eiko

    2011-01-01

    Increased attention has been paid to the issue of turnover among newly graduated nurses who leave their jobs at the initial stage of employment. This early turnover can be attributed to a gap between the skills acquired upon the completion of basic nursing education and those required at actual workplaces. Retirement on health grounds has increased as one of the reasons for the turnover. There are also signs of an increase in the number of newly graduated nurses who develop depression. In acc...

  17. Job stress and burnout: A comparative study of senior and head nurses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xiaorong; Wang, Ping; Hou, Wenxiu; Chen, Lili; Lou, Fenglan

    2017-06-01

    Senior nurses can suffer from high job stress and burnout, which can lead to negative patient outcomes and higher turnover rates; however, few studies have examined this topic. We recruited 224 head and senior nurses from September to December 2015 using convenience and cluster sampling, to compare job stress and burnout levels between the two groups. The Nurse Job Stressors Inventory and Maslach Burnout Inventory scales were used to evaluate job stress and burnout, respectively. Results indicated that job stress scores significantly differed between head and senior nurses. The highest scoring subscales in both groups were time allocation and workload problems. Scores for the three burnout dimensions also significantly differed between the groups. Positive correlations between job stress and burnout were stronger among senior nurses than head nurses. Burnout may be higher among senior nurses given head nurses' potential for greater perceived job control. Our findings suggest that measures need to be taken to reduce burnout and turnover rates among senior nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Study of the influence on emotional work contract nurses on Job Burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Changping

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Discuss the influences of contract nurse’ emotion work on job burnout and provide theoretical basis for reducing the job burnout of perception level which caused by emotion work of contract nurse. Methods: The data which comes from the questionnaire survey about the Chinese edition of Maslach job burnout scale for 298 contract nurse is used statistical analysis by SPSS11.5 software. Results: The current contract nurse is more inclined to “surface acting” on working and the nurses have a lower level “depersonalization” (P < 0.05, the difference is statistically significant and the more “deep acting” are used the lower level of job burnout. There is a various factors’ correlation between contract nurse’s emotion work and job burnout. : Conclusions: The “surface acting” could increase job burnout, “deep acting” and emotion expression requirements could increase personal job satisfaction.

  19. Risk factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome in the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas-De la Fuente, Guillermo A; Vargas, Cristina; San Luis, Concepción; García, Inmaculada; Cañadas, Gustavo R; De la Fuente, Emilia I

    2015-01-01

    The burnout syndrome is beginning to be regarded as an occupational illness of high prevalence among nursing in Spain. Individuals suffering from the syndrome manifest important health problems. More information about prevalence and risk factors for burnout is needed to prevent the syndrome and to determine the most appropriate clinical interventions when the disorder appears. Burnout levels were evaluated in a group of nurses. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of burnout, to identify the variables related to burnout and to propose a risk profile for this syndrome among the nursing personnel. The study was carried out in public health centers in Andalusia (Spain). The sample consisted of 676 nursing professionals from public health centers. Dependent variables were the three Burnout dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. Independent variables were socio-demographic, organizational, personality-related variables. The nurses manifested average to high burnout levels. There were statistically significant differences in burnout levels associated with the following variables: age, gender, marital status, having children, level of healthcare, type of work shift, healthcare service areas and conducting administrative tasks. Burnout was also associated with personality-related variables. The prevalence of burnout among nursing professionals is high. Gender, age, marital status, level of healthcare, work shift and healthcare service areas predicted at least one of the dimensions of the syndrome. Neuroticism, agreeability, extraversion and conscientiousness are personality traits that predict at least two of the dimensions of burnout syndrome in nurses. Therefore, personality factors should be considered in any theory of risk profiles for developing burnout syndrome in the nursing profession. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality of working life and burnout among nursing staff in Intensive Care Units

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmidt, Denise Rodrigues Costa; Paladini, Márcia; Biato, Cleonice; Pais, Juliana Domingues; Oliveira, Adelaine Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    ...) and the presence of burnout among nursing professionals working at Intensive Care Units. The sample was composed of 53 nursing professionals from a university hospital located in the city of Londrina-PR, Brazil...

  1. Correlation between burnout and professional value in Chinese oncology nurses: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Clinical implication: The prevalence of job burnout in oncology nurses is high, and this could be improved by increasing perception of professional value. It is urgent for managers to strengthen professional value education and to take strategies that reduce job burnout, which is important for the overall quality and safety of nursing.

  2. The effects of job characteristics and individual characteristics on job satisfaction and burnout in community nursing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, P.G.M.; Kerkstra, A.; Huijer-Abu Saad, H.; Zee, J. van der

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe job satisfaction and burnout among two categories of community-based nurses (N = 402) in the Netherlands taking account of job and individual characteristics. Results show that these nurses are moderately satisfied with their jobs and the effects of burnout are

  3. Demand–Control Model and its Relationship with Burnout Syndrome in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Heidari Pahlavian

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: Based on the results of the study should be stated that if job control and psychological job demand were high, nurses will not be prone to burnout. And also occurrence of burnout in reduced personal accomplishment dimension among nurses who reported their job had low psychosocial demand and low control, was more than others.

  4. Burnout in nurses working in Portuguese central prisons and type of employment contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Aida Maria de Oliveira Cruz; Claro, Margarida; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Many studies on burnout have been conducted to try to identify the most vulnerable populations and settings for burnout. Despite the existing studies on burnout in Portuguese nurses, no studies have yet been conducted in prisons. This study measured the levels of burnout among nurses working in prisons and their relationship to the socio-demographic variables and type of employment contract. A questionnaire on the socio-demographic and professional characteristics and the MBI-GS (Maslach Burnout Inventory - General Survey) were sent to the 124 nurses working in Portuguese central prisons, resulting in a final sample of 95 nurses. Associations between burnout levels and socio-demographic variables were identified by Pearson's coefficient and differences between groups according to type of employment were verified using analysis of variance (ANOVA). 31.57% of nurses showed both emotional and physical exhaustion and cynicism, and 6.32% lacked professional efficiency. Statistically significant differences were found (p = 0.031) in terms of cynicism and the type of employment contract between nurses from the Ministry of Justice (Mean = 13.55) and nurses who were individual service providers (Mean = 7.25). Nurses working in prisons have higher burnout levels than nurses in general, as well as high levels of emotional and physical exhaustion (Mean = 12.85) and cynicism (Mean = 12.32). These findings confirm that special attention should be given to nurses working in these services.

  5. Psychosocial factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Luiz Lima da Silva; Rafael da Silva Soares; Felipe dos Santos Costa; Danusa de Souza Ramos; Fabiano Bittencourt Lima; Liliane Reis Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units and establish associations with psychosocial factors. Methods This descriptive study evaluated 130 professionals, including nurses, nursing technicians, and nursing assistants, who performed their activities in intensive care and coronary care units in 2 large hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were collected in 2011 using a self-reported questionnaire. The Maslach Burnout...

  6. [HIGH PREVALENCE OF BURNOUT AND DEPRESSION MAY INCREASE THE INCIDENCE OF COMORBIDITIES AMONG HUNGARIAN NURSES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ádám, Szilvia; Cserháti, Zoltán; Mészáros, Veronika

    2015-09-30

    Poor mental health among health care professionals may have a significant impact on public health. There is limited information about the prevalence and potential consequences of burnout and depression among nurses in Hungary. The objective of this study is to explore the relationship between burnout as well as depression and somatic symptoms as well as comorbidities among nurses in Hungary. Cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires among 1,713 nurses. Burnout and depression were assessed by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-HSS) and the Shortened Beck Depression Questionnaire, respectively. Somatisation was measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-1 5). Correlates of burnout and depression were assessed by logistic and linear regression analyses. The prevalence of depressive symptom and clinical depression was 35% and 13%, respectively. The prevalence of moderate and high level emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and decreased personal accomplishment was 44%, 36% and 74%, respectively. We identified burnout and depression as a predictor of high prevalence of subjective somatisation. Whilst burnout showed a strong association with increased prevalence of hypertension, depression predicted almost all examined diseases, in particular, cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases, as well as neoplasms. We found high prevalence of burnout and depression among nurses in Hungary. As depression has been shown to be associated with higher prevalence of comorbidities than burnout, its consequences may be more significant. Appropriate prevention, diagnosis, and adequate treatment of burnout and depression may decrease the prevalence of ensuing comorbidities.

  7. [Burnout syndrome among nurses and nurses' aides in an intensive care unit and admission wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Cabrera, Luciano; Hernández Medina, Elena; Eugenio Robaina, Pilar; Sánchez-Palacios, Manuel; Pérez Sánchez, Ruymán; Falcón Moreno, Raúl

    2009-01-01

    To compare the degree of severity of burnout syndrome among the healthcare personnel of an intensive care unit (ICU) and admission wards. We performed a cross-sectional, descriptive study with nurses and nurses' aides in the ICU and admission wards of the Hospital Universitario Insular de Gran Canaria (Spain). An anonymous survey was performed through the 22-item Maslach Burnout Inventory, which measures the three dimensions of burnout syndrome: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. We interviewed 92 nurses (61% from the ICU and 39% from admission wards) and 80 nurses' aides (51% from the ICU and 49% from admission wards). In all groups, a moderate degree of emotional exhaustion was found, which was more severe in nurses' aides working on admission wards than in those working in the ICU (22.26, SD=7.47 vs 26.51, SD=7.12, p=0.011). High levels of depersonalization and emotional exhaustion were found in all groups, with no significant difference among staff working in the ICU or admission wards. No significant differences were found in the perception of burnout between staff in the ICU or in admission wards. The degree of emotional exhaustion was moderate, while degrees of depersonalization and lack of personal accomplishment were high.

  8. Factors Influencing Emergency Nurses' Burnout During an Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Choi, Jeong Sil

    2016-12-01

    Emergency department (ED) nurses suffer from persistent stress after experiencing the traumatic event of exposure to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), which can subsequently lead to burnout. This study aimed to assess ED nurses' burnout level during an outbreak of MERS-CoV and to identify influencing factors in order to provide basic information for lowering and preventing the level of burnout. Study participants were ED nurses working in eight hospitals designated for treating MERS-CoV-infected patients in Korea. We performed multiple regression analysis to explore the factors influencing burnout. The ED nurses' burnout was affected by job stress (β=0.59, pburnout. ED nurses taking care of MERS-CoV-infected patients should be aware that burnout is higher for nurses in their divisions than nurses in other hospital departments and that job stress is the biggest influential factor of burnout. To be ready for the outbreak of emerging contagious diseases such as MERS-CoV, efforts and preparations should be made to reduce burnout. Job stress should be managed and resolved. Working conditions for mitigating job stress and systematic stress management programs should be provided, and hospital resources for the treatment of MERS-CoV need to be reinforced. Moreover, promoting support from family and friends is required. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Relationship between job demand and burnout in nurses: does it depend on work engagement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sierra, Rosa; Fernández-Castro, Jordi; Martínez-Zaragoza, Fermín

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to deepen the understanding of the relationships among job demands, control, social support, burnout and engagement in nurses. Burnout is a prevalent phenomenon among nurses because of the interaction between high demands and low resources, according to the job demands-resources model. A descriptive, correlational design was used in a stratified random sample of 100 nurses recruited from two Spanish hospitals. Job demand, social support, control, engagement, and burnout were measured. Data were analysed by hierarchical regression analysis. Social support is a significant predictor of nurses' engagement and demands is a predictor of nurses' burnout. Work engagement moderates the relationship between job demands and burnout. The process that leads to burnout and the process that leads to engagement are not isolated processes; engagement acts as a moderator of burnout. The prevailing paradigm in combating burnout in nursing can be changed and could be based on the enhancement of nurses' strengths through increasing engagement. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Development of the Psychiatric Nurse Job Stressor Scale (PNJSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Hironori; Abe, Hiroshi; Funakoshi, Yayoi; Omori, Hisamitsu; Matsuo, Hisae; Ishida, Yasushi; Katoh, Takahiko

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a tool, the Psychiatric Nurse Job Stressor Scale (PNJSS), for measuring the stress of psychiatric nurses, and to evaluate the reliability and validity of the PNJSS. A total of 302 psychiatric nurses completed all the questions in an early version of the PNJSS, which was composed of 63 items and is based on past literature of psychiatric nurses' stress. A total of 22 items from four factors, 'Psychiatric Nursing Ability', 'Attitude of Patients', 'Attitude Toward Nursing' and 'Communication', were extracted in exploratory factor analysis. With regard to scale reliability, the item-scale correlation coefficient was r = 0.265-0.570 (P job stressor' scale was r = 0.172-0.420 (P job reaction' scale was r = 0.201-0.453 (P job stressors. © 2011 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2011 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  11. The Mediating Role of Coping Style in the Relationship between Psychological Capital and Burnout among Chinese Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Yongqing Ding; Yanjie Yang; Xiuxian Yang; Tiehui Zhang; Xiaohui Qiu; Xin He; Wenbo Wang; Lin Wang; Hong Sui

    2015-01-01

    Background Burnout is recognized as an occupational hazard, and nursing has a high risk of burnout. This study aims to explore the relationship between psychological capital (PsyCap) and burnout among Chinese nurses and the mediating role of coping style in this relationship. Methods A total of 1,496 nurses (effective response rate: 80.11%) from two large general hospitals in Daqing City of China were selected as participants. Data were collected via the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMB...

  12. Study of the influence on emotional work contract nurses on Job Burnout

    OpenAIRE

    Song Changping; Fan Weiwei; Zhao Chenxu; Gao Ling

    2017-01-01

    Discuss the influences of contract nurse’ emotion work on job burnout and provide theoretical basis for reducing the job burnout of perception level which caused by emotion work of contract nurse. Methods: The data which comes from the questionnaire survey about the Chinese edition of Maslach job burnout scale for 298 contract nurse is used statistical analysis by SPSS11.5 software. Results: The current contract nurse is more inclined to “surface acting” on working and the nurses have a lower...

  13. Burnout in the nursing home health care aide: A systematic review

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    Sarah L. Cooper

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Factors associated with burnout in health care aides are similar to those reported among nurses, although the level of evidence and low methodological rigor of these studies suggest more robust study designs are warranted. Our findings suggest research focused on this important but largely invisible group of care providers could yield important advances in understanding burnout in this group and yield potential interventions to buffer burnout and its consequences. Without mitigating the effects of burnout on nursing home health care aides, vulnerable older adults in residential care are at risk.

  14. Hardy personality and burnout syndrome among nursing students in three Brazilian universities—an analytic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Nursing students may exhibit the characteristics of resistance to stress, such as hardiness, which can reduce the risk of burnout. However, we found only one published study about these phenomena among nursing students. Thus, we investigated the association between hardiness and burnout in such students. Methods An analytic, cross-sectional study was conducted among 570 nursing students from three Brazilian universities. Data were collected relating to sociodemographic characteristics, hardiness, and burnout, which we analyzed using inferential statistics. Results We observed that 64.04% of nursing students in the sample had a high level of emotional exhaustion, 35.79% had a high level of cynicism, and 87.72% had a low level of professional efficacy: these are dimensions of burnout. We also found that 48.77% had a high level of control, 61.40% a high level of commitment, and 35.44% a high level of challenge: these are dimensions of hardiness. Only 24.74% of the students experienced burnout, and 21.93% met the criteria for a hardy personality. There was a statistically significant difference between the frequency of hardiness and burnout (p = 0.033), with 68.00% of hardy students not exhibiting burnout. Conclusions Although nursing students live with educational stressors, burnout was not preponderant in our sample students; this may be linked to hardiness. Thus, given its benefits to student life and health, we recommend the development of strategies to promote hardiness among nursing students. PMID:24678676

  15. The factors influencing burnout and job satisfaction among critical care nurses: a study of Saudi critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Jalal; Wilson, Rhonda; Woods, Cindy; Usher, Kim

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence of burnout and job satisfaction among Saudi national critical care nurses. Burnout is caused by a number of factors, including personal, organisational and professional issues. Previous literature reports a strong relationship between burnout and job satisfaction among critical care nurses. Little is known about this phenomenon among Saudi national critical care nurses. A convenience sample of 150 Saudi national critical care nurses from three hospitals in Hail, Saudi Arabia were included in a cross-sectional survey. Saudi national critical care registered nurses reported moderate to high levels of burnout in the areas of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation. Participants also reported a feeling of ambivalence and dissatisfaction with their jobs but were satisfied with the nature of their work. Saudi national critical care nurses experience moderate to high levels of burnout and low levels of job satisfaction. Burnout is a predictor of job satisfaction for Saudi national critical care nurses. These results provide clear evidence of the need for nurse managers and policy makers to devise strategies to help nurses better cope with a stressful work environment, thereby also improving job satisfaction among Saudi national critical care nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Nurses' attitudes toward ethical issues in psychiatric inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Nurhan

    2014-05-01

    Nursing is an occupation that deals with humans and relies upon human relationships. Nursing care, which is an important component of these relationships, involves protection, forbearance, attention, and worry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ethical beliefs of psychiatric nurses and ethical problems encountered. The study design was descriptive and cross-sectional. RESEARCH CONTEXT: Methods comprised of a questionnaire administered to psychiatric nurses (n=202) from five psychiatric hospitals in Istanbul, Turkey, instruction in psychiatric nursing ethics, discussion of reported ethical problems by nursing focus groups, and analysis of questionnaires and reports by academicians with clinical experience. PARTICIPANTS consist of the nurses who volunteered to take part in the study from the five psychiatric hospitals (n=202), which were selected with cluster sampling method. Ethical considerations: Written informed consent of each participant was taken prior to the study. The results indicated that nurses needed additional education in psychiatric ethics. Insufficient personnel, excessive workload, working conditions, lack of supervision, and in-service training were identified as leading to unethical behaviors. Ethical code or nursing care -related problems included (a) neglect, (b) rude/careless behavior, (c) disrespect of patient rights and human dignity, (d) bystander apathy, (e) lack of proper communication, (f) stigmatization, (g) authoritarian attitude/intimidation, (h) physical interventions during restraint, (i) manipulation by reactive emotions, (j) not asking for permission, (k) disrespect of privacy, (l) dishonesty or lack of clarity, (m) exposure to unhealthy physical conditions, and (n) violation of confidence. The results indicate that ethical codes of nursing in psychiatric inpatient units are inadequate and standards of care are poor. In order to address those issues, large-scale research needs to be conducted in psychiatric nursing with a

  17. Work Related Stress, Burnout, Job Satisfaction and General Health of Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Khamisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaps in research focusing on work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses is evident within developing contexts like South Africa. This study identified the relationship between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses. A total of 1200 nurses from four hospitals were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study (75% response rate. Participants completed five questionnaires and multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine significant relationships between variables. Staff issues are best associated with burnout as well as job satisfaction. Burnout explained the highest amount of variance in mental health of nurses. These are known to compromise productivity and performance, as well as affect the quality of patient care. Issues, such as security risks in the workplace, affect job satisfaction and health of nurses. Although this is more salient to developing contexts it is important in developing strategies and intervention programs towards improving nurse and patient related outcomes.

  18. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  19. [Burnout in Nursing Professionals Performing Overtime Workdays in Emergency and Critical Care Departments. Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas-De la Fuente, Guillermo Arturo; Albendín-García, Luis; de la Fuente, Emilia Inmaculada; San Luis, Concepción; Gómez-Urquiza, José Luis; Cañadas, Gustavo Raúl

    2016-09-14

    Burnout syndrome is a disorder that seriously affects people who suffer it, the institutions in which they work and the quality of healthcare. It is of great interest to advance in burnout research for its possible prevention. The aim of this work was to study the levels of burnout syndrome in nurses of emergency department with overtime workdays and to know the relationship between burnout and personality characteristics. Multicenter cross-sectional study with a sample of 1225 emergency nurses from the Andalusian Health Service. Demographic, social and occupational variables were recorded. Burnout was assessed with Maslach Burnout Inventory and personality factors with NEO-Five Factor Inventory. Descriptive analysis of the variables, independent means hypothesis contrast and bayesian analysis were done. 44.1% of nurses who perform overtime workdays have high burnout versus a 38% for those without such overload. These differences have been also found in burnout dimensions, especially in emotional exhaustion (15.3% versus 10.8%) and depersonalization (17.9% versus 11.8%). Overtime workdays performed by emergency nurses seems to have a negative on them and it could also influence the development of burnout syndrome.

  20. Child psychiatric nursing. Moving into the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, L M

    1994-03-01

    Changes in health care policy must be made to pave the way for the appropriate treatment and prevention of child and adolescent mental health problems. Nurses can provide the leadership needed to make the changes. Organizations such as the Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nurses and the Society for Education and Research in Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing are already making important contributions. Challenges in the arenas of treatment, education, and research are before us in child psychiatric nursing. We are facing these demands, however, and are moving forward into the twenty-first century.

  1. Burnout and psychiatric morbidity among medical students entering clinical training: a three year prospective questionnaire and interview-based study

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    Runeson Bo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental distress among medical students is often reported. Burnout has not been studied frequently and studies using interviewer-rated diagnoses as outcomes are rarely employed. The objective of this prospective study of medical students was to examine clinically significant psychiatric morbidity and burnout at 3rd year of medical school, considering personality and study conditions measured at 1st year. Methods Questionnaires were sent to 127 first year medical students who were then followed-up at 3rd year of medical school. Eighty-one of 3rd year respondents participated in a diagnostic interview. Personality (HP5-i and Performance-based self-esteem (PBSE-scale were assessed at first year, Study conditions (HESI, Burnout (OLBI, Depression (MDI at 1st and 3rd years. Diagnostic interviews (MINI were used at 3rd year to assess psychiatric morbidity. High and low burnout at 3rd year was defined by cluster analysis. Logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of high burnout and psychiatric morbidity, controlling for gender. Results 98 (77% responded on both occasions, 80 (63% of these were interviewed. High burnout was predicted by Impulsivity trait, Depressive symptoms at 1st year and Financial concerns at 1st year. When controlling for 3rd year study conditions, Impulsivity and concurrent Workload remained. Of the interviewed sample 21 (27% had a psychiatric diagnosis, 6 of whom had sought help. Unadjusted analyses showed that psychiatric morbidity was predicted by high Performance-based self-esteem, Disengagement and Depression at 1st year, only the later remained significant in the adjusted analysis. Conclusion Psychiatric morbidity is common in medical students but few seek help. Burnout has individual as well as environmental explanations and to avoid it, organisational as well as individual interventions may be needed. Early signs of depressive symptoms in medical students may be important to address. Students

  2. Burnout and psychiatric morbidity among medical students entering clinical training: a three year prospective questionnaire and interview-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Marie E; Runeson, Bo

    2007-04-12

    Mental distress among medical students is often reported. Burnout has not been studied frequently and studies using interviewer-rated diagnoses as outcomes are rarely employed. The objective of this prospective study of medical students was to examine clinically significant psychiatric morbidity and burnout at 3rd year of medical school, considering personality and study conditions measured at 1st year. Questionnaires were sent to 127 first year medical students who were then followed-up at 3rd year of medical school. Eighty-one of 3rd year respondents participated in a diagnostic interview. Personality (HP5-i) and Performance-based self-esteem (PBSE-scale) were assessed at first year, Study conditions (HESI), Burnout (OLBI), Depression (MDI) at 1st and 3rd years. Diagnostic interviews (MINI) were used at 3rd year to assess psychiatric morbidity. High and low burnout at 3rd year was defined by cluster analysis. Logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of high burnout and psychiatric morbidity, controlling for gender. 98 (77%) responded on both occasions, 80 (63%) of these were interviewed. High burnout was predicted by Impulsivity trait, Depressive symptoms at 1st year and Financial concerns at 1st year. When controlling for 3rd year study conditions, Impulsivity and concurrent Workload remained. Of the interviewed sample 21 (27%) had a psychiatric diagnosis, 6 of whom had sought help. Unadjusted analyses showed that psychiatric morbidity was predicted by high Performance-based self-esteem, Disengagement and Depression at 1st year, only the later remained significant in the adjusted analysis. Psychiatric morbidity is common in medical students but few seek help. Burnout has individual as well as environmental explanations and to avoid it, organisational as well as individual interventions may be needed. Early signs of depressive symptoms in medical students may be important to address. Students should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities

  3. The effect of the individual's personality on the emergence of burnout among nurses.

    OpenAIRE

    MATLASOVÁ, Hana

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on assessing whether the type of personality predisposes the formation of burnout of nurses. The work presents the problem of burnout (stage, symptoms, prevention). It also deals with the personality types and defines the profession and working skills of a nurse. The research part of the thesis seeks to determine whether certain personality type of nurses reports a higher tendency to develop the syndrome. The work also focuses on the findings of the highest presence of bur...

  4. Perceived stress, psychological well-being and burnout among female nurses working in government hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Divinakumar K J; Shivram Bhat Pookala; Ram Chandra Das

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have studied about the Burnout among government employed Female Nurses in India. Methods: A cross sectional survey was done by mailing questionnaires containing Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI) and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) to all 603 Nurses posted in thirty government hospitals of central India. Fifty seven percent responded and 298 valid questionnaires were analysed. Results: Sixty three nurses (21%) had GHQ 28 sc...

  5. Psychiatric Nurses' Attitude and Practice toward Physical Restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Amal Sobhy

    2017-02-01

    This study was to assess psychiatric nurses' attitude and practice toward physical restraint among mentally ill patients. A descriptive research design was used to achieve the study objective. The present study was carried out in three specialized governmental mental hospitals and two psychiatric wards in general hospital. A convenient purposive sample of 96 nurses who were working in the previously mentioned setting was included. The tool used for data collection was the Self-Administered Structured Questionnaire; it included three parts: The first comprised items concerned with demographic characteristics of the nurses, the second comprised 10 item measuring nurses' attitudes toward physical restraint, and the third was used to assess nurses' practices regarding use of physical restraint. There were insignificant differences between attitudes and practices in relation to nurses' sex, level of education, years of experience and work place. Moreover, a positive significant correlation was found between nurses' total attitude scores, and practices regarding use of physical restraint. Psychiatric nurses have positive attitude and adequate practice toward using physical restraints as an alternative management for psychiatric patients. It is important for psychiatric nurses to acknowledge that physical restraints should be implemented as the last resort. The study recommended that it is important for psychiatric nurses to acknowledge that physical restraints should be implemented as the last resort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Burnout na clínica psiquiátrica: relato de um caso Burnout in psychiatric practice: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Vieira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de burnout, identificada na década de 1970, caracteriza-se por uma tríade de dimensões (exaustão emocional, despersonalização e redução da realização pessoal e é uma condição relacionada à organização do trabalho. Entretanto, não consta nas classificações psiquiátricas. O artigo apresenta o conceito de burnout, estabelece o seu atual status nosológico e introduz uma breve discussão sobre a diferença entre burnout e depressão, a partir do relato de um caso atendido no Instituto de Psiquiatria da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro.The burnout syndrome was first described in the 1970's and is characterized by three dimensions (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. Burnout is a work organization-related health condition. Nevertheless, it is not part of any psychiatric classification. This article presents the concept of burnout, establishes its nosological status and introduces a brief discussion on the difference between burnout and depression, based on the report of a clinical case treated at Instituto de Psiquiatria da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro.

  7. Investigation of risk factors of psychological acceptance and burnout syndrome among nurses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yongcheng; Yao, Wu; Wang, Wei; Li, Hong; Lan, Yajia

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine reliability of Chinese version of Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), the relationship between psychological acceptance (PA), and burnout syndrome and their risk factors among nurses in China. The reliability of AAQ-II in Chinese was evaluated first by testing on 111 doctors and 108 nurses in China. On the number of 845 nurses selected from nine city hospitals by using stratified cluster sampling method, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey was administered to establish the presence of burnout, and the AAQ-II was used to measure their PA. Results showed that the AAQ-II in Chinese had a good test-retest reliability. PA was statistically significantly negatively correlated to the three dimensionalities of burnout among nurses in China. Male and female nurses had a significant difference in PA. Risk factors for burnout were age (25-44 years), marital status (married), gender (male), hospital department (emergency) and position (primary title) as well as PA. The findings provide insights into the risk factors of burnout in Chinese nurses and may have clinical implications in preventing burnout in Chinese nurses. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Emotion work and burnout: cross-sectional study of nurses and physicians in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Mariann; Kovacs, Eszter; Hegedu, Katalin

    2010-10-01

    To investigate predictors of occupational burnout, such as emotion work, among health care workers and compare the frequencies of burnout and emotion work in nurses and physicians. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2007 and 2008 among 80 physicians and 76 nurses working in a variety of health care settings in Hungary. The survey contained sociodemographic questions and work- and health-related questions from, respectively, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey and the Hungarian version of the Frankfurt Emotion Work Scale. To identify the dimensions of emotion work associated with burnout, linear regression analyses were carried out. To analyze differences in burnout and emotion work between nurses and physicians, independent t tests were used. Nurses reported significantly higher emotional dissonance and fewer regulation possibilities, such as interaction and emotion control, than physicians. However, no differences were found in the level or frequency of burnout. Nurses had fewer regulation requirements regarding sensitivity and sympathy. Linear regression analyses showed that emotional dissonance for emotional exhaustion (β=0.401) and display of negative emotions for depersonalization (β=0.332) were the strongest predictors of burnout. The factors that should be taken into account when developing prevention and intervention programs differ for nurses and physicians. In nurses, the focus should be on stressors and emotional dissonance, while in physicians it should be on work requirements and display and regulation of negative emotions.

  9. Síndrome de burnout ou estafa profissional e os transtornos psiquiátricos Burnout syndrome and psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Ramos Trigo

    2007-01-01

    responsible for its development, its association with psychiatric disorders and consequences for the individual and for the organization. METHODS: It was carried out a review using database from MedLine, Scielo, American Psychiatry Association, Evidence-Based Mental Health, American College of Physicians, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, National Guideline Clearinghouse and from World Health Organization, between 1985 and 2006. CONCLUSION: The prevalence is still uncertain, but data suggest that it could affect a significant number of individuals, range from aproximately 4% to 85.7% according to the studied population. It could be presented as a comorbidity with some psychiatric illnesses like depressive disorder. The effects of burnout could interfere negatively in the individual level (physical, mental, professional and social; professional level (slow and negligent service to the patient/customer, impersonal contact with colleagues and/or patient/customers; and organizational level (conflict with the team’s members, turnover, absenteeism, diminishing of service’s quality. More researches should be carried out to organizations make positive changes based in scientific evidences.

  10. [Effectiveness of an inpatient multimodal psychiatric-psychotherapeutic program for the treatment of job burnout].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Kathleen; Conrad, Nathalie; Straus, Doris; Porschke, Hildburg; von Känel, Roland

    2016-03-16

    We studied the clinical course and long-term effects of inpatient treatment in 723 patients with job burnout referred with an ICD-10 F diagnosis and Z73.0 code («overwhelming exhaustion») to a Swiss hospital specialized in the treatment of job stress-related disorders. Patients were characterized in terms of age, gender, socioeconomic status. Self-rated psychological measures related to general and burnout-specific symptoms (i. e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishments) were applied before and after a six-week treatment program, as well as at 15 months after hospital discharge in 232 patients. The results show that the multimodal inpatient psychiatric-psychotherapeutic treatment was successful with a sustainable effect on psychological well-being (>90 %), including improvements regarding emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishments as well as professional reintegration in 71 % of cases.

  11. Nursing Burnout: Cross-Sectional Study at a Large Army Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 175, 6:435, 2010 Nursing Burnout : Cross-Sectional Study at a Large Army Hospital LTC Gary Morris Lang, AN USA; 1LT Elizabeth A...Rfister, AN USA; 1LT Michelle J. Siemens, AN USA ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to examine the levels of burnout among U,S, Army and civilian...364) completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory, 7"-test and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze data. Findings suggest that both groups

  12. The factors associated with the burnout syndrome and fatigue in Cypriot nurses: a census report

    OpenAIRE

    Raftopoulos Vasilios; Charalambous Andreas; Talias Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Fatigue and burnout are two concepts often linked in the literature. However, regardless of their commonalities they should be approached as distinct concepts. The current and ever-growing reforms regarding the delivery of nursing care in Cyprus, stress for the development of ways to prevent burnout and effectively manage fatigue that can result from working in stressful clinical environments. Methods To explore the factors associated with the burnout syndrome in Cypriot n...

  13. Sharps injuries and job burnout: a cross-sectional study among nurses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuhui; Yao, Lin; Li, Shixue; Liu, Yan; Wang, Haiyan; Sun, Yu

    2012-09-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between sharps injuries and job burnout in nurses. Sharps injury questionnaires and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) questionnaires were used to investigate and analyze job burnout among 468 nurses, of which 458 effective questionnaires were collected, for a response rate of 97.86%. A total of 292 nurses had at least one sharps injury (63.76% of the 458 nurses). The dimension scores were higher for injured nurses compared with non-injured nurses. The difference between the dimensions of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization for nurses with sharps injuries was statistically significant (P opportunity to nurses for training and education to reduce the prevalence of sharps injuries. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Factors Influencing Emergency Nurses' Burnout During an Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Kim, RN, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: ED nurses taking care of MERS-CoV-infected patients should be aware that burnout is higher for nurses in their divisions than nurses in other hospital departments and that job stress is the biggest influential factor of burnout. To be ready for the outbreak of emerging contagious diseases such as MERS-CoV, efforts and preparations should be made to reduce burnout. Job stress should be managed and resolved. Working conditions for mitigating job stress and systematic stress management programs should be provided, and hospital resources for the treatment of MERS-CoV need to be reinforced. Moreover, promoting support from family and friends is required.

  15. Patient Aggression and the Wellbeing of Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Virve Pekurinen; Laura Willman; Marianna Virtanen; Mika Kivimäki; Jussi Vahtera; Maritta Välimäki

    2017-01-01

    Wellbeing of nurses is associated with patient aggression. Little is known about the differences in these associations between nurses working in different specialties. We aimed to estimate and compare the prevalence of patient aggression and the associations between patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses in psychiatric and non-psychiatric specialties (medical and surgical, and emergency medicine). A sample of 5288 nurses (923 psychiatric nurses, 4070 medical and surgical nurses, 295 e...

  16. Relations among social support, burnout, and experiences of anger: an investigation among emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy-Kart, Müge

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether social support, burnout, and anger expression are related with each other among emergency nurses working in private- or public-sector hospitals. The sample consisted of 100 emergency nurses working in the private or public sector in Ankara, Turkey. The Maslach Burnout Inventory, The Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and The Trait-Anger and Anger Expression Scale were used. The results demonstrated that social support did not differentiate among the nurses working in the private sector or in the public sector according to the burnout subscales' scores. However, nurses in the private sector find it more difficult to express their anger. The state-trait anger levels of the nurses differ according to the burnout levels and also according to the sector that they are working in. The congruence between this study's findings and the literature is discussed.

  17. Burnout during nursing education predicts lower occupational preparedness and future clinical performance: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudman, Ann; Gustavsson, J Petter

    2012-08-01

    Early-career burnout among nurses can influence health and professional development, as well as quality of care. However, the prospective occupational consequences of study burnout have not previously been investigated in a national sample using a longitudinal design. To prospectively monitor study burnout for a national sample of nursing students during their years in higher education and at follow-up 1 year post graduation. Further, to relate the possible development of study burnout to prospective health and life outcomes, as well as student and occupational outcomes. A longitudinal cohort of Swedish nursing students (within the population-based LANE (Longitudinal Analysis of Nursing Education/Entry) study) from all sites of education in Sweden was surveyed annually. Data were collected at four points in time over 4 years: three times during higher education and 1 year post graduation. : A longitudinal sample of 1702 respondents was prospectively followed from late autumn 2002 to spring 2006. Mean level changes of study burnout (as measured by the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, i.e. the Exhaustion and Disengagement subscales) across time, as well as prospective effects of baseline study burnout and changes in study burnout levels, were estimated using Latent Growth Curve Modeling. An increase in study burnout (from 30% to 41%) across 3 years in higher education was found, and levels of both Exhaustion and Disengagement increased significantly across the years in education (ppsychological well-being. Aspects related to work skills and intention to leave the profession were also affected. Thus, burnout development during higher education may be an important concern, and effective preventive measures to counteract burnout development may be necessary already at the outset of nursing education. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Female nurses' burnout symptoms: No association with the Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yufang; Lam, Louisa; Luo, Yuanhui; Plummer, Virginia; Cross, Wendy; Li, Hui; Yin, Yizhen; Zhang, Jingping

    2017-03-01

    Across the world, hospital nurses experience a high level of burnout. Exploring biochemical markers of burnout could help to understand physiological changes and may provide useful evidence for preventing burnout symptoms. The current study included 94 female nurses from one Chinese third-level hospital. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) was used to investigate burnout symptoms: emotional exhaustion, cynicism, reduced professional efficacy, as well as the burnout average. The HPT axis was tested by checking blood levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Nonparametric tests showed that no significant difference in biochemical markers was found between the burnout and non-burnout groups. Spearman correlation analysis found that biochemical markers had no significant association with burnout symptoms, except weakly negative associations between reduced professional efficacy and blood pressure and heart rate. These findings show a rather poor correlation of the HPT axis on burnout symptoms. Expanding the biochemical index of the HPT axis, comparing well-defined samples and using longitudinal studies are recommended for further studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experiences of violence, burnout and job satisfaction in Korean nurses in the emergency medical centre setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hee Sook; Sok, Sohyune R

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the experience of violence in relation to burnout and job satisfaction in Korean nurses in the emergency medical centre setting. Participants were 236 nurses in the emergency medical centre setting of three metropolitan areas in Korea. Measures included a general characteristics form, characteristics related to experiences of violence, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. Data were collected from June 2013 to February 2014. In the prediction model, 33.4% of burnout was explained and 35.7% for job satisfaction. The greatest influence on burnout was handling violence, followed by verbal abuse. The greatest influence on job satisfaction was physical threat, followed by handling violence. The study shows that burnout and job satisfaction of Korean nurses in the emergency medical centre setting are related to experiences of violence such as verbal abuse, physical threat and physical violence, as well as handling violence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Quantification of burnout in emergency nurses: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Cheng, Bin; Zhu, Xiao Ping

    2018-01-17

    Previous studies showed increased levels of absenteeism, drug abuse, depression, and symptoms allied with burnout in emergency nurses. This meta-analysis aimed to quantify the three dimensions of burnout in emergency nurses and estimate the proportion of nurses who experience higher than tolerable levels of burnout. A systematic search was conducted on PubMed, Scielo, Xueshu Baidu and Informa databases with a cut-off time between 1997 and 2017 to retrieve published papers in any language that had estimated the burnout levels in emergency nurses by using MBI scale. We identified a total of 11 eligible studies. The total mean estimate was moderate for emotional exhaustion (25.552), but clearly trending towards higher level, whereas depersonalization (10.383) and lack of personal accomplishment (30.652) showed higher burnouts levels. The proportion of emergency nurses suffering from high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment was 40.5%, 44.3%, and 42.7%, respectively. Burnout is detrimental to achieving high-quality healthcare services and causes a loss of productivity. It is high time for nursing leader and management personnel to identify appropriate measures to counteract burnout. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Burnout among nursing staff in accident and emergency and acute medicine: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Mark; Melby, Vidar

    2003-11-01

    This study was designed to identify the prevalence of burnout among nurses working in Accident and Emergency (A & E) and acute medicine, to establish factors that contribute to stress and burnout, to determine the experiences of nurses affected by it and highlight its effects on patient care and to determine if stress and burnout have any effects on individuals outside the clinical setting. A triangulated research design was used incorporating quantitative and qualitative methods. Maslach Burnout Inventory was used. Nurses working in acute medicine experienced higher levels of emotional exhaustion than their A & E counterparts. The overall level of depersonalization was low. High levels of personal accomplishment were experienced less by junior members of staff. Stress and burnout have far reaching effects both for nurses in their clinical practice and personal lives. If nurses continue to work in their current environment without issues being tackled, then burnout will result. The science of nursing does not have to be painful, but by recognition of the existence of stress and burnout we can take the first steps towards their prevention.

  2. Burnout syndrome in nurses working in palliative care units: An analysis of associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo-Baeza, Mercedes; Mendiola-Infante, Susana Virginia; Sepehri, Armina; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Cortés-Castell, Ernesto

    2018-01-01

    To analyse the association between psychological, labour and demographic factors and burnout in palliative care nursing. There is a lack of published research evaluating burnout in palliative care nursing. This observational cross-sectional study involved 185 palliative care nurses in Mexico. The primary variables were burnout defined by its three dimensions (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment). As secondary variables, psychological, labour and demographic factors were considered. A binary logistic regression model was constructed to determine factors associated with burnout. A total of 69 nurses experienced high emotional exhaustion (37.3%), 65 had high depersonalization (35.1%) and 70 had low personal performance (37.8%). A higher proportion of burnout was found in the participants who were single parents, working >8 hr per day, with a medium/high workload, a lack of a high professional quality of life and a self-care deficit. Our multivariate models were very accurate in explaining burnout in palliative care nurses. These models must be externally validated to predict burnout and prevent future complications of the syndrome accurately. Nurses who present the factors found should be the focus of interventions to reduce work stress. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Occupational stressors and coping as determinants of burnout in female hospice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, N

    2001-02-01

    Stressors, coping and demographic variables were examined as predictors of burnout in a sample of hospice nurses. The study aimed to investigate the level of burnout among hospice nurses; to ascertain which aspects of nursing work were positively or negatively related to burnout; to examine the relative contributions made by these different variables and to suggest individual and organizational interventions to reduce levels of burnout. Eighty-nine female nurses from nine hospices completed a battery of questionnaires comprising the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Nursing Stress Scale, Ways of Coping Scale and a demographic information form. In general, the level of burnout (characterized by high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalization of patients and low personal accomplishment) was found to be low. In multiple regression analyses, 'death and dying', "conflict with staff', 'accepting responsibility' and higher nursing grade contributed to emotional exhaustion. 'Conflict with staff', 'inadequate preparation', 'escape' and reduced 'planful problem-solving' contributed to depersonalization. 'Inadequate preparation', 'escape', reduced 'positive reappraisal' and fewer professional qualifications contributed to lower levels of personal accomplishment. Overall, stressors made the greatest contribution to burnout and demographic factors contributed the least. The importance of not labelling individuals as good and bad 'copers' was discussed, as the effectiveness of a strategy may depend on the situation. It was concluded that the investigation of problem-focused and emotion-focused coping in relation to burnout, was oversimplifying the coping-burnout relationship. Suggestions for stress management included staff training in counselling skills, monitoring staff conflict, implementing stress inoculation training to teach appropriate use of coping skills and finally, monitoring particularly vulnerable groups of hospice staff such as unqualified nursing assistants and

  4. Burnout syndrome in surgical oncology and general surgery nurses: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Książek, Ilona; Stefaniak, Tomasz J; Stadnyk, Magdalena; Książek, Janina

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of burnout syndrome is strongly associated with and modulated by multiple personality and environmental factors. In Poland, nurses experience a discrepancy between the demands, expectations and social status of the position of their profession and low salaries. Such a situation provokes frustration and depression, and further leads to problems of adaptation including burnout syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of burnout syndrome among nurses working in general surgery and surgical oncology specialties. The study was designed as a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. It was undertaken in the largest Hospital in the Pomeranian region of Poland. The participants included 60 nurses working in two departments: General Surgery and Surgical Oncology. The study was based upon an anonymous self-test composed of a questionnaire and three psychological measures: Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Psychological Burden Scale and a self-constructed questionnaire on job satisfaction. Intensity of burnout syndrome was significantly higher among oncology nurses than among surgical ones. There was also a strong but not significant trend towards higher Psychological Burden Scale in the group of oncology nurses. The study revealed a high degree of emotional burden and burnout in nurses working in the study hospital suggesting that nurses are at great occupational risk. The findings of the study provide evidence of the potential need to restructure the system and suggest that nurses need more control of their work including a higher degree of involvement in clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Burnout

    OpenAIRE

    Woitsch, Marek

    2015-01-01

    This Thesis deals with the issue of the burnout syndrome and with relationship between burnout syndrome and social support. The aim of this work is based on knowledge from the literature and from experience of clinical psychiatrists to assess the significance of social support for individuals suffering from the burnout syndrome. In the Thesis, there are first defined terms burnout syndrome and social support. Consequently, there are presented the most important knowledge of social support, it...

  6. Burnout in health-care professionals during reorganizations and downsizing. A cohort study in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall-Lord Marie-Louise

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burnout is a psychological reaction triggered by interaction between personal characteristics and stress factors. Reorganizations and downsizing with increased workload imply stress for health-care professionals. This is a study of burnout in nurses during a period with two comprehensive reorganizations. Methods In this quasi-experimental retrospective cohort study, burnout was assessed in nurses with long work experience in three surveys during a 30 months' period with two comprehensive reorganizations and downsizing of a hospital unit with mostly seriously ill patients with cancer. Burnout was measured with Bergen Burnout Indicator (BBI at each survey, and "Sense of Coherence" (SOC with Antonovsky's questionnaire at the last survey. Results One man and 45 women aged 30 to 65 years were invited to the surveys. There was a significant increase in burnout during the study period, the mean increase in BBI-score was 12.5 pr year (p Conclusions There was a significant development of burnout in a group of nurses during a period with two reorganizations and downsizing. Burnout was associated with low SOC. Working with seriously ill patients with cancer has probably made the nurses exceptionally vulnerable to the stress and workload related to the reorganizations.

  7. Psychosocial factors and prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jorge Luiz Lima; Soares, Rafael da Silva; Costa, Felipe dos Santos; Ramos, Danusa de Souza; Lima, Fabiano Bittencourt; Teixeira, Liliane Reis

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing workers in intensive care units and establish associations with psychosocial factors. This descriptive study evaluated 130 professionals, including nurses, nursing technicians, and nursing assistants, who performed their activities in intensive care and coronary care units in 2 large hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were collected in 2011 using a self-reported questionnaire. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to evaluate the burnout syndrome dimensions, and the Self Reporting Questionnaire was used to evaluate common mental disorders. The prevalence of burnout syndrome was 55.3% (n = 72). In the quadrants of the demand-control model, low-strain workers exhibited a prevalence of 64.5% of suspected cases of burnout, whereas high-strain workers exhibited a prevalence of 72.5% of suspected cases (p = 0.006). The prevalence of suspected cases of common mental disorders was 27.7%; of these, 80.6% were associated with burnout syndrome (burnout syndrome. Psychosocial factors were associated with the development of burnout syndrome in this group. These results underscore the need for the development of further studies aimed at intervention and the prevention of the syndrome.

  8. Relationship between ICU nurses' moral distress with burnout and anticipated turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoorideh, Foroozan Atashzadeh; Ashktorab, Tahereh; Yaghmaei, Farideh; Alavi Majd, Hamid

    2015-02-01

    Moral distress is one of intensive care unit nurses' major problems, which may happen due to various reasons, and has several consequences. Due to various moral distress outcomes in intensive care unit nurses, and their impact on nurses' personal and professional practice, recognizing moral distress is very important. The aim of this study was to determine correlation between moral distress with burnout and anticipated turnover in intensive care unit nurses. This study is a descriptive-correlation research. A total of 159 intensive care unit nurses were selected from medical sciences universities in Iran. Data collection instruments included "demographic questionnaire," "ICU Nurses' Moral Distress Scale," "Copenhagen Burnout Inventory" and "Hinshaw and Atwood Turnover Scale." Data analysis was done by using SPSS19. Informed consent from samples and research approval was obtained from Shahid Beheshti Medical Sciences University Research Ethics Board in Tehran. The findings showed intensive care unit nurses' moral distress and anticipated turnover was high, but burnout was moderate. The results revealed that there was a positive statistical correlation between intensive care unit nurses' age, their work experience and the fraction of nurses' number to number of intensive care unit beds with their moral distress and burnout. However, there were no correlation between gender, marriage status, educational degree and work shift and moral distress. Some of the findings of this research are consistent with other studies and some of them are inconsistent. Similarly, moral distress with burnout and anticipated turnover did not have statistical correlation. However, a positive correlation was found between burnout and anticipated turnover. The results showed that increase in the recruitment of young nurses, and nursing personnel, and diminishing intensive care unit nurses' moral distress, burnout and their turnover intention are essential. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. The relationship between coping strategies and burnout syndrome in oncology nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Vévodová

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a major problem in the nursing profession. It is related to work overload, lack of nursing staff, and work in shifts, lack of coping strategies and a high turnover amongst health care staff. Rapid increase of stress in the oncology centers results in a high risk of burnout. One of the options for prevention is to find suitable coping strategies. The research objective of this study was to determine the rate of burnout amongst oncology nurses and to determine the relationship between coping strategies and burnout amongst oncology nurses in the Czech Republic. The survey was designed as a quantitative research. A questionnaire battery was used consisting of questionnaires MBI-GS (Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, evaluating the degree of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment and standardized questionnaire OSI-R (Inventory of occupational stress which evaluates the emotional, cognitive stress management and the coping strategy (personal resources for coping with stress. The results of a questionnaire MBI-GS showed that out of the total of 140 oncology nurses, burnout was detected in 36 (26 % in the area of emotional exhaustion, in 24 (17 % in depersonalization, and in 53 nurses (28 % in personal accomplishment. The existence of a significant negative relationship was confirmed between the extent of burnout and all coping strategies monitored - social support, relaxation, self-care, and rational / cognitive coping.When analyzing all three areas of burnout, 23.66 % from the total number of 140 nurses are in the state of burnout. The results can be compared with the results of studies conducted by Zálešáková, Bužgová (2011 who found alarming values of burnout among 36.9 % oncology nurses and 11.9 % of the nurses were in the state of burnout. A meta-analysis of studies focusing on burnout among health care professionals working in oncology indicated that 25-36 % showed signs of burnout

  10. A modern history of psychiatric-mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Laura C; Scharer, Kathleen M

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the progression of developments in psychiatric-mental health nursing from the 1960s to the present. The 1960s were a time of shortage of psychiatric APRNs, with legislation expanding the availability of mental health services. We find ourselves in a similar time with 7 million new health insurance enrollees, because of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The expansion of health insurance coverage comes at a time when some colleges of nursing are closing master's programs in psychiatric-mental health, in lieu of the DNP mandate from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Is history repeating itself? Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Depression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feely, M; Long, A

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a theory of connectivity, which was formulated from the findings of a Classical Grounded Theory study that was designed to capture a sample of people's perceptions of living with depression or caring for individuals with depression. Data were collected from: (1) a focus group consisting of people with depression (n = 7), of which five were patients in the community and two were nurses; (2) one-to-one interviews with patients in the community (n = 5) and nurses (n = 5), three of whom had experienced depression from both sides of the caring process; and (3) two 'happy accident' focus groups (n = 25; n = 18) comprising of healthcare workers with a shared understanding of depression. Purposeful sampling was used initially. Thereafter, in keeping with one of the key tenets of grounded theory, theoretical sampling was used until theoretical saturation occurred. Data were analysed using the constant comparative approach together with the NVivo qualitative analysis software package. The core category that emerged was 'connectivity' relating to the connections and disconnections, which people make in their lives. Six key categories emerged all of which were integrated with the core category. Hence, connectivity provided a significant platform for understanding and responding to the life experience of depression. They were: (1) life encounters on the journey to naming; (2) depression: What's in a name? The silent thief; (3) tentative steps to health care; (4) connective encounters and challenges; (5) connecting with self; and (6) self-connection maintenance. Subsequently, a theory, 'Depression: a psychiatric nursing theory of connectivity', surfaced from the overall findings. We argue that this theory of connectivity provides a framework that people working in the field of holistic treatment and care could use to better understand and respond to the life experience of people living with depression.

  12. Factors that influence the development of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction in emergency department nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Stacie; Chen, Hsiu-Chin; Maughan, Dale; Heaston, Sondra

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine the prevalence of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout in emergency department nurses throughout the United States and (b) to examine which demographic and work-related components affect the development of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout in this nursing specialty. This was a nonexperimental, descriptive, and predictive study using a self-administered survey. Survey packets including a demographic questionnaire and the Professional Quality of Life Scale version 5 (ProQOL 5) were mailed to 1,000 selected emergency nurses throughout the United States. The ProQOL 5 scale was used to measure the prevalence of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout among emergency department nurses. Multiple regression using stepwise solution was employed to determine which variables of demographics and work-related characteristics predicted the prevalence of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout. The α level was set at .05 for statistical significance. The results revealed overall low to average levels of compassion fatigue and burnout and generally average to high levels of compassion satisfaction among this group of emergency department nurses. The low level of manager support was a significant predictor of higher levels of burnout and compassion fatigue among emergency department nurses, while a high level of manager support contributed to a higher level of compassion satisfaction. The results may serve to help distinguish elements in emergency department nurses' work and life that are related to compassion satisfaction and may identify factors associated with higher levels of compassion fatigue and burnout. Improving recognition and awareness of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout among emergency department nurses may prevent emotional exhaustion and help identify interventions that will help nurses remain empathetic and

  13. Effect of effort-reward imbalance and burnout on infection control among Ecuadorian nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colindres, C V; Bryce, E; Coral-Rosero, P; Ramos-Soto, R M; Bonilla, F; Yassi, A

    2017-11-07

    Nurses are frequently exposed to transmissible infections, yet adherence to infection control measures is suboptimal. There has been inadequate research into how the psychosocial work environment affects compliance with infection control measures, especially in low- and middle-income countries. To examine the association between effort-reward imbalance, burnout and adherence to infection control measures among nurses in Ecuador. A cross-sectional study linking psychosocial work environment indicators to infection control adherence. The study was conducted among 333 nurses in four Ecuadorian hospitals. Self-administered questionnaires assessed demographic variables, perceived infection risk, effort-reward imbalance, burnout and infection control adherence. Increased effort-reward imbalance was found to be a unique incremental predictor of exposure to burnout, and burnout was a negative unique incremental predictor of nurses' self-reported adherence with infection control measures. Results suggest an effort-reward imbalance-burnout continuum, which, at higher levels, contributes to reduce adherence to infection control. The Ecuadorean government has made large efforts to improve universal access to health care, yet this study suggests that workplace demands on nurses remain problematic. This study highlights the contribution of effort-reward-imbalance-burnout continuum to the chain of infection by decreased adherence to infection control of nurses. Health authorities should closely monitor the effect of new policies on psychosocial work environment, especially when expanding services and increasing public accessibility with limited resources. Additionally, organizational and psychosocial interventions targeting effort-reward imbalance and burnout in nurses should be considered part of a complete infection prevention and control strategy. Further study is warranted to identify interventions that best ameliorate effort-reward imbalance and burnout in low- and middle

  14. Patient Aggression and the Wellbeing of Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virve Pekurinen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wellbeing of nurses is associated with patient aggression. Little is known about the differences in these associations between nurses working in different specialties. We aimed to estimate and compare the prevalence of patient aggression and the associations between patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses in psychiatric and non-psychiatric specialties (medical and surgical, and emergency medicine. A sample of 5288 nurses (923 psychiatric nurses, 4070 medical and surgical nurses, 295 emergency nurses participated in the study. Subjective measures were used to assess both the occurrence of patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses (self-rated health, sleep disturbances, psychological distress and perceived work ability. Binary logistic regression with interaction terms was used to compare the associations between patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses. Psychiatric nurses reported all types of patient aggression more frequently than medical and surgical nurses, whereas nurses working in emergency settings reported physical violence and verbal aggression more frequently than psychiatric nurses. Psychiatric nurses reported poor self-rated health and reduced work ability more frequently than both of the non-psychiatric nursing groups, whereas medical and surgical nurses reported psychological distress and sleep disturbances more often. Psychiatric nurses who had experienced at least one type of patient aggression or mental abuse in the previous year, were less likely to suffer from psychological distress and sleep disturbances compared to medical and surgical nurses. Psychiatric nurses who had experienced physical assaults and armed threats were less likely to suffer from sleep disturbances compared to nurses working in emergency settings. Compared to medical and surgical nurses, psychiatric nurses face patient aggression more often, but certain types of aggression are more common in emergency settings. Psychiatric nurses have

  15. Work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses: the mediating effect of psychological capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Chang, Ying; Fu, Jialiang; Wang, Lie

    2012-10-29

    Burnout among nurses not only threatens their own health, but also that of their patients. Exploring risk factors of nurse' burnout is important to improve nurses' health and to increase the quality of health care services. This study aims to explore the relationship between work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses and the mediating role of psychological capital in this relationship. This cross-sectional study was performed during the period of September and October 2010. A questionnaire that consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), the work-family conflict scale and the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24) scale, as well as demographic and working factors, was distributed to nurses in Liaoning province, China. A total of 1,332 individuals (effective response rate: 78.35%) became our subjects. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of psychological capital. Both work interfering family conflict and family interfering work conflict were positively related with emotional exhaustion and cynicism. However, work interfering family conflict was positively related with professional efficacy whereas family interfering work conflict was negatively related with it. Psychological capital partially mediated the relationship of work interfering family conflict with emotional exhaustion and cynicism; and partially mediated the relationship of family interfering work conflict with emotional exhaustion, cynicism and professional efficacy. Work-family conflict had effects on burnout and psychological capital was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Psychological capital was a positive resource for fighting against nurses' burnout.

  16. Health Professionals Facing Burnout: What Do We Know about Nursing Managers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Heeb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To address the degree of burnout in nursing managers in hospitals of Western Switzerland, including comparison with medical managers, and its relationship with personal, work-related, and organizational characteristics. Methods. Statistical analysis of the scores of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey from 257 nursing managers who answered a standardized electronic questionnaire. Results. Nursing managers showed a low degree of burnout, which was similar to that of medical managers. Most of them had a low level of emotional exhaustion and a low level of depersonalization, while personal accomplishment was contrasted. Only 2.3% had a high degree of burnout. These findings challenge the hypothesis of high stress being associated with high burnout, as nursing managers can be supposed to have a highly demanding job due to their intermediary position within the hospital hierarchy. Variations of burnout by personal, work-related, and organizational characteristics mainly concerned emotional exhaustion. Conclusion. Though nursing managers face a highly demanding job, they may benefit from resources (including coping strategies and empowerment which help counterbalance job stress. Unequal distribution of resources may play a central role when facing burnout.

  17. Prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in Emergency Nurses: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Urquiza, Jose Luis; De la Fuente-Solana, Emilia I; Albendín-García, Luis; Vargas-Pecino, Cristina; Ortega-Campos, Elena M; Cañadas-De la Fuente, Guillermo A

    2017-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of burnout (based on the Maslach Burnout Inventory on the 3 dimensions of high Emotional Exhaustion, high Depersonalization, and low Personal Accomplishment) among emergency nurses. A search of the terms "emergency AND nurs* AND burnout" was conducted using the following databases: CINAHL, Cochrane, CUIDEN, IBECS, LILACS, PubMed, ProQuest, PsycINFO, SciELO, and Scopus. Thirteen studies were included for the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales of Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization and 11 studies for the subscale of low Personal Accomplishment. The total sample of nurses was 1566. The estimated prevalence of each subscale was 31% (95% CI, 20-44) for Emotional Exhaustion, 36% (95% CI, 23-51) for Depersonalization, and 29% (95% CI, 15-44) for low Personal Accomplishment. The prevalence of burnout syndrome in emergency nurses is high; about 30% of the sample was affected with at least 1 of the 3 Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales. Working conditions and personal factors should be taken into account when assessing burnout risk profiles of emergency nurses. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. Job conditions, job satisfaction, somatic complaints and burnout among East African nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Doef, Margot; Mbazzi, Femke Bannink; Verhoeven, Chris

    2012-06-01

    To describe job conditions, job satisfaction, somatic complaints and burnout of female East African nurses working in public and private hospitals and to determine how these well-being outcomes are associated with job conditions. Insight into job conditions, health and well-being status and their interrelation is virtually lacking for East African nurses. Cross-sectional survey of 309 female nurses in private and public hospitals in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Nurses completed a survey assessing job conditions and job satisfaction (the Leiden Quality of Work Life Questionnaire-nurses version), somatic complaints (subscale of the Symptom CheckList) and burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory). The East African nurses show high levels of somatic complaints, and nearly one-third of the sample would be labelled as burned out. In comparison with a Western European nurses reference group, the nurses score unfavourably on job conditions that require financial investment (e.g. workload, staffing, equipment and materials). On aspects related to the social climate (e.g. decision latitude, cooperation), however, they score more favourably. In comparison with private hospital nurses, public hospital nurses score similarly on aspects related to the social climate, but worse on the other job conditions. Public hospital nurses have a lower job satisfaction than private hospital nurses, but show comparable levels of somatic complaints and burnout. Strongest correlates of low job satisfaction are low supervisor support and low financial reward. Burnout is mainly associated with high workload and inadequate information provision, whereas somatic complaints are associated with demanding physical working conditions. Improvement in job conditions may reduce the high levels of burnout and somatic complaints and enhance job satisfaction in East African nurses. Efforts and investments should be made to improve the job conditions in East African nurses as they are key persons in the delivery of

  19. Satisfaction, burnout and intention to stay of emergency nurses in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Ma, Lily; Gao, Caiping; Li, Tengteng; Huang, Lihua; Huang, Weiqin

    2017-07-01

    Stability of the nursing workforce is considered a key factor for high-quality healthcare. Satisfaction and burnout are reported to be closely related to staff turnover. This study investigates satisfaction and burnout of ED nurses in Shanghai and association of these factors with intention to stay on the job. This is a cross-sectional descriptive survey study conducted between October and December 2015. Our own questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory were used to construct the survey. The convenience sampling method was used. The survey targeted ED nurses in 30 Shanghai hospitals. Data were analysed using descriptive, non-paired t - tests, analysis of variance and multivariable logistic regression to decipher possible causes for burnout and identify reasons for continued interest in staying on the job by ED nurses. Of 1137 nurses who received surveys, 976 (87%) responded. Among the respondents, 75% reported being very satisfied or satisfied with their jobs, but there was a high level of burnout, and 22.5% of the nurses expressed their intention to leave the ED within the following year (pburnout were associated with intention to leave. Salary, nurse-patient relationships, nurse staffing and work environment were areas where nurses were less satisfied, while group cohesion was associated with greater satisfaction. ED nurses in Shanghai report a high level of burnout, which is associated with an intention to leave their jobs. Interventions are needed to improve satisfaction and reduce burnout to maintain the stability of the nursing workforce. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. The association between social capital and burnout in nurses of a trauma referral teaching hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Farahbod

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Social capital is a multi-faceted phenomenon in social sciences that massively affects many social fields. It can be a helpful factor in promoting health. Among the groups with high burnout, nurses have always shown higher levels of burnout. Studies have revealed that social capital can be an important factor affecting burnout. This study aimed to determine the extent of the effect of social capital on burnout in nurses of a trauma referral teaching hospital in Rasht. This was a descriptive correlational study conducted on 214 nurses of a trauma referral teaching hospital. Maslach standard questionnaire and the social capital questionnaire devised by Boyas and colleagues were used. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficient, and linear regression analysis to determine the extent of the effect of social capital on burnout. The study showed an inverse association between social capital and burnout. The intensity of the relationship was -0.451 (P<0.0001. Also, the linear regression model of social capital on burnout variable showed that the regression coefficient of social capital equaled -0.34. The determination coefficient of this regression model indicated that social capital explained 20% of burnout changes. The results showed high burnout in emotional exhaustion dimension and an inverse association between social capital and burnout. Thus, attempts should be made to promote social capital dimensions among nurses. Given the inevitability of job stress in a nursing environment, and managers should plan on improving the working conditions and training techniques to deal with such stress.

  1. Affective temperament, job stress and professional burnout in nurses and civil servants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marcin Jaracz; Izabela Rosiak; Anna Bertrand-Bucińska; Maciej Jaskulski; Joanna Nieżurawska; Alina Borkowska

    2017-01-01

    .... The aim of the present study was to assess the affective temperament, the level of job stress and professional burnout, as well as the relationships between these variables, in public servants and nurses...

  2. A study to assess burnout among nurses of maternity department in Gauhati Medical College Hospital, Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marami Baishya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burnout in healthcare workers, especially among nurses, can have an impact on overall healthcare delivery system. For health in general and maternal health in particular, wellbeing of healthcare workers, including nurses, is of paramount importance. Material and methods: This study aimed to assess burnout among nurses working in the maternity department. One hundred nurses of a tertiary care centre, selected by non-purposive convenient sampling, were examined by a standardised questionnaire. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics. Results: Burnout in depersonalisation was moderate while that in emotional exhaustion and personal achievement were of low-levels. Conclusion: Understanding the nature of the problem of burnout can guide in better management.

  3. Association of goal orientation with work engagement and burnout in emergency nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jef ADRIAENSSENS; Veronique De GUCHT; Stan MAES

    2015-01-01

    .... This study explored to what extent the 4-dimensional model of goal orientation adds additional variance to the explanation of burnout and work engagement in emergency nurses, after controlling...

  4. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; Tarcan, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    ...). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution...

  5. Association of goal orientation with work engagement and burnout in emergency nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adriaenssens, Jef; De Gucht, Veronique; Maes, Stan

    2015-01-01

    ...-being. This study explored to what extent the 4-dimensional model of goal orientation adds additional variance to the explanation of burnout and work engagement in emergency nurses, after controlling...

  6. Attitudes of psychiatric nurses to treatment and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D J; Philip, A E

    1985-06-01

    A sample of 208 psychiatric nurses and nursing assistants completed a questionnaire assessing attitudes to treatment and patients. Significant attitudinal differences between groups were found in relation to professional grade, age and sex. Staff with more professional training were less authoritarian and impersonal than staff more junior in the hierarchy. Younger males with Registered Mental Nurse training were found to be significantly less inclined towards physical methods of nursing and treatment. Male nurses tended to favour therapeutic techniques which emphasized independent nurse action and psychological proximity to patients. Female nurses were more favourably inclined to physical methods of treatment and were significantly more authoritarian and formal towards patients in line with the traditional stereotype of the general hospital nurse. Results are discussed in relation to the setting up of new treatment regimes within psychiatric hospitals and the influence that staff attitudes have on their functioning.

  7. The impact of job rotation on nurses burnout in Ayatollah Kashani hospital, Tehran: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahabi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims Job burnout is one of the syndromes which is known by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and deterioration of job performance. Due to the negative impact this syndrome on patients, employees, and organization in healthcare settings this issue has drawn attention of many researchers to itself during recent years. Despite the large number of publications in this area however, limited attention has been paid to the factors influencing job burnout. The goal of the present study was to determine the level of job burnout and impacts of job rotation on nurses burnout in Ayatollah Kashani hospital , Tehran.   Methods In order to do this research a historical cohort study was done to determine degree of job burnout among nurses with and without job rotation in Ayatollah Kashani Hospital in Tehran. The number for nurses with job rotation was (n=59 and without job rotation (n=29. Data was collected via a self-report ques tionnaire. Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI was used to assess the job burnout of the subjects.   Results The overall findings revealed that nurses had low level of emotional exhaustion, low level of depersonalization and middle level of declining in personal accomplishment. No significant difference was observed between the job burnout of the tow group of nurses - with and without rotation. In comparing the level of job burnout among the nurses of different wards (i.e. between wards comparison the findings revealed that nurses of the emergency ward, had higher rate of depersonalization (P=0.012. Conclusion The nurses burnout showed to be at the medium level with respect to the personal accomplishment subscale, which seems to require a managerial intervention in this hospital. Apparently job rotation as it is done currently has no significant impact on the nurses’ job burnout in Ayatollah Kashani hospital and these researchers suggest that other alternative approaches to be consider  to be used to improve

  8. Burnout in the nursing home health care aide: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Sarah L.; Carleton, Heather L.; Chamberlain, Stephanie A.; Cummings, Greta G; Bambrick, William; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the evidence on factors that influence burnout in health care aides working in nursing homes. Design: Systematic literature review. Data sources: Two search engines (Google and EBSCO Discovery Service) and five databases (MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Proquest Dissertations & Theses) through to August 2013. Keywords: nursing home, health care aide and burnout (all synonyms were included). Methods: Two authors independently assessed methodol...

  9. Prevalence of burnout syndrome among nurses in urgency and emergency hospital system

    OpenAIRE

    Dantas, Tatiana Rodrigues da Silva; Carreiro, Bruno Oliveira; Pascoal, Francilene Figueirêdo da Silva; Moraes, Marina Nascimento de; Cordeiro, Renata Cavalcanti; Filha, Maria de Oliveira Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Objective: investigating the prevalence of Burnout among nurses in hospitals of urgency and emergency in the State of Paraiba. Method: this is a descriptive, quantitative, cross-sectional study conducted in six hospitals specialized in urgency and emergency service in the state. The sample consisted of 110 nurses. It was used as instrument the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Data were analyzed with SPSS-Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 18.0. Results: the results pointed to 65,3%...

  10. Prevalence of professional burnout and its related factors among nurses in Tabriz in 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar; Maleki, Ahdieh; Sahebihagh, Mohammad H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Burnout is a syndrome containing three dimensions of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduction of personal accomplishment. Nurses are exposed to professional burnout (PB) due to their exposure to physical, mental, and emotional stressors, which can lead to numerous complications in their personal, social, and organizational life. This study aimed to define the prevalence of PB amongst nurses working in hospitals in Tabriz and to detect its related effective factors ...

  11. Burnout among nurses working in social welfare centers for the disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahana, Eleni; Papadopoulou, Konstantina; Roumeliotou, Olga; Tsounis, Andreas; Sarafis, Pavlos; Niakas, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    In the healthcare sector, we often come across the burnout syndrome. It is an occupational syndrome which causes, physical and emotional exhaustion. More information is needed on the dangers of burnout and how often it occurs in healthcare. The purpose of this study was to investigate burnout and factors associated with the syndrome among nurses working with people that are mentally challenged. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, among 180 nurses working in public health centers for the disabled in multiple regions of Greece. A self-administered questionnaire with questions about socio-demographic and work-related characteristics was used, as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) for burnout assessment. Univariate and multivariate analyzes were performed. The burnout dimensions of emotional exhaustion (Mean = 31.36) and depersonalization (Mean = 11.27) were at high levels while personal accomplishment was at low levels (Mean = 44.02). Female nurses had a higher personal accomplishment score (Mean = 44.82, p =  0.047) than men (Mean = 42.10, p =  0.047). Marital status, daily routine and relationships with supervisors were significantly related with emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment and professional experience with higher levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Reason for professional selection was an independent predictor for depersonalization and personal accomplishment, with those that have selected the nursing profession randomly or because of the fear of unemployment having higher scores. Moderate relationships with colleagues was an independent predictor for all burnout dimensions. Nurses working in services for people with intellectual disabilities in Greece show increased burnout levels. Burnout can be prevented by offering more opportunities for professional advancement and education, new ways to provide supervisor support, provide incentives for nurses to initiate or participate in

  12. Nurse-led medication reviews in psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Mainz, Jan; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    Background : Potential inappropiate prescribing (IP) is associated with higher mortality, morbidity and risk of hospitalization. Potential IP has only been investigated in elderly populations and never in a psychiatric setting or a general population. Registered nurses are the healthprofessionals...

  13. Core self-evaluation and burnout among Nurses: the mediating role of coping styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofei; Guan, Lili; Chang, Hui; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the potential association between core self-evaluation and the burnout syndrome among Chinese nurses, and the mediating role of coping styles in this relationship. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shenyang, China, from May to July, 2013. A questionnaire which consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), the Core Self-Evaluation Scale (CSE), and the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (CSQ), was completed by a total of 1,559 nurses. Hierarchical linear regression analyses and the Sobel test were performed to determine the mediating role of coping styles on the relationship between CSE and burnout. Nurses who had higher self-evaluation characteristics, reported less emotional exhaustion and cynicism, and higher professional efficacy. Coping style had a partial mediating effect on the relationship between CSE and the burnout syndrome among nurses. Core self-evaluation had effects on burnout and coping style was a mediating factor in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Therefore, the improvement of coping strategies may be helpful in the prevention of burnout among nurses, thus enhancing professional performance.

  14. Role stress and personal resources in nursing: a cross-sectional study of burnout and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrosa, Eva; Moreno-Jiménez, Bernardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Raquel

    2011-04-01

    The experience of role stress has been linked to burnout as an important job stressor, but the impact of this stressor in the context of engagement (characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption) has not yet been sufficiently studied among nurses. Personal resources also appear to influence the process of burnout and engagement. This study examines the influence of role stress and personal resources (optimism, hardy personality and emotional competence) in nursing on burnout and engagement dimensions. Cross-sectional data from 508 nurses from general hospitals in Madrid (Spain) showed that both role stress and personal resources were related to burnout and engagement dimensions, although role stress was more closely related to nursing burnout, whereas personal resources were more closely related to nursing engagement. In addition, optimism as a personal resource, showed a moderator effect on exhaustion and the three dimensions of engagement. The study provides additional support about role stress as an important predictor of burnout and engagement in nursing, even after controlling for personal resources and socio-demographic variables. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Burnout in nurses who work in palliative care: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Rosado Mendes da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a systematic review of burnout in nurses who work in palliative care. Objectives: To investigate and to analyze the current literature on burnout in nurses of palliative care. Methods: For this systematic review we made searches in electronic databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, MEDICLATINA, SCIELO in 2009-2015. Results: The burnout affects the nurse, the patient, the family and the team. Nurses are the professional group with higher levels of fatigue and burnout. The work overload, lack of working conditions for the provision of care to the patient and family, the disorganization of work, difficulties in interpersonal relationships with peers and relatives and lack of psychological support in the institution serve as risk factors for developing this syndrome. The mutual affection and support within the team, recognition of his work, seeing the benefit of actions/quality of life and well- -being in patients and family are protective factors. To support policies of hospital workers increase satisfaction levels and help in preventing burnout. Conclusions: There is burnout in nurses in palliative care but at lower levels than nurses working in other services.

  16. Core Self-Evaluation and Burnout among Nurses: The Mediating Role of Coping Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofei; Guan, Lili; Chang, Hui; Zhang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to determine the potential association between core self-evaluation and the burnout syndrome among Chinese nurses, and the mediating role of coping styles in this relationship. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shenyang, China, from May to July, 2013. A questionnaire which consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), the Core Self-Evaluation Scale (CSE), and the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (CSQ), was completed by a total of 1,559 nurses. Hierarchical linear regression analyses and the Sobel test were performed to determine the mediating role of coping styles on the relationship between CSE and burnout. Results Nurses who had higher self-evaluation characteristics, reported less emotional exhaustion and cynicism, and higher professional efficacy. Coping style had a partial mediating effect on the relationship between CSE and the burnout syndrome among nurses. Conclusions Core self-evaluation had effects on burnout and coping style was a mediating factor in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Therefore, the improvement of coping strategies may be helpful in the prevention of burnout among nurses, thus enhancing professional performance. PMID:25541990

  17. Core self-evaluation and burnout among Nurses: the mediating role of coping styles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the potential association between core self-evaluation and the burnout syndrome among Chinese nurses, and the mediating role of coping styles in this relationship. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Shenyang, China, from May to July, 2013. A questionnaire which consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS, the Core Self-Evaluation Scale (CSE, and the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (CSQ, was completed by a total of 1,559 nurses. Hierarchical linear regression analyses and the Sobel test were performed to determine the mediating role of coping styles on the relationship between CSE and burnout. RESULTS: Nurses who had higher self-evaluation characteristics, reported less emotional exhaustion and cynicism, and higher professional efficacy. Coping style had a partial mediating effect on the relationship between CSE and the burnout syndrome among nurses. CONCLUSIONS: Core self-evaluation had effects on burnout and coping style was a mediating factor in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Therefore, the improvement of coping strategies may be helpful in the prevention of burnout among nurses, thus enhancing professional performance.

  18. Burnout and psychological distress among nurses in a Nigerian tertiary health institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwaraji, F E; Aguwa, E N

    2014-03-01

    The role of nurses in the health care delivery system cannot be overemphasized. Nurses are needed at all levels of healthcare and the profession requires a lot of dedication, time and energy with regards to patient management and service delivery. This time investment and dedication to duty is likely to lead to burnout and psychological distress among the nurses. This study assesses the prevalence of burnout and psychological distress among nurses working in Nigerian tertiary health institution. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) were used to assess 210 nurses working in this health institution for symptoms of burnout and psychological distress. High levels of burnout were identified in 42.9% of the respondents in the area of emotional exhaustion, 47.6% in the area of depersonalization and 53.8% in the area of reduced personal accomplishment, while 44.1% scored positive in the GHQ-12 indicating presence of psychological distress. Prevalence of burnout and psychological distress is high among nurses.

  19. [Correlation Between Nursing Work Environment and Nurse Burnout, Job Satisfaction, and Turnover Intention in the Western Region of Mainland China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Meng; Fang, Jin-Bo

    2016-02-01

    Nurse burnout and low job satisfaction are main reasons that cause nurses to leave their current position. Improving the nursing work environment may reduce the severity of job burnout and of job dissatisfaction and thus decrease the turnover intention of nursing staff. The aim of this study was to explore the correlation between the nursing work environment and the outcome variables of burnout, job satisfaction, and turnover intention in the western region of Mainland China. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. Survey data were collected between February and December 2012 from 1,112 clinical nurses working at 83 medical, surgical, and intensive care units in 20 hospitals across the western region of Mainland China. Multistage sampling was conducted on some of the participants. The research instruments that were used included the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Nurse Job Satisfaction Scale, and the self-developed basic information and turnover intention questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19.0. The level of statistical significance was set at pwork environment, collegial nurse-physician relations earned the most favorable mean scores (3.57±0.68; total=4 points), whereas adequacy of staffing and resources earned the lowest (3.21±0.82). Over half of the participants (58.4%) reported experiencing a high level of emotional exhaustion (EE) burnout, 45.2% reported experiencing a high level of depersonalization (DP) burnout, and 24.6% reported experiencing a high level of personal accomplishment (PA) burnout. About 59% of the participants were satisfied with their work and 3.8% reported intention to leave. Participants in self-reported "favorable" work environments were less likely to report high burnout, less likely to report intention to leave, and more likely to report job satisfaction than their peers in self-reported "poor

  20. Patient satisfaction, stress and burnout in nursing personnel in emergency departments: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Risquez, M Isabel; García-Izquierdo, Mariano

    2016-07-01

    Patient satisfaction is considered a measure of the status of the interaction between health- care professionals and service users. The level of this measure indicates the quality of the care received. Burnout is a common phenomenon in nursing professionals and it is a response to the chronic occupational stress. Different studies have shown a link between patient satisfaction and stress and burnout syndrome experienced by nursing personnel in various hospital units. The main objective of this study was to analyze the associations between patients' satisfaction with emergency services and perception of work stress and burnout by the nursing professionals who looked after these patients at a group level. The study followed a descriptive and cross-sectional design; the data were collected by means of questionnaires. Emergency services at two general hospitals in Murcia (Spain). Two samples, one formed of emergency service nursing professionals (n=148) and the other formed by patients (n=390), who were grouped in 48 units of analysis. To evaluate perception of stress and burnout of the nursing personnel, we used the Spanish adaptation of the Nursing Stress Scale for hospital emergency nursing personnel, and the Spanish adaptation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, respectively. A Spanish adaptation of the La Mónica-Obsert Patient Satisfaction Scale was used to define the patients' feelings about their nursing care. Moreover, some socio-demographic variables and the length of stay in the emergency unit were included in the protocol. Before statistical analysis, the data were collated at a group level. The intraclass correlation coefficients and the Average Deviation Index support the aggregation of these data at a unit level. Neither perception of stress nor the various elements of burnout experienced by nursing staff were related to patients' levels of satisfaction. We observed a significant and positive association between stress perception among the nurses and two

  1. Epigenetics: An Emerging Framework for Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSocio, Janiece E

    2016-07-01

    The aims of this paper are to synthesize and report research findings from neuroscience and epigenetics that contribute to an emerging explanatory framework for advanced practice psychiatric nursing. Discoveries in neuroscience and epigenetics reveal synergistic mechanisms that support the integration of psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, and psychoeducation in practice. Advanced practice psychiatric nurses will benefit from an expanded knowledge base in neuroscience and epigenetics that informs and explains the scientific rationale for our integrated practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Job Satisfaction and Burnout among Intensive Care Unit Nurses and Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhren, Hilde; Ekeberg, Oivind; Stokland, Olav

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nurses and physicians working in the intensive care unit (ICU) may be exposed to considerable job stress. The study aim was to assess the level of and the relationship between (1) job satisfaction, (2) job stress, and (3) burnout symptoms. Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed at ICUs at Oslo University Hospital. 145 of 196 (74%) staff members (16 physicians and 129 nurses) answered the questionnaire. The following tools were used: job satisfaction scale (scores 10-70), modified Cooper's job stress questionnaire (scores 1-5), and Maslach burnout inventory (scores 1-5); high score in the dimension emotional exhaustion (EE) indicates burnout. Personality was measured with the basic character inventory. Dimensions were neuroticism (vulnerability), extroversion (intensity), and control/compulsiveness with the range 0-9. Results. Mean job satisfaction among nurses was 43.9 (42.4-45.4) versus 51.1 (45.3-56.9) among physicians, P burnout value (EE) was 2.3 (95% CI 2.2-2.4), and mean job stress was 2.6 (2.5-2.7), not significantly different between nurses and physicians. Females scored higher than males on vulnerability, 3.3 (2.9-3.7) versus 2.0 (1.1-2.9) (P Burnout (EE) correlated with job satisfaction (r = -0.4, P Burnout mean scores are relatively low, but high burnout scores are correlated with vulnerable personality, low job satisfaction, and high degree of job stress.

  3. The Correlation of Nurses' job Burnout and Their Social Responsibility Considering the Role of Control Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyhane Izedi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Job burnout is an occupational hazard that reduces physical and mental energy of the staff. This study was aimed to investigate the relationship between the nurses' job burnout and their social responsibility considering the moderating role of control locus. Methods: In an analytical and cross-sectional study we used 3 valid questionnaires including Maslach burnout inventory, Dynson social responsibility and Rotter locus of control in 3 educational hospitals of Yazd, Iran. A total of 246 nurses contributed in the study. Data analysis was done through SPSS19. We used Pearson and Kendall correlation coefficient in data analysis. Findings: The mean scores of job burnout and social responsibility of studied group were 60.75 +8.37 and 71.84+15.47, respectively. Job burnout is negatively correlated with social responsibility statistically (r= -0.250 while locus of control acts as the moderator of this correlation. Conclusion: Our results suggest that creating a supportive work environment for nurses enhances their social responsibility trough affecting their level of job burnout. Also, the approved moderating role of control locus in the relationship of job burnout and social responsibility indicates that the personality traits can be considered as the appropriate criteria for entry to nursing schools.

  4. [Prevalence of burnout syndrome in nursing staff in a large hospital in south of Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Davi de Souza; Magnago, Renata Faverzani; Sakae, Thiago Mamôru; Magajewski, Flávio Ricardo Liberali

    2009-07-01

    Burnout syndrome is a chronic adaptive disorder that affects workers and is characterized by three forms of psychological distress: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of low personal fulfillment. A cross-sectional quantitative design was used to apply questionnaires including socio-cultural data and the Maslach Burnout Inventory in 151 nurses and nurse technicians, representing 54.1% of this professional category in a large general hospital in Tubarão, Santa Catarina State, Brazil. Mean scores were: emotional exhaustion (17), depersonalization (7.79), and low personal fulfillment (36.6). According to the criterion proposed by Ramirez et al., no cases of burnout were diagnosed. According to the criteria by Grunfeld et al., 35.7% of the interviewees displayed burnout. The standard profile of workers with burnout identified in the study was: nurse technicians, female gender, age 26-35 years, married, with no children, and with five or more years in the profession. Hospital wards or areas with the highest proportion of nursing staff with burnout were the grouped hospital sectors (42.6%), ICU (25.9%), and neonatal ICU (18.5%). There was no statistically significant association between ward or hospital area and burnout.

  5. Perceptions of Burnout, Its Prevention, and Its Effect on Patient Care as Described by Oncology Nurses in the Hospital Setting
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    To identify overall perceptions of burnout within the inpatient oncology nursing population, how they perceived that burnout affected the care they provided, and how they perceived that burnout could be decreased.
. A quantitative descriptive study using questionnaires to describe perceptions of burnout.
. A university-affiliated hospital using inpatient oncology nurses from three nursing units at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Presbyterian in Pennsylvania.
. A convenience sample of 61 nurses. 
. Two instruments were used to investigate various aspects about perceptions of burnout among inpatient oncology nurses. Nurses participated on an anonymous voluntary basis by completing these instruments. 
. Perceived burnout, perception of how burnout affects care provided to patients, and strategies to relieve burnout.
. Inpatient oncology nurses report a moderate level of perceived burnout. In addition, this nursing population perceived that this burnout had a negative impact on the care they provided. Nurses believed they experienced burnout because of increased nurse-patient ratios and skipped or shortened lunches or breaks. However, they perceived that burnout could be prevented when adequate resources, collaboration, teamwork, and the support of family and friends existed. 
. As a result of the level of care needed by inpatients with cancer, the association between burnout experienced by nurses and how it can affect care is important to recognize. One such association identified was that a relationship existed between the nurses' interactions with patients' family, friends, or visitors and increased perceptions of burnout and depersonalization. As a result, nurses can experience increased burnout and act in a manner that lacks compassion because of emotional detachment.
. With extremely ill inpatients with cancer, nurses need to be able to manage high levels of demands from patients and their family members to provide quality and

  6. Affective temperament, job stress and professional burnout in nurses and civil servants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Jaracz

    Full Text Available The risk of professional burnout is constituted by job-related as well as individual factors. The latter involve affective temperament, which influences the perception of job-related stress. The aim of the present study was to assess the affective temperament, the level of job stress and professional burnout, as well as the relationships between these variables, in public servants and nurses.100 civil servants and 100 nurses were enrolled in the study. Affective temperament and burnout were assessed by means of TEMPS-A and MBI questionnaires, respectively. To measure the level of job-related stress, we have designed a 6-item self-reported questionnaire, which considered stressors common for both professions.Compared to the civil servants, nurses showed higher rate of anxious temperament and experienced greater intensity of job-related stress. The groups did not differ in the intensity of burnout symptoms. The rates of cyclothymic and anxious temperaments correlated with the intensity of stress, and burnout symptoms in the group of nurses. Within the civil servants group, the level of stress correlated with intensity of burnout, however no correlations with affective temperament were observed. The regression analysis performed in both groups revealed the significant effect of stress and cyclothymic temperament on burnout, while the effect of anxious temperament was not significant.Cyclothymic and anxious temperaments are related to the level of experienced job stress and the risk of burnout. In professions like nursing, where employees show elevated rates of these temperaments, burnout prevention and stress management education is of particular importance.

  7. Affective temperament, job stress and professional burnout in nurses and civil servants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaracz, Marcin; Rosiak, Izabela; Bertrand-Bucińska, Anna; Jaskulski, Maciej; Nieżurawska, Joanna; Borkowska, Alina

    2017-01-01

    The risk of professional burnout is constituted by job-related as well as individual factors. The latter involve affective temperament, which influences the perception of job-related stress. The aim of the present study was to assess the affective temperament, the level of job stress and professional burnout, as well as the relationships between these variables, in public servants and nurses. 100 civil servants and 100 nurses were enrolled in the study. Affective temperament and burnout were assessed by means of TEMPS-A and MBI questionnaires, respectively. To measure the level of job-related stress, we have designed a 6-item self-reported questionnaire, which considered stressors common for both professions. Compared to the civil servants, nurses showed higher rate of anxious temperament and experienced greater intensity of job-related stress. The groups did not differ in the intensity of burnout symptoms. The rates of cyclothymic and anxious temperaments correlated with the intensity of stress, and burnout symptoms in the group of nurses. Within the civil servants group, the level of stress correlated with intensity of burnout, however no correlations with affective temperament were observed. The regression analysis performed in both groups revealed the significant effect of stress and cyclothymic temperament on burnout, while the effect of anxious temperament was not significant. Cyclothymic and anxious temperaments are related to the level of experienced job stress and the risk of burnout. In professions like nursing, where employees show elevated rates of these temperaments, burnout prevention and stress management education is of particular importance.

  8. Relationship of workplace incivility, stress, and burnout on nurses' turnover intentions and psychological empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeleye, Olubunmi; Hanson, Patricia; O'Connor, Nancy; Dunn, Deborah

    2013-10-01

    This study explored the relationships among perceived workplace incivility, stress, burnout, perceived turnover intentions, and perceived level of psychological empowerment among acute care nurses (medical-surgical and critical care) in community and tertiary hospitals through the lens of complexity science. An exploratory study was conducted, and findings demonstrate significant relationships among workplace incivility, stress, burnout, turnover intentions, total years of nursing experience, and RN education levels. Creating targeted retention strategies and policies that will be sensitive to the needs and interests of nurses at high risk for leaving their organizations is imperative for nurse executives.

  9. Prevalence and relationship between burnout, job satisfaction, stress, and clinical manifestations in Spanish critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa Iglesias, Marta Elena; Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Stress, burnout, and job satisfaction have become increasingly important in nursing environments over the last 20 years. For critical care nurses, the work environment is extremely stressful, even for the best-prepared professional. The aims of this study were to measure the prevalence of burnout syndrome, job satisfaction, job stress, and clinical manifestations of stress and to demonstrate the relationship between these variables among Spanish critical care nurses with a convenience sample of 74. Results showed a moderate frequency of nursing stress, high frequency of emotional exhaustion, and negative evaluation of career accompanied by moderate development of negative attitudes toward patients (depersonalization). Other findings are also presented.

  10. Determinants of burnout in acute and critical care military nursing personnel: a cross-sectional study from Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayala, Elizabeth; Carnero, Andrés M

    2013-01-01

    Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive...

  11. A qualitative study of factors influencing psychiatric nursing practice in Australian prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J

    1999-01-01

    Factors influencing the practice of psychiatric nursing in Australian prisons. A qualitative study of psychiatric nurses (N = 30) working in a prison. The psychiatric nurses identified the following factors as influencing their work: challenging patients, threats to personal survival of patients, the technology and artifice of confinement, conflicting values of nurses and corrections staff, stigma by association, and prisoner identification of the nurses with prison administration. Psychiatric nurses who work in forensic settings must adapt to less than optimal practice conditions.

  12. Demographics and Personality Factors Associated with Burnout among Nurses in a Singapore Tertiary Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Shin Yuh; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Ayre, Tracy Carol; Uthaman, Thendral; Fong, Kuan Yok; Tien, Choo Eng; Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of burnout among nurses in Singapore and investigate the influence of demographic factors and personal characteristics on the burnout syndrome. Methods. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted. All registered nurses working in Singapore General Hospital were approached to participate. A questionnaire eliciting data on demographics, burnout (measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI), and personality profile (measured using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, NEO-FFI) was used. Results. 1830 nurses out of 3588 responded (response rate: 51%). Results from 1826 respondents were available for analysis. The MBI identified 39% to have high emotional exhaustion (EE, cut-off score of >27), 40% having high depersonalization (DP, cut-off score of >10), and 59% having low personal accomplishment (PA, cut-off score of nurses less than 30 years with high to very high neuroticism were more likely to experience high EE, high DP, and low PA. Conclusion. Younger nurses in Singapore are at increased risk of burnout. Personality traits also played a significant role in the experience of burnout.

  13. Demographics and Personality Factors Associated with Burnout among Nurses in a Singapore Tertiary Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yuh Ang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of burnout among nurses in Singapore and investigate the influence of demographic factors and personal characteristics on the burnout syndrome. Methods. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted. All registered nurses working in Singapore General Hospital were approached to participate. A questionnaire eliciting data on demographics, burnout (measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI, and personality profile (measured using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, NEO-FFI was used. Results. 1830 nurses out of 3588 responded (response rate: 51%. Results from 1826 respondents were available for analysis. The MBI identified 39% to have high emotional exhaustion (EE, cut-off score of >27, 40% having high depersonalization (DP, cut-off score of >10, and 59% having low personal accomplishment (PA, cut-off score of <33. In multivariable analysis, age, job grade, and neuroticism were significantly associated with each of the 3 components of the MBI. Staff nurses less than 30 years with high to very high neuroticism were more likely to experience high EE, high DP, and low PA. Conclusion. Younger nurses in Singapore are at increased risk of burnout. Personality traits also played a significant role in the experience of burnout.

  14. The factors associated with the burnout syndrome and fatigue in Cypriot nurses: a census report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raftopoulos Vasilios

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue and burnout are two concepts often linked in the literature. However, regardless of their commonalities they should be approached as distinct concepts. The current and ever-growing reforms regarding the delivery of nursing care in Cyprus, stress for the development of ways to prevent burnout and effectively manage fatigue that can result from working in stressful clinical environments. Methods To explore the factors associated with the burnout syndrome in Cypriot nurses working in various clinical departments. A random sampling method taking into account geographical location, specialty and type of employment has been used. Results A total of 1,482 nurses (80.4% were females working both in the private and public sectors completed and returned an anonymous questionnaire that included several aspects related to burnout; the MBI scale, questions related to occupational stress, and questions pertaining to self reported fatigue. Two-thirds (65.1% of the nurses believed that their job is stressful with the majority reporting their job as stressful being female nurses (67.7%. Twelve point eight percent of the nurses met Maslach’s criteria for burnout. The prevalence of fatigue in nurses was found 91.9%. The prevalence of fatigue was higher in females (93% than in males (87.5% (p = 0.003. As opposed to the burnout prevalence, fatigue prevalence did not differ among the nursing departments (p = 0.166 and among nurses with a different marital status (p = 0.553. Burnout can be associated adequately knowing if nurses find their job stressful, their age, the level of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. It has been shown that the fatigue may be thought of as a predictor of burnout, but its influence is already accounted by emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Conclusion The clinical settings in Cyprus appear as stress generating environment for nurses. Nurses working both in the private and public

  15. The factors associated with the burnout syndrome and fatigue in Cypriot nurses: a census report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftopoulos, Vasilios; Charalambous, Andreas; Talias, Michael

    2012-06-20

    Fatigue and burnout are two concepts often linked in the literature. However, regardless of their commonalities they should be approached as distinct concepts. The current and ever-growing reforms regarding the delivery of nursing care in Cyprus, stress for the development of ways to prevent burnout and effectively manage fatigue that can result from working in stressful clinical environments. To explore the factors associated with the burnout syndrome in Cypriot nurses working in various clinical departments. A random sampling method taking into account geographical location, specialty and type of employment has been used. A total of 1,482 nurses (80.4% were females) working both in the private and public sectors completed and returned an anonymous questionnaire that included several aspects related to burnout; the MBI scale, questions related to occupational stress, and questions pertaining to self reported fatigue. Two-thirds (65.1%) of the nurses believed that their job is stressful with the majority reporting their job as stressful being female nurses (67.7%). Twelve point eight percent of the nurses met Maslach's criteria for burnout. The prevalence of fatigue in nurses was found 91.9%. The prevalence of fatigue was higher in females (93%) than in males (87.5%) (p = 0.003). As opposed to the burnout prevalence, fatigue prevalence did not differ among the nursing departments (p = 0.166) and among nurses with a different marital status (p = 0.553). Burnout can be associated adequately knowing if nurses find their job stressful, their age, the level of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. It has been shown that the fatigue may be thought of as a predictor of burnout, but its influence is already accounted by emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. The clinical settings in Cyprus appear as stress generating environment for nurses. Nurses working both in the private and public sector appear to experience low to severe burnout. Self

  16. Compassion Fatigue in Psychiatric Nursing: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Uslu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a systematic compilation study which aimed to determine whether psychiatry nurses were fatigue of compassion, or not. The screening of several databases revealed four articles fulfilling inclusion criteria of the study. While three of the articles examined were descriptive; one was in cross-sectional pattern. Along the inclusion criterions, no any Turkish article was determined regarding the subject. In these articles, compassion fatigue concept has usually been considered with “compassion satisfaction and burnout” concepts. According to the findings of aforesaid articles, it was determined that compassion satisfaction of psychiatry nurses was at low level; that their compassion fatigue and burnout levels were high; and as well that they showed post-traumatic stress symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(4.000: 421-420

  17. [Nursing perspective on psychiatric care in Ivory Coast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Dan

    2017-05-01

    Michaël Bilson is a nurse at the psychiatric hospital of Bingerville, in Ivory Coast. Here, he describes his mission supporting the National Health Worker Training Institute. It is the only nurse training school in Ivory Coast. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Burnout in health-care professionals during reorganizations and downsizing. A cohort study in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordang, Kirsten; Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise; Farup, Per G

    2010-06-04

    Burnout is a psychological reaction triggered by interaction between personal characteristics and stress factors. Reorganizations and downsizing with increased workload imply stress for health-care professionals. This is a study of burnout in nurses during a period with two comprehensive reorganizations. In this quasi-experimental retrospective cohort study, burnout was assessed in nurses with long work experience in three surveys during a 30 months' period with two comprehensive reorganizations and downsizing of a hospital unit with mostly seriously ill patients with cancer. Burnout was measured with Bergen Burnout Indicator (BBI) at each survey, and "Sense of Coherence" (SOC) with Antonovsky's questionnaire at the last survey. One man and 45 women aged 30 to 65 years were invited to the surveys. There was a significant increase in burnout during the study period, the mean increase in BBI-score was 12.5 pr year (p downsizing. Burnout was associated with low SOC. Working with seriously ill patients with cancer has probably made the nurses exceptionally vulnerable to the stress and workload related to the reorganizations.

  19. Understanding the domestic rupture in forensic psychiatric nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jean Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the tensions that exist between care and custody in correctional environments by presenting the (im)possibilities of psychiatric nursing practice within this context. The analysis will be guided by empirical data obtained from a qualitative research conducted in a correctional setting. Semistructured interviews with nurses were conducted and used as the primary source of data for analysis. This article will explore the contextual characteristics of psychiatric nursing practice in correctional settings, describe the alienating effects of this context on nursing practice, theorize nurses' experience using Festinger's theory on cognitive dissonance, and, finally, explore how some nurses engage in the reconstruction of their care to counter the effects of working in correctional settings.

  20. The Psychiatric Family Nurse Practitioner: A Collaborator in Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Patricia D.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner (Psych.F.N.P.) to contribute to family practice through physical care and mental health care exists in the here and now. This role is a synthesis of 2 advanced practice roles, the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist (Psych.C.N.S.) and family nurse practitioner (F.N.P.), both of which continue to have great utility independently. This synthesis is a practical application of concepts that have evolved to meet the changing patterns of ...

  1. Work stress, occupational burnout and depression levels: a clinical study of paediatric intensive care unit nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ching; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Cheng, Su-Fen; Wu, Li-Min; Ou-Yang, Mei-Chen

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between work stress and depression; and investigate the mediating effect of occupational burnout among nurses in paediatric intensive care units. The relationships among work stress, occupational burnout and depression level have been explored, neither regarding occupational burnout as the mediating role that causes work stress to induce depression nor considering the paediatric intensive care unit context. A cross-sectional correlational design was conducted. One hundred and forty-four female paediatric intensive care unit nurses from seven teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan were recruited as the participants. Data were collected by structured questionnaires including individual demographics, the Nurse Stress Checklist, the Occupational Burnout Inventory and the Taiwan Depression Questionnaire. The results indicated that after controlling for individual demographic variables, the correlations of work stress with occupational burnout, as well as work stress and occupational burnout with depression level were all positive. Furthermore, occupational burnout may exert a partial mediating effect on the relationship between work stress and depression level. This study provides information about work stress, occupational burnout and depression level, and their correlations, as well as the mediating role of occupational burnout among paediatric intensive care unit nurses. It suggests government departments and hospital administrators when formulating interventions to prevent work stress and occupational burnout. These interventions can subsequently prevent episodes of depression in paediatric intensive care unit nurses, thereby providing patients with a safe and high-quality nursing environment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Is it possible to strengthen psychiatric nursing staff's clinical supervision?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of a meta-supervision intervention in terms of participation, effectiveness and benefits of clinical supervision of psychiatric nursing staff. BACKGROUND: Clinical supervision is regarded as a central component in developing mental health nursing practices, but the evidence...... supporting positive outcomes of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing is not convincing. DESIGN: The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. All permanently employed nursing staff members at three general psychiatric wards at a Danish university hospital (n = 83) were allocated to either...... on individuals or wards already actively engaged in clinical supervision, which suggested that individuals and wards without well-established supervision practices may require more comprehensive interventions targeting individual and organizational barriers to clinical supervision....

  3. Vulnerability to burnout within the nursing workforce-The role of personality and interpersonal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuens, Nina; Van Bogaert, Peter; Franck, Erik

    2017-12-01

    To study the combination of personality and interpersonal behaviour of staff nurses in general hospitals in relation to burnout and its separate dimensions. More research on the individual factors contributing to the development of burnout is needed to improve the risk profile of nursing staff. Therefore, a combination of Leary's interpersonal circumplex model, which depicts the interpersonal behaviour trait domain, and the five-factor model was considered in the study at hand. A cross-sectional research method was applied using self-report questionnaires. A total of 880 Belgian general hospital nurses were invited to participate in the study. Data were collected from November 2012-July 2013. The questionnaire consisted of three validated self-report instruments: the NEO five-factor inventory, the Dutch Interpersonal Behaviour Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Of the 880 nurses invited to participate, 587 (67%) returned the questionnaire. Sex, neuroticism, submissive-friendly behaviour, dominant-friendly behaviour and vector length were found to be predictive factors for emotional exhaustion. For depersonalisation, sex, neuroticism, conscientiousness, friendly behaviour, submissive-friendly behaviour, dominant-hostile behaviour and vector length were predictive factors. Finally, personal accomplishment was determined by neuroticism, openness, conscientiousness, and hostile behaviour. This study confirmed the influence of the Big Five personality factors on the separate dimensions of burnout. Interpersonal behaviour made a significant contribution to the predictive capacity of the regression models of all three dimensions of burnout. Additional longitudinal research is required to confirm the causal relationship between these individual factors and burnout. The results of this study can help to achieve a better understanding of which vulnerabilities an individual prevention programme for burnout should target. In addition, hospitals could use assessment

  4. Prevalence of burnout syndrome in clinical nurses at a hospital of excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Vivian F; Filho, Celso Ferreira; Valenti, Vitor E; Ferreira, Marcelo; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; de Carvalho, Tatiana Dias; Xavier, Valdelias; de Oliveira Filho, JapyAngeli; Gregory, Pedro; Leão, Eliseth Ribeiro; Francisco, Natascha G; Ferreira, Celso

    2014-01-01

    Burnout syndrome can be defined as long-term work stress resulting from the interaction between constant emotional pressure associated with intense interpersonal involvement for long periods of time and personal characteristics. We investigated the prevalence/propensity of Burnout syndrome in clinical nurses, and the factors related to Burnout syndrome-associated such as socio-demographic characteristics, work load, social and family life, leisure activities, extra work activities, physical activities, and work-related health problems. We conducted a cross-sectional, quantitative, prospective epidemiological study with 188 surgical clinic nurses. We used the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), which is a socio-demographic questionnaire and the most widely used instrument to assess Burnout syndrome (three basic dimensions: emotional exhaustion, despersonalization and professional underachievement). The socio-demographic profile questionnaire wascomposed of questions regarding identification, training, time at work, work characteristics and personal circumstances. The prevalence of Burnout syndrome was higher (10.1%) and 55, 4% of subjects had a propensity to develop this syndrome. The analysis of the socio-demographic profile of the nurse sample studied showed that most nurses were childless married women, over 35 years of age, working the day shift for 36 hours weekly on average, with 2-6 years of post-graduation experience, and without extra employments. Factors such as marital status, work load, emotion and work related stress aggravated the onset of the syndrome. The prevalence and propensity of Burnout syndrome were high. Some factors identified can be useful for the adoption of preventive actions in order to decrease the prevalence of the clinical nurses Burnout syndrome.

  5. Factors involved in nurses' responses to burnout: a grounded theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intense and long-standing problems in burn centers in Tehran have led nurses to burnout. This phenomenon has provoked serious responses and has put the nurses, patients and the organization under pressure. The challenge for managers and nurse executives is to understand the factors which would reduce or increase the nurses' responses to burnout and develop delivery systems that promote positive adaptation and facilitate quality care. This study, as a part of more extensive research, aims to explore and describe the nurses' perceptions of the factors affecting their responses to burnout. Methods Grounded theory was used as the method. Thirty- eight participants were recruited. Data were generated by unstructured interviews and 21 sessions of participant observations. Constant comparison was used for data analysis. Results Nurses' and patients' personal characteristics and social support influenced nurses' responses to burnout. Personal characteristics of the nurses and patients, especially when interacting, had a more powerful effect. They altered emotional, attitudinal, behavioral and organizational responses to burnout and determined the kind of caring behavior. Social support had a palliative effect and altered emotional responses and some aspects of attitudinal responses. Conclusions The powerful effect of positive personal characteristics and its sensitivity to long standing and intense organizational pressures suggests approaches to executing stress reduction programs and refreshing the nurses' morale by giving more importance to ethical aspects of caring. Moreover, regarding palliative effect of social support and its importance for the nurses' wellbeing, nurse executives are responsible for promoting a work environment that supports nurses and motivates them.

  6. Compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress in heart and vascular nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jennifer L; Derr, Denise M; Cicchillo, Vikki J; Bressler, Sonya

    2011-01-01

    Objectives for this project were to determine the prevalence of compassion satisfaction (CS), burnout, and secondary traumatic stress (STS) in heart and vascular nurses to confirm whether differences exist between intensive care and intermediate care nurses. The Professional Quality of Life Scale Compassion Satisfaction and Compassion Fatigue: Version 5 developed by Stamm (2009) was used. Results showed that nurses who work in the heart and vascular intermediate care unit had average to high scores of CS, low to average levels of burnout, and low to average levels of STS. Nurses who work in the heart and vascular intensive care unit had average to high levels of CS, low to average levels of burnout, and low to average levels of STS. These findings suggest that leadership should be aware of the prevalence of STS and burnout in heart and vascular nurses. Raising awareness of STS and burnout in intensive care and intermediate care nurses can help in targeting more specific strategies that may prevent the onset of developing these symptoms.

  7. [Mediator effect of resilience between burnout and health in nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrogante, Óscar

    2014-01-01

    To determine the relationships between 3 burnout dimensions (Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization, and Reduced Personal Accomplishment), health (physical and mental health), and resilience, as well as to analyse the mediator role of resilience in relationships between burnout and health in a sample of Nursing staff. A correlational and cross-sectional study with probabilistic sampling was conducted on a sample of 194 Nursing staff of University Hospital of Fuenlabrada (Madrid), and composed of nurses (n=133) and nursing assistants (n=61). MBI-HSS (burnout syndrome), SF-12v1 (physical and mental components of health), 10-Item CD-RISC (resilience), and sociodemographic variables. Correlational analyses showed that mental health was negatively related with 3 burnout dimensions and positively with resilience. Furthermore, physical health was only negatively related with Emotional Exhaustion, and positively with resilience. Mediational analyses revealed that resilience mediated, on one hand, the relationship between Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization with mental health (partial mediation) and, on the other hand, the relationship between Reduced Personal Accomplishment and mental health (total mediation). Resilience is not only important to improve the mental health of Nursing staff, but also to buffer and minimize the negative consequences of the occupational stress to which they are at risk, with its most adverse result being signs of burnout. Therefore, resilience training should be promoted to improve nursing clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The calm before the storm? Burnout and compassion fatigue among undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalec, Barret; Diefenbeck, Cynthia; Mahoney, Margaret

    2013-04-01

    Studies have consistently highlighted the deleterious impact of burnout and compassion fatigue on professional nurses' well-being and willingness to remain in the profession. Yet, as to what extent these noxious conditions are suffered among nursing students is still unclear. In this study 436 undergraduate nursing students completed surveys assessing their experiences of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, lack of personal accomplishment, burnout, secondary traumatic stress, and compassion satisfaction (factors of burnout and compassion fatigue). There were no significant differences found between 3rd and 4th year students' reports of detrimental conditions and those of the 1st or 2nd year students. Furthermore, 4th year students reported significantly higher levels of personal accomplishment compared to 1st and 2nd year students. Semi-structured in-depth interviews with 3rd and 4th year students revealed that their clinical exposure during these years (especially during the 4th year) may enhance their other-orientation as well as promote role actualization, which may serve as protective features. Students did, however, express concern regarding an inevitable onset of burnout at some point during their professional careers. It is suggested that a key to understanding the onset and experience of burnout and compassion fatigue among nurses is to continue to examine the transition from student to professional nurse and the cultural atmosphere of nursing education compared to professional practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Age as a Risk Factor for Burnout Syndrome in Nursing Professionals: A Meta-Analytic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Urquiza, José L; Vargas, Cristina; De la Fuente, Emilia I; Fernández-Castillo, Rafael; Cañadas-De la Fuente, Guillermo A

    2017-04-01

    Although past research has highlighted the possibility of a direct relationship between the age of nursing professionals and burnout syndrome, results have been far from conclusive. The aim of this study was to conduct a wider analysis of the influence of age on the three dimensions of burnout syndrome (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) in nurses. We performed a meta-analysis of 51 publications extracted from health sciences and psychology databases that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. There were 47 reports of information on emotional exhaustion in 50 samples, 39 reports on depersonalization for 42 samples, and 31 reports on personal accomplishment in 34 samples. The mean effect sizes indicated that younger age was a significant factor in the emotional exhaustion and depersonalization of nurses, although it was somewhat less influential in the dimension of personal accomplishment. Because of heterogeneity in the effect sizes, moderating variables that might explain the association between age and burnout were also analyzed. Gender, marital status, and study characteristics moderated the relationship between age and burnout and may be crucial for the identification of high-risk groups. More research is needed on other variables for which there were only a small number of studies. Identification of burnout risk factors will facilitate establishment of burnout prevention programs for nurses. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The role of rewards and demands in burnout among surgical nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata A. Basińska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Job rewards have both, an intrinsic and an extrinsic motivational potential, and lead to employees' development as well as help them to achieve work goals. Rewards can balance job demands and protect from burnout. Due to changes on the labour market, new studies are needed. The aim of our study was to examine the role of demands and individual rewards (and their absence in burnout among surgical nurses. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 2009 and 2010 with 263 nurses who worked in surgical wards and clinics in hospitals in Southern Poland. The hypotheses were tested by the use of measures of demands and rewards (Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire by Siegrist and burnout syndrome (Maslach Burnout Inventory. A cross-sectional, correlational study design was applied. Results: Nurses experienced the largest deficiencies in salary and prestige. Exhaustion was explained by stronger demands and lack of respect (large effect. Depersonalization was explained by stronger demands, lack of respect and greater job security (medium effect. Reduced personal achievement was explained by more demands and greater job security (small effect. Conclusions: Excessive demands and lack of esteem are key reasons for burnout among surgical nurses. Job security can increase burnout when too many resources are invested and career opportunities do not appear. These results may help to improve human resource management in the healthcare sector.

  11. The mediating effect of emotional intelligence between emotional labour, job stress, burnout and nurses' turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Eunyoung; Lee, Young Sook

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to construct and test the structural equation modelling on nurses' turnover intention including emotional labour, job stress, emotional intelligence and burnout in order to identify the mediating effect of emotional intelligence between those variables. Emotional labour, job stress and burnout increase turnover intention of nurses. However, emotional intelligence is negatively correlated with emotional labour and reduces job stress, burnout and turnover intention. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the goodness of fit of the hypothetical model of nurses' turnover intention. Research data were collected via questionnaires from 4 to 22 August 2014 and analysed using SPSS version 18.0 and AMOS version 20.0. The model fit indices for the hypothetical model were suitable for recommended. Emotional intelligence has decreasing effect on turnover intention through burnout, although its direct effect on turnover intention is not significant. Emotional intelligence has mediation effect between emotional labour and burnout. This study's results suggest that increasing emotional intelligence might critically decrease nurses' turnover intention by reducing the effect of emotional labour on burnout. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Regulatory focus and burnout in nurses: The mediating effect of perception of transformational leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Zhang, Shilei; Xu, Hang; Liu, Xufeng; Miao, Danmin

    2015-12-01

    This correlation study investigated the relationship between nurses' regulatory focus and burnout, as mediated by their perceptions of transformational leadership, using a cross-sectional research design with anonymous questionnaires. In July-August 2012, data were collected from 378 nurses from three hospitals in Shaanxi Province, China, using self-report questionnaires for measuring the nurses' regulatory focus, their level of burnout and their perception of whether the leadership of their supervisor was transformational. Structural equation modelling and bootstrapping procedures were used to identify the mediating effect of their perceptions of transformational leadership. The results supported our hypothesized model. The type of regulatory focus emerged as a significant predictor of burnout. Having a perception of transformational leadership partially mediated the relationship between regulatory focus and burnout. Having a promotion focus reduced burnout when the participants perceived transformational leadership, whereas having a prevention focus exhibited the opposite pattern. The mediating effect of the perception of transformational leadership suggests that a promotion focus may help diminish burnout, directly and indirectly. Nurse managers must be aware of the role of a regulatory focus and cultivate promotion focus in their followers. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. [Effects of nurses' mentoring on turnover intention: focused on the mediating effects role stress and burnout].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangsook; Kim, Ohsook; Joo, Yunsu; Choi, Eunduck; Han, Jeongwon

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the casual relationship between nurses' mentoring and turnover intention and to verify the goodness of fit between a hypothetical model and actual data in order to suggest an adequate model. The survey was conducted with 434 nurses working in general hospitals in Seoul. Data were collected during February 2013, and analyzed with SPSS Windows 18.0 and AMOS 7.0. Mentoring was found to have a direct effect on decrease in role stress. Role stress had a direct effect on increase in burnout and mentoring, with role stress as a mediator, there was an indirect effect on burnout. Burnout had a direct effect on increase in turnover intention, and role stress, with burnout as a mediator, and mentoring, through role stress and burnout, an indirect effect was found on increase in turnover intention. The results of this study indicate that nursing managers should put effort into reducing role stress and burnout, while seeking to establish a more efficient mentoring system so that for nurses, there will be a lowering of turnover intention.

  14. Noise-induced stress as a predictor of burnout in critical care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topf, M; Dillon, E

    1988-09-01

    In this study we found that, for 100 critical care nurses, noise-induced occupational stress was positively related to burnout as measured by Jones's Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (r = 0.369, p less than 0.001) and the emotional exhaustion subscale of Maslach's Burnout Inventory (r = 0.300, p less than 0.01). Hierarchical multiple regressions confirmed these results once variance in burnout linked with life stressors and other occupational stressors was accounted for. Furthermore, an interaction term, noise-induced stress X intrinsic sensitivity to noise in the person, did not account for significant variance in burnout once independent variance linked with noise-induced stress was identified. That is, nurses with intrinsic sensitivity to noise were no more at risk for burnout linked with noise-induced stress than were less sensitive nurses. This result is discussed as evidence that there are exceptionally high levels of noise in critical care units. The critical care unit noises that are most distressing to nurses are identified and discussed in terms of stress theory.

  15. Structural empowerment and burnout among Portuguese nursing staff: An explicative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgambídez-Ramos, Alejandro; Borrego-Alés, Yolanda; Vázquez-Aguado, Octavio; March-Amegual, Jaume

    2017-11-01

    Kanter's structural empowerment model was used to assess the influence of access to opportunities, resources, information and support on core burnout through global empowerment in a nursing sample in Portugal. The empowerment experience increases the levels of nursing professionals' satisfaction and performance preventing the emergence of burnout. However, the relationship between structural empowerment and burnout has been scarcely studied in Portugal. We conducted a cross-sectional correlational study assessing a final sample of 297 participants (62.13% response rate, 63.64% women). Model fit and mediation test were examined using structural equation modelling (path analysis). Access to opportunities and access to support had direct impact, through global empowerment, on core burnout, whereas access to resources had both direct and indirect impact on core burnout. The results validated the structural empowerment model and its application in nursing staff in Portugal. Professional training plans, the development of formal and informal support networks, and the availability of resources increase the levels of empowerment and decrease the likelihood of experiencing burnout in nursing professionals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Ideology of nursing care in child psychiatric inpatient treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellilä, Heikki; Välimäki, Maritta; Warne, Tony; Sourander, Andre

    2007-09-01

    Research on nursing ideology and the ethics of child and adolescent psychiatric nursing care is limited. The aim of this study was to describe and explore the ideological approaches guiding psychiatric nursing in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient wards in Finland, and discuss the ethical, theoretical and practical concerns related to nursing ideologies. Data were collected by means of a national questionnaire survey, which included one open-ended question seeking managers' opinions on the nursing ideology used in their area of practice. Questionnaires were sent to all child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient wards (n = 69) in Finland; 61 ward managers responded. Data were analysed by qualitative and quantitative content analysis. Six categories -- family centred care, individual care, milieu centred care, integrated care, educational care and psychodynamic care -- were formed to specify ideological approaches used in inpatient nursing. The majority of the wards were guided by two or more approaches. Nursing models, theories and codes of ethics were almost totally ignored in the ward managers' ideological descriptions.

  17. The environment of professional practice and Burnout in nurses in primary healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Regina Lorenz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to assess how nurses perceive autonomy, control over the environment, the professional relationship between nurses and physicians and the organizational support and correlate them with burnout, satisfaction at work, quality of work and the intention to quit work in primary healthcare.METHOD: cross-sectional and correlation study, using a sample of 198 nurses. The tools used were the Nursing Work Index Revised, Maslach Burnout Inventory and a form to characterize the nurses. To analyze the data, descriptive statistics were applied and Spearman's correlation coefficient was used.RESULTS: the nurses assessed that the environment is partially favorable for: autonomy, professional relationship and organizational support and that the control over this environment is limited. Significant correlations were evidenced between the Nursing Work Index Revised, Maslach Burnout Inventory and the variables: satisfaction at work, quality of care and the intent to quit the job.CONCLUSION: the nurses' perceptions regarding the environment of practice are correlated with burnout, satisfaction at work, quality of care and the intent to quit the job. This study provides support for the restructuring of work processes in the primary health care environment and for communication among the health service management, human resources and occupational health areas.

  18. Moral distress and Burnout syndrome: are there relationships between these phenomena in nursing workers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziele de Lima Dalmolin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify relationships between moral distress and Burnout in the professional performance from the perceptions of the experiences of nursing workers. METHODS: this is a survey type study with 375 nursing workers working in three different hospitals of southern Rio Grande do Sul, with the application of adaptations of the Moral Distress Scale and the Maslach Burnout Inventory, validated and standardized for use in Brazil. Data validation occurred through factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha. For the data analysis bivariate analysis using Pearson's correlation and multivariate analysis using multiple regression were performed. RESULTS: the existence of a weak correlation between moral distress and Burnout was verified. A possible positive correlation between Burnout and therapeutic obstinacy, and a negative correlation between professional fulfillment and moral distress were identified. CONCLUSION: the need was identified for further studies that include mediating and moderating variables that may explain more clearly the models studied.

  19. Relationship between musculoskeletal disorders, job demands, and burnout among emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorour, Amany Sobhy; El-Maksoud, Mona M Abd

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) represent one of the most common occupational problems in nursing. MSDs can negatively impact one's quality of life. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between MSDs, job demands, and burnout among emergency nurses. The researchers hypothesized that increased job demands were associated with more MSDs and consequently higher levels of burnout. The study was conducted on a convenience sample of 58 nurses working in the emergency departments of Zagazig University Hospital and Al-Ahrar, Hospital Egypt from October to December 2010, using a cross-sectional analytic design. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire that included the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire, the Job Content Questionnaire, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The results revealed that 32.8% of the nurses were overweight and 17.2% were obese. The most common sites of pain were the neck (67.2%), shoulder (65.5%), and lower back (63.8%). Lower back pain was the most common site affected (72.4%) with a mean 5.1 on a scale ranging from 0 to 13. A positive correlation existed between the scores of job demand and burnout (r = 0.340, p burnout whereas the job demand score was the independent predictor of the number of MSDs. This study documents an increased prevalence of MSDs among emergency nurses, as predicted by increased job demand and associated with a higher level of burnout. Hence, it is important for hospital and nursing administrators to address the factors contributing to job stress and burnout, with emphasis on job satisfaction and work organization to alleviate the burden of psychosocial factors in this setting.

  20. Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction Among Oncology Nurses in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stacey; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Odell, Annie; Reynolds, Grace; Su, Yuhua

    2016-07-01

    To examine the experiences of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction among oncology nurses in the United States and Canada. 
. Quantitative, descriptive, nonexperimental.
. Online survey with members from the Canadian Association of Nursing Oncology and the Oncology Nursing Society.
. 486 American and 63 Canadian practicing oncology nurses.
. The Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) scale, version 5, and modified Abendroth Demographic Questionnaire were administered through FluidSurveys™, an online data collection instrument. Chi-square tests of independence were used to investigate associations between demographic characteristics, health, personal stressors, and work-related characteristics to experiences of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction. Compassion fatigue was measured using the subscales of secondary traumatic stress and burnout. 
. Compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction.
. Demographic characteristics were similar in American and Canadian participants, and both cohorts reported comparable levels of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction. Perception of team cohesiveness within the workplace environment was found to be significant for both groups, as indicated by significant relationships in all three subscales of secondary traumatic stress, burnout, and compassion satisfaction in the ProQOL.
. Healthy and supportive work environments are imperative to nurses' health, well-being, and satisfaction. Improvements in the workplace can help prevent negative sequelae, as well as improve health outcomes for patients and nurses, decrease nurse turnover, and reduce healthcare expenditures. 
. Findings can be used to implement institutional changes, such as creating policies and guidelines for the development of preventive interventions and psychosocial support for nurses.

  1. Nursing diagnoses related to psychiatric adult inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfelder, Fritz; van Achterberg, Theo; Müller Staub, Maria

    2018-02-01

    To detect the prevalence of NANDA-I diagnoses and possible relationships between those and patient characteristics such as gender, age, medical diagnoses and psychiatric specialty/setting. There is a lack on studies about psychiatric inpatient characteristics and possible relationships among these characteristics with nursing diagnoses. A quantitative-descriptive, cross-sectional, completed data sampling study was performed. The data were collected from the electronic patient record system. Frequencies for the social-demographic data, the prevalence of the NANDA-I diagnoses and the explanatory variables were calculated. In total, 410 nursing phenomena were found representing 85 different NANDA-I diagnoses in 312 patients. The NANDA-I diagnosis "Ineffective Coping" was the most frequently stated diagnosis followed by "Ineffective Health Maintenance," "Hopelessness" and "Risk for Other-Directed Violence". Men were more frequently affected by the diagnoses "Ineffective Coping," "Hopelessness," "Risk for Self-Directed Violence," "Defensive Coping" and "Risk for Suicide," whereas the diagnoses "Insomnia," "Chronic Confusion," "Chronic Low Self-Esteem" and "Anxiety" were more common in women. Patients under the age of 45 years were more frequently affected by "Chronic Low Self-Esteem" and "Anxiety" than older patients. "Ineffective Coping" was the most prevalent diagnosis by patients with mental disorders due to psychoactive substance use. Patients with schizophrenia were primarily affected by the diagnoses "Ineffective Coping," "Impaired Social Interaction" and "Chronic Low Self-Esteem." This study demonstrates the complexity and diversity of nursing care in inpatient psychiatric settings. Patients' gender, age and psychiatric diagnoses and settings are a key factor for specific nursing diagnosis. There are tendencies for relationships between certain nursing diagnosis and patient characteristics in psychiatric adult inpatients. This enhances the specific, extended

  2. Association between low empathy and high burnout among primary care physicians and nurses in Lleida, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuguero, Oriol; Ramon Marsal, Josep; Esquerda, Montserrat; Vivanco, Luis; Soler-González, Jorge

    2017-12-01

    Burnout is a growing problem among healthcare professionals and may be mitigated and even prevented by measures designed to promote empathy and resilience. We studied the association between burnout and empathy in primary care practitioners in Lleida, Spain and investigated possible differences according to age, sex, profession, and place of practice (urban versus rural). All general practitioners (GPs) and family nurses in the health district of Lleida (population 366 000) were asked by email to anonymously complete the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) between May and July 2014. Tool consistency was evaluated by Cronbach's α, the association between empathy and burnout by Spearman's correlation coefficient, and the association between burnout and empathy and sociodemographic variables by the χ 2 test. One hundred and thirty-six GPs and 131 nurses (52.7% response rate) from six urban and 16 rural practices participated (78.3% women); 33.3% of respondents had low empathy, while 3.7% had high burnout. The MBI and JSPE were correlated (P empathy (P empathy. Although burnout was relatively uncommon in our sample, it was associated with low levels of empathy. This finding and our observation of lower empathy levels in rural settings require further investigation. [Box: see text].

  3. [Comparative study of burnout in Intensive Care and Emergency Care nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos Risquez, M I; Godoy Fernández, C; Peñalver Hernández, F; Alonso Tovar, A R; López Alcaraz, F; López Romera, A; Garnés González, S; Salmerón Saura, E; López Real, M D; Ruiz Sánchez, R; Simón Domingo, P; Manzanera Nicolás, J L; Menchón Almagro, M A; Liébanas Bellón, R

    2008-01-01

    To assess and compare the burnout level between Intensive Care Unit and Emergency Unit, and study its association with the sociodemographic and work characteristics of the professionals surveyed. Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Emplacement. Intensive Care Unit of the university hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia-Spain. STUDIED SAMPLE: 97 nursing professionals: 55 professionals belong to the Emergency Department, and 42 professionals belong to the Intensive Care Department. Two evaluation tools were used: a sociodemographic and work survey, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory, 1986. Quantitative variables expressed as mean +/- SD compared with the Student's T test and qualitative variables compared with the chi2 test. SPSS 12.0(c). The comparative analysis of the burnout dimensions shows that emotional exhaustion level is significantly higher in the intensive care service than in the emergency one (25.45 +/- 11.15 vs 22.09 +/- 10.99) p burnout dimensions do not show significant differences between both departments. The masculine gender obtains a higher score in the depersonalization dimension of burnout (10.12 +/- 5.38) than female one (6.7 +/- 5.21) p burnout levels are moderate to high among the nursing professionals studied. A total of 5.15% of the sample studied achieves a high score in the three dimensions of the burnout syndrome. The intensive care professionals are the most vulnerable to suffering high levels of emotional exhaustion, and the masculine gender is more susceptible to depersonalization attitudes.

  4. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; Tarcan, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-03-01

    Studies on the topic of burnout measure the effects of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) (negative or cynical attitudes toward work), and reduced sense of personal accomplishment (PA). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution. The aim of this study was to assess burnout differences across EM professional types.The total population of 250 EM professionals at 2 public urban hospitals in Turkey were surveyed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and basic social- and work-related demographics. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and additional post hoc tests were computed.Findings show that EE and DP scores were high across all occupational groups, while scores on PA were low. There was a statistically significant difference between nurses and medical technicians (P Burnout can be high across occupational groups in the emergency department. Burnout is important for EM administrators to assess across human resources. Statistically significant differences across socio-demographic groups vary across occupational groups. However, differences between occupational groups may not be explained effectively by the demographic factors assessed in this or other prior studies. Rather, the factors associated with burnout are incomplete and require further institutional, cultural, and organizational analyses including differentiating between job tasks carried out by each EM job type.

  5. Comparing Burnout Across Emergency Physicians, Nurses, Technicians, and Health Information Technicians Working for the Same Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Schooley, Benjamin; Hikmet, Neset; TARCAN, Menderes; Yorgancioglu, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies on the topic of burnout measure the effects of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) (negative or cynical attitudes toward work), and reduced sense of personal accomplishment (PA). While the prevalence of burnout in practicing emergency medicine (EM) professionals has been studied, little is known of the prevalence and factors across physicians, nurses, technicians, and health information technicians working for the same institution. The aim of this study was to a...

  6. Burnout syndrome among psychiatric trainees in 22 countries: Risk increased by long working hours, lack of supervision, and psychiatry not being first career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, N; Podlesek, A; Volpe, U; Barrett, E; Ferrari, S; Rojnic Kuzman, M; Wuyts, P; Papp, S; Nawka, A; Vaida, A; Moscoso, A; Andlauer, O; Tateno, M; Lydall, G; Wong, V; Rujevic, J; Platz Clausen, N; Psaras, R; Delic, A; Losevich, M A; Flegar, S; Crépin, P; Shmunk, E; Kuvshinov, I; Loibl-Weiß, E; Beezhold, J

    2016-02-01

    Postgraduate medical trainees experience high rates of burnout, but evidence regarding psychiatric trainees is missing. We aim to determine burnout rates among psychiatric trainees, and identify individual, educational and work-related factors associated with severe burnout. In an online survey psychiatric trainees from 22 countries were asked to complete the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-GS) and provide information on individual, educational and work-related parameters. Linear mixed models were used to predict the MBI-GS scores, and a generalized linear mixed model to predict severe burnout. This is the largest study on burnout and training conditions among psychiatric trainees to date. Complete data were obtained from 1980 out of 7625 approached trainees (26%; range 17.8-65.6%). Participants were 31.9 (SD 5.3) years old with 2.8 (SD 1.9) years of training. Severe burnout was found in 726 (36.7%) trainees. The risk was higher for trainees who were younger (Pburnout, severe burnout remained associated with long working hours (Pburnout. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses: A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamisa, Natasha; Peltzer, Karl; Ilic, Dragan; Oldenburg, Brian

    2016-12-01

    Nurses experience high levels of work related stress and burnout as well as low job satisfaction and poor general health owing to the nature of their work. This paper seeks to provide a better understanding of the nature of relationships between work related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and general health of nurses over one year. This study involved a longitudinal design. Two hundred and seventy seven nurses from four hospitals completed a follow up survey consisting of five questionnaires. Data were collected between 2013 and 2014. The data were analysed using generalized estimation equation analysis. Lack of support was associated with burnout, patient care was associated with job satisfaction and staff issues were associated with general health of nurses. Burnout is more strongly related to job satisfaction than general health. The findings of this study could inform evidence based policy and practice through interventions aimed at improving job satisfaction and reducing the impact of burnout on general health of nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Compassion satisfaction, burnout, and compassion fatigue among emergency nurses compared with nurses in other selected inpatient specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Crystal; Craig, Janet; Janvrin, David R; Wetsel, Margaret A; Reimels, Elaine

    2010-09-01

    Today the proportion of acute patients entering the health care system through emergency departments continues to grow, the number of uninsured patients relying primarily on treatment in the emergency department is increasing, and patients' average acuities are rising. At the same time, support resources are constrained, while reimbursement and reputation depends increasingly on publicly available measures of patient satisfaction. It is important to understand the potential effect of these pressures on direct care staff. This study explores the prevalence of compassion satisfaction, burnout, and compassion fatigue among emergency nurses and nurses in other selected inpatient specialties. Emergency nurses and nurses from 3 other specialty units self-selected participation in a cross-sectional survey. Participants completed a sociodemographic profile and the Professional Quality of Life: Compassion Satisfaction and Fatigue Subscales, R-IV. Scale scores were summed for compassion satisfaction, burnout, and compassion fatigue for emergency nurses and compared with those of nurses in other specialties. Approximately 82% of emergency nurses had moderate to high levels of burnout, and nearly 86% had moderate to high levels of compassion fatigue. Differences between emergency nurses and those working in 3 other specialty areas, that is, oncology, nephrology, and intensive care, on the subscales for compassion satisfaction, burnout, or compassion fatigue did not reach the level of statistical significance. However, the scores of emergency nurses evidenced a risk for less compassion satisfaction, while intensive care nurses demonstrated a higher risk for burnout and oncology nurses reflected a risk for higher compassion fatigue. ED nurse managers, along with other nurse leaders, are faced with the competing demands of managing the satisfaction of patients, recruitment and retention of experienced nurses, and provision of quality and safe care customized to patients' needs

  9. The Prevalence of Burnout and Its Association With Types of Capital Among Female Nurses in West of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Karami Matin; Ahmadi; Irandoost; Babasafari; Rezaei

    2014-01-01

    Background Burnout is a common syndrome associated with job stresses in the health sector personnel, especially female nurses. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate burnout and its association with types of capital among female nurses in educational hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods This was a retrospective cross-sectional st...

  10. Motivation, leadership, empowerment and confidence: their relation with nurses' burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Ioanna V; Fradelos, Evangelos C; Kleisiaris, Christos F; Tsaras, Konstantinos; Kalota, Malamati A; Kourkouta, Lambrini

    2014-12-01

    Burnout is usually defined as a state of physical, emotional and mental exhaustion that results from long-term involvement in work situations that are emotionally demanding. A great deal of researches has been devoted to the understanding of factors contributing to burnout and the negative effects that burnout has in the cost and the quality of the provided healthcare. Many researchers believe that in difficult and stressful working conditions the work environment should be changed in order to reduce burnout levels successfully. Indeed, recent studies have highlighted the role of human resources management in burnout. It has been widely recognized that human resource management policies should be at the core of any sustainable solution that aims to increase health care systems performance and efficient. Motivation, leadership, empowerment and confidence are very important factors that should be considered in this direction because they are strongly related with burnout levels.

  11. Tangled ruptures: discursive changes in Danish psychiatric nursing 1965-75

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, N

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing and psychiatric nurses have been referred to in various ways over the course of history. These articulations reflect and constitute the ways in which nursing is comprehended during specific periods. A rupture in these descriptions and conceptions of Danish psychiatric nursing...... over the period 1965--75 is identified using a discourse analytical framework, inspired primarily by Foucault. This rupture influenced all aspects of psychiatric nursing: the perception of the psychiatric patient, the expertise and knowledge of the nurse and the care given by the nurse. The study...

  12. A Professional Containment Method in Acute Psychiatric Care: Nursing Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Sabancigullari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Observation is a method that is used in place of other control methods such as chemical and physical detention, isolation. Observation is used especially as an interference method to ensure the safety of the patients with suicidal and aggressive behaviors in acute psychiatric care in many countries. Especially in acute psychiatric wards using observations of nursing as a professional control method is an important issue. This article aims to draw attention to the importance of the subject in our country about using nursing observations as a control method in acute psychiatric care from the view of the literature. In this article several studies related to risk assessment, decision making, the levels of observation, the application of observation and the ethical aspects of observation on acute psychiatric care have been discussed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(1.000: 79-91

  13. A study of stress and burnout in nursing students in Hong Kong: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger; Deary, Ian; Thompson, David; Li, Gloria

    2008-10-01

    Stress in nursing students may be related to attrition from nursing programmes and lead to a shortage of nurses entering clinical careers. In addition, stress leads to psychological morbidity which may have profound adverse consequences for individual nursing students. To follow a cohort of nursing students from entry to their programme to the end of the first year and to study the interrelationship between a range of psychological variables including personality, stress, coping and burnout. Prospective, repeated measures survey using self-administered questionnaires. A university school of nursing in Hong Kong. Students were selected on the basis of entry to their nursing programme in 2004; 158 students entered the study and 147 completed; 37 were male and 121 were female at entry. The mean age of the cohort at entry was 19.1 (S.D. 0.85); ages ranged from 18 to 26. The questionnaires administered at wave 1 were: the NEO Five Factor Inventory, the Coping in Stressful Situations questionnaire, the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Stress in Nursing Students questionnaire. At wave 2 the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Stress in Nursing Students questionnaire were administered. Students suffered greater levels of psychological morbidity and burnout at the second time wave and this was largely explained by the personality trait of neuroticism. Stress also increased and this was largely explained by emotion-oriented coping. Undertaking a nursing programme leads to increased level of stress, burnout and psychological morbidity and this is largely related to individual personality and coping traits.

  14. Factors Related to Burnout in the Neonatal Intensive Care Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    During the 1970s other researchers such as Pines, Maslach , Kann(r, and Kafry began conducting research on burnout in the helping and social service...a more positive view of themselves and of their patients. Maslach and Pines (1977) looked at staff-client ratio in relation to burnout in child care...health professional. Twenty items measure the burnout syndrome as defined by Maslach and Pines ( Maslach , 1976; Maslach & Pines, 1977; Pines & Maslach

  15. The effect of bullying on burnout in nurses: the moderating role of psychological detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Belinda C; Holland, Peter; Reynolds, Roslyn

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between bullying and burnout and the potential buffering effect psychological detachment might have on this relationship. There is evidence to suggest that bullying is relatively widespread in the nursing profession, with previous studies indicating that bullying is associated with higher levels of burnout. There is, however, limited research focusing on potential moderators of the relationship between bullying and burnout. A cross-sectional quantitative study conducted with self-completed, anonymous questionnaires. The study was conducted in 2011 with 762 Registered Nurses in Australia. Two hypotheses were tested with validated measures of bullying, psychological detachment and burnout. The hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression. Bullying is positively associated with burnout. Psychological detachment does not significantly moderate the relationship between bullying and burnout. The results indicate that bullying exacts a strong negative toll on nurses. Ensuring there are workplace policies and practices in place in healthcare organizations to reduce the instances of bullying and proactively address it when it does occur would therefore seem crucial. Individuals may also lower their risk of burning out by psychologically detaching from work. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Nurse burnout in China: a questionnaire survey on staffing, job satisfaction, and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Minmin; Ruan, Hui; Xing, Weijie; Hu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The investigators examined how nurse staffing affects nurse job satisfaction and quality of care. Inadequate nurse staffing is a worldwide issue with profound effects on nurse job satisfaction and quality of care. Few studies have examined the relationship between nurse staffing and job satisfaction and quality of care in China. A cross-sectional design was adopted, wherein 873 nurses were surveyed on demographics, nurse staffing, job-related burnout, job dissatisfaction, intent to leave, and quality of care. The median patient-nurse ratio was five; 45.1% nurses reported high levels of job-related burnout, and 55.6%, job dissatisfaction. In adjusted regression models, patient-nurse ratios of four or less were related to a decrease in the odds of job dissatisfaction (odds ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.36-0.85) and increase in the odds of quality of care (odds ratio 1.78, 95% confidence interval 1.02-2.82). Nurse staffing is associated with job dissatisfaction and quality of care. Nurse managers should maintain an adequate level of nurse staffing, referring to the patient-nurse ratio. They should create new initiatives to increase job satisfaction among nurses and to evaluate their effects. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Self-efficacy, perceptions of context, and burnout: a multilevel study on nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Chiara; Borgogni, Laura; Vecchione, Michele; Maslach, Christina

    2014-07-24

    The role of personal and situational factors in burnout development in the hospital context is well known. The majority of studies used standardized and generic scales and focused exclusively on the individual level of analysis, underestimating the role of teamwork effects. This study adopted a contextualized and multilevel approach in order to examine the different roles of individual and unit level nurse efficacy beliefs and hospital perceptions of context in predicting job burnout. Nurses (N=1020) belonging to 118 units completed two measures specifically tailored for the nursing environment: nurse self-efficacy, perceptions of context (teamwork, supervisor, management, and workload) together with MBI-GS exhaustion and cynicism scales. Multilevel confirmatory factor analysis was performed in order to verify the internal validity of nurse self-efficacy and hospital perceptions of context scales. A multilevel structural equation model was tested at individual and unit levels, using nurse self-efficacy, hospital perceptions of context and age as predictors of exhaustion and cynicism. The good psychometric properties of the scales were confirmed. At individual level, nurse self-efficacy was the strongest predictor of both burnout dimensions. Exhaustion was also predicted by perception of workload and perception of management, while cynicism was also predicted by perceptions of teamwork, workload, and age. At unit level, perceptions of workload and teamwork emerged as predictors of unit exhaustion and cynicism, respectively. Based on our results, it is possible to plan distinct individual and/or unit-focused interventions in order to prevent hospital staff burnout.

  18. BURNOUT SYNDROME IN NURSES OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE: AN INTEGRATIVE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magno Conceição das Merces

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Burnout Syndrome (BS also known as burnout is described as a phenomenon composed of feelings of failure and exhaustion, caused by excessive wear and energy resources, mediated by practice and work stress. In this sense, the nurse Primary Health Care (PHC is not exempted in the development of the syndrome in question, since it is a profession that develops their work activities through direct contact with patients and families, making workloads too much which can depreciate the quality of care. This study becomes relevant because it will contribute to the PHC nurses have deeper knowledge of the BS, and few studies at this level of health care. He stood as guiding question: What is the prevalence of BS nurses in the PHC based in Brazilian literature from 2000 to 2014? And as objective to determine the prevalence of BS nurses in the PHC. Content: This is an integrative literature review. To that end, we conducted survey of manuscripts published from 2000 to 2014, using as descriptors, in combination: nurse; burnout and primary care in the Virtual Health Library (VHL. Conclusion: It is not yet possible to know the prevalence of BS nurses in the PHC due to lack of studies in the area. KEYWORDS: Nurse. Burnout, Professional. Primary Health Care.

  19. The impact of psychological capital on job burnout of Chinese nurses: the mediator role of organizational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiaxi; Jiang, Xihua; Zhang, Jiaxi; Xiao, Runxuan; Song, Yunyun; Feng, Xi; Zhang, Yan; Miao, Danmin

    2013-01-01

    Nursing has a high risk of job burnout, but only a few studies have explored its influencing factors from an organizational perspective. The present study explores the impact of psychological capital on job burnout by investigating the mediating effect of organizational commitment on this relationship. A total of 473 female nurses from four large general hospitals in Xi'an City of China were selected as participants. Data were collected via the Psychological Capital Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, and the Organizational Commitment Scale. Both psychological capital and organizational commitment were significantly correlated to job burnout. Structural equation modelling indicated that organizational commitment partially mediated the relationship between psychological capital and job burnout. The final model revealed a significant path from psychological capital to job burnout through organizational commitment. These findings extended prior reports and shed some light on the influence of psychological capital on job burnout.

  20. Prevalence of professional burnout and its related factors among nurses in Tabriz in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar; Maleki, Ahdieh; Sahebihagh, Mohammad H

    2012-11-01

    Burnout is a syndrome containing three dimensions of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduction of personal accomplishment. Nurses are exposed to professional burnout (PB) due to their exposure to physical, mental, and emotional stressors, which can lead to numerous complications in their personal, social, and organizational life. This study aimed to define the prevalence of PB amongst nurses working in hospitals in Tabriz and to detect its related effective factors in 2010. This is a cross-sectional analytical study conducted on all selected nurses working in hospitals in Tabriz. The questionnaires were filled and returned by 712 subjects after taking their consent. The data were collected by a questionnaire including questions on demographic characteristics and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Independent t-test was employed to compare mean quantitative variables in two groups of individuals with and without PB. Chi-square test was also adopted to compare the prevalence of PB in levels of qualitative variables. Logistic regression test was employed for multiple analyses of PB related factors. In this analysis, variables in level of 0.2 which had an association with PB as a single variable were entered to the model. Among the nurses taking part in the study, 156 (21.9%, CI 95%: 19.0-25.1) suffered from PB based on its definition. The risk of burnout is increased by 1.12-folds for each overwork night shift. Higher education increases professional burnout by 3.17-folds. The prevalence of burnout among nurses in Tabriz was revealed. Night shift and education level were shown to have an association with professional burnout.

  1. Implementation of information technology in nursing practice - challenge for management in psychiatric nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Hätönen, Heli; Välimäki, Maritta

    2009-01-01

    The implementation of information technology (IT) applications in nursing practice requires systematic investments and guidance. A collaborative organisational culture, and systematic and close clinical and administrative cooperation during the implementation process support the acceptance of IT among users in organisation. Although knowledge of IT projects management exists, there is a lack of knowledge about nursing management in IT implementation processes in psychiatric nursing.

  2. Intensive care nurses' perception of futility: job satisfaction and burnout dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özden, Dilek; Karagözoğlu, Şerife; Yildirim, Gülay

    2013-06-01

    Suffering repeated experiences of moral distress in intensive care units due to applications of futility reflects on nurses' patient care negatively, increases their burnout, and reduces their job satisfaction. This study was carried out to investigate the levels of job satisfaction and exhaustion suffered by intensive care nurses and the relationship between them through the futility dimension of the issue. The study included 138 intensive care nurses. The data were obtained with the futility questionnaire developed by the researchers, Maslach Burnout Inventory and Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. It was determined that nurses who agreed to the proposition that the application of futility demoralizes health-care professionals had low levels of job satisfaction but high levels of depersonalization. It was determined that nurses had moderate levels of job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, and personal achievements but high levels of sensitivity. Nurses' job satisfaction and sensitivities are positively affected when they consider that futility does not contradict the purposes of medicine.

  3. Is the burnout syndrome associated with elder mistreatment in nursing homes: results of a cross-sectional study among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberg, Marijana; Železnik, Danica; Meštrović, Tomislav; Ribić, Rosana; Kozina, Goran

    2017-09-26

    As this issue has not yet been addressed in Croatia, our aim was to explore the presence of the burnout syndrome in nurses and see how it is related to their perception of elder mistreatment in nursing homes and extended care units. The burnout syndrome was assessed in 171 nursing professionals with a standardised Maslach Burnout Inventory for Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) for three dimensions: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA). High EE was reported by 43.9 %, high DP by 22.2 %, and low PA by 39.8 % of the respondents. Their perception of elder abuse and neglect was investigated with two self-completion questionnaires. The answers suggest that elder mistreatment in Croatian nursing homes and extended care units is more common than expected: 55 % witnessed shouting at a resident in anger, 43 % insulting and swearing at a resident, 42 % force-feeding the resident, 39 % ignoring a resident when they called, and 38 % neglecting to turn or move a resident to prevent pressure sores. We also established associations between a number of questionnaire items on perceived abuse and neglect and the burnout syndrome dimensions and determined the items that predicted the type and level of burnout in our respondents. One way to avoid the pitfalls that lead to abuse and neglect is education in schools and at work. We believe our research could contribute to this end.

  4. Organizational politics, nurses' stress, burnout levels, turnover intention and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, L J; McEnroe-Petitte, D M; Gloe, D; Tsaras, K; Arteche, D L; Maldia, F

    2017-03-01

    This is a research report examining the influence of organizational politics perceptions on nurses' work outcomes (job satisfaction, work stress, job burnout and turnover intention). Organizational politics is a phenomenon common in almost all institutions and is linked with undesirable consequences in employees. Despite the plethora of research around the world on this topic, studies describing organizational politics in nursing remain underexplored. A cross-sectional research design was utilized in this study. One hundred sixty-six (166) nurses participated. Five standardized tools were used: the Job Satisfaction Index, the Job Stress Scale, the Burnout Measure Scale, the Turnover Intention Inventory Scale and the Perception of Organizational Politics Scale. Nurses employed both in private and government-owned hospitals perceived moderate levels of organizational politics. Positive correlations were identified between perceived organizational politics and job stress, turnover intention and job burnout. Negative correlations were found between perceived organizational politics and job satisfaction. Perceptions of workplace politics in Filipino nurses were lower when compared to findings in other international studies. A strong link was found between organizational politics perceptions and the four job outcomes (stress and burnout levels, turnover intention and job satisfaction). Use of a self-reporting questionnaire and exclusion of nurses from other provinces. Perceived organizational politics predicted nurses' stress and burnout levels, turnover intention and job satisfaction. The findings of this study may provide a valuable perspective of this organizational issue and could assist policymakers and nurse administrators in formulating interventions that could minimize the effect of workplace politics. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Burnout Disrupts Anxiety Buffer Functioning Among Nurses: A Three-Way Interaction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Elena; Pedrazza, Monica; Berlanda, Sabrina; Pyszczynski, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 40 years, job burnout has attracted a great deal of attention among researchers and practitioners and, after decades of research and interventions, it is still regarded as an important issue. With the aim of extending the Anxiety Buffer Disruption Theory (ABDT), in this paper we argue that high levels of burnout may disrupt the anxiety buffer functioning that protects people from death concerns. ABDT was developed from Terror Management Theory (TMT). According to TMT, reminders of one’s mortality are an essential part of humans’ daily experience and have the potential to awake paralyzing fear and anxiety. In order to cope with death concerns, people typically activate an anxiety-buffering system centered on their cultural worldview and self-esteem. Recent ABDT research shows that individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder are unable to activate such anxiety buffering defenses. In line with these results, we hypothesized that the burnout syndrome may have similar effects, and that individuals with higher levels of burnout will be less likely to activate an anxiety buffering response when their mortality is made salient. Participants were 418 nurses, who completed a questionnaire including: a mortality salience (MS) manipulation, a delay manipulation, and measures of burnout, work-related self-efficacy, and representation of oneself as a valuable caregiver. Nurses are daily exposed both to the risk of burnout and to mortality reminders, and thus constituted an ideal population for this study. In line with an anxiety buffer disruption hypothesis, we found a significant three-way interaction between burnout, MS and delay. Participants with lower levels of burnout reported higher levels of self-efficacy and a more positive representation as caregivers in the MS condition compared to the control condition, when there was a delay between MS manipulation and the assessment of the dependent measures. The difference was non-significant for participants

  6. Burnout Disrupts Anxiety Buffer Functioning Among Nurses: A Three-Way Interaction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Trifiletti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, job burnout has attracted a great deal of attention among researchers and practitioners and, after decades of research and interventions, it is still regarded as an important issue. With the aim of extending the Anxiety Buffer Disruption Theory (ABDT, in this paper we argue that high levels of burnout may disrupt the anxiety buffer functioning that protects people from death concerns. ABDT was developed from Terror Management Theory (TMT. According to TMT, reminders of one’s mortality are an essential part of humans’ daily experience and have the potential to awake paralyzing fear and anxiety. In order to cope with death concerns, people typically activate an anxiety-buffering system centered on their cultural worldview and self-esteem. Recent ABDT research shows that individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder are unable to activate such anxiety buffering defenses. In line with these results, we hypothesized that the burnout syndrome may have similar effects, and that individuals with higher levels of burnout will be less likely to activate an anxiety buffering response when their mortality is made salient. Participants were 418 nurses, who completed a questionnaire including: a mortality salience (MS manipulation, a delay manipulation, and measures of burnout, work-related self-efficacy, and representation of oneself as a valuable caregiver. Nurses are daily exposed both to the risk of burnout and to mortality reminders, and thus constituted an ideal population for this study. In line with an anxiety buffer disruption hypothesis, we found a significant three-way interaction between burnout, MS and delay. Participants with lower levels of burnout reported higher levels of self-efficacy and a more positive representation as caregivers in the MS condition compared to the control condition, when there was a delay between MS manipulation and the assessment of the dependent measures. The difference was non

  7. Burnout Disrupts Anxiety Buffer Functioning Among Nurses: A Three-Way Interaction Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Elena; Pedrazza, Monica; Berlanda, Sabrina; Pyszczynski, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 40 years, job burnout has attracted a great deal of attention among researchers and practitioners and, after decades of research and interventions, it is still regarded as an important issue. With the aim of extending the Anxiety Buffer Disruption Theory (ABDT), in this paper we argue that high levels of burnout may disrupt the anxiety buffer functioning that protects people from death concerns. ABDT was developed from Terror Management Theory (TMT). According to TMT, reminders of one's mortality are an essential part of humans' daily experience and have the potential to awake paralyzing fear and anxiety. In order to cope with death concerns, people typically activate an anxiety-buffering system centered on their cultural worldview and self-esteem. Recent ABDT research shows that individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder are unable to activate such anxiety buffering defenses. In line with these results, we hypothesized that the burnout syndrome may have similar effects, and that individuals with higher levels of burnout will be less likely to activate an anxiety buffering response when their mortality is made salient. Participants were 418 nurses, who completed a questionnaire including: a mortality salience (MS) manipulation, a delay manipulation, and measures of burnout, work-related self-efficacy, and representation of oneself as a valuable caregiver. Nurses are daily exposed both to the risk of burnout and to mortality reminders, and thus constituted an ideal population for this study. In line with an anxiety buffer disruption hypothesis, we found a significant three-way interaction between burnout, MS and delay. Participants with lower levels of burnout reported higher levels of self-efficacy and a more positive representation as caregivers in the MS condition compared to the control condition, when there was a delay between MS manipulation and the assessment of the dependent measures. The difference was non-significant for participants

  8. The Prevalence of Burnout and Its Association With Types of Capital Among Female Nurses in West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karami Matin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Burnout is a common syndrome associated with job stresses in the health sector personnel, especially female nurses. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate burnout and its association with types of capital among female nurses in educational hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods This was a retrospective cross-sectional study. The study population was all female nurses working in educational hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Participants completed a questionnaire containing three parts as: Maslach Burnout Inventory, the types of capital and sociodemographic characteristics. Data Analysis was done using SPSS version 18. Results In total, 40% of female nurses had a high level of burnout. The mean scores of the emotion exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment were 33.7, 16 and 25.7, respectively. In addition, 50% of female nurses had a high social capital, 86% of them had a moderate economic capital and 49.3% had a low cultural capital. Finally, there were significant negative correlations between burnout and capital types (economic, cultural and social. Conclusions The prevalence of burnout among nurses is high. Capital types had a positive impact on reducing burnout. Therefore, maintaining capital types should be considered to decrease burnout in nurses.

  9. Psychiatric nursing liaison in a combat zone: an autoethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whybrow, D

    2013-12-01

    Military mental health nurses are tasked with providing psychiatric liaison to British forces deployed to combat zones. This forms part of a wider effort to maintain the combat effectiveness of the fighting force. During a recent deployment, I maintained a reflexive journal of my experience of liaising with the British Chain of Command. I then used line by line coding via the NVIVO 9 software package to formulate the core themes that became a framework for this autoethnography. My personality and social anxieties shaped how I performed the psychiatric liaison role. I was able to develop a template for liaison that accounted for both 'me' and my need to feel authentic or credible as a nurse, yet still enabled me to communicate effectively with the Chain of Command. One template for psychiatric nursing liaison with British combat forces is to focus upon key stakeholders within the Chain of Command, specifically, the Officer Commanding, the Sergeant Major, the Trauma Risk Management co-ordinator (usually the Sergeant Major) and the embedded medical asset. Further research is needed to establish how other nurses approach psychiatric nursing liaison. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cross-cultural differences in psychiatric nurses' attitudes to inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Gerard J.; Middel, Berry; Dassen, Theodoor; Reijneveld, Menno S A

    Little is currently known about the attitudes of psychiatric nurses toward patient aggression, particularly from an international perspective. Attitudes toward patient aggression of psychiatric nurses from five European countries were investigated using a recently developed and tested attitude

  11. Assessment of burn-out and quality of life in nursing professionals: the contribution of perceived social support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evagelos Fradelos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burnout has received increased research attention in recent years. The aim of the present study is to examine levels of burnout as well as quality of life (QOL in nursing staff in Greece. The association of social support with burnout and QOL is also investigated. One-hundred individuals working in Mental and General Hospitals in the broader area of Athens will participate in this study. The measurement tools include i the Maslach Burnout Inventory, ii the SF-36 Health Survey and iii the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Burnout and QOL are expected to be related to the evaluation of social environment.

  12. Psychiatric Nurses' Views on Caring: Patients and Canine Companions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Camille

    2017-03-01

    Psychiatric nurses are expert care providers for individuals with mental health needs. The art of caring spans across multiple species, is important to understand, and is universal whether intentions are toward individuals or animals. Pets are often cared for and viewed as family members. The current research examined psychiatric nurses' views on the similarities and differences of caring for patients and their pet dogs. Twenty-five nurses were interviewed. Similarities of caring for patients and canines included trusting relationships, companionship, daily basic needs, and improved communication through monitored body language. Differences in caring included personal expectations, unconditional love, and professional boundaries. Understanding the concepts of caring for patients and pet dogs will provide the opportunity for insight into familial versus professional relationships, improve communication with others, and strengthen the human-animal bond. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(3), 46-52.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Motivational Factors that Help in Coping with Barriers to Provision of Psychiatric Nursing Care: Perspective of Psychiatric Nurses in a Hospital Setting in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimba, Solomon Musa; Duma, Sinegugu

    2015-07-01

    This qualitative case study explored barriers to provision of psychiatric nursing care in a hospital in Plateau State, Nigeria, and revealed motivational factors that helped the nurses to cope with these barriers. Data collection methods included grand tour and in-depth interviews and participant observation. Motivational factors were related to the psychiatric nurse's individual intrinsic belief system, as well as to their intrinsic belief system as influenced by the environment. These motivational factors highlight how psychiatric nurses continue to cope with the barriers they face in provision of care. The findings indicate the need for hospital management to create and sustain an environment to complement the existing intrinsic motivation of psychiatric nurses to provide psychiatric nursing care, and to provide prompt and appropriate emotional and psychological support to psychiatric nurses worldwide.

  14. Workplace empowerment, incivility, and burnout: impact on staff nurse recruitment and retention outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Leiter, Michael; Day, Arla; Gilin, Debra

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of empowering work conditions and workplace incivility on nurses' experiences of burnout and important nurse retention factors identified in the literature. A major cause of turnover among nurses is related to unsatisfying workplaces. Recently, there have been numerous anecdotal reports of uncivil behaviour in health care settings. We examined the impact of workplace empowerment, supervisor and coworker incivility, and burnout on three employee retention outcomes: job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover intentions in a sample of 612 Canadian staff nurses. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses revealed that empowerment, workplace incivility, and burnout explained significant variance in all three retention factors: job satisfaction (R(2) = 0.46), organizational commitment (R(2) = 0.29) and turnover intentions (R(2) = 0.28). Empowerment, supervisor incivility, and cynicism most strongly predicted job dissatisfaction and low commitment (P < 0.001), whereas emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and supervisor incivility most strongly predicted turnover intentions. In our study, nurses' perceptions of empowerment, supervisor incivility, and cynicism were strongly related to job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover intentions. Managerial strategies that empower nurses for professional practice may be helpful in preventing workplace incivility, and ultimately, burnout.

  15. Effects of role stress on nurses' turnover intentions: The mediating effects of organizational commitment and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang-Sook; Han, Jeong-Won; An, Young-Suk; Lim, So-Hee

    2015-10-01

    This paper was designed to extend the extant research regarding factors related to nurses' turnover intentions. This survey-based study was based on a path analysis designed to verify a hypothesized causal model involving nurses' role stress, organizational commitment, turnover intentions, and burnout. This study distributed 500 questionnaires to nurses in general hospitals with more than 500 beds located in Seoul, Korea, during 16-30 April 2012. Role conflict, an underlying factor in role stress, had no significant effect on role stress, but the results showed that role ambiguity reduced organizational commitment. On the other hand, role conflict and role ambiguity increased the level of burnout. Organizational commitment reduced turnover intentions, and burnout increased turnover intentions. Role conflict and role ambiguity had no direct effect on turnover intentions, but they had indirect effects on organizational commitment and burnout. To reduce nurses' turnover rate, this study recommends developing plans to improve their organizational commitment because it mediates role stress and turnover intention. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  16. Examining factor structure of Maslach Burnout Inventory among nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Huan-Fang; Chien, Tsair-Wei; Yen, Miaofen

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the factorial structure of a Chinese version of the MBI-HSS for nurses in Taiwan. BACKGROUND Previous studies have presented different factorial structures using the Maslach burnout inventory-human services survey (MBI-HSS). Secondary data analysis was implemented to explore the factor structure of MBI-HSS using exploratory factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was then performed to verify the modified structure for nurses in Taiwan. The EFA found that three factors explaining 57% of the variance were extracted, and 20 of the 22 items were retained. The goodness-of-fit test was performed using the CFA approach, and it was verified that the modified version of MBI-HSS is a suitable instrument for measuring burnout for nurses in Taiwan. A nationwide sample confirmed the factorial structure of MBI-HSS for nurses in Taiwan with a three-dimension, 20-item assessment, and the variance was not diminished in this sample. These findings demonstrate that the modified version of MBI-HSS provides a suitable instrument for measuring burnout for nurses in Taiwan. Therefore, the modified version of MBI-HSS can be used to compare burnout of nurses across cultures, providing valuable information for policies or preventions in the future. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. [Quality of life and mental health among nurses attending courses on the prevention of professional burnout].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borge, Lisbet; Martinsen, Egil W; Hoffart, Randi-Ann; Larsen, Sigrid

    2003-06-26

    In a collaboration that started in 2001, the Norwegian Nurses' Association and Modum Bad Centre for Mental Health have offered burnout-preventing courses at Modum Bad's resource section for health care professionals, Villa Sana. We have assessed results among the attendees of the first six courses (mean age of 48.3 years, range 35-61) and compared them to results with the same rating scales among 50 breast cancer survivors (mean age 49.3 years, range 31-66). Informed consent was obtained from 45 attendees (of a total of 47) who filled in self-rating scales assessing level of depression, anxiety and quality of life and a comprehensive questionnaire about their health, work and family situation. The course was assessed on the last day. The majority of attendees had symptoms of depression and anxiety and assessed their quality of life as "average". In comparison, the breast cancer survivors had significantly less psychiatric symptoms and reported higher quality of life. Two thirds of the attendees saw a connection between their problems and work and private life; 33 thought that the course had helped them clarifying important issues in their life. The attendees assessed the course as very useful.

  18. The Relationship of Organizational Commitment, Job Satisfaction and Burnout on Physicians and Nurses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosun Nurperihan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim/purpose - This study has three main aims; the first aim is determining doctors' and nurses' organizational commitment, vocational satisfaction and burnout levels; the second is analyzing the relations between organizational commitment, vocational satisfaction and burnout levels; and the third aim is analyzing doctors' and nurses' organizational commitment, vocational satisfaction and burnout levels according to their demographical characteristics. Design/methodology/approach - Data for the cross-sectional study was gathered from a university hospital in Turkey of 735 doctors and nurses. Data was gathered by a four part data gathering medium. The medium consists of a personal data form developed by the researchers, Allen - Meyer organizational commitment scale, Minnesota satisfaction scale and Maslach burnout scale. The gathered data was evaluated with correlation analysis, variance analysis, definitive statistics, meaningfulness test of variance between two averages and averaging methods. Findings - The evaluated data showed that participants' emotional and normative commitment levels are over average and continuation commitment level is high; their burnout level is high, desensitization level is at average, intrinsic satisfaction level is high because of their personal success; and extrinsic satisfaction level is low and general vocational satisfaction level is close to neutral. Academician doctors' emotional and normative commitment levels; intrinsic and extrinsic vocational satisfaction levels; desensitization and personal success levels are higher than assistants' and nurses'. In our study, it is found out that as emotional and normative commitment levels increase, so does the vocational satisfaction; while the continuation commitment level increases, vocational satisfaction level decreases; and meaningful statistical relation was determined between vocational satisfaction and burnout levels. Research implications - The limitation of the

  19. Association of goal orientation with work engagement and burnout in emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaenssens, Jef; De Gucht, Veronique; Maes, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Goal orientation is a mindset towards the achievement of work-related goals, and it has been found to be related to occupational well-being. This study explored to what extent the 4-dimensional model of goal orientation adds additional variance to the explanation of burnout and work engagement in emergency nurses, after controlling for demographics, job characteristics and organizational variables. Self-report questionnaires including the Leiden Quality of Work Questionnaire for Nurses, Goal Orientation Questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were completed by 170 out of 274 emergency nurses from 13 secondary Belgian hospitals (response rate 62%). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted. Goal orientation explained 14 and 13% of the variance in burnout and work engagement respectively. Job control was predictive of both outcomes. Job demands was a predictor of burnout, and social support predicted work engagement. Reward was related to work engagement. The mastery-approach goal orientation was strongly related to an increase in work engagement and to a decrease in burnout. The performance-avoidance goal orientation was strongly related to a decrease in work engagement and to an increase in burnout. The performance-approach and mastery-avoidance goal orientations were not predictive for the two outcome variables. Goal orientation explains additional variance in burnout and work engagement over and above work characteristics and organizational variables. A mastery-approach goal orientation appears to be beneficial while a performance-avoidance goal orientation is not. Hospital management should therefore invest in personal involvement and growth of ER-nurses and in a rewarding organizational culture.

  20. [The burnout syndrome among nurses working in Lithuanian cardiac surgery centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimantaite, Renata; Seskevicius, Arvydas

    2006-01-01

    The burnout syndrome may be defined as a complex phenomenon which is characterized by three components: emotional burnout (physical and psychical exhaustion, incapability to carry on requirements), depersonalization (cynical attitude towards performed work, duties, cold or negative reaction to the patients), and lowered efficiency (reflected by the sense of incompetence, the lack of efficiency and achievements). This process is progressing slowly for a long time and is characterized individually by various psychical and physical symptoms of different intensity. The aim of this study was to examine the manifestation of burnout syndrome and to estimate the influence of the syndrome on the behavior and practice of the nurses in cardiac surgery units of Lithuania (to evaluate physiological and psychological symptoms of the burnout). The study was performed using a questionnaire. A total of 180 questionnaires completed by nurses in Lithuanian cardiac surgical centers (Vilnius, Kaunas, and Klaipeda) were analyzed. The study revealed that 72.8% of nurses had an excess of workload (exceeding full-time job). Most of the respondents (84.4%) pointed out the emotional stress, unevaluated work and underpayment. Three-fourths of the nurses (75%) indicated that they felt physical fatigue after their work. More than half of nurses (67.2%) felt general fatigue, 63.3% reported the leg pains after the work, and 32.2% feel splitting headaches. Psychological fatigue was stressed by 86.1% of specialists. The main causes of psychological stress are as follows: the communication with the doctors in 57% of the cases, communication with the patient's relatives in 52% of cases, communication with the nursing administration in 49% of cases, and communication with the patients in 40% of cases. The majority of the nurses working in the centers of cardiac surgery experience physical and psychological fatigue, emotional stress. All this determinates the dissatisfaction in the work, conflicts

  1. Correlation between Anger and Job Motivation among Psychiatric Nurses in Kashan Psychiatric Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouchaki E.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: In general, nurses who work in department of psychiatric are in fact interacting with emotional disorders of patients once providing their care services. higher levels of job motivation and satisfaction can markedly foster service improvement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between anger and job motivation in nurses of a psychiatric hospital. Instrument & Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive research in 2014, all 50 psychiatry nurses working at Kargarnejad Hospital of Kashan City, Iran, were entirely studied. A demographical questionnaire, the Anger Multiple Scale and the Job Motivation Scale were used for data gathering. Data were analyzed by SPSS 19 software using Pearson correlation coefficient. Findings: The mean score of anger was 3.01±0.36 and of job motivation was 1.70±0.86. There was a significant relationship between job motivation and the number of family members and conditions of employment of nurses (p=0.001. There was a significant inverse relationship between scores of anger and job motivation of psychiatry nurses of the hospital (r=-0.712; p=0.001. Conclusion: There is a relationship between anger and job motivation in nurses of Kashan Psychiatric hospital.

  2. The Prevalence of Burnout Among Nursing Home Physicians: An International Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Arif; Smalbrugge, Martin; Moser, Andrea; Karuza, Jurgis; Crecelius, Charles; Hertogh, Cees; Feldman, Sid; Katz, Paul R

    2018-01-01

    Physician burnout is a critical factor influencing the quality of care delivered in various healthcare settings. Although the prevalence and consequences of burnout have been well documented for physicians in various jurisdictions, no studies to date have reported on burnout in the postacute and long-term care setting. In this exploratory study, we sought to quantify the prevalence of burnout among 3 cohorts of physicians, each practicing in nursing homes in the United States (US), Canada, or The Netherlands. International comparisons were solicited to highlight cultural and health system factors potentially impacting burnout levels. Using standard survey techniques, a total of 721 physicians were solicited to participate (Canada 393; US 110; The Netherlands 218). Physicians agreeing to participate were asked to complete the "Maslach Burnout Inventory" using the Survey Monkey platform. A total of 118 surveys were completed from The Netherlands, 59 from Canada, and 65 from the US for response rates of 54%, 15%, and 59%, respectively. While US physicians demonstrated more negative scores in the emotional exhaustion subscale compared with their counterparts in Canada and The Netherlands, there were no meaningful differences on the depersonalization and personal accomplishments subscales. Factors explaining these differences are explored as well as approaches to future research on physician burnout in postacute and long-term care. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The relationship between socio-demographic variables, job stressors, burnout, and hardy personality in nurses: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrosa, Eva; Moreno-Jiménez, Bernardo; Liang, Youxin; González, José Luis

    2008-03-01

    Nursing is considered as a risk profession with high levels of stress and burnout, and these levels are probably increasing. A model of prediction of burnout in nursing that includes socio-demographic variables, job stressors, and personal vulnerability, or resistance, is proposed. A cross-sectional correlational design was used. A sample of 473 nurses and student nurses in practice from three General Hospitals in Madrid (Spain) completed the "Nursing Burnout Scale". The data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations, and hierarchical multiple regression. The proposed model is a good predictor of the diverse burnout sub-dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and lack of personal accomplishment. Significant predictors of burnout included age, job status, job stressors (workload, experience with pain and death, conflictive interaction, and role ambiguity), and hardy personality (commitment, control, and challenge). Identifying an integrative process of burnout among nurses is an essential step to develop effective managerial strategies so as to reduce the burnout problem. Specifically, the present study suggests that intervention aimed at reducing the risk for burnout may achieve better results if it includes enhancement of workers' hardy personality rather than just decreasing environmental stressors.

  4. The exploration of in-service training needs of psychiatric nurses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-10

    Oct 10, 2014 ... to psychiatric nursing. This study aimed to increase the awareness of the needs and benefits of in-service training of psychiatric nurses and to formulate recommendations for in- service training for psychiatric nursing. Research method and design. Design. A qualitative research design with explorative, ...

  5. [Nurses and burnout: a survey in an Emergency Department in the Lazio Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleandri, Angela; Sansoni, Julita

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays, burnout represents a growing phenomenon in technologically advanced countries, so much so that there is now abundant literature available on this topic. The aim of our study was to assess the level of burnout in a group of 108 nurses working in an Emergency Department by means of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. This instrument is based on the concept that burnout presents 3 basic features: Emotional Exhaustion (EE), Depersonalization (DP) and Personal Achievement (PA). Results showed that a significant relationship exists between EE and DP, the working environment and the same social-demographic features, while the PA sub-scale was not found to be dependent on any of the social-demographic characteristics.

  6. Group-level impact of work environment dimensions on burnout experiences among nurses: a multivariate multilevel probit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoyue; Bruyneel, Luk; Sermeus, Walter; Van den Heede, Koen; Matawie, Kenan; Aiken, Linda; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    Nurses' work environments are associated with burnout experiences among nurses. The RN4CAST project provides data on these constructs within a four-level structure (nurse, nursing unit, hospital, and country), implying more complicated multilevel analysis strategies than have been used in previous efforts studying this relationship. First, to explore and investigate the effect of the nursing unit, hospital, and country level variability on the relationship between dimensions of nurses' work environment and dimensions of burnout. Second, to explore the significance of the nursing unit, hospital, and country level variability among the burnout dimensions. Data from the RN4CAST project were available from a cross-sectional survey among 23,446 nurses in 2087 nursing units in 352 hospitals in 11 countries. Nurse-reported information on their work environment (managerial support for nursing, doctor-nurse collegial relations, and promotion of care quality) and burnout experiences (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment) were available. We specified ecological measures of the nurse work environment dimensions at the three organizational levels and combined these with individual-level outcomes within a series of multilevel statistical models. The final model was a multivariate multilevel probit model in which we modeled the work environment and burnout dimensions jointly. Doctor-nurse collegial relations affected all burnout dimensions, but at the unit level only. For the dimension of promotion of care quality, the effect of the ecological exposure on burnout was pronounced at both the nursing unit and the hospital level for all three burnout dimensions. Findings for the dimensions of managerial support for nursing were ambiguous. Nurse work environment dynamics are related to nurses' burnout experiences at both the nursing unit and the hospital level. This implies that both hospital-wide and unit-specific interventions should be considered to

  7. Providing structure. Unraveling and building a psychiatric nursing intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses commonly refer to ‘providing structure’ (PS) as a key intervention. But, no consensus exists about what PS entails. PS can be understood as a complex intervention. In five studies a definition, activities and context-variables were described. On the basis of results of a

  8. Nurse occupational burnout and patient-rated quality of care: The boundary conditions of emotional intelligence and demographic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Minston; Shih, Chih-Ting; Hsu, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Most previous studies on the relationship between occupational burnout and the quality of care among nurses have used self-reported data on the quality of care from nurses, thus rendering evaluating the relationship between burnout and the quality of care difficult. Hospitals increasingly hire contract nurses and high turnover rates remain a concern. Little is known about whether nurses' emotional intelligence and demographic factors such as contract status, tenure, and marital status affect the quality of care when burnout occurs. This study investigated the relationship between burnout and patient-rated quality of care and investigated the moderating role of emotional intelligence and demographic variables. Hierarchical moderated regression was used to analyze 98 sets of paired data obtained from nurses and their patients at a teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. The results suggest that occupational burnout has a less unfavorable effect on the quality of care from permanent, married, and senior nurses. Nursing management should pay particular attention to retaining permanent, married, and senior nurses. To ensure a sustainable nursing workforce in the future, newly graduated registered nurses should have access to permanent positions and opportunities for long-term professional development. In addition, married nurses should be provided with flexible work-family arrangements to ensure their satisfaction in the nursing profession. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  9. Perception of economic crisis among Spanish nursing students: Its relation to burnout and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano-García, Guadalupe; Montañés, Pilar; Megías, Jesús L

    2017-05-01

    The high levels of indebtedness and deficit of Spain's autonomous communities as a consequence of the national and European economic crisis have caused radical changes in the Spanish National Health Service. At the present time, the economic crisis is seriously affecting nurses in several European countries, and especially in Spain. The aim of this study was to analyse whether nursing students' perceptions of economic crisis influence their levels of burnout and engagement in relation to their studies. We have also tried to clarify the relationship of sociodemographic variables (age and gender) and personal control factors (self-efficacy, locus of control and success) with these factors. This was a transversal study based on descriptive and inferential statistical analysis. Analysis of the quantitative data was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences, IBM 19.0 (SPSS, 2010). 166 nursing students participated in the study, comprising 142 women and 24 men studying in Schools of Nursing in the North of Spain. They completed various questionnaires to gather information on sociodemographic variables and measure burnout, engagement, locus of control, expectations of success and perceptions of threat due to the economic crisis. Higher perception of economic crisis by the students is related to higher scores for burnout and lower scores for engagement. The scores for burnout were also positively predicted by external locus of control and negatively predicted by perception of self-efficacy. The age of participants is related to lower levels of burnout and higher levels of engagement. Finally, expectation of success also positively predicted the level of engagement. The results demonstrate the importance of the perceptions of the economic crisis on the development of burnout and engagement among nursing students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Burnout syndrome in pre-hospital and hospital emergency. Cognitive study in two cohorts of nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchitti, Chiara; Cannizzaro, Giorgia; Rosi, Fabrizio; Maccaroni, Roberto; Menditto, Vincenzo G

    2014-01-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) associated with stress has been documented in health care professionals in many specialties. The emergency department and the pre-hospital healthcare services are highly stressful environments. Little is known about the BOS in critical care nursing staff. The objective of the study is to compare the incidence of BOS and its three domains, namely, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced professional accomplishment, in two cohorts of critical care nurses: a pre-hospital and a hospital emergency service. A survey using a questionnaire (the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, MBI-GS), among nurses of two Italian emergency services has been performed: a hospital emergency service (HES, Emergency Department or "Pronto Soccorso") and a pre-hospital emergency service (PHES, territorial healthcare service or "Centrale Operativa 118"). All 60 nurses surveyed (82% female) filled the questionnaires. BOS-related symptoms have been identified in at least 50% of the nurses in the HES: 50% suffered a medium-high emotional exhaustion, 75% had a medium-high depersonalization and 92.5% had a medium-high reduced professional accomplishment. Among the PEHS nurses, BOS-related symptoms have been identified in at least 60% of the respondents: 60% had a medium-high emotional exhaustion, 70% had a medium-high depersonalization and 95% had a medium-high reduced professional accomplishment. Moreover, the likelihood that a nurse has a severe BOS, that is at least one degree of high burnout or ≥2 degrees of medium burnout, is significantly higher in the group of the PHES than in the HES (90% vs 60%, p <0.02). At least two-thirds of critical care nursing staff had a severe BOS. The incidence of BOS appeared to be similar among PHES and HES nurses with a higher trend for the former. Further interventional studies are needed to investigate the determinants of BOS among critical care nurses and the potentially preventive strategies.

  11. Bullying among nurses and its relationship with burnout and organizational climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Gabriele; Mancuso, Serena; Fiz Perez, Francisco; Castiello D'Antonio, Andrea; Mucci, Nicola; Cupelli, Vincenzo; Arcangeli, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    Workplace bullying is one of the most common work-related psychological problems. Bullying costs seem higher for organizations composed of health-care workers who perform direct-contact patients-complex tasks. Only a few studies have been carried out among nurses in Italy and integrated models of bullying antecedents and consequences are particularly missing. The aim of this study was to develop a bullying model focused on the interaction between bullying and burnout in the setting of a climate-health relationship. Research involved 658 nurses who completed a survey on health, burnout, bullying and organizational climate. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesis. Results suggest that workplace bullying partially mediates the relationship between organizational climate and burnout and that bullying does not affect health directly, but only indirectly, via the mediation of burnout. Our study demonstrates the key-role of workplace bullying and burnout in the climate-health relationship in order to understand and to improve nurses' health. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Millennial Students' Preferred Methods for Learning Concepts in Psychiatric Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Janet K

    2015-09-01

    The current longitudinal, descriptive, and correlational study explored which traditional teaching strategies can engage Millennial students and adequately prepare them for the ultimate test of nursing competence: the National Council Licensure Examination. The study comprised a convenience sample of 40 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a psychiatric nursing course. The students were exposed to a variety of traditional (e.g., PowerPoint(®)-guided lectures) and nontraditional (e.g., concept maps, group activities) teaching and learning strategies, and rated their effectiveness. The students' scores on the final examination demonstrated that student learning outcomes met or exceeded national benchmarks. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. [Job burnout: focusing on occupational differences of enthusiasm for job].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Junichi; Nakanishi, Daisuke; Shiwa, Shiro

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates characteristics of burnout, as related to job descriptions in mental hospitals and presuppositions of the concept of burnout (burnout is caused as a result of having enthusiasm for a job). The results of a questionnaire survey (burnout tendency, Japanese Burnout Scale, enthusiasm for a job in the past, modified Enthusiasm scale) with 781 workers at mental hospitals showed that burnout characteristics varied according to job descriptions. Specifically, psychiatric social workers, medical assistants, and nurses fell into the high-burnout category, whereas doctors, occupational therapists, and pharmacists fell into the low-burnout category. In addition, in order to compare enthusiasm for a job in the past with current burnout tendencies, factor scores for the respective scales were classified into a low group or a high group and were cross tabulated. The numbers in the cells of the groups indicating the opposite of the definition of burnout (low enthusiasm-high burnout tendency, high enthusiasm-low burnout tendency) were larger. This indicates that having enthusiasm for a job is not a direct factor for burnout, which is different from the presupposition about burnout.

  14. Determinants of burnout in acute and critical care military nursing personnel: a cross-sectional study from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Elizabeth; Carnero, Andrés M

    2013-01-01

    Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive measures for this high-risk occupational group. In this context, we aimed to examine the association between the dimensions of burnout and selected socio-demographic and occupational factors in military acute/critical care nursing personnel from Lima, Peru. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 93 nurses/nurse assistants from the acute and critical care departments of a large, national reference, military hospital in Lima, Peru, using a socio-demographic/occupational questionnaire and a validated Spanish translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Total scores for each of the burnout dimensions were calculated for each participant. Higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores, and lower personal achievement scores, implied a higher degree of burnout. We used linear regression to evaluate the association between each of the burnout dimensions and selected socio-demographic and occupational characteristics, after adjusting for potential confounders. The associations of the burnout dimensions were heterogeneous for the different socio-demographic and occupational factors. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were independently associated with having children (pintensive care unit compared with the recovery room (pcare nursing personnel, potential screening and preventive interventions should focus on younger/less experienced nurses/nurse assistants, who are single, have children, or work in the most acute critical care areas (e.g. the emergency room/intensive care unit).

  15. Nurses of the psychiatric service as the specific occupational group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimentova I.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for psychiatric services in modern health care system will increase due to the growth in number of mental diseases. The role of nurses in prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of mental illness has a number of features. These features are related to care of patients with high level of aggressiveness, behavioral deviations, and problems in self-service. Differences in procedure practice and communicative space specialize and make narrower the nurses' professional practice in psychiatry and determine appearance of specific mechanisms and norms bound up with the necessity of supervision of patients while respecting their rights. Personnel's oversight functions, deviant behavior of patients, high degree of closure of psychiatric medical institutions — are the reasons for specialization of nurses' professional group in psychiatry, forming special mechanisms of maintaining tolerance to patients in professional sphere of this community.

  16. Job characteristics, burnout and negative workhome interference in a nursing environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FE Koekemoer

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were 1 to determine which job characteristics are associated with burnout and 2 to determine the mediating role of negative work-home interference (WHI in the relationship between job characteristics and burnout within a nursing environment. Random samples (n = 300 were taken of nurses working in the Johannesburg, Klerksdorp, Krugersdorp, Pretoria and Potchefstroom areas. The results of the regression analyses indicated that the main job characteristics that predict exhaustion were pressure and a lack of autonomy, role clarity, colleague support and financial support. A lack of role clarity, colleague support and financial support were the main job characteristics that predict mental distance. Negative WHI played a partially mediating role in the relationship between job characteristics and burnout.

  17. Multiple interactions of hazard exposures, role stressors and situational factors, and burnout among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jinky Leilanie

    2007-01-01

    This was a cross-sectional study which looked into the interaction between situational factors, role stressors, hazard exposure and personal factors among 135 nurses in the Philippine General Hospital. More than half (58.5%) of the respondents reported being ill due to work in the past year, and 59.3% missed work because of an illness. Regression showed factors associated with burnout were organizational role stress, hazard exposure, self-efficacy, age, number of working years, illness in the past 12 months, migraine, dizziness, sleep disorder, cough and colds, and diarrhea. After multiple regression analysis, organizational role stress (p = .000), migraine (p = .001), age (p = .018) and illness in the past 12 months (p = .000) were found to be significant predictors of burnout. The contribution of the study is in advancing new concepts in the already existing framework of burnout, and thus, assisting nurses and hospital administration in on controlling this problem.

  18. The connection between illness representations of Alzheimer's disease and burnout among social workers and nurses in nursing homes and hospitals: a mixed-methods investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinan-Altman, Shiri; Werner, Perla; Cohen, Miri

    2016-01-01

    To examine the relationship between Alzheimer's disease (AD) illness representations and burnout among social workers and nurses, based on the self-regulatory model. A mixed-methods study was conducted. First, 327 social workers and nurses completed measures of cognitive and emotional representations, burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, lack of personal accomplishment), role variables, knowledge about AD, emotion-focused coping, problem-focused coping, and demographic and occupational characteristics. Second, interviews were conducted with eight social workers and nurses to uncover their perceptions about AD and their burnout experience. Using structural equation modeling and controlling background variables, findings indicated that emotional representations were associated with burnout while only some of the cognitive illness representations were associated with burnout. While cognitive illness representations were associated directly to burnout, the association between emotional representations and burnout was mediated by emotion-focused coping. The trimmed model showed a good fit of the data and explained 32.2% of the variance in emotion-focused coping, 51% of the variance in emotional exhaustion, 37.7% of the variance in depersonalization, and 22.6% of the variance in lack of personal accomplishment. Interviews demonstrated that AD characteristics were perceived as affecting participants on both personal and professional levels; the participants expressed negative feelings towards AD and stated that these perceptions and feelings had led them to burnout. AD illness representations may be a risk factor for developing burnout. New directions for intervention programs, aiming to reduce burnout, should be examined.

  19. The relationships among work stress, resourcefulness, and depression level in psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu Mi; Lai, Chien Yu; Chang, Yong-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Yu, Ching-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Psychiatric nurses are exposed to highly stressful work environments that can lead to depression over time. This study aimed to explore the relationships among work stress, resourcefulness, and depression levels of psychiatric nurses. A cross-sectional design with randomized sampling was used; 154 psychiatric nurses were recruited from six medical centers in Taiwan. Psychiatric nurses' work stress was found positively correlated with their depression level, and negatively related to resourcefulness. Work stress significantly predicted depression level. These results suggest that the hospital administrative units may develop training courses about resourcefulness skills to reduce psychiatric nurses' work stress, and improve their mental health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses: the mediating effect of psychological capital

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    Wang Yang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burnout among nurses not only threatens their own health, but also that of their patients. Exploring risk factors of nurse’ burnout is important to improve nurses’ health and to increase the quality of health care services. This study aims to explore the relationship between work-family conflict and burnout among Chinese female nurses and the mediating role of psychological capital in this relationship. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed during the period of September and October 2010. A questionnaire that consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS, the work-family conflict scale and the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24 scale, as well as demographic and working factors, was distributed to nurses in Liaoning province, China. A total of 1,332 individuals (effective response rate: 78.35% became our subjects. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of psychological capital. Results Both work interfering family conflict and family interfering work conflict were positively related with emotional exhaustion and cynicism. However, work interfering family conflict was positively related with professional efficacy whereas family interfering work conflict was negatively related with it. Psychological capital partially mediated the relationship of work interfering family conflict with emotional exhaustion and cynicism; and partially mediated the relationship of family interfering work conflict with emotional exhaustion, cynicism and professional efficacy. Conclusion Work-family conflict had effects on burnout and psychological capital was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Psychological capital was a positive resource for fighting against nurses’ burnout.

  1. Occupational stress, sense of coherence, coping, burnout and work engagement of registered nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna J. van der Colff

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the occupational stress, sense of coherence, coping, burnout and work engagement of registered nurses in South Africa. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The study population consisted of 818 registered nurses. The Nursing Stress Inventory, the Orientation to Life Questionnaire, the COPE, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey, and the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were administered. The results show that the experience of depletion of emotional resources and feelings of depersonalisation by registered nurses were associated with stress due to job demands and a lack of organisational support, focus on and ventilation of emotions as a coping strategy, and a weak sense of coherence. Work engagement was predicted by a strong sense of coherence and approach-coping strategies.

  2. The relationship between job stress and burnout levels of oncology nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rujnan Tuna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Job stress and burnout levels of oncology nurses increase day-by-day in connection with rapidly increasing cancer cases worldwide as well as in Turkey. The purpose of this study was to establish job stress and burnout levels of oncology nurses and the relationship in between. Methods: The sample of this descriptive study comprised of 189 nurses that are selected by nonprobability sampling method, employed by 11 hospitals in Istanbul. Survey form of 20 questions, Job Stressors Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI were used during collection of data. Data were evaluated using percentage, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U and Spearman correlation analyses. Results: In the study, there was a positively weak correlation between "Work Role Ambiguity" subdimension of Job Stressors Scale and "Emotional Exhaustion" and "Personal Accomplishment" subdimensions, whereas a positively weak and medium correlation was encountered between "Work Role Conflict" subdimension and "Emotional Exhaustion" and "Depersonalization" subdimensions. A negatively weak correlation was found between "Work Role Overload" subdimension and "Emotional Exhaustion" and "Depersonalization" subdimensions. Conclusion: A significant relationship was established between subdimensions of job stress level and of burnout level, that a lot of oncology nurses who have participated in the study wanted to change their units, because of the high attrition rate.

  3. BURNOUT, UNCERTAINTY, AND THE DESIRE FOR SOCIAL-COMPARISON AMONG NURSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUUNK, BP; SCHAUFELI, WB; YBEMA, JF

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted among 295 nurses to examine the interest in social comparison information, that is, the desire to learn more about the feelings and responses of others facing a similar situation. Occupational burnout, in particular emotional exhaustion, reduced personal accomplishment and

  4. Social comparison as a predictor of changes in burnout among nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham P.; Zurriaga, Rosario; Peiro, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    This study addressed the question whether the affect evoked by social comparisons and individual differences in social comparison orientation (SCO) may predict the development of burnout over a period of one year. The participants were 93 nurses (25 males and 68 females) who filled out a

  5. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Levels of Burnout Among Oncology Nurses: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Urquiza, José L; Aneas-López, Ana B; Fuente-Solana, Emilia I; Albendín-García, Luis; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Fuente, Guillermo A

    2016-05-01

    To determine (a) the average levels of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (D), and personal accomplishment (PA) among oncology nurses; (b) the prevalence of low, medium, and high levels of burnout for each dimension; and (c) the risk factors for burnout.
. A systematic review was carried out using the CUIDEN, CINAHL®, LILACS, ProQuest, PubMed, SciELO, and Scopus databases. 
. The 436 search results obtained were reduced to a final sample of 27 articles after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria.
. With respect to levels of burnout, published results differ in their conclusions. In general, they indicate that oncology nurses feel little sense of PA and suffer from EE, although few signs of D exist. 
. Oncology nurses present high levels of EE and of reduced PA. A large proportion of these nurses are at risk of developing burnout. Age, work experience, workload, and communication skills are among the factors that may influence development of the syndrome. 
. Programs should be developed to identify interventions that would reduce EE and enhance feelings of PA. In addition, risk factors and protective measures should be studied more comprehensively.

  6. Pediatric novice nurses: examining compassion fatigue as a mediator between stress exposure and compassion satisfaction, burnout, and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Rika M L; Li, Angela; Klaristenfeld, Jessica; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether compassion fatigue mediated associations between nurse stress exposure and job satisfaction, compassion satisfaction, and burnout, controlling for pre-existing stress. The Life Events Checklist was administered to 251 novice pediatric nurses at the start of the nurse residency program (baseline) and 3 months after to assess pre-existing and current stress exposure. Compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout were assessed 3 months after baseline and job satisfaction 6 months after. Stress exposure significantly predicted lower compassion satisfaction and more burnout. Compassion fatigue partially mediated these associations. Results demonstrate a need for hospitals to prevent compassion fatigue in healthcare providers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [The characteristics of nurses' and caregivers' behaviour in different clinical settings with special attention to burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálfiné, Szabó Ilona

    2008-08-03

    The author draws attention to the up-to-datedness of the selected topic and its personal and institutional effects. Stress in work (workplace stress) has a significant role in the pathomechanism of burnout. Nurses are exposed to excessive stress burden in work so expected incidence of burnout is relatively high among them. Goal of this study is to draw a picture about the situation, condition of mental health, degree and rate of burnout in nurses in given health care situations. Self-completed, anonymous questionnaire questioning the surveyed socio-demographic data while using three standardized questionnaires with the measurement of the degree of burnout, physical and mental exhaustion and fatigue as well as dysfunctional attitudes. The study surveyed 805 individuals analyzing the specific characteristics of supporting relationship and joining points between degree of burnout and (hospital) department care form. Among 374 nurses working in the intensive care unit 9.4% suffer from burnout, while among 155 nurses working in active care unit this rate is 0.6%. According to the findings of the study there are also other influential elements, namely the facts that nurses have part-time jobs (second jobs) besides their full-time jobs and the lack of moral and financial respect or recognition. Among the surveyed population 273 individuals--33.9%--are at risk regarding burnout, 44 individuals--5.5%--show signs of burnout and 7 individuals--0.9%--are in a condition where treatment is needed. The study supposed the influential role of certain personality factors (dysfunctional attitudes) in the development of burnout. Comparison showed that burnout phenomenon and dysfunctional attitudes are correlated. The survey results confirmed that socio-demographic factors had no effect on burnout development. The severity of patients' condition and the degree of permanent stressful situation in intensive care units are among determinant workplace factors.

  8. Effects of core self-evaluations on the job burnout of nurses: the mediator of organizational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yangen; Lu, Jiamei; Liu, Xianmin; Zhang, Pengcheng; Chen, Wuying

    2014-01-01

    To explore the impact of Core self-evaluations on job burnout of nurses, and especially to test and verify the mediator role of organizational commitment between the two variables. Random cluster sampling was used to pick up participants sample, which consisted of 445 nurses of a hospital in Shanghai. Core self-evaluations questionnaire, job burnout scale and organizational commitment scale were administrated to the study participants. There are significant relationships between Core self-evaluations and dimensions of job burnout and organizational commitment. There is a significant mediation effect of organizational commitment between Core self-evaluations and job burnout. To enhance nurses' Core self-evaluations can reduce the incidence of job burnout.

  9. The Relationship between Motivation and Academic burnout in Nursing and Paramedical Students of Qom University of Medical Sciences, Iran

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    Fatemeh Sharififard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Academic burnout leads to poor performance in students. On the other hand, motivation has direct relationship with academic performance of students. In this study, the relationship between motivation and academic burnout among nursing and paramedical students was investigated. Methods: This study was conducted as a cross-sectional study on nursing and paramedical students of Qom city in the second semester of 2014-2015. A total of 264 students were randomly selected from nursing and paramedical students. Data collection tools were demographic information form, academic burnout questionnaire, and academic motivation scale. Data were analyzed using regression and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. The significance level was considered p<0.05. Results: The mean and standard deviation of academic burnout scores of the students was 28.52±15.84. All academic motivation subscales had significant relationship with academic burnout. There were significant relationships between a motivation (OR=1.17, CI=1.08-1.26 and intrinsic motivation (OR=0.92, CI=0.88-0.95 with academic burnout. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicated that a significant percentage of the students are experiencing academic burnout, and student with intrinsic motivation have lower academic burnout. Therefore, improvement of this personal trait in the students can reduce their academic burnout.

  10. Job Satisfaction and Burnout among Intensive Care Unit Nurses and Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Hilde Myhren; Øivind Ekeberg; Olav Stokland

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nurses and physicians working in the intensive care unit (ICU) may be exposed to considerable job stress. The study aim was to assess the level of and the relationship between (1) job satisfaction, (2) job stress, and (3) burnout symptoms. Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed at ICUs at Oslo University Hospital. 145 of 196 (74%) staff members (16 physicians and 129 nurses) answered the questionnaire. The following tools were used: job satisfaction scale (scores 10?70),...

  11. Rules of Thumb: Hints for the psychiatric nursing student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karshmer, J F

    1982-03-01

    The eight "rules of thumb" offered here are representative of numerous more that have been helpful stimulators for psychiatric nursing students. The suggest to the students a consistent approach based upon a rationale and do not encourage rote memorization of techniques. Students are encouraged to critically analyze the reasons and conceptual underpinnings for each encounter they have with patients. The "rules of thumb" encourage this self-exploration and attention to "What is it I'm really asking, or feeling, or thinking?" Only with this sort of continuous evaluation and reassessment can even the most novice of students begin to establish a therapeutic treatment approach with psychiatric patients.

  12. Alexithymia and its association with burnout, depression and family support among Greek nursing staff

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    Giotakis Konstantinos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined the relation between alexithymia (i.e. the inability to recognize and verbalize emotions and professional burnout. Considering the absence of relevant studies in the Greek scientific literature, the aim of this work was to examine the associations of alexithymia with the three facets of professional burnout, the perception of family support and depression in nursing personnel. Methods The study was performed in one of the largest hospitals in Greece and included 95 nurses. Assessments of alexithymia, burnout, depression and family support were made by means of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Julkunen Family Support Scale, respectively. Student's t-test, Pearson's correlation and stepwise linear regression were used for the evaluation of data. Results Alexithymia was correlated positively with depression, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and negatively with sense of family support and personal achievement. Additionally, family support was correlated positively with personal achievement and negatively with depression. Conclusion In the scientific literature there is a debate as to whether alexithymia is a stable personality characteristic or if it is dependent on symptoms of mental disorders. We tried to interpret the associations of alexithymia with professional burnout, depressive symptoms and family support. From this study it appears very likely that alexithymia is directly associated with depression and personal achievement, but also – indirectly – with the sense of family support.

  13. Alexithymia and its association with burnout, depression and family support among Greek nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratis, Dionisios; Tselebis, Athanasios; Sikaras, Christos; Moulou, Aikaterini; Giotakis, Konstantinos; Zoumakis, Emmanuel; Ilias, Ioannis

    2009-08-11

    Few studies have examined the relation between alexithymia (i.e. the inability to recognize and verbalize emotions) and professional burnout. Considering the absence of relevant studies in the Greek scientific literature, the aim of this work was to examine the associations of alexithymia with the three facets of professional burnout, the perception of family support and depression in nursing personnel. The study was performed in one of the largest hospitals in Greece and included 95 nurses. Assessments of alexithymia, burnout, depression and family support were made by means of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Julkunen Family Support Scale, respectively. Student's t-test, Pearson's correlation and stepwise linear regression were used for the evaluation of data. Alexithymia was correlated positively with depression, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and negatively with sense of family support and personal achievement. Additionally, family support was correlated positively with personal achievement and negatively with depression. In the scientific literature there is a debate as to whether alexithymia is a stable personality characteristic or if it is dependent on symptoms of mental disorders. We tried to interpret the associations of alexithymia with professional burnout, depressive symptoms and family support. From this study it appears very likely that alexithymia is directly associated with depression and personal achievement, but also indirectly with the sense of family support.

  14. Stress, Social Support, and Burnout Among Long-Term Care Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, Erin L; Northrop, Lynn; Edelstein, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Long-term care nursing staff are subject to considerable occupational stress and report high levels of burnout, yet little is known about how stress and social support are associated with burnout in this population. The present study utilized the job demands-resources model of burnout to examine relations between job demands (occupational and personal stress), job resources (sources and functions of social support), and burnout in a sample of nursing staff at a long-term care facility (N = 250). Hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed that job demands (greater occupational stress) were associated with more emotional exhaustion, more depersonalization, and less personal accomplishment. Job resources (support from supervisors and friends or family members, reassurance of worth, opportunity for nurturing) were associated with less emotional exhaustion and higher levels of personal accomplishment. Interventions to reduce burnout that include a focus on stress and social support outside of work may be particularly beneficial for long-term care staff. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. The role of psychological factors in oncology nurses' burnout and compassion fatigue symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Joana; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2017-06-01

    This study explored the role of several psychological factors in professional quality of life in nurses. Specifically, we tried to clarify the relationships between several dimensions of empathy, self-compassion, and psychological inflexibility, and positive (compassion satisfaction) and negative (burnout and compassion fatigue) domains of professional quality of life. Using a cross-sectional design, a convenience sample of 221 oncology nurses recruited from several public hospitals filling out a battery of self-report measures. Results suggested that nurses that benefit more from their work of helping and assisting others (compassion satisfaction) seem to have more empathic feelings and sensibility towards others in distress and make an effort to see things from others' perspective. Also, they are less disturbed by negative feelings associated with seeing others' suffering and are more self-compassionate. Nurses more prone to experience the negative consequences associated with care-providing (burnout and compassion fatigue) are more self-judgmental and have more psychological inflexibility. In addition, they experience more personal feelings of distress when seeing others in suffering and less feelings of empathy and sensibility to others' suffering. Psychological factors explained 26% of compassion satisfaction, 29% of burnout and 18% of compassion fatigue. We discuss the results in terms of the importance of taking into account the role of these psychological factors in oncology nurses' professional quality of life, and of designing nursing education training and interventions aimed at targeting such factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Comparative Study of Nursing Students and Nurses in Their Twenties on Interpersonal Relations. : Analysis Centering on the Stress Response Burnout

    OpenAIRE

    和田, 由紀子; 小林, 祐子; Wada, Yukiko; Kobayashi, Yuko

    2006-01-01

    We did a questionnaire survey and exam to clarity the connection between stress response burnout and interpersonal relations. The subject of our investigation were nursing students n=226 and 20s nurses in the terminal care unit in the whole country. The results of the exam on nursing students were completely different from a consistent tendency on 20, 30, and 40 nurses. And we analyzed the results on nursing students and 20's nurses based on stress response burnout . According to that, in the...

  17. Psychosocial work environment and burnout among emergency medical and nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribà-Agüir, V; Martín-Baena, D; Pérez-Hoyos, S

    2006-11-01

    The prevalence of burnout syndrome is increasing among doctors and nurses. The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between the psychosocial work environment and burnout syndrome among emergency medical and nursing staff in Spain. A secondary aim was to determine if the effect of this psychosocial work environment on burnout was different for doctors and nurses. A cross-sectional survey was carried out by means of a mail questionnaire among 945 emergency doctors and nursing staff of Spain. The outcome variable was three dimensions of burnout syndrome [emotional exhaustion (EE), personal accomplishment (PA), depersonalisation (DP)]. The explanatory variable was that psychosocial work environment evaluated according to Karasek and Johnson's demand-control model. The adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated by logistical regression. The probability of high EE was greater among those exposed to high psychological demands, OR 4.66 (2.75-7.90), low job control, OR 1.65 (1.04-2.63), and low supervisors' social support, OR 1.64 (1.01-2.59). Emotional exhaustion dimension was negatively influenced by low control only among doctors. Those exposed to low job control had a higher risk of low PA, OR 2.55 (1.66-3.94). There was no evidence of negative effect of psychosocial risk factors on the DP. Prevalence of EE and PA was higher among doctors and nurses. The presence of risk factors derived from work organisation within the work place (psychosocial risk factors) increases the probability of presenting burnout syndrome and, above all, EE.

  18. Burnout syndrome in nursing professionals from urgency and emergency services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nytale Lindsay Cardoso Portela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar como os estudos científicos descrevem a síndrome de Burnout em profissionais de enfermagem de serviços de urgência e emergência. Métodos: Revisão integrativa de literatura realizada através das bases de dados BDENF, IBECS, LILACS, MEDLINE e SciELO, por meio dos descritores: esgotamento profissional and enfermagem. Das 3087 publicações selecionadas pelos descritores, apenas 11 artigos atenderam os critérios de inclusão e exclusão. Resultados: Dentre os artigos selecionados, 07 tratavam do estresse; 04 falavam da qualidade de vida e lazer; 01 abordava sobre os sintomas somáticos associados ao Burnout e 03 detalhavam sobre a síndrome de Burnout, abordando os fatores preditores e as dimensões sintomatológicas de acordo com o Maslach Burnout Inventory. Conclusão: Esse estudo é importante para que população, profissionais e gestores adquiram conhecimento acerca da síndrome, podendo contribuir para o desenvolvimento de estratégias de enfrentamento, que irão minimizar os riscos de desencadeamento do Burnout. Descritores: Esgotamento profissional, Enfermagem, Síndrome.

  19. Clinical Education In psychiatric mental health nursing: Overcoming current challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heeseung; Hwang, Boyoung; Kim, Sungjae; Ko, Heesung; Kim, Sumi; Kim, Chanhee

    2016-04-01

    In response to current challenges in psychiatric mental health nursing education, nursing schools have implemented new strategies in teaching undergraduate nursing students. The objectives of the study were to evaluate learning outcomes of a mental health nursing clinical practicum and to explore students' perceptions of the clinical practicum. This was a mixed-method study. Sixty-three undergraduate nursing students, who were undertaking their first mental health clinical practicum, completed a set of structured questionnaires and answered open-ended questions about the clinical practicum. Answers to open-ended questions were analyzed qualitatively, and learning outcomes (i.e., empathy, mental illness prejudice, simulation-related efficacy, and satisfaction) were measured at three time points: pre-clinical, post-simulation, and post-clinical. Students reported improvement in empathy and simulation-related self-efficacy after the clinical practicum, but no change was found in mental illness prejudice. Students' expectations for and evaluation of the clinical practicum are summarized. The observed improvement in learning outcomes of the clinical practicum may be attributed to the unique contribution of each component of the clinical practicum and the synergic effect of these diverse components. To manage emerging challenges in clinical settings and nursing education, it is critical to develop systematic and comprehensive mental health nursing clinical practicums for undergraduate nursing students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of two different psychiatric nursing courses on nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, perceptions of psychiatric nursing, and career choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Zekiye Çetinkaya; Günüşen, Neslihan Partlak; İnan, Figen Şengün; Ince, Sevecen Çelik; Sari, Ayşe

    This quasi-experimental study was carried out to compare the attitudes towards psychiatry patients of students educated with problem-based learning and students educated with a traditional method in western Turkey. The students' perceptions of psychiatric nursing and their career choices were also evaluated. The sample consisted of 202 students; 130 were educated with a problem-based learning model and 72 were educated with a traditional method. Students educated with the problem-based learning method developed more positive attitudes towards mental illness after the psychiatric nursing course in comparison with students educated with the traditional method. Students educated with the traditional method preferred psychiatric nursing in comparison with nursing students educated with problem-based learning. It is important that the psychiatric nursing curriculum includes topics and programs that will create awareness in students regarding stigmatization of mental illness and its effects. In addition, we suggest that studies are performed to determine the perceptions of students towards psychiatric nursing and the factors that affect their career choices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Professional burnout, stress and job satisfaction of nursing staff at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Portero de la Cruz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to describe the social and work characteristics of the nursing staff at a tertiary hospital in the Public Health Service of Andalucía, to assess the degree of professional professional burnout and job satisfaction of those professionals and to study the possible relation between the professional burnout variables and the stress and job satisfaction levels on the one hand and social and employment variables on the other.METHOD: descriptive and cross-sectional study in a sample of 258 baccalaureate and auxiliary nurses. As research instruments, an original and specific questionnaire was used to collect social and employment variables, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Nursing Stress Scale and the Font-Roja questionnaire. Descriptive, inferential statistics and multivariate analysis were applied.RESULTS: average scores were found for professional stress and satisfaction, corresponding to 44,23 and 65,46 points, respectively. As regards professional burnout, an average score was found on the emotional exhaustion subscale; a high score for depersonalization and a low score for professional accomplishment. Studies are needed to identify the scores on these subscales in health organizations and to produce knowledge on their interrelations.

  2. Effect of spiritual intelligence, emotional intelligence, psychological ownership and burnout on caring behaviour of nurses: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Devinder; Sambasivan, Murali; Kumar, Naresh

    2013-11-01

    To propose a model of prediction of caring behaviour among nurses that includes spiritual intelligence, emotional intelligence, psychological ownership and burnout. Caring behaviour of nurses contributes to the patients' satisfaction, well-being and subsequently to the performance of the healthcare organisations. This behaviour is influenced by physiological, psychological, sociocultural, developmental and spiritual factors. A cross-sectional survey was used, and data were analysed using descriptive statistics and structural equation modelling. Data were collected between July-August 2011. A sample of 550 nurses in practice from seven public hospitals in and around Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia) completed the questionnaire that captured five constructs. Besides nurses, 348 patients from seven hospitals participated in the study and recorded their overall satisfaction with the hospital and the services provided by the nurses. Data were analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM). The key findings are: (1) spiritual intelligence influences emotional intelligence and psychological ownership, (2) emotional intelligence influences psychological ownership, burnout and caring behaviour of nurses, (3) psychological ownership influences burnout and caring behaviour of nurses, (4) burnout influences caring behaviour of nurses, (5) psychological ownership mediates the relationship between spiritual intelligence and caring behaviour and between emotional intelligence and caring behaviour of nurses and (6) burnout mediates the relationship between spiritual intelligence and caring behaviour and between psychological ownership and caring behaviour of nurses. Identifying the factors that affect caring behaviour of nurses is critical to improving the quality of patient care. Spiritual intelligence, emotional intelligence, psychological ownership and burnout of nurses play a significant role in effecting caring behaviour of nurses. Healthcare providers must consider the

  3. Burnout syndrome in nursing professionals from an intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa Santi Fernandes; Maria José Trevizani Nitsche; Ilda de Godoy

    2017-01-01

    Objetivo: Avaliar o nível da Síndrome de burnout nos profissionais de Enfermagem na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva. Metodologia: Estudo quantitativo e transversal, realizado com 47 profissionais de Enfermagem que trabalham na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva de um hospital publico de alta complexidade, no período de Abril a Outubro de 2012. Utilizou-se um questionário estruturado autoaplicável acrescido do Maslach Burnout Inventory, analizou-se por regressão logística pelo teste de Wald. Resultado:...

  4. Decreasing Stress and Burnout in Nurses: Efficacy of Blended Learning With Stress Management and Resilience Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magtibay, Donna L; Chesak, Sherry S; Coughlin, Kevin; Sood, Amit

    The study's purpose was to assess efficacy of blended learning to decrease stress and burnout among nurses through use of the Stress Management and Resiliency Training (SMART) program. Job-related stress in nurses leads to high rates of burnout, compromises patient care, and costs US healthcare organizations billions of dollars annually. Many mindfulness and resiliency programs are taught in a format that limits nurses' attendance. Consistent with blended learning, participants chose the format that met their learning styles and goals; Web-based, independent reading, facilitated discussions. The end points of mindfulness, resilience, anxiety, stress, happiness, and burnout were measured at baseline, postintervention, and 3-month follow-up to examine within-group differences. Findings showed statistically significant, clinically meaningful decreases in anxiety, stress, and burnout and increases in resilience, happiness, and mindfulness. Results support blended learning using SMART as a strategy to increase access to resiliency training for nursing staff.

  5. Patient participation: causing moral stress in psychiatric nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Trine-Lise; Hanssen, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore psychiatric nurses' experiences and perspectives regarding patient participation. Patient participation is an ambiguous, complex and poorly defined concept with practical/clinical, organisational, legal and ethical aspects, some of which in psychiatric units may cause ethical predicaments and moral stress in nurses, for instance when moral caring acts are thwarted by constraints. An explorative quantitative pilot study was conducted at a psychiatric subacute unit through three focus group interviews with a total of nine participants. A thematic analytic approach was chosen. Preliminary empirical findings were discussed with participants before the final data analysis. Ethical research guidelines were followed. Patient participation is a difficult ideal to realise because of vagueness of aim and content. What was regarded as patient participation differed. Some interviewees held that patients may have a say within the framework of restraints while others saw patient participation as superficial. The interviewees describe themselves as patient's spokespersons and contributing to patients participating in their treatment as a great responsibility. They felt squeezed between their ethical values and the 'system'. They found themselves in a negotiator role trying to collaborate with both the doctors and the patients. Privatisation of a political ideal makes nurses vulnerable to burn out and moral distress. Nurses have a particular ethical responsibility towards vulnerable patients, and may themselves be vulnerable when caught in situations where their professional and moral values are threatened. Unclear concepts make for unclear division of responsibility. Patient participation is often a neglected value in current psychiatric treatment philosophy. When healthcare workers' ethical sensibilities are compromised, this may result in moral stress. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. Psychiatric nursing care for adult survivors of child maltreatment: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zalm, Y.C.; Nugteren, W.A.; Hafsteinsdottir, T.B.; van der Venne, C.G.J.M.; Kool, N.; van Meijel, B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. Conclusions: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to ask

  7. Burnout versus depression and sense of coherence: study of Greek nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselebis, A; Moulou, A; Ilias, I

    2001-06-01

    We assessed the relationships between burn out, depression and sense of coherence (SOC) using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, Beck's depression inventory and Antonovsky's SOC questionnaire in a large sample of 17 male and 62 female Greek nurses. Analysis showed that SOC in nursing staff was correlated with burnout (BO) and depression, while the latter was correlated to a lesser degree with BO. The relationship of BO with depression seems to be the result of the relationship between depression and SOC. Thus, we could hypothesize that the degree of SOC renders persons either vulnerable or resistant to both depression and BO, though further studies are warranted. In the hospital setting, the intervention by specialized personnel in order to assist nursing staff with BO may be an appealing option. Further, prevention programs aimed at helping individuals prone to BO could also be envisaged.

  8. Job Satisfaction and Burnout among Intensive Care Unit Nurses and Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde Myhren

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nurses and physicians working in the intensive care unit (ICU may be exposed to considerable job stress. The study aim was to assess the level of and the relationship between (1 job satisfaction, (2 job stress, and (3 burnout symptoms. Methods. A cross-sectional study was performed at ICUs at Oslo University Hospital. 145 of 196 (74% staff members (16 physicians and 129 nurses answered the questionnaire. The following tools were used: job satisfaction scale (scores 10–70, modified Cooper's job stress questionnaire (scores 1–5, and Maslach burnout inventory (scores 1–5; high score in the dimension emotional exhaustion (EE indicates burnout. Personality was measured with the basic character inventory. Dimensions were neuroticism (vulnerability, extroversion (intensity, and control/compulsiveness with the range 0–9. Results. Mean job satisfaction among nurses was 43.9 (42.4–45.4 versus 51.1 (45.3–56.9 among physicians, P<0.05. The mean burnout value (EE was 2.3 (95% CI 2.2–2.4, and mean job stress was 2.6 (2.5–2.7, not significantly different between nurses and physicians. Females scored higher than males on vulnerability, 3.3 (2.9–3.7 versus 2.0 (1.1–2.9 (P<0.05, and experienced staff were less vulnerable, 2.7 (2.2–3.2, than inexperienced staff, 3.6 (3.0–4.2 (P<0.05. Burnout (EE correlated with job satisfaction (r=-0.4, P<0.001, job stress (r=0.6, P<0.001, and vulnerability (r=0.3, P=0.003. Conclusions. The nurses were significantly less satisfied with their jobs compared to the physicians. Burnout mean scores are relatively low, but high burnout scores are correlated with vulnerable personality, low job satisfaction, and high degree of job stress.

  9. Comparison of experienced burnout symptoms in specialist oncology nurses working in hospital oncology units or in hospices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostacoli, Luca; Cavallo, Marco; Zuffranieri, Marco; Negro, Manuela; Sguazzotti, Erica; Picci, Rocco Luigi; Tempia, Patrizia; La Ciura, Pietro; Furlan, Pier Maria

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to clarify the differential contributions of situational and individual factors to burnout symptoms experienced by two independent groups of specialist oncology nurses working in oncology hospital units or in hospices. The study involved a group of specialist oncology nurses working in hospital oncology units (n = 59) and a group of specialist oncology nurses working in hospices (n = 33). Participants were invited to provide demographic data, and indicate the clinical setting in which they worked and their work experience; the Italian versions of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) (a measure of burnout symptoms), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) (a measure of anxiety and depression), and the Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ) (a measure of relational style) were then administered. The two groups of nurses were well matched for age, work experience, and levels of anxiety and depression. Regarding their relational style, the two groups only differed significantly on two subscales of the ASQ (i.e. "Confidence" and "Relationships as Secondary"). The two groups significantly differed in the levels of all burnout symptoms investigated (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal achievement), with nurses working in hospital units showing higher levels of burnout symptoms. Interestingly, multivariate regression analyses showed that the institutional factor (clinical setting in which nurses worked) clearly emerged as the only factor that influenced the level of all burnout symptoms, whereas the contribution of individual factors was less significant. These findings help to clarify the differential contributions of institutional and individual factors to burnout symptoms in specialist oncology nurses, and corroborate the need for interventions to contain nurses' burnout symptoms.

  10. Burnout, Engagement, and Organizational Culture: Differences between Physicians and Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Mijakoski

    2015-08-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Data obtained can be used in implementation of specific organizational interventions in the hospital setting. Providing adequate JD-R interaction can lead to prevention of burnout in health professionals (HPs and contribute positively to better job engagement in HPs and higher quality of patient care.

  11. Burnout Levels and Affecting Factors in Nurses Working in a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Özsoylu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It was aimed to determine the burnout level and associated factors in nurses working in a university hospital. Methods: The study was designed as a cross-sectional study. The Maslach Burnout Inventory, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey were used to assess the level of burnout in nurses working in Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine between April 2017 and May 2017. Results: A total of 44 nurses with the mean age of 30.5 years (range: 22-46 participated in the study. Fourteen (31.8% were working in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU and the remaining 30 (68.2% were working in other departments. 31.8% were in the age group 25-29, 31.8% in the age group 30-34, and 13.6% in the age group 35-39 and, 22.8% of participants were ≥40 years of age. Nurses working in the other departments had higher scores on SF-36 role limitations due to emotional problems scale than PICU nurses (p=0.039. At the same time, PICU nurses were also better in terms of social functioning than nurses working in other departments (p=0.049. It was observed that working in intensive care unit decreased personal goal achievement [odds ratio (OR 2.13,95%, confidence interval (CI 1.21-3.84] 2.13 times and increased depersonalization (OR 1.8, 95%, CI 1.07-3.34 1.8 times. In multiple regression analysis, it was found that working in intensive care unit decreased personal goal achievement (OR 2.07, 95%, CI 1.17-3.74 2.07 times and increased depersonalization (OR 1.76, 95%, CI 1.12-3.21 1.76 times. Conclusion: Nurses working in intensive care units constitute one of the highest risk groups for burnout syndrome due to stressful working conditions as well as intense work environment. For this reason, assessment of burnout in PICU nurses at certain intervals and based on the results obtained, improving working conditions besides providing coping skills training may be suggested.

  12. Burnout mediates the association between depression and patient safety perceptions: a cross-sectional study in hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Judith; Louch, Gemma; Dunning, Alice; Johnson, Olivia; Grange, Angela; Reynolds, Caroline; Hall, Louise; O'Hara, Jane

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between depressive symptoms, burnout and perceptions of patient safety. A mediation model was proposed whereby the association between symptoms of depression and patient safety perceptions was mediated by burnout. There is growing interest in the relationships between depressive symptoms and burnout in healthcare staff and the safety of patient care. Depressive symptoms are higher in healthcare staff than the general population and overlap conceptually with burnout. However, minimal research has investigated these variables in nurses. Given the conceptual overlap between depressive symptoms and burnout, there is also a need for an explanatory model outlining the relative contributions of these factors to patient safety. A cross-sectional questionnaire was distributed at three acute NHS Trusts. Three-hundred and twenty-three hospital nursing staff completed measures of depressive symptoms, burnout and patient safety perceptions (including measures at the level of the individual and the work area/unit) between December 2015 - February 2016. When tested in separate analyses, depressive symptoms and burnout facets were each associated with both patient safety measures. Furthermore, the proposed mediation model was supported, with associations between depressive symptoms and patient safety perceptions fully mediated by burnout. These results suggest that symptoms of depression and burnout in hospital nurses may have implications for patient safety. However, interventions to improve patient safety may be best targeted at improving burnout in particular, with burnout interventions known to be most effective when focused at both the individual and the organisational level. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimenyimana, E; Poggenpoel, M; Myburgh, C; van Niekerk, V

    2009-09-01

    Caring for good people is difficult enough; to care for people who are either aggressive or violent is even more difficult. This is what psychiatric nurses working in the psychiatric institution in which research was done are exposed to on a daily basis. The aim of the research was to explore and describe the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, and contextual study design was utilised. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and naïve sketches. Tesch 's (Creswell, 2004: 256) method of open coding and an independent coder were utilised for data analysis. This study shed some light on the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. The findings show that the level of violence and aggression to which psychiatric nurses are exposed is overwhelming and the consequences are alarming. The contributing factors to this violence and aggression are: the mental status and the conditions in which patients are admitted; the staff shortage; the lack of support among the members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT); and the lack of structured and comprehensive orientation among newly appointed staff members. As a result, psychiatric nurses are emotionally, psychologically, and physically affected. They then respond with the following emotions and behaviour: fear, anger, frustration, despair, hopelessness and helplessness, substance abuse, absenteeism, retaliation and the development of an "I don't care" attitude.

  14. Nurses' perceptions of nursing interventions supporting quality of life in acute psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Anneli; Hätönen, Heli; Kollanen, Marjo; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Välimäki, Maritta

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to examine nurses' (N=29) perceptions of nursing interventions in supporting patients' quality of life (QoL) in acute psychiatric inpatient settings. An explorative descriptive study design was applied. The data were generated through seven focus group interviews and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Five main categories of nursing interventions to support patients' QoL were identified. Interventions were related to care planning, empowering interventions, social interventions, activating interventions, and security interventions. Emphasis should be placed on nurses' opportunities to improve patients' QoL according to patients' individual needs. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. BURNOUT SYNDROME IN NURSING STUDENTS BASED ON EFFECT OF STRESSOR, RELATIONAL MEANING AND COPING STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Mazarina Devi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Professional education program is a program in which nursing students are transformed to become professional nurses. At this level, nursing students will encounter various stressors. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between stressors, relational meaning and coping strategy on burnout syndrome in nursing students who are undergoing professional education. Method: This was a correlational study using cross-sectional approach. Population comprised regular student of nursing profession program at the Faculty of Nursing, Airlangga University. Sample size was determined by simple random sampling and 61 persons were included in the inclusion criteria. Data then analyzed using multiple linear regression test with signi fi cance level ofα < 0.05. Results: This study found that total burnout syndrome was signi fi cantly related to relational meaning (p = 0.005, β = 0.460. Emotional exhaustion was signi fi cantly related to relational meaning (p= 0.001, β = 0.532 and emotion focused coping (p = 0.035, β =0.298. Relational meaning was also signifi cantly related to depersonalization (p = 0.002, β = 0.050. Subsequently, the decline in self-achievement was signi fi cantly related to personal stressors, i.e the number of room mates (p = 0.016, β = 0.344, total learning time/day (p = 0.036, β=0.366 and environmental stressors (workload (p = 0.039, β = -0.349. Discussion: It is suggested for students to prepare for professional education, and the Faculty of Nursing, Airlangga University, should strengthen the function of academic counselors in terms of preceptorship role model in order to avoid the risk of burnout syndrome when the nursing students undergoing professional education.

  16. Student nurses' learning processes in interaction with psychiatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Linda

    2011-01-01

    When the Danish government converted the national practice-oriented nursing qualification from a vocational course to a bachelor’s degree in 2002, the clinical training component was scaled back. Accordingly, mentors needed to optimise students’ learning from this curtailed clinical practice....... A fuller understanding of how student nurses function and learn during clinical training is vital. This article presents the findings of a qualitative investigation of student nurses’ learning processes during their clinical placement in psychiatric nursing practice. An explorative and qualitative...... to understanding and analysing the content of student nurses’ learning processes. Data was generated from qualitative, semi-structured interviews with, observations of, and obser-views with, eleven students. The obser-view process is my development. It is a common reflection between researcher and research...

  17. The Mediating Role of Coping Style in the Relationship between Psychological Capital and Burnout among Chinese Nurses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqing Ding

    Full Text Available Burnout is recognized as an occupational hazard, and nursing has a high risk of burnout. This study aims to explore the relationship between psychological capital (PsyCap and burnout among Chinese nurses and the mediating role of coping style in this relationship.A total of 1,496 nurses (effective response rate: 80.11% from two large general hospitals in Daqing City of China were selected as participants. Data were collected via the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI, the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24, the Chinese Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ and demographic and caregiver-patient relationship. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of positive coping and negative coping, and we used the Bootstrap method to confirm the mediating effect.Self-efficacy, hope, resilience and optimism of nurses were all negatively related with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment among Chinese nurses. Positive coping partially mediated the relationship between hope/optimism and emotional exhaustion and between self-efficacy/optimism and reduced personal accomplishment. Negative coping fully mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and emotional exhaustion, and in the regression model self-efficacy was positively correlated with emotional exhaustion. And negative coping also partially mediated the relationship between hope/optimism and emotional exhaustion and between optimism and depersonalization.PsyCap had effects on burnout and coping style was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Nurses who had a strong sense of self-efficacy adopted more negative coping style, which in turn would lead to higher levels of emotional exhaustion. These findings shed light on the influence of negative coping on burnout, and positive coping was a positive resource for fighting against nurses' burnout. Hence, in order to avoid negative coping style

  18. Factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout development, job satisfaction and patient care quality: a time-lagged study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boamah, Sheila A; Read, Emily A; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2017-05-01

    To test a hypothesized model linking new graduate nurses' perceptions of their manager's authentic leadership behaviours to structural empowerment, short-staffing and work-life interference and subsequent burnout, job satisfaction and patient care quality. Authentic leadership and structural empowerment have been shown to reduce early career burnout among nurses. Short-staffing and work-life interference are also linked to burnout and may help explain the impact of positive, empowering leadership on burnout, which in turn influences job satisfaction and patient care quality. A time-lagged study of Canadian new graduate nurses was conducted. At Time 1, surveys were sent to 3,743 nurses (November 2012-March 2013) and 1,020 were returned (27·3% response rate). At Time 2 (May-July 2014), 406 nurses who responded at Time 1 completed surveys (39·8% response rate). Descriptive analysis was conducted in SPSS. Structural equation modelling in Mplus was used to test the hypothesized model. The hypothesized model was supported. Authentic leadership had a significant positive effect on structural empowerment, which in turn decreased both short-staffing and work-life interference. Short-staffing and work-life imbalance subsequently resulted in nurse burnout, lower job satisfaction and lower patient care quality 1 year later. The findings suggest that short-staffing and work-life interference are important factors influencing new graduate nurse burnout. Developing nurse managers' authentic leadership behaviours and working with them to create and sustain empowering work environments may help reduce burnout, increase nurse job satisfaction and improve patient care quality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Mediating Role of Coping Style in the Relationship between Psychological Capital and Burnout among Chinese Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongqing; Yang, Yanjie; Yang, Xiuxian; Zhang, Tiehui; Qiu, Xiaohui; He, Xin; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lin; Sui, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Burnout is recognized as an occupational hazard, and nursing has a high risk of burnout. This study aims to explore the relationship between psychological capital (PsyCap) and burnout among Chinese nurses and the mediating role of coping style in this relationship. A total of 1,496 nurses (effective response rate: 80.11%) from two large general hospitals in Daqing City of China were selected as participants. Data were collected via the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI), the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24), the Chinese Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ) and demographic and caregiver-patient relationship. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of positive coping and negative coping, and we used the Bootstrap method to confirm the mediating effect. Self-efficacy, hope, resilience and optimism of nurses were all negatively related with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment among Chinese nurses. Positive coping partially mediated the relationship between hope/optimism and emotional exhaustion and between self-efficacy/optimism and reduced personal accomplishment. Negative coping fully mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and emotional exhaustion, and in the regression model self-efficacy was positively correlated with emotional exhaustion. And negative coping also partially mediated the relationship between hope/optimism and emotional exhaustion and between optimism and depersonalization. PsyCap had effects on burnout and coping style was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Nurses who had a strong sense of self-efficacy adopted more negative coping style, which in turn would lead to higher levels of emotional exhaustion. These findings shed light on the influence of negative coping on burnout, and positive coping was a positive resource for fighting against nurses' burnout. Hence, in order to avoid negative coping style, improve skill

  20. Structural characteristics of hospitals and nurse-reported care quality, work environment, burnout and leaving intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Rikard; Smeds Alenius, Lisa; Griffiths, Peter; Runesdotter, Sara; Tishelman, Carol

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether hospital characteristics not readily susceptible to change (i.e. hospital size, university status, and geographic location) are associated with specific self-reported nurse outcomes. Research often focuses on factors within hospitals (e.g. work environment), which are susceptible to change, rather than on structural factors in their own right. However, numerous assumptions exist about the role of structural factors that may lead to a sense of pessimism and undermine efforts at constructive change. Data was derived from survey questions on assessments of work environment and satisfaction, intention to leave, quality of care and burnout (measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory), from a population-based sample of 11 000 registered nurses in Sweden. Mixed model regressions were used for analysis. Registered nurses in small hospitals were slightly more likely to rank their working environment and quality of nursing care better than others. For example 23% of staff in small hospitals were very satisfied with the work environment compared with 20% in medium-sized hospitals and 21% in large hospitals. Registered nurses in urban areas, who intended to leave their job, were more likely to seek work in another hospital (38% vs. 32%). While some structural factors were related to nurse-reported outcomes in this large sample, the associations were small or of questionable importance. The influence of structural factors such as hospital size on nurse-reported outcomes is small and unlikely to negate efforts to improve work environment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Why is psychiatric nursing not the preferred option for nursing students: A cross-sectional study examining pre-nursing and nursing school factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hui Lin; Seow, Esmond; Chua, Boon Yiang; Xie, Huiting; Wang, Jia; Lau, Ying Wen; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-05-01

    There is a shortage of nurses working in the mental health field globally. The aim of the present study was to examine Singapore nursing students' attitudes towards specializing in psychiatric nursing by examining the pre-nursing and nursing school factors as well as attitudes towards psychiatry and personality traits. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted with 500 nursing students from four nursing institutions in Singapore. Students' attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP-18), perception of psychiatric nursing career aspects relative to other fields, and personality traits (mini-IPIP) were assessed. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatric nursing. Logistic regression was used to examine the combined effect of factors upon the outcome. Twenty-six students (5.2%) rated "definitely decided to do" psychiatric nursing. Pre-nursing school factors associated with choosing psychiatry included ethnicity, current education, parents' wishes, having personal/family experience of mental illness, prior work experience, interest in psychiatric nursing and psychology module taken prior to current school admission. Nursing school factors such as teaching methods and clinical exposure were not associated with choosing psychiatric nursing. Positive attitudes towards psychiatry, perception of better career aspects in psychiatric nursing relative to other fields, and the personality traits of extraversion and intellect/imagination were associated with likelihood of choosing psychiatric nursing. Logistic regression revealed Malay (OR: 1.90, 1.14-3.16, p=0.013) and Indian ethnicity (OR: 2.56, 1.32-4.96, p=0.005), interest in psychiatry (OR: 22.56, 8.22-61.92, pnursing than other fields (OR: 1.91, 1.21-3.04, p=0.006), extraversion (OR: 1.09, 1.02-1.17, p=0.012) and positive attitude towards psychiatry (OR: 2.72, 1.75-4.23, pstudents choosing psychiatric nursing. The selection of psychiatry as a specialty by nursing students was affected by pre-nursing

  2. Short sleep duration is dose-dependently related to job strain and burnout in nurses: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Weishan; Guo, Yue Leon; Hung, Yu-Ju; Yang, Chiu-Yueh; Shiao, Judith Shu-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Lack of sleep is a common problem amongst nurses. Short sleep duration has been related to stress and burnout. However, in nurses, the effects of short sleep duration on job strain and burnout are controversial and a clear relationship has been lacking. This study aims to assess whether short sleep duration is related to job strain and burnout statue, and whether such relationship is in a dose-dependent manner. A cross-sectional survey among female nurses in secondary referral health centers in Taiwan, using a self-administered structured questionnaire. Stratified sampling by region and patient bed number category was done to select representative centers for this survey. Approximately 10% of all secondary referral centers were randomly selected from each stratum. Non-linear dose-response relationship between sleep duration and job strain and burnout scores was assessed by general additive models (GAM), adjusting for personal characteristics, work condition, and family situation. Among the 2268 full-time nurses in 39 hospitals invited to participate in this study, 1384 (61%) satisfactorily completed the questionnaire. There were 169 nurses (12.2%) who slept less than 6 h per working day. Among the participants, 37% (n=512) were classified into high strain group. The mean scores of personal, work-related, and client-related burnout were 59.4 (SD=22.0), 54.6 (SD=21.7), and 42.3 (SD=18.6). Compared to those slept longer than 7 h, nurse who slept less than 6 h per working day had higher risk for job strain (adjusted odds ratio, AOR=1.8, 95% confidence interval, CI=1.2-2.7), personal burnout (AOR=3.0, CI=1.7-5.2), work-related burnout (AOR=3.4, CI=2.0-6.0), and client-related burnout (AOR=2.0, CI=1.2-3.6). GAM analysis found a linear relationship between sleep duration and job strain, and client-related burnout. For personal and work-related burnout, a linear increase in burnout score between 7 h and 5 h of sleep was observed, followed by a leveling off for durations of

  3. Effect of professional self-concept on burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China: the mediator role of organisational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Lin; Tian, Lang; Diao, Yongshu; Hu, Xiuying

    2015-10-01

    To examine the associations among professional self-concept, organisational commitment and burnout, and to analyse the mediating role of organisational commitment on the relationship between professional self-concept and burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China. Previous studies have focused on work environmental variables that contributed to burnout in nurses. However, no study has explored the mediating effect of organisational commitment on the correlation between professional self-concept and burnout in community health nurses. A cross-sectional descriptive study. This study was conducted at 36 community health centres in Chengdu, China with 485 nurses sampled using a two-stage sampling method. The measures used in our study included Nurses' Self-concept Questionnaire, Organisational Commitment Scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory. The results of structural equation model techniques indicated that, in the direct approach, positive professional self-concept resulted in increased organisational commitment and reduced burnout. Higher organisational commitment resulted in less burnout. In the indirect approach, organisational commitment performed as a partial mediator on the correlation between professional self-concept and burnout. Positive perception of professional self-concept can result in reduced burnout via enhancing organisational commitment. It is crucial for nursing administrators to develop effective intervention strategies such as skills escalator training and assertive training, and establishing a supportive working environment to enhance nurses' professional self-concept and organisational commitment, and decrease burnout. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Study of Some Demographic Properties Influencing the Burnout Levels of Nurses in Public Hospitals by CHAID Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zübeyir BAĞCI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is aimed to identify the burnout levels of nurses which prevent them from doing their business more efficiently and to examine the effects of various demographic variables on burnout. The data necessary for the research have been gathered from 256 nurses working in public hospitals within borders of central district of Denizli province using “Maslach Burnout Inventory”. They were analyzed by SPSS and CHAID was used as the analysis method. In consequence it has been determined that nurses experience low-level emotional exhaustion, average-level depersonalization and high-level decrease in personal accomplishment. It has also been concluded that burnout levels are affected by demographic properties such as age, marital status, tenure of office, daily workload, education and income level

  5. Nurses’ burnout and counterproductive work behavior in a Nigerian sample: The moderating role of emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard I. Ugwu

    Full Text Available This study examined the moderating role of EI in the relationship between burnout and CWB among 401 nurses drawn from various hospitals within South-eastern Nigeria. Three instruments were used for the collection of data, namely: Counterproductive Work Behaviour Checklist, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and Brief Emotional Intelligence scale. Moderated multiple regression results showed that emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment, positively predicted CWB. In addition, EI significantly and negatively predicted CWB. Results also showed that EI moderated the positive relationship between emotional exhaustion and CWB and between depersonalization and CWB such that the positive relationship between these two dimensions of burnout and CWB was stronger for nurses with low EI compared to those with high EI. The implications of the findings and limitations of the study were discussed. Keywords: Nurses, Burnout, Counterproductive work behaviour, Emotional intelligence

  6. Impact of critical care environment on burnout, perceived quality of care and safety attitude of the nursing team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edinêis de Brito Guirardello

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: assess the perception of the nursing team about the environment of practice in critical care services and its relation with the safety attitude, perceived quality of care and burnout level. Method: cross-sectional study involving 114 nursing professionals from the intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. The following instruments were used: Nursing Work Index-Revised, Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Safety Attitude Questionnaire. Results: the professionals who perceived greater autonomy, good relationships with the medical team and better control over the work environment presented lower levels of burnout, assessed the quality of care as good and reported a positive perception on the safety attitude for the domain job satisfaction. Conclusion: the findings evidenced that environments favorable to these professionals' practice result in lower levels of burnout, a better perceived quality of care and attitudes favorable to patient safety.

  7. Burnout syndrome in nursing assistants of a public hospital in the state of São Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Naiza do Nascimento; de Lucca, Sergio Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The burnout syndrome is a psychosocial phenomenon that arises as a response to chronic interpersonal stressors present at work. There are many aspects that make nursing assistants vulnerable to chronic stress situations that may lead to burnout, highlighting the low degree of autonomy in the healthcare staff and spending more in direct contact with patients. To assess the prevalence of the burnout syndrome in nursing assistants in a public hospital, as well as its association with socio-demographic and professional variables. A socio-demographic and professional questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-SS) were applied to 534 nursing assistants. The prevalence of burnout syndrome among nursing assistants was 5.9%. High emotional exhaustion was observed in 23.6%, 21.9% showed high depersonalization, and 29.9% low professional achievement. It was found statistically significant associations between emotional exhaustion, job sector and marital status; depersonalization, having children and health problems; low professional achievement and job sector and number of jobs. There was association between job satisfaction and the three dimensions. Professionals working in the health area must pay intense and extended attention to people who are dependent upon others. The intimate contact of the nursing assistants with hard-to-handle patients, as well as being afraid to make mistakes in healthcare are additional chronic stress factors and burnout syndrome cases related in this study.

  8. Nursing unit teams matter: Impact of unit-level nurse practice environment, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, and quality of care, and patient adverse events--a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Timmermans, Olaf; Weeks, Susan Mace; van Heusden, Danny; Wouters, Kristien; Franck, Erik

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the impact of nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events variables at the nursing unit level. Nurse practice environment studies show growing insights and knowledge about determining factors for nurse workforce stability, quality of care, and patient safety. Until now, international studies have primarily focused on variability at the hospital level; however, insights at the nursing unit level can reveal key factors in the nurse practice environment. A cross-sectional design with a survey. In a cross-sectional survey, a sample of 1108 nurses assigned to 96 nursing units completed a structured questionnaire composed of various validated instruments measuring nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout, nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events. Associations between the variables were examined using multilevel modelling techniques. Various unit-level associations (simple models) were identified between nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout dimensions, and nurse reported outcome variables. Multiple multilevel models showed various independent variables such as nursing management at the unit level, social capital, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization as important predictors of nurse reported outcome variables such job satisfaction, turnover intentions, quality of care (at the unit, the last shift, and in the hospital within the last year), patient and family complaints, patient and family verbal abuse, patient falls, nosocomial infections, and medications errors. Results suggested a stable nurse work force, with the capability to achieve superior quality and patient safety outcomes, is associated with unit-level favourable perceptions of nurse work environment factors, workload, decision latitude, and social capital, as well low levels of burnout

  9. Factors related to the burnout of Japanese female nurses with children under 3 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Yuko; Suzuki, Eiko; Kobiyama, Atsuko; Maruyama, Akiko; Sera, Yoshiko

    2017-07-01

    Burnout is a common feature among healthcare professionals; however, little systematic research exists on burnout among nurses who are raising children. The burnout-related factors among female nurses with children under the age of 3 years were identified in order to ascertain potential burnout prevention methods. In total, 1681 nurses with children who worked at nine city hospitals in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan, were sent the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey; 1173 nurses responded in June 2014. They were divided according to their sex and children's ages. A data analysis was undertaken for those female nurses with children who were aged under 3 years who provided valid responses (n = 158). A number of factors related to burnout in female nurses with children aged under 3 years was found via a multiple regression analysis: irritation at being unable to attend to their own affairs, over 4-6 h of overtime work per week, having a child aged under 3 years as the first or second child, little sense of work fulfillment, using a childcare facility outside the workplace, dissatisfaction with their salary, feeling ill-qualified as a parent, and a sense of inadequate support. Child care occurs during a limited period and appropriate support is needed. A workplace environment with no overtime work, a childcare facility in the workplace, and mental health support to reduce "feelings of irritation" and "feeling ill-qualified as a parent" could help to prevent burnout in female nurses with toddlers and infants. © 2016 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  10. The Mediating Role of Coping Style in the Relationship between Psychological Capital and Burnout among Chinese Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yongqing; Yang, Yanjie; Yang, Xiuxian; Zhang, Tiehui; Qiu, Xiaohui; He, Xin; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lin; Sui, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Burnout is recognized as an occupational hazard, and nursing has a high risk of burnout. This study aims to explore the relationship between psychological capital (PsyCap) and burnout among Chinese nurses and the mediating role of coping style in this relationship. Methods A total of 1,496 nurses (effective response rate: 80.11%) from two large general hospitals in Daqing City of China were selected as participants. Data were collected via the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI), the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24), the Chinese Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ) and demographic and caregiver-patient relationship. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of positive coping and negative coping, and we used the Bootstrap method to confirm the mediating effect. Results Self-efficacy, hope, resilience and optimism of nurses were all negatively related with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment among Chinese nurses. Positive coping partially mediated the relationship between hope/optimism and emotional exhaustion and between self-efficacy/optimism and reduced personal accomplishment. Negative coping fully mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and emotional exhaustion, and in the regression model self-efficacy was positively correlated with emotional exhaustion. And negative coping also partially mediated the relationship between hope/optimism and emotional exhaustion and between optimism and depersonalization. Conclusion PsyCap had effects on burnout and coping style was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Nurses who had a strong sense of self-efficacy adopted more negative coping style, which in turn would lead to higher levels of emotional exhaustion. These findings shed light on the influence of negative coping on burnout, and positive coping was a positive resource for fighting against nurses’ burnout. Hence, in order to

  11. Career Choice and Longevity in U.S. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Robbi K; Diefenbeck, Cynthia A; Brown, Carlton G

    2015-06-01

    The demand for mental health services in the United States taxes the existing care continuum and is projected to increase as federal initiatives such as the Affordable Care Act and mental health parity improve access to, and coverage for, mental health services. Quality health care providers, such as psychiatric-mental health nurses, are needed to bolster the mental health system. Prior research has focused on the unpopularity of psychiatric nursing as a career choice for nursing students. The purpose of this study is to understand how seasoned psychiatric nurses came to choose and remain in the specialty; descriptive phenomenology is used. In a face-to-face interview, eight registered nurses described their experiences with psychiatric nursing as a student, their entry into psychiatric nursing, and factors related to their longevity in the specialty. Giorgi's Existential Phenomenological Research Method was employed to analyze the interview data. Three themes emerged related to career choice: Interest Developed Prior to or While in Nursing School, Personal Relevance, and Validation of Potential. Three themes emerged related to retention: Overcoming Stereotypes to Develop Career Pride, Positive Team Dynamics, and Remaining Hopeful. Nurse educators play an important role in identifying talent, validating capability, enhancing interest, and increasing students' confidence to pursue a psychiatric nursing career, while nursing administrators and clinical specialists play a key role in retention. Findings also stimulate pertinent questions surrounding the long-term viability of the psychiatric-mental health nursing specialty.

  12. Occurrence of post traumatic stress symptoms and their relationship to professional quality of life (ProQoL) in nursing staff at a forensic psychiatric security unit: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvrud, Christian; Nonstad, Kåre; Palmstierna, Tom

    2009-04-16

    Violence is frequent towards nurses in forensic mental health hospitals. Implications of this high risk environment have not been systematically explored. This paper explores occurrence of symptoms on post traumatic stress and their relationship to professional quality of life. Self report questionnaires assessing symptoms of post traumatic stress and professional quality of life were distributed among psychiatric nurses in a high security forensic psychiatric unit with high frequency of violent behaviour. Relationships between post traumatic stress symptoms, forensic nursing experience, type of ward and compassion satisfaction, burnout and compassion fatigue were explored. The prevalence of post traumatic stress symptoms was low. Low scores were found on compassion satisfaction. Length of psychiatric nursing experience and low scores on compassion satisfaction were correlated to increased post traumatic stress symptoms. Although high violence frequency, low rate of post traumatic stress symptoms and low compassion satisfaction scores was found. High staff/patient ratio and emotional distance between staff and patients are discussed as protective factors.

  13. Job satisfaction among psychiatric registered nurses in New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, T P

    2008-06-01

    This research used Herzberg et al.'s two-factor theory as a framework with which to examine job satisfaction in a sample of 161 registered psychiatric nurses in the states of Connecticut, Maine and Massachusetts (USA). Weiss et al.'s Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire short form was used to measure possible relationships between ability utilization, compensation, co-workers, achievement and job satisfaction. Findings support Herzberg et al.'s theory, showing moderate correlations among nurses' ability utilization, achievement and job satisfaction. Mean general satisfaction of respondents was closer to satisfied than neutral; respondents indicated greatest satisfaction with ability utilization (86%) and achievement (83%); 67% were satisfied with co-workers, and 52% with compensation. Respondents were least satisfied with compensation, with 14% indicating that they were very dissatisfied. Although compensation was an issue, it is possible that other factors, such as safety, management conflict, and balancing the needs of job and family, if addressed, may help increase job satisfaction and retention of psychiatric nursing staff.

  14. [Facilitating the diagnosis of depression and burnout by identifying demographic and work-related risk and protective factors among nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ádám, Szilvia; Nistor, Anikó; Nistor, Katalin; Cserháti, Zoltán; Mészáros, Veronika

    2015-08-09

    Depression and burnout are frequent comorbidities among nurses. Despite similar symptoms, their management differ. Therefore, their timely diagnosis is essential. To identify demographic and work-related risk and protective factors of burnout and depression, and facilitate their diagnosis. A cross-sectional study among 1,713 nurses was carried out. Depression and burnout were assessed by the shortened Beck Depression Questionnaire and Maclach Burnout Inventory, respectively. Risk and protective factors were explored using t-tests and analysis of variance. The prevalence of depression and moderate-to-high burnout was 35.1% and 34-74%, respectively. Having a partner/child and longer employment in the outpatient setting protected from burnout. Lack of a partner and male sex emerged as risk factors of depression and depersonalisation, respectively. High prevalence of depression and burnout among nurses poses a significant public health issue. Familiarity with the disease-specific risk and protective factors identified in this research may facilitate timely diagnosis and effective disease management.

  15. Community psychiatric nurses and the care co-ordinator role: squeezed to provide 'limited nursing'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Alan

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports a study illuminating the factors that either facilitate or constrain the ability of community psychiatric nurses, in their role as care co-ordinators, to meet service users' and carers' needs. The Care Programme Approach is the key policy underpinning community-focused mental health services in England, but has been unevenly implemented and is associated with increased inpatient bed use. The care co-ordinator role is central to the Care Programme Approach and is most often held by community psychiatric nurses, but there has been little research into how this role is performed or how it affects the work of community psychiatric nurses and their ability to meet the needs of service users. A multiple case study of seven sectorised community mental health teams was employed over 2 years using predominantly qualitative methods including participant observation, semi-structured interviews and document review. The data were collected in one National Health Service trust in south England between 1999 and 2001. Additional duties and responsibilities specifically associated with the care co-ordinator role and multidisciplinary working, combined with heavy workloads, produced 'limited nursing', whereby community psychiatric nurses were unable to provide evidence-based psychosocial interventions that are recognized to reduce relapse amongst people with severe mental illness. The role of the Care Programme Approach care co-ordinator was not designed to support the provision of psychosocial interventions. Consequently, community psychiatric nurses in the co-ordinator role are faced with competing demands and are unable to provide the range of structured, evidence-based interventions required. This may partially account for the increased inpatient bed use associated with the Care Programme Approach.

  16. The effect of perceived organisational support on burnout among community health nurses in China: the mediating role of professional self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Lin; Tian, Lang; Diao, Yongshu

    2016-01-01

    To examine the mediating effect of professional self-concept on the association between perceived organisational support and burnout among community health nurses in Chengdu, China. Burnout is a common phenomenon among nurses and previous studies have focused on work environmental factors contributing to burnout. Limited studies have examined the effects of perceived organisational support and professional self-concept on burnout among community health nurses. This was a cross-sectional study with 551 community health nurses in Chengdu, China, which included a two-stage sampling method. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the relationships among perceived organisational support, professional self-concept and burnout. The final sample included 456 nurses (82.7%). Perceived organisational support was a significant positive direct predictor for professional self-concept and a significant negative direct predictor for burnout. Professional self-concept was a significant negative direct contributor to burnout. Professional self-concept had a mediating effect on the relationship between perceived organisational support and burnout. Perceived organisational support may result in reduced burnout by facilitating the development of positive professional self-concept. Strategies such as establishing a supportive work environment and professional competence training may be effective methods for burnout prevention and management among community health nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Stress and burnout in community mental health nursing: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D; Burnard, P; Coyle, D; Fothergill, A; Hannigan, B

    2000-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that suggests that many community mental health nurses (CMHNs) experience considerable stress and burnout. This review aimed to bring together the research evidence in this area for CMHNs working within the UK. Seventeen papers were identified in the literature, seven of which looked at stress and burnout for all members of community mental health teams (CMHTs) and the remaining 10 papers focused on CMHNs. The evidence indicates that those health professionals working as part of community teams are experiencing increasing levels of stress and burnout as a result of increasing workloads, increasing administration and lack of resources. For CMHNs specific stressors were identified. These included increases in workload and administration, time management, inappropriate referrals, safety issues, role conflict, role ambiguity, lack of supervision, not having enough time for personal study and NHS reforms, general working conditions and lack of funding and resources. Areas for future research are described and the current study of Welsh CMHNs is announced. This review has been completed against a background of further significant changes in the health service. In the mental health field, specific new initiatives will have a significant impact on the practice of community mental health nursing. A new National Framework for Mental Health, along with a review of the Mental Health Act (1983), will undoubtedly help to shape the future practice of mental health nursing.

  18. Burnout in Relation to Specific Contributing Factors and Health Outcomes among Nurses: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamisa, Natasha; Peltzer, Karl; Oldenburg, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Nurses have been found to experience higher levels of stress-related burnout compared to other health care professionals. Despite studies showing that both job satisfaction and burnout are effects of exposure to stressful working environments, leading to poor health among nurses, little is known about the causal nature and direction of these relationships. The aim of this systematic review is to identify published research that has formally investigated relationships between these variables. Six databases (including CINAHL, COCHRANE, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PROQUEST and PsyINFO) were searched for combinations of keywords, a manual search was conducted and an independent reviewer was asked to cross validate all the electronically identified articles. Of the eighty five articles that were identified from these databases, twenty one articles were excluded based on exclusion criteria; hence, a total of seventy articles were included in the study sample. The majority of identified studies exploring two and three way relationships (n = 63) were conducted in developed countries. Existing research includes predominantly cross-sectional studies (n = 68) with only a few longitudinal studies (n = 2); hence, the evidence base for causality is still very limited. Despite minimal availability of research concerning the small number of studies to investigate the relationships between work-related stress, burnout, job satisfaction and the general health of nurses, this review has identified some contradictory evidence for the role of job satisfaction. This emphasizes the need for further research towards understanding causality. PMID:23727902

  19. Prevalence of burnout syndrome in oncology nursing: A meta-analytic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadas-De la Fuente, Guillermo A; Gómez-Urquiza, Jose L; Ortega-Campos, Elena M; Cañadas, Gustavo R; Albendín-García, Luis; De la Fuente-Solana, Emilia I

    2018-01-03

    To determine the prevalence of high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and low personal accomplishment in nursing professionals in oncology services. A meta-analytical study was performed. The search was carried out in March 2017 in Pubmed, CINAHL, Scopus, Scielo, Proquest, CUIDEN, and LILACS databases. Studies using Maslach Burnout Inventory for the assessment of burnout were included. The total sample of oncology nurses was n = 9959. The total number of included studies was n = 17, with n = 21 samples for the meta-analysis of emotional exhaustion and n = 18 for depersonalization and low personal accomplishment. The prevalence of emotional exhaustion and of depersonalization was 30% (95% CI = 26%-33%) and 15% (95% CI = 9%-23%), respectively, and that of low personal performance was 35% (95% CI = 27%-43%). The are many oncology nurses with emotional exhaustion and low levels of personal accomplishment. The presence and the risk of burnout among these staff members are considerable. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Personality, organizational stress, and attitudes toward work as prospective predictors of professional burnout in hospital nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudek-Knežević, Jasna; Kalebić Maglica, Barbara; Krapić, Nada

    2011-01-01

    Aim To examine to what extent personality traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness), organizational stress, and attitudes toward work and interactions between personality and either organizational stress or attitudes toward work prospectively predict 3 components of burnout. Methods The study was carried out on 118 hospital nurses. Data were analyzed by a set of hierarchical regression analyses, in which personality traits, measures of organizational stress, and attitudes toward work, as well as interactions between personality and either organizational stress or attitudes toward work were included as predictors, while 3 indices of burnout were measured 4 years later as criteria variables. Results Personality traits proved to be significant but weak prospective predictors of burnout and as a group predicted only reduced professional efficacy (R2 = 0.10), with agreeableness being a single negative predictor. Organizational stress was positive, affective-normative commitment negative predictor, while continuance commitment was not related to any dimension of burnout. We found interactions between neuroticism as well as conscientiousness and organizational stress, measured as role conflict and work overload, on reduced professional efficacy (βNRCWO = -0.30; ßcRCWO = -0.26). We also found interactions between neuroticism and affective normative commitment (β = 0.24) and between openness and continuance commitment on reduced professional efficacy (β = -0.23), as well as interactions between conscientiousness and continuance commitment on exhaustion. Conclusion Although contextual variables were strong prospective predictors and personality traits weak predictors of burnout, the results suggested the importance of the interaction between personality and contextual variables in predicting burnout. PMID:21853549

  1. Job burnout among critical care nurses from 14 adult intensive care units in Northeastern China: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Chun; Huang, De-Sheng; Guan, Peng

    2014-06-19

    The shortage of qualified nurses is one of the critical challenges in the field of healthcare. Among the contributing factors, job burnout has been indicated as a risk factor for the intention to leave. The purpose of this study was to provide a better understanding of the local status and reference data for coping strategies for intensive care unit (ICU)-nurse burnout among Liaoning ICU nurses. Observational study. 17 ICUs from 10 tertiary-level hospitals in Liaoning, China. 431 ICU nurses from 14 ICUs nested in 10 tertiary-level hospitals in Liaoning, China, were invited during October and November 2010. Burnout was measured using the 22-item Chinese version of Maslach Burnout Inventory-Health Service Survey (MBI-HSS) questionnaires. 14 ICUs responded actively and were included; the response rate was 87.7% among the 486 invited participants from these 17 ICUs. The study population was a young population, with the median age 25 years, IQR 23-28 years and female nurses accounted for the major part (88.5%). 68 nurses (16%) were found to have a high degree of burnout, earning high emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores together with a low personal accomplishment score. The present study indicated a moderate distribution of burnout among ICU nurses in Liaoning, China. An investigation into the burnout levels of this population could bring more attention to ICU caregivers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Determinants of Burnout in Acute and Critical Care Military Nursing Personnel: A Cross-Sectional Study from Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Elizabeth; Carnero, Andrés M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive measures for this high-risk occupational group. In this context, we aimed to examine the association between the dimensions of burnout and selected socio-demographic and occupational factors in military acute/critical care nursing personnel from Lima, Peru. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study in 93 nurses/nurse assistants from the acute and critical care departments of a large, national reference, military hospital in Lima, Peru, using a socio-demographic/occupational questionnaire and a validated Spanish translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Total scores for each of the burnout dimensions were calculated for each participant. Higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores, and lower personal achievement scores, implied a higher degree of burnout. We used linear regression to evaluate the association between each of the burnout dimensions and selected socio-demographic and occupational characteristics, after adjusting for potential confounders. The associations of the burnout dimensions were heterogeneous for the different socio-demographic and occupational factors. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were independently associated with having children (pdepersonalization scores were independently associated with being single compared with being divorced, separated or widowed (p<0.01), working in the emergency room/intensive care unit compared with the recovery room (p<0.01), and inversely associated with age (p<0.05). Finally, higher personal achievement scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05). Conclusion Among Peruvian military acute and critical care nursing personnel, potential screening and preventive interventions should focus on younger/less experienced nurses/nurse assistants, who are

  3. Psychometric properties of the Maslach Burnout Inventory for Human Services among Italian nurses: a test of alternative models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanti, Renato; Lombardo, Caterina; Lucidi, Fabio; Violani, Cristiano; Lazzari, David

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the factor structure of an Italian version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory for Human Service employees. In addition we examined the reliability and construct validity of the scale. There is increasing evidence that nurses are at risk of experiencing burnout. Despite the vast international use of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey, its factor structure and reliability are not beyond question. In a sample of nurses (N = 1613) six alternative factor models of the instrument were tested using confirmatory factor analysis. Furthermore, we examined the invariance of the pattern of factor loadings of the model that better fitted the data across gender groups. To test construct validity, participants completed four subscales of Symptoms Check List 90-R. Internal consistency was evaluated computing Cronbach's alpha estimates of the scales. The study was conducted in 2007 and 2008 in Italy. The factor analysis provided support for a 20-item version identifying the three original dimensions. The model was found to be factorially invariant between men and women. Correlations between the latent MBI-HSS dimensions and distress variables were in line with theoretical predictions. Reliability was supported by acceptable Cronbach's alpha indexes. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Service Survey has acceptable validity and reliability for measuring burnout among nurses, and can help healthcare managers to offer interventions to reduce burnout among nurses. Limitations of the study and suggestions for further research are highlighted. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Psychiatric hospital nursing staff's experiences of participating in group-based clinical supervision:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Angel, Sanne; Traynor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Group-based clinical supervision is commonly offered as a stress-reducing intervention in psychiatric settings, but nurses often feel ambivalent about participating. This study aimed at exploring psychiatric nurses' experiences of participating in groupbased supervision and identifying psychosocial...... reasons for their ambivalence. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 psychiatric nurses at a Danish university hospital. The results indicated that participation in clinical supervision was difficult for the nurses because of an uncomfortable exposure to the professional community. The sense...... of exposure was caused by the particular interactional organisation during the sessions, which brought to light pre-existing but covert conflicts among the nurses....

  5. Differences between Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses' family-focused practice in adult mental health services

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grant, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric nurses\\' practice with parents who have mental illness, their children and families is an important issue internationally. This study provides a comparison of Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses\\' family-focused practices in adult mental health services. Three hundred and forty three nurses across Ireland and 155 from Australia completed the Family Focused Mental Health Practice Questionnaire. Cross-country comparisons revealed significant differences, in terms of family-focused skill, knowledge, confidence and practice. Australian psychiatric nurses engaged in higher family-focused practice compared to Irish nurses. The comparative differences between countries may be attributable to differences in training, workplace support and policy.

  6. Efficacy of integrated interventions combining psychiatric care and nursing home care for nursing home residents: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Janine; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Verhey, Frans R J; Schols, Jos M G A

    2010-01-01

    Nursing home residents needing both psychiatric care and nursing home care for either somatic illness or dementia combined with psychiatric disorders or severe behavioural problems are referred to as Double Care Demanding patients, or DCD patients. Integrated models of care seem to be necessary in order to improve the well-being of these residents. Two research questions were addressed. First, which integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are described in the research literature? And second, which outcomes of integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are reported in the literature? A critical review of studies was done that involved integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care on psychiatric disorders and severe behavioural problems in nursing home patients. A systematic literature search was performed in a number of international databases. Eight intervention trials, including four RCTs (2b level of evidence), were identified as relevant studies for the purpose of this review. Seven studies, three of which were RCTs, showed beneficial effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach combining medical, psychiatric and nursing interventions on severe behavioural problems in DCD nursing home patients. Important elements of a successful treatment strategy for DCD nursing home patients include a thorough assessment of psychiatric, medical and environmental causes as well as programmes for teaching behavioural management skills to nurses. DCD nursing home patients were found to benefit from short-term mental hospital admission.This review underlines the need for more rigorously designed studies to assess the effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach towards DCD nursing home residents. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. How Changes in Psychosocial Job Characteristics Impact Burnout in Nurses: A Longitudinal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanti, Renato; van der Doef, Margot; Maes, Stan; Meier, Laurenz Linus; Lazzari, David; Violani, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this longitudinal study was to test the Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS) model and to analyze whether changes in psychosocial job characteristics are related to (changes in) burnout. Previous studies on the effects of JDCS variables on burnout dimensions have indicated that the iso-strain hypothesis (i.e., high job demands, low control, and low support additively predict high stress reactions) and the buffer hypotheses (i.e., high job control and/or social support is expected to moderate the negative impact of high demands on stress reactions) have hardly been examined concurrently in a longitudinal design; and that the effects of changes of psychosocial job variables on burnout dimensions have hardly been analyzed. This two wave study was carried out over a period of 14 months in a sample of 217 Italian nurses. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the cross lagged main and interactive effects of JDCS variables, and to analyse the across-time effects of changes in JDCS dimensions on burnout variables. The Time 1 job characteristics explained 2-8% of the variance in the Time 2 burnout dimensions, but no support for the additive, or the buffer hypothesis of the JDCS model was found. Changes in job characteristics explained an additional 3-20% of variance in the Time 2 burnout dimensions. Specifically, high levels of emotional exhaustion at Time 2 were explained by high levels of social support at Time 1, and unfavorable changes in demands, control, and support over time; high depersonalization at Time 2 was explained by high social support at time 1 and by an increase in demands over time; and high personal accomplishment at Time 2 was predicted by high demands, high control, interactive effect demands × control × social support, at Time 1, and by a decrease in demands over time. No reversed effects of burnout on work characteristics have been found. Our findings suggest that the work environment is subject to changes: the majority of

  8. Stress, coping and burnout among Intensive Care Unit nursing staff: associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolhe, Rafaela; Barbosa, Ricardo Luis; Oliveira, Elaine Machado de; Costa, Ana Lúcia Siqueira; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2015-02-01

    Objective To investigate emotional stress, coping and burnout among nursing staff and their association with biosocial factors and characteristics of work in Intensive Care Units (ICU). Method This was a cross-sectional study, conducted in eight ICUs at a teaching hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, in October 2012. Biosocial data and information about the professionals' work was gathered, and they were given the Scale of Occupational Stress, Scale of Occupational Coping, List of Signs and Symptoms of Stress and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results The study sample consisted of 287 subjects, predominately women, with partners and children. Most professionals presented moderate stress levels and control as a coping strategy (74.47% and 79.93%, respectively), and burnout was present among 12.54%. Factors associated with stress were related to working conditions. The most prevalent protective factors were having a partner, working in the clinical ICU and liking work, while adequate amount of sleep was a protective factor for burnout. Conclusion Control of the working environment and adequate sleep are decisive and protective factors in dealing with situations of occupational stress.

  9. Empathy, loneliness, burnout, and life satisfaction in Chilean nurses of palliative care and homecare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marilaf Caro, Magdalena; San-Martín, Montserrat; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Vivanco, Luis

    Empathy has been described as an essential competence of healthcare professionals who are working in palliative care and homecare services. In these services, usually accompanied by a high risk of physical and emotional burnout, empathy can play an important role in the improvement of occupational wellbeing. The aim of this study was to confirm the role of empathy in the prevention of loneliness and burn out, and in the promotion of life satisfaction. In 2016, an observational study was carried out in Chile with professional nurses who were working in palliative care and homecare services. Empathy with the patients, loneliness, life satisfaction, and burnout were measured using psychometric scales. Correlation analyses were applied to confirm relationships among the elements measured. In a sample of 64 participants, positive correlations were confirmed between empathy and life satisfaction (P = 0.40; p = 0.003), and between empathy and professional experience (P = 0.29; p = 0.04). On the other hand, inverse correlations were confirmed between empathy and burnout (P = -0.38; p = 0. 01), and between empathy and loneliness (P = -0.41; p = 0.004). These findings confirm the important role that empathy plays in the prevention of loneliness and burnout, and in the promotion of life satisfaction. Evidence found suggests that empathetic abilities can be improved by the professional experience. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. A systematic review on the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gi, Toh Shir; Devi, Kamala M; Neo Kim, Emily Ang

    2011-01-01

    Nursing shortage is a global issue that which affects oncology nursing. Oncology nurses are more prone to experience job dissatisfaction, stress and burnout when they work in units with poor staffing. There is thus a need for greater understanding of the relationship between the nursing shortage and nursing outcomes in oncology/haematology settings. This review aimed to establish the best available evidence concerning the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings; and to make recommendations for practice and future research. Types of participants: This review considered studies that included oncology registered nurses (RNs) who were more than 18 years of age and worked in either inpatient or outpatient oncology/haematology wards or units for the adult or paediatric patients.Types of intervention: This review considered studies that evaluated the relationship between the nursing shortage and nurses' job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels in oncology/haematology settings.Types of outcomes: This review included studies that measured job satisfaction, stress and burnout levels using different outcomes measures. Job satisfaction was determined by the Measure of Job Satisfaction scale, the Misener Nurse Practitioner Job Satisfaction Scale and the Likert scale, stress by the Pediatric Oncology Nurse Stressor Questionnaire and burnout by the Maslash Burnout Inventory scale.Types of studies: This review included descriptive/descriptive-correlational studies which were published in English. The search strategy sought to identify published and unpublished studies conducted between 1990 and 2010. Using a three-step search strategy, the following databases were accessed: CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, ScienceDirect, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, Proquest and Mednar. Two independent reviewers assessed each paper for methodological validity prior to inclusion in

  11. Descriptive study of burnout, compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction in undergraduate nursing students at a tertiary education institution in KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina T. Mathias

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have investigated burnout and compassion fatigue among nurses and effects in the nursing profession. However, there are limited investigations of burnout and compassion fatigue among undergraduate nursing students in South Africa, as nursing students may experience distressful situations during their nursing education course, which may have an impact during their training and in their profession as they graduate.Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to describe compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and burnout among undergraduate nursing students at a tertiary nursing institution.Methods: A quantitative descriptive study was conducted to describe compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and burnout among undergraduate nursing students at a tertiary nursing institution in KwaZulu-Natal. Convenience sampling was used.Results: Sixty-seven undergraduate students (26 third-year and 41 fourth-year nursing students took the self-test Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL. The study results indicate that undergraduate students experienced average levels of compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction.Conclusion: As shown in the study, some of the undergraduate students are experiencing compassion fatigue and burnout, associated with relieving suffering of others. Therefore, knowledge of compassion fatigue and burnout and the coping strategies should be part of nursing training.

  12. Comparing Mental Illness Stigma among Nurses in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahimi Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stigma can complicate people’s mental health problems by affecting different sides of personal life, increasing negative attitudes, causing discriminatory behavior towards them, and reducing the chances of recovery and returning to normal life. This research aims to compare the stigma of mental illness among nurses working in psychiatric and non-psychiatric wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. A total of 240 nurses participated in this descriptive and analytic study. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI Scale, which is a 40-item self-report questionnaire. All data were analyzed using SPSS 13. The majority of nurses have a medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness, and there is no significant relation between the type of wards and mean stigma scores. After eliminating factors such as mental illness in nurses and their families, it seems that only working with people with mental illness in psychiatric wards is not enough to create a positive attitude toward them. Additionally, the less physical activity and taking advantage of legal benefits of work hardship for psychiatric nurses, low income, and stigma toward psychiatric nursing, probably may make a difference in inclining to work in psychiatry ward between the two groups in spite of relatively equal stigma scores.

  13. Compassion fatigue and burnout in Iranian nurses: The role of perceived social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariapooran, Saeed

    2014-05-01

    Nurses are at risk for symptoms of compassion fatigue (CF) and burnout (BO). Social support plays an important role in predicting CF and BO. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of the symptoms of CF and BO and the role of perceived social support in predicting these symptoms in Iranian nurses. Using a correlational descriptive survey research design, we selected 173 participants among the nurses working in public hospitals of Malayer, Iran. Professional Quality of Life (CF and BO subscales) and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) were used for collecting the data. The obtained results indicated that the prevalence of CF and BO symptoms was 45.3% and 15.03%, respectively, in Iranian nurses. Social support (significant other, family, and friends) was negatively correlated to BO (P nurses. Based on the obtained results, some nurses (especially emergency nurses) are at risk for CF and BO and social support negatively correlated to CF and BO in Iranian nurses. It is necessary to develop support systems for nurses who are at risk for CF and BO.

  14. Relation of Compassionate Competence to Burnout, Job Stress, Turnover Intention, Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment for Oncology Nurses in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-A; Ahn, Seung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Nursing focuses on the development of an empathic relationship between the nurse and the patients. Compassionate competence, in particular, is a very important trait for oncology nurses. The current study sought to determine the degree of compassionate competence in oncology nurses, as well as to determine the relationships between compassionate competence, burnout, job stress, turnover intention, degrees of job satisfaction, and organizational commitment in oncology nurses. A descriptive correlational study evaluating the relationships between compassionate competence, burnout, job stress, turnover intention, degrees of job satisfaction, and organizational commitment in 419 oncology nurses was conducted between January 30 and February 20, 2015. The average score of compassionate competence for oncology nurses in the current study was higher than for clinical nurses. The correlational analysis between compassionate competence and organizational commitment, burnout, job stress, turnover intention, and degree of job satisfaction revealed a high correlation between compassionate competence and positive job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Compassionate competence was higher in oncology nurses than in nurses investigated in previous studies and positively correlated with work experience. Job satisfaction and organizational commitment in nurses may be improved through compassionate competence enhancement programs that employ a variety of experiences.

  15. Burnout, social support, and coping at work among social workers, psychologists, and nurses: the role of challenge/control appraisals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zur, Hasida; Michael, Keren

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is twofold: (1) to compare stress appraisals, coping strategies, social resources, and burnout at work between social workers, psychologists and nurses; and (2) to assess the effectiveness of appraisals and support in reducing burnout and enhancing effective coping strategies. Questionnaires containing assessments of work stress appraisals, coping strategies used to deal with problems at work, and social support at work, as well as burnout measures of exhaustion, depersonalization, and accomplishment were completed by 249 female professionals (age range 25-61). No differences were observed between the three professions on most psychological measures, except for the depersonalization outcome of burnout, which was significantly lower among psychologists than among nurses or social workers. High challenge/control appraisal of the job was directly related to all burnout outcomes, contributing to less exhaustion and depersonalization and to more personal accomplishment. The challenge/control appraisal was also negatively associated with emotion-focused coping. By comparison, the stress/load appraisal contributed to more exhaustion at work, while emotion-focused coping contributed to higher depersonalization. Social support was associated with higher challenge/control appraisal, with the latter mediating support effects on burnout. These data suggest that the perception of challenge/control in one's work may be an important factor in preventing work burnout in the three professions tested in the study.

  16. Burnout and Stress Among Nurses in a University Tertiary Hospital Burnout y estrés en enfermeros de un hospital universitario de alta complejidad Burnout e estresse em enfermeiros de um hospital universitário de alta complexidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Regina Lorenz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional, analytical and correlational study investigated the existence of Burnout based on a sample of 149 nurses of a university tertiary hospital from October to December 2008 and correlate Burnout with stressors in the hospital work environment. The Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Nurses’ Stress Inventory and a questionnaire to characterize the subjects were applied. The results indicated the presence of Burnout in 7.3% of nurses (quartile and 10.22% (tercile, and also a correlation among the inventories’ domains. Vulnerability to this type of illness among nurses was increased by stress experienced in the work environment.Se trata de un estudio transversal, analítico y de correlación que tuvo por objetivo investigar la existencia de Burnout en una muestra de 149 enfermeros de un hospital universitario de alta complejidad, en el período de octubre a diciembre de 2008, correlacionándolo con factores de estrés del ambiente de trabajo hospitalario. Fueron aplicados el Inventario de Burnout de Maslach, el Inventario de Estrés en Enfermeros y una ficha de caracterización de los sujetos. Los resultados indicaron la presencia de las tres dimensiones indicativas de Burnout en 7,3% de los enfermeros (cuartil y 10,22% (tercil, así como la correlación entre dominios de los inventarios. La vulnerabilidad para ese tipo de enfermedad, en enfermeros, fue potencializada por la existencia de factores de estrés en el ambiente de trabajo.Estudo transversal, analítico e correlacional que objetivou investigar a existência de Burnout em amostra de 149 enfermeiros de um hospital universitário de alta complexidade, no período de outubro a dezembro de 2008, correlacionando-o com estressores do ambiente de trabalho hospitalar. Foram aplicados o inventário de Burnout de Maslach, o inventário de estresse em enfermeiros e uma ficha de caracterização dos sujeitos. Os resultados indicaram a presença das três dimensões sugestivas de

  17. Effect of Communication Skills Training on Components of Burnout among Nurses Work in Tehran University of Medical Science Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Mazloomy Mahmoodabad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of communication skills training on components of burnout among nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This was an interventional study on 107 nurses working in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Science. Participants, who met the inclusion criteria, complete the two-part questionnaire for demographic variables and the Maslach burnout inventory (MBI. The interventional group participated in a two-day workshop communication skills training. Three months after the workshop, participants in the study were asked to complete MBI questionnaire again. Data were analyzed with Spss 18 software. Results: The results of the paired t-test in the experimental group before and after intervention showed statistically significant difference in the mean score on emotional exhaustion of the frequency scale (p< 0̸008 and intensity (p˂ 0̸001, and intensity scale of depersonalization (p˂ 0̸03. After the intervention, the mean score of the three components of burnout in both frequency and intensity scale, in two groups was significant (p˂ 0̸05, which implied that communication skills training have a favorable effect on burnout among hospital nurses. Conclusion: With knowledge of effect of communication skills training on nurses burnout, it is recommended to apply this training to prevention and health promotion programs for nurses.

  18. From medicalization to hybridization: a postcolonial discourse for psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, P E

    2001-04-01

    I begin with an Orwellian dilemma [Orwell G. (1968) The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, Vol. 1, p. 239. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York]: do I 'shoot the elephant' (by writing the abstract) to impress the editor? Or, with the courage of my postmodern convictions, do I lay down my rifle and disregard such suppressive editorial instructions? Bang! My words strafe the paper and the elephant is dead. How difficult it is to stay standing against the powerful currents of the dominant tradition. How easy it is to disavow the inequalities and injustices of that tradition when your livelihood (and your ego) depends upon it. So goes the theme of my paper, that, despite the clarion calls of the illustrious minority to reject the patriarchal model of medical psychiatry, psychiatric nurses continue to be propelled by the twin engines of illness and diagnosis. Yet as soon as psychiatry encounters the 'other' it becomes, in Homi K. Bhabha's words, 'hybridized': a pregnant pause created from the seeds of two different cultures. In this sense, every psychiatric moment becomes a golden opportunity for the psychiatric nurse to abdicate her role as medical factotum. Freed from these contractual obligations, she can join the 'other' and share in his experiences, sustaining rather than negating him within a truly therapeutic alliance. In similar fashion, this article has become a mixture of rhetorical fluidity and structured reality: a hybridized compromise which acknowledges the journal's publication boundaries yet still revels, at times, in the freedom of an open and lyrical text.

  19. Effects of work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support on burnout in Registered Nurses: a structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goong, Hwasoo; Xu, Lijuan; Li, Chun-Yu

    2016-11-01

    To examine the effects of work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support (RRSS) on burnout of nurses pursuing an advanced degree. A predictive correlational cross-sectional study design was used. Nurses were found to be a high-risk group for burnout, even more so among nurses pursuing an advanced degree. When nurses with a professional career marry and decide to become students, inter-role conflicts and burnout are possible outcomes of the resulting multiple roles. Using convenience sampling, data were collected from October 2011-May 2012. A questionnaire about work-family-school role conflicts, RRSS, burnout and general information was completed by 286 nurses pursuing an advanced degree at 12 hospitals in Korea. Data were analysed using SPSS and structural equation modelling with the Analysis of Moment Structures program. The proposed model provided a good fit to the obtained data. Work-family-school role conflicts and social support exerted significant effects on burnout. Role-related social support was found to play a partial mediating role between work-family-school role conflicts and burnout. The findings of this study imply that RRSS significantly directly and indirectly influences burnout among the nurses pursuing an advanced degree. It is necessary for nursing managers to consider implementing family- and school-friendly policies (e.g. flexible work schedules) to help nurses to manage their multiple roles and thereby decrease their burnout rate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Community psychiatric nursing in the Netherlands: a survey of a thriving but threatened profession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekkoek, B.W.; Meijel, B.K.G. van; Schene, A.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the Dutch community psychiatric nursing profession. In spite of their large numbers, estimated at 2900, Dutch community psychiatric nurses (CPNs) have contributed little to the international literature. The history of the profession reveals a

  1. Power and leadership in psychiatric nursing. Directions for the next century: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, M L

    1997-01-01

    Power and leadership in psychiatric nursing. To describe power, leadership, and their relationship to psychiatric nursing, with suggestions for the future of the discipline. Review of literature and author's observations of the discipline. The relationship of power and leadership focuses on leader qualities, a model for the interrelationship of leaders and colleagues, and the leader's achievement of a power position.

  2. BURNOUT SYNDROME AND ITS ASSOCIATION TO PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN NURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÓNICA M. NOVOA GÓMEZ

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aim was to evaluate the Burnout syndrome and its association to psychological profile and quality of lifein nurses from urgency, oncology and neonatology services at a third level hospital in Bogotá city. The research pertainsto the investigation group in Psychology and Health of the Psychology Faculty at the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana.It is a non-experimental research within a correlational descriptive design. The instruments used were the Catell’s 16Personality Factors Inventory (16PF, the Maslash Burnout Inventory (MBI, a semi-structured interview and anobservational register. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and Spearman correlation. Additionally, multivariatecovariance analysis (MANCOVA and Pearson correlation were used in special cases. SSPS programme was used for thisdata analysis. Results showed that the Burnout syndrome was not present in the evaluated nurses but they had somesymptoms, like emotional tiredness and depersonalisation; personality factors as impulsive-prudent, confident-jealousand dominant-submisive were found as predictors of occupational performance.

  3. The estimation of the expression and prevalence of the burnout syndrome considering the nurses working in the Lithuanian centers of cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Vimantaitė, Renata

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this scientific work is to make the research of the display and prevalence of the burnout syndrome among the nurses working in the Lithuanian cardiac surgery centres and what influence it brings on the behaviour and the working activity of nurses. Tasks: 1. To estimate the potential risk factors of the burnout syndrome among the nurses working in the Lithuanian centres of cardiac surgery and also their differences, subject to the nurses working place - the intensive care...

  4. The Competencies, Roles and Scope of Practice of Advanced Psychiatric Nursing in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Wardani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The graduate advanced psychiatric nursing (psychiatric nursing specialist from master degree in Indonesia are about 70 nurses, 67 nurses were graduated from University of Indonesia. They are working at mental health services and educational setting around Indonesia and yet seem not ready to perform some specific advanced competencies in clinical area. The mastery on mental health assessment, neurochemical perspectives, medical management and psychotherapy have not yet performed by the psychiatric nurse specialist in the clinical area or community.To have those competencies and its performances, therefore the curriculum in a psychiatric nursing graduate program must include advanced courses in physiopsychology, psychopathology, advanced psychopharmacology, neurobehavioral science, advanced mental health assessment, and advanced treatment interventions such as psychotherapy and prescription and management of psychotropic medications as their core and major courses in the curriculum. Those courses should be performed in their clinical practice courses or other related learning experiences. When those qualifications are met, then they are competent to be called advanced psychiatric nurse.As advanced practice registered nurses, the advanced psychiatric nurses should be able to demonstrate their direct expertise and roles in advanced mental health assessment, diagnostic evaluation, psychopharmacology management, psychotherapy with individuals, group and families, case management, millieu management, liason and counselling from prevention, promotion until psychiatric rehabilitation. Meanwhile the skill such as psycho-education, teaching, unit management, research and staff development can be added as their indirect roles.

  5. The lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bimenyimana

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Caring for good people is difficult enough; to care for people who are either aggressive or violent is even more difficult. This is what psychiatric nurses working in the psychiatric institution in which research was done are exposed to on a daily basis. The aim of the research was to explore and describe the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, and contextual study design was utilised. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and naïve sketches. Tesch’s (Creswell, 2004:256 method of open coding and an independent coder were utilised for data analysis. This study shed some light on the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. The findings show that the level of violence and aggression to which psychiatric nurses are exposed is overwhelming and the consequences are alarming. The contributing factors to this violence and aggression are: the mental status and the conditions in which patients are admitted; the staff shortage; the lack of support among the members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT; and the lack of structured and comprehensive orientation among newly appointed staff members. As a result, psychiatric nurses are emotionally, psychologically, and physically affected. They then respond with the following emotions and behaviour: fear, anger, frustration, despair, hopelessness and helplessness, substance abuse, absenteeism, retaliation and the development of an “I don’t care” attitude.

  6. [TYPE A BEHAVIOUR AS A PREDICTOR OF BURNOUT AND JOB SATISFACTION IN INTENSIVE CARE UNITS NURSES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Dorota; Pawliszewska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Working at intensive care unit (ICU) is one ot the most difticult and taxing nursing speciaites. It demans not only extensive knowledge and professional skills but also specific personality temperamental dispositions. The aim of the study was to verify if typeA behavior (TAB) is a predictor ofburnout and job satisfaction in ICU nurses and if this effect still exists after controlling for selected demographic and job characteristics. The study group consisted of 99 nurses (77 women), aged 24-58 (mean (M) = 32.33; standard deviation (SD) = 8:81) working at ICU. The following tools were used: to measure TAB - Type A Behavior Survey BWZ by Wrzesniewski; job burnout - the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory OLBI by Demerouti et al.; and job satisfaction - the Job Satisfaction Scale by Zalewska. The results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that after controlling for selected demographic and job characteristics, tendency for aggressibn was a predictor of higher exhaustion, disengagement and lower job satisfaction. Achievement striving and tendency to dominate were related to higher job satisfaction and lower exhaustion, respectively. Significant predictors of professional functioning were also: duty work system, place of living and gender. The results of the study.confirmed that all 3 content features of TAB were significant predictors of job functioning of ICU nurses. They also indicate that considering TAB in the context of individual adjustment to the environment of the job at ICU would be a valuable direction forfuture research.

  7. [Current status of job burnout in clinical nurses in a grade A tertiary hospital and related influencing factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, L Y; Fan, C L; Wang, L G; Tao, T; Gao, W B; Li, Y H

    2017-10-20

    Objective: To investigate the current status of job burnout in clinical nurses in a grade A tertiary hospitalin Shaoxing,China and related influencing factors. Methods: In October 2016, the Nursing Burnout Scale (NBS)was used for the investigation of 304 clinical nurses in a grade A tertiary hospital.The contents of the investigation included general data(including age,education background,working years,marital status, frequency of night shifts,professional title, and way of employment), characteristics of working environment,burnout, personality characteristics,coping strategy,and psychosomatic symptoms.SPSS 18.0 was used to conduct Pearson correlation analysis of the scores of each dimension of NBS. A multivariate regression analysis was performed with the demographic features of clinical nurses as the independent variable and the scores of each dimension of NBS as the dependent variable. Results: Among the clinical nurses in this grade A tertiary hospital, the incidence rate of severe burnout was 74%.The Pearson correlation analysis showed that burnout,pessimistic personality,negative coping,and psychosomatic symptoms were positively correlated with working environment( r =0.530,0.316,0.116,and 0.502); pessimistic personality and psychosomatic symptoms were positively correlated with burnout( r =0.618 and 0.675); psychosomatic symptoms were positively correlated withpessimistic personality( r =0.540); negative coping was negatively correlated with pessimistic personality( r =-0.145).The multivariate linear regression analysis showed that department(Department of Internal Medicine or Department of Surgery, B =-0.364 and -0.428)and frequency of night shifts(burnout; 1 - 3 working years( B =-0.238)was an influencing factor for the score of pessimistic personality; married state,1 - 3 working years,and department (Department of Internal Medicine or Department of Surgery)were influencing factors for the score of psychosomatic symptoms( B =0.263,-0.301,-0.322,and -0

  8. Type A behaviour as a predictor of burnout and job satisfaction in intensive care units nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Włodarczyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Working at intensive care unit (ICU is one of the most difficult and taxing nursing specialties. It demands not only extensive knowledge and professional skills but also specific personality-temperamental dispositions. The aim of the study was to verify if type A behavior (TAB is a predictor of burnout and job satisfaction in ICU nurses and if this effect still exists after controlling for selected demographic and job characteristics. Material and Methods: The study group consisted of 99 nurses (77 women, aged 24–58 (mean (M = 32.33; standard deviation (SD = 8.81 working at ICU. The following tools were used: to measure TAB – Type A Behavior Survey BWZ by Wrzesniewski; job burnout – the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory OLBI by Demerouti et al.; and job satisfaction – the Job Satisfaction Scale by Zalewska. Results: The results of hierarchical regression analyses showed that after controlling for selected demographic and job characteristics, tendency for aggression was a predictor of higher exhaustion, disengagement and lower job satisfaction. Achievement striving and tendency to dominate were related to higher job satisfaction and lower exhaustion, respectively. Significant predictors of professional functioning were also: duty work system, place of living and gender. Conclusions: The results of the study confirmed that all 3 content features of TAB were significant predictors of job functioning of ICU nurses. They also indicate that considering TAB in the context of individual adjustment to the environment of the job at ICU would be a valuable direction for future research. Med. Pr. 2015;66(2:213–224

  9. Respect in forensic psychiatric nurse-patient relationships: a practical compromise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Donald N; Peter, Elizabeth; Gallop, Ruth; Angus, Jan E; Liaschenko, Joan

    2011-03-01

    The context of forensic psychiatric nursing is distinct from other psychiatric settings as, it involves placement of patients in secure environments with restrictions determined by the courts. Previous literature has identified that nurses morally struggle with respecting patients who have committed heinous offences, which can lead to the patient being depersonalized and dehumanized. Although respect is fundamental to ethical nursing practice, it has not been adequately explored conceptually or empirically. As a result, little knowledge exists that identifies how nurses develop, maintain, and express respect for patients. The purpose of this study is to analyze the concept of respect systematically, from a forensic psychiatric nurse's perspective using the qualitative methodology of focused ethnography. Forensic psychiatric nurses were recruited from two medium secure forensic rehabilitation units. In the first interview, 13 registered nurses (RNs) and two registered practical nurses (RPNs) participated, and although all informants were invited to the second interview, six RNs were lost to follow-up. Despite this loss, saturation was achieved and the data were interpreted through a feminist philosophical lens. Respect was influenced by factors categorized into four themes: (1) emotive-cognitive reactions, (2) nonjudgmental approach, (3) social identity and power, and (4) context. The data from the themes indicate that forensic psychiatric nurses strike a practical compromise, in their understanding and enactment of respect in therapeutic relationships with forensic psychiatric patients. © 2011 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  10. Facing the challenges and building solutions in clinical psychiatric nursing in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, Kourosh; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Mohammadpour, Ali

    2012-10-01

    Psychiatric nurses play an important role in the process of caring for mentally ill patients and are continually faced with the numerous challenges and complex issues related to this field. This study aimed to understand the perspectives of psychiatric nurses regarding the issues they face while providing care and examine the possible solutions for improvement of inpatient care in clinical settings. The study adopted a qualitative approach that utilized a content analysis of audio taped, semi-structured interviews that had been conducted with 24 nurses. Two main themes emerged from the data. The first, Challenges in Providing Care within Psychiatric Wards, had the following subthemes: Politics and Rules of Organization, Safety and Security Issues, Uncertainty about the Role, Lack of Trained Staff, and Sociocultural Issues. The second theme, Solutions for Improving Psychiatric Care, had the subthemes of Empowerment across four domains: Psychiatric Nurses, Mentally Ill Patients and their Families, The Psychiatric Mental Health System, and the Cultural Context. The results indicated that if nurses are expected to provide optimal nursing care within a psychiatric ward, then there is a need for a stable and responsible organizational structure, skilled psychiatric nurses, and community-based care along with an anti-stigma program.

  11. Effect of personal and work stress on burnout, job satisfaction and general health of hospital nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Khamisa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of studies to date have focused on the effects of work stress in the nursing environment, with the effect of personal stress in nursing being less explored. This study sought to determine whether personal stress is a more significant predictor of burnout, job satisfaction and general health than work stress. Of the 1200 nurses randomly selected to participate in the study, 895 agreed to complete six questionnaires over 3 weeks. Data was analysed using hierarchical multiple linear regression. Findings revealed that personal stress is a better predictor of burnout and general health than job satisfaction, which is better predicted by work stress. The findings of this study could inform potential solutions to reduce the impact of personal and work stress on burnout, job satisfaction and general health. Coping strategies and staffing strategies need to be evaluated within developing contexts such as South Africa to as certain their effectiveness.

  12. Empathy toward Patients with Mental Illness among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Impact of a Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Marwa Abd El-Gawad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an ability and skill that can be learned and developed through appropriate education and practice. While the importance of nurses' empathy is widely acknowledged, little is known about the impact of passing through the psychiatric nursing and mental health educational experience at the Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University on…

  13. Psychiatric wards with locked doors--advantages and disadvantages according to nurses and mental health nurse assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, K; von Knorring, L; von Essen, L

    2006-04-01

    To describe nurses' and mental health nurse assistants' perceptions of advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door. Psychiatric staff sometimes needs to protect patients from harming themselves or others. To keep the entrance door locked may help staff to achieve this goal. How locked entrance doors at psychiatric wards are experienced by staff, working on these wards, has been investigated to a very limited extent. The study was explorative and descriptive. Audio taped, semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions about advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door, were conducted with 20 nurses and 20 mental health nurse assistants. Data were analyzed with content analysis. A content analysis revealed eight categories of advantages and 18 categories of disadvantages. Most advantages mentioned by nurses and mental health nurse assistants were categorized as providing staff with control over patients, providing patients with a secure and efficient care and protecting patients and staff against 'the outside'. Most disadvantages mentioned by nurses were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, making patients feel dependent and creating a non-caring environment. Most disadvantages mentioned by mental health nurse assistants were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, causing emotional problems for patients, making staff's power obvious and forcing patients to adapt to other patients' needs. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants mentioned more disadvantages than advantages and nurses mentioned more disadvantages than mental health nurse assistants. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants perceive a number of advantages and disadvantages for themselves, patients and significant others with a locked door at a psychiatric ward. Most of these concern patients' experiences. It is important for

  14. Psychiatric nursing menbers' reflections on participating in group-based clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Angel, Sanne; Traynor, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a report of an interview study exploring psychiatric hospital nursing staff members' reflections on participating in supervision. Clinical supervision is a pedagogical process designed to direct, develop, and support clinical nurses. Participation rates in clinical supervision...... they influence participation rates. Twenty-two psychiatric hospital nursing staff members were interviewed with a semistructured interview guide. Interview transcripts were interpreted by means of Ricoeur's hermeneutic method. The respondents understood clinical supervision to be beneficial, but with very...

  15. Group cohesion and organizational commitment: protective factors for nurse residents' job satisfaction, compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angela; Early, Sean F; Mahrer, Nicole E; Klaristenfeld, Jessica L; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-01

    Stress can have detrimental effects on nurse residents' levels of job satisfaction, compassion, fatigue, and burnout. This can lead to high turnover rates and poor quality of care among novice nurses. Therefore, it is critical to identify protective factors to prevent the onset of negative nurse outcomes (compassion fatigue, burnout, and job dissatisfaction) and to promote positive nurse outcomes (job satisfaction, compassion satisfaction). This study aimed to determine whether factors such as group cohesion and organizational commitment would be protective and moderate the association between stress exposure and posttraumatic stress symptoms and other negative nurse outcomes, thus facilitating positive outcomes. Findings showed that group cohesion was effective in moderating the negative effects of current stress exposure and posttraumatic stress symptoms on negative nurse outcomes, specifically on increased compassion fatigue and burnout, and reduced compassion satisfaction. In addition, organizational commitment was determined to promote positive nurse outcomes such as job satisfaction and compassion satisfaction. The study findings are promising, as retention of quality nurses is a significant problem for hospitals. Nurse managers and hospital administrators should be aware of the benefits of group cohesion and organizational commitment and strive to make the promotion of these factors a priority. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Burnout among mental health professionals: A Tunisian experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halayem-Dhouib, S; Zaghdoudi, L; Zremdini, R; Maalej, I; Béchir, M Ben; Labbène, R

    2010-12-01

    Burnout syndrome consists in physical as well as mental exhaustion observed in professionals whose work involves continuous contact with other people. Psychiatrists and psychiatry nursing staff are considered to be vulnerable to experiencing burnout. The purposes of this study aim to investigate the prevalence of burnout syndrome in practitioners, residents and nurses working in the psychiatric hospital of Tunisia. It also aims to investigate the relationship between burnout, depression, and a variety of personal variables, including age, gender, marital, parental and personal difficulties within this population. A cross-sectional study was conducted among the nursing staff (n=54), residents (n=41) and practitioners (n=11) in Razi hospital in Tunisia. The Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Beck depression inventory and a general questionnaire on demographic data were used. High levels of burnout were detected among nurses. This was true for the emotional tiredness sub-scale (mean score: 26.18); the depersonalization subscale (mean score: 10.20) and for the alteration of personal achievements (mean score: 32.94). High scores in emotional tiredness were correlated to depression (P=0.000; R=0.56) and to personal difficulties (P=0.021; R=0.31) in this group. Residents showed high scores in personal achievements (mean score: 32.56), and practitioners did not reach the cutoff scores on the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Our results are somewhat comparable to those of studies in other countries. Burnout syndrome was highly prevalent among nurses and residents. This study corroborates former results of a relation between depression and burnout. A strong relationship was found between personal difficulties and burnout, but seemed to be more specific to the nursing sample. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The journey between ideal and real: Experiences of beginners psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankeh, Hamidreza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Hoseini, Seyaid-Ali; Khodai-Ardekandi, Mohammad-Reza; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa; Bohm, Katarina; Nakhaie, Maryam; Ranjbar, Maryam; Castrén, Maaret

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how novice nurses perceive their career in the psychiatric ward can be helpful for nurse educators and managers to gain insight into psychiatric nursing care and adding applicable knowledge to the development of support strategies for this group. The aim of this study was to describe and illuminate experiences of new graduated nurses working at a psychiatric ward in an Iranian context. A descriptive phenomenology has been chosen. Participants with baccalaureate degrees in nursing were selected purposefully and they all had less than 6 months of work experience in psychiatric wards beforehand. The study was conducted at the Razi Hospital in Iran. Data were collected through unstructured individual in-depth interviews and analyzed according to the Colaizzi method by means of Husserlian phenomenology. Three main themes were found in this study, of which six sub-themes were constructed as follows: Being in the world of fear and complaint, which has been abstracted by having mixed feelings of conflict and compliant on entry to the psychiatric ward, doubt about adequacy of being a psychiatric nurse and working in psychiatric ward and a frightening and non-supportive environment; A sense of imprisoned and confined, which has been constructed by different experience with different environmental milieu in psychiatric ward, as a lock sense; Becoming a psychiatric nurse, which has been constructed as a sense of usefulness, a sense of sympathy and compassion for patients and a sense of professional identity. This study identified areas that require modification by providing insight into lived experiences of beginners' nurses as the value in psychiatric ward. New graduated nurses may face negative perceptions and feelings due to confrontation with a new environment, patients and colleagues as well as shortcomings in the preparation.

  18. Experiences by student nurses during clinical placement in psychiatric units in a hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J.C. Van Rhyn

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available An exploratory study was conducted with the aim of discovering and describing experiences of psychiatric nursing students during clinical placement in a psychiatric unit. For the purpose of the study an unstructured interview was conducted with each participant during their first placement in a psychiatric unit to identify the factors experienced as stressful. The results indicated that all eight participants experienced average to high stress. Sources of stress identified included, among others, ineffective teaching and learning programmes, poor managerial governance of the service, detachment of professional nurses from their teaching role, poor relationships among staff, overreliance on the medical model of care and patient neglect. Psychiatric nursing students sampled indicated universal support for in-service education and training for professional nurses, attitude change of professional nurses towards students, support for student initiatives, student involvement in patient care and adequate allocation of resources for patient care and nurse training. The exploration and description of experiences of the psychiatric nursing students will help nurse educators plan clinical learning opportunities in such a way that they are less stressful, thus ensuring that psychiatric nursing students are equipped to utilise themselves as therapeutic instruments.

  19. Burnout syndrome among multinational nurses working in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, University of Dammam and ... Background: Nursing Staff is reported to be under extreme state of stress, leading to ... conditions have to be improved to develop strategies to cope and alleviate stressful situations. ... means compared using Student's t-test.

  20. Burnout syndrome among multinational nurses working in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in general, causes stress including the critical nature of their work staffing shortages requiring fewer nurses to care for more patients with less help.[13]. This leads to negative health conditions affecting personal well-being and subsequently decreases the quality and efficacy of patient care.[14]. Table 3: Depersonalization ...

  1. The influence of Burnout, the quality of life, socioeconomic factors and coping strategies used by health-care professionals and nursing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Contreras, Françoise; Juárez, Fernando; Murrain, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the Burnout syndrome and quality of life, as well as the socioeconomic variables in the coping styles used by 71 health workers (52.1 % nurses and 47.9 % nursing aids). The health questionnaire (SF36), the stress coping questionnaire (CAE) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) were applied. According to the results, the presence of Burnout was low (77.5 % without Burnout), the quality of life was reduced in the areas of vitality, corpor...

  2. [Quality of working life and burnout among nursing staff in Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Denise Rodrigues Costa; Paladini, Márcia; Biato, Cleonice; Pais, Juliana Domingues; Oliveira, Adelaine Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive-correlational and cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the quality of working life (QWL) and the presence of burnout among nursing professionals working at Intensive Care Units. The sample was composed of 53 nursing professionals from a university hospital located in the city of Londrina-PR, Brazil. Three instruments were used for data collection: socio-demographic and professional characterization, Visual Analogue Scale for QWL and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Data was collected from April to August, 2009. Among the participants, most were auxiliary nurses (52.8%), women (66.0%) and married (67.9%). The average age was of 42.4 years. Regarding assessment of QWL, the average score obtained for the total sample was 71.1 (SD=15.5), showing that workers were satisfied with their QWL. The average for Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization and Personal Accomplishment dimensions was 11.4 (SD=7.7), 4.6 (SD=4.1) and 25.0 (SD=5.9), respectively. The QWL for the total sample showed significant association only with Emotional Exhaustion (p=0.000).

  3. Patient aggression in psychiatric services: the experience of a sample of nurses at two psychiatric facilities in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, B O; Isa, E W; Oud, N

    2011-05-01

    Aggression is a common feature in psychiatric in-patient units in Africa. The attitudes of psychiatric nurses and their perceptions of the frequency of in-patient aggression have not been explored in the Nigerian context. Using a crosssectional study design, two self-report questionnaires (the Attitudes toward Aggression Scale (ATAS) and the Perception of the Prevalence of Aggression Scale (POPAS)) were administered to nursing staff (n=73) at two psychiatric facilities in Benin City, Nigeria. Overall, nurses viewed aggression as offensive, destructive and intrusive. They were less likely to view it as a means of communication or serving protective functions. Verbal aggression was the commonest type of aggression experienced while sexual intimidation and suicide attempts were least common. Male nurses were more likely to experience physical violence and aggressive 'splitting' behaviours, while nurses with over a decade of professional experience were more likely to experience verbal and humiliating aggressive behaviours. In contrast to previous studies, fewer nurses required days off work due to aggressive behaviour. Aggression is commonly experienced by nurses in in-patient units in Nigeria. Their views were predominantly negative. Training programmes are required to change staff attitudes as well as research on the cultural factors mediating these attitude dispositions.

  4. A non-linear relationship between the cumulative exposure to occupational stressors and nurses' burnout and the potentially emotion regulation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ji-Wei; Lin, Ping-Zhen; Zhang, Hui-Hui; Li, Jia-Huan; Cao, Feng-Lin

    2017-10-08

    Stressful situations can increase the likelihood of nurses experiencing negative emotions, especially burnout. To explore the association of cumulative exposure to occupational stressors and emotion regulation strategies with nurses' burnout. Participants were 602 nurses from three general hospitals in Jinan, China. Social demographic characteristics, occupational stress, burnout, and emotion regulation strategies (cognitive reappraisal, expressive suppression, and rumination), were assessed. Nearly 70% of nurses reported that they were burnt out. Those with a moderate level and high level of stressors were 3.203 times and 26.444 times more likely to have burnout, respectively (x 2 trend = 62.732). Logistic regression revealed that nurses had higher cognitive reappraisal score (odds ratios (OR) = 0.941), scored lower for burnout. Those who had higher expressive suppression score (OR = 1.054), higher rumination score (OR = 1.037), and a higher level of stressors (OR = 2.779-18.259) scored higher for burnout. The results of sensitivity analysis were similar. A non-linear relationship exists between the cumulative exposure to occupational stressors and nurses' burnout. Those who less frequently use cognitive reappraisal, more frequently use rumination and expressive suppression, and have a high level of stressors may be more likely to experience burnout.

  5. Nurses' caring and empathy in Jordanian psychiatric hospitals: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadidi, Majdi M B; Abdalrahim, Maysoon S; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    Nurses working in psychiatric hospitals need to acquire the skills of therapeutic communication and empathy, and have higher levels of caring. The present study aims to investigate the level of caring and empathy among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was utilized to collect data from 205 nurses recruited from three psychiatric hospitals in Jordan. The Background Information Questionnaire, Modified Caring Dimensions Inventory, and Toronto Empathy Questionnaire were administered to the recruited participants. The findings revealed that the sampled nurses had a high level of caring and empathy. Significant correlations were found between caring and having a specialized training in mental health nursing, and having organizational and managerial support. However, no significant correlations were found between empathy and participants' characteristics. Specialized training in mental health nursing, having organizational and managerial support, and empathy were found predictors for caring. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  6. Insufficiently studied factors related to burnout in nursing: Results from an e-Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to identify potentially important factors in explaining burnout in nursing that have been insufficiently studied or ignored. Methods A three-round Delphi study via e-mail correspondence was conducted, with a group of 40 European experts. The e-Delphi questionnaire consisted of 52 factors identified from a literature review. Experts rated and scored the importance of factors in the occurrence of burnout and the degree of attention given by researchers to each of the variables listed, on a six-point Likert scale. We used the agreement percentage (>80%) to measure the level of consensus between experts. Furthermore, to confirm the level of consensus, we also calculated mean scores and modes. Regardless of the degree of consensus reached by the experts, we have calculated the mean of the stability of the answers for each expert (individual's qualitative stability) and the mean of the stability percentages of the experts (qualitative group stability). Results The response rate in the three rounds was 93.02% (n = 40). Eight new factors were suggested in the first round. After modified, the e-Delphi questionnaire in the second and third rounds had 60 factors. All the factors reached the third round with a consensus level above 80% in terms of the attention that researchers gave them in their studies. Moreover, the data show a total mean qualitative group stability of 96.21%. In the third round 9 factors were classified by experts as ‘studied very little’, 17 as ‘studied little’ and 34 as 'well studied' Conclusion Findings show that not all the factors that may influence nursing burnout have received the same attention from researchers. The panel of experts has identified factors that, although important in explaining burnout, have been poorly studied or even forgotten. Our results suggest that further study into factors such as a lack of recognition of part of the tasks that nurses perform, feminine stereotype or excessive bureaucracy is

  7. Insufficiently studied factors related to burnout in nursing: Results from an e-Delphi study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Manzano-García

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify potentially important factors in explaining burnout in nursing that have been insufficiently studied or ignored.A three-round Delphi study via e-mail correspondence was conducted, with a group of 40 European experts. The e-Delphi questionnaire consisted of 52 factors identified from a literature review. Experts rated and scored the importance of factors in the occurrence of burnout and the degree of attention given by researchers to each of the variables listed, on a six-point Likert scale. We used the agreement percentage (>80% to measure the level of consensus between experts. Furthermore, to confirm the level of consensus, we also calculated mean scores and modes. Regardless of the degree of consensus reached by the experts, we have calculated the mean of the stability of the answers for each expert (individual's qualitative stability and the mean of the stability percentages of the experts (qualitative group stability.The response rate in the three rounds was 93.02% (n = 40. Eight new factors were suggested in the first round. After modified, the e-Delphi questionnaire in the second and third rounds had 60 factors. All the factors reached the third round with a consensus level above 80% in terms of the attention that researchers gave them in their studies. Moreover, the data show a total mean qualitative group stability of 96.21%. In the third round 9 factors were classified by experts as 'studied very little', 17 as 'studied little' and 34 as 'well studied'.Findings show that not all the factors that may influence nursing burnout have received the same attention from researchers. The panel of experts has identified factors that, although important in explaining burnout, have been poorly studied or even forgotten. Our results suggest that further study into factors such as a lack of recognition of part of the tasks that nurses perform, feminine stereotype or excessive bureaucracy is needed for a better

  8. User Violence and Nursing Staff Burnout: The Modulating Role of Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galián-Muñoz, Inmaculada; Ruiz-Hernández, Jose Antonio; Llor-Esteban, Bartolomé; López-García, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to patient violence in health staff can lead to the onset of burnout in these workers. The main goal of this investigation is to study how exposure to this kind of violence affects onset of burnout and to appraise the role of job satisfaction as a modulating variable. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out using a self-administered anonymous questionnaire with the nursing staff of all the public hospitals of the Region of Murcia (Spain), obtaining a sample of 1,489 health professionals. From the results obtained, we underline the modulating role of extrinsic job satisfaction in the relationship between nonphysical violence and emotional exhaustion, and the protective effect of job satisfaction on the impact of nonphysical violence and the level of cynicism. No effects of job satisfaction in the relationship between physical violence and burnout were observed. We therefore conclude that experiencing nonphysical aggression has a lower impact on the psychological health of workers who are satisfied with their job, and interventions aimed at increasing these workers' extrinsic job satisfaction are highly recommended. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. The protective role of self-efficacy against workplace incivility and burnout in nursing: A time-lagged study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fida, Roberta; Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Leiter, Michael P

    Incivility has negative consequences in the workplace and remains a prevalent issue in nursing. Research has consistently linked incivility to nurse burnout and, in turn, to poor mental health and turnover intentions. To retain high-quality nurses, it is important to understand what factors might protect nurses from the negative effects of workplace mistreatment. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of relational occupational coping self-efficacy in protecting nurses from workplace incivility and related burnout and turnover intentions. A two-wave national sample of 596 Canadian nurses completed mail surveys both at Time 1 and one year later at Time 2. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized model. The model showed a good fit, and most of the hypothesized paths were significant. Overall, the results supported the hypothesized protective effect of relational occupational coping self-efficacy against incivility and later burnout, mental health, and turnover intentions. Relational occupational coping self-efficacy is an important protective factor against negative work behavior. Organizations should provide nurses with opportunities to build their coping strategies for managing job demands and difficult interpersonal interactions. Similarly, providing exposure to effective role models and providing meaningful verbal encouragement are other sources of efficacy information for building nurses' relational coping self-efficacy.

  10. Empowering leadership, perceived organizational support, trust, and job burnout for nurses: a study in an Italian general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbio, Andrea; Bellan, Maria; Manganelli, Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    A strong nursing leadership that instills trust in the leader and in the organization is an important component for an effective leadership, particularly for health care organizations, because trust defines the heart of health care workplaces by promoting patient safety, excellence in care, recruitment, and retention of the nursing staff. This study aimed to test the impact of perceived empowerment leadership style expressed by the nurse supervisor, nurses' perceived organizational support, trust in the leader, and trust in the organization on nurses' job burnout. A group of 273 nurses from an Italian public general hospital took part in a cross-sectional study on a voluntary basis by filling out an anonymous questionnaire. Empowering leadership was an important predictor of trust in the leader. Trust in the organization was influenced by perceived organizational support and by the Informing dimension of the empowering leadership style. Trust in the leader and trust in the organization showed a negative impact on job burnout and also mediated the effects of some empowering leadership dimensions and perceived organizational support on job burnout. The central role of trust in health care organizations was corroborated, as well as the beneficial effects of adopting specific features of empowerment leadership behaviors toward the nursing staff. Empowering leadership could be successfully proposed in training programs directed to nurses' supervisors and health care managers.

  11. Relationships of work-related psychosocial risks, stress, individual factors and burnout – Questionnaire survey among emergency physicians and nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana M. Ilić

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychosocial risks represent a great challenge for safety and health protection at work in Europe. The purpose of this study has been to determine the relationships of psychosocial risks arising from work, stress, personal characteristics and burnout among physicians and nurses in the Emergency Medical Service (EMS. Material and Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire survey which contained the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI. Results: A total of 88 physicians and 80 nurses completed the survey. Physicians demonstrated higher emotional (mean (M ± standard deviation (SD = 74.57±16.85 and cognitive (M±SD = 75.95±13.74 demands as compared to nurses. Both groups had high sensory demands and responsibilities at work, in spite of the low degree of their autonomy. The meaning of work, commitment to the workplace, and insecurity at work were high for both groups. Among all participants, stressful behavior and reactions were within the limits of low values ( 60. Personal and patient-related burnout was high for both groups, where physicians were significantly affected by work-related burnout. The influence at work, degree of freedom at work, social support, sense of coherence, mental health, and problem-focused coping are negatively related to work-related burnout. Conclusions: Based on personal factors and coping styles, emergency physicians and nurses are representing a self-selective professional group that meets high work demands, great responsibility, strong commitment and insecurity at work. Burnout of physicians and nurses in the EMS tends to be ignored, although it has severe consequences on their mental and general health. Med Pr 2017;68(2:167–178

  12. Relationships of work-related psychosocial risks, stress, individual factors and burnout - Questionnaire survey among emergency physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Ivana M; Arandjelović, Mirjana Ž; Jovanović, Jovica M; Nešić, Milkica M

    2017-03-24

    Psychosocial risks represent a great challenge for safety and health protection at work in Europe. The purpose of this study has been to determine the relationships of psychosocial risks arising from work, stress, personal characteristics and burnout among physicians and nurses in the Emergency Medical Service (EMS). We performed a cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire survey which contained the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI). A total of 88 physicians and 80 nurses completed the survey. Physicians demonstrated higher emotional (mean (M) ± standard deviation (SD) = 74.57±16.85) and cognitive (M±SD = 75.95±13.74) demands as compared to nurses. Both groups had high sensory demands and responsibilities at work, in spite of the low degree of their autonomy. The meaning of work, commitment to the workplace, and insecurity at work were high for both groups. Among all participants, stressful behavior and reactions were within the limits of low values ( 60). Personal and patient-related burnout was high for both groups, where physicians were significantly affected by work-related burnout. The influence at work, degree of freedom at work, social support, sense of coherence, mental health, and problem-focused coping are negatively related to work-related burnout. Based on personal factors and coping styles, emergency physicians and nurses are representing a self-selective professional group that meets high work demands, great responsibility, strong commitment and insecurity at work. Burnout of physicians and nurses in the EMS tends to be ignored, although it has severe consequences on their mental and general health. Med Pr 2017;68(2):178-178.

  13. Relationship between occupational stress and depression among psychiatric nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Kaori; Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Danjo, Kazuma; Furukori, Hanako; Sato, Yasushi; Tomita, Tetsu; Fujii, Akira; Nakagam, Taku; Sasaki, Masahide; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing is a stressful area of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to examine occupational stress among psychiatric nurses in Japan. In this cross-sectional study, 238 psychiatric nurses were recruited from 7 hospitals. Data regarding the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire (GJSQ), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Health Practice Index (HPI) were obtained via self-report questionnaires. After adjusting for all the variables, CES-D scores were associated with job stress, but social support reduced the effect of stress on depression among psychiatric nurses. However, the interpretation of these results was hampered by the lack of data concerning important occupational factors, such as working position, personal income, and working hours. Further longitudinal investigation into the factors associated with depression may yield useful information for administrative and psychological interventions.

  14. From Teacher Burnout to Student Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    PP, Noushad

    2008-01-01

    Originally, Burnout was a common work related phenomena resulting of severe stress. Burnout is considered to be a long-term stress reaction that particularly occurs among professionals who work with people in some capacity--like teachers, nurses, or social workers. Although various definitions of burnout exist, it is most commonly described as a…

  15. [Burnout syndrome of human services professionals--doctors, nurses, caregivers, teachers and clerks (1). Maslach Burnout Inventory: factor structures for samples of human services professionals, and its relation with Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuko, E; Yamagishi, M; Kishi, R; Miyake, H

    1989-07-01

    During the past decade, burnout syndrome has been widely discussed not only in the USA but also in Japan. To evaluate the state of "burnout," two major scales are available: the first is the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) developed by C. Maslach and the other is the burnout scale by A. Pines. MBI is suggested to be independent of and incompatible with Pines' burnout scale, but, Pines' burnout scale is predominantly used in Japan, while both are used in the USA. Since hardly any studies of burnout using MBI have been made in Japan, we measured and analyzed MBI to evaluate the burnout state of doctors, nurses, caregivers, teachers and clerks who are engaged in "human services professions." The available data were subjected to factor analysis, reliability analysis and multiple regression analysis using Zung's Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS). The following results were obtained. 1) The factor analysis showed that the factor loading pattern was similar to that of Maslach's, but two different factors were emerged in addition to the standard factors in the intensity subscale. 2) In the relationship with the state of depression, burnout is closely related to depression but simultaneously has its own factors. This suggest that burnout is not a subtype of the depressive state.

  16. The application of Reiki in nurses diagnosed with Burnout Syndrome has beneficial effects on concentration of salivary IgA and blood pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Lourdes Díaz-Rodríguez; Manuel Arroyo-Morales; Irene Cantarero-Villanueva; Carolina Férnandez-Lao; Marie Polley; César Fernández-de-las-Peñas

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immediate effects of the secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), α-amylase activity and blood pressure levels after the application of a Reiki session in nurses with Burnout Syndrome. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design was conducted to compare the immediate effects of Reiki versus control intervention (Hand-off sham intervention) in nurses with Burnout Syndrome. Sample was composed of eighteen nurses (aged 34-56 years) with bur...

  17. The Burnout on Nurses in ICU, Emergency and Surgery at Teaching Hospital Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences and Relationship with Perceived Stress

    OpenAIRE

    MK Fakhri; A Aslipoor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Nursing Profession is stressful and the stress of the job, it will eventually cause burnout but people's different perception of stressful event can adjust this relation. The purpose of study is to assessment burnout on nurses in ICU, emergency and surgical and relationship with perceived stress. Methods: This is a descriptive analytically cross-sectional study. The population of study were all male and female nurses who are working in 4 teaching hospitals which ...

  18. The customer is always right: patients' perceptions of psychiatric nursing actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, I; Roberson, E

    1995-01-01

    In this age of consumerism, consideration should be given to patients' perceptions of interactions with the health care provider as a factor in assessing the quality of care provided. This article describes a study of 100 psychiatric inpatients in a large urban medical center who evaluated 50 commonly used psychiatric nursing actions. Significant differences were found between the general psychiatric patient population and the substance abuse population in perception of helpfulness and frequency of performance with 7 of the 50 nursing actions. As the consumer's perception of the effectiveness of nursing actions is determined, emphasis can be given to those interventions when planning patient care.

  19. Design and evaluation of an online teaching strategy in an undergraduate psychiatric nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Jane S; Marfurt, Stephanie; daCunha, Miguel; Engebretson, Joan

    2005-12-01

    Psychiatric nurse educators are challenged to prepare graduates in meeting the needs of individuals with a mental illness within an increasingly technology-based environment. This requires the development and evaluation of educational strategies that immerse students in web-based learning. This article presents an overview of a hybrid teaching design that includes classroom teaching and asynchronous threaded discussion in a teaching module in an undergraduate psychiatric nursing course. Evaluation of student preferences, advantages and disadvantages, and learning, as well as qualitative evaluation of students' description of critical thinking, supports the value of online teaching in psychiatric nursing education.

  20. Burnout Among Direct-Care Workers in Nursing Homes: Influences of Organizational, Work Place, Interpersonal, and Personal Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatts, Dale E; Seckin, Gul; Shen, Yuying; Thompson, Michael; Auden, Dana; Cready, Cynthia M

    2018-01-10

    The many negative effects of burnout have prompted researchers to better understand the factors contributing to it. The purpose of this paper is to add to this body of knowledge through the study of burnout among direct care workers (DCWs) in nursing homes (NH). Perhaps the factor most often associated with employee burnout is the level of staffing-insufficient staffing results in work overload and eventually employee burnout. A closer look at research findings suggest that there are many other factors also contributing to burnout. These range from those at the organizational level, such as availability of training and resources to individual characteristics such as self-esteem and length of employment. A self-administered survey instrument was completed by 410 DCWs working within 11 NHs in the north Texas region. Regression analyses were performed, adjusting for clustering by NH. Beta coefficients and structure coefficients are reported. Burnout was measured through three dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. Organizational, work design, interpersonal, and individual characteristics were found to be associated with one or more dimensions of burnout. The analyses largely support previous research. Organizational variables of significance included the availability of resources to do the work, available training, and fair pay. Work design variables of significance included adequate staffing. The individual characteristic, self-esteem, appeared to have the strongest impact on burnout. Commitment to the organization also had a large impact. While the data do not allow for the testing of causal relationships, the data do suggest that providing adequate staffing, perceived fair pay, sufficient work resources (e.g., towels, gowns), management support, and adequate training may result in less DCW burnout on the job. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights

  1. Psychiatric nurses' attitudes towards inpatient aggression : Preliminary report of the development of Attitude Towards Aggression Scale (ATAS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, GJ; Dassen, TWN; Burgerhof, JGM; Middel, B

    Professional skills to adequately manage patient aggression are a prerequisite for nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. These 'technical' skills, however, are necessary but not sufficient for effective nurse intervention. 'The attitude of nurses' towards client aggression also contributes to

  2. Advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners' ideas and needs for supervision in private practice in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temane, Annie M; Poggenpoel, Marie; Myburgh, Chris P H

    2014-04-07

    Supervision forms an integral part of psychiatric nursing. The value of clinicalsupervision has been demonstrated widely in research. Despite efforts made toward advancedpsychiatric nursing, supervision seems to be non-existent in this field. The aim of this study was to explore and describe advanced psychiatric nursepractitioners' ideas and needs with regard to supervision in private practice in order tocontribute to the new efforts made in advanced psychiatric nursing in South Africa. A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory, and contextual design using a phenomenological approach as research method was utilised in this study. A purposive sampling was used. Eight advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice described their ideas and needs for supervision during phenomenological interviews. Tesch's method of open coding was utilised to analyse data. After data analysis the findings were recontextualised within literature. The data analysis generated the following themes - that the supervisor should have or possess: (a) professional competencies, (b) personal competencies and (c) specificfacilitative communication skills. The findings indicated that there was a need for supervision of advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice in South Africa. This study indicates that there is need for supervision and competent supervisors in private practice. Supervision can be beneficial with regard to developing a culture of support for advanced psychiatric practitioners in private practice and also psychiatric nurse practitioners.

  3. Advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners’ ideas and needs for supervision in private practice in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie M. Temane

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supervision forms an integral part of psychiatric nursing. The value of clinicalsupervision has been demonstrated widely in research. Despite efforts made toward advancedpsychiatric nursing, supervision seems to be non-existent in this field.Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore and describe advanced psychiatric nursepractitioners’ ideas and needs with regard to supervision in private practice in order tocontribute to the new efforts made in advanced psychiatric nursing in South Africa.Method: A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory, and contextual design using a phenomenological approach as research method was utilised in this study. A purposive sampling was used. Eight advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice described their ideas and needs for supervision during phenomenological interviews. Tesch’s method of open coding was utilised to analyse data. After data analysis the findings were recontextualised within literature.Results: The data analysis generated the following themes – that the supervisor should have or possess: (a professional competencies, (b personal competencies and (c specificfacilitative communication skills. The findings indicated that there was a need for supervision of advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice in South Africa.Conclusion: This study indicates that there is need for supervision and competent supervisors in private practice. Supervision can be beneficial with regard to developing a culture of support for advanced psychiatric practitioners in private practice and also psychiatric nurse practitioners.

  4. Burnout, compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and secondary traumatic stress in trauma nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, Katherine A; VonRueden, Kathryn T; Friedmann, Erika; McQuillan, Karen A; Gilmore, Rebecca; Kramer, Betsy; Murray, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The relationship of burnout (BO), compassion fatigue (CF), compassion satisfaction (CS), and secondary traumatic stress (STS) to personal/environmental characteristics, coping mechanisms, and exposure to traumatic events was explored in 128 trauma nurses. Of this sample, 35.9% had scores consistent with BO, 27.3% reported CF, 7% reported STS, and 78.9% had high CS scores. High BO and high CF scores predicted STS. Common characteristics correlating with BO, CF, and STS were negative coworker relationships, use of medicinals, and higher number of hours worked per shift. High CS correlated with greater strength of supports, higher participation in exercise, use of meditation, and positive coworker relationships. Caring for trauma patients may lead to BO, CF, and STS; identifying predictors of these can inform the development of interventions to mitigate or minimize BO, CF, and STS in trauma nurses.

  5. Different Places, Different Ideas: Reimagining Practice in American Psychiatric Nursing After World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kylie M

    2018-01-01

    In 1952, Hildegard Peplau published her textbook Interpersonal Relations in Nursing: A Conceptual Frame of Reference for Psychodynamic Nursing. This was the same year the American Psychiatric Association (APA) published the first edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (1st ed.; DSM-I; APA). These events occurred in the context of a rapidly changing policy and practice environment in the United States after World War II, where the passing of the National Mental Health Act in 1946 released vast amounts of funding for the establishment of the National Institute of Mental Health and the development of advanced educational programs for the mental health professions including nursing. This article explores the work of two nurse leaders, Hildegard Peplau and Dorothy Mereness, as they developed their respective graduate psychiatric nursing programs and sought to create new knowledge for psychiatric nursing that would facilitate the development of advanced nursing practice. Both nurses had strong ideas about what they felt this practice should look like and developed distinct and particular approaches to their respective programs. This reflected a common belief that it was only through nurse-led education that psychiatric nursing could shape its own practice and control its own future. At the same time, there are similarities in the thinking of Peplau and Mereness that demonstrate the link between the specific social context of mental health immediately after World War II and the development of modern psychiatric nursing. Psychiatric nurses were able to gain significant control of their own education and practice after the war, but this was not without a struggle and some limitations, which continue to impact on the profession today.

  6. The prevalence and impact of post traumatic stress disorder and burnout syndrome in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealer, Meredith; Burnham, Ellen L; Goode, Colleen J; Rothbaum, Barbara; Moss, Marc

    2009-01-01

    To determine whether post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and burnout syndrome (BOS) are common in nurses, and whether the co-existence of PTSD and BOS is associated with altered perceptions of work and nonwork-related activities. University hospital nurses were administered four validated psychological questionnaires. The response rate was 41% (332/810). Twenty two percent (73/332) had symptoms of PTSD, 18% (61/332) met diagnostic criteria for PTSD, and 86% (277/323) met criteria for BOS. Ninety eight percent (59/60) of those fulfilling diagnostic criteria for PTSD were positive for BOS. When grouped into three categories: positive for PTSD and BOS (n=59), positive for BOS and negative for PTSD (n=217), and negative for both BOS and PTSD (n=46), there were significant differences in the years of employment as a nurse (Pnursing care (P=.006), confidence in physicians (P=.01), and perception that their work impacted patient outcomes (P=.01). Nurses with BOS and PTSD were significantly more likely to have difficulty in their life outside of the work environment when compared to those with BOS alone. We identified that PTSD and BOS are common in nurses and those with PTSD will almost uniformly have symptoms of BOS. Co-existence of PTSD and BOS has a dramatic effect on work and nonwork related activities and perceptions.

  7. We are different: the voices of psychiatric advanced practice nurses on the performance of their roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Yuen-Ling; Chan, Zenobia C Y; Chien, Wai-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Many studies have affirmed that psychiatric advanced practice nurses (APNs) perform multifaceted roles. However, only a limited amount of research has been conducted on their perceptions of the performance of their roles. To explore the lived experiences of psychiatric APNs concerning the performance of their roles. Data were collected from individual semi-structured interviews and analysed using the interpretative phenomenological analysis method. The study was conducted in a hospital cluster in Hong Kong. Thirteen psychiatric APNs were purposively recruited. Three themes were discerned, namely, 'We are different', 'Who am I?', and 'I am who I am'. The findings can help psychiatric APNs and nurse administrators to better understand the needs of the role-bearers (APNs) and to develop strategies to support the development of advanced psychiatric nursing practices in Hong Kong and worldwide.

  8. Metasynthesis of research on the role of psychiatric inpatient nurses: what is important to staff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Kathleen R; Johnson, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient psychiatric nurses are a large workforce, but their work is poorly articulated and thus poorly understood outside of the professional inpatient community. To learn how inpatient psychiatric nurses depict their work, define important aspects of their role, and view the impact of the unit environment on their clinical practice. Metasynthesis of research that has focused on the ideas and perceptions of inpatient psychiatric nurses around their role and practice on inpatient psychiatric units. Three themes emerged from the analysis; the first was an umbrella for three important aspects of nursing work: the nurses' efforts to forge engagement with patients; their activities which maintained the safety of the unit and interventions nurses viewed as educating/empowering patients. The second theme captures the conditions that enabled nurses to do this work such as a cohesive nursing team and their sense of self-direction in their role. The final theme centers on difficulties nurses encountered in enacting their role which included multiple responsibilities for patient care and management of the milieu; intense work often with low visibility and scant support within the organization. Nurses need to articulate their practice so they can assert for the staffing and resources needed to keep units safe and promote patients' well-being, strive toward quality, and promote the development of the specialty.

  9. Job satisfaction and resilience in psychiatric nurses: A study at the Institute of Mental Health, Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhimin; Gangaram, Poornima; Xie, Huiting; Chua, Stephanie; Ong, Samantha Bee Cheng; Koh, Sioh Eng

    2017-12-01

    Job satisfaction ranks highly as one of the main factors influencing turnover rates among nurses. Mental health nursing has been reported to be a particularly stressful specialty, yet little is known about the level of job satisfaction among psychiatric nurses in Singapore. Resilience is defined as a means of adapting to stress at the workplace, and could serve as a factor influencing job satisfaction. The present study aimed to explore the current level of job satisfaction among psychiatric nurses working in the only tertiary psychiatric institution in Singapore, the influencing factors, and the relationship between resilience and job satisfaction. A survey questionnaire consisting of the following was administered to all eligible nurses working in the Institute of Mental Health between the period of 16-24 December 2014: (i) The McCloskey and Mueller Satisfaction Scale; (ii) The Resilience Scale; and (iii) sociodemographic data form. A total of 874 nurses were eligible for participation in the study, and a total of 748 nurses responded, totalling 85.6% response. A mean satisfaction score of 95.21 and mean resilience score of 125.74 were obtained. Mean satisfaction and resilience scores were the highest for nurses with longer working experience and those of older age. A positive and significant association between satisfaction and resilience scores (P = 0.001) was obtained. Psychiatric nurses in Singapore are generally satisfied with their job, but this can be further improved with the strengthening of personal resilience. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. Prevalence and predictors of compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction among oncology nurses: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hairong; Jiang, Anli; Shen, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Given the complexity of caring work, recent studies have focused on the professional quality of life of oncology nurses. China, the world's largest developing country, faces heavy burdens of care for cancer patients. Chinese oncology nurses may be encountering the negative side of their professional life. However, studies in this field are scarce, and little is known about the prevalence and predictors of oncology nurses' professional quality of life. To describe and explore the prevalence of predictors of professional quality of life (compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction) among Chinese oncology nurses under the guidance of two theoretical models. A cross-sectional design with a survey. Ten tertiary hospitals and five secondary hospitals in Shanghai, China. A convenience and cluster sample of 669 oncology nurses was used. All of the nurses worked in oncology departments and had over 1 year of oncology nursing experience. Of the selected nurses, 650 returned valid questionnaires that were used for statistical analyses. The participants completed the demographic and work-related questionnaire, the Chinese version of the Professional Quality of Life Scale for Nurses, the Chinese version of the Jefferson Scales of Empathy, the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire, the Perceived Social Support Scale, and the Chinese Big Five Personality Inventory brief version. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, simple and multiple linear regressions were used to determine the predictors of the main research variables. Higher compassion fatigue and burnout were found among oncology nurses who had more years of nursing experience, worked in secondary hospitals and adopted passive coping styles. Cognitive empathy, training and support from organizations were identified as significant protectors, and 'perspective taking' was the strongest predictor of compassion satisfaction, explaining 23.0% of

  11. Perceived Nonbeneficial Treatment of Patients, Burnout, and Intention to Leave the Job Among ICU Nurses and Junior and Senior Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Daniel; Rüddel, Hendrik; Thomas-Rüddel, Daniel O; Felfe, Jörg; Poidinger, Bernhard; Matthäus-Krämer, Claudia T; Hartog, Christiane S; Bloos, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Perceiving nonbeneficial treatment is stressful for ICU staff and may be associated with burnout. We aimed to investigate predictors and consequences of perceived nonbeneficial treatment and to compare nurses and junior and senior physicians. Cross-sectional, multicenter paper-pencil survey on personal and work-related characteristics, perceived nonbeneficial treatment, burnout, and intention to leave the job. Convenience sample of 23 German ICUs. ICU nurses and physicians. None. A total of 847 questionnaires were returned (51% response); 778 had complete data for final multivariate analyses. Nonbeneficial treatment was in median perceived "sometimes." Adjusted for covariates, it was perceived more often by nurses and junior physicians (both p ≤ 0.001 in comparison to senior physicians), while emotional exhaustion was highest in junior physicians (p ≤ 0.015 in comparison to senior physicians and nurses), who also had a higher intention to leave than nurses (p = 0.024). Nonbeneficial treatment was predicted by high workload and low quality collaboration with other departments (both p ≤ 0.001). Poor nurse-physician collaboration predicted perception of nonbeneficial treatment among junior physicians and nurses (both p ≤ 0.001) but not among senior physicians (p = 0.753). Nonbeneficial treatment was independently associated with the core burnout dimension emotional exhaustion (p ≤ 0.001), which significantly mediated the effect between nonbene