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Sample records for psychiatric inpatient population

  1. Proactive and Reactive Aggression in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fite, Paula J.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2009-01-01

    This study examined relations between proactive and reactive aggression and indicators of antisocial behavior (callous/unemotional traits and behavioral consequences) and negative affect (depression and suicidal behavior) in a sample of 105 children admitted to an acute child psychiatric inpatient unit. The majority of the children were male (69%)…

  2. Age structure at diagnosis affects aggression in a psychiatric inpatient population: age structure affecting inpatient aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Un Jung; Lee, JooYoung; Kim, Hyo-Won; Lee, Jung Sun; Joo, Yeon-Ho; Kim, Seong-Yoon; Kim, Chang Yoon; Shin, Yong-Wook

    2014-12-30

    Study of inpatient aggression in psychiatric inpatient units (PIUs), where vulnerable patients interact intensely in small groups, is hampered by a lack of systematic monitoring of aggressive events in the context of group dynamics. Our current study examines the relationship between aggression and group structure in the PIU of a general tertiary-care hospital over a 9-month period. The severity of aggression was monitored daily using the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS). Clinical data including the daily number and mean age of subpopulations with different diagnoses were acquired. Cross-correlation function and autoregressive integrated moving average modeling were used to assess the effects of various group structure parameters on the incidence of aggressive events in the PIU. The daily total OAS score correlated positively with the daily mean age of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. By contrast, the OAS total score demonstrated a negative correlation with the daily mean age of patients with major depression. The age of the patients at diagnosis is an important group structure that affects the incidence of aggression in a PIU.

  3. Paraphilias in adult psychiatric inpatients.

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    Marsh, Patrick J; Odlaug, Brian L; Thomarios, Nick; Davis, Andrew A; Buchanan, Stephanie N; Meyer, Craig S; Grant, Jon E

    2010-05-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the prevalence of paraphilias in an adult inpatient psychiatric population. One hundred twelve consecutive, voluntarily admitted, adult male psychiatric inpatients were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Sexual Disorders Module, Male Version, to assess the rates of DSM-IV paraphilias. Fifteen patients (13.4%) reported symptoms consistent with at least one lifetime DSM-IV paraphilia. The most common paraphilias were voyeurism (n = 9 [8.0%]), exhibitionism (n = 6 [5.4%]), and sexual masochism (n = 3 [2.7%]). Patients who screened positive for a paraphilia had significantly more psychiatric hospitalizations (P = .006) and, on a trend level, were more likely to have attempted suicide. In addition, patients with paraphilias were significantly more likely to report having been sexually abused than patients without a paraphilia (P = paraphilia. Paraphilias appear to be more common in adult male psychiatric inpatients than previously estimated. The study also demonstrated that these disorders were not screened for by the treating physician and thus may go untreated. Further, larger-scale studies are necessary in order to further examine the rates of these disorders in the general population.

  4. Psychiatric inpatient expenditures and public health insurance programmes: analysis of a national database covering the entire South Korean population

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    Chung Woojin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical spending on psychiatric hospitalization has been reported to impose a tremendous socio-economic burden on many developed countries with public health insurance programmes. However, there has been no in-depth study of the factors affecting psychiatric inpatient medical expenditures and differentiated these factors across different types of public health insurance programmes. In view of this, this study attempted to explore factors affecting medical expenditures for psychiatric inpatients between two public health insurance programmes covering the entire South Korean population: National Health Insurance (NHI and National Medical Care Aid (AID. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study used a nationwide, population-based reimbursement claims dataset consisting of 1,131,346 claims of all 160,465 citizens institutionalized due to psychiatric diagnosis between January 2005 and June 2006 in South Korea. To adjust for possible correlation of patients characteristics within the same medical institution and a non-linearity structure, a Box-Cox transformed, multilevel regression analysis was performed. Results Compared with inpatients 19 years old or younger, the medical expenditures of inpatients between 50 and 64 years old were 10% higher among NHI beneficiaries but 40% higher among AID beneficiaries. Males showed higher medical expenditures than did females. Expenditures on inpatients with schizophrenia as compared to expenditures on those with neurotic disorders were 120% higher among NHI beneficiaries but 83% higher among AID beneficiaries. Expenditures on inpatients of psychiatric hospitals were greater on average than expenditures on inpatients of general hospitals. Among AID beneficiaries, institutions owned by private groups treated inpatients with 32% higher costs than did government institutions. Among NHI beneficiaries, inpatients medical expenditures were positively associated with the proportion of

  5. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility PPS

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    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Since October 1, 1983, most hospitals have been paid under the hospital inpatient prospective payment system (PPS). However, certain types of specialty hospitals and...

  6. Prevalence of use, abuse and dependence on legal and illegal psychotropic substances in an adolescent inpatient psychiatric population.

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    Niethammer, Oliver; Frank, Reiner

    2007-06-01

    To examine the prevalence of use, abuse, and dependence on legal and illegal psychotropic substances in an adolescent in-patient psychiatric population in relation to age and gender. Participants were all consecutive admissions (patients aged from 14 to 17) to the adolescent psychiatric in-patient unit. Of the 86 patients who met all the criteria for taking part in the study 70 were interviewed, giving a response rate of 81%. Prevalence of use and of substance use disorders were assessed through structured diagnostic interviews (M-CIDI), conducted from March 2000 through July 2000. We found high prevalence of use and of the diagnosis of legal and illegal psychotropic substances. Around 76% reported a regular use of tobacco, 44% regular alcohol use, and 40% regular use of illegal substances. Diagnosis (abuse or dependence) was found in 50% of cases for nicotine, 29% for alcohol, and 26% for illegal substances. The adolescent in-patient psychiatric population is at high risk of use, abuse, and dependence on legal and illegal psychotropic substances. It is important to diagnose these disorders (anamnesis, screening tools) and to install preventive and therapeutic programs in clinical therapeutic settings.

  7. Interpersonal trauma, attachment insecurity and anxiety in an inpatient psychiatric population.

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    Wiltgen, Anika; Arbona, Consuelo; Frankel, Leslie; Frueh, B Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Current research suggests that interpersonal trauma has an impact on insecure attachment and anxiety. Some research further suggests that attachment may play a mediating role between traumatic events and psychopathology. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the experience of interpersonal trauma, attachment anxiety, attachment avoidance and clinical anxiety severity among adult psychiatric inpatients who reported having experienced interpersonal trauma after the age of 16. It was hypothesized that attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance would mediate the relationship between interpersonal trauma and clinical anxiety level. This study used archival data on 414 adult psychiatric inpatients in a large city in the Southwest U.S. Results suggest that interpersonal trauma was correlated to attachment avoidance but not to attachment anxiety and that attachment avoidance partially mediated the relation of interpersonal trauma to anxiety. The attachment framework appositely explains how a negative model of other contributes to the relation between experiences of interpersonal trauma and anxiety in adulthood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impulse control disorders in adult psychiatric inpatients.

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    Grant, Jon E; Levine, Laura; Kim, Daniel; Potenza, Marc N

    2005-11-01

    The authors' goal was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients. They used the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview, a semistructured clinical interview assessing pathological gambling, trichotillomania, kleptomania, pyromania, intermittent explosive disorder, compulsive buying, and compulsive sexual behavior, to screen 204 consecutively admitted psychiatric inpatients. One hundred twelve of the inpatients were women (54.9%), and the mean age of the 204 inpatients was 40.5 years (SD=13.2, range=18-83). Patients whose screen was positive for an impulse control disorder were evaluated with structured clinical interviews. Sixty-three patients (30.9%) were diagnosed with at least one current impulse control disorder. The most common impulse control disorders were compulsive buying (N=19 [9.3%]), kleptomania (N=16 [7.8%]), and pathological gambling (N=14 [6.9%]). Patients with and without co-occurring impulse control disorders did not differ significantly from each other on demographic measures or number or type of psychiatric diagnoses other than impulse control disorders. Impulse control disorders appear common among psychiatric inpatients. Additional, larger studies are needed to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in the general population and specific psychiatric groups.

  9. Suicide among older psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Zarit, Steven H; Tu, Xin

    2006-01-01

    characteristics. RESULTS: Affective disorders were found to be associated with an almost twofold higher risk of suicide among psychiatric inpatients than other types of disorders (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-2.6). Patients with dementia had a significantly lower risk ratio of 0.2 (95% CI: 0......OBJECTIVE: Older adults have elevated suicide rates, especially in the presence of a psychiatric disorder, yet not much is known about predictors for suicide within this high-risk group. The current study examines the characteristics associated with suicide among older adults who are admitted...

  10. Low rate of obesity among psychiatric inpatients in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthoenis, M; Aichberger, Marion; Puteh, Ibrahim; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2014-01-01

    A vast majority of psychiatric medication causes weight gain, however the rate of obesity in psychiatric patients has yet to be thoroughly studied in Indonesia. The present study aims to assess the prevalence of obesity among psychiatric inpatients in Indonesia. This cross sectional study was conducted in Banda Aceh Psychiatric Hospital, Indonesia from December 2012 to January 2013. The Body Mass Index (BMI) and blood pressure of a total 242 inpatients was measured, and data on their demographic information and medication were collected from the patient's chart. The prevalence rate of obesity among psychiatric inpatients was 5% (95% CI = 2.6-8.5%), and overweight was 8% (95% CI = 5.1-12.4). The mean BMI was 21.44 kg/m² (SD: 3.43). Stage I hypertension and stage II hypertension was found among 7% (95% CI = 4.1-11), and 2% (95% CI = 0.9-5.3%) inpatients, respectively. The findings suggest that the rate of overweight, obesity and hypertension in the present study population was relatively low compared to rates of the general population. The inpatients have limited access to food and only eat meals that are provided to them by the hospital.

  11. Onconeural Antibodies in Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæther, Sverre Georg; Schou, Morten; Stoecker, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorders associated with onconeural antibodies often appear with neuropsychiatric symptoms. To study the prevalence of onconeural antibodies in patients admitted to acute psychiatric inpatient care, the serum of 585 such patients was tested for antibodies targeting MOG......, GLRA1B, DPPX, GRM1, GRM5, DNER, Yo, ZIC4, GAD67, amphiphysin, CV2, Hu, Ri, Ma2, and recoverin. Only one sample was positive (antirecoverin IgG). The present findings suggest that serum onconeural antibody positivity is rare among patients acutely admitted for inpatient psychiatric care. The clinical...

  12. Bullying behaviour and criminality: a population-based follow-up study of adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Northern Finland.

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    Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Riala, Kaisa; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2011-04-15

    The recent school shootings in Europe and the USA have raised the question of whether victims of bullying run an increased risk of committing violent crimes later in life, but scientific research in this area is scarce. The aim of this work was to investigate whether bullying behaviour is associated with later criminal offences committed in adolescence and young adulthood. We studied a sample of 508 Finnish adolescents (age 12-17 years) admitted to psychiatric inpatient care between April 2001 and March 2006. Data on crimes committed and the age of onset of criminal activity were extracted from the official criminal records of the national Legal Register Centre in October 2008. The Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL) was used to define bullying status, and to obtain DSM-IV-based psychiatric diagnoses for the adolescents. Violent crimes were statistically significantly associated with bullying behaviour, but not non-violent crimes. Furthermore, being a bully was predictive of an early onset of severe violent offences. When controlled for the psychiatric diagnoses of the adolescents, we observed decreased likelihood of criminality among victims. Thus bullying others may increase the risk of violent offences, while being a victim is not a risk factor for criminality. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Low blood pressure in psychiatric inpatients.

    OpenAIRE

    Masterton, G; Main, C J; Lever, A F; Lever, R S

    1981-01-01

    Blood pressure recordings in 116 female psychiatric inpatients were analysed. Sixty-nine women had schizophrenia, the remainder a variety of psychiatric conditions. All had been in hospital continuously for more than one year, the average for 19 years continuously. An average of seven recordings of blood pressure per patient had been made during that time. The latest of these compared well with measurements made independently using a sphygmomanometer free from observer bias. On admission to h...

  14. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.; Jansen, G.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatient aggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this "Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale" (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff

  15. Dissociative Experiences in Psychiatric Inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Firoozabadi; Nooshin Reza Alizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Dissociative disorders are conditions that involve disruptions of memory, awareness, identity, or perception. Data collected in diverse geographic locations underline the consistency in clinical symptoms of dissociative disorders. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, prevalence of dissociative experiences has been screened in hospitalized patients in psychiatric wards of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Iran. One hundred and sixty patients in two hospitals entered the study. Our...

  16. Choking risk among psychiatric inpatients

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    Nagamine T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Takahiko Nagamine1Division of Psychiatric Internal Medicine, Seiwakai-Kitsunan Hospital, Suzenji, JapanChoking is a life-threatening and not infrequent occurrence in psychiatric hospitals. There is, however, little information available about the risk factors or methods to prevent choking. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the 8 patients who had a cardiopulmonary arrest due to choking and received resuscitation at our hospital during the 6-year period from April 2005 to March 2011. The study involved 6 males and females, all of whom were patients with schizophrenia taking antipsychotics orally. They were aged from 56 to 79 (mean ± SD: 69.0 ± 7.5 years, with the duration of illness from 28 to 54 years (39.9 ± 7.9 years. In 6 of the 8 cases, choking was diagnosed immediately on the basis of the situation at the time of cardiopulmonary arrest. In the remaining 2 cases, cardiopulmonary arrest was initially unexplained, and choking was only diagnosed subsequently. Choking was caused by bread in all cases. Tracheal intubation was carried out in all cases and resulted in successful resuscitation, causing no subsequent change in functions compared with the prechoking condition. All 8 patients had been receiving multiple antipsychotics before the event (mean number of drugs used 2.5 ± 0.7, with a total dose level ranging from 600 to 1800 mg/day chlorpromazine equivalents (mean 1113 ± 341 mg/day. Seven of the 8 patients had mild to moderate involuntary movements, and 5 patients were diagnosed with antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia. During the 5-year period before the choking event, 7 of the 8 patients had at least 1 treatment interruption, and some patients had up to 4 interruptions.

  17. Dissociative identity disorder in psychiatric inpatients.

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    Rifkin, A; Ghisalbert, D; Dimatou, S; Jin, C; Sethi, M

    1998-06-01

    The aim of this study was to replicate reports of a high rate of dissociative identity disorder in psychiatric inpatients. Subjects were 100 randomly selected women, 16-50 years old, who had recently been admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital. Diagnoses were made by two interviewers through use of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders. One percent (N = 1) of the interviewed subjects had dissociative identity disorder. Contrary to previous studies, the authors found a low rate of dissociative identity disorder, perhaps because of the different methodology used.

  18. Substance use and violence among psychiatric inpatients.

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    Stewart, D; Bowers, L

    2015-03-01

    Nursing staff on psychiatric wards often attribute patient violence and aggression to substance use. This study examined incidents of alcohol and illicit drug use among acute psychiatric inpatients and associations between substance use and violence or other forms of aggression. A sample of 522 adult psychiatric inpatients was recruited from 84 acute psychiatric wards in England. Data were collected from nursing and medical records for the first 2 weeks of admission. Only a small proportion of the sample was reported to have used or been under the influence of alcohol (5%) or drugs (3%). There was no physical violence during a shift when a patient had used alcohol or drugs. Substance using patients were also no more likely than others to behave violently at any point during the study period. However, incidents of substance use were sometimes followed by verbal aggression. Beliefs that substance using patients are likely to be violent were not supported by this study, and could impact negatively on therapeutic relationships between nurses and this patient group. Future studies are needed to examine how staff intervene and interact with intoxicated patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Psychiatric Morbidity Patterns in Referred Inpatients of Other Specialties

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    Ajay Risal

    2013-03-01

    Conclusions: Psychiatric consultation was sought mostly by medical ward that had maximum number of patients presenting with self-poisoning. The commonest diagnosis seen in the referred in-patients was depression and anxiety disorder. Keywords: consultation-liaison psychiatry; in-patient referral; psychiatric morbidity.

  20. The Role of Parenting Styles in the Relation Between Functions of Aggression and Internalizing Symptoms in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Population.

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    Pederson, Casey A; Rathert, Jamie L; Fite, Paula J; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric inpatient hospitalization is a costly intervention for youth. With rates of hospitalization rising, efforts to refine prevention and intervention are necessary. Aggression often precedes severe internalizing behaviors, and proactive and reactive functions of aggression are differentially associated with internalizing symptomatology. Thus, further understanding of the links between functions of aggression and internalizing symptomatology could aid in the improvement of interventions for hospitalized youth. The current study examined parenting styles, gender, and age as potential moderators of the relations between proactive and reactive aggression and internalizing symptoms. Participants included 392 children, 6-12 years of age admitted consecutively to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Reactive aggression was uniquely associated with anxiety symptoms. However, proactive aggression was associated with internalizing problems only when specific parenting styles and demographic factors were present. Although both proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression were associated with internalizing symptoms, differential associations were evident. Implications of findings are discussed.

  1. Dose-Specific Adverse Drug Reaction Identification in Electronic Patient Records: Temporal Data Mining in an Inpatient Psychiatric Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Robert; Werge, Thomas; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    all indication areas.The aim of this study was to take advantage of techniques for temporal data mining of EPRs in order to detect ADRs in a patient- and dose-specific manner.We used a psychiatric hospital’s EPR system to investigate undesired drug effects. Within one workflow the method identified...... patient-specific adverse events (AEs) and links these to specific drugs and dosages in a temporal manner, based on integration of text mining results and structured data. The structured data contained precise information on drug identity, dosage and strength.When applying the method to the 3,394 patients......Data collected for medical, filing and administrative purposes in electronic patient records (EPRs) represent a rich source of individualised clinical data, which has great potential for improved detection of patients experiencing adverse drug reactions (ADRs), across all approved drugs and across...

  2. A Controlled Comparison of Psychiatric Day Treatment and Inpatient Hospitalization

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    Washburn, Stephen; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Seriously ill female psychiatric patients (N=59) were randomly assigned to an inpatient or day service. Data indicate the day treatment is, on the whole, superior to inpatient treatment in subjective distress, community functioning, family burden, total hospital cost, and days of attachment to the hospital program. (Author)

  3. Self-Reported Suicidal Ideation in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

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    Steer, Robert A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSI) to 108 adolescent inpatients diagnosed with mixed psychiatric disorders. Examined relationships of Beck Depression Inventory, Anxiety Inventory, and Hopelessness Scale with BSI. Results support use of BSI with adolescent inpatients. Findings indicated that hopelessness was related to suicidal…

  4. Aggression among psychiatric inpatients in Greece.

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    Oulis, P; Lykouras, L; Dascalopoulou, E; Psarros, C

    1996-01-01

    We studied, during 5 consecutive days, the prevalence, types and demographic, historical and clinical correlates of overt aggression in a population of 136 acute and chronic inpatients with mainly a diagnosis of psychotic disorder. Almost one fourth of them exhibited some sort of aggressive behavior. Verbal aggression was by far the most frequent type followed-in decreasing order-by physical aggression, aggression against property and self-aggression. Past threats of violence and attacks on others as well as concurrent motor excitement, agitation, low tolerance of frustration, difficulty in delaying gratification, depressive feelings, anger, hostility, affective lability and antisocial behavior differed significantly across the aggressive and the nonaggressive groups. The best short-term clinical predictors of aggression were different for each type, anger being their sole common predictor, and accounted for various proportions of the corresponding variances ranging from only 13.3% for self-aggression to 39.2% for verbal aggression.

  5. Reducing Psychiatric Inpatient Readmissions Using an Organizational Change Model.

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    Molfenter, Todd; Connor, Tim; Ford, James H; Hyatt, John; Zimmerman, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-day hospital readmission rates have become a quality indicator for many regulators and payers, but published accounts of reducing these rates across a patient population are lacking. This article describes and evaluates the Wisconsin Mental Health Readmissions Project, which aimed to reduce psychiatric inpatient 30-day readmission rates in Wisconsin. Nineteen county human services boards representing 23 of Wisconsin's 72 counties and 61% of the state's residential admissions participated in a statewide quality improvement collaborative from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Participants applied a standardized organizational change model, called NIATx, in the context of a multicounty quality improvement collaborative to reduce 30-day readmission rates. Readmission rates were tracked through national and state databases, using 2009 as a baseline, and analyzed using a chi-square analysis to test the proportion of means. The study team compared readmission rates of Wisconsin counties that participated in the statewide collaborative with those that did not. Between 2009 and 2013, the 30-day readmission rates in Wisconsin declined significantly for counties that participated in the project when compared to those that did not (2009-2013) [Χ2(4) = 54.503, P < .001], based on a 2.5% decline for participants vs a 0.7% decline for nonparticipants. Reductions to behavioral health inpatient readmission rates beyond individual case examples have been difficult to document. This analysis evaluates a method that Wisconsin behavioral health providers applied as part of a multicounty program addressing readmission rates. The findings highlight quality improvement program design elements and interventions to consider in reducing inpatient behavioral health readmissions, as well as the need for further research on this complex systems issue.

  6. Determinants of completed railway suicides by psychiatric in-patients: case-control study.

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    Lukaschek, Karoline; Baumert, Jens; Krawitz, Marion; Erazo, Natalia; Förstl, Hans; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-11-01

    Suicide prediction during psychiatric in-patient treatment remains an unresolved challenge. To identify determinants of railway suicides in individuals receiving in-patient psychiatric treatment. The study population was drawn from patients admitted to six psychiatric hospitals in Germany during a 10-year period (1997-2006). Data from 101 railway suicide cases were compared with a control group of 101 discharged patients matched for age, gender and diagnosis. Predictors of suicide were change of therapist (OR = 22.86, P = 0.004), suicidal ideation (OR = 7.92, Punemployment (OR = 2.72, P = 0.04). Neither restlessness nor impulsivity predicted in-patient suicide. Suicidal ideation, unfavourable clinical course and the use of multiple psychotropic substances (reflecting the severity of illness) were strong determinants of railway suicides. The most salient finding was the vital impact of a change of therapist. These findings deserve integration into the clinical management of patients with serious mental disease. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  7. The social support network for black psychiatric inpatients

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    G. Ngubane

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available A survey was carried out of almost 50% of Black inpatients in a state psychiatric hospital to evaluate the level of accessibility of the family network of the patients. Staff were interviewed on the problems they have with contacting families. The survey shows the extent of inadequate access and identifies reasons for the problem.

  8. Profile of forensic psychiatric inpatients referred to the Free State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. An accused found unfit to stand trial and/or not criminally responsible for his/her actions because of mental illness, is declared a state patient by the court. Aim. The aim of the study was to analyse the biographical data and relevant particulars of forensic psychiatric inpatients who were admitted to the Free State ...

  9. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.L.I.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.E.; Jansen, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatienaggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff members

  10. Associations between Relational Aggression, Depression, and Suicidal Ideation in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Sample

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    Fite, Paula J.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani; Preddy, Teresa M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined relations between relational aggression, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation in a child clinical population. Participants included 276 children (M age = 9.55 years; 69% Male) who were admitted to a child psychiatric inpatient facility. Findings suggested that relational aggression was associated with depressive…

  11. Ideology of nursing care in child psychiatric inpatient treatment.

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    Ellilä, Heikki; Välimäki, Maritta; Warne, Tony; Sourander, Andre

    2007-09-01

    Research on nursing ideology and the ethics of child and adolescent psychiatric nursing care is limited. The aim of this study was to describe and explore the ideological approaches guiding psychiatric nursing in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient wards in Finland, and discuss the ethical, theoretical and practical concerns related to nursing ideologies. Data were collected by means of a national questionnaire survey, which included one open-ended question seeking managers' opinions on the nursing ideology used in their area of practice. Questionnaires were sent to all child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient wards (n = 69) in Finland; 61 ward managers responded. Data were analysed by qualitative and quantitative content analysis. Six categories -- family centred care, individual care, milieu centred care, integrated care, educational care and psychodynamic care -- were formed to specify ideological approaches used in inpatient nursing. The majority of the wards were guided by two or more approaches. Nursing models, theories and codes of ethics were almost totally ignored in the ward managers' ideological descriptions.

  12. Prevalence of Alcohol and Substance Use Disorder among Psychiatric Inpatients

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    Gonca Karakus

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of alcohol and substance use disorders in psychiatric inpatient clinics and determine the frequencies of alcohol and substance use disorder among psychiatric disease groups and find out the differences in between these groups. Material and Methods: Thus all patients admitted to inpatients psychiatric clinics of in one year period were approached for inclusion into this study, and 155 patients with a hospitalization period longer than one day who provided informed consent were included in the study. All patients included in the study were interviewed with a semi structured interview scale to get information regarding the presence of alcohol, nicotine and other substance use disorder. Results: The results of this study confirmed high rates of alcohol, nicotine and substance use disorder comorbidity in psychiatric inpatients. The results of one year prospective follow up study revealed that 57.4% of patients had nicotine dependence, 21.9% alcohol dependence and misuse and 9% had sedative misuse or dependence. The rate of substance use disorder was high among all psychiatric disorder subgroups. Considering all substances including nicotine together, 55% of patients with psychotic disorder had at least one substance use disorder whereas these figures were 61% and 81% for affective disorders and anxiety disorders respectively. Conclusion: Professionals dealing with treatment of psychiatric disorders should always be aware of substance use disorder comorbidity, and start treatment immediately without causing any delay in treatment. Obviously we need future large prospective studies to get more insight into these dual-diagnose disorders. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(1.000: 37-48

  13. Nursing diagnoses related to psychiatric adult inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfelder, Fritz; van Achterberg, Theo; Müller Staub, Maria

    2018-02-01

    To detect the prevalence of NANDA-I diagnoses and possible relationships between those and patient characteristics such as gender, age, medical diagnoses and psychiatric specialty/setting. There is a lack on studies about psychiatric inpatient characteristics and possible relationships among these characteristics with nursing diagnoses. A quantitative-descriptive, cross-sectional, completed data sampling study was performed. The data were collected from the electronic patient record system. Frequencies for the social-demographic data, the prevalence of the NANDA-I diagnoses and the explanatory variables were calculated. In total, 410 nursing phenomena were found representing 85 different NANDA-I diagnoses in 312 patients. The NANDA-I diagnosis "Ineffective Coping" was the most frequently stated diagnosis followed by "Ineffective Health Maintenance," "Hopelessness" and "Risk for Other-Directed Violence". Men were more frequently affected by the diagnoses "Ineffective Coping," "Hopelessness," "Risk for Self-Directed Violence," "Defensive Coping" and "Risk for Suicide," whereas the diagnoses "Insomnia," "Chronic Confusion," "Chronic Low Self-Esteem" and "Anxiety" were more common in women. Patients under the age of 45 years were more frequently affected by "Chronic Low Self-Esteem" and "Anxiety" than older patients. "Ineffective Coping" was the most prevalent diagnosis by patients with mental disorders due to psychoactive substance use. Patients with schizophrenia were primarily affected by the diagnoses "Ineffective Coping," "Impaired Social Interaction" and "Chronic Low Self-Esteem." This study demonstrates the complexity and diversity of nursing care in inpatient psychiatric settings. Patients' gender, age and psychiatric diagnoses and settings are a key factor for specific nursing diagnosis. There are tendencies for relationships between certain nursing diagnosis and patient characteristics in psychiatric adult inpatients. This enhances the specific, extended

  14. Effects of music on major depression in psychiatric inpatients.

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    Hsu, Wei-Chi; Lai, Hui-Ling

    2004-10-01

    The study was to assess the effectiveness of soft music for treatment of major depressive disorder inpatients in Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. A pretest-posttest with a two-group repeated measures design was used. Patients with major depressive disorder were recruited through referred by the psychiatric physicians. Subjects listened to their choice of music for 2 weeks. Depression was measured with the Zung's Depression Scale before the study and at two weekly posttests. Using repeated measures ANCOVA, music resulted in significantly better depressive scores, as well as significantly better subscores of depression compared with controls. Depression improved weekly, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The findings provide evidence for psychiatric nurses to use soft music as an empirically based intervention for depressed inpatients.

  15. [Psychopharmacotherapy in adolescents with borderline personality disorder in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöckel, Lars; Goth, Kirstin; Matic, Nina; Zepf, Florian Daniel; Holtmann, Martin; Poustka, Fritz

    2010-01-01

    The majority of adult patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are treated with psychotropic drugs. However, there are no data on psychotropic therapy in adolescents. This study examines the prevalence of BPD in an adolescent population undergoing either inpatient or outpatient psychiatric treatment and assesses psychotropic prescription patterns in adolescent in- and outpatients with BPD. Out of a population of adolescents undergoing psychiatric treatment over a seven-year observation period, 58 adolescent patients with BPD (16.7 +/- 2.5 years) were investigated retrospectively with regard to their first episode of treatment, type of medication, and different risk variables. Out of the investigated population, 37 inpatients and 21 outpatients received treatment. Inpatients were shown to have higher rates of risk variables (approx. 68% with co-morbid disorders and approx. 49% with self-harmful behaviour, significantly (p NaSSA) were most commonly prescribed, followed by neuroleptics. More than 50% of the medicated patients were treated with multiple psychotropic drugs administered simultaneously. Pharmacotherapy in BPD has a high and increasing therapeutic value, with the prescription of psychotropic drugs being primarily symptom-orientated. Pharmacotherapy of co-morbid disorders should be accorded equal treatment priority. In line with this, psychotropic treatment of BPD in adolescents is increasingly important. Inpatient adolescents are more burdened in terms of psychiatric risk variables, and also receive medication more often.

  16. Nurses' attitudes toward ethical issues in psychiatric inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Nurhan

    2014-05-01

    Nursing is an occupation that deals with humans and relies upon human relationships. Nursing care, which is an important component of these relationships, involves protection, forbearance, attention, and worry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ethical beliefs of psychiatric nurses and ethical problems encountered. The study design was descriptive and cross-sectional. RESEARCH CONTEXT: Methods comprised of a questionnaire administered to psychiatric nurses (n=202) from five psychiatric hospitals in Istanbul, Turkey, instruction in psychiatric nursing ethics, discussion of reported ethical problems by nursing focus groups, and analysis of questionnaires and reports by academicians with clinical experience. PARTICIPANTS consist of the nurses who volunteered to take part in the study from the five psychiatric hospitals (n=202), which were selected with cluster sampling method. Ethical considerations: Written informed consent of each participant was taken prior to the study. The results indicated that nurses needed additional education in psychiatric ethics. Insufficient personnel, excessive workload, working conditions, lack of supervision, and in-service training were identified as leading to unethical behaviors. Ethical code or nursing care -related problems included (a) neglect, (b) rude/careless behavior, (c) disrespect of patient rights and human dignity, (d) bystander apathy, (e) lack of proper communication, (f) stigmatization, (g) authoritarian attitude/intimidation, (h) physical interventions during restraint, (i) manipulation by reactive emotions, (j) not asking for permission, (k) disrespect of privacy, (l) dishonesty or lack of clarity, (m) exposure to unhealthy physical conditions, and (n) violation of confidence. The results indicate that ethical codes of nursing in psychiatric inpatient units are inadequate and standards of care are poor. In order to address those issues, large-scale research needs to be conducted in psychiatric nursing with a

  17. Predictors of psychiatric inpatient suicide: a national prospective register-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben; Mortensen, Preben B

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the incidence and risk factors of psychiatric inpatient suicide within a national cohort representing all psychiatric hospital admissions. METHOD: This national prospective register-based study followed all psychiatric hospital admissions in Denmark from the date of patient...... admission until patient discharge or inpatient suicide over a 10-year study period from 1997 through 2006. By using survival analysis techniques, this study was the first to take the inpatient time at risk into account in the estimation of the suicide rate and the predictors of suicide among hospital......-admitted psychiatric patients. RESULTS: Among 126,382 psychiatric inpatients aged 14 years or older, 279 suicides occurred. The risk of inpatient suicide was high: 860 suicides per 100,000 inpatient years. Of those individuals who completed suicide, 50% died within 18 days of admission. The inpatient suicide rate...

  18. Changes in Inpatient and Postdischarge Suicide Rates in a Nationwide Cohort of Danish Psychiatric Inpatients, 1998-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-01-01

    A reduction in the number of inpatient beds as well as shorter admissions have aroused concern that tendencies to deinstitutionalize may increase the suicide rate for psychiatric patients who have been hospitalized. One study indicates that a decreasing inpatient suicide rate may actually reflect...... a transfer to an increasing postdischarge suicide rate; however, uncertainties exist about this transfer, since it is not well studied. The objectives of this study were to estimate adjusted changes over time in suicide rates among psychiatric inpatients and recently discharged psychiatric patients...

  19. Cysticercosis in chronic psychiatric inpatients from a Venezuelan community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Néstor W; Rossi, Nineth E; Galeazzi, Tatiana N; Sánchez, Nora M; Colmenares, Francisco I; Medina, Oscar D; Uzcategui, Néstor L; Alfonzo, Nacarid; Arango, Celso; Urdaneta, Haideé

    2005-09-01

    Cysticercosis due to Taenia solium infection is endemic in developing countries of the Americas, Asia, and Africa. This study was designed to establish the prevalence of cysticercosis in 158 inpatients of a psychiatric institution in the state of Tachira (Venezuela) and in 127 healthy control subjects. Positive blood tests for cysticercosis by Western blotting were recorded in 18.35% of the patients and in 1.57% of the controls. Individuals with mental retardation were found to carry an increased risk of cysticercosis (RR: 2.92; 1.22 7.0; P health care system.

  20. Thwarted interpersonal needs and suicide ideation: Comparing psychiatric inpatients with bipolar and non-bipolar mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nathanael J; Mitchell, Sean M; Roush, Jared F; Brown, Sarah L; Jahn, Danielle R; Cukrowicz, Kelly C

    2016-12-30

    Psychiatric inpatients are at heightened risk for suicide, and evidence suggests that psychiatric inpatients with bipolar mood disorders may be at greater risk for suicide ideation compared to those with non-bipolar mood disorders. There is a paucity of research directly comparing risk factors for suicide ideation in bipolar versus non-bipolar mood disorders in an inpatient sample. The current study sought to clarify the association between two constructs from the interpersonal theory of suicide (i.e., perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness) in leading to suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients with bipolar and non-bipolar mood disorders. Participants were (N=90) psychiatric inpatients with a bipolar (n = 20) or non-bipolar mood disorder (n=70; per their medical charts). Perceived burdensomeness, but not thwarted belongingness, was significantly associated with suicide ideation after adjusting for other covariates. This suggests perceived burdensomeness may play a key role in suicide ideation among psychiatric inpatients with any mood disorder and highlights the importance of assessment and intervention of perceived burdensomeness in this population. Contrary to our hypothesis, mood disorder group (i.e., bipolar versus non-bipolar) did not moderate the relations between perceived burdensomeness/thwarted belongingness and suicide ideation. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. When should psychiatrists seek criminal prosecution of assaultive psychiatric inpatients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Justin; Ralston, D Christopher; McCullough, Laurence B; Coverdale, John H

    2009-08-01

    This Open Forum commentary reviews the ethical considerations relevant to the question of prosecuting assaultive psychiatric patients, with particular attention to the significance that should be attached to the arguments generated by those considerations. A comprehensive literature search was conducted incorporating the terms "assaultive patients," "ethics," "psychiatric inpatients," and "law." The literature of professional medical ethics was applied to identify relevant domains of ethical argument. Five domains were identified: fiduciary obligations of physicians to assaultive and other patients; obligations to staff members; professional virtues of compassion, self-sacrifice, and self-effacement; retributive justice; and the patient's right to confidentiality. The content of each domain is explained, and guidance is provided on how to assess the relative strengths of ethical argument within each domain. All five domains must be explicitly addressed in order to make ethically disciplined judgments about whether to seek prosecution. A distinctive feature of this ethical analysis is the central importance of the professional virtues.

  2. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Measure Data – National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  3. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Measure Data – by Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  4. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Measure Data – by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  5. Terminal delirium misdiagnosed as major psychiatric disorder: Palliative care in a psychiatric inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aligeti, Sabitha; Baig, Muhammad R; Barrera, Fernando F

    2016-06-01

    Delirium is a neuropsychiatric condition characterized by acute change in cognition and disturbance of consciousness. A similar state during the final days of life is termed "terminal delirium." We present three cases with end-stage chronic medical problems without any significant psychiatric history who were admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit or a locked dementia unit for management of "depression," "dementia," or "psychosis." Early diagnosis of terminal delirium helps prevent patients, family members, and staff from undergoing severe emotional distress and facilitates appropriate end-of-life care.

  6. Use of potentially abusive psychotropic substances in psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modestin, J; Nussbaumer, C; Angst, K; Scheidegger, P; Hell, D

    1997-01-01

    A series of 417 consecutively admitted psychiatric inpatients were studied with regard to their use of potentially abusive psychotropic substances in the last 3 months preceding admission. In all patients face-to-face interviews were performed; in 354 of them urine specimens could also be tested. Alcohol and benzodiazepines belonged to the most frequently used substances followed by cannabis, opiates and cocaine. Barbiturates, hallucinogens and amphetamine derivatives were only exceptionally reported. The most important finding of the study is that every fifth patient regularly used "hard" drugs (opiates and/or cocaine), every fourth patient illegal drugs and every third patient alcohol. Substances were found in 54% of all urine specimens; methadone, opiates and cocaine were hardly found alone. For the latter substances excellent agreement was found between interview reports and urine exams. Excluding patients diagnosed as substance-use disorders, there were no statistically significant differences between schizophrenic, affective, neurotic/stress/somatoform and other disorders with regard to the use of "hard" drugs and illegal drugs. Regular substance use correlated with much worse psychosocial adjustment. Substance use has to be explored and considered in every individual psychiatric inpatient.

  7. Overweight in adolescent, psychiatric inpatients: A problem of general or food-specific impulsivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deux, Natalie; Schlarb, Angelika A; Martin, Franziska; Holtmann, Martin; Hebebrand, Johannes; Legenbauer, Tanja

    2017-05-01

    Adolescent psychiatric patients are vulnerable to weight problems and show an overrepresentation of overweight compared to the healthy population. One potential factor that can contribute to the etiology of overweight is higher impulsivity. As of yet, it is unclear whether it is a general impulse control deficit or weight-related aspects such as lower impulse control in response to food that have an impact on body weight. As this may have therapeutic implications, the current study investigated differences between overweight and non-overweight adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N = 98; aged 12-20) in relation to trait impulsivity and behavioral inhibition performance. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and two go/no-go paradigms with neutral and food-related stimulus materials were applied. Results indicated no significant differences concerning trait impulsivity, but revealed that overweight inpatients had significantly more difficulties in inhibition performance (i.e. they reacted more impulsively) in response to both food and neutral stimuli compared to non-overweight inpatients. Furthermore, no specific inhibition deficit for high-caloric vs. low-caloric food cues emerged in overweight inpatients, whereas non-overweight participants showed significantly lower inhibition skills in response to high-caloric than low-caloric food stimuli. The results highlight a rather general, non-food-specific reduced inhibition performance in an overweight adolescent psychiatric population. Further research is necessary to enhance the understanding of the role of impulsivity in terms of body weight status in this high-risk group of adolescent inpatients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Validity of routine clinical diagnoses in acute psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Eduard; Wyder, Lea; Holtforth, Martin Grosse; Schnyder, Ulrich; Hepp, Urs; Stulz, Niklaus

    2018-01-01

    To examine the validity of diagnoses obtained by clinicians during routine clinical examination on acute psychiatric inpatient wards. N=100 inpatients with a broad spectrum of major mental disorders were randomly selected in a mental hospital's department of general psychiatry. Patients were diagnosed by independent assessors within Md = 5 (Range: 1-18) days of admission using the SCID I in order to examine the validity of the diagnoses given by the clinical staff based on routine assessments. The commonly used clinical examination technique had good overall agreement with the SCID I assessments regarding primary diagnoses at the level of ICD-10 main categories (F2, F30-31, F32-F33, F4; κ = 0.65). However, agreement between routine clinical diagnoses and the SCID I diagnoses tended to be low for some specific mental disorders (e.g., depressive disorders) and for secondary diagnoses. The validity of routine clinical diagnoses established in acute inpatient settings is limited and should be improved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral health status and treatment needs of psychiatric inpatients in Ranchi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvan Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral health has an impact on general health, self-esteem and quality of life, but it often has a low priority in the context of mental health and in some phases of illness, the priority may be nonexistent Patients with psychiatric illness have poor oral hygiene than general population. Very few studies have been reported regarding the oral health among Indian psychiatric inpatients. Aim: To assess the oral health status of long-term psychiatric inpatients in a psychiatric institute and to evaluate the treatment requirements of psychiatric inpatients for maintaining the oral hygiene. Materials and methods: Psychiatric inpatients were examined and data was collected using the WHO standardized dental evaluation form in the psychiatric institute. Results: One hundred and forty-one patents (53% female: mean age: 36.56 ± 13.28 years: 47% male: mean age: 37.36 ± 12.49 years: length of illness: More than 5 years, 35.5%: less than 5 years, 84.5% were included in the study. 73% being schizophrenics. Dental canes was found in 55.3% patients. Calculus was present in 94.3% patients. Missing teeth was found in 22.7% patients. Mucosal lesions and oral ulcers were seen in 5.7 and 1 4% of total examined patients respectively. Percentages of patient requiring extractions were 34.8%. oral prophylaxis 98.6%. conservative treatment 31.9% and prosthesis 20.6%. Age was significantly correlated with number of decayed (r = 0.294, p < 0.01 and missing teeth (r = 0.436, p < 0.01. Length of illness was significantly correlated with number of decayed (r = 0.258. p < 0.01 and missing teeth (r = 0.229. p < 0.0 1 Conclusion: Oral health is an important and integral part of health care. Members of multidisciplinary team should be encouraged to assist psychiatric patients in maintaining their oral health with good oral hygiene and access to dental treatment taking into account their special needs.

  10. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide—An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-01-01

    People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools. PMID:28257103

  11. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide—An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Madsen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools.

  12. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide-An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-03-02

    People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools.

  13. Death by unnatural causes during childhood and early adulthood in offspring of psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, Roger; Pickles, Andrew R.; Appleby, Louis

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Offspring of psychiatric inpatients are at higher risk of death from all causes, but their cause-specific risks have not been quantified. OBJECTIVE: To investigate cause-specific deaths at 1 to 25 years in offspring of parents previously admitted as psychiatric inpatients. DESIGN: Popula...

  14. Patterns of psychotropic medication use in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alosaimi FD

    2016-04-01

    (27.9%, and antianxiety (6.2%. However, compared to outpatients, the current use of medications for inpatients was more frequent (93.8% vs 89.9%, P=0.019 with inpatients more likely to be treated with multiple medications (2.1 vs 1.8 medications. A similar trend was observed in the case of antipsychotics, high potency first-generation antipsychotics, second-generation antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and antianxiety medicines where inpatients were more frequently treated with these medications for all psychiatric diagnoses when compared with outpatients. On the contrary, in the case of antidepressant treatment, an opposite trend was observed with more number of treated outpatients in comparison to inpatients. Among elderly patients, 75.9% received antipsychotics, mainly second-generation formulations (67.2%, whereas only 41% received antidepressants and 13.8% received mood stabilizers.Conclusion: Based upon the present study data, it is concluded that among all the psychotropic medications, antipsychotics were heavily used and the frequency was found to be significantly high in the case of inpatients compared with outpatients. Such a practice may lead to multiple negative consequences among the Saudi psychiatric patient population. Further, extensive use of sodium valproate in the case of bipolar disorder, and also among females either in childbearing age or during pregnancy is also the cause of concern and warrants logical use. Overall, this study may help in assessing the burden of psychiatric illness within specific patient demographics and might be effectively used to strategically plan health resources allocation, generate new treatment hypothesis, or be used as a source of evidence that could further integrate other observational studies.Keywords: psychotropic, inpatient, outpatient, antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, Saudi Arabia

  15. [Assessment of inappropriate prescriptions in psychiatric in-patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bord, Benjamin; Courtet, Philippe; Hansel, Sylvie; Barbotte, Eric; Marhuenda, Yolande; Peyrière, Hélène

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate occurrence of the inappropriate prescriptions in a psychiatric department. In this prospective survey over a two-month period, the medical orders were analysed. Inappropriate prescription was defined as any discrepancy with summary of product characteristics (SPC) or our hospital treatment guidelines. One hundred inpatients (72 women, mean age 37.5+/-15 years) were included. We reviewed 495 medication orders, which represent 1875 prescribed drugs. We found 2636 discrepancies with SPC or our hospital treatment guidelines. The proportion of discrepancies related to legal informations was 21.28% and them related to pharmacotherapy was 55.04%. The proportion of discrepancy per patient was estimated to 4.93%. Our study shows a high proportion of inappropriate prescriptions, none of them having induced adverse-drug effects.

  16. Sensory rooms in psychiatric inpatient care: Staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkdahl, Anna; Perseius, Kent-Inge; Samuelsson, Mats; Lindberg, Mathilde Hedlund

    2016-10-01

    There is an increased interest in exploring the use of sensory rooms in psychiatric inpatient care. Sensory rooms can provide stimulation via sight, smell, hearing, touch and taste in a demand-free environment that is controlled by the patient. The rooms may reduce patients' distress and agitation, as well as rates of seclusion and restraint. Successful implementation of sensory rooms is influenced by the attitudes and approach of staff. This paper presents a study of the experiences of 126 staff members who worked with sensory rooms in a Swedish inpatient psychiatry setting. A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used. Data were collected by a web based self-report 12-item questionnaire that included both open- and closed-ended questions. Our findings strengthen the results of previous research in this area in many ways. Content analyses revealed three main categories: hopes and concerns, focusing on patients' self-care, and the room as a sanctuary. Although staff initially described both negative and positive expectations of sensory rooms, after working with the rooms, there was a strong emphasis on more positive experiences, such as letting go of control and observing an increase in patients' self-confidence, emotional self-care and well-being. Our findings support the important principals of person-centred nursing and recovery-oriented mental health and the ability of staff to implement these principles by working with sensory rooms. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Association between cigarette smoking and suicide in psychiatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Sharifi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cigarette smoking is the single largest preventable cause of death and disability in the industrialized world and it causes at least 85% of lung cancers, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. In addition smokers are at a higher risk from psychiatric co-morbid illness such as depression and completed suicide. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey in which we targeted all patients with serious mental illness (SMI who were admitted in Razi mental health Hospital in Tehran, Iran. We recruited 984 participants, who were receiving services from Razi mental health Hospital and hospitalized for at least two days between 21 July to 21 September, 2010. Nine hundred and fifty patients out of this figure were able to participate in our study. Results The final study sample (n = 950 consisted of 73.2% males and 26.8% females. The mean age was 45.31 (SD=13.7. A majority of participants (70% was smoker. A history of never smoking was present for 25.2% of the study sample; while 4.8% qualified as former smokers and 70.0% as occasional or current smokers. Two hundred and nineteen participants had attempted suicide amongst them 102 (46.6% once, 37 (16.9% twice, and 80 (36.5% attempted more than two times in their life time. In regression model, gender, age, and cigarette consumption were associated with previous suicide attempts and entered the model in this order as significant predictors. Conclusion There is an association of cigarette smoking and suicide attempt in psychiatric inpatients. Current smoking, a simple clinical assessment, should trigger greater attention by clinicians to potential suicidality and become part of a comprehensive assessment of suicide risk.

  18. [Diagnosis of Metabolic Risk Factors in Psychiatric Inpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Sibylle; Wolff-Menzler, Claus; Schulz, Michael; Noelle, Rüdiger; Wiegand, Hauke Felix; Seemüller, Florian; Nienaber, Andre; Löhr, Michael; Godemann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Individuals suffering from mental illness have one to two decades reduced life expectancy. The increased morbidity and mortality is mainly due to cardiometabolic disorders. Despite these numbers, international studies give evidence that diagnoses and treatment of metabolic risk factors in psychiatric patients is insufficient. We assume that in Germany metabolic risk factors are also underdiagnosed and insufficiently treated. We tested for the frequency of diagnoses of the metabolic risk factors obesity, nicotine dependence and abuse, disorders of lipid metabolism, hypertension and diabetes in 139 307 cases of residential treatment and semi-residential care in 47 psychiatric hospitals in Germany in the year 2012. Data were derived from the VIPP(indicators of treatment quality in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine)-project, a project that comprises the routine data of psychiatric hospitals, that are sent to the InEK (institute for the lump sum payment system for hospitals). Frequencies were compared with prevalence of metabolic risk factors in the German population and prevalences of metabolic risk factors found in psychiatric patients in international studies. In particular obesity (2.8 %), disorders of lipid metabolism (2.8 %) and nicotin dependence (4.2 %) were underdiagnosed. We assume that also diabetes (6.8 %) and hypertension (17.7 %) were underdiagnosed. The results give evidence that metabolic risk factors are underdiagnosed and possibly insufficiently treated in German psychiatric hospitals. We cannot exclude that the results might also be due to poor documentation. It remains to be seen if the introduction of the PEPP (the new lump sum payment system in German psychiatry) will heighten the level of attention for metabolic risk factors and their treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Switch Function and Pathological Dissociation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chui-De Chiu

    Full Text Available Swift switching, along with atypical ability on updating and inhibition, has been found in non-clinical dissociators. However, whether swift switching is a cognitive endophenotype that intertwines with traumatisation and pathological dissociation remains unknown. Unspecified acute psychiatric patients were recruited to verify a hypothesis that pathological dissociation is associated with swift switching and traumatisation may explain this relationship. Behavioural measures of intellectual function and three executive functions including updating, switching and inhibition were administered, together with standardised scales to evaluate pathological dissociation and traumatisation. Our results showed superior control ability on switching and updating in inpatients who displayed more symptoms of pathological dissociation. When all three executive functions were entered as predictors, in addition to intellectual quotient and demographic variables to regress upon pathological dissociation, switching rather than updating remained the significant predictor. Importantly, the relationship between pathological dissociation and switching became non-significant when the effect of childhood trauma were controlled. The results support a trauma-related switching hypothesis which postulates swift switching as a cognitive endophenotype of pathological dissociation; traumatisation in childhood may explain the importance of swift switching.

  20. Predominant diagnoses, gender, and admission duration in an adult psychiatric inpatient hospital in United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Lazzari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study objective was to epidemiologically analyse patients presenting at an adult and mixed-gender psychiatric inpatient unit in Essex, Kingswood Centre, UK, to report the predominant diagnoses, gender, and admission duration. Method and material: Meta-analysis and descriptive statistics analysed the year 2016 discharge data on Excel® for 162 patients. ICD-10 codes classified their mental illnesses. Results: Meta-analysis evidenced statistically significant heterogeneity in numbers admissions (I2=95%; p≤0.001, length (I2=78%; p≤0.001, and gender (I2=76%; p≤0.001. The prevailing diagnosis was borderline personality disorder (BPD (rate, 95% CI=0.46 [0.38-0.54]. The longest admission was for schizoaffective disorder (mean duration, 95% CI=53 [22.65-83.34], p=0.001. Gender presented a prevalence of male over female admissions for schizophrenia (OR, 95% CI=0.14 [0.05-0.35], p≤0.001 and BPD with prevalence of female over male admissions (OR, 95% CI=2.79 [1.35-5.76], p=0.05. Conclusion: Female patients with BPD were the most represented category in non-forensic psychiatric inpatient wards in the population studied. Male patients with schizophrenia represented the other gender highly represented. The longest admission was recorded for schizoaffective disorder due to the complexity to treat both mood and psychotic symptoms. It is likely that women with BPD will be the future recipients of psychiatric inpatient and outpatient healthcare services.

  1. The Relationship between Seclusion and Restraint Use and Childhood Abuse among Psychiatric Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Joseph H.; Springer, Justin; Beck, Niels C.; Menditto, Anthony; Coleman, James

    2011-01-01

    Seclusion and restraint (S/R) is a controversial topic in the field of psychiatry, due in part to the high rates of childhood physical and sexual abuse found among psychiatric inpatients. The trauma-informed care perspective suggests that the use of S/R with previously abused inpatients may result in retraumatization due to mental associations…

  2. Pregnant Adolescents Admitted to an Inpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Unit: An Eight-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Teresa M; Markley, Laura A; Nelson, Dana; Crane, Stephen S; Fitzgibbon, James J

    2015-12-01

    To assess patient outcomes and describe demographic data of pregnant adolescents admitted to an inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit, as well as to determine if it is safe to continue to admit pregnant adolescents to such a unit. A descriptive retrospective chart review conducted at a free-standing pediatric hospital in northeast Ohio of all pregnant adolescents aged 13 to 17 years admitted to the inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit from July 2005 to April 2013. Data collection included details on demographic, pregnancy status, and psychiatric diagnoses. Eighteen pregnant adolescents were admitted to the psychiatric unit during the time frame. Sixteen of those were in the first trimester of pregnancy. Pregnancy was found to be a contributing factor to the adolescent's suicidal ideation and admission in 11 of the cases. Admission to an inpatient psychiatric facility did not lead to adverse effects in pregnancy. Pregnant adolescents did not have negative pregnancy outcomes related to admission to an inpatient psychiatric unit. Results of this study suggest that it is safe to continue to admit uncomplicated pregnant adolescents in their first trimester to an inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit for an acute stay. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychiatric inpatient care at a county hospital before and after the inception of a university-affiliated psychiatry residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Benjamin K P; Ma, Albert Y

    2007-09-01

    The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), along with Kern Medical Center (KMC) and Kern County Mental Health (KCMH), established a new psychiatry residency program in 2004. In this study, we compared psychiatric care at a county psychiatric facility serving a population of 760,000 inhabitants before and after the initiation of this psychiatry residency program. Medical charts for all patients admitted to the psychiatric inpatient service during the year before the inception of the psychiatry residency program (2003-2004) and during the first year in which there was full implementation of residents after inception of the psychiatry residency program (2005-2006) were reviewed. Baseline characteristics, demographics, and various outcomes of the two groups were compared. After the residency program was established, the mean length of stay increased from 8.8 to 9.8 days (p psychiatric inpatient setting. More research is needed to identify strategies, such as guidelines to eliminate over-utilization of resources and methods to improve residents' competency, that may successfully enhance the quality of care provided by residents to psychiatric inpatients.

  4. Patterns Of Aggression Among Psychiatric In-Patients At The Jos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aggression in the form of violence has been reportedly associated with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses, and in some cases, serious consequences have resulted form such assault. The study was aimed at determining the ranges and target of aggressive behaviour among Psychiatric in-patients at Jos University Teaching ...

  5. Adverse Childhood Experiences in a Post-bariatric Surgery Psychiatric Inpatient Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Kathryn; Ross, Colin A

    2017-12-01

    Sixty-three inpatients in a psychiatric hospital who had previously undergone bariatric surgery were interviewed by the hospital dietitian. The purpose of the study was to determine the frequency of adverse childhood experiences in this population. Participants completed the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Scale. The average score on the ACE was 5.4 (3.3); 76% of participants reported childhood emotional neglect, 70% childhood verbal abuse, and 64% childhood sexual abuse; only two participants reported no adverse childhood experiences. The participants in the study reported high levels of adverse childhood experiences compared to the general population, which is consistent with prior literature on rates of childhood trauma in post-bariatric surgery patients. The role of adverse childhood experiences in post-bariatric surgery adaptation should be investigated in future research, including in prospective studies.

  6. [Recommendations for psychotherapy in psychiatric inpatient treatment : Results of the PAKT Study Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, C; Flammer, E; Pfiffner, C; Grempler, J; Längle, G; Eschweiler, G-W; Spießl, H; Steinert, T

    2017-03-01

    In the S3 treatment guidelines psychotherapy is recommended in all psychological disorders. Therefore, outpatient or inpatient psychotherapy should be recommended by therapists in most cases. On the other hand, it is well known that waiting periods for psychotherapeutic treatment are considerable, which raises the question how the recommendation for psychotherapy is presented in psychiatric hospitals in Germany. The article deals with the question of how frequent the recommendation of psychotherapeutic treatment is made after psychiatric inpatient stay or day care, and if there are differences between hospitals and patient groups. In four psychiatric hospitals in southern Germany the frequency of recommendation for psychotherapy in psychiatric patients was registered and compared to the number of all patients treated in the equivalent time. For this purpose, we analyzed data of the basic documentation in the four participating hospitals. Overall, 9.6 % of the patients received a recommendation of psychotherapeutic treatment. In the psychiatric university hospital a subsequent psychotherapeutic treatment was recommended somewhat more often. Differences between hospitals were present but marginal. Over all participating hospitals, psychotherapy was recommended markedly less frequently in patients with an F2 diagnosis in comparison with patients with F3 or F4 diagnoses. Psychotherapeutic treatment after psychiatric inpatient stay is recommended cautiously. Probably therapists anticipate the fact that the growing demand for psychotherapeutic treatment in general reduces the chances for persons after psychiatric inpatient treatment.

  7. Predictors of aggression on the psychiatric inpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serper, Mark R; Goldberg, Brett R; Herman, Kristine G; Richarme, Danielle; Chou, James; Dill, Charles A; Cancro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Patients with severe mental illness are at increased risk to commit acts of aggression in the inpatient hospital setting. Aggressive behaviors have severe negative consequences for the patient, victims, clinical staff, and the therapeutic community as a whole. While risk factors of community and inpatient aggression overlap, many predictive factors diverge between the two settings. For example, while medication noncompliance has been a robust predictor of community aggression, this factor has little predictive value for inpatient settings where patients' pharmacotherapy is closely monitored. Relatively fewer investigators have examined a wide range of predictive factors associated with aggressive acts committed on the psychiatry inpatient service, often with conflicting results. The present study examined demographic, clinical, and neurocognitive performance predictors of self, other, object, and verbal aggressiveness in 118 acute inpatients. Results revealed that the arrival status at the hospital (voluntary vs involuntary), female gender, and substance abuse diagnosis were predictors of verbal aggression and aggression against others. Impaired memory functioning also predicted object aggression. Fewer symptoms, combined with higher cognition functioning, however, were significant predictors of self-aggressive acts committed on the inpatient service. The need for relating predictors of specific types of aggressiveness in schizophrenia is discussed.

  8. Pattern of psychiatric inpatient admission in Ibadan: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Such audit of psychiatric services is not a popular research venture in Nigeria. Objectives: The study aims to describe the pattern of old psychiatric admissions in a tertiary health facility and the socio-cultural and environmental factors that may influence the pattern. Methods: Data on monthly admissions over a 5-year period ...

  9. Metasynthesis of research on the role of psychiatric inpatient nurses: what is important to staff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Kathleen R; Johnson, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient psychiatric nurses are a large workforce, but their work is poorly articulated and thus poorly understood outside of the professional inpatient community. To learn how inpatient psychiatric nurses depict their work, define important aspects of their role, and view the impact of the unit environment on their clinical practice. Metasynthesis of research that has focused on the ideas and perceptions of inpatient psychiatric nurses around their role and practice on inpatient psychiatric units. Three themes emerged from the analysis; the first was an umbrella for three important aspects of nursing work: the nurses' efforts to forge engagement with patients; their activities which maintained the safety of the unit and interventions nurses viewed as educating/empowering patients. The second theme captures the conditions that enabled nurses to do this work such as a cohesive nursing team and their sense of self-direction in their role. The final theme centers on difficulties nurses encountered in enacting their role which included multiple responsibilities for patient care and management of the milieu; intense work often with low visibility and scant support within the organization. Nurses need to articulate their practice so they can assert for the staffing and resources needed to keep units safe and promote patients' well-being, strive toward quality, and promote the development of the specialty.

  10. The Influence of Psychiatric Comorbidity on Inpatient Outcomes following Distal Humerus Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard T. Buller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The influence of psychiatric comorbidity on outcomes following inpatient management of upper extremity fractures is poorly understood. Methods. The National Hospital Discharge Survey was queried to identify patients admitted to US hospitals with distal humerus fractures between 1990 and 2007. Patients were subdivided into 5 groups: depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, dementia, and no psychiatric comorbidity. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified independent risk factors for adverse events, requirement of blood transfusion, and discharge to another inpatient facility. Results. A cohort representative of 526,185 patients was identified as having a distal humerus fracture. Depression, anxiety, and dementia were independently associated with higher odds of in-hospital adverse events (P<0.001. Depression was associated with higher odds of inpatient blood transfusion (P<0.001. Depression, schizophrenia, and dementia were associated with higher odds of nonroutine discharge to another inpatient facility (P<0.001. Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia had a mean of 12 (P<0.001 more days of care than patients with no psychiatric comorbidity. Discussion. Patients with comorbid psychiatric illness who are admitted to hospitals with distal humerus fractures are at increased risk of inpatient adverse events and posthospitalization care.

  11. Length of stay of general psychiatric inpatients in the United States: systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tulloch, Alex D

    2011-05-01

    Psychiatric length of stay (LOS) has reduced but is still longer than for physical disorders. Inpatient costs are 16% of total mental health spending. Regression analyses of the determinants of LOS for US adult psychiatric inpatients were systematically reviewed. Most studies predated recent LOS reductions. Psychosis, female gender and larger hospital size were associated with longer LOS, while discharge against medical advice, prospective payment, being married, being detained and either younger or middle age were associated with shorter LOS. Associations appeared consistent, especially where sample size was above 3,000. Updated studies should be adequately powered and include the variables above.

  12. The effects of relaxation exercises on anxiety levels in psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, S

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of relaxation exercises on anxiety levels in an inpatient general psychiatric unit. The conceptual framework used was holism. A convenience sample of 39 subjects was studied. Anxiety levels were measured prior to and post interventions with the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Progressive muscle relaxation, meditative breathing, guided imagery, and soft music were employed to promote relaxation. A significant reduction in anxiety level was obtained on the post-test. The findings of this study can be incorporated by holistic nurses to help reduce anxiety levels of general psychiatric inpatients by using relaxation interventions.

  13. Hospital Related Stress Among Patients Admitted to a Psychiatric In-patient Unit in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha KS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric patient’s attitudes towards hospitalization have found an association between patient perceptions of the ward atmosphere and dissatisfaction. The aim of the study was to determine the aspects of stress related to hospitalization in inpatients admitted to a psychiatric facility. Fifty in-patients of both sexes admitted consecutively to a psychiatric unit in a General Hospital were asked to rate the importance of, and their satisfaction with, 38 different aspects of in-patient care and treatment. Results showed that the major sources of stress were related to having a violent patient near to his/her bed; being away from family; having to stay in closed wards; having to eat cold and tasteless food; losing income or job due to illness, being hospitalized away from home; not able to understand the jargons used by the clinical staff and not getting medication for sleep. A well-differentiated assessment of stress and satisfaction has implications for the evaluation of the quality of psychiatric care and for the improvement of in-patient psychiatric care.

  14. Patientś experiences of patient education on psychiatric inpatient wards; a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, S T; Videbech, P; Kragh, M; Thisted, C N; Bjerrum, M B

    2017-09-12

    To synthesize the evidence on how patients with serious mental disorders perceived patient education on psychiatric wards and to learn more about the patient perceived benefits and limitations related to patient education and how well patient education meets the perceived needs of inpatients. Quantitative and qualitative data were categorized and synthesized. A systematic literature search was conducted. Articles were validated using validated critical appraisal tools. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Five articles met the inclusion criteria. The results concerned the specific population with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Two explanatory syntheses were aggregated: (I) Benefits and perceived barriers to receiving education and (II) Educational needs of mental health patients. Patients reported mechanical information dissemination and lack of individual and corporative discussions. Patients preferred patient education from different educational sources with respect to individual needs. Patient education were most useful when it could be tailored to an individuaĺs specific needs and match patient preference for how to receive it. The findings did not provide evidence to support any educational methods of preference. The findings may contribute to the development of educational interventions that are perceived more helpful for in-patients suffering from serious mental disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of psychiatric inpatient capacities and diagnostic practice in Tashkent/Uzbekistan as compared to Berlin/Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Adrian P; Fakhriddinov, Sardor; Fayzirahmanova, Maria; Aichberger, Marion C; Ivens, Sebastian; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam; Grohmann, Renate; Magzumova, Shakhnoza; Heinz, Andreas; Sartorius, Norman; Ströhle, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    The present study shows a comparison of diagnoses used for the treatment of urban psychiatric inpatients in Tashkent/Uzbekistan and Berlin/Germany. Differential diagnostic practices related to different traditions in psychopathology between the two settings are analysed to explain part of the difference in relative frequencies of the diagnoses. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of diagnoses used for the treatment of 845 inpatients including 17 out of 18 wards of the Tashkent psychiatric hospital and of all 2,260 psychiatric and psychotherapeutic inpatients in Berlin in October 2008. Relative frequencies of diagnostic categories were calculated for each setting and compared between the two settings using the Chi-square test. A descriptive analysis of differential diagnostic practice is used to explain differences in relative frequencies. Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (59.3 vs. 21.0%), with organic mental disorders (20.5 vs. 8.3%), with mental retardation (6.9 vs. 0.2%) and with neurasthenia (1.4 vs. 0.0%) had larger relative frequencies of the psychiatric inpatient population in Tashkent than in Berlin. Patients diagnosed with unipolar depression (24.1 vs. 0.9%), substance use disorder (17.4 vs. 6.4%), adjustment disorder (6.0 vs. 0.4%), schizoaffective disorder (4.9 vs. 0.0%), mania and bipolar disorder (5.3 vs. 0.4%), personality disorder (3.2 vs. 2.0%) and anxiety disorder (3.1 vs. 0.1%) had larger relative frequencies in Berlin than in Tashkent. The diagnostic concept of schizophrenia in Tashkent includes patients with affective psychoses, schizoaffective psychoses and delusional disorders. In Tashkent, mental disorders are more readily associated with organic brain disease such as head trauma or vascular disease than in Berlin. In Tashkent, most of the psychiatric inpatient capacities are used for the treatment of schizophrenia and organic mental disorders, whereas in Berlin patients with affective disorders, schizophrenia and substance use

  16. Self-reported peer victimization and suicidal ideation in adolescent psychiatric inpatients: the mediating role of negative self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Heather A; Bilge-Johnson, Sumru; Rabinovitch, Annie E; Fishel, Hazel

    2014-10-01

    The current study investigated relationships among self-reported peer victimization, suicidality, and depression in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Sixty-seven adolescent psychiatric inpatients at a Midwestern children's hospital completed measures of bullying and peer victimization, suicidal ideation, and depression during their inpatient stay. Analyses indicated significant moderate correlations among victimization, suicidal ideation, and depression in adolescents. Results from mediational analyses found that negative self-esteem mediated the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation. To date, this study is the first to directly examine the mechanisms underlying the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation in adolescent psychiatric inpatients. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Improving the physical health in long-term psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Peter; Davidsen, A.S.; Killian, R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with psychiatric illness have increased somatic morbidity and increased mortality. Knowledge of how to integrate the prevention and care of somatic illness into the treatment of psychiatric patients is required. The aims of this study were to investigate whether an intervention...... programme to improve physical health is effective. METHODS: An extension of the European Network for Promoting the Health of Residents in Psychiatric and Social Care Institutions (HELPS) project further developed as a 12-month controlled cluster-randomized intervention study in the Danish centre. Waist...... circumference was a proxy of unhealthy body fat in view of the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Waist circumference was 108 cm for men and 108 cm for women. Controlled for cluster randomization, sex, age, and body fat, the intervention group showed a small...

  18. Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Admission Rates and Subsequent One-Year Mortality in England: 1998-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Anthony; Clacey, Joe; Seagroatt, Valerie; Goldacre, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a time of very rapid change not only in physical but also psychological development. During the teenage years there is a reported rise in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate age- and sex-specific National Health Service (NHS) hospital inpatient admission rates for psychiatric…

  19. Acceptance of Computerized Compared to Paper-and-Pencil Assessment in Psychiatric Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bernhard; Schneider, Barbara; Fritze, Jurgen; Gille, Boris; Hornung, Stefan; Kuhner, Thorsten; Maurer, Konrad

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the acceptance of computerized assessment, particularly compared to conventional paper-and-pencil techniques, in seriously impaired psychiatric inpatients. Describes the development of a self-rating questionnaire (OPQ, Operation and Preference Questionnaire) and reports results that showed computerized assessment was convincingly…

  20. Psychomotor Therapy as an Additive Intervention for Violent Forensic Psychiatric Inpatients: A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Zwets (Almar); R.H.J. Hornsveld (Ruud); P.E.H.M. Muris (Peter); T. Kanters (Thijs); E. Langstraat (Egbert); H.J.C. van Marle (Hjalmar)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe first results of psychomotor therapy (PMT) as an additional component to Aggression Replacement Training (ART) were explored in a group of forensic psychiatric inpatients (N = 37). Patients were divided into two groups: ART+PMT (experimental group) and ART+Sports (control group).

  1. The impact of the 2008 economic crisis on the increasing number of young psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medel-Herrero, Alvaro; Gomez-Beneyto, Manuel

    2017-11-21

    Little is published about the impact of the 2008 economic crisis on mental health services in Spain. An interrupted time series analysis was conducted to investigate a potential short-term association between the 2008 economic crisis and the number of psychiatric hospital admissions. The timing of the intervention (April 2008) was based on observed changes in Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Data on 1,152,880 psychiatric inpatients from the national Hospital Morbidity Survey, 69 months before and after the onset of the economic crisis (April 2008), were analyzed. Age-adjusted psychiatric (ICD9 290-319) hospital discharge rates significantly increased from April 2008, matching the onset of the crisis, especially for inpatients aged 15-24 years old and to a less extend for inpatients aged 25-34 years old. Other age groups were not affected. There was a significant increase in diagnoses for disturbance of conduct and emotions, depression, neurotic and personality disorders and alcohol and drug disorders; however, diagnoses for mental retardation and organic psychosis for 15-34 years old inpatients were unaffected. Psychiatric hospital admissions abruptly increased in April 2008, coinciding with the onset of the economic crisis. We identified age groups and diagnoses affected. Increased hospitalizations were found only at the age-ranges most affected by the rise in unemployment. The diagnoses affected were those most sensitive to environmental changes. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-harm in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhand, Naista; Matheson, Katherine; Courtney, Darren

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive report of children and adolescents who engaged in self-harm during their admission to a psychiatric inpatient unit. A chart review was conducted on all admissions to an acute care psychiatric inpatient unit in a Canadian children's hospital over a one-year period. Details on patients with self-harm behaviour during the admission were recorded, including: demographics, presentation to hospital, self-harm behaviour and outcome. Baseline variables for patients with and without self-harm behaviour during admission were compared. Self-harm incidents were reported in 60 of 501 (12%) admissions during the one-year period of the study. Fourteen percent of patients (50 of 351) accounted for total number of 136 self-harm incidents. Half of these incidents (49%) occurred outside of the hospital setting, when patients were on passes. Using the Beck Lethality Scale (0-10), mean severity of the self-injury attempts was 0.33, and there were no serious negative outcomes. Self-harm behaviour during inpatient psychiatric admission is a common issue among youth, despite safety strategies in place. While self-harm behaviour is one of the most common reasons for admission to psychiatric inpatient unit, our understanding of nature of these acts during the admission and contributing factors are limited. Further research is required to better understand these factors, and to develop strategies to better support these patients.

  3. A review and meta-analysis of the patient factors associated with psychiatric in-patient aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dack, C; Ross, J; Papadopoulos, C; Stewart, D; Bowers, L

    2013-04-01

    To combine the results of earlier comparison studies of in-patient aggression to quantitatively assess the strength of the association between patient factors and i) aggressive behaviour,ii) repetitive aggressive behaviour. A systematic review and meta-analysis of empirical articles and reports of comparison studies of aggression and non-aggression within adult psychiatric in-patient settings. Factors that were significantly associated with in-patient aggression included being younger, male, involuntary admissions, not being married, a diagnosis of schizophrenia, a greater number of previous admissions, a history of violence, a history of self-destructive behaviour and a history of substance abuse. The only factors associated with repeated in-patient aggression were not being male, a history of violence and a history of substance abuse. By comparing aggressive with non-aggressive patients, important differences between the two populations may be highlighted. These differences may help staff improve predictions of which patients might become aggressive and enable steps to be taken to reduce an aggressive incident occurring using actuarial judgements. However, the associations found between these actuarial factors and aggression were small. It is therefore important for staff to consider dynamic factors such as a patient's current state and the context to reduce in-patient aggression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. The psychiatric inpatient physical health assessment sheet (PIPHAS): a useful tool to improve the speed, efficiency, and documentation of physical examination in new psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettipher, Alexander; Ovens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    There is increased morbidity and mortality among patients suffering from mental illness. This is believed to be multi-factorial. Poor access to healthcare, the stigma of mental illness, reduced clinic attendance, lifestyle factors, and side effects of medications are cited as possible contributing factors. It is therefore vital to perform a physical examination to identify previously undiagnosed conditions during the admission of a psychiatric inpatient. The Royal College of Psychiatrists recommends that all patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital should receive a full physical examination on admission, or within twenty-four hours of admission. A snapshot audit was carried out at Prospect Park Hospital in Reading, which highlighted that The Royal College of Psychiatrist's recommendation, along with Trust guidelines regarding physical examination were not being met, with only 78 out of 111 patients (70.3%) undergoing an examination during their admission. In addition to this, examinations were often poorly documented and not covering all examination domains. A psychiatric inpatient physical health assessment sheet (PIPHAS) was designed and introduced, providing a quick and standardised approach to the documentation of a physical examination. After the intervention was put into practice, its impact was assessed by performing a retrospective review of the admission clerking notes of the next 100 admissions to Prospect Park Hospital. Following the introduction of the PIPHAS form there was an increase in the number of patients undergoing physical examination on admission to hospital (75 out of 100 patients, 75%). There was also an increase in the thorough documentation of all examination domains (e.g. respiratory examination) for patients that had a completed PIPHAS form scanned within their medical records. This quality improvement project demonstrates that the PIPHAS form is a useful tool to improve the speed, efficiency, and documentation of a thorough physical

  5. Determinants of Seclusion After Aggression in Psychiatric Inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vruwink, F.J.; Noorthoorn, E.O.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Nagel, J.E.L. van der; Hox, J.J.C.M.; Mulder, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    ome aggressive incidents in psychiatric wards result in seclusion, whereas others do not. We used the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised and the mental health trust's database to identify determinants that predicted seclusion after aggression. These consisted of demographic, diagnostic,

  6. Prevalence of Alcohol and Substance Use Disorder among Psychiatric Inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Karakus

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Professionals dealing with treatment of psychiatric disorders should always be aware of substance use disorder comorbidity, and start treatment immediately without causing any delay in treatment. Obviously we need future large prospective studies to get more insight into these dual-diagnose disorders. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(1: 37-48

  7. pattern of psychiatric inpatient admission in ibadan: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pattern of psychiatric admission that may be found in. Nigeria. Such findings may improve the preparedness of mental health facilities by guiding service organisation and planning in most sub-Sahara African countries like Nigeria where mental health services are poorly developed and professionals are scarce5.

  8. Mood disorders in general hospital inpatients: one year data from a psychiatric consultation-liaison service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisei, Sandro; Pauselli, Luca; Balducci, Pierfrancesco Maria; Moretti, Patrizia; Quartesan, Roberto

    2013-09-01

    Mood disorders (MD) show higher prevalence among psychiatric disorders. As a matter of fact 10% of inpatients in non psychiatric health care structures are affected by MD. A consultation-liaison service bridges the gap between psychiatric and other medical disciplines and increases the cooperation in the context of care, improving the diagnostic process for all inpatients in medical wards. Our sample is composed of 1702 patients assessed from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2012 referred from the wards for psychiatric specialist evaluation in Santa Maria della Misericordia, Perugia, Italy. Each patient was assessed by a consultant psychiatrist performing a psychiatric interview leading to a diagnosis according to DSM-IV-TR criteria. Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected and registrered in the clinical records. SPSS software (ver. 18) was used for data analysis. Chi-square test and T-student tests were performed as appropriate. A p-valueconsultation referral urgent status we found that 84% of requests needed to be seen within 24 h, most of them come from Emergency room. Statistically significant correlations can be found between the source of referrals, the reasons for the referrals, psychiatric care prior to the evaluation and the psychiatric disorder which was diagnosed during the assessment. Consultation-liaison service for MD in an italian general hospital is generally based on emergency/urgency referrals from the Emergency room for patients already assessed to mental care facilities by private or national health service psychiatrists.

  9. Vitamin D status of psychiatric inpatients in New Zealand’s Waikato region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menkes David B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D deficiency is widespread in New Zealand, confers multiple health risks, and may be particularly common among people with psychiatric illness. We studied vitamin D status in an unselected sample of adult psychiatric inpatients in Hamilton (latitude 37.5 S during late winter. Methods We recruited 102 consenting subjects and measured 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 levels in venous blood using a competitive electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. In addition to descriptive statistics, we used one-sample t-tests to determine the extent to which ethnic and diagnostic subgroups fell below the vitamin D deficiency threshold of 50 nM. Results 75 subjects (74% had vitamin D levels Conclusions Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in the psychiatric inpatient setting in New Zealand and may be relevant to poor physical health outcomes, notably among Maori and those with schizophrenia. These findings support proposals to provide vitamin D supplementation, particularly during the winter months.

  10. Prevalence and influence of psychiatric comorbidity on rehabilitation outcome for older hospital inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluyas, Cathy; Lum, Carmel; Chong, Sinn Yuin; Borg, Cynthia; Haines, Terry P

    2011-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the psychiatric comorbidity of a group of older subacute inpatients and then determine whether their psychiatric comorbidity affected measures of rehabilitation outcomes. Eighty-eight older subacute inpatients were recruited for this prospective study. Psychiatric comorbidity was defined according to a participants' performance on four inventory scales: the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI), Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and Health of the Nation Outcome Scale 65+. Rehabilitation outcome referred to the participants' length of stay and their performance at discharge on the EuroQol-5D health-related quality of life questionnaire and Barthel index. 68% of the participants scored in the clinical range on at least one of the four scales assessing psychiatric comorbidity at admission, with 51% in the clinical range for GDS and 32% for the GAI. The decrease in scores by the time of discharge was significant for all four scales. Linear regression analyses pointed to a trend for depressive symptoms at admission to be an influential but nonsignificant predictor of rehabilitation outcome. An interesting association was found between the length of the previous acute admission and the GDS score on admission to the subacute unit. A high prevalence of psychological symptoms was identified upon admission, with a significant decrease by the time of discharge. These factors did not significantly predict the selected measures of rehabilitation outcome. Opportunities for future longitudinal research on the prevalence and impact of psychiatric comorbidities on patient outcomes are considered.

  11. Normal range MMPI-A profiles among psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilts, Darolyn; Moore, James M

    2003-09-01

    The present study examined the base rates of normal range Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) profiles in an inpatient sample and examined the differences between adolescents with apparently valid normal range profiles (all clinical scale T-scores MMPI-A validity scale scores and other indexes of underreporting. Normal range profiles cannot be adequately explained by a less pathological history prior to hospitalization or by defensiveness. Thirty percent of male and 25% of female adolescents produced valid MMPI-A profiles in which none of the clinical scales were elevated. Both male and female adolescents with normal range profiles were generally less likely to report internalizing symptoms than those with elevated profiles, but both groups report externalizing symptoms. Neither the standard MMPI-A validity scales nor additional validity scales discriminated between profile groups. Clinicians should not assume that normal range profiles indicate an absence of problems.

  12. Variations in the costs of child and adolescent psychiatric in-patient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecham, Jennifer; Chisholm, Daniel; O'Herlihy, Anne; Astin, Jack

    2003-09-01

    Child and adolescent in-patient care is a highly specialised service, ideally requiring planning at a national level, but there are no routine data collections specifically for these services. To estimate unit costs for child and adolescent psychiatric in-patient units and to analyse the variations in costs between units. Data collection alongside a national survey with cost estimations guided by principles drawn from economic theory. Bivariate and multivariate analyses are employed to identify cost influences. Fifty-eight units could provide sufficient data to allow calculation of the cost per in-patient day; mean= pound 197 (s.d.=71.6; 1999-2000 prices). The management sector, type of provision, number of rooms, capacity and location explained nearly half of the cost variation. Child and adolescent psychiatric in-patient units are an expensive resource, with personnel absorbing two-thirds of the total costs. Costs per in-patient day vary fourfold and the exploration of cost variations can inform commissioning strategies.

  13. Examining patients' perceptions of care to identify opportunities for quality improvement in psychiatric inpatient hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Glorimar

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to examine patients' perceptions with psychiatric care to prioritize action for quality improvement (QI), and to explore differences in care experiences across domains of care by sample subgroups in psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Analysis of frequency, central tendency, and variation examined the distribution of 11,778 Inpatient Consumer Surveys (ICS), from 67 psychiatric inpatient hospitals, by domain of care and Likert scale. The percentage of patients responding positively to each domain of care was evaluated. A performance-importance matrix was constructed to identify key drivers and prioritize action for QI. Chi-squared, t test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) analyses evaluated the experiences of care by sample subgroups. Overall, patients tended to be satisfied with the care received. However, patients perceived their care differently across hospitals. Hospitals scored lower in the rights domain, mainly attributed to problems with communication between patients and hospital staff. Patients' care experiences varied among sample subgroups; however, four sample characteristics were common to all domains of care. Patients who were Latinos, aged 65 years and older, who completed the survey at discharge, before leaving the hospital, had a higher perception of care across all domains of care. Either an examination of the individual items on the ICS or the aggregation of them by domain of care, the ICS could be a significant tool for hospitals that continuously strive to improve the quality of care provided to psychiatric patients in a time driven by the needs and expectations of consumers.

  14. Is there an impact of global and local disasters on psychiatric inpatient admissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, Helene; Lauber, Christoph; Malti, Tina; Rössler, Wulf

    2004-10-01

    Disasters of the magnitude of September 11, 2001 have a serious public health impact. By dominating media broadcasts, this effect is not limited to the site of the disaster. We tested the hypothesis whether such extraordinary burden results in an increase of psychiatric inpatient treatment. As such we analysed all psychiatric inpatient admissions in the Canton of Zurich/Switzerland. To test the influence of proximity to a disaster, we additionally analysed the impact of a local amok run on September 27, 2001. Psychiatric inpatient admissions in the Canton of Zurich from September 2000 to September 2002 were analysed based on the data of the psychiatric case register. ARIMA modelling was employed to describe time-series of admissions per week over the 2-year period and to identify the impact of the incidents of 9/11 and 9/27, 2001. Mean numbers of weekly admissions were comparable in a time span of one month before and one month after the two incidents, thus, no significant changes were detected by the ARIMA modelling. Against widespread beliefs, for patients with severe mental disorders requiring hospitalisation illness factors seem to play a more relevant role for decompensation than external psychosocial factors such as the described incidents.

  15. Prevalence rates of borderline symptoms reported by adolescent inpatients with BPD, psychiatrically healthy adolescents and adult inpatients with BPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Mary C; Temes, Christina M; Magni, Laura R; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Aguirre, Blaise A; Goodman, Marianne

    2017-08-01

    The validity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in children and adolescents has not been studied in a rigorous manner reflecting the criteria of Robins and Guze first detailed in 1970. This paper and the others in this series address some aspects of this multifaceted validation paradigm, which requires that a disorder has a known clinical presentation, can be delimited from other disorders, 'runs' in families, and something of its aetiology, treatment response and course is known. Three groups of subjects were studied: 104 adolescent inpatients meeting the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines and DSM-IV criteria for BPD, 60 psychiatrically healthy adolescents and 290 adult inpatients meeting the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines and DSM-III-R criteria for BPD. Adolescents with BPD had significantly higher prevalence rates of 22 of the 24 symptoms studied than psychiatrically healthy adolescents. Only rates of serious treatment regressions and countertransference problems failed to reach the Bonferroni-corrected level of 0.002. Adolescents and adults with BPD had only four symptomatic differences that reached this level of significance, with adolescents with BPD reporting significantly lower levels of quasi-psychotic thought, dependency/masochism, devaluation/manipulation/sadism and countertransference problems than adults with BPD. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that adolescents report BPD as severe as that reported by adults. They also suggest that BPD in adolescents is not a tumultuous phase of normal adolescence. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. From ideals to resignation - interprofessional teams perspectives on everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Jenny; Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren; Ringnér, Anders; Lindgren, Britt-Marie

    2016-11-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Psychiatric inpatient care has been described by both ward staff and patients as being demanding and disorganized, lacking opportunities for quality interactions in everyday life through joint activities. Qualitative research on interprofessional teams' perspectives on everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care is lacking. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Staff have ideals about care and collaboration, but the obstacles they face in everyday life, such as a poor environment, power asymmetry, lacking structure and the demands of managing chaos, mean that they appear to resign and shift focus from the patients' best interests to self-survival. Different professions in general describe the same obstacles in everyday life on the wards but there are also profession-specific perspectives on distancing and feelings of abandonment. To our knowledge, these findings have not been reported in the international evidence. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Given these findings we suggest interventions such as Protected Engagement Time as well as reflective dialogues within interprofessional teams. This would help staff to resume their caring role in everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care and put their ideals into practice. Introduction Patients and ward staff describe psychiatric inpatient care as demanding, characterized by unpredictable events, yet research on interprofessional teams perspectives of everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care lacks. Aim This study aims to explore everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care, as reported by staff in interprofessional teams. Method A grounded theory design was used and 36 participants were interviewed. Results The analysis resulted in a process-oriented core category From ideals to resignation. Related to this core category were three further categories: Knowing where to go, Walking a path of obstacles and Shifting focus from the patient's best

  17. [Predictive factors of suicide? an 8-year-long prospective longitudinal study of 200 psychiatric inpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioulac, S; Bourgeois, M; Ekouevi, D K; Bonnin, J M; Gonzales, B; Castello, M F

    2000-01-01

    Suicide is the most dramatic complication of psychiatric disorders. Certain risk factors are generally accepted by practitioners. Mental disorders increase (tenfold) suicidal risk. However, this "statistically rare event" renders very difficult the definition of predictive factors. A personal prospective longitudinal study of 200 psychiatric inpatients followed up during an 8-year period found 5% of deaths by suicide. Amongst the various risk factors reputed predictive for suicide, only 2 were found statistically more frequent in the suicidal group: familial antecedents (1st degree relatives) of suicide and hospitalization in psychiatry. Impulsivity was also more frequent but could be imputed to the younger age of the suicide victims. Therefore, it was impossible to find determinants of suicide. This makes difficult preventive measures, excepted that psychiatric patients are at a much greater risk and should be diagnosed and correctly treated. There are also increasing legal aspects of responsibility for psychiatrists and psychiatric institutions in charge of these patients.

  18. Determining suitability of placement for long-stay psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conning, A M; Brownlow, J M

    1992-07-01

    Fifty-three long-stay patients on the back wards of a large psychiatric hospital in London were assessed to determine their suitability for other placements after the hospital was closed. The general and deviant behavior subscales of the REHAB Scale were used in the assessment. A wide range of scores indicated that these patients varied greatly in basic living skills. Associations were investigated between patients' scores and somatic problems, fluctuations in mental state, and adverse reactions to change, which affect patients' ability to live in the community. Of 14 patients whose scores indicated a potential for discharge, two had significant deviant behaviors, seven had fluctuating mental states, and two were known to react adversely to change. Although the REHAB Scale is useful, results show that placement decisions should not be based on scores alone. Flexible services that take into account fluctuations in patients' functioning are required.

  19. Functional Deficits and Aggressive Behaviors in an Inpatient Psychiatric Hospital: Description and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nicole Tuomi; McGill, Amanda C; Vogler, Jason E; Oxley, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The primary goals of compulsory, inpatient, psychiatric treatment are to decrease dangerous behaviors and help improve functioning so that a safe discharge to a less restrictive environment can be obtained. This study examined the aggression rates, levels of functioning, and treatment adherence for persons treated for schizophrenia (N = 506) compared with persons treated for borderline personality disorder (BPD) (N = 98) in an inpatient psychiatric facility. Over half of persons engaged in at least one incident of aggressive behavior during hospitalization. Differences in the types of aggression and functional deficits between these two clinical sub-groups were found. In addition, overall impairment increased the likelihood of aggressive behavior for persons diagnosed with schizophrenia, whereas irritability and social dependence increased the risk of aggression for persons diagnosed with BPD. Treatment interventions that target the improvement of these deficits may help reduce the intensity and severity of aggressive behaviors and help improve functioning and discharge readiness.

  20. Gender differences in psychiatric diagnoses among inpatients with and without intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsky, Yona; Bradley, Elspeth A; Gracey, Carolyn D; Durbin, Janet; Koegl, Chris

    2009-01-01

    There are few published studies on the relationship between gender and psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Adults (N = 1,971) with and without intellectual disabilities who received inpatient services for psychiatric diagnosis and clinical issues were examined. Among individuals with intellectual disabilities, women were more likely to have a diagnosis of mood disorder and sexual abuse history; men were more likely to have a substance abuse diagnosis, legal issues, and past destructive behavior. Gender difference patterns found for individuals with intellectual disabilities were similar to those of persons without intellectual disabilities, with the exception of eating disorder and psychotic disorder diagnoses. Gender issues should receive greater attention in intellectual disabilities inpatient care.

  1. Aggressive Behavior in Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Inpatients: Determinants of reactive aggression and their consequences for treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Zwets, Almar

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractThe first goal of the current research project was to get more insight in the determinants of reactive aggression, namely psychopathy, as measured with the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and implicit attitudes toward violence. The second goal was was to investigate the possible treatment effects of a multi-modal treatment program for violent forensic psychiatric inpatients, consisting of the extended Aggression Replacement Training (ART) and psychomotor therapy (PMT). ...

  2. Psychomotor Therapy as an Additive Intervention for Violent Forensic Psychiatric Inpatients: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zwets, Almar; Hornsveld, Ruud; Muris, Peter; Kanters, Thijs; Langstraat, Egbert; Marle, Hjalmar

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe first results of psychomotor therapy (PMT) as an additional component to Aggression Replacement Training (ART) were explored in a group of forensic psychiatric inpatients (N = 37). Patients were divided into two groups: ART+PMT (experimental group) and ART+Sports (control group). Primary outcome measures of aggression, anger, and social behavior, and secondary outcome measures of coping behavior and bodily awareness during anger were administered on three occasions: pretreatme...

  3. Implicit attitudes toward violence and their relation to psychopathy, aggression, and socially adaptive behaviors in forensic psychiatric inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwets, Almar J.; Hornsveld, Ruud H J; Muris, Peter; Huijding, Jorg; Kanters, Thijs; Snowden, Robert J.; van Marle, Hjalmar

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the relation between implicit attitudes toward violence and different aspects of violent and social behavior in Dutch forensic psychiatric inpatients, an implicit association test was related to measures of psychopathy, aggression, and socially adaptive behaviors. Results

  4. Predicting inpatient aggression by self-reported impulsivity in forensic psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousardt, Annelea M C; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W; Noorthoorn, Eric O; Hummelen, Jacobus W; Nijman, Henk L I

    2016-07-01

    Empirical knowledge of 'predictors' of physical inpatient aggression may provide staff with tools to prevent aggression or minimise its consequences. To test the value of a self-reported measure of impulsivity for predicting inpatient aggression. Self-report measures of different domains of impulsivity were obtained using the Urgency, Premeditation, Perseverance, Sensation seeking, Positive urgency (UPPS-P) impulsive behaviour scale with all 74 forensic psychiatric inpatients in one low-security forensic hospital. Aggressive incidents were measured using the Social Dysfunction and Aggression Scale (SDAS). The relationship between UPPS-P subscales and the number of weeks in which violent behaviour was observed was investigated by Poisson regression. The impulsivity domain labelled 'negative urgency' (NU), in combination with having a personality disorder, predicted the number of weeks in which physical aggression was observed by psychiatric nurses. NU also predicted physical aggression within the first 12 weeks of admission. The results indicate that NU, which represents a patient's inability to cope with rejection, disappointments or other undesired feelings, is associated with a higher likelihood of becoming violent while an inpatient. This specific coping deficit should perhaps be targeted more intensively in therapy. Self-reported NU may also serve as a useful adjunct to other risk assessment tools and as an indicator of change in violence risk. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Mental health recovery for psychiatric inpatient services: perceived importance of the elements of recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, B W M; Ng, B F L; Li, V C K; Yeung, Y M; Lee, M K L; Leung, A Y H

    2012-06-01

    OBJECTIVES. To develop a questionnaire for measuring the perceived importance of the elements of mental health recovery in psychiatric inpatients in Hong Kong and to test the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. METHODS. Thematic content analysis of identified literature on mental health recovery was performed to identify the elements related to mental health recovery. A questionnaire was developed to assess the perceived importance of the identified elements. An expert panel was set up to evaluate the content validity and patient focus group's face validity of the questionnaire. Participants were recruited from medium-stay and rehabilitation wards of Castle Peak Hospital. RESULTS. A total of 101 psychiatric inpatients completed the questionnaire, the majority of whom suffered from schizophrenia (75%). Having meaning in life was rated by 91% of the participants as an important element of recovery, followed by hope (86%) and general health and wellness (85%). Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency was 0.91. Explorative factor analysis yielded 7 factors and intraclass correlation coefficients revealed a fair-to-good test-retest reliability. CONCLUSIONS. The results supported the psychometric properties of the questionnaire for measurement of mental health recovery and serve as a basis for the future development of recovery-oriented services in the psychiatric inpatient settings in this locality.

  6. Violent behavior in acute psychiatric inpatient facilities: a national survey in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancosino, Bruno; Delmonte, Sara; Grassi, Luigi; Santone, Giovanni; Preti, Antonio; Miglio, Rossella; de Girolamo, Giovanni

    2009-10-01

    Violence committed by acute psychiatric inpatients represents an important and challenging problem in clinical practice. Sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment information were collected for 1324 patients (677 men and 647 women) admitted to Italian public and private acute psychiatric inpatient facilities during an index period in 2004, and the sample divided into 3 groups: nonhostile patients (no episodes of violent behavior during hospitalization), hostile patients (verbal aggression or violent acts against objects), and violent patients (authors of physical assault). Ten percent (N = 129) of patients showed hostile behavior during hospitalization and 3% (N = 37) physically assaulted other patients or staff members. Variables associated with violent behavior were: male gender, attitude at admission, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, personality disorder, mental retardation, organic brain disorder or substance/alcohol abuse. Violent behavior during hospitalization was a predictive factor for higher Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale scores and for lower Personal and Social Performance scale scores at discharge. Despite the low percentage of violent and hostile behavior observed in Italian acute inpatient units, this study shed light on a need for the careful assessment of clinical and treatment variables, and greater effort aimed at improving specific prevention and treatment programs of violent behavior.

  7. Psychiatric admissions fall following the Christchurch earthquakes: an audit of inpatient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaglehole, Ben; Bell, Caroline; Beveridge, John; Frampton, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Following the devastating earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand, there was the widespread perception that the demand for inpatient mental health services would increase. However, our clinical observation was to the contrary, with substantial reductions in inpatient utilisation being noted. We therefore examined psychiatric bed occupancy and admission data to improve understanding of the impact of the disaster on mental health services. We audited acute psychiatric bed occupancy and admission rates prior to and following a major earthquake. After the earthquake, total bed occupancy reduced from an average of 93% to 79%. Daily admissions also reduced by 20.2% for the 30 days following the earthquake. All diagnostic groups, with the exception of the 'Schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders' category, contributed to the reduction. No rebound to increased occupancy or admissions was seen over the study period. The study confirmed our clinical observation that demand for acute inpatient psychiatric services were markedly reduced after the February 2011 earthquake. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  8. A review of ECG and QT interval measurement use in a public psychiatric inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berling, Ingrid; Gupta, Rahul; Bjorksten, Cecilia; Prior, Felicity; Whyte, Ian M; Berry, Sherman

    2017-08-01

    There is an increased rate of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in mental health patients. Some antipsychotic medications are known to prolong the QT interval, thus increasing a patient's risk of SCD via the arrhythmia, torsades de pointes (TdP). Our aim was to evaluate assessment for QT prolongation within a public inpatient mental health facility by auditing electrocardiograph (ECG) use. We reviewed records of all mental health inpatient admissions to a public emergency mental health inpatient unit between 1 January 2016 and 11 February 2016. ECG availability was noted and QT interval was manually measured and assessed for risk of TdP using the QT nomogram when present. Demographic information and medication use was collected. Of 263 mental health inpatient admissions, 50 (19%) presentations had an ECG. A total of four (8%) had a prolonged QT interval. Of the 50 patients with an ECG, 12 (24%) were taking medication known to prolong the QT interval. There was very limited risk assessment for QT prolongation in a public hospital psychiatric inpatient unit, with less than 20% of patients having an ECG performed. Our study supports an association between QT-prolonging drugs and a clinically significant prolonged QT interval; however, a larger study with routine ECG screening is required.

  9. [Use of social media by psychiatric in-patients : Case report and further perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, O M; Podoll, K; Schneider, F

    2017-08-03

    Communication by means of social networks and messenger programs as well as the use of smartphones have rapidly increased during recent years and are constantly present in everyday life. We report about a 25-year-old patient with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder who posted photographs of acute self-injuries to a group of fellow patients by means of a messenger app while on weekend leave during psychiatric hospital treatment. The implications about possible effects of the use of social media by psychiatric in-patients on treatment and group dynamics are discussed. Furthermore, social media communication by patients is focused on in general and potential consequences for psychiatric, psychotherapeutic and psychosomatic treatment are discussed.

  10. A systematic review of music therapy practice and outcomes with acute adult psychiatric in-patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Carr

    Full Text Available There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported.A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis.98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions.No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to develop specific music therapy models for this

  11. A systematic review of music therapy practice and outcomes with acute adult psychiatric in-patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to develop specific music therapy models for this patient group that

  12. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  13. Self-harm as a risk factor for inpatient aggression among women admitted to forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenius, Heidi; Leppänen Östman, Sari; Strand, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    Inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric patients has been shown to be associated with self-harm, that is considered to be a historical risk factor for violence. Research on associations between previous or current self-harm and different types of inpatient aggression is missing. The aim of this register study was to investigate the prevalence of self-harm and the type of inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric inpatients, and to study whether the patients' self-harm before and/or during forensic psychiatric care is a risk factor for inpatient aggression. Female forensic psychiatric patients (n = 130) from a high security hospital were included. The results showed that 88% of the female patients had self-harmed at least once during their life and 57% had been physically and/or verbally aggressive towards staff or other patients while in care at the hospital. Self-harm before admission to the current forensic psychiatric care or repeated self-harm were not significantly associated with inpatient aggression, whereas self-harm during care was significantly associated with physical and verbal aggression directed at staff. These results pointed towards self-harm being a dynamic risk factor rather than a historical risk factor for inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric patients. Whether self-harm is an individual risk factor or a part of the clinical risk factor 'Symptom of major mental illness' within the HCR-20V3 must be further explored among women. Thus, addressing self-harm committed by female patients during forensic psychiatric care seems to be important in risk assessments and the management of violence, especially in reducing violence against staff in high-security forensic psychiatric services.

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Eating-related Psychopathology and Food Addiction in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Özgür; Föcker, Manuel; Kliewer, Josephine; Esber, Simon; Peters, Triinu; de Zwaan, Martina; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2017-05-01

    Our aims were to investigate the relationship between food addiction and mental disorders including eating disorders (ED), eating-related psychopathology and body mass index-standard deviation score in a sample of adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Food addiction was assessed with the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS). Eating-related psychopathology was measured with the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ). Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. The sample consisted of n = 242 adolescent psychiatric inpatients, of which n = 37 (15.3%) met criteria for an ED. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the association between YFAS symptom count, TFEQ scales and ED controlling for age and gender. Food addiction frequency was 16.5%, and the mean YFAS symptom count was 2.39 (SD: 1.60). In patients with food addiction, TFEQ scale scores were significantly higher than patients without food addiction. Frequency of ED was 42.9% in patients with and 9.9% in patients without food addiction. The TFEQ subscales disinhibition and hunger as well as diagnosis of ED were associated with YFAS symptom count. Food addiction in adolescent psychiatric inpatients occurs with rates higher than those seen in community samples of children, adolescents and adults. Food addiction might be associated with eating styles related to susceptibility to hunger and feelings of loss of control. The implications of high-YFAS scores in restricting-type anorexia nervosa warrant further investigations to explore which and how the respective items are interpreted in this ED subgroup. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  16. The geriatric population and psychiatric medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Sannidhya; Sareen, Himanshu; Trivedi, J K

    2010-01-01

    With improvement in medical services in the last few years, there has been a constant rise in the geriatric population throughout the world, more so in the developing countries. The elderly are highly prone to develop psychiatric disorders, probably because of age related changes in the brain, concomitant physical disorders, as well as increased stress in later life. Psychiatric disorders in this population may have a different presentation than in other groups and some of psychopathologies might be mistaken for normal age related changes by an unwary clinician. Therefore the need of the day is to train psychiatrists and physicians to better recognize and manage mental disorders in this age group.

  17. Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Adults With Previous Hospital-Based Psychiatric Inpatient and Outpatient Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Waagstein, Kristine; Winkel, Bo Gregers

    2015-01-01

    hospital contact and was identified using The Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. All diagnoses in Danish registries are coded according to ICD-8 or ICD-10. All hospital records were retrieved manually. Results: Among 5,178 deaths, 395 were due to SCD and autopsies were performed on 262 (66......Introduction: Psychiatric patients have premature mortality compared to the general population. The incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in psychiatric patients is unknown in a nationwide setting. The aim of this study was to compare nationwide SCD incidence rates in young individuals...... with and without previous psychiatric disease. Method: Nationwide, retrospective cohort study including all deaths in people aged 18–35 years in 2000–2006 in Denmark. The unique Danish death certificates and autopsy reports were used to identify SCD cases. Psychiatric disease was defined as a previous psychiatric...

  18. Patient participation in pro re nata medication in psychiatric inpatient settings: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Kirsi; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Leinonen, Minna; Louheranta, Olavi; Kangasniemi, Mari

    2017-12-21

    Pro re nata (PRN) medication is widely used and studied in psychiatric care, but our knowledge about patient participation in its administration is fragmented. The aim of this integrative review was to describe and synthesize previous knowledge of patient participation in PRN in psychiatric inpatient settings. We conducted both electronic and manual searches, using the CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO, and PubMed databases, and eight scientific journals. Searches were limited to the English language, to the years 2006-2016, and to selected papers using inclusion, exclusion, and quality criteria. We identified 16 relevant papers, and these showed that patient participation included patient-related starting points, including the patients' willingness to participate and their knowledge of the medication. The patients' participation in PRN practices was demonstrated by the opportunity to request PRN and to refuse any PRN that was offered. Patient participation was shown to be linked to certain situations where PRN was recommended. The role that the professionals played in patient participation included interacting with patients, providing counselling and alternatives for PRN. Our results also revealed that coercion was used administering PRN. The existing literature exposed challenges that need to be addressed if patient participation in the use of PRN medication is to be effectively achieved in psychiatric inpatient settings. Equal partnerships between patients, nurses, and physicians are an essential part of this process, and further research into PRN medication is urgently needed, particularly studies that focus on patients' experiences. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. Treatment of avoidant personality traits in a German armed forces inpatient psychiatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Peter; Alliger-Horn, Christina; Kowalski, Jens T; Plate, Stefan; Wallner, Franziska; Wolff, Elisabeth; Ströhle, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Military duty places high demands on the soldiers' social adaptability and competences. Avoidant personality traits can lead to interpersonal conflicts and at least to mental disorders. 192 German Armed Forces soldiers were treated in a multimodal inpatient psychiatric treatment setting at a Bundeswehr hospital between 2007 and 2010. 129 of these patients received a social skills group training (group training of social competence [GSC]) as part of this setting. A comparison group (n=63) did not participate but got unspecific treatment elements instead. The Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R) and the Inventory on Competence and Control Beliefs (Fragebogen zu Kompetenz- und Kontrollüberzeugungen [FKK]) were applied. Symptom severity in the SCL-Global Severity Index, sum scale of the SCL-90-R and the four primary scales of the FKK showed significant improvements both immediately after treatment and at follow-up. No significant influence of the form of treatment (with/without GSC), age, gender, diagnosis, and deployments on the treatment result was established in the analysis of covariance. The data suggest that an inpatient psychiatric treatment setting focused on avoidant personality traits has a favorable effect on psychiatric symptom severity in military personnel. Social skills group training as a treatment component does not seem to be significantly superior to the standard setting.

  20. Effects of a single-session assertiveness music therapy role playing protocol for psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement and measure the effectiveness of a single-session assertiveness music therapy role playing protocol for psychiatric inpatients. Participants (N=133) were randomly assigned by group to one of three conditions: (a) Assertiveness Music Therapy, (b) No Music Assertiveness, or (c) Music No Assertiveness. Participants in both assertiveness conditions role played a number of different commonly occurring scenarios at an inpatient psychiatric facility and in the community. There were no significant between-group differences in posttest quality of life, locus of control, or other subscales. However, participants in both assertiveness conditions tended to have slightly higher internal locus of control and overall quality of life scores than participants in the music no assertiveness condition. Additionally, the assertiveness music therapy condition had higher attendance rates than the other conditions. A higher percentage of participants from both the assertiveness music therapy and music no assertiveness conditions indicated they thought their session was the most helpful/therapeutic group therapy session in which they had participated; this was not the case for the assertiveness no music condition. Future research is warranted to measure the effects of protocols that can help psychiatric patients generalize skills learned in treatment.

  1. Safety in psychiatric inpatient care: The impact of risk management culture on mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemon, Allie; Jenkins, Emily; Bungay, Vicky

    2017-10-01

    The discourse of safety has informed the care of individuals with mental illness through institutionalization and into modern psychiatric nursing practices. Confinement arose from safety: out of both societal stigma and fear for public safety, as well as benevolently paternalistic aims to protect individuals from self-harm. In this paper, we argue that within current psychiatric inpatient environments, safety is maintained as the predominant value, and risk management is the cornerstone of nursing care. Practices that accord with this value are legitimized and perpetuated through the safety discourse, despite evidence refuting their efficacy, and patient perspectives demonstrating harm. To illustrate this growing concern in mental health nursing care, we provide four exemplars of risk management strategies utilized in psychiatric inpatient settings: close observations, seclusion, door locking and defensive nursing practice. The use of these strategies demonstrates the necessity to shift perspectives on safety and risk in nursing care. We suggest that to re-centre meaningful support and treatment of clients, nurses should provide individualized, flexible care that incorporates safety measures while also fundamentally re-evaluating the risk management culture that gives rise to and legitimizes harmful practices. © 2017 The Authors Nursing Inquiry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  3. [Effectiveness of an inpatient multimodal psychiatric-psychotherapeutic program for the treatment of job burnout].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Kathleen; Conrad, Nathalie; Straus, Doris; Porschke, Hildburg; von Känel, Roland

    2016-03-16

    We studied the clinical course and long-term effects of inpatient treatment in 723 patients with job burnout referred with an ICD-10 F diagnosis and Z73.0 code («overwhelming exhaustion») to a Swiss hospital specialized in the treatment of job stress-related disorders. Patients were characterized in terms of age, gender, socioeconomic status. Self-rated psychological measures related to general and burnout-specific symptoms (i. e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishments) were applied before and after a six-week treatment program, as well as at 15 months after hospital discharge in 232 patients. The results show that the multimodal inpatient psychiatric-psychotherapeutic treatment was successful with a sustainable effect on psychological well-being (>90 %), including improvements regarding emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishments as well as professional reintegration in 71 % of cases.

  4. MMPI-A structural summary variables: prevalence and correlates in an adolescent inpatient psychiatric sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogge, David L; Stokes, John M; McGrath, Robert E; Bilginer, Lale; DeLuca, Victoria A

    2002-12-01

    This study examined the prevalence and correlates of Archer and Krishnamurthy's MMPI-A Structural Summary (SS) dimensions in a sample of 632 adolescent psychiatric inpatients through a series of correlational analyses. These analyses examined the relationship between factor dimensions and categorically defined dimension elevations and external criterion measures that included chart review data, therapist ratings, chart diagnoses, and cognitive test performance. The SS dimensions provided additional interpretive yield for some within-normal-limits profiles. An examination of the pattern of correlations revealed small to moderate relationships between all SS variables and external criterion measures.

  5. Prevalence of aggressive behaviours among inpatients with psychiatric disorders: A case study analysis from Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sagarat, Ahmad Y; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Al-Sarayreh, Faris; Nawafleh, Hani; Moxham, Lorna

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the correlates of aggression among consumers with mental illness within two psychiatric hospitals in Jordan. This was a descriptive, cross sectional study carried out by auditing consumers' medical records in regards to incidents of aggression before and during admission. Approval was gained from 203 next of kins to review the consumers' medical records. Results from this case analysis, found the prevalence of aggressive behaviours among psychiatric inpatient's in Jordan to be 23.6%, the most common form of aggression was consumer to consumer and that the aggressive act was more likely to be perpetrated by younger consumers. Such findings contribute to the discourse about aggression and understanding who and what causes aggression can go toward identify strategies for early intervention and management. After all, mental health units should be places of safety, that is, an asylum, and everyone who enters that environment deserves to be safe. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Brief report: Correlates of inpatient psychiatric admission in children and adolescents with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Matthew J; Watson, Hunna J; Egan, Sarah J; Hoiles, Kimberley J; Harper, Emily; McCormack, Julie; Shu, Chloe; Forbes, David A

    2015-06-01

    To examine the prevalence and importance of psychological, behavioural, and situational correlates of impending psychiatric inpatient admissions in children and adolescents with eating disorders. The sample consisted of 285 patients (8-17 years, M = 14.4, SD = 1.49) with DSM-5 eating disorders assessed between 2006 and 2013 from the Helping to Outline Pediatric Eating Disorders (HOPE) Project. The sample was split into two groups, those with (n = 38) and without (n = 247) impending psychiatric admission; Discriminant function analysis was used to examine correlates. The prevalence of impending psychiatric admission was 13.3%. Suicidal ideation provided the greatest discriminating power, followed by eating pathology, depressive symptoms, anxiety, multiple methods of weight control, binge eating, and family functioning. Earlier recognition of comorbid symptoms in eating disorders in the community may reduce the number of young people with eating disorders who present needing critical psychiatric care. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Frequency of Djinnati Syndrome among Inpatient Admissions at Baharan Psychiatric Hospital in Zahedan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Ghasemi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A culture-bound syndrome common in Baluchistan is Djinnati that is classified as trance and possession state, a sub-class of dissociative disorders NOS, in DSM IV-TR. The present study aims to determine the frequency of Djinnati syndrome among in-patients at Baharan psychiatric hospital in Zahedan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, the statistical community includes all patients (N=773 who were admitted in Baharan psychiatric hospital during a 6 months period. After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 150 subjects (61 males and 89 females were selected. Semi-structural interview and Dissociative Experience Scale (DES questionnaire were performed for them. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, χ2, and t-tests were employed for analysis of data in SPSS-18. Results: Frequency of Djinnati syndrome among patients admitted in this referral psychiatric hospital was 4.1% and this syndrome showed a significant dominance in female sex (M/F=1/3. There was also a positive and significant correlation between child abuse and dissociative experiences including Djinnati. Conclusion: The study has shown that dissociative disorders NOS, in the form of trance and possession states (such as Djinnati, are not rare especially in the eastern parts of Iran and among poor and young women. It is important to define Djinnati syndrome in this region and prepare medical students and psychiatric residents for diagnosing and managing this condition. Its relationship with child abuse should be considered in preventive medicine.

  8. Gun Violence Following Inpatient Psychiatric Treatment: Offense Characteristics, Sources of Guns, and Number of Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivisto, Aaron J

    2017-10-01

    This study presents data on the relative contribution to gun violence by people with a history of inpatient psychiatric treatment and on federal efforts to deter presumptively dangerous persons from obtaining firearms, information useful for analyzing the potential public health benefits of gun policies targeting people with serious mental illness. The study also estimates the reduction in gun violence victims that would be expected if individuals with a previous psychiatric hospitalization were prohibited from purchasing firearms. Data from 838 violent gun offenders from a nationally representative sample of state prison inmates were analyzed. Those with and without a history of psychiatric hospitalization were compared on a range of offense characteristics, including relationship to the victim, number of victims, location of the offense, and source of firearms. Inmates with a history of hospitalization constituted 12% of all violent gun offenders and accounted for 13% of the sample's victims. They were less likely than those without a previous hospitalization to victimize strangers (odds ratio=.52) and were no more likely to commit gun violence in public or to have multiple victims. Among those with previous hospitalizations, 78% obtained guns from sources not subject to federal background checks. Of the total 1,041 victims of gun violence, only 3% were victimized by participants with a history of hospitalization who obtained guns from currently regulated sources. Prohibiting all individuals with a history of psychiatric hospitalization from purchasing firearms, absent expanded background checks, was estimated to reduce the number of gun violence victims by only 3%.

  9. [Feeling of Liberty and Internalized Stigma: Comparison of Inpatient and Outpatient Cases Receiving Psychiatric Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamışlı, Songül; Dil, Satı; Daştan, Leyla; Eni, Nurhayat

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether liberty-restricting and other factors can predict internalized stigma among psychiatric inpatients and outpatients. The study sample comprised of 129 inpatients, admitted at least once to psychiatry ward, and 100 outpatients who have never been hospitalized, receiving psychiatric treatment. In addition to demographic and clinical features, patients were evaluated for perceived deprivation of liberty and internalized stigma levels. Patients stated that their liberty was restrained mostly due to involuntary treatment, communication problems, side effects of medical treatment and inability to choose their treatment team. Regression analysis showed that internalized stigma was predicted by perceived deprivation of liberty, marital status and number of admissions to ward. Stigma was related to marital status and admissions to the psychiatry ward. Perceived deprivation of liberty predicts stigma regardless of the disease severity CONCLUSION: Perception of stigma leads to self-isolation, behavioral avoidance and refusal of aid-seeking. Our study indicated that perceived deprivation of liberty is one of the most important factors that lead to increased stigma. Based on our findings, we can say that as patients experience less perceived deprivation of liberty, they would have less stigma and thus, their compliance would increase.

  10. The prediction of discharge from in-patient psychiatric rehabilitation: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mountain Debbie A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At any time, about 1% of people with severe and enduring mental illness such as schizophrenia require in-patient psychiatric rehabilitation. In-patient rehabilitation enables individuals with the most challenging difficulties to be discharged to successful and stable community living. However, the length of rehabilitation admission that is required is highly variable and the reasons for this are poorly understood. There are very few case-control studies of predictors of outcome following hospitalisation. None have been carried out for in-patient rehabilitation. We aimed to identify the factors that are associated with achieving discharge from in-patient rehabilitation by carrying out a case-control study. Methods We compared two groups: 34 people who were admitted to the Rehabilitation Service at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital and discharged within a six year study period, and 31 people who were admitted in the same period, but not discharged. We compared the groups on demographic, illness, treatment and risk variables that were present at the point of their admission to rehabilitation. We used independent t tests and Pearson Chi-Square tests to compare the two groups. Results We found that serious self harm and suicide attempts, treatment with high dose antipsychotics, antipsychotic polypharmacy and previous care in forensic psychiatric services were all significantly associated with non-discharge. The non-discharged group were admitted significantly later in the six year study period and had already spent significantly longer in hospital. People who were admitted to rehabilitation within the first ten years of developing psychosis were more likely to have achieved discharge. Conclusions People admitted later in the study period required longer rehabilitation admissions and had higher rates of serious self harm and treatment resistant illness. They were also more likely to have had previous contact with forensic services. This

  11. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Barbara; Salize, Hans Joachim; Dressing, Harald; Rüsch, Nicolas; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bühlmann, Monika; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Korinth, Lena; Rössler, Wulf

    2012-09-05

    The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates) has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients' perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be compared with standard care procedures (control group

  12. [Guideline-adherent inpatient psychiatric psychotherapeutic treatment of borderline personality disorder : Normative definition of personnel requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohus, M; Schmahl, C; Herpertz, S C; Lieb, K; Berger, M; Roepke, S; Heinz, A; Gallinat, J; Lyssenko, L

    2016-07-01

    Borderline personality disorders (BPD) are severe mental diseases which place high pressure on the psychiatric healthcare system. Nowadays, well-tested, disorder-specific treatment concepts are available also for inpatient treatment in Germany. These show very good and long-term improvements in the psychopathology as well as posttreatment social participation; however, prerequisites for the implementation of these evidence-based inpatient psychotherapy programs are well-trained treatment teams and appropriate financing of resource expenditure. The aim was to formulate a definition of normative needs for treatment duration and intensity for a guideline-conform, empirically proven and effective inpatient treatment of borderline personality disorder as well as the derived personnel requirements in comparison to the currently available resources within the framework of the Psychiatry Personnel Act (Psych-PV). The resource requirements were established based on evaluated hospital ward models, the recommendations of the S2 guidelines and the criteria of specialist societies and compared with the personnel stipulations according to the Psych-PV. The results for a normatively established treatment program showed a pronounced deficit in the financing of the evaluated resource requirements, even when the stipulations laid down in the Psych-PV were implemented to 100 %. Disorder-specific inpatient treatment programs for borderline personality disorder have been scientifically proven to be highly effective; however, resource analyses show that the personnel requirements necessary for effective implementation of these programs are much higher than those allocated by the funding according to the Pysch-PV. The current underfunding leads to inadequate treatment outcomes with high readmission rates and as a result high direct and indirect costs of illness.

  13. Prevalence of stalking in a psychiatric hospital population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressing, Harald; Gass, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Study of the lifetime prevalence of stalking and types of stalking in a sample of psychiatric inpatients. A total of 300 patients consecutively admitted to the psychiatric hospital of the Central Institute of Mental Health (Zentralinstitut für Seelische Gesundheit) in Mannheim were studied by means of the Stalking Behaviour Questionnaire (Stalking-Verhaltens-Fragebogen). Of the sample, 21% at some time in their lives had been the victim of stalking. Men were affected as often as women were. The course of stalking was more difficult and more violent in this sample than in a sample taken from the general population in Mannheim. In the majority of the cases the mental disorder had manifested itself before the first stalking incident. In only four out of 64 cases did the responsible physicians know of the previous or ongoing stalking victimization of their patients. Mentally ill individuals are more often affected by stalking than the general population. The topic of stalking should thus be addressed more frequently when taking the case histories of mentally ill patients, in order to provide them with the appropriate type of medical care and support.

  14. Reducing the Use of Seclusion and Restraint in Psychiatric Emergency and Adult Inpatient Services— Improving Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wale, Joyce B; Belkin, Gary S; Moon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of seclusion and restraint (S/R) use has been given national priority by the US government, The Joint Commission, and patient advocacy groups. It is associated with high rates of patient and staff injuries and is a coercive and potentially traumatizing intervention. The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) is the largest municipal health care system in the country, with 11 HHC facilities operating psychiatric emergency services and inpatient psychiatric services. HHC operates 1117 adult inpatient psychiatric beds with an average length of stay of 22.2 days that generated over 19,000 discharges in 2009. In 2009, there were over 36,000 psychiatric emergency services visits. HHC's Office of Behavioral Health provides strategic leadership, planning, and support for the operations and quality objectives of these services. In January 2007, the corporate office initiated the Seclusion and Restraint Reduction Initiative, with a sequenced, intensive series of interventions and strategies to help focus the behavioral health leadership and staff on the need for continued culture change toward a more patient-centered and safe system of psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient care. From 2007 to 2009, there was a substantial decline in HHC's overall rate of S/R incidents in inpatient units. The more substantial impact was in the reduced overall time spent in S/R; the reduced frequency of use of S/R; and the reduced likelihood of patient injury from S/R use. PMID:21841927

  15. Reducing the use of seclusion and restraint in psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient services- improving patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wale, Joyce B; Belkin, Gary S; Moon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of seclusion and restraint (S/R) use has been given national priority by the US government, The Joint Commission, and patient advocacy groups. It is associated with high rates of patient and staff injuries and is a coercive and potentially traumatizing intervention. The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) is the largest municipal health care system in the country, with 11 HHC facilities operating psychiatric emergency services and inpatient psychiatric services. HHC operates 1117 adult inpatient psychiatric beds with an average length of stay of 22.2 days that generated over 19,000 discharges in 2009. In 2009, there were over 36,000 psychiatric emergency services visits. HHC's Office of Behavioral Health provides strategic leadership, planning, and support for the operations and quality objectives of these services. In January 2007, the corporate office initiated the Seclusion and Restraint Reduction Initiative, with a sequenced, intensive series of interventions and strategies to help focus the behavioral health leadership and staff on the need for continued culture change toward a more patient-centered and safe system of psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient care. From 2007 to 2009, there was a substantial decline in HHC's overall rate of S/R incidents in inpatient units. The more substantial impact was in the reduced overall time spent in S/R; the reduced frequency of use of S/R; and the reduced likelihood of patient injury from S/R use.

  16. Handover of patient information from the crisis assessment and treatment team to the inpatient psychiatric unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Amanda; Sands, Natisha; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Henderson, Kathryn

    2015-06-01

    Handover, or the communication of patient information between clinicians, is a fundamental component of health care. Psychiatric settings are dynamic environments relying on timely and accurate communication to plan care and manage risk. Crisis assessment and treatment teams are the primary interface between community and mental health services in many Australian and international health services, facilitating access to assessment, treatment, and admission to hospital. No previous research has investigated the handover between crisis assessment and treatment teams and inpatient psychiatric units, despite the importance of handover to care planning. The aim of the present study was to identify the nature and types of information transferred during these handovers, and to explore how these guides initial care planning. An observational, exploratory study design was used. A 20-item handover observation tool was used to observe 19 occasions of handover. A prospective audit was undertaken on clinical documentation arising from the admission. Clinical information, including psychiatric history and mental state, were handed over consistently; however, information about consumer preferences was reported less consistently. The present study identified a lack of attention to consumer preferences at handover, despite the current focus on recovery-oriented models for mental health care, and the centrality of respecting consumer preferences within the recovery paradigm. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. State dependent gene-environment interaction: serotonin transporter gene-child abuse interaction associated with suicide attempt history among depressed psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Gen; Romanowicz, Magdalena; Passov, Victoria; Rundell, James; Mrazek, David; Kung, Simon

    2013-05-01

    The serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5HTTLPR) and child abuse history have been associated with an increased suicide risk for general population, but such association is not clear among psychiatric depressed inpatients. A chart review identified 422 depressed inpatients genotyped for 5HTTLPR. Child abuse and suicide attempt history were recorded. The relationship between 5HTTLPR, child abuse, and suicide attempts were analyzed. There was a significant relationship between 5HTTLPR and history of suicide attempt (the long/long versus the short carriers, 47.9% versus 31.8%, p=0.0015). There was also a significant main effect from child abuse history (abused versus not abused, 45.1% versus 28.6%, p=0.0001). The likelihood ratio test showed a significant result for the l/l genotype group with child abuse history (odds ratio 4.11, χ2 = 23.5, pchild abuse history and suicide attempt history is needed. The rs25531 variant among a long allele (long-A and long-G) of 5HTTLPR was not genotyped. In addition to the direct effect from 5HTTLPR and child abuse history, an interaction between the 5HTTLPR gene and child abuse history influenced psychiatric profiles of depressed inpatients. Contrary to the widely recognized "reactivity" associated with the short allele, our patients with the l/l genotype and child abuse history showed significantly severer psychiatric pathology than short carriers with child abuse history. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. A Comparative Study of United States Service Members With and Without a History of Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization on Post Deployment Trauma, Depression, and Hazardous Alcohol Use Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    regression analyses were conducted to test study hypotheses. Results: Previously psychiatrically hospitalized service members demonstrated...predicting positive Two-Item Conjoint Screen (TICS) from history of inpatient psychiatric hospitalization (N = 492...positive Two-Item Conjoint Screen (TICS) in inpatient cases (Group 1; N = 246) . 63 Table 6. Summary of logistic regression model predicting positive Two

  19. [Mortality of psychiatric inpatients in France during World War II: a demographic study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapireau, F

    2009-04-01

    In France, World War II lasted from 1939 to 1945. Under-nourishment was a national problem, and was more severe in mental hospitals. The mortality of psychiatric inpatients in France during World War II has long been a controversial issue in the country. Some authors wrote of the "soft extermination" of 40 000 mental patients, although this has been proven false. The historical study published in 2007 by Isabelle von Bueltzingsloewen provides in-depth description and analysis of starvation due to food restrictions in French mental hospitals. Although the French official statistic services published detailed data, no demographic study has been published so far. Such studies have been conducted in Norway and in Finland. "The influence of a period of under-nourishment upon mortality in mental hospitals can rarely be seen with a clarity equal to that in this work. The strict rationing was the same for everybody, but, extra muros, there was private initiative and ingenuity to help in alleviating the distress. Naturally, patients in institution had no ability to act on their own. The immense increase during the period of war from 1941 to 1945 appeared both as an increase in the exact death-risk and as an increase in the disproportion with normal mortality. The men reacted more strongly than women; which is readily comprehensible on physiological grounds, as the rations were virtually the same for all." Excess mortality continued after the war. Even though under-nourishment had ceased, death rates from tuberculosis remained high the following year. Both papers state that the poor hygiene and bad living conditions existing in mental hospitals before the war worsened the effects of food restrictions. DEMOGRAPHIC DATA: French data were published by the General Statistics of France (SGF) that became the National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (Insee) in 1946. A series of datasets were published each year according to sex, diagnosis and type of psychiatric

  20. Disentangling depression and anxiety in relation to neuroticism, extraversion, suicide, and self-harm among adult psychiatric inpatients with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subica, Andrew M; Allen, Jon G; Frueh, B Christopher; Elhai, Jon D; Fowler, J Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about depression-anxiety comorbidity and its association with personality traits and suicide/self-harm in adult psychiatric inpatients with serious mental illness (SMI), impacting clinical assessment and treatment. This study sought to determine the symptom structure of depression-anxiety comorbidity and its relation to neuroticism, extraversion, and suicide/self-harm behaviour in this high-risk population. Nine hundred and sixty-two adults receiving inpatient care at a private psychiatric hospital completed questionnaires at admission. Confirmatory factor analyses compared a bifactor solution specifying a general distress factor and two specific depression and anxiety factors against unidimensional and correlated factors solutions. The bifactor solutions' factors were subsequently correlated with neuroticism and extraversion subscales and pre-hospitalization suicide/self-harm behaviours. The bifactor model rendered superior fit to sample data and a robust general factor - accounting for 77.61% of common item variance - providing the first evidence for a tripartite structure of depression and anxiety among adult inpatients. The bifactor solution-outputted independent general distress, depression, and anxiety factors positively correlated with neuroticism, the personality dimension corresponding to trait negative affectivity. The general distress and depression factors associated with recent self-harm, but factors showed no associations with prior suicidal behaviour. In adult psychiatric inpatients, general distress substantially underlies comorbid depression and anxiety symptom variation and may contribute to recent incidence of self-harm. Transdiagnostic assessments and interventions targeting general distress may temper depression, anxiety, and self-harm in adult inpatients. Clinical implications Depression-anxiety comorbidity symptomology in adult psychiatric inpatients is primarily composed of general distress. General distress and specific

  1. Ringleader bullying: association with psychopathic narcissism and theory of mind among child psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellwagen, Kurt K; Kerig, Patricia K

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the association of ringleader bullying with psychopathic traits and theory of mind among 100 youth aged 10-15 (62 boys and 38 girls) receiving inpatient psychiatric services at a state facility. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated a positive association between ringleader bullying and psychopathic narcissism, and a significant interaction effect between narcissism and theory of mind. More specifically, narcissism moderated the relationship between theory of mind and ringleader bullying such that theory of mind was positively associated with ringleader bullying when levels of narcissism were high, and theory of mind was negatively associated ringleader bullying when levels of narcissism were low. The discussion of these results focuses on the importance of developing effective treatment techniques for youth whose bullying behavior is associated with narcissistic features and social acuity.

  2. Health care professionals implementing a smoke-free policy at inpatient psychiatric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lyle G; Oliffe, John L; Johnson, Joy L; Bottorff, Joan L

    2014-12-01

    Smoke-free grounds policies (SFGPs) were introduced to inpatient psychiatric hospital settings to improve health among patients, staff, and visitors. We conducted an ethnographic study in Northern British Columbia, Canada, to describe how the implementation of SFGPs is affected by institutional cultures. Data reported here included participant observation, document review, informal discussions (n = 11), and interviews with health care professionals (HCPs; n = 19) and staff (n = 2) at two hospitals. We used iterative and inductive processes to derive thematic findings. Findings related to HCPs illustrate how local contexts and cultural factors affect SFGP implementation. These factors included individual beliefs and attitudes, the influence of group norms, leadership and consensus building, and locale-specific norms. Strong, consultative leadership, in which leaders solicited input from and long-term support of people most directly responsible for policy implementation, was key to success. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Development of the Observation Scale for Aggressive Behavior (OSAB) for Dutch forensic psychiatric inpatients with an antisocial personality disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornsveld, R.H.J.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Hollin, C.R.; Kraaimaat, F.W.

    2007-01-01

    The Observation Scale for Aggressive Behavior (OSAB) has been developed to evaluate inpatient treatment programs designed to reduce aggressive behavior in Dutch forensic psychiatric patients with an antisocial personality disorder, who are "placed at the disposal of the government". The scale should

  4. The impact of inpatient suicide on psychiatric nurses and their need for support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takusari Eri

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nurses working in psychiatric hospitals and wards are prone to encounter completed suicides. The research was conducted to examine post-suicide stress in nurses and the availability of suicide-related mental health care services and education. Methods Experiences with inpatient suicide were investigated using an anonymous, self-reported questionnaire, which was, along with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, administered to 531 psychiatric nurses. Results The rate of nurses who had encountered patient suicide was 55.0%. The mean Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R score was 11.4. The proportion of respondents at a high risk (≥ 25 on the 88-point IES-R score for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD was 13.7%. However, only 15.8% of respondents indicated that they had access to post-suicide mental health care programmes. The survey also revealed a low rate of nurses who reported attending in-hospital seminars on suicide prevention or mental health care for nurses (26.4% and 12.8%, respectively. Conclusions These results indicated that nurses exposed to inpatient suicide suffer significant mental distress. However, the low availability of systematic post-suicide mental health care programmes for such nurses and the lack of suicide-related education initiatives and mental health care for nurses are problematic. The situation is likely related to the fact that there are no formal systems in place for identifying and evaluating the psychological effects of patient suicide in nurses and to the pressures stemming from the public perception of nurses as suppliers rather than recipients of health care.

  5. The impact of inpatient suicide on psychiatric nurses and their need for support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Chizuko; Chida, Fuminori; Nakamura, Hikaru; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Yagi, Junko; Koeda, Atsuhiko; Takusari, Eri; Otsuka, Kotaro; Sakai, Akio

    2011-03-08

    The nurses working in psychiatric hospitals and wards are prone to encounter completed suicides. The research was conducted to examine post-suicide stress in nurses and the availability of suicide-related mental health care services and education. Experiences with inpatient suicide were investigated using an anonymous, self-reported questionnaire, which was, along with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, administered to 531 psychiatric nurses. The rate of nurses who had encountered patient suicide was 55.0%. The mean Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) score was 11.4. The proportion of respondents at a high risk (≥ 25 on the 88-point IES-R score) for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was 13.7%. However, only 15.8% of respondents indicated that they had access to post-suicide mental health care programmes. The survey also revealed a low rate of nurses who reported attending in-hospital seminars on suicide prevention or mental health care for nurses (26.4% and 12.8%, respectively). These results indicated that nurses exposed to inpatient suicide suffer significant mental distress. However, the low availability of systematic post-suicide mental health care programmes for such nurses and the lack of suicide-related education initiatives and mental health care for nurses are problematic. The situation is likely related to the fact that there are no formal systems in place for identifying and evaluating the psychological effects of patient suicide in nurses and to the pressures stemming from the public perception of nurses as suppliers rather than recipients of health care.

  6. Predictors of effective de-escalation in acute inpatient psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Mary; Stewart, Duncan; James, Karen; Richardson, Michelle; Renwick, Laoise; Brennan, Geoffrey; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    To explore the factors that influence the use of de-escalation and its success in halting conflict in acute psychiatric inpatient setting. De-escalation is the use of verbal and nonverbal communication to reduce or eliminate aggression and violence during the escalation phase of a patient's behaviour. Although de-escalation is a first-line intervention in aggression management in acute psychiatric settings, little is known about the use or effectiveness of this technique. A retrospective case note analysis. For each patient (n = 522), their involvement in conflict (e.g. aggression) or containment (e.g. coerced medication) during the first two weeks of their admission was recorded. The frequency and order of the conflict and containment events were identified during each shift. The sequences of events occurring in shifts involving de-escalation were analysed. Sequences where de-escalation ended the pattern of conflict or containment were categorised as 'successful', and all others were categorised as 'unsuccessful'. Over half of patients (53%) experienced de-escalation during the first two weeks of admission, with the majority of these (37%) experiencing multiple episodes. De-escalation was successful in approximately 60% of cases. Successful de-escalations were preceded by fewer, and less aggressive, conflict events, compared with unsuccessful de-escalations, which were most frequently followed by administration of pro re nata medication. Patients with a history of violence were more likely to experience de-escalation, and it was more likely to be unsuccessful. De-escalation is frequently effective in halting a sequence of conflict in acute inpatient settings, but patients with a history of violence may be specifically challenging. These findings provide support for de-escalation in practice but suggest that nurses may lack confidence in using the technique when the risk of violence is greater. Providing evidence-based staff training may improve staff confidence

  7. Prevalence of periodontal disease among inpatients in a psychiatric hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Ajithkrishnan Champettil; Iyer, Ramya Radhakrishnan; Kalantharakath, Thanveer

    2012-01-01

    This paper assessed the periodontal status of inpatients at Government Mental Hospital, Vadodara, India, and studied the possible relationship between periodontal status and age, length of hospitalization, type of mental illness, and medication and tobacco use. Information about psychiatric diagnosis, length of hospitalization, and prescribed medication was obtained from hospital records. We interviewed 165 inpatients and recorded their chief dental complaints (if any) and relevant histories. Periodontal status was assessed using the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Descriptive statistics, nonparametric tests, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. The most prevalent periodontal condition was shallow pockets (47.27%). Some subjects (10.3%) had loss of attachment (LOA) of 9-11 mm. Age and length of hospitalization were significantly associated with periodontal status. Multiple logistic regression revealed that only age was significantly associated with periodontal pockets. Male gender, age, and tobacco-related habits were significantly associated with LOA of more than 0-3 mm. © 2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Factor analysis of the DSM-III-R borderline personality disorder criteria in psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanislow, C A; Grilo, C M; McGlashan, T H

    2000-10-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the factor structure of the DSM-III-R criteria for borderline personality disorder in young adult psychiatric inpatients. The authors assessed 141 acutely ill inpatients with the Personality Disorder Examination, a semistructured diagnostic interview for DSM-III-R personality disorders. They used correlational analyses to examine the associations among the different criteria for borderline personality disorder and performed an exploratory factor analysis. Cronbach's coefficient alpha for the borderline personality disorder criteria was 0.69. A principal components factor analysis with a varimax rotation accounted for 57.2% of the variance and revealed three homogeneous factors. These factors were disturbed relatedness (unstable relationships, identity disturbance, and chronic emptiness); behavioral dysregulation (impulsivity and suicidal/self-mutilative behavior); and affective dysregulation (affective instability, inappropriate anger, and efforts to avoid abandonment). Exploratory factor analysis revealed three homogeneous components of borderline personality disorder that may represent personality, behavioral, and affective features central to the disorder. Recognition of these components may inform treatment plans.

  9. Pathway to mental health recovery: a qualitative and quantitative study on the needs of Chinese psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, B W M; Tsang, M M Y; Lee, V C K; Liu, A C Y; Tse, S; Luk, H S M; Lo, N K Y; Lo, P H; Leung, Y L

    2016-07-12

    Exploration of the information and participation needs of psychiatric inpatients is an important step for the implementation of recovery-oriented mental health service. The objective of this study was to explore the information and participation needs of Chinese psychiatric inpatients in the largest psychiatric hospital in Hong Kong. The study was divided into two parts. In the first part, eight focus groups with patients, patients' relatives and healthcare professionals were held to identify 22 items of information needs and 16 items of participation needs of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Basing on the items identified in the first part of the study, a questionnaire was developed to survey on the importance of the different information and participation needs in the second part of the study. Participants were asked to rate in rank order their perceived importance of the items in the questionnaire survey. A hundred and eighty three Chinese psychiatric inpatients completed the questionnaire and the majority of them suffered from schizophrenia (68.3 %). For information needs, the top three needs rated by patients as the most important in descending order were: "Information on the classifications of mental illnesses, signs and symptoms and factors contributing to relapse", "Information on the criteria and arrangements for discharge", and "Information on the importance of psychiatric drug taking and its side effects". For participation needs, the top three needs rated by patients as the most important in descending order were: "Enquiring about personal needs and arrangements", "Keeping in touch with the outside world", and "Learning and practising self-management". This study reveals that Chinese psychiatric inpatients are concerned about information on their mental illness and its treatments as well as the criteria for discharge. On the other hand, patients are concerned about their personal needs, their self-management, as well as their keeping in touch with the

  10. Inpatient treatment of major depression in Austria between 1989 and 2009: impact of downsizing of psychiatric hospitals on admissions, suicide rates and outpatient psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssoki, B; Willeit, M; Blüml, V; Höfer, P; Erfurth, A; Psota, G; Lesch, O M; Kapusta, N D

    2011-09-01

    During the last 20 years Austrian psychiatric services underwent fundamental changes, as a focus was set on downsizing psychiatric hospitals. Little is known about how restructuring of mental health services affected patients with major depression and suicide rates. Monthly hospital discharges from all hospitals in Austria with the diagnosis of unipolar major depression as primary reason for inpatient treatment were obtained for the time period between 1989 and 2008. These data were correlated with relevant parameters from the general health system, such as number of hospital beds, suicide rate, density of psychotherapists and sales of antidepressants. While the number of psychiatric beds was reduced by almost 30%, the total annual numbers of inpatient treatment episodes for depression increased by 360%. This increase was stronger for men than for women. Further on this development was accompanied by a decrease in the suicide rate and an improvement in the availability of professional outpatient mental health service providers. Only aggregated patient data and no single case histories were available for this study. The validity of the correct diagnosis of unipolar major depression must be doubted, as most likely not all patients were seen by a clinical expert. Our data show that although inpatient treatment for unipolar major depression dramatically increased, reduction of psychiatric beds did not lead to an increase of suicide rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Therapeutic community model in short psychiatric hospitalization. Descriptive study on the dynamic psychiatric inpatient unit of the Italian hospital of Buenos Aires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusevich, Daniel; Ruiz, Martín; Vairo, María; Girard, Paula; Rozadilla, Gustavo; Castagnola, Guido; Job, Alfredo; Pinto, Inés; Finkelsztein, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    the aim of this paper is to communicate a project of short term psychiatric hospitalization, based on a therapeutic community model, considering qualitative and quantitative aspects in the present socio - cultural context. this psychiatric hospitalization model that embraces psychodynamic and pharmacological interventions is focused in the intensity of interactions between members of the therapeutic community and integrated to the administrative structure of a general hospital; this will be the key to consider patient's return to the community and to move forward over the prejudices that inpatients suffer. quantitative, prospective, observational and transversal study on a Dynamic Psychiatric Inpatient Unit. 605 patients were included. mean length of stay was 16.34 days; principal causes of admission were depression (19.4%), suicide ideas (17.7%), suicide attempt (17.6%), substance abuse or dependence (14.3%), psychosis (13.8%), behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (6%). There were 75 readmissions. 14.88% patients were physically restrained. Principal Axis I diagnosis were depression (32.1%), substance dependence (13.2%), bipolar disorder (10.2%), dementia (7.6%), schizophrenia (7.5%), and psychotic disorder (5.8). Axis II diagnosis were borderline personality disorder (27.3%), narcissistic personality disorder (8.9%), histrionic personality disorder (5.3%). this kind of approach shows a structural model that allows possible and persistent favorable changes for psychiatric inpatients.

  12. Pathway for inpatients with depressive episode in Flemish psychiatric hospitals: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoens Steven R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the context of a biopsychosocial model of the treatment of depressive episodes, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. Clinical pathways have been developed and implemented in hospitals to support multidisciplinary teamwork. The aim of this study is to explore current practice for the treatment of depressive episodes in Flemish psychiatric hospitals. Current practice in different hospitals is studied to get an idea of the similarities (outlined as a pathway and the differences in the treatment of depressive episodes. Methods A convenience sample of 11 Flemish psychiatric hospitals participated in this qualitative study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with different types of health care professionals (n = 43. The websites of the hospitals were searched for information on their approach to treating depressive episodes. Results A flow chart was made including the identified stages of the pathway: pre-admission, admission (observation and treatment, discharge and follow-up care. The characteristics of each stage are described. Although the stages are identified in all hospitals, differences between hospitals on various levels of the pathway exist. Hospitals emphasized the individual approach of each patient. The results point to a biopsychosocial approach to treating depressive episodes. Conclusion This study outlined current practice as a pathway for Flemish inpatients with depressive episodes. Within the context of surveillance of quality and quantity of care, this study may encourage hospitals to consider developing clinical pathways.

  13. Internalized Stigma and Perceived Family Support in Acute Psychiatric In-Patient Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Gülçin; Küçük, Leyla

    2016-02-01

    This descriptive study aims to identify the relationship between internalized stigma and perceived family support in patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric unit. The sample is composed of 224 patients treated in an acute inpatient psychiatric ward in İstanbul, Turkey. The data were collected using information obtained from the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale and Social Support from Family Scale. The mean age of the patients was 37±11.56years, and the mean duration of treatment was 6.27±5.81years. Most patients had been hospitalized three or more times. Of the total number of patients, 66.1% had been taken to the hospital by family members. We noted a statistically significant negative correlation between the total scores obtained from the perceived Social Support from Family Scale and the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale. The patients were observed to stigmatize themselves more when the perceived social support from their family had decreased. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comorbid internet addiction in male clients of inpatient addiction rehabilitation centers: psychiatric symptoms and mental comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfling, Klaus; Beutel, Manfred E; Koch, Andreas; Dickenhorst, Ulrike; Müller, Kai W

    2013-11-01

    Addictive Internet use has recently been proposed to be included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Still, little is known about its nosological features, including comorbidity with other mental disorders and disorder-specific psychopathological symptoms. To investigate whether Internet addiction (IA) is an issue in patients in addiction treatment, 1826 clients were surveyed in 15 inpatient rehabilitation centers. Male patients meeting criteria for comorbid IA (n = 71) were compared with a matched control group of male patients treated for alcohol addiction without addictive Internet use (n = 58). The SCL-90-R, the Patient Health Questionnaire, and the seven-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder were used to assess associated psychiatric symptoms and further comorbid disorders. Comorbid IA was associated with higher levels of psychosocial symptoms, especially depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and interpersonal sensitivity. Moreover, the patients with IA more frequently met criteria for additional mental disorders. They display higher rates of psychiatric symptoms, especially depression, and might be in need of additional therapeutic treatment. In rehabilitation centers, a regular screening for IA is recommended to identify patients with this (non-substance-related) addiction and supply them with additional disorder-specific treatment.

  15. Stigmatization of psychiatric symptoms and psychiatric service use: a vignette-based representative population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowislo, Julia F; Lange, Claudia; Euler, Sebastian; Hachtel, Henning; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan; Lang, Undine E; Huber, Christian G

    2017-06-01

    Background There is evidence for two different types and/or sources of mental illness stigma, namely the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. However, no current study has compared the two. Furthermore, gaps exist in our knowledge of both types of stigma. Little is known about the perceived stigma of specific psychiatric service treatment environments, for instance forensic settings. In addition, systematic research on stigma attached to symptoms of personality disorders in the general population is scarce, and for borderline personality disorder, nonexistent. Methods We conducted a representative survey of the general population (N = 2207) in the canton of Basel-Stadt, Switzerland. Participants were asked to read a vignette depicting either the psychiatric symptoms of a fictitious character or a psychiatric service institution to which the character had been admitted, and indicate desired social distance (an indicator for stigma). Type of symptoms, type of psychiatric service, dangerousness, and gender were systematically varied between vignettes. Findings Desired social distance was significantly lower in relation to psychiatric service use than to psychiatric symptoms. Overall, symptoms of alcohol dependency, behavior endangering others, and the fictitious character's being male tend to increase stigmatization. Interestingly, the character's being hospitalized in a psychiatric unit at a general hospital and also respondent familiarity with psychiatric services tend to decrease stigmatization. Interpretation Familiarity of the general population with psychiatric patients should be increased. Furthermore, treatment in psychiatric units located within general hospitals should be promoted, as such treatment is associated with decreased stigma.

  16. Relatives of psychiatric inpatients--do physical violence and suicide attempts of patients influence family burden and participation in care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellin, Lars; Ostman, Margareta

    2005-01-01

    A common concern of psychiatric patients' relatives is that patients might be a danger to themselves or others. The aim of this study was to investigate family burden and relatives' participation in care in relation to physical violence towards others and suicide attempts by psychiatric inpatients before admission. Information concerning violence and suicide attempts by the patients prior to admission was collected from the medical records of 155 acutely voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric inpatients. Relatives were interviewed a month after admission, using a semi-structured questionnaire. Violence towards other persons and suicide attempts were recorded in 16% and 17% of the cases, respectively. There were no differences between relatives of patients who had been violent and other relatives regarding burden and participation in care. Relatives of patients with suicide attempts more often stated they had been prevented from having own company, worried about suicide attempts by the patient, had mental health problems of their own, and had own need for care and support. It was concluded that violence of acutely admitted psychiatric patients, targeted at other people, was not associated with burden of family, but the results corroborate the need for psychiatric services to involve and support relatives of psychiatric patients with suicidal behaviour.

  17. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition Short Form for Index and IQ Scores in a Psychiatric Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Bruce K.; Girard, Todd A.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2007-01-01

    An eight-subtest short form (SF8) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition (WAIS-III), maintaining equal representation of each index factor, was developed for use with psychiatric populations. Data were collected from a mixed inpatient/outpatient sample (99 men and 101 women) referred for neuropsychological assessment. Psychometric…

  18. Foot Complications in a Representative Australian Inpatient Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Lazzarini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the prevalence and factors independently associated with foot complications in a representative inpatient population (adults admitted for any reason with and without diabetes. We analysed data from the Foot disease in inpatients study, a sample of 733 representative inpatients. Previous amputation, previous foot ulceration, peripheral arterial disease (PAD, peripheral neuropathy (PN, and foot deformity were the foot complications assessed. Sociodemographic, medical, and foot treatment history were collected. Overall, 46.0% had a foot complication with 23.9% having multiple; those with diabetes had higher prevalence of foot complications than those without diabetes (p<0.01. Previous amputation (4.1% was independently associated with previous foot ulceration, foot deformity, cerebrovascular accident, and past surgeon treatment (p<0.01. Previous foot ulceration (9.8% was associated with PN, PAD, past podiatry, and past nurse treatment (p<0.02. PAD (21.0% was associated with older age, males, indigenous people, cancer, PN, and past surgeon treatment (p<0.02. PN (22.0% was associated with older age, diabetes, mobility impairment, and PAD (p<0.05. Foot deformity (22.4% was associated with older age, mobility impairment, past podiatry treatment, and PN (p<0.01. Nearly half of all inpatients had a foot complication. Those with foot complications were older, male, indigenous, had diabetes, cerebrovascular accident, mobility impairment, and other foot complications or past foot treatment.

  19. Impact of a postdischarge smoking cessation intervention for smokers admitted to an inpatient psychiatric facility: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockings, Emily A L; Bowman, Jenny A; Baker, Amanda L; Terry, Margarett; Clancy, Richard; Wye, Paula M; Knight, Jenny; Moore, Lyndell H; Adams, Maree F; Colyvas, Kim; Wiggers, John H

    2014-11-01

    Persons with a mental disorder smoke at higher rates and suffer disproportionate tobacco-related burden compared with the general population. The aim of this study was to determine if a smoking cessation intervention initiated during a psychiatric hospitalization and continued postdischarge was effective in reducing smoking behaviors among persons with a mental disorder. A randomized controlled trial was conducted at an Australian inpatient psychiatric facility. Participants were 205 patient smokers allocated to a treatment as usual control (n = 101) or a smoking cessation intervention (n = 104) incorporating psychosocial and pharmacological support for 4 months postdischarge. Follow-up assessments were conducted at 1 week, 2, 4, and 6 months postdischarge and included abstinence from cigarettes, quit attempts, daily cigarette consumption, and nicotine dependence. Rates of continuous and 7-day point prevalence abstinence did not differ between treatment conditions at the 6-month follow-up; however, point prevalence abstinence was significantly higher for intervention (11.5%) compared with control (2%) participants at 4 months (OR = 6.46, p = .01). Participants in the intervention condition reported significantly more quit attempts (F[1, 202.5] = 15.23, p = .0001), lower daily cigarette consumption (F[4, 586] = 6.5, p < .001), and lower levels of nicotine dependence (F[3, 406] = 8.5, p < .0001) compared with controls at all follow-up assessments. Postdischarge cessation support was effective in encouraging quit attempts and reducing cigarette consumption up to 6 months postdischarge. Additional support strategies are required to facilitate longer-term cessation benefits for smokers with a mental disorder. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Demographic and clinical factors associated with benzodiazepine prescription at discharge from psychiatric inpatient treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Shannon M; Knauf, Kendra Quincy; Derbidge, Christina M; Kimmel, Ryan; Vannoy, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We sought to characterize diagnostic and treatment factors associated with receiving a prescription for benzodiazepines at discharge from a psychiatric inpatient unit. We hypothesized that engaging in individual behavioral interventions while on the unit would decrease the likelihood of receiving a benzodiazepine prescription at discharge. This is an observational study utilizing medical chart review (n=1007) over 37 months (2008-2011). Descriptive statistics characterized patient demographics and diagnostic/prescription frequency. Multivariate regression was used to assess factors associated with receiving a benzodiazepine prescription at discharge. The sample was 61% female with mean age=40.5 (S.D.=13.6). Most frequent diagnoses were depression (54.7%) and bipolar disorder (18.6%). Thirty-eight percent of participants engaged in an individual behavioral intervention. Benzodiazepines were prescribed in 36% of discharges. Contrary to our hypothesis, individual behavioral interventions did not influence discharge benzodiazepine prescriptions. However, several other factors did, including having a substance use disorder [odds ratio (OR)=0.40]. Male sex (OR=0.56), Black race (OR=0.40) and age (OR=1.03) were nonclinical factors with strong prescribing influence. Benzodiazepines are frequently prescribed at discharge. Our results indicate strong racial and sex biases when prescribing benzodiazepines, even after controlling for diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Maladaptive interpersonal schemas as sensitive and specific markers of borderline personality disorder among psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lisa J; Tanis, Thachell; Ardalan, Firouz; Yaseen, Zimri; Galynker, Igor

    2016-08-30

    Diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and mood and psychotic disorders characterized by major mood episodes (i.e., major depressive, bipolar and schizoaffective disorder) share marked overlap in symptom presentation, complicating differential diagnosis. The current study tests the hypothesis that maladaptive interpersonal schemas (MIS) are characteristic of BPD, but not of the major mood disorders. One hundred psychiatric inpatients were assessed by SCID I, SCID II and the Young Schema Questionnaire (YSQ-S2). Logistic regression analyses tested the association between MIS (measured by the YSQ-S2) and BPD, bipolar, major depressive and schizoaffective disorder. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analyses assessed the sensitivity and specificity of MIS as a marker of BPD. After covariation for comorbidity with each of the 3 mood disorders, BPD was robustly associated with 4 out of 5 schema domains. In contrast, only one of fifteen regression analyses demonstrated a significant association between any mood disorder and schema domain after covariation for comorbid BPD. ROC analyses of the 5 schema domains suggested Disconnection/Rejection had the greatest power for identification of BPD cases. These data support the specific role of maladaptive interpersonal schemas in BPD and potentially contribute to greater conceptual clarity about the distinction between BPD and the major mood disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cognitive functioning and adjudicative competence: defendants referred for neuropsychological evaluation in a psychiatric inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Beth C; Marcopulos, Bernice A; Brand, Jesse G; Campbell, Kristen T; Kent, Julie-Ann

    2017-11-01

    A paucity of peer-reviewed research exists regarding the relation between cognitive functioning and adjudicative competence, despite increasing awareness of cognitive deficits associated with serious mental illness. This retrospective study sought to add to and expand upon existing research by considering performance validity and court determinations of competence, when available. We compared demographic and cognitive variables of a group of defendants with presumed valid testing admitted to an inpatient psychiatric facility for evaluation of adjudicative competence and referred for neuropsychological evaluation (n = 45) and compared individuals determined by the evaluator and/or the court to be competent (n = 30) and incompetent (n = 15). Defendants who were incompetent were more likely to be diagnosed with a cognitive disorder, with a medium effect size. There was a difference in tests of immediate and delayed memory as measured by the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), with medium to large effects, and high delayed memory scores were helpful in ruling out incompetence (Negative predictive power = 85.71%). These results provide support for the relationship between cognitive functioning and trial competence, particularly at high and low levels of performance.

  3. Failure to maintain set as a predictor of childhood depression within a children's psychiatric inpatient sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Brian C; Gaudet, Charles E; Dupont-Frechette, Jennifer A; Tellock, Perrin P; Maher, Isolde D; Haisley, Lauren D; Holler, Karen A

    2016-12-30

    Despite a wealth of studies in adults and adolescents, only a handful of studies have examined executive function in childhood depression. This study utilized retrospective chart review of a children's psychiatric inpatient program to evaluate executive function via Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) in 33 children (6-12 years old) with a depressive disorder and 61 age/sex-matched children without a depressive disorder referred for neuropsychological evaluation. WCST categories, perseverative errors, and failure to maintain set errors were examined as potential predictors of depressive disorder diagnosis and self-reported depressive symptoms. After controlling for age, length of hospital stay, and ADHD, failure to maintain set significantly predicted depressive disorder diagnosis. Failure to maintain set was also significantly associated with self-reported depressive symptoms. Current findings provide preliminary evidence to suggest that failure to maintain set may reflect a core deficit of childhood depression. While findings are preliminary, this may have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of childhood depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modification of severe violent and aggressive behavior among psychiatric inpatients through the use of a short-term token economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Soon; Lee, Kyunghee

    2012-12-01

    Meager research has been carried out to determine the effectiveness of the token economy among patients behaving violently in mental hospitals. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the Short-Term Token Economy (STTE) on violent behavior among chronic psychiatric in-patients. A nonequivalent control group design method was utilized. Participants in an experimental group (n=22) and control group (n=22) took part in this study from January to April, 2008. Observation on aggressive behavior among male in-patients in one hospital as a baseline was made during the week before the behavior modification program and measurement of aggressive behavior was done using the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS), which includes verbal attacks, property damage and physical attacks. The aggressive behavior scores of the experimental group decreased, those of the control group, scores showed an increase after the eight-week behavior modification program utilizing STTE. The results of the study indicate that STTE is effective in reducing the incidence of aggressive behavior among male in-patients in psychiatric hospitals. The outcome of this study should be helpful in reducing the use of coercive measures or psychoactive medication in controlling the violent behavior among in-patients in hospitals.

  5. Seizures during antidepressant treatment in psychiatric inpatients--results from the transnational pharmacovigilance project "Arzneimittelsicherheit in der Psychiatrie" (AMSP) 1993-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, M; Grohmann, R; Engel, R R; Nitsche, M A; Rüther, E; Degner, D

    2013-11-01

    There is little clinical data available about seizure rates in psychiatric inpatients, and there are no studies with reference data to the frequencies of antidepressant (AD) use for this important clinical population. This study investigates seizure rates during AD treatment in psychiatric inpatient settings, drawn from the transnational pharmacovigilance programme Arzneimittelsicherheit in der Psychiatrie (AMSP) in relation to the known frequencies of ADs used in the participating clinics. Comparisons are made to former publications and their limitations. Seventy-seven cases were identified with grand mal seizures (GMS) during AD treatment between 1993 and 2008, with a total number of 142,090 inpatients under surveillance treated with ADs in the participating hospitals. The calculated overall rate of reported seizures of patients during AD treatment in this collective is 0.05 % for ADs imputed alone or in combination with other psychotropic drug groups and 0.02 % when only ADs were given and held responsible for GMS. The patients receiving tri- or tetracyclic ADs (TCAs) had a 2-fold risk to develop a seizure as compared to the overall average rate in this sample. In 11 cases, there was only one AD imputed--the majority of these cases (9/11) were TCA. Monotherapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) or dual serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) were never imputed alone in this sample. The results of the study favour the assumption that SSRIs, noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSA) and dual SNRI might be more appropriate than TCAs for the treatment of psychiatric patients with an enhanced seizure risk.

  6. Foot Complications in a Representative Australian Inpatient Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurn, Sheree E.; Kamp, Maarten C.; Ng, Vanessa; Thomas, Courtney; Jen, Scott; Wills, Jude; Kinnear, Ewan M.; d'Emden, Michael C.; Reed, Lloyd F.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence and factors independently associated with foot complications in a representative inpatient population (adults admitted for any reason with and without diabetes). We analysed data from the Foot disease in inpatients study, a sample of 733 representative inpatients. Previous amputation, previous foot ulceration, peripheral arterial disease (PAD), peripheral neuropathy (PN), and foot deformity were the foot complications assessed. Sociodemographic, medical, and foot treatment history were collected. Overall, 46.0% had a foot complication with 23.9% having multiple; those with diabetes had higher prevalence of foot complications than those without diabetes (p foot ulceration, foot deformity, cerebrovascular accident, and past surgeon treatment (p foot ulceration (9.8%) was associated with PN, PAD, past podiatry, and past nurse treatment (p diabetes, mobility impairment, and PAD (p Foot deformity (22.4%) was associated with older age, mobility impairment, past podiatry treatment, and PN (p foot complication. Those with foot complications were older, male, indigenous, had diabetes, cerebrovascular accident, mobility impairment, and other foot complications or past foot treatment. PMID:29164152

  7. Attendance at an outpatient follow-up clinic by HIV-positive psychiatric patients initiated on ART as inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette M Nel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence suggests that the presence of mental illness may be associated with poorer adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART. There is also a general understanding that patients initiated on ART as inpatients have poorer outcomes than those initiated as outpatients. Negative perceptions regarding future adherence may affect the clinical decision to initiate ART in hospitalised psychiatric patients. Attendance at clinic appointments is an indicator of medication adherence, and is easily measurable in a limited-resource setting.  Objectives. The primary objective of this study was to examine the rate of attendance at the first clinic appointment post discharge from a period of psychiatric hospitalisation in HIV-positive psychiatric patients initiated on ART as inpatients. A secondary objective was to determine which factors, if any, were associated with clinic attendance.  Methods. This study was a retrospective record review, conducted at the Luthando Neuropsychiatric HIV Clinic in Soweto, which is an integrated mental healthcare and ART clinic. Patients who were initiated on ART as psychiatric inpatients from 1 July 2009 to 31 December 2010, and subsequently discharged for outpatient follow-up at Luthando Clinic were included in the sample.   Results. There were 98 patients included in the analysis. The sample was predominantly female. The rate of attendance was 80%. The attendant and non-attendant groups were similar in terms of demographic and clinical data.  Significantly fewer non-attendant patients had disclosed their HIV status to their treatment supporter (p=0.01.  Conclusion. Non-disclosure of HIV status needs to be further addressed in integrated psychiatric HIV treatment facilities in order to improve attendance. Female predominance in this setting should also be further investigated.

  8. 77 FR 47223 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... resource use and costs among psychiatric hospitals and psychiatric units. Section 405(g)(2) of the Medicare... differences in patient resource use and costs among psychiatric hospitals and psychiatric units. Section 405(g...(s)(3)(B)) for RYs 2013 and 2014 that reduces the update to the IPF PPS base rate for the FY...

  9. Physical morbidity in elderly psychiatric inpatients: prevalence and possible relations between the major mental disorders and physical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamis, D; Ball, C

    2000-03-01

    This study examines the prevalence of physical morbidity in elderly psychiatric inpatients and the possible relationships between major psychiatric disorders (organic mental disorders, schizophrenic and mood disorders) and physical illnesses. The clinical implications of such relationships are discussed. Data were obtained from two old age psychiatry wards over a six month period. Seventy-nine subjects were studied and information was obtained from their medical files. Demographic characteristics, psychiatric diagnosis, number of physical illnesses and number of body systems affected were collected. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the psychiatric groups on continuous outcome data and chi(2) test to compare psychiatric groups on categorical data. Seventy-five per cent of subjects had at least one physical illness. The number of medical illnesses was independent from the psychiatric disorder. Subjects with mood disorders, and especially depression, were more likely to suffer from hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular illnesses than subjects with schizophrenic or organic disorders. Subjects with organic disorders had the lowest prevalence of endocrine disease and diabetes. It was concluded the link between mood disorders (depression), cardiovascular diseases and hypertension could be of a 'cause/effect' type or are the results of a survivor effect. The high prevalence of physical morbidity has implications for training and continuing professional development of those in Old Age Psychiatry Services. It should also be taken into consideration when the location of services is being decided.

  10. Prevalence and patterns of antipsychotic use in youth at the time of admission and discharge from an inpatient psychiatric facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procyshyn, Ric M; Su, Johnny; Elbe, Dean; Liu, Angela Y; Panenka, William J; Davidson, Jana; Honer, William G; Barr, Alasdair M

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and patterns of antipsychotic use in children and adolescents at the time of admission and discharge from a tertiary care inpatient psychiatric facility. This retrospective analysis included all patients 18 years and younger, who were admitted and discharged from a child and adolescent tertiary care inpatient psychiatric facility between May 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009. Data for medications at admission were obtained using a province-wide network that links all pharmacies in British Columbia, Canada to a central set of data systems, whereas data for medications at discharge were obtained using the Department of Pharmacy's (British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) inpatient computer database. Apart from antipsychotics, overall drug use included antidepressants, mood stabilizers, benzodiazepines, anticholinergics, stimulants, and sleep medications. Referral and discharge diagnoses were also examined. During the study period, 335 patients were admitted and discharged from the tertiary care inpatient psychiatric facility. Significantly, more patients were prescribed with an antipsychotic at the time of discharge from hospital compared with that of the time when they were admitted to hospital (51.6% vs 30.7%; P discharge (32.0% vs 42.2%, respectively) followed by attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder medications (22.3% vs 24.9% at admission and discharge, respectively) and anticonvulsants (19.4% vs 19.1% at admission and discharge, respectively). Whether the significant increase in antipsychotic use seen from the time of admission to discharge is solely attributed to clinical worsening or other variables requires further investigation.

  11. The role of punishment in the in-patient treatment of psychiatrically disturbed children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderton, H R

    1967-02-01

    The role of punishment in the psychiatric in-patient treatment of nonpsychotic latency-age children with behaviourdisorders is discussed. Punishment is defined as the removal of previously existing positive reinforcers or the administration of aversive stimuli. Ways in which appropriate social behaviour may be acquired are briefly considered. These include reinforcement of desirable responses, non-reinforcement of undesirable responses, reinforcement of incompatible responses and imitative learning. The reported effects of punishment on behaviour are reviewed and the psychological functions necessary before punishment can have the intended effects considered. For seriously disturbed children punishment is ineffective as a treatment technique. It reinforces pathological perceptions of self and adults even if it successfully suppresses behaviour. The frame of reference of the seriously disturbed child contraindicates the removal of positive reinforcers and verbal as well as physical aversive stimuli. Controls and punishments must be clearly distinguished. Controls continue only as long as the behaviour towards which they are directed. They do not include the deliberate establishment of an unpleasant state by the adult as a result of particular behaviour. Control techniques such as removal from a group may be necessary but when possible should be avoided in favour of techniques less likely to be misinterpreted. Avoidance of punishment in treatment makes even more important explicit expectations and provision of realistic controls. Natural laws may result in unpleasant experiences as an unavoidable result of certain behaviour. By definition such results can never be imposed by the adult. Treatment considerations may necessitate that the child be protected from the results of his actions. Avoidance of punishment requires a higher staff/child ratio, more mature and better trained staff. Sometimes children have previously been deterred from serious community acting out

  12. Does psychopathology at admission predict the length of inpatient stay in psychiatry? Implications for financing psychiatric services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herwig Uwe

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The debate on appropriate financing systems in inpatient psychiatry is ongoing. In this context, it is important to control resource use in terms of length of stay (LOS, which is the most costly factor in inpatient care and the one that can be influenced most easily. Previous studies have shown that psychiatric diagnoses provide only limited justification for explaining variation in LOS, and it has been suggested that measures such as psychopathology might be more appropriate to predict resource use. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between LOS and psychopathological syndromes or symptoms at admission as well as other characteristics such as sociodemographic and clinical variables. Methods We considered routine medical data of patients admitted to the Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich in the years 2008 and 2009. Complete data on psychopathology at hospital admission were available in 3,220 inpatient episodes. A subsample of 2,939 inpatient episodes was considered in final statistical models, including psychopathology as well as complete datasets of further measures (e.g. sociodemographic, clinical, treatment-related and psychosocial variables. We used multivariate linear as well as logistic regression analysis with forward selection procedure to determine the predictors of LOS. Results All but two syndrome scores (mania, hostility were positively related to the length of stay. Final statistical models showed that syndromes or symptoms explained about 5% of the variation in length of stay. The inclusion of syndromes or symptoms as well as basic treatment variables and other factors led to an explained variation of up to 25%. Conclusions Psychopathological syndromes and symptoms at admission and further characteristics only explained a small proportion of the length of inpatient stay. Thus, according to our sample, psychopathology might not be suitable as a primary indicator for estimating LOS and contingent

  13. Factors related to positive and negative outcomes in psychiatric inpatients in a General Hospital Psychiatric Unit: a proposal for an outcomes index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUGO KARLING MORESCHI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background General Hospital Psychiatric Units have a fundamental importance in the mental health care systems. However, there is a lack of studies regarding the level of improvement of patients in this type of facility. Objective To assess factors related to good and poor outcomes in psychiatric inpatients using an index composed by clinical parameters easily measured. Methods Length of stay (LOS, Global Assessment of Functioning (variation and at discharge and Clinical Global Impression (severity and improvement were used to build a ten-point improvement index (I-Index. Records of psychiatric inpatients of a general hospital during an 18-month period were analyzed. Three groups (poor, intermediate and good outcomes were compared by univariate and multivariate models according to clinical and sociodemographic variables. Results Two hundred and fifty patients were included, with a percentage in the groups with poor, regular and good outcomes of 16.4%, 59,6% and 24.0% respectively. Poor outcome at the discharge was associated mainly with lower education, transient disability, antipsychotics use, chief complaint “behavioral change/aggressiveness” and psychotic features. Multivariate analysis found a higher OR for diagnoses of “psychotic disorders” and “personality disorders” and others variables in relation to protective categories in the poor outcome group compared to the good outcome group. Discussion Our I-Index proved to be an indicator of that allows an easy and more comprehensive evaluation to assess outcomes of inpatients than just LOS. Different interventions addressed to conditions such as psychotic disorders and disruptive chief complaints are necessary.

  14. Cross-cultural differences in psychiatric nurses' attitudes to inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Gerard J.; Middel, Berry; Dassen, Theodoor; Reijneveld, Menno S A

    Little is currently known about the attitudes of psychiatric nurses toward patient aggression, particularly from an international perspective. Attitudes toward patient aggression of psychiatric nurses from five European countries were investigated using a recently developed and tested attitude

  15. Hostility during admission interview as a short-term predictor of aggression in acute psychiatric male inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, Alfonso; Kustermann, Stefano; Di Genio, Massimo; Siracusano, Alberto

    2003-12-01

    A critical step for improving the prediction of on-ward violence is the identification of variables that are not only consistently associated with an increased risk of aggression but also easily evaluated during the admission interview. The goal of this prospective study was to assess the predictive utility of hostility during admission interview. The sample consisted of 80 newly admitted male patients with heterogeneous DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses recruited from the psychiatric ward of an urban public hospital. Psychiatric symptoms at admission were assessed with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). Aggressive behavior during the first week of hospitalization was measured with the Modified Overt Aggression Scale. Data were collected between January and June 1998. In a multiple regression model, BPRS items hostility and tension-excitement emerged as significant predictors of verbal aggression, whereas thinking disturbance (high) and suspiciousness-uncooperativeness (low) emerged as significant predictors of aggression against objects. In contrast, when aggression was treated as a binary dependent variable in a logistic model, hostility during the admission interview had no utility in predicting on-ward aggressive behavior. This study confirms the importance of distinguishing between different types of aggression to improve the accuracy of predictions of violence. The findings suggest that the question whether hostility is a useful short-term predictor of aggression in psychiatric inpatients cannot be answered conclusively. The predictive utility of hostility was relatively high for predicting verbal aggression but was negligible for predicting other types of aggressive behavior.

  16. Clinical Characteristics and Precipitating Factors of Adolescent Suicide Attempters Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Care in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Bae, Jeong-Hoon; Shin, Min-Sup; Yoo, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to examine the rates, correlates, methods, and precipitating factors of suicide attempts among adolescent patients admitted for psychiatric inpatient care from 1999 to 2010 in a university hospital in Korea. Methods The subjects consisted of 728 patients who were admitted for psychiatric inpatient care in a university hospital over a 12-year period and who were aged 10-19 years at the time of admission. We retrospectively investigated the information on suicidal behaviors and other clinical information by reviewing the subjects' electronic medical records. Whether these patients had completed their suicide on 31 December 2010 was determined by a link to the database of the National Statistical Office. Results Among 728 subjects, 21.7% had suicidal ideation at admission, and 10.7% admitted for suicidal attempts. Female gender, divorced/widowed parents, and the presence of mood disorders were associated with a significantly increased likelihood of suicide attempts. Most common method of suicide attempts was cutting, and most common reason for suicide attempts was relationship problems within the primary support group. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was associated with increased risk of death by suicide after discharge. Conclusion These results highlight the role of specific psychosocial factor (e.g., relational problems) and psychiatric disorders (e.g., mood disorders) in the suicide attempts of Korean adolescents, and the need for effective prevention strategies for adolescents at risk for suicide. PMID:25670943

  17. Group schema therapy for personality disorders: A pilot study for implementation in acute psychiatric in-patient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadić, Igor; Lamberth, Sina; Reiss, Neele

    2017-07-01

    Group schema therapy (GST) has been proposed as a novel long-term treatment programme for borderline and cluster C personality disorders. We implemented a short-term GST programme (12-15 sessions, based on the manual by Farrell and Shaw (2012), including both cognitive / behavioural and experiential interventions for in-patients (n=9) with either borderline or cluster C personality disorders (and axis I co-morbidities) treated in a (sub)acute psychiatric in-patient setting. We evaluated pre- and post-treatment self-report of maladaptive and adaptive schema modes (using the SMI) and early maladaptive schemas (YSQ-3), as well as overall symptom severity (brief symptom check list, BSCL-53-S), patient satisfaction (ZUF-8) and group climate and coherence (GCQ-S). We found significant reduction of symptoms, and trend-level improvement for schema mode activation, but not maladaptive schemas. Effect sizes of Cohen's d=0.857 for symptoms and d=0.693 for maladaptive schema mode reduction were, however, lower than previous GST trials in in-patient settings with a longer treatment phase and outpatient GST trials using the Farrell and Shaw-model, indicating importance of duration in ST treatment. Our findings in this uncontrolled study provide first evidence that GST (based on the Farrell and Shaw model) can be implemented and adapted for use in short-term in-patient (sub)acute settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inpatient Care or Outplacement: Which Is Better for the Psychiatric Medically Infirm Patient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles G.

    1976-01-01

    Geriatric ward patients (N=84) were randomly assigned to groups targeted for outplacement planning or inpatient care. During the following year, the mean Morale Inventory score of the outplacement sample improved while that of the inpatient group remained statis. Results argue for an increased emphasis on outplacement programs among geriatric…

  19. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  20. Patientś experiences of patient education on psychiatric inpatient wards;

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S. T.; Videbech, P.; Kragh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To synthesize the evidence on how patients with serious mental disorders perceived patient education on psychiatric wards and to learn more about the patient perceived benefits and limitations related to patient education and how well patient education meets the perceived needs....... The results concerned the specific population with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Two explanatory syntheses were aggregated: (I) Benefits and perceived barriers to receiving education and (II) Educational needs of mental health patients. Patients reported mechanical information dissemination and lack...... of individual and corporative discussions. Patients preferred patient education from different educational sources with respect to individual needs. Conclusion: Patient education were most useful when it could be tailored to an individuaĺs specific needs and match patient preference for how to receive it...

  1. A prospective examination of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior among psychiatric adolescent inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, Ewa K; Berona, Johnny; King, Cheryl A

    2015-04-01

    The challenge of identifying suicide risk in adolescents, and particularly among high-risk subgroups such as adolescent inpatients, calls for further study of models of suicidal behavior that could meaningfully aid in the prediction of risk. This study examined how well the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behavior (IPTS)--with its constructs of thwarted belongingness (TB), perceived burdensomeness (PB), and an acquired capability (AC) for lethal self-injury--predicts suicide attempts among adolescents (N = 376) 3 and 12 months after hospitalization. The three-way interaction between PB, TB, and AC, defined as a history of multiple suicide attempts, was not significant. However, there were significant 2-way interaction effects, which varied by sex: girls with low AC and increasing TB, and boys with high AC and increasing PB, were more likely to attempt suicide at 3 months. Only high AC predicted 12-month attempts. Results suggest gender-specific associations between theory components and attempts. The time-limited effects of these associations point to TB and PB being dynamic and modifiable in high-risk populations, whereas the effects of AC are more lasting. The study also fills an important gap in existing research by examining IPTS prospectively. © 2014 The American Association of Suicidology.

  2. Psychiatric Diagnoses among an HIV-Infected Outpatient Clinic Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Enbal; Önen, Nur F; Donovan, Michael F; Rosenburg, Neal; Overton, E Turner

    2016-01-01

    As individuals with HIV infection are living longer, the management of psychiatric disorders has increasingly been incorporated into comprehensive care. Individuals were recruited from an outpatient HIV clinic to assess the prevalence and related associations of current psychiatric disorders and biomarkers. Of the 201 participants who completed the interviews, the median age was 43.5 years, and the majority was male and African American. Most were receiving HIV therapy and 78% of those had achieved virologic suppression. Prevalent psychiatric diagnoses included major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety, and agoraphobia. Alcohol and cocaine/crack abuse and dependence were common substance use disorders. Current receipt of HIV therapy was less common among those diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. Agoraphobia was the only disorder associated with unsuppressed viral load. Psychiatric and substance use disorders are highly prevalent among an urban HIV clinic population, although we identified few associations between psychiatric diagnoses and HIV diseases status. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Syphilis sero-positivity in recently admitted and long-term psychiatric inpatients: Screening, prevalence and diagnostic profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P Henning

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Syphilis research has neglected the prevalence of the disease among psychiatric patients, and traditional syphilis screening has been reported as inadequate. Objectives. (i To assess the syphilis prevalence among psychiatric patients; (ii to compare psychiatric diagnoses of syphilis-infected and -uninfected patients; (iii to assess self-reported high-risk sexual behaviour; (iv to establish syphilis/HIV co-morbidity; and (v to investigate the performance of the rapid plasma reagin (RPR test in syphilis screening, compared with the Treponema pallidum haemagglutination (TPHA test. Methods. Psychiatric inpatients at Weskoppies Hospital, Pretoria, who consented to participate in the study (N=195 were categorised according to gender and length of admission (long-term or recent. Non-treponemal RPR, confirmatory TPHA, HIV-rapid and HIV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA tests were performed. A reactive TPHA test was used to diagnose syphilis. Results. The estimated prevalence of syphilis was 11.7%. There was no significant association between TPHA sero-positivity and primary psychiatric diagnosis or self-reported high-risk sexual behaviour. Significant co-morbidity existed between syphilis and HIV (p=0.012. Compared with the TPHA test, the RPR test performed poorly, identifying only 2/23 patients who had a sero-positive TPHA test (8.7% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Conclusions. The prevalence of syphilis was higher than anticipated, supporting the need for routine testing. The significant co-morbidity and alarming prevalence of HIV and syphilis warrant testing for both conditions in all psychiatric admissions. Current syphilis screening with a single RPR test is inadequate; both RPR and TPHA tests should be performed.

  4. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  5. Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder on a psychiatric inpatient ward and the value of a screening question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Akyüz, Elvan U; Hodsoll, John

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) on an inpatient ward in the UK with a larger sample than previously studied and to investigate the value of a simple screening question during an assessment interview. Four hundred and thirty two consecutive admissions were screened for BDD on an adult psychiatric ward over a period of 13 months. Those who screened positive had a structured diagnostic interview for BDD. The prevalence of BDD was estimated to be 5.8% (C.I. 3.6-8.1%). Our screening question had a slightly low specificity (76.6%) for detecting BDD. The strength of this study was a larger sample size and narrower confidence interval than previous studies. The study adds to previous observations that BDD is poorly identified in psychiatric inpatients. BDD was identified predominantly in those presenting with depression, substance misuse or an anxiety disorder. The screening question could be improved by excluding those with weight or shape concerns. Missing the diagnosis is likely to lead to inappropriate treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Subtyping female adolescent psychiatric inpatients with features of eating disorders along dietary restraint and negative affect dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, C M

    2004-01-01

    Cluster-analytic studies of eating disorders in adult patients have yielded two subtypes (pure dietary and mixed dietary-negative affect). This study aimed to replicate the subtyping in female adolescent psychiatric inpatients with features of eating disorders. Cluster analyses of 137 patients with eating-disordered features revealed a dietary-negative affect subtype (43%) and a pure dietary subtype (57%). The dietary-negative affect subtype was characterized by greater likelihood of binge eating, greater eating-related psychopathology, and greater body image dissatisfaction. The two subtypes did not differ significantly in scores reflective of clinical syndromes (other than the significantly higher depressive affect in the negative affect subtype), but the dietary-negative affect subtype was characterized by greater personality disturbance and higher reported concerns in clinical areas, including suicidality and childhood abuse. The cluster analysis produced different results from an alternative approach to subtyping by vomiting. These findings provide further support for the reliability and validity of this subtyping scheme for eating pathology. Clinically, the findings suggest that the combination of dieting and negative affect signals a more disturbed variant of eating-disorder related psychopathology in female adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

  7. Attachment style and suicide behaviors in high risk psychiatric inpatients following hospital discharge: The mediating role of entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Galynker, Igor I; Briggs, Jessica; Duffy, Molly; Frechette-Hagan, Anna; Kim, Hae-Joon; Cohen, Lisa J; Yaseen, Zimri S

    2017-11-01

    Insecure attachment is associated with suicidal behavior. This relationship and its possible mediators have not been examined in high-risk psychiatric inpatients with respect to the critical high-risk period following hospital discharge. Attachment styles and perception of entrapment were assessed in 200 high-risk adult psychiatric inpatients hospitalized following suicidal ideation or suicide attempt. Suicidal behaviors were evaluated with the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale at 1-2 months post-discharge. Associations between different attachment styles and suicidal behaviors were assessed and mediation of attachment effects by entrapment was modeled. Fearful attachment was associated with post-discharge suicidal behavior and there was a trend-level negative association for secure attachment. In addition, entrapment mediated the relationship between fearful attachment and suicidal behavior. The current study highlights the mediating role of perceptions of entrapment in the contribution of fearful attachment to suicidal behavior in high-risk patients, suggesting entrapment as potential therapeutic target to prevent suicidal behavior in these individuals. Further research is warranted to establish the mechanisms by which entrapment experiences emerge in patients with insecure attachment styles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of Snoezelen (multi-sensory behavior therapy) and psychiatric care on agitation, apathy, and activities of daily living in dementia patients on a short term geriatric psychiatric inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, Jason A; Sacks, Amanda; Matheis, Robert; Collier, Lesley; Calia, Tina; Hanif, Henry; Kofman, Eugene S

    2007-01-01

    A randomized, controlled, single-blinded, between group study of 24 participants with moderate to severe dementia was conducted on a geriatric psychiatric unit. All participants received pharmacological therapy, occupational therapy, structured hospital environment, and were randomized to receive multi sensory behavior therapy (MSBT) or a structured activity session. Greater independence in activities of daily living (ADLs) was observed for the group treated with MSBT and standard psychiatric inpatient care on the Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living (KI-ADL; P = 0.05) than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone. The combination treatment of MSBT and standard psychiatric care also reduced agitation and apathy greater than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone as measured with the Pittsburgh Agitation Scale and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease (P = 0.05). Multiple regression analysis predicted that within the multi-sensory group, activities of daily living (KI-ADL) increased as apathy and agitation reduced (R2 = 0.42; p = 0.03). These data suggest that utilizing MSBT with standard psychiatric inpatient care may reduce apathy and agitation and additionally improve activities of daily living in hospitalized people with moderate to severe dementia more than standard care alone.

  9. Effects of a live educational music therapy intervention on acute psychiatric inpatients' perceived social support and trust in the therapist: a four-group randomized effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Social support is associated with enhanced illness management and recovery in persons with mental illness, making it an important topic addressed through acute inpatient psychoeducational programs. In addition, trust in the therapist may mediate clinical outcomes in this patient population. To date, few studies have examined the effect of music-based psychoeducational programs on these variables. The purpose of this study was to isolate and examine the component parts of a live educational music therapy intervention, and its effect on acute psychiatric inpatients' perceived social support from significant others, family, and friends and trust in the therapist. This study also explored whether trust in therapist varied across conditions, but did not examine it as a mediator for social support. Participants (N = 96) were cluster-randomized in a single-session posttest-only design to one of four conditions: live educational music therapy, recorded educational music therapy, education without music, or recreational music therapy without education. Conditions were designed to isolate the following intervention components: live vs. recorded music, educational vs. non-educational content, and music vs. nonmusic modality. Dependent measures were assessed post intervention via established self-report instruments evaluating perceived social support and trust in the therapist. There were no significant between-group differences for social support or trust in therapist total scores. However, subscale score analyses revealed two significant between-group differences: (a) participants in the Live Educational Music Therapy condition reported significantly higher perceived therapist competence compared with the Recorded Educational Music Therapy condition; (b) participants in the Live Educational Music Therapy condition reported significantly higher perceived support from friends compared with the Recreational Music Therapy condition. Live educational music therapy may be a way to

  10. Bullying behavior is related to suicide attempts but not to self-mutilation among psychiatric inpatient adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Räsänen, Pirkko; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the association of bullying behavior with suicide attempts and self-mutilation among adolescents. The study sample consisted of 508 Finnish adolescents (age 12-17 years) admitted to psychiatric inpatient care between April 2001 and March 2006. DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses and variables measuring suicidal behavior (i.e. suicide attempts and self-mutilation) and bullying behavior (i.e. a victim, a bully or a bully-victim) were obtained from the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the impact of being a victim, a bully or both a bully and a victim on suicide attempts and self-mutilation. After adjusting for age, school factors, family factors and psychiatric disorders, there was a higher risk of suicide attempts in girls who were victims of bullying (OR=2.07, CI=1.04-4.11, p=0.037) or who bullied others (OR=3.27, CI=1.08-9.95, p=0.037). Corresponding associations were not found for boys; nor was any association of bullying behavior with self-mutilation found among either sex. Among girls, being bullied or bullying others are both potential risk factors for suicidal behavior. Psychiatric assessment and treatment should thus be considered not only for victims of bullying, but also for bullies. Suicide-prevention programs should also routinely include interventions to reduce bullying. However, the generalization of our findings to all adolescents is limited because our study sample consisted of psychiatric adolescent patients. In addition, some of the possible findings might have remained statistically insignificant due to the small sample size among adolescents who had performed suicide attempts or self-mutilation. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  12. Association of family background with adolescent smoking and regular use of illicit substances among underage psychiatric in-patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether adolescent's family type was associated with regular smoking or the use of illicit substances (cannabis or hard drugs) among underage adolescent psychiatric in-patients. The sample consisted of 471 adolescents aged 12-17 years admitted to psychiatric hospital between April 2001 and March 2006 at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. The information on family factors and substance use was based on the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime interview and the European modification of the Addiction Severity Index questionnaire. Compared to adolescent boys from two-parent families, those from child welfare placement were more likely to regularly use both cannabis (odds ratio [OR]=4.4; 95%confidence interval [CI]=1.4-13.7; P=.012) and hard drugs (OR=8.4; 95% CI=1.7-42.1; P=.01).Among girls, no association was found between family type and the use of illicit substances. Two-parent or foster family units may protect adolescents from involvement with illicit substances. In clinical adolescent psychiatric practice more attention should be paid to family interventions and parental support.

  13. Patient satisfaction and therapeutic alliance amongst involuntary and voluntary psychiatric inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Elz, Carolin Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of the detention of general-psychiatric patients on the subjective outcome of treatment. Patient satisfaction and therapeutic alliance are especially relevant as subjective outcome parameters: The satisfaction of patients has gained growing importance as part of statutory quality managment and the alliance is discussed as one of the most crucial factors of psychotherapeutic success, it correlates positively with objective outcome. In general-psychiatric settin...

  14. "Helicobacter Pylori" Infection in Five Inpatient Units for People with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David; Vemuri, Murali; Gunatilake, Deepthi; Tewari, Sidhartha

    2008-01-01

    Background: A high prevalence of "Helicobacter pylori" infection has been reported among people with intellectual disability, especially those residing in hospital and similar settings. Surveys of inpatients have found unusually high rates of gastrointestinal malignancy, to which "H. pylori" infection predisposes. Methods: "Helicobacter pylori"…

  15. Do mental health consumers want to improve their long-term disease risk behaviours? A survey of over 2000 psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlem, Kate; Bailey, Jacqueline; Metse, Alexandra; Asara, Ashley; Wye, Paula; Clancy, Richard; Wiggers, John; Bowman, Jenny

    2017-12-02

    Policies and clinical guidelines acknowledge the role mental health services have in addressing the physical health of individuals with a mental illness; however, little research has explored interest in reducing health risk behaviours or the acceptability of receiving support to reduce such risks among psychiatric inpatients. This study estimated the prevalence of four long-term disease risk behaviours (tobacco smoking, hazardous alcohol consumption, inadequate fruit and/or vegetable consumption, and inadequate physical activity); patient interest in reducing these risks; and acceptability of being provided care to do so during a psychiatric inpatient stay. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with 2075 inpatients from four inpatient psychiatric facilities in one health district in Australia (October 2012-April 2014). Prevalence of risk behaviours ranged from 50.2% (inadequate physical activity) to 94.8% (inadequate fruit and/or vegetable consumption). The majority of respondents (88.4%) had more than one risk behaviour, and most were seriously considering improving their risk behaviours (47.6% to 65.3%). The majority (80.4%) agreed that it would be acceptable to be provided support and advice to change such behaviours during their psychiatric inpatient stay. Some diagnoses were associated with smoking and hazardous alcohol consumption, interest in reducing alcohol consumption and increasing fruit and/or vegetable consumption, and acceptability of receiving advice and support. The findings reinforce the need and opportunity for psychiatric inpatient facilities to address the long-term disease risk behaviours of their patients. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Mental Health Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  16. Inpatient psychiatric care experience and its relationship to posthospitalization treatment participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowersox, Nicholas W; Bohnert, Amy S B; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2013-06-01

    This study used factor analysis of a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) survey to identify factors that measure satisfaction with inpatient treatment and to examine the factors' utility in evaluating treatment participation following discharge. The Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (inpatient version) (I-SHEP) was mailed to 34,237 veterans who were discharged from inpatient to outpatient care in the VHA during fiscal year 2009 and was completed by 7,408 patients. A factor analysis of survey responses identified underlying I-SHEP factors and evaluated relationships between the factors, patient characteristics, and attendance at VHA mental health appointments within seven and 30 days of discharge. The factor analysis identified three domains of satisfaction: respect and caring by nurses-overall hospital impression; involvement and information about care; and respect and caring by doctors. These factors demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α=.93, .90, and .94, respectively) and accounted for a moderate amount of variance in patient responses (r2=.167). Only the care involvement and information factor was associated with participation in follow-up care: increased satisfaction (one standard deviation change in scale score) was associated with improved odds of a mental health visit within seven and 30 days of discharge (odds ratio=1.14 and 1.17, respectively, p<.01). After discharge, persons may not generalize satisfaction about the respect and caring shown by inpatient treatment teams toward their decision to attend outpatient care. Providing patients with information about treatment and involving them in care decisions during inpatient care may help facilitate the transition to outpatient settings.

  17. Undertreatment of human immunodeficiency virus in psychiatric inpatients: a cross-sectional study of seroprevalence and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Torres MA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Miguel Angel Gonzalez-Torres,1,2 Miguel Angel Salazar,3 Manuel Imaz,4 Lucía Inchausti,1,2 Berta Ibañez,5 Aranzazu Fernandez-Rivas,1,2 Javier Pastor,3 Bosco Anguiano,3 Pedro Muñoz,3 Eduardo Ruiz,1,2 Rodrigo Oraa,3 Sonia Bustamante,1,2 Sofia Alvarez de Eulate,2 Ramón Cisterna4,61Department of Neuroscience, University of the Basque Country, 2Psychiatry Service, Basurto University Hospital, Bilbao, 3Mental Health Network of Biscay, Basque Health Service, Biscay, 4Microbiology Service, Basurto University Hospital, Bilbao, 5Navarra Biomed-Miguel Servet Foundation, Red de Investigación en Servicios Sanitarios y Enfermedades Crónicas (REDISSEC, Pamplona, 6Department of Microbiology, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, SpainBackground: The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of HIV and its associated demographic and clinical factors among psychiatric inpatients of a general hospital.Methods: This was a single-center, observational, cross-sectional study that included patients consecutively admitted to our unit aged 16 years or older and with no relevant cognitive problems. The patients were evaluated using a semistructured interview and an appropriate test for HIV infection.Results: Of the 637 patients who were screened, 546 (86% who consented to participate were included in the analyses. Twenty-five (4.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0–6.8 patients were HIV-positive. The prevalence was higher among patients with substance misuse (17.4%, 95% CI 9.7–28.8. All except one of the 25 patients knew of their seropositive condition prior to participation in the study. Only 14 (56% of the 25 seropositive patients had previously received pharmacological treatment for their infection. According to the multiple logistic regression analysis, the likelihood of HIV infection was lower in patients with higher levels of education and higher among patients who were single, had history of intravenous drug use, and had an HIV

  18. Greenlandic adoptees' psychiatric inpatient contact. A comparative register-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laubjerg, Merete; Petersson, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    and international research stressing that adoptees demonstrate reverse health outcomes. The cohort is in-ward patients (> 24 hours), born between 1973 and 2005. Correlation between various dependent and independent variables are analysed. The research makes different comparative statements of psychiatric admissions......  The aim is to highlight adoptees' and stepchildren's psychiatric contact and diagnoses compared to non-adoptees. The setting is Greenland and the methodology is a comparative in-ward patient register-based study. The background is the Greenlandic tradition for adoption and community child care...... and diagnoses related to adoptees and stepchildren compared to non-adoptees with respect to demographic and socio-economic indicators. The psychiatric data material is collected from 1992 to 2008 and the socio-economic indicators are included from 1996. The findings show, contrary to findings related...

  19. Accuracy of MMPI-A scales ACK, MAC-R, and PRO in detecting comorbid substance abuse among psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micucci, Joseph A

    2002-06-01

    This study investigated the accuracy of various indices involving the MMPI-A scales, ACK, MAC-R, and PRO in diagnosing substance abuse in a sample of 79 psychiatric inpatients. In the full sample, 89.9% of the cases were accurately classified by at least one of the three scales. The overall accuracy of classification was similar among males, females, Caucasians, and African Americans, although there was a tendency for more false positive misclassifications among males. Profile code type moderated the accuracy of classification with greatest accuracy for code types including Scales 1, 2, 3, 5, or 0 and least accuracy for code types including Scales 4, 6, or 9. ACK, MAC-R, and PRO were better at screening out cases of substance abuse than in accurately identifying those adolescents who were using substances.

  20. Stigma, Social Structure, and the Biomedical Framework: Exploring the Stigma Experiences of Inpatient Service Users in Two Belgian Psychiatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sercu, Charlotte; Bracke, Piet

    2017-07-01

    The study discusses the stigma experiences of service users in mental health care, within the debate on the role of the biomedical framework for mental health care and power relations in society. Interview data of inpatient users ( n = 42) and care providers ( n = 43) from two Belgian psychiatric hospitals were analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach: Findings offer insight into how stigma experiences are affected by social structure. Stigma seemed to be related to the relation between care providers and service users their social position. The concept "mental health literacy" is used to frame this finding. In paying attention to the specific cultural and normative context, which influences the relationship between mental health literacy and stigma, it is further possible to cast some light on the meaning of the biomedical model for the construction and maintenance of power relations in mental health care and broader society.

  1. Use of movies for group therapy of psychiatric inpatients: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Esra; Ulus, Fuat; Selvitop, Rabia; Yazici, Ahmet Bülent; Aydin, Nazan

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on the use of cinema therapy at a psychiatry clinic for inpatients. The program, "Watching Cinema Group Therapy," was used with over 500 inpatients over the course of one year. We found that using movies for group psychotherapy sessions encouraged the patients to talk about their beliefs, thoughts, and feelings while discussing the characters and stories. We also used the movies as a reward for patients who had developed a therapeutic alliance. It motivated the patients to be active instead of simply remaining in their rooms. As a follow-up to full-length films, it was more useful to show short scenes to patients who had been administered high doses of drugs. Movies can be an important, positive, and productive means of treatment and teaching.

  2. eLearning course may shorten the duration of mechanical restraint among psychiatric inpatients: a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontio, Raija; Pitkänen, Anneli; Joffe, Grigori; Katajisto, Jouko; Välimäki, Maritta

    2014-10-01

    The management of psychiatric inpatients exhibiting severely disturbed and aggressive behaviour is an important educational topic. Well structured, IT-based educational programmes (eLearning) often ensure quality and may make training more affordable and accessible. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of an eLearning course for personnel on the rates and duration of seclusion and mechanical restraint among psychiatric inpatients. In a cluster-randomized intervention trial, the nursing personnel on 10 wards were randomly assigned to eLearning (intervention) or training-as-usual (control) groups. The eLearning course comprised six modules with specific topics (legal and ethical issues, behaviour-related factors, therapeutic relationship and self-awareness, teamwork and integrating knowledge with practice) and specific learning methods. The rates (incidents per 1000 occupied bed days) and durations of the coercion incidents were examined before and after the course. A total of 1283 coercion incidents (1143 seclusions [89%] and 140 incidents involving the use of mechanical restraints [11%]) were recorded on the study wards during the data collection period. On the intervention wards, there were no statistically significant changes in the rates of seclusion and mechanical restraint. However, the duration of incidents involving mechanical restraints shortened from 36.0 to 4.0 h (median) (P eLearning course, the duration of incidents involving the use of mechanical restraints decreased. However, more studies are needed to ensure that the content of the course focuses on the most important factors associated with the seclusion-related elements. The eLearning course deserves further development and further studies. The duration of coercion incidents merits attention in future research.

  3. Acute psychiatric in-patients tested for HIV status: a clinical profile

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-11-11

    Nov 11, 2005 ... Predominantly risperidone and haloperidol in combination with valproate were used in treatment and at relatively high dosages. Conclusion: Amongst HIV positive service users acute psychiatric symptoms almost exclusively consisted of associated psychosis or manic symptoms rather than depression.

  4. Medicare program; inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment system for federal fiscal year 2012; changes in size and square footage of inpatient rehabilitation units and inpatient psychiatric units. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    This final rule will implement section 3004 of the Affordable Care Act, which establishes a new quality reporting program that provides for a 2 percent reduction in the annual increase factor beginning in 2014 for failure to report quality data to the Secretary of Health and Human Services. This final rule will also update the prospective payment rates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) for Federal fiscal year (FY) 2012 (for discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2011 and on or before September 30, 2012) as required under section 1886(j)(3)(C) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Section 1886(j)(5) of the Act requires the Secretary to publish in the Federal Register on or before the August 1 that precedes the start of each FY the classification and weighting factors for the IRF prospective payment system (PPS) case-mix groups and a description of the methodology and data used in computing the prospective payment rates for that fiscal year. We are also consolidating, clarifying, and revising existing policies regarding IRF hospitals and IRF units of hospitals to eliminate unnecessary confusion and enhance consistency. Furthermore, in accordance with the general principles of the President's January 18, 2011 Executive Order entitled "Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review," we are amending existing regulatory provisions regarding ''new'' facilities and changes in the bed size and square footage of IRFs and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs) to improve clarity and remove obsolete material.

  5. Non-psychiatric inpatient care preceding admission for self-harm in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idenfors, Hans; Strömsten, Lotta M J; Renberg, Ellinor Salander

    2016-09-01

    Many young people contact health services before they harm themselves intentionally. However, they often seek care for non-suicidal or non-psychiatric causes despite having suicidal thoughts. We investigated the non-psychiatric hospital diagnoses received by young people during the year before their first admission to hospital for self-harm. From a national register, we selected people who were hospitalised for an episode of self-harm during the period 1999-2009, at which time they were aged 16 to 24. We compared them with matched controls regarding the probability for having been admitted with different diagnoses during the year preceding the self-harm admission. The study included 48,705 young people (16,235 cases and 32,470 controls). Those admitted for self-harm were more likely than controls to have been hospitalised for non-psychiatric reasons, which included symptomatic diagnoses such as abdominal pain, syncope/collapse, unspecified convulsions, and chest pain. Certain chronic somatic illnesses were also overrepresented, such as epilepsy, diabetes mellitus type 1, and asthma. Symptomatic diagnoses were more common in those who had been admitted for self-harm. It is possible that psychiatric problems could have been the cause of the symptoms in some of these admissions where no underlying illness could be found, and if this was not uncovered it might lead to a delay in suicide risk assessment. For several chronic illnesses, when admitted to hospital, a psychiatric evaluation might be indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Patients with ICD-10 disorders F3 and F4 in psychiatric and psychosomatic in-patient units - who is treated where? : Allocation features from the PfAD study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichescu-Burian, D; Cerisier, C; Czekaj, A; Grempler, J; Hund, S; Jaeger, S; Schmid, P; Weithmann, G; Steinert, T

    2017-01-01

    In Germany, in-patient treatment of patients with depressive, neurotic, anxiety, and somatoform disorders (ICD-10 F3, F4) is carried out in different settings in psychiatry and psychosomatics. Which patient characteristics determine referral to one or the other specialty is a crucial question in mental health policy and is a matter of ongoing controversy. However, comparative data on patient populations are widely lacking. In the study of Treatment Pathways of Patients with Anxiety and Depression (PfAD study), a total of 320 patients with ICD-10 F3/F4 clinical diagnoses were consecutively recruited from four treatment settings (psychiatric depression ward, psychiatric crisis intervention ward, psychiatric day hospitals, or psychosomatic hospital units; 80 participants per setting) and investigated. In all treatment settings, patients with considerable severity of illness and chronicity were treated. Female gender, higher education, and higher income predicted referral to psychosomatic units; male gender, transfer from another hospital or emergency hospitalization, co-morbidity with a personality disorder, higher general psychiatric co-morbidity, and danger to self at admission predicted referral to psychiatric unit. Patients in psychosomatic units had neither more psychosomatic disorders nor more somatic problems. There is considerable overlap between the clientele of psychiatric and psychosomatic units. Referral and allocation appears to be determined by aspects of severity and social status.

  7. Reducing transfers of psychiatric inpatients to emergency rooms of general hospitals in Singapore: a clinical practice improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Tchern Kuang Lambert; Tay, Kai Hong; Fang, Tina; Fung, Daniel Shuen Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital commonly suffer from comorbid medical problems which sometimes require urgent medical attention. Twenty-two percent of emergency medical transfers from the Institute of Mental Health (IMH) to the emergency rooms of general hospitals were preventable and could be managed at IMH itself. We undertook a quality improvement project to understand the reasons behind such preventable referrals and implemented changes to address this. Using the model for improvement, we deconstructed our processes and analysed root causes for such preventable referrals. Thereafter changes were implemented with Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles to analyse their outcomes. During the 6-month study period, we achieved a 100% reduction in preventable referrals through strategies aimed at reducing pressure on our on-call physicians in the making of medical decisions, maximising usage of our medical resources, constant education and raising awareness of this issue. Reducing preventable transfer of inpatients from a psychiatric hospital to the emergency departments of general hospitals is a worthwhile endeavour. Such initiatives optimise use of healthcare resources, improve patient care and increase satisfaction.

  8. Is exposure to domestic violence and violent crime associated with bullying behaviour among underage adolescent psychiatric inpatients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustanoja, Susanna; Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Pirkko; Säävälä, Hannu; Riala, Kaisa

    2011-08-01

    We examined the relationship of exposure to domestic violence and violence occurring outside home to bullying behaviour in a sample (508; 40.9% males, 59.1% females) of underage psychiatric inpatient adolescents. Participants were interviewed using K-SADS-PL to assess DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses and to gather information about domestic and other violence and bullying behaviour. Witnessing interparental violence increased the risk of being a victim of bullying up to 2.5-fold among boys. For girls, being a victim of a violent crime was an over 10-fold risk factor for being a bully-victim. Gender differences were seen in witnessing of a violent crime; girls were more likely to be bullies than boys. Further, as regards being a victim of a violent crime outside home and physical abuse by parents at home, girls were significantly more often bully-victims than boys. When interfering and preventing bullying behaviour, it is important to screen adolescents' earlier experiences of violence.

  9. Correlation between brain damage, associated biomarkers, and medication in psychiatric inpatients: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Madoka; Kanzaki, Tetsuto; Mizoi, Mutsumi; Nakamura, Mizuho; Uemura, Takeshi; Mimori, Seisuke; Uju, Yoriyasu; Sekine, Keisuke; Ishii, Yukihiro; Yoshimi, Taro; Yasui, Reiko; Yasukawa, Asuka; Sato, Mamoru; Okamoto, Seiko; Hisaoka, Tetsuya; Miura, Masafumi; Kusanishi, Shun; Murakami, Kanako; Nakano, Chieko; Mizuta, Yasuhiko; Mishima, Shunichi; Hayakawa, Tatsuro; Tsukada, Kazumi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2017-01-01

    We clarified the correlation between brain damage, associated biomarkers and medication in psychiatric patients, because patients with schizophrenia have an increased risk of stroke. The cross-sectional study was performed from January 2013 to December 2015. Study participants were 96 hospitalized patients (41 men and 55 women) in the Department of Psychiatry at Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Ichikawa, Chiba, Japan. Patients were classified into schizophrenia (n=70) and mood disorders (n=26) by psychiatric diagnoses with DSM-IV-TR criteria. The incidence of brain damage [symptomatic and silent brain infarctions (SBIs) and white matter hyperintensity (WMH)] was correlated more with mood disorders than with schizophrenia. It has been previously shown that the concentrations of protein-conjugated acrolein (PC-Acro) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) increased in plasma of brain infarction patients together with C-reactive protein (CRP). The concentration of PC-Acro was significantly higher in patients with mood disorders than in those with schizophrenia. The concentration of IL-6 in both groups was nearly equal to that in the control group, but that of CRP in both groups, especially in mood disorders, was higher than that in the control group. Accordingly, the relative risk value for brain infarction was higher in patients with mood disorders than with schizophrenia. Medication with atypical antipsychotics reduced PC-Acro significantly in all psychiatric patients and reduced IL-6 in mood disorder patients. Measurement of 3 biomarkers (CRP, PC-Acro and IL-6) are probably useful for judgement of severity of brain damage and effectiveness of medication in psychiatric patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Animal-assisted therapy with chronic psychiatric inpatients: equine-assisted psychotherapy and aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurenberg, Jeffry R; Schleifer, Steven J; Shaffer, Thomas M; Yellin, Mary; Desai, Prital J; Amin, Ruchi; Bouchard, Axel; Montalvo, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT), most frequently used with dogs, is being used increasingly as an adjunctive alternative treatment for psychiatric patients. AAT with larger animals, such as horses, may have unique benefits. In this randomized controlled study, equine and canine forms of AAT were compared with standard treatments for hospitalized psychiatric patients to determine AAT effects on violent behavior and related measures. The study included 90 patients with recent in-hospital violent behavior or highly regressed behavior. Hospitalization at the 500-bed state psychiatric hospital was two months or longer (mean 5.4 years). Participants were randomly selected to receive ten weekly group therapy sessions of standardized equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP), canine-assisted psychotherapy (CAP), enhanced social skills psychotherapy, or regular hospital care. Participants' mean age was 44, 37% were female, 76% had diagnoses of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, and 56% had been committed involuntarily for civil or forensic reasons. Violence-related incident reports filed by staff in the three months after study intake were compared with reports two months preintake. Interventions were well tolerated. Analyses revealed an intervention group effect (F=3.00, df=3 and 86, p=.035); post hoc tests showed specific benefits of EAP (p<.05). Similar AAT effects were found for the incidence of 1:1 clinical observation (F=2.70, df=3 and 86, p=.051); post hoc tests suggested benefits of CAP (p=.058) as well as EAP (p=.082). Covariance analyses indicated that staff can predict which patients are likely to benefit from EAP (p=.01). AAT, and perhaps EAP uniquely, may be an effective therapeutic modality for long-term psychiatric patients at risk of violence.

  11. High tuberculosis prevalence in a psychiatric hospital in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duc, L.; Vree, M.; Cobelens, F. G.; Phuc, L. T.; Sy, D. N.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about tuberculosis (TB) prevalence in psychiatric hospitals in Vietnam, but prevalence may be higher than in the general population. We assessed the TB prevalence among in-patients of a psychiatric hospital in 2005 in Danang City, Vietnam. Of 300 in-patients, 70 had an abnormal X-ray

  12. Stability of memories of parental rearing among psychiatric inpatients: a replication based on EMBU subscales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J; Eisemann, M

    2001-01-01

    With regard to information about parental rearing, retrospective data are exclusively available among adults. These data are vulnerable due to various biases. This study was performed in order to replicate the findings of overall stability of three perceived parental rearing factors of the EMBU (Swedish acronym for 'own memories of childhood upbringing') based on 14 rather detailed subscales. A consecutive sample of 220 depressive inpatients were investigated on admission and at discharge by means of the EMBU, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale. Perceived parental rearing scores showed high stability despite clinically significant changes in the severity of depression, except for 'tolerance', 'guilt engendering', 'performance orientation' and 'shaming' parenting with probable gender-specific effects which were found to covary with dysfunctional attitudes. Recall of parenting should be taken as a subjective truth when it is assessed by standardised behaviour-oriented questionnaires like the EMBU. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Child psychiatric disorders in a primary care Arab population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Al-Sabosy, Moza; Saeed, Mohammed; Sabri, Sufyan

    2004-01-01

    Physical and psychiatric comorbidity is relatively common in general practice but there have been few systematic studies using clinical interviews of children attending the primary care services in the Arab population, and none from the Gulf countries. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and nature of child psychiatric morbidity in primary care in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Systematic psychiatric evaluations were carried out on consecutive children aged 6 to 18 years visiting their primary care doctors in Al Ain. The sample consisted of 141 (50.7%) boys and 137 (49.3%) girls. Forty-three percent of the 278 children received a DSM-IV diagnosis. Of these, 46 (38%) were males and 74 (62%) were females. However, only 1.1% (3/120) of the patients consulted general practitioners for a primary psychiatric symptom. The most common diagnosis was anxiety disorder followed by depression. Obsessive compulsive disorder was present in 11%, conduct disorder in 7%, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in 3% of those with a diagnosis. A statistically significant association was found between DSM-IV caseness and female gender, higher number of children in the household, relationship problems in the family, physical illness and family history of psychiatric disorder. Other factors that did not show any significant association were age, nationality, socioeconomic status, parental education or occupation, scholastic performance or developmental delay in the child, or parental consanguinity. Our findings suggest that psychiatric disorders are common among young people of Arab origin attending primary care facilities, and that doctors need to be vigilant about this possibility.

  14. Psychiatric care utilization among older people with intellectual disability in comparison with the general population: a register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmon, A; Björne, P; Nylander, L; Ahlström, G

    2016-11-09

    People with intellectual disability have been found to have higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders than the general population. However, they do not seem to have a corresponding increase in psychiatric care utilization. The aim of the present study was to investigate psychiatric care utilization among older people with intellectual disability. We used a cohort of people with intellectual disability, 55+ years in 2012 (n = 7936), and an equally sized age and sex matched reference cohort from the general population. Psychiatric care utilization was measured using registrations in the Swedish National Patient register during 2002-2012, where each registration corresponds to a psychiatric care occasion. About 20 % of those with intellectual disability had at least one registration during the study period, compared to some 6 % in the general population sample. In the whole cohort as well as stratified by sex, people with intellectual disability were 3-4 times more likely than those in the general population sample to have had at least one registration during the study period. The effect was, however, only consistent in age groups comprising people younger than 65 years. Among people with intellectual disability, men were more likely than women to have had at least one registration, and people living in special housing (group home or service home) during the entire study period were less likely than those who only lived in special housing for parts of the study or not at all. People with intellectual disability had longer stays per inpatient registration compared with the general population sample. When stratifying on sex, the effect was found only among men, although there were no sex differences within the cohort of people with intellectual disability. Among people with intellectual disability, living in special housing during the entire study period was associated with shorter stays per inpatient registration. Although people with intellectual disability

  15. Premorbid intelligence of inpatients with different psychiatric diagnoses does not differ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Stratta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Stratta1, Ilaria Riccardi2, Annarita Tomassini2, Maria Marronaro2, Roberta Pacifico2, Alessandro Rossi2,31Department of Mental Health, A.U.S.L. 4 L’Aquila, Italy; 2Department of Experimental Medicine, University of L’Aquila, Italy; 3Clinical Psychology Unit at Villa Serena, c/o ‘Casa di Cura Villa Serena’, Viale L. Petruzzi, 19, Città S.Angelo, Pescara, ItalyAbstract: The diagnostic specificity of poor premorbid intelligence is controversial. We explored premorbid intelligence level in psychiatric patients with personality disorders, depressive disorders, bipolar disorders and schizophrenic disorders. 273 consecutively admitted patients and 81 controls were included in the study and tested with the ‘Test di Intelligenza Breve’, an Italian adaptation of the National Adult Reading Test. Significant differences between the clinical samples and the control subjects were found but not among the 4 clinical groups. The observation of premorbid IQ deficits in subjects with diagnoses other than schizophrenia suggests a common vulnerability diathesis, which is most likely to have a neurodevelopmental basis.Keywords: premorbid intelligence, psychiatric disorders, specificity

  16. Identifying key factors associated with aggression on acute inpatient psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Allan, Teresa; Simpson, Alan; Jones, Julia; Van Der Merwe, Marie; Jeffery, Debra

    2009-04-01

    Aggressive behaviour is a critical issue for modern acute psychiatric services, not just because of the adverse impact it has on patients and staff, but also because it puts a financial strain on service providers. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of patient violence to other variables: patient characteristics, features of the service and physical environment, patient routines, staff factors, the use of containment methods, and other patient behaviours. A multivariate cross sectional design was utilised. Data were collected for a six month period on 136 acute psychiatric wards in 26 NHS Trusts in England. Multilevel modelling was conducted to ascertain those factors most strongly associated with verbal aggression, aggression toward objects, and physical aggression against others. High levels of aggression were associated with a high proportion of patients formally detained under mental health legislation, high patient turnover, alcohol use by patients, ward doors being locked, and higher staffing numbers (especially qualified nurses). The findings suggest that the imposition of restrictions on patients exacerbates the problem of violence, and that alcohol management strategies may be a productive intervention. Insufficient evidence is available to draw conclusions about the nature of the link between staffing numbers and violence.

  17. Acute behavioral crises in psychiatric inpatients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD): recognition of concomitant medical or non-ASD psychiatric conditions predicts enhanced improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinchat, Vincent; Cravero, Cora; Diaz, Lautaro; Périsse, Didier; Xavier, Jean; Amiet, Claire; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Bodeau, Nicolas; Wachtel, Lee; Cohen, David; Consoli, Angèle

    2015-03-01

    During adolescence, some individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) engage in severe challenging behaviors, such as aggression, self-injury, disruption, agitation and tantrums. We aimed to assess risk factors associated with very acute behavioral crises in adolescents with ASD admitted to a dedicated neurobehavioral unit. We included retrospectively in 2008 and 2009 29 adolescents and young adults with ASD hospitalized for severe challenging behaviors and proposed a guideline (Perisse et al., 2010) that we applied prospectively for 29 patients recruited for the same indications between 2010 and 2012. In total, 58 patients were admitted (n=70 hospitalizations, mean age=15.66 (±4.07) years, 76% male). We systematically collected data describing socio-demographic characteristics, clinical variables (severity, presence of language, cognitive level), comorbid organic conditions, etiologic diagnosis of the episode, and treatments. We explored predictors of Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAFS) score and duration of hospitalization at discharge. All but 2 patients exhibited severe autistic symptoms and intellectual disability (ID), and two-thirds had no functional verbal language. During the inpatient stay (mean=84.3 (±94.9) days), patients doubled on average their GAFS scores (mean=17.66 (±9.05) at admission vs. mean=31.4 (±9.48) at discharge). Most common etiologies for acute behavioral crises were organic causes [n=20 (28%), including epilepsy: n=10 (14%) and painful medical conditions: n=10 (14%)], environmental causes [n=17 (25%) including lack of treatment: n=11 (16%) and adjustment disorder: n=6 (9%)], and non-ASD psychiatric condition [n=33 (48%) including catatonia: n=5 (7%), major depressive episode: n=6 (9%), bipolar disorder: n=4 (6%), schizophrenia: n=6 (9%), other/unknown diagnosis: n=12 (17%)]. We found no influence of age, gender, socio-economic status, migration, level of ID, or history of seizure on improvement of GAFS score at discharge

  18. Paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity: ethical perspectives in encounters with patients in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto-Piri, Veikko; Engström, Karin; Engström, Ingemar

    2013-12-06

    Psychiatric staff members have the power to decide the options that frame encounters with patients. Intentional as well as unintentional framing can have a crucial impact on patients' opportunities to be heard and participate in the process. We identified three dominant ethical perspectives in the normative medical ethics literature concerning how doctors and other staff members should frame interactions in relation to patients; paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse statements describing real work situations and ethical reflections made by staff members in relation to three central perspectives in medical ethics; paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity. All staff members involved with patients in seven adult psychiatric and six child and adolescent psychiatric clinics were given the opportunity to freely describe ethical considerations in their work by keeping an ethical diary over the course of one week and 173 persons handed in their diaries. Qualitative theory-guided content analysis was used to provide a description of staff encounters with patients and in what way these encounters were consistent with, or contrary to, the three perspectives. The majority of the statements could be attributed to the perspective of paternalism and several to autonomy. Only a few statements could be attributed to reciprocity, most of which concerned staff members acting contrary to the perspective. The result is presented as three perspectives containing eight values.•Paternalism; 1) promoting and restoring the health of the patient, 2) providing good care and 3) assuming responsibility.•Autonomy; 1) respecting the patient's right to self-determination and information, 2) respecting the patient's integrity and 3) protecting human rights.•Reciprocity; 1) involving patients in the planning and implementation of their care and 2) building trust between staff and patients. Paternalism clearly appeared to be the dominant

  19. Comparison of psychiatric disability on the health of nation outcome scales (HoNOS) in resettled traumatized refugee outpatients and Danish inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palic, Sabina; Kappel, Michelle; Nielsen, Monica

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, the mental health issues of traumatized refugees are mainly documented in terms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. Importantly, there are no reports of the level of psychiatric disability in treatment seeking traumatized refugees resettled in the West...... and social domains. The rate of pre- to post-treatment improvement on the HoNOS was smaller for the traumatized refugees than it was for the psychiatric inpatients. CONCLUSIONS: The level, and the versatile profile, of psychiatric disability on the HoNOS point to complex bio-psycho-social problems...... in resettled treatment seeking traumatized refugees. Thus, a broader assessment of symptoms and better cooperation between psychiatric, health care, and social systems is necessary in order to meet the treatment needs of this group....

  20. Some aspects of self-destructive behavior in forensic psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendula-Jengić, Vesna; Bosković, Gordan; Dodig, Goran; Weiner-Crnja, Milica

    2004-06-01

    In this study authors have analysed a group of patients (N=65) that were treated at the Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Psychiatric Hospital Rab, during the period of 1998-2000. Detailed analysis of all anamnestic and hetero-anamnestic data as well as the observations during the treatment separated few significant patterns of self-destructive behaviour of various intensity and different possible consequences. The results showed out that within the first group of patients with self-destructive behaviour was noticed a significant increased number of younger age patients who were diagnosed with personality disorder especially borderline and antisocial type. Additionally facing difficulties with alcohol abuse and drug addiction. In a second group there were older patients with serious attempt of suicide dominantly diagnosed with endogenous psychosis, especially schizophrenia.

  1. The effect of a change of director in a psychiatric inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, R J; Slovak, J P

    1976-02-01

    Suicide, aggressive acting out, and increased numbers of AWOL patients are distinct possibilities if internal structures of psychiatric impatient units are altered-especially in units that offer intensive therapeutic experience on a short term basis to severely ill patients. One such time is when the directorship changes in this kind of unit. A sucessful unit is frequently thought to be the result of the charismatic leadership of its chief. With his departure, the unit loses its elan and becomes an uninspired pedestrian operation. Hence, such a unit loses personnel and even its program when the chief changes. In this paper, the authors give data to support the hypothesis that a unit with a specific philosophical treatment orientation will continue to function at a relatively high level of effectiveness and efficiency regardless of the difference between chiefs.

  2. Influence of sexual abuse on HIV-related attitudes and behaviors in adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L K; Kessel, S M; Lourie, K J; Ford, H H; Lipsitt, L P

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the associations between sexual abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related attitudes and behaviors of adolescents with a psychiatric disorder. HIV-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors were examined by self-report assessment of adolescents admitted to a psychiatric hospital (N = 100). A subsample (n = 30) completed a role-playing exercise regarding HIV-preventive behavior that was scored for the degree of effective communication by raters blind to the subjects' abuse history. HIV-related risk behaviors were prevalent, including unprotected sexual intercourse (67%) and multiple partners (27%) among the sexually active (71% of the total). Also frequent were alcohol and drug use (25%) and sharing cutting instruments (22%) among those engaged in self-cutting behavior (62%). The 38% of the sample identified as having a history of sexual abuse indicated significantly poorer self-efficacy concerning condom use than their peers. Abused females scored significantly lower on the self-efficacy of condom use scale and reported significantly more frequent alcohol use than nonabused females (p = .003). A hierarchical multiple regression that controlled for consistency of condom use and tolerance of people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome found that abuse history uniquely accounted for 16% of the variance in condom use self-efficacy. Analysis of the videotaped role-play found that abused adolescents were significantly less competent and had more difficulty in effective communication than their peers (p = .003). A history of sexual abuse is associated with impaired safe sexual decision-making and HIV-preventive communication skills, even in this already at-risk group. This study also underscores the importance of actively addressing these issues in the context of clinical care.

  3. Increased Silent Brain Infarction Accompanied With High Prevalence of Diabetes and Dyslipidemia in Psychiatric Inpatients: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Tetsuto; Uju, Yoriyasu; Sekine, Keisuke; Ishii, Yukihiro; Yoshimi, Taro; Yasui, Reiko; Yasukawa, Asuka; Sato, Mamoru; Okamoto, Seiko; Hisaoka, Tetsuya; Miura, Masafumi; Kusanishi, Shun; Murakami, Kanako; Nakano, Chieko; Mizuta, Yasuhiko; Mimori, Seisuke; Mishima, Shunichi; Igarashi, Kazuei; Takizawa, Tsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Tatsuro; Tsukada, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia have increased risk of atherosclerotic diseases. It is already known that lifestyle-related disorders and the use of antipsychotics are closely related with the progression of atherosclerosis in psychiatric patients. Stroke as well as coronary heart disease play an important role in the cause of death in Asia and Japan. Thus, we studied the prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in psychiatric inpatients in Japan using brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This cross-sectional study was performed from January 2012 to December 2013. Study participants were 152 hospitalized patients (61 men and 91 women) in the Department of Psychiatry at Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Ichikawa City, Japan. Mean ages were 50.0 and 57.1 years old for men and women, respectively. The diagnoses (DSM-IV-TR criteria) of participants were schizophrenia (69.1%), mood disorder (18.4%), and other mental disorders (12.5%). We checked physical status, metabolic status of glucose and lipid levels, and brain MRI within 1 week of admission. The study group showed a significantly high prevalence of diabetes and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterolemia in both sexes (n = 61 in men, n = 91 in women, P < .05). In the study group, serum fasting plasma glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels were significantly high (n = 152, P < .05), but serum HDL cholesterol and total cholesterol were significantly low in both sexes (n = 61 in men, n = 90 in women, P < .05), and triglycerides were low in men (n = 61, P < .05). Silent brain infarction was recognized at a higher rate (n = 98, P < .05) compared with healthy controls. Participants in this study had an increased ratio of silent brain infarction compared with Japanese healthy controls, accompanied with higher ratios of diabetes and low HDL cholesterol.

  4. Reactions of psychiatric inpatients to the threat of biological and chemical warfare in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D; Ofir, Dana; Brodsky, Ori; Yakirevitch, Janna; Drannikov, Angela; Navo, Nadav; Kotler, Moshe

    2004-04-01

    In the months before the Second Gulf War, the threat of biological and chemical warfare led many Israelis to experience significant stress and mood changes. In this study, we investigated whether this threat affected the subjective mood and behavior of inpatients with schizophrenia and compared the results with effects noted in their clinical staff. Subjects were evaluated at two points in time-2 months before the war and on day 1 of the war-with a specially designed questionnaire and with the Spielberger Scale for Trait Anxiety. Although the responses of the two groups did not differ radically before the war, on the first day of war, significant differences were noted, with patients demonstrating increases in anxiety and level of concern. Both groups reported similar effects on their mood. Patients were more concerned about the potential for the outbreak of World War III, whereas staff were more concerned about economic effects. Female subjects in both groups demonstrated greater anxiety and mood changes after the outbreak of war compared with before the war. Effects observed on the patients may be related to the decreased coping threshold resulting from their illness, which renders psychotic patients more vulnerable to any acute stressor; however, effects on the staff members should not be ignored.

  5. Mental capacity and psychiatric in-patients: implications for the new mental health law in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Gareth S; Szmukler, George; Richardson, Genevra; David, Anthony S; Hayward, Peter; Rucker, James; Harding, Duncan; Hotopf, Matthew

    2009-09-01

    In England and Wales mental health services need to take account of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Mental Health Act 1983. The overlap between these two causes dilemmas for clinicians. To describe the frequency and characteristics of patients who fall into two potentially anomalous groups: those who are not detained but lack mental capacity; and those who are detained but have mental capacity. Cross-sectional study of 200 patients admitted to psychiatric wards. We assessed mental capacity using a semi-structured interview, the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment (MacCAT-T). Of the in-patient sample, 24% were informal but lacked capacity: these patients felt more coerced and had greater levels of treatment refusal than informal participants with capacity. People detained under the Mental Health Act with capacity comprised a small group (6%) that was hard to characterise. Our data suggest that psychiatrists in England and Wales need to take account of the Mental Capacity Act, and in particular best interests judgments and deprivation of liberty safeguards, more explicitly than is perhaps currently the case.

  6. Impact of psychotic symptoms on cognitive functioning in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients with severe mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, James B; Weiss, Shira R; Segovich, Kristin T; Barbot, Baptiste

    2016-10-30

    Despite established differences in cognitive functioning of adults with mood disorder-related psychosis and those with non-affective psychotic disorders, there is limited evidence of the impact of psychotic symptoms on the cognitive functioning of children and adolescents with mood disorders. This study investigates IQ, working memory, and processing speed scores in 80 child and adolescent inpatients discharged from an intermediate care state psychiatric hospital, using a retrospective chart review. Associations between diagnosis based on DSM-IV criteria (7 with Major Depression- MDD; 43 with Bipolar Disorders-BD, and 30 with Mood Disorders Not Otherwise Specified-NOS), presence of current psychotic features, and cognitive functioning (WISC-IV IQ, Coding, Symbol Search, and Digit Span) were investigated using Multivariate Analyses of Variance. No differences were found in cognitive functioning between patients with MDD and BD, or between those with severe Mood Disorders (MDD or BD) and those with NOS, when controlling for age, gender, and presence of psychotic features. However, patients with severe mood disorders and psychotic features showed lower IQs and greater working memory deficits than those without psychotic features or NOS. Results are discussed in terms of treatment planning for children and adolescents at risk for developing psychotic symptoms and severe mood disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Childhood maltreatment severity and alcohol use in adult psychiatric inpatients: The mediating role of emotion regulation difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutcher, Christina D; Vujanovic, Anka A; Paulus, Daniel J; Bartlett, Brooke A

    2017-09-01

    Emotion regulation difficulties are a potentially key mechanism underlying the association between childhood maltreatment and alcohol use in adulthood. The current study examined the mediating role of emotion regulation difficulties in the association between childhood maltreatment severity (i.e., Childhood Trauma Questionnaire total score) and past-month alcohol use severity, including alcohol consumption frequency and alcohol-related problems (i.e., number of days of alcohol problems, ratings of "bother" caused by alcohol problems, ratings of treatment importance for alcohol problems). Participants included 111 acute-care psychiatric inpatients (45.0% female; Mage=33.5, SD=10.6), who reported at least one DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder Criterion A traumatic event, indexed via the Life Events Checklist for DSM-5. Participants completed questionnaires regarding childhood maltreatment, emotion regulation difficulties, and alcohol use. A significant indirect effect of childhood maltreatment severity via emotion regulation difficulties in relation to alcohol use severity (β=0.07, SE=0.04, 99% CI [0.01, 0.21]) was documented. Specifically, significant indirect effects were found for childhood maltreatment severity via emotion regulation difficulties in relation to alcohol problems (β's between 0.05 and 0.12; all 99% bootstrapped CIs with 10,000 resamples did not include 0) but not alcohol consumption. Emotion regulation difficulties may play a significant role in the association between childhood maltreatment severity and alcohol outcomes. Clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Changes of the psychogeriatric inpatient care at the University Psychiatric Hospitals in Basel following the constitution of an outpatient care service for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Gökhan; Hiss, Barbara; Maeck, Lienhard; Stoppe, Gabriela

    2014-05-01

    10-year follow-up of the psychogeriatric inpatient care at the University Psychiatric Hospitals Basel following the establishment of an outpatient care service for the elderly (ADA). Standardized chart review of a random sample of psychogeriatric cases (≥ 65 y) of the years 1997 and 2007 (n = 100 each) in terms of socio-demographic, diagnostic, therapeutic und administrative data. The number of patients with contact to both inpatient and outpatient services prior to admission increased. There was no change regarding the amount of unvoluntary admissions. As expected more complex cases were treated. The case management showed changes towards greater guideline conformity. The 10-year follow-up shows a better outpatient treatment and the provision of inpatient facilities for complex multimorbid and emergency patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Perceived Stress among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric Inpatient Care: The Influence of Perceptions of the Ward Atmosphere and the Psychosocial Work Environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Eklund, Mona; Wann-Hansson, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate (1) perceived stress as felt by the nursing staff working in psychiatric inpatient care, (2) possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants, and (3) associations among individual characteristics, the ward atmosphere, the psychosocial work environment, and perceived stress. Ninety-three members of the nursing staff completed three instruments-one each measuring perceived stress, the ward atmosphere, and the psychosocial work environment. The...

  10. [Compulsory measures and pathological creatine kinase levels in psychiatric in-patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of compulsory measures (CM) with pathological Creatine Kinase (CK) levels in 317 patients admitted to a secure psychiatric ward. The assumptions is that CK-activity is increased prior to administration of CM because increases in CK-levels may represent aggressive behaviour as precursors of a higher chance of administrating CM. The CK-levels were assessed immediately following admission. During the course of the patients' stay the frequency of different CM was assessed by the use of the Staff Observation Aggression Scale. In a CHAID analysis pathological CK-levels were associated with subsequent administration of CM. Lifetime aggression and main diagnosis were associated with administration of CM as well. In a ROC analysis concerning pathological CK-activity the AUC for subsequent administration of CM was 70.5 % with a sensitivity of 73.5 % and a specifity of 67.5 %. Despite some methodological shortcomings the study indicates that it could be useful to measure CK-activity at the time of admission because pathological levels may indicate an increased probability of administration of CM subsequent to aggressive behaviour. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Reduction of Seclusion and Restraint in an Inpatient Psychiatric Setting: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Ellen W; Woolley, Stephen; Szarek, Bonnie L; Mucha, Theodore F; Dutka, Olga; Schwartz, Harold I; Wisniowski, Jeff; Goethe, John W

    2017-03-01

    The authors describe a quality and safety initiative designed to decrease seclusion/restraint (S/R) and present the results of a pilot study that evaluated the effectiveness of this program. The study sample consisted of consecutive admissions to a 120-bed psychiatric service after the intervention was implemented (October 2010-September 2012, n = 8029). Analyses compared S/R incidence and duration in the study sample to baseline (consecutive admissions during the year prior to introduction of the intervention, October 2008-September 2009, n = 3884). The study intervention, which used evidence-based therapeutic practices for reducing violence/aggression, included routine use of the Brøset Violence Checklist, mandated staff education in crisis intervention and trauma informed care, increased frequency of physician reassessment of need for S/R, formal administrative review of S/R events and environmental enhancements (e.g., comfort rooms to support sensory modulation). Statistically significant associations were found between the intervention and a decrease in both the number of seclusions (p < 0.01) and the duration of seclusion per admission (p < 0.001). These preliminary results support the conclusion that this intervention was effective in reducing use of seclusion. Further study is needed to determine if these prevention strategies are generalizable, the degree to which each component of the intervention contributes to improve outcome, and if continuation of the intervention will further reduce restraint use.

  12. Coping with information style and family burden: Possible roles of self-stigma and hope among parents of children in a psychiatric inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson-Ohayon, I; Pijnenborg, G H M; Ben-Pazi, A; Taitel, S; Goldzweig, G

    2017-05-01

    Parents of children who are hospitalized in inpatient psychiatric units must cope with significant challenges. One of these challenges relates to the way in which they cope with illness-related information. The current study examined the relationship between two such coping styles - monitoring and blunting - and family burden among parents of children in a psychiatric inpatient unit. Moreover, the possible moderating roles played by hope and self-stigma in these associations were also examined. Questionnaires regarding coping with information style, self-stigma, hope and family burden were administered to 70 parents. A main positive effect of hope and a main negative effect of self-stigma were uncovered. An interaction between self-stigma and monitoring was also revealed, suggesting that for parents with high self-stigma, compared to those with low self-stigma, more monitoring was related to more burden. Tailoring family interventions according to coping style and self-stigma is highly recommended as a mean to reduce the family burden of parents whose child is hospitalized in a psychiatric inpatient unit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of Sexual Fantasies in Psychiatric Inpatients With Mood and Psychotic Disorders and Comorbid Personality Disorder Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón Vilar, Giancarlo; Concepción, Erika; Galynker, Igor; Tanis, Thachell; Ardalan, Firouz; Yaseen, Zimri; Cohen, Lisa J

    2016-02-01

    Sexuality is an important aspect of quality of life and sexual fantasies comprise a normal part of human sexuality. However, the nature of sexuality and sexual fantasies of patients with mental illness remains an understudied area. To investigate the nature and frequency of sexual fantasies in psychiatric patients, the present study compared the frequency of four types of sexual fantasies across four different mood and psychotic diagnoses and three personality disorder clusters. Study participants included 133 psychiatric inpatients recruited from an urban hospital. Sexual fantasies were compared across patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, major depressive disorder and three nonclinical samples from the literature and then correlated with personality cluster scores. Subjects were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV for Axis I and for Axis II Disorders. Sexual fantasies were assessed by the Wilson Sexual Fantasies Questionnaire, which measures four types of sexual fantasies (exploratory, intimate, impersonal, and sadomasochistic). Within the entire sample, there were significant differences across sexual fantasy types, with subjects scoring highest on intimate sexual fantasies and then exploratory, impersonal, and sadomasochistic. There were no significant differences across mood and psychotic diagnostic groups for any of the sexual fantasy scales and the scores were within the normative range of nonclinical samples. Patients with high cluster B scores scored significantly higher on all four fantasy scales than those without. Patients with high cluster A scores scored lower on intimate fantasies, but there was no association between cluster C scores and sexual fantasies. The association between cluster B and sexual fantasies remained consistent across Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV for Axis I diagnoses (no interaction effect). Patients with severe mental illness report sexual fantasies that are

  14. A lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender dedicated inpatient psychiatric unit in rural New England: a descriptive analysis in demographics, service utilisation and needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotzbaugh, Ralph; Glover, Eileen

    2016-12-01

    To develop an understanding of lesbian-, gay-, bisexual-, transgender-specific mental health and substance abuse needs in rural populations and to improve data about sexual orientation and gender identity. Existing literature on mental health needs for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender populations has continued to reveal higher levels of need. Research has also demonstrated that few mental health providers have expertise or comfort in treating lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender clients. Descriptive correlational study. A sample (n = 456) of patient records admitted to a rural lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender inpatient psychiatric clinic over 12 months were examined using descriptive statistics. Patient zip code information was used to determine the levels of rurality. Chi-square analysis was used to determine relationships between sexual orientation, rural/urban distinctions and concomitant drug use. Unexpectedly, those who identified as heterosexual were significantly more likely to concomitantly abuse alcohol and heroin than those who identified as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender. Patients residing in small or isolated rural areas were more likely to abuse alcohol or synthetics than those residing in urban or micropolitan areas. Results of this study concerning substance abuse among lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals are not reflective of prior studies. LGBT patients did not demonstrate a higher proportion of substance abuse compared with those identifying as heterosexual. Increased substance abuse among those from rural isolated areas does support prior studies. The context of gathering demographic information on sexual orientation was thought by staff to increase the number of those identifying as heterosexual. Context in which sensitive questions are asked may affect the accuracy of demographic data. Lack of information regarding patients' sexual orientation or gender identity may impact perceived need for

  15. Knowledge of the patient as decision-making power: staff members' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration in challenging situations in psychiatric inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Looi, Git-Marie E; Zingmark, Karin; Sävenstedt, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Challenging situations in psychiatric inpatient settings call for interprofessional collaboration, but the roles and responsibilities held by members of different professions is unclear. The aim of this study was to describe staff members' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration in the context of challenging situations in psychiatric inpatient care. Prior to the study taking place, ethical approval was granted. Focus group interviews were conducted with 26 physicians, ward managers, psychiatric nurses, and nursing assistants. These interviews were then transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results described participants' perceptions of shared responsibilities, profession-specific responsibilities and professional approaches. In this, recognising knowledge of the patient as decision-making power was understood to be a recurring theme. This is a delimited qualitative study that reflects the specific working conditions of the participants at the time the study was conducted. The findings suggest that nursing assistants are the most influential professionals due to their closeness to and first-hand knowledge of patients. The results also point to the possibility of other professionals gaining influence by getting closer to patients and utilising their professional knowledge, thus contributing to a more person-centred care. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  16. Psychiatric hospitalization and suicide among the very old in Denmark: population-based register study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Vach, Werner

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Very old people have higher suicide rates than the younger elderly population. Psychiatric disorders are known to have a strong association with suicide among elderly people. AIMS: To analyse the analyse the suicide risk associated with psychiatric hospitalisation among the very old......: The association between suicide and psychiatric hospitalisation is much weaker for the very old than for the old. Psychiatric disorders among very old people may be interacting with other disorders, may be underdiagnosed or treated in other healthcare settings....

  17. [Prevalence and Phenomenology of Psychotic-Like Symptoms in Borderline Personality Disorders - Associations with Suicide Attempts and Use of Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Katrin; Schätzle, Anja; Kowohl, Pauline; Leske, Lisa; Huber, Christian G; Schäfer, Ingo

    2018-01-19

    Psychotic-like symptoms are found in a subgroup of borderline patients (BPD). Reported prevalence is heterogeneous (up to 50% affected). Investigations in Germany have not been conducted so far. Furthermore, the precise phenomenology of the psychotic symptoms and the effects on suicidal behavior and the use of inpatient psychiatric treatment are unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate prevalence rates and phenomenology of psychotic-like symptoms. Associations between the latter and suicidality as well as the use of inpatient psychiatric treatment were examined. Further influencing factors were taking into account. Psychotic-like symptoms were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview-I in 95 BPD patients. To investigate the associations between psychotic-like symptoms and suicidality as well as the use of inpatient psychiatric treatment, correlation and regression analyzes were calculated, considering severity of PTSD, BPD and depression. 36% of the patients reported alterations of perception and 21% delusions, both multiform and long lasting. The number of suicide attempts was associated with delusions, alterations of perception and severity of PTSD, BPS, and depression. Only delusions and severity of PTSD explained together 25.8% of the variance for the prediction of the number of suicide attempts. Age of initial hospitalization showed fewer and number of hospitalizations no associations at all. Psychotic-like symptoms should not be trivialized, which may happen by using terms such as pseudo-hallucinations or transient paranoid ideas, and may be particularly associated with suicidal tendencies complicating the clinical course. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Association between dopaminergic polymorphisms and borderline personality traits among at-risk young adults and psychiatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faludi Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the development of borderline personality disorder (BPD both genetic and environmental factors have important roles. The characteristic affective disturbance and impulsive aggression are linked to imbalances in the central serotonin system, and most of the genetic association studies focused on serotonergic candidate genes. However, the efficacy of dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2 blocking antipsychotic drugs in BPD treatment also suggests involvement of the dopamine system in the neurobiology of BPD. Methods In the present study we tested the dopamine dysfunction hypothesis of impulsive self- and other-damaging behaviors: borderline and antisocial traits were assessed by Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnosis (SCID for DSM-IV in a community-based US sample of 99 young adults from low-to-moderate income families. For the BPD trait analyses a second, independent group was used consisting of 136 Hungarian patients with bipolar or major depressive disorder filling out self-report SCID-II Screen questionnaire. In the genetic association analyses the previously indicated polymorphisms of the catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT Val158Met and dopamine transporter (DAT1 40 bp VNTR were studied. In addition, candidate polymorphisms of the DRD2 and DRD4 dopamine receptor genes were selected from the impulsive behavior literature. Results The DRD2 TaqI B1-allele and A1-allele were associated with borderline traits in the young adult sample (p = 0.001, and p = 0.005, respectively. Also, the DRD4 -616 CC genotype appeared as a risk factor (p = 0.02. With severity of abuse accounted for in the model, genetic effects of the DRD2 and DRD4 polymorphisms were still significant (DRD2 TaqIB: p = 0.001, DRD2 TaqIA: p = 0.008, DRD4 -616 C/G: p = 0.002. Only the DRD4 promoter finding was replicated in the independent sample of psychiatric inpatients (p = 0.007. No association was found with the COMT and DAT1 polymorphisms. Conclusions Our results

  19. Minor Self-Harm and Psychiatric Disorder: A Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skegg, Keren; Nada-Raja, Shyamala; Moffit, Terrie E.

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which minor self-harm in the general population is associated with psychiatric disorder. A population-based sample of 980 young adults was interviewed independently about past-year suicidal and self-harm behavior and thoughts, and psychiatric disorders. Self-harm included self-harmful behaviors such as…

  20. Completed audit cycle to explore the use of the STOPP/START toolkit to optimise medication in psychiatric in-patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Victor M; Hill, Natalie; Kumar, Sugandha

    2018-02-01

    Aims and method To explore the use of the STOPP/START toolkit in older psychiatric in-patients with dementia. Clinical records and current drug charts were reviewed against STOPP/START criteria for all in-patients (n = 86) on six specialist dementia wards. Benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and opiates were most commonly prescribed inappropriately. The most common unprescribed medication groups were statins, calcium supplements and vitamin D supplements. There was an overall reduction of 7% in comorbidities and 8% in the number of prescriptions. t-test showed a significant drop in average comorbidities between both audits, t(1) = 23.920, P = 0.027, and in average prescriptions per patient, t(1) = 28.808, P = 0.022. There was no difference in the number of patients receiving polypharmacy, t(1) = 7.500, P = 0.084, or receiving medication with a high risk of adverse drug reactions, t(1) = 6.857, P = 0.092. Clinical implications The STOPP/START toolkit highlighted the importance of collaborative working between doctors, clinical pharmacists and nursing staff, and could provide old age psychiatrists with a structured tool to identify inappropriate prescribing of non-psychiatric medications. Declaration of interests None.

  1. A study of suicide and attempted suicide by self-immolation in an Irish psychiatric population: an increasing problem.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, J M

    2012-02-03

    In the Western World self-immolation is an uncommon but dramatic method of attempting suicide. In-patients who attempt suicide by fire-setting tend to be female with severe psychopathology. In a previous study from the South of Ireland, seven cases from a psychiatric and prison population were identified in a five year period from 1984 to 1989. This would represent an annual rate of 1.07 per cent of burns treated in the burns unit at Cork University Hospital. In this study 12 cases were identified for the years 1994 and 1995. This represents an increase of 3.5 per cent from 1.07 to 4.6 per cent of all burns treated at the same institution. Ten of these patients had a previous psychiatric history and eight of them were resident on a psychiatric ward when they committed the act. Seven of the patients were found to have a high degree of suicide intent of whom four died of their injuries, which gives a mortality rate for this group of 33 per cent. Effective prevention policies are necessary if this increasing problem is to be curtailed.

  2. What are effective strategies for implementing trauma-informed care in youth inpatient psychiatric and residential treatment settings? A realist systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Stephanie A; Gauvin, Emma; Jamieson, Ally; Rathgeber, Melanie; Faulkner-Gibson, Lorelei; Bell, Sarah; Davidson, Jana; Russel, Jennifer; Burke, Sharlynne

    2017-01-01

    Many young people who receive psychiatric care in inpatient or residential settings in North America have experienced various forms of emotional trauma. Moreover, these settings can exacerbate trauma sequelae. Common practices, such as seclusion and restraint, put young people at risk of retraumatization, development of comorbid psychopathology, injury, and even death. In response, psychiatric and residential facilities have embraced trauma-informed care (TIC), an organizational change strategy which aligns service delivery with treatment principles and discrete interventions designed to reduce rates of retraumatization through responsive and non-coercive staff-client interactions. After more than two decades, a number of TIC frameworks and approaches have shown favorable results. Largely unexamined, however, are the features that lead to successful implementation of TIC, especially in child and adolescent inpatient psychiatric and residential settings. Using methods proposed by Pawson et al. (J Health Serv Res Policy 10:21-34, 2005), we conducted a modified five-stage realist systematic review of peer-reviewed TIC literature. We rigorously searched ten electronic databases for peer reviewed publications appearing between 2000 and 2015 linking terms "trauma-informed" and "child*" or "youth," plus "inpatient" or "residential" plus "psych*" or "mental." After screening 693 unique abstracts, we selected 13 articles which described TIC interventions in youth psychiatric or residential settings. We designed a theoretically-based evaluative framework using the active implementation cycles of the National Implementation Research Network (NIRN) to discern which foci were associated with effective TIC implementation. Excluded were statewide mental health initiatives and TIC implementations in outpatient mental health, child welfare, and education settings. Interventions examined included: Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competency Framework; Six Core Strategies

  3. Sleep disturbances in a clinical forensic psychiatric population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Jeanine; Karsten, Julie; de Weerd, Al; Lancel, Marike

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Poor sleep is known to cause detrimental effects on the course of diverse psychiatric disorders and is a putative risk factor for hostility and aggression. Thus, sleep may be crucial in forensic psychiatric practice. However, little is known about the prevalence of sleep disturbances in

  4. Validation of the Portuguese version of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being scale (FACIT-Sp 12) among Brazilian psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Lucchetti, Alessandra Lamas Granero; de Bernardin Gonçalves, Juliane Piasseschi; Vallada, Homero P

    2015-02-01

    Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being scale (FACIT-Sp 12) is one of the most used and most validated instruments for assessing spiritual well-being in the world. Some Brazilian studies have used this instrument without, however, assessing its psychometric properties. The present study aims to validate the Portuguese version of the FACIT-Sp 12 among Brazilian psychiatric inpatients. A self-administered questionnaire, covering spiritual well-being (FACIT-Sp 12), depression, anxiety, religiosity, quality of life, and optimism, was administered. Of those who met the inclusion criteria, 579 patients were invited to participate and 493 (85.1 %) were able to fill out the FACIT-Sp 12 twice (test and retest). Subsequently, the validation analysis was carried out. Estimation of test-retest reliability, discriminant, and convergent validity was determined by the Spearman's correlation test, and the internal consistency was examined by the Cronbach's alpha. The sample was predominantly male (63.9 %) with a mean age of 35.9 years, and the most common psychiatric condition was bipolar disorder (25.7 %) followed by schizophrenia (20.4 %), drug use (20.0 %), and depression (17.6 %) according to ICD-10. The total FACIT-Sp 12 scale as well as the subscales demonstrated high internal consistency (coefficient alphas ranging from 0.893 for the total scale to 0.655 for the Meaning subscale), good convergent and divergent validity, and satisfactory test-retest reliability (rho = 0.699). The Portuguese version of FACIT-Sp 12 is a valid and reliable measure to use in Brazilian psychiatric inpatients. The availability of a brief and broad measure of spiritual well-being can help the study of spirituality and its influence on health by researchers from countries that speak the Portuguese language.

  5. Subject-chosen activities in occupational therapy for the improvement of psychiatric symptoms of inpatients with chronic schizophrenia: a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshii, Junko; Yotsumoto, Kayano; Tatsumi, Eri; Tanaka, Chito; Mori, Takashi; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2013-07-01

    To compare the therapeutic effects of subject-chosen and therapist-chosen activities in occupational therapy for inpatients with chronic schizophrenia. Prospective comparative study. A psychiatric hospital in Japan. Fifty-nine patients with chronic schizophrenia who had been hospitalized for many years. The subjects received six-months occupational therapy, participating in either activities of their choice (subject-chosen activity group, n = 30) or activities chosen by occupational therapists based on treatment recommendations and patient consent (therapist-chosen activity group, n = 29). The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale were used to evaluate psychiatric symptoms and psychosocial function, respectively. After six-months occupational therapy, suspiciousness and hostility scores of the positive scale and preoccupation scores of the general psychopathology scale significantly improved in the subject-chosen activity group compared with the therapist-chosen activity group, with 2(2) (median (interquartile range)) and 3(1.25), 2(1) and 2.5(1), and 2(1) and 3(1), respectively. There were no significant differences in psychosocial functions between the two groups. In within-group comparisons before and after occupational therapy, suspiciousness scores of the positive scale, preoccupation scores of the general psychopathology scale, and psychosocial function significantly improved only in the subject-chosen activity group, with 3(1) to 2(2), 3(1) to 2(1), and 40(9) to 40(16) respectively, but not in the therapist-chosen activity group. The results suggested that the subject-chosen activities in occupational therapy could improve the psychiatric symptoms, suspiciousness, and preoccupation of the inpatients with chronic schizophrenia.

  6. Cross-sectional study to evaluate the longitudinal development of child and adolescent psychiatric diagnoses of inpatients in Vorarlberg, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Karoline; Fuchs, Martin; Veraar, Maria; Menz, Wolfgang; Kemmler, Georg; Simma, Burkhard

    2016-02-01

    Clinical experience has repeatedly shown evidence for continuity between mental disorders in children and adolescents and mental disorders in adulthood. Up to now, Austria has had no epidemiologic data on psychiatric diseases in children and adolescents and their development into adulthood. How often do children and adolescents with psychiatric diseases have psychiatric diseases in adulthood? Is there any association between psychiatric diagnoses in childhood/adolescence and adulthood? Electronic medical records provided us with data on 2210 children and adolescents who were admitted to any hospital in the State of Vorarlberg, Austria, between 1997 and 2012 because of psychiatric diseases. In this cross-sectional study, diagnoses were coded according to ICD-10 and ICD-9 criteria. The three main reasons for admission of children and adolescents were substance abuse, emotional disorders and conduct disorders. Of the admitted children and adolescents, 9.8 % were readmitted to a psychiatric institution in adulthood. The main reason for readmission in adulthood appears to be disorders due to psychoactive substances (42.1 %). Of young patients with psychoactive substance use, 9.7 % were rehospitalized in adulthood, 70.8 % of them showed a diagnosis in the same category (F1) on admission. Children and adolescents admitted for schizophrenia, schizotypal, and delusional disorders (F2) were significantly more likely to be readmitted in adulthood (40.9 %) compared to any other child psychiatric diagnosis. This study once again shows the continuity of psychiatric disorders from childhood and adolescence to adulthood. It also gives further information about the transmission of diagnoses when patients reached the age of 18 years and their outcome. Until now, there is hardly any information about the outcome of children and adolescents with psychiatric diagnoses in Austria. We want to bring up more knowledge on that issue. Research findings may improve prevention and clinical

  7. 'She's manipulative and he's right off': a critical analysis of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language in the acute inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Bridget; Manias, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Remarks such as 'she's manipulative' and 'he's right off' are familiar to psychiatric nurses. This paper critiques the language nurses use in acute inpatient psychiatry services, highlighting the diverse discourses implicated in nurses' writing and speaking about patients. Based on a review of the literature, this paper examines ethnographic studies and discourse analyses of psychiatric nurses' oral and written language. A prominent debate in the literature surrounds nurses' use of standardized language, which is the use of set terms for symptoms and nursing activities. This review of spoken descriptions of patients highlights nurses' use of informal and local descriptions, incorporating elements of moral judgement, common sense language and empathy. Research into written accounts in patient files and records show nurses' use of objectifying language, the dominance of medicine and the emergence of the language of bureaucracy in health services. Challenges to the language of psychiatry and psychiatric nursing arise from fields as diverse as bioscience, humanism and social theory. Authors who focus on the relationship between language, power and the discipline of nursing disagree in regard to their analysis of particular language as a constructive exercise of power by nurses. Thus, particular language is in some instances endorsed and in other instances censured, by nurses in research and practice. In this paper, a Foucauldian analysis provides further critique of taken-for-granted practices of speech and writing. Rather than censoring language, we recommend that nurses, researchers and educators attend to nurses' everyday language and explore what it produces for nurses, patients and society.

  8. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care: Perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning after 12 months of preventive monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eLay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate effects of a preventive monitoring program targeted to reduce compulsory re-hospitalization and perceived coercion in patients with severe mental disorder. We analyze patient outcomes in terms of perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning at 12 months. Methods: The program consists of individualized psycho-education, crisis cards and, after discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a 24-month preventive monitoring. In total, 238 psychiatric inpatients who had had compulsory admission(s during the past 24 months were included in the trial. T1-assessment 12 months after baseline was achieved for 182 patients. Results: Study participants reported lower levels of perceived coercion, negative pressures and process exclusion, a higher level of optimism, and a lesser degree of distress due to symptoms, interpersonal relations and social role functioning (significant time effects. However, improvements were not confined to the intervention group, but seen also in the TAU group (no significant group or interaction effects. Altered perceptions were linked to older age, shorter illness duration, female sex, non-psychotic disorder, and compulsory hospitalization not due to risk of harm to others. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that changes in the subjective perspective were fuelled primarily by participation in this study, rather than by having received the specific intervention. The study contributes to a better understanding of the interaction between 'objective' measures (compulsory readmissions and patients’ perceptions and highlights the need for treatment approaches promoting empowerment in individuals with a history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations.

  9. Preventing Compulsory Admission to Psychiatric Inpatient Care: Perceived Coercion, Empowerment, and Self-Reported Mental Health Functioning after 12 Months of Preventive Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Barbara; Drack, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a preventive monitoring program targeted to reduce compulsory rehospitalization and perceived coercion in patients with severe mental disorder. We analyze patient outcomes in terms of perceived coercion, empowerment, and self-reported mental health functioning at 12 months. The program consists of individualized psychoeducation, crisis cards and, after discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a 24-month preventive monitoring. In total, 238 psychiatric inpatients who had had compulsory admission(s) during the past 24 months were included in the trial. T1-assessment 12 months after baseline was achieved for 182 patients. Study participants reported lower levels of perceived coercion, negative pressures, and process exclusion, a higher level of optimism, and a lesser degree of distress due to symptoms, interpersonal relations, and social role functioning (significant time effects). However, improvements were not confined to the intervention group, but seen also in the treatment-as-usual group (no significant group or interaction effects). Altered perceptions were linked to older age, shorter illness duration, female sex, non-psychotic disorder, and compulsory hospitalization not due to risk of harm to others. Our findings suggest that changes in the subjective perspective were fueled primarily by participation in this study rather than by having received the specific intervention. The study contributes to a better understanding of the interaction between "objective" measures (compulsory readmissions) and patients' perceptions and highlights the need for treatment approaches promoting empowerment in individuals with a history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations.

  10. Changes in dynamic risk and protective factors for violence during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment: Predicting reductions in postdischarge community recidivism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries Robbé, M. de; Vogel, V. de; Douglas, K.S.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies have rarely investigated the association between improvements on dynamic risk and protective factors for violence during forensic psychiatric treatment and reduced recidivism after discharge. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of treatment progress in risk and

  11. Psychiatric nurses' attitudes towards inpatient aggression : Preliminary report of the development of Attitude Towards Aggression Scale (ATAS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, GJ; Dassen, TWN; Burgerhof, JGM; Middel, B

    Professional skills to adequately manage patient aggression are a prerequisite for nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. These 'technical' skills, however, are necessary but not sufficient for effective nurse intervention. 'The attitude of nurses' towards client aggression also contributes to

  12. Well-Being and Safety Among Inpatient Psychiatric Staff: The Impact of Conflict, Assault, and Stress Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, EL; Fenwick, K; Brekke, JS; Novaco, RW

    2016-01-01

    © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Psychiatric staff are faced with multiple forms of hostility, aggression, and assault at work, collectively referred to as workplace violence, which typically is activated by patients but can also come from coworkers and supervisors. Whether workplace violence adversely affects staff well-being may be related not only to its presence, but also to an individual’s stress reactivity. At a large public psychiatric hospital, an online survey was co...

  13. Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Other Clinically Significant Body Image Concerns in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Phillips, Katharine A.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study assessed prevalence and clinical correlates of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), eating disorders (ED), and other clinically significant body image concerns in 208 consecutively admitted adolescent inpatients. It was hypothesized that adolescents with BDD would have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality.…

  14. Functional Status Predicts Acute Care Readmissions from Inpatient Rehabilitation in the Stroke Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Slocum

    Full Text Available Acute care readmission risk is an increasingly recognized problem that has garnered significant attention, yet the reasons for acute care readmission in the inpatient rehabilitation population are complex and likely multifactorial. Information on both medical comorbidities and functional status is routinely collected for stroke patients participating in inpatient rehabilitation. We sought to determine whether functional status is a more robust predictor of acute care readmissions in the inpatient rehabilitation stroke population compared with medical comorbidities using a large, administrative data set.A retrospective analysis of data from the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation from the years 2002 to 2011 was performed examining stroke patients admitted to inpatient rehabilitation facilities. A Basic Model for predicting acute care readmission risk based on age and functional status was compared with models incorporating functional status and medical comorbidities (Basic-Plus or models including age and medical comorbidities alone (Age-Comorbidity. C-statistics were compared to evaluate model performance.There were a total of 803,124 patients: 88,187 (11% patients were transferred back to an acute hospital: 22,247 (2.8% within 3 days, 43,481 (5.4% within 7 days, and 85,431 (10.6% within 30 days. The C-statistics for the Basic Model were 0.701, 0.672, and 0.682 at days 3, 7, and 30 respectively. As compared to the Basic Model, the best-performing Basic-Plus model was the Basic+Elixhauser model with C-statistics differences of +0.011, +0.011, and + 0.012, and the best-performing Age-Comorbidity model was the Age+Elixhauser model with C-statistic differences of -0.124, -0.098, and -0.098 at days 3, 7, and 30 respectively.Readmission models for the inpatient rehabilitation stroke population based on functional status and age showed better predictive ability than models based on medical comorbidities.

  15. Celiac Disease Is Associated with Childhood Psychiatric Disorders: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butwicka, Agnieszka; Lichtenstein, Paul; Frisén, Louise; Almqvist, Catarina; Larsson, Henrik; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2017-05-01

    To determine the risk of future childhood psychiatric disorders in celiac disease, assess the association between previous psychiatric disorders and celiac disease in children, and investigate the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders in siblings of celiac disease probands. This was a nationwide registry-based matched cohort study in Sweden with 10 903 children (aged celiac disease and 12 710 of their siblings. We assessed the risk of childhood psychiatric disorders (any psychiatric disorder, psychotic disorder, mood disorder, anxiety disorder, eating disorder, psychoactive substance misuse, behavioral disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD], autism spectrum disorder [ASD], and intellectual disability). HRs of future psychiatric disorders in children with celiac disease and their siblings was estimated by Cox regression. The association between previous diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder and current celiac disease was assessed using logistic regression. Compared with the general population, children with celiac disease had a 1.4-fold greater risk of future psychiatric disorders. Childhood celiac disease was identified as a risk factor for mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, behavioral disorders, ADHD, ASD, and intellectual disability. In addition, a previous diagnosis of a mood, eating, or behavioral disorder was more common before the diagnosis of celiac disease. In contrast, siblings of celiac disease probands were at no increased risk of any of the investigated psychiatric disorders. Children with celiac disease are at increased risk for most psychiatric disorders, apparently owing to the biological and/or psychological effects of celiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictive validity of the Suicide Trigger Scale (STS-3 for post-discharge suicide attempt in high-risk psychiatric inpatients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimri S Yaseen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The greatly increased risk of suicide after psychiatric hospitalization is a critical problem, yet we are unable to identify individuals who would attempt suicide upon discharge. The Suicide Trigger Scale v.3 (STS-3, was designed to measure the construct of an affective 'suicide trigger state' hypothesized to precede a suicide attempt (SA. This study aims to test the predictive validity of the STS-3 for post-discharge SA on a high-risk psychiatric-inpatient sample. METHODS: The STS-3, and a psychological test battery measuring suicidality, mood, impulsivity, trauma history, and attachment style were administered to 161 adult psychiatric patients hospitalized following suicidal ideation (SI or SA. Receiver Operator Characteristic and logistic regression analyses were used to assess prediction of SA in the 6-month period following discharge from hospitalization. RESULTS: STS-3 scores for the patients who made post-discharge SA followed a bimodal distribution skewed to high and low scores, thus a distance from median transform was applied to the scores. The transformed score was a significant predictor of post-discharge SA (AUC 0.731, and a subset of six STS-3 scale items was identified that produced improved prediction of post-discharge SA (AUC 0.814. Scores on C-SSRS and BSS were not predictive. Patients with ultra-high (90(th percentile STS-3 scores differed significantly from ultra-low (10(th percentile scorers on measures of affective intensity, depression, impulsiveness, abuse history, and attachment security. CONCLUSION: STS-3 transformed scores at admission to the psychiatric hospital predict suicide attempts following discharge among the high-risk group of suicidal inpatients. Patients with high transformed scores appear to comprise two clinically distinct groups; an impulsive, affectively intense, fearfully attached group with high raw STS-3 scores and a low-impulsivity, low affect and low trauma-reporting group with low raw

  17. The mediational significance of negative/depressive affect in the relationship of childhood maltreatment and eating disorder features in adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, C J; Ansell, E B; Fehon, D C; Grilo, C M

    2011-03-01

    Childhood maltreatment is a risk factor for eating disorder and negative/depressive affect appears to mediate this relation. However, the specific elements of eating- and body-related psychopathology that are influenced by various forms of childhood maltreatment remain unclear, and investigations among adolescents and men/boys have been limited. This study investigated the mediating role of negative affect/depression across multiple types of childhood maltreatment and eating disorder features in hospitalized adolescent boys and girls. Participants were 148 adolescent psychiatric inpatients who completed an assessment battery including measures of specific forms of childhood maltreatment (sexual, emotional, and physical abuse), negative/depressive affect, and eating disorder features (dietary restriction, binge eating, and body dissatisfaction). Findings suggest that for girls, negative/depressive affect significantly mediates the relationships between childhood maltreatment and eating disorder psychopathology, although effects varied somewhat across types of maltreatment and eating disorder features. Generalization of mediation effects to boys was limited.

  18. The Mediational Significance of Negative/Depressive Affect in the Relationship of Childhood Maltreatment and Eating Disorder Features in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Ansell, Emily B.; Fehon, Dwain C.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood maltreatment is a risk factor for eating disorder and negative/depressive affect appears to mediate this relation. However, the specific elements of eating- and body-related psychopathology that are influenced by various forms of childhood maltreatment remain unclear and investigations among adolescents and men/boys have been limited. This study investigated the mediating role of negative affect/depression across multiple types of childhood maltreatment and eating disorder features in hospitalized adolescent boys and girls. Method Participants were 148 adolescent psychiatric inpatients who completed an assessment battery including measures of specific forms of childhood maltreatment (sexual, emotional, and physical abuse), negative/depressive affect, and eating disorder features (dietary restriction, binge eating, and body dissatisfaction). Results Findings suggest that for girls, negative/depressive affect significantly mediates the relationships between childhood maltreatment and eating disorder psychopathology, although effects varied somewhat across types of maltreatment and eating disorder features. Generalization of mediation effects to boys was limited. PMID:21727786

  19. The Therapeutic Relationship in Inpatient Psychiatric Care: A Narrative Review of the Perspective of Nurses and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Poyato, Antonio R; Montesó-Curto, Pilar; Delgado-Hito, Pilar; Suárez-Pérez, Raquel; Aceña-Domínguez, Rosa; Carreras-Salvador, Regina; Leyva-Moral, Juan M; Lluch-Canut, Teresa; Roldán-Merino, Juan F

    2016-12-01

    To study the significance of 'therapeutic relationship' between nurses and patients within the context of a psychiatric hospital. Narrative literature review. Content analysis. The significance of the therapeutic relationship is quite similar for both nurses and patients in psychiatric hospital units. Nevertheless, several factors may separate the two positions: the time available for the relationship, the negative perceptions on the part of both parties, and the insecurity of the setting. Increased knowledge and understanding of the significance of the therapeutic relationship from the perspective of nurses and patients would allow the strengthening of areas of mutual interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ecological Assessment of Clinicians’ Antipsychotic Prescription Habits in Psychiatric Inpatients: A Novel Web- and Mobile Phone–Based Prototype for a Dynamic Clinical Decision Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrigón, Maria Luisa; Brandt, Sara A; Nitzburg, George C; Ovejero, Santiago; Alvarez-Garcia, Raquel; Carballo, Juan; Walter, Michel; Billot, Romain; Lenca, Philippe; Delgado-Gomez, David; Ropars, Juliette; de la Calle Gonzalez, Ivan; Courtet, Philippe; Baca-García, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Background Electronic prescribing devices with clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) hold the potential to significantly improve pharmacological treatment management. Objective The aim of our study was to develop a novel Web- and mobile phone–based application to provide a dynamic CDSS by monitoring and analyzing practitioners’ antipsychotic prescription habits and simultaneously linking these data to inpatients’ symptom changes. Methods We recruited 353 psychiatric inpatients whose symptom levels and prescribed medications were inputted into the MEmind application. We standardized all medications in the MEmind database using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system and the defined daily dose (DDD). For each patient, MEmind calculated an average for the daily dose prescribed for antipsychotics (using the N05A ATC code), prescribed daily dose (PDD), and the PDD to DDD ratio. Results MEmind results found that antipsychotics were used by 61.5% (217/353) of inpatients, with the largest proportion being patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (33.4%, 118/353). Of the 217 patients, 137 (63.2%, 137/217) were administered pharmacological monotherapy and 80 (36.8%, 80/217) were administered polytherapy. Antipsychotics were used mostly in schizophrenia spectrum and related psychotic disorders, but they were also prescribed in other nonpsychotic diagnoses. Notably, we observed polypharmacy going against current antipsychotics guidelines. Conclusions MEmind data indicated that antipsychotic polypharmacy and off-label use in inpatient units is commonly practiced. MEmind holds the potential to create a dynamic CDSS that provides real-time tracking of prescription practices and symptom change. Such feedback can help practitioners determine a maximally therapeutic drug treatment while avoiding unproductive overprescription and off-label use. PMID:28126703

  1. Sleep ameliorating effects of acupuncture in a psychiatric population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Lim, S.; Egger, J.I.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2013-01-01

    The interest of psychiatric patients for complementary medicine, such as acupuncture, is stable, but effect studies in psychiatry remain scarce. In this pilot study, the effects of 3 months of acupuncture treatment on sleep were evaluated and compared between a group of patients with schizophrenia

  2. Risk factors for violence among long-term psychiatric in-patients: a comparison between violent and non-violent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, C; Rosema, D

    2010-11-01

    The problem of the prediction of violence in psychiatric patients has led to a proliferation of research over the last decade. This study focuses on enduring patient related risk factors of violence, and investigates which long-term patients in Weskoppies Hospital (a specialist psychiatric hospital) are the most likely to commit violent acts. Nursing statistics on violent incidents and other security breaches were collected for 262 long-term in-patients over a six month period (April - September 2007). The 41 patients who committed violent acts were compared to the 221 non-violent patients in terms of demographic and clinical variables, using two-way tables and Chi-Square or Fisher's Exact Tests. The prevalence of violence among the long-term patients was 16%. Fighting among patients was the most common form of violence (58%). The most significant risk factors of violence among the long-term patients are: A diagnosis of mental retardation; first hospital admission before the age of 40 years; total hospital stay >12 years; current accommodation in a closed ward; habitual verbal aggression; absence of disorganised behaviour; and being clinically evaluated as unsuitable for community placement. The findings will help to identify those long-term patients most at risk of violence. The subgroup of patients with mental retardation is responsible for a isproportionately large number of violent acts in the hospital. The risk lies not so much in their psychiatric symptoms, but more in their cognitive ability, coping skills and inappropriate admission circumstances. Efforts should be directed - at a provincial level - towards their community placement.

  3. Changes in dynamic risk and protective factors for violence during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment: predicting reductions in postdischarge community recidivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries Robbé, Michiel; de Vogel, Vivienne; Douglas, Kevin S; Nijman, Henk L I

    2015-02-01

    Empirical studies have rarely investigated the association between improvements on dynamic risk and protective factors for violence during forensic psychiatric treatment and reduced recidivism after discharge. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of treatment progress in risk and protective factors on violent recidivism. For a sample of 108 discharged forensic psychiatric patients pre- and posttreatment assessments of risk (HCR-20) and protective factors (SAPROF) were compared. Changes were related to violent recidivism at different follow-up times after discharge. Improvements on risk and protective factors during treatment showed good predictive validity for abstention from violence for short- (1 year) as well as long-term (11 years) follow-up. This study demonstrates the sensitivity of the HCR-20 and the SAPROF to change and shows improvements on dynamic risk and protective factors are associated with lower violent recidivism long after treatment.

  4. Eveningness and poor sleep quality independently contribute to self-reported depression severity in psychiatric inpatients with affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias Johannes; Kundermann, Bernd; Cabanel, Nicole

    2016-07-01

    Background Chronotype and insomnia have been related to the development and to an unfavourable course of depression. However, the mutual relationship of both risk factors is as yet unclear, especially in acute, clinically manifest depressive disorders. Aims The present study was carried out to elucidate the separate direct and indirect influence of chronotype and poor sleep quality on depression severity in patients hospitalized for depression. Methods Depression severity (BDI-II), chronotype (Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire), and subjective sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index total score) were assessed concurrently in inpatients with a depressive syndrome and insomnia during routine treatment. Correlations, multiple regression and bootstrapping methods for testing mediation models were applied to assess the independent direct and indirect effects of chronotype and sleep quality on depression severity, after adjusting for effects of age and gender. Results Data from 57 consecutively admitted patients (88% with major depression) were analyzed (68% women, mean age 41 ± 13 years). Significant correlations between morningness-eveningness (p sleep quality (p sleep quality, age and gender, only chronotype (p sleep disturbances (p poor subjective sleep quality were independently and directly associated with higher depression severity in inpatients with depressive syndromes. Chronotype and sleep quality should be taken into account not only in risk assessment and prevention but also in hospitalized patients to develop and improve treatment options.

  5. Reducing seclusion and restraint use in inpatient settings: a phenomenological study of state psychiatric hospital leader and staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckshorn, Kevin Ann

    2014-11-01

    The current study explored and described the experiences of individuals who either directed or participated in successfully reducing the use of restraint and seclusion (R/S) in two inpatient public mental health hospitals. A phenomenological methodology was used to capture the lived experiences of 21 study participants, including senior leaders, middle managers, and direct care staff, who were interviewed as key informants. Thirty-two themes were extracted and subsequently synthesized into five "meaning themes." The five meaning themes yielded six significant findings: (a) critical roles of leadership and staff in successful R/S reduction projects; (b) ability of leaders and staff to change their beliefs and behaviors; (c) ability of leaders and staff to build a shared vision that was critical to the reduction of R/S use in in-patient settings; (d) identification and resolution of key challenges staff and leaders experienced in reduction efforts; (e) use of a solid performance improvement lens to direct changes in practices; and (f) important lessons learned. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. High prevalence of underweight and undernutrition in Japanese inpatients with schizophrenia: a nationwide survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Takuro; Suzuki, Yutaro; Yamazaki, Manabu; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Mori, Takao; Ozeki, Yuji; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Minami, Yoshitake; Okamoto, Kurefu; Sagae, Toyoaki; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To clarify the prevalence of underweight and overweight/obesity, and laboratory data for nutritional status in Japanese outpatients and inpatients with schizophrenia. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting A questionnaire conducted in inpatient and outpatient facilities in Japan. Participants The population of adult patients with schizophrenia in Japan (N=23 116). Main outcome measures The prevalence of underweight and undernutrition in Japanese inpatients and outpatients with schizophrenia. Results We conducted a large-scale investigation of the prevalence of underweight and undernutrition in 520 outpatient facilities and 247 inpatient facilities belonging to the Japan Psychiatric Hospitals Association between January 2012 and July 2013. There were 7655 outpatients and 15 461 inpatients with schizophrenia. There was a significant difference in the distribution of three body mass index levels between outpatients and inpatients (punderweight inpatients with schizophrenia was significantly higher than that among outpatients (punderweight individuals aged ≥40 years was higher in inpatients than in outpatients and in the general Japanese population. The proportion of individuals with hypocholesterolaemia was significantly higher in inpatients with schizophrenia than in outpatients (punderweight between outpatients and inpatients with schizophrenia; the proportion of severe underweight in inpatients was twofold higher than in outpatients. Conclusions The prevalence of underweight and undernutrition in Japanese inpatients with schizophrenia was higher than in outpatients and the general population. Therefore, the physical risk of inpatients should be carefully considered in clinical practice. PMID:26656016

  7. Psychiatric hospital beds and prison populations in South America since 1990: does the Penrose hypothesis apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Adrian P; Chow, Winnie S; Arduino, Margarita; Barrionuevo, Hugo; Fritsch, Rosemarie; Girala, Nestor; Minoletti, Alberto; Mitkiewicz, Flávia; Rivera, Guillermo; Tavares, María; Priebe, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    In 1939, English mathematician, geneticist, and psychiatrist Lionel Sharples Penrose hypothesized that the numbers of psychiatric hospital beds and the sizes of prison populations were inversely related; 75 years later, the question arises as to whether the hypothesis applies to recent developments in South America. To explore the possible association of changes in the numbers of psychiatric hospital beds with changes in the sizes of prison populations in South America since 1990. We searched primary sources for the numbers of psychiatric hospital beds in South American countries since 1990 (the year that the Latin American countries signed the Caracas Declaration) and compared these changes against the sizes of prison populations. The associations between the numbers of psychiatric beds and the sizes of prison populations were tested using fixed-effects regression of panel data. Economic variables were considered as covariates. Sufficiently reliable and complete data were obtained from 6 countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay. The numbers of psychiatric beds and the sizes of prison populations. Since 1990, the numbers of psychiatric beds decreased in all 6 countries (ranging from -2.0% to -71.9%), while the sizes of prison populations increased substantially (ranging from 16.1% to 273.0%). Panel data regression analysis across the 6 countries showed a significant inverse relationship between numbers of psychiatric beds and sizes of prison populations. On average, the removal of 1 bed was associated with 5.18 more prisoners (95% CI, 3.10-7.26; P = .001), which was reduced to 2.78 prisoners (95% CI, 2.59-2.97; P prison populations remained practically unchanged when income inequality was considered as a covariate (-4.28 [95% CI, -5.21 to -3.36]; P prison populations have increased against a background of strong economic growth. The changes appear to be associated because the numbers of beds decreased more extensively when and

  8. Inpatient Psychiatric Admission Rates in a U.S. Air Force Basic Military Training Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-20

    entity or an entity seeking to do business with the government, then your presentation should have an ethics review. If your travel is being paid...the date (month, day and year) along with the location of your presentation. It is important to update this information so that we can provide quality...request form to clinical investigations. S02 ISG/JAC ( Ethics Review) and Public Affa irs {S9 MOW/PA) for review and then forward you a final letter of

  9. Physical activity in adolescents with psychiatric disorders and in the general population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Adults who suffer from psychiatric disorders report low levels of physical activity and the activity levels differ between disorders. Less is known regarding physical activity across psychiatric disorders in adolescence. We investigate the frequency and type of physical activity in adolescent psychiatric patients, compared with adolescents in the general population. Methods A total of 566 adolescent psychiatric patients aged 13–18 years who participated in the CAP survey, Norway, were compared to 8173 adolescents aged 13–19 years who participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, Young-HUNT 3, Norway. All adolescents completed a questionnaire, including questions about physical activity and participation in team and individual sports. Results Approximately 50% of adolescents with psychiatric disorders and 25% of the population sample reported low levels of physical activity. Within the clinical sample, those with mood disorders (62%) and autism spectrum disorders (56%) were the most inactive and those with eating disorders (36%) the most active. This pattern was the same in individual and team sports. After multivariable adjustment, adolescents with a psychiatric disorder had a three-fold increased risk of lower levels of physical activity, and a corresponding risk of not participating in team and individual sports compared with adolescents in the general population. Conclusions Levels of physical activity were low in adolescent psychiatric patients compared with the general population, yet activity levels differed considerably between various disorders. The findings underscore the importance of assessing physical activity in adolescents with psychiatric disorders and providing early intervention to promote mental as well as physical health in this early stage of life. PMID:24450542

  10. Likelihood of obtaining Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) and SIRS-2 elevations among forensic psychiatric inpatients with screening elevations on the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmire, David M; Tarescavage, Anthony M; Gottfried, Emily D

    2016-12-01

    The Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST) was designed as a screening measure for feigned psychiatric symptoms. When M-FAST Total Scores are elevated (raw score ≥6), the test manual recommends follow-up with a more comprehensive measure of feigning, such as the widely used and researched Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) or the revised version of the test (SIRS-2). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate how often M-FAST screening elevations are associated with subsequent elevations on the SIRS or SIRS-2. The sample included archival data from 100 forensic psychiatric inpatients who obtained M-FAST Total Score elevations ≥6 during screening and were subsequently administered the SIRS (that was also rescored using SIRS-2 criteria). Among examinees who elevated the M-FAST over the recommended cutoff, 66.0% met standard SIRS feigning criteria, 42% met SIRS-2 criteria for feigning, and 81.0% obtained at least 1 SIRS/SIRS-2 elevation in the Probable Feigning range or higher. These results are consistent with the M-FAST manual guidelines, which support the use of the ≥6 M-FAST cutoff score to screen for potential feigning (but not as an independent marker of feigning). A higher M-FAST cutoff score of ≥16 was associated with subsequently meeting full SIRS criteria for feigning in 100.0% of protocols. Because the SIRS criteria were designed to have very low false positive rates, these findings indicate that more confident assertions about feigning can be made when elevations reach this level on the MFAST. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. [Special observation on psychiatric patients on acute inpatient wards at the Division of Psychiatry, Landspítali-University Hospital in Iceland, attitudes of patients and staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snorrason, Jón; Grímsdóttir, Gudrún Ulfhildur; Sigurdsson, Jón Fridrik

    2007-12-01

    Special observation (constant observation) of patients is common on psychiatric wards, both in Iceland and abroad, but very few studies have been conducted on their therapeutic value. The objective was to investigate the extent and nature of special observation on emergency wards at the division of psychiatry at the Landspitali-University Hospital in Iceland as well as the attitudes of patients and staff toward special observation. Information about patients on special observation was recorded over a three months period. Patients were interviewed with a standardised eleven questions interview shortly after the observation finished in order to investigate their attitudes toward the observation. Also, members of staff from each ward were asked to answer eight questions about their attitudes toward special observation in general. The Ethics Committee of Landspitali - University Hospital gave its permission for the study. During the research period observation was used for 157 patients, which is 31% of the total number of patients admitted during that period. Most of the patients (83%) were on 5-15 minutes observation, 25 per cent on close observation and 11 percent on suicide or constant observation. The majority of the patients claimed that security was the most important aspect of being on special observation, independent of which type of observation they were, and only one fifth felt that the company of staff was most important. The staff members on the other hand claimed that concern for the patient, respect and companionship were most important for the patients, independent of the type of observation used. The extent, nature and process of observation on acute inpatient wards in Iceland seems to be comparable to other studies from abroad. In view of the importance of special observations in psychiatric emergency care and their influence on patients' private life it is important to develop and implement clinical guidelines about their use.

  12. Prevalence of child abuse in child and adolescent clinical population referred to psychiatric facilities in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Gholamreza Nourazar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was ‎designed to evaluate the prevalence of child abuse in a child and adolescent psychiatric clinical population. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a clinical population of children and adolescents aged 8-18 years. 80 out-patients and 94 in-patients were selected according to probability proportional to size sampling. Kiddie schedule for affective disorder and schizophrenia questionnaire, a demographic questionnaire, and child abuse self-report scale were filled for each subject. Data were analyzed by using Stata software. Results: Among the out-patient subjects, 50 were male (62.5% and 30 were female (37.5%; for in-patient these subjects numbers were 76 (80.9% and 18 (19.1%, respectively. The mean age of subjects was 15.2 years in the in-patient group and 11.7 years in the out-patient group. In 66.1% of abuse cases the perpetrators were parents, 5.2% siblings, and 28.7% someone else. Among in-patient subjects, summed up prevalence rates of severe and very severe psychological abuse, neglect, physical abuse, and sexual abuse were 11.7, 33.0, 2.1, and 0.0%, respectively; for out-patient subjects these values were 3.8, 11.2, 3.8, and 0.0%, respectively. Moreover, among in-patient subjects, prevalence rates of moderate psychological abuse, neglect, physical abuse, and sexual abuse were 27.7, 27.7, 24.5, and 4.3%, respectively; and for out-patient subjects these values were 30.0, 27.5, 11.2, and 0.0%, respectively. Subjects with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD suffered a higher rate of physical abuse, whereas, subjects with bipolar mood disorder (BMD suffered a higher rate of sexual abuse. Conclusion: The prevalence of child abuse is highly prevalent in children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders. It is recommended that this population be screened routinely for child abuse.

  13. Psychiatric comorbidities in children and adolescents with psoriasis - a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todberg, T; Egeberg, A; Jensen, P

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is present in 2-3% of the adult European population(1) and 0.7-1.2% in children(1,2) . Adults with psoriasis have increased risk of depression(3) , and US data reported an increased risk of psychiatric diseases in pediatrics with psoriasis(4) , however European data are lacking. Primary...... outcomes were to examine the risk of psychiatric disorders including use of psychopharmacotherapy in children with psoriasis compared to healthy controls in a population-based cohort study. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.......Psoriasis is present in 2-3% of the adult European population(1) and 0.7-1.2% in children(1,2) . Adults with psoriasis have increased risk of depression(3) , and US data reported an increased risk of psychiatric diseases in pediatrics with psoriasis(4) , however European data are lacking. Primary...

  14. Assessing the contribution of borderline personality disorder and features to suicide risk in psychiatric inpatients with bipolar disorder, major depression and schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ruifan; Cohen, Lisa J; Tanis, Thachell; Qizilbash, Azra; Lopatyuk, Yana; Yaseen, Zimri S; Galynker, Igor

    2015-03-30

    Suicidal behavior often accompanies both borderline personality disorder (BPD) and severe mood disorders, and comorbidity between the two appears to further increase suicide risk. The current study aims to quantify the risk of suicidality conferred by comorbid BPD diagnosis or features in three affective disorders: major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BP) and schizoaffective disorder. One hundred forty-nine (149) psychiatric inpatients were assessed by SCID I and II, and the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Logistic regression analyses investigated the associations between previous suicide attempt and BPD diagnosis or features in patients with MDD, BP, and schizoaffective disorder, as well as a history of manic or major depressive episodes, and psychotic symptoms. Comorbid BPD diagnosis significantly increased suicide risk in the whole sample, and in those with MDD, BP, and history of depressive episode or psychotic symptoms. Each additional borderline feature also increased risk of past suicide attempt in these same groups (excepting BP) and in those with a previous manic episode. Of the BPD criteria, only unstable relationships and impulsivity independently predicted past suicide attempt. Overall, among patients with severe mood disorders, the presence of comorbid BPD features or disorder appears to substantially increase the risk of suicide attempts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Short-term effects of media exposure to the thin ideal in female inpatients with an eating disorder compared to female inpatients with a mood or anxiety disorder or women with no psychiatric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeber, Sabine; Burgmer, Ramona; Wyssen, Andrea; Leins, Judith; Rustemeier, Martina; Munsch, Simone; Herpertz, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    Previous research demonstrated that the exposure to media portrayals of the thin body ideal negatively affects body satisfaction and mood of healthy women and thus represents a sociocultural risk factor for the development of eating disorders. However, at present, it is not known whether negative effects of the thin ideal are pronounced in eating-disordered patients. Female inpatients with a current diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (N = 36), bulimia nervosa (N = 32), or mood or anxiety disorder (N = 31), and women with no current psychiatric diagnosis were randomly assigned to exposure to magazine pictures depicting the thin female body ideal or landscape scenes in two experimental phases (leafing through a magazine followed by instructed imagination of a picture from the magazine). The groups were compared on measures of body satisfaction and mood that were collected before and after the two phases. Leafing through a fashion magazine was not associated with negative effects on body satisfaction or mood in all groups. Imagining the thin ideal resulted in a decrease in body satisfaction and a decrease in positive mood. We found no diagnosis-specific effects indicating no stronger negative impact of the thin ideal on eating-disorder patients. Given the lacking differences between eating-disordered patients and controls, these findings underline the importance of future research to enhance our understanding of what happens when patients are exposed to external or internal stimuli of media images of the thin ideal. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:708-715). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome among psychiatric inpatients in Brazil Prevalência de síndrome metabólica em pacientes psiquiátricos internados no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo José Ribeiro Teixeira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Metabolic syndrome is a highly prevalent disorder among the general population. Studies show an even higher prevalence among psychiatric patients. The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome among inpatients of a psychiatric ward of a general hospital in Brazil and correlate it with their respective psychiatric diagnoses and with the antipsychotics and mood stabilizers used. METHOD: 170 inpatients (mean age: 45.6 years were evaluated according to the National Cholesterol Education Program criteria for metabolic syndrome, with a modification of the criteria for blood pressure and fasting glucose. RESULTS: The prevalence found was 29.4%, being higher in women (43.6% versus 20.8%, p = 0.002. The prevalence stratified by psychiatric diagnostic was 48.1% for depression, 38.3% for bipolar disorder, 31.8% for schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, 5.1% for alcoholism, and 23.1% for "other mental disorders". The prevalence for alcoholism was significantly lower than the prevalence rates associated with other diagnostic categories (p = 0.035. After using the multivariate analysis, female gender and use of lithium remained as factors associated with a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence found was 29.4%. Gender (female and use of lithium were factors significantly associated with the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome.OBJETIVO: A síndrome metabólica é um transtorno de alta prevalência na população em geral. Estudos demonstram prevalência ainda maior em pacientes psiquiátricos. O objetivo deste trabalho é avaliar a prevalência de síndrome metabólica em pacientes internados em uma enfermaria psiquiátrica de um hospital geral no Brasil e correlacioná-la com os diagnósticos psiquiátricos e com o uso de medicamentos antipsicóticos e moduladores do humor. MÉTODO: Cento e setenta pacientes (idade média: 45,6 anos foram avaliados de acordo com os critérios do National

  17. A population-based study of premorbid scholastic achievement among patients with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Vardit Zerem; Hornik-Lurie, Tzipi; Reichenberg, Abraham

    2017-07-01

    Population-based studies of premorbid cognitive functioning in schizophrenia have found verbal deficits and low IQ scores. It remains unclear, however, whether premorbid deficits are specific to schizophrenia, compared with other psychiatric disorders. Moreover, studies using school-based measures are few and their results inconsistent. This study assesses the eighth-grade (ages 13-14; n=11, 418) scholastic performance of adults with psychiatric disorders (n=194, 1.7, particularly with schizophrenia (n=86, 0.8%), comparing the results with those of their normative peers. The researchers examined report cards of eighth-graders at state secular schools in Jerusalem over a ten-year period (1978-1988), applying ANOVA and logistic regression models to evaluate associations between school performance and subsequent psychiatric hospitalization. The findings indicated that participants hospitalized with varied psychiatric disorders had lower grades in mathematics, gym, handcraft and academic core subjects, with significantly lower overall scores. Amended logistic regression models indicate that reduced performance (in mathematics, gym, handcraft and overall scores) was correlated with an increasing likelihood of hospitalization for the psychiatric disorders group and the subgroup with schizophrenia-related ailments. These results imply that eighth-grade school performance in core subjects is poorer among persons later hospitalized with psychiatric disorders than that of their classmates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Electronic media use and addiction among youth in psychiatric clinic versus school populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Susan; Saran, Kelly; Green, David A; Hong, Irene

    2012-12-01

    Electronic media use is highly prevalent among today's youth, and its overuse in the general population has been consistently associated with the presence of psychiatric symptoms. In contrast, little information exists about electronic media use among youth with psychiatric disorders. Our study aims to compare patterns of television and computer and gaming station use among youth in psychiatric clinic and community-based school populations. Surveys were completed by 210 youth and parents, from school (n = 110) and psychiatric clinic (n = 100) populations. Duration and frequency of television, video gaming, and nongaming computer activities were ascertained, along with addictive features of use. Descriptive and comparative analyses were conducted, with a statistical threshold of P addictive patterns related to computer and gaming station use were similar between the 2 populations. However, the clinically based sample favoured more violent games, with 29% reporting playing mature-rated games, compared with 13% reported by the school-based sample (P = 0.02). Youth with externalizing disorders expended greater time video gaming, compared with youth with internalizing disorders (P = 0.01). Clinically based samples of youth with mental illnesses spend more time engaged in electronic media activities and are more likely to play violent video games, compared with youth in the general population. Further research is needed to determine the long-term implications of these differences.

  19. A profile of perceived stress factors among nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, Maria; Erwee, Danelle; Serfontein, Isabel; Visser, Maré; Calitz, Frikkie J W; Joubert, Gina

    2017-03-16

    Nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients experience unique stress factors that can influence their personal well-being and work performance. To compile a profile of stress factors experienced by nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex (FSPC). This descriptive study included 89 nursing staff members from this environment. A questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic information and determine personal and occupational stressors. The data were summarised by frequencies and percentages (categorical variables) and means or percentiles (numerical variables). Most participants were aged between 46 and 55 (41.2%), female (93.2%) and black (93.2%), and 76.7% had children or dependant minors. The main stressors among participants were pressure providing financially for their children and dependant minors (71.2%), caring for them (39.4%) and fearing them moving away (25.8%). Occupational stressors included high workload (66.3%), lack of decision-making by superiors (58.1%), underpayment (53.5%), endangerment of physical health (52.3%) and safety (50.0%), working hours (51.2%), pressure of expectations from superiors (48.8%), uncertainty of employment (48.8%), work responsibilities (47.7%) and perceiving that skills and training were not appreciated. They experienced stress regarding health issues such as hyper- and hypotension (35.3%). Because of stress 34.5% of participants took leave, 34.5% developed depression and 14.3% had panic attacks. Most of the respondents experienced personal and occupational stress that influenced their health, which poses serious challenges for the management of the FSPC. Security should be upgraded, medical and psychological support for the staff and care facilities for their dependants should be provided, and financial problems experienced by these staff members should be addressed. The workload of the nursing staff at FSPC needs urgent attention. This

  20. A profile of perceived stress factors among nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Conradie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients experience unique stress factors that can influence their personal well-being and work performance. Objectives: To compile a profile of stress factors experienced by nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex (FSPC. Methods: This descriptive study included 89 nursing staff members from this environment. A questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic information and determine personal and occupational stressors. The data were summarised by frequencies and percentages (categorical variables and means or percentiles (numerical variables. Results: Most participants were aged between 46 and 55 (41.2%, female (93.2% and black (93.2%, and 76.7% had children or dependant minors. The main stressors among participants were pressure providing financially for their children and dependant minors (71.2%, caring for them (39.4% and fearing them moving away (25.8%. Occupational stressors included high workload (66.3%, lack of decision-making by superiors (58.1%, underpayment (53.5%, endangerment of physical health (52.3% and safety (50.0%, working hours (51.2%, pressure of expectations from superiors (48.8%, uncertainty of employment (48.8%, work responsibilities (47.7% and perceiving that skills and training were not appreciated. They experienced stress regarding health issues such as hyper- and hypotension (35.3%. Because of stress 34.5% of participants took leave, 34.5% developed depression and 14.3% had panic attacks. Conclusion: Most of the respondents experienced personal and occupational stress that influenced their health, which poses serious challenges for the management of the FSPC. Security should be upgraded, medical and psychological support for the staff and care facilities for their dependants should be provided, and financial problems experienced by these staff members should be addressed. The workload of

  1. Adapting the SRQ for Ethiopian Populations : A Culturally-Sensitive Psychiatric Screening Instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youngmann, Rafael; Zilber, Nelly; Workneh, Fikre; Giel, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a culturally sensitive psychiatric screening instrument valid for Ethiopians in Ethiopia and Israel. The study sample was composed of 356 Amharic-speaking Ethiopians from Ethiopia and Israel, aged 18-55, divided into three groups: i) general population; ii)

  2. Parent-youth agreement on symptoms and diagnosis: assessment with a diagnostic interview in an adolescent inpatient clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauth, Bertrand; Arnkelsson, Guðmundur B; Magnússon, Páll; Skarphéðinsson, Guðmundur Á; Ferrari, Pierre; Pétursson, Hannes

    2010-12-01

    Diagnostic information on adolescents may be elicited from both youths and their parents, especially for depressive and suicidal symptomatology. The objective of this study was to examine the degree of agreement between parent and adolescent reports of major psychiatric disorders, at the diagnostic and at the symptom level, in a severely affected inpatient clinical population. 64 parent-adolescent pairs were interviewed separately with the semi-structured diagnostic interview Kiddie-SADS-PL. Symptomatology was also assessed with 11 self-report and parent-report scales, all translated, adapted and in most cases validated in Iceland. A total of 25 subscales were included to assess emotional dimensions such as depression or anxiety and cognitive dimensions such as attention deficit or self-concept. Good agreement was found for social phobia and fair agreement for generalized anxiety disorder. Although parent-youth agreement was poor in most cases at the symptoms level, significant correlations indicated consistency for most severity scores, except those related to depressive symptomatology, attention deficit, separation anxiety or conduct disorder. The low agreement between reports of suicidal ideation is in line with results from previous studies and suggests that parents might under- or over-estimate this symptomatology. The combination of data obtained with diagnostic interviews and rating-scales confirmed results from prior empirical work, giving greater weight to parents' reports of observable behavior and to adolescents' reports of subjective experiences, especially depressive symptomatology. Our findings suggest that both parent and child informants are necessary to obtain adequate assessments in adolescents. Further research should explore the correspondence between discrepant diagnoses and external criteria such as parental psychopathology or parent-child relationships and attachment. Psychoanalysis could benefit from cognitive neuroscience and use cognitive

  3. Comparisons Between the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent- Restructured Form (MMPI-A RF) and MMPI-A in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, John M; Pogge, David L; Archer, Robert P

    2017-04-20

    This study explored the association between the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-Adolescent-Restructured Form (MMPI-A-RF) and the MMPI-Adolescent (MMPI-A) form in a sample of 3,516 adolescents receiving inpatient psychiatric treatment, including 2,798 adolescents meeting validity inclusion cutoffs for both measures. There was 92.5% agreement rate with respect to global identification of cases as valid or invalid and some empirical support for lowering interpretive cutoffs for validity scales on the MMPI-A-RF. The MMPI-A-RF Demoralization Scale (RCd) was shown to correlate significantly less strongly with Restructured Clinical (RC) scales than with MMPI-A clinical scales. RC scales also demonstrated significantly lower mean interscale correlations than MMPI-A clinical scales. As expected, this greater level of scale independence resulted in significantly fewer profiles with multiple scale elevations. As was anticipated, with the exception of RC1 predicting MMPI-A hypochondriasis, correlational and classification agreement analyses suggested moderate associations between the RC and MMPI-A clinical scales, but somewhat stronger agreement between comparable PSY-5 scales. Changes in interpretive cutoff procedures for the RC scales, including RCd, also resulted in 5.5% fewer "within normal limits" profiles than the use of MMPI-A with all 10 clinical scales. Finally, stepwise linear regression analyses indicated that MMPI-A-RF Higher-Order scales were best predicted by those MMPI-A clinical scale combinations that they are purported to be linked with in the MMPI-A-RF manual. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Perceived Dangerousness as Related to Psychiatric Symptoms and Psychiatric Service Use – a Vignette Based Representative Population Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowislo, Julia F.; Gonet-Wirz, Franca; Borgwardt, Stefan; Lang, Undine E.; Huber, Christian G.

    2017-01-01

    Perceptions of dangerousness are an influential component of mental health stigma and can be driven by the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. Yet, no previous study compared symptoms and service use associated perceptions of dangerousness. Therefore, we conducted a representative survey (N = 2,207) in the canton of Basel-Stadt, Switzerland. Participants were asked to answer the perceived dangerousness scale with respect to a vignette that either depicted psychiatric symptoms of a fictitious character or a psychiatric service institution the fictitious character had been admitted to. Between the vignettes, type of symptoms, type of psychiatric service, dangerousness, and gender were systematically varied. Perceived dangerousness was significantly lower as related to psychiatric service use than related to psychiatric symptoms. Overall, symptoms of alcohol dependency, behavior endangering others, and male gender of the fictitious character tend to increase perceived dangerousness. Furthermore, being hospitalized in a psychiatric unit at a general hospital or the rater being familiar with psychiatric services tends to decrease perceived dangerousness. Effective anti-stigma initiatives should integrate education about dangerousness as well as methods to increase familiarity with psychiatry. Additionally, an integration of modern psychiatry in somato-medical care institutions might decrease stigmatization. PMID:28367993

  5. Perceived Dangerousness as Related to Psychiatric Symptoms and Psychiatric Service Use - a Vignette Based Representative Population Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowislo, Julia F; Gonet-Wirz, Franca; Borgwardt, Stefan; Lang, Undine E; Huber, Christian G

    2017-04-03

    Perceptions of dangerousness are an influential component of mental health stigma and can be driven by the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. Yet, no previous study compared symptoms and service use associated perceptions of dangerousness. Therefore, we conducted a representative survey (N = 2,207) in the canton of Basel-Stadt, Switzerland. Participants were asked to answer the perceived dangerousness scale with respect to a vignette that either depicted psychiatric symptoms of a fictitious character or a psychiatric service institution the fictitious character had been admitted to. Between the vignettes, type of symptoms, type of psychiatric service, dangerousness, and gender were systematically varied. Perceived dangerousness was significantly lower as related to psychiatric service use than related to psychiatric symptoms. Overall, symptoms of alcohol dependency, behavior endangering others, and male gender of the fictitious character tend to increase perceived dangerousness. Furthermore, being hospitalized in a psychiatric unit at a general hospital or the rater being familiar with psychiatric services tends to decrease perceived dangerousness. Effective anti-stigma initiatives should integrate education about dangerousness as well as methods to increase familiarity with psychiatry. Additionally, an integration of modern psychiatry in somato-medical care institutions might decrease stigmatization.

  6. Medicare Program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system changes and FY2011 rates; provider agreements and supplier approvals; and hospital conditions of participation for rehabilitation and respiratory care services; Medicaid program: accreditation for providers of inpatient psychiatric services. Final rules and interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    : We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs. We also are setting forth the update to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. We are updating the payment policy and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and setting forth the changes to the payment rates, factors, and other payment rate policies under the LTCH PPS. In addition, we are finalizing the provisions of the August 27, 2009 interim final rule that implemented statutory provisions relating to payments to LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities and increases in beds in existing LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities under the LTCH PPS. We are making changes affecting the: Medicare conditions of participation for hospitals relating to the types of practitioners who may provide rehabilitation services and respiratory care services; and determination of the effective date of provider agreements and supplier approvals under Medicare. We are also setting forth provisions that offer psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs increased flexibility in obtaining accreditation to participate in the Medicaid program. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs will have the choice of undergoing a State survey or of obtaining accreditation from a national accrediting organization whose hospital accreditation

  7. [Prevalence and impact of stalking in psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressing, Harald; Scheuble, Barbara; Gass, Peter

    2009-10-01

    The present study was designed to to investigate lifetime prevalence and types of stalking victimization in a sample of psychiatric in-patients. 300 consecutively admitted patients of the psychiatric clinic of the Central Institute of Mental Health were included and examined with a standardized stalking victimisation questionnaire. The cohort of psychiatric in-patients had a lifetime prevalence of being a stalking victim of 21.3 % . The percentage of men and women affected was equal. The course of stalking was more difficult to handle and more violent compared to a representative cohort of the general population of Mannheim. In most cases, the psychiatric disorder had been present before the stalking victimization started. The attending psychiatrists were only aware of the stalking victimization in four cases. Stalking seems to be a relevant problem in psychiatric patients. The results indicate that there is urgent need for advanced educational programs for patients and psychiatrists. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart. New York.

  8. 'I can see it and I can feel it, but I can't put my finger on it': A Foucauldian discourse analysis of experiences of relating on psychiatric inpatient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, John; Holttum, Sue; Springham, Neil; Butt, Kate

    2017-10-27

    Research has shown interpersonal relationships influence experiences of inpatient psychiatric services. This study explored inpatient staff and service users' talk about relating, and consequences on available/limited social actions. A Foucauldian discourse analysis was used to analyse transcribed semi-structured interviews and focus groups with current inpatient staff members and members of a service-user involvement group. Two focus groups (service users n = 10; staff n = 6) and five interviews (service users n = 2; staff n = 3) were held, with participants responding to questions regarding the discursive object of 'experiences of relating on inpatient wards'. A dominant 'medical-technical-legal' discourse was seen, alongside a counter discourse of 'ordinary humane relating'. Through the tensions between these discourses emerged a discourse of 'collaborative exploration'. The medical-technical-legal discourse perpetuates notions of mental illness as impenetrable to relating. Staff fear of causing harm and positions of legal accountability generate mistrust which obstructs relating, whilst patients expect to be asked their opinions on their experiences and to be involved in deciding what treatment to accept, and experience frustration and alienation when this is not forthcoming. Ordinary humane relating was described as vital for service users in regaining a sense of self, although not considered enough in itself to promote recovery/wellness. 'Treatment for my problems' was constructed by service users as emerging through the collaborative exploration discourse, where therapeutic relationships can develop, enabling change and a return to safety. Discourse analysis of how we talk can help us understand the complexities of being, working, and relating on psychiatric inpatient units. Relating as constructed through the medical-technical-legal discourse is seen as the most legitimized but least fulfilling for staff and service users alike. Both staff and

  9. Lifetime prevalence, psychiatric comorbidity and demographic correlates of "hikikomori" in a community population in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Asuka; Miyake, Yuko; Kawakami, Norito; Tsuchiya, Masao; Tachimori, Hisateru; Takeshima, Tadashi

    2010-03-30

    The epidemiology of "hikikomori" (acute social withdrawal) in a community population is not clear, although it has been noted for the past decade in Japan. The objective of this study is to clarify the prevalence of "hikikomori" and to examine the relation between "hikikomori" and psychiatric disorders. A face-to-face household survey was conducted of community residents (n=4134). We defined "hikikomori" as a psychopathological phenomenon in which people become completely withdrawn from society for 6 months or longer. We asked all respondents whether they had any children currently experiencing "hikikomori". For respondents aged 20-49 years old (n=1660), we asked whether they had ever experienced "hikikomori". A total of 1.2% had experienced "hikikomori" in their lifetime. Among them, 54.5% had also experienced a psychiatric (mood, anxiety, impulse control, or substance-related) disorder in their lifetime. Respondents who experienced "hikikomori" had a 6.1 times higher risk of mood disorder. Among respondents, 0.5% currently had at least one child who had experienced "hikikomori". The study suggests that "hikikomori" is common in the community population in Japan. While psychiatric disorders were often comorbid with "hikikomori", half of the cases seem to be "primary hikikomori" without a comorbid psychiatric disorder. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nursing interventions in inpatient psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frauenfelder, F.; Muller-Staub, M.; Needham, I.; Achterberg, T. van

    2013-01-01

    The successful application of the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) in inpatient psychiatry depends on whether the classification adequately describes nursing care in this setting. The present study aimed to identify nursing interventions mentioned in journal articles on psychiatric

  11. Abstinence phenomena of chronic cannabis-addicts prospectively monitored during controlled inpatient detoxification (Part II): Psychiatric complaints and their relation to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its metabolites in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Udo; Borda, Thorsten; Scherbaum, Norbert; Specka, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the impact of inpatient detoxification treatment on psychiatric symptoms of chronic cannabis addicts and to analyze the influence of serum cannabinoid levels on the severity of these symptoms. Thirty five treatment-seeking, not active co-morbid chronic cannabis dependents (ICD-10) were studied on admission and on abstinence days 8 and 16, using several observational and self-report scales, such as Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA), Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Simultaneously obtained serum was analyzed with regard to levels of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its main metabolites 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH) and 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH). At admission, nearly 90% of the patients were not, or only mildly, affected by depression, anxiety or manic symptoms. In contrast, patients' self-description indicated a strong psychiatric burden in approximately 60% of the cases. All patients improved significantly within 16 days of the treatment. Effect sizes ranged from 0.7 to 1.4. (Cohen's d) for the respective scales. Serum THC-levels were positively associated with impairment of cognition in HAMA and motor retardation in BPRS. All other test results were not significantly related to the serum levels of the measured cannabinoids. Effects of the cannabis withdrawal syndrome and executive dysfunctions might explain the discrepancy between the observer ratings and self-reported psychiatric burden. Inpatient cannabis detoxification treatment significantly improved psychiatric symptoms. Serum THC-levels were not associated with affective symptoms and anxiety but predicted cognitive impairment and motor retardation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Aggression levels in treatment seeking inpatients with alcohol-related problems compared to levels in the general population in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerevich, József; Bácskai, Erika; Czobor, Pál

    2007-08-01

    Association between aggression and heavy alcohol use is documented in the literature in various disparate samples and settings. Comparison of trait aggression levels using a uniform methodology across different samples is almost entirely lacking. This study compared trait aggression levels of treated inpatients with severe alcohol-related problems with those of a nationally representative sample of the general adult population using the same methodology. Results indicated that in the patient population the trait aggression levels were substantially higher than in the general population. Because several studies have demonstrated that aggressive personality traits are closely linked with violence after drinking alcohol, our results further highlight the importance of treatment programs in this at-risk population. From a methodological perspective, the higher trait aggression level of inpatients with alcohol-related problems compared with the general population supports the assumption that the underrepresentation of alcoholics in the population surveys may restrict the range in the severity of alcohol use and dependence, and may therefore produce severely biased results in such studies.

  13. Suicide ideation and attempts and bullying in children and adolescents: psychiatric and general population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Baweja, Raman; Calhoun, Susan L; Syed, Ehsan; Mahr, Fauzia; Siddiqui, Farhat

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the relationship between bullying and suicide behavior yield mixed results. This is the first study comparing frequencies of suicide behavior in four bullying groups (bully, victim, bully/victim, and neither) in two large psychiatric and community samples of young children and adolescents. Maternal ratings of bullying and suicide ideation and attempts were analyzed for 1,291 children with psychiatric disorders and 658 children in the general population 6-18 years old. For both the psychiatric and community samples, suicide ideation and attempt scores for bully/victims were significantly higher than for victims only and for neither bullies nor victims. Differences between victims only and neither victims nor bullies were nonsignificant. Controlling for sadness and conduct problems, suicide behavior did not differ between the four bullying groups. All children with suicide attempts had a comorbid psychiatric disorder, as did all but two children with suicide ideation. Although the contribution of bullying per se to suicide behavior independent of sadness and conduct problems is small, bullying has obvious negative psychological consequences that make intervention imperative. Interventions need to focus on the psychopathology associated with being a victim and/or perpetrator of bullying in order to reduce suicide behavior.

  14. Do intercultural factors play a role in exacerbating psychiatric symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Yong Lock; Yap, Hwa Ling

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old mixed-race woman suffering from recurrent major depressive episodes, with suicidal ideation and risk, involving several inpatient admissions. A comorbid diagnosis of borderline personality disorder was also recorded in one of her previous inpatient admissions. During her last inpatient admission, a multidisciplinary case discussion and review of the patient's life highlighted several possible intercultural trigger factors that could have contributed to the exacerbation of her psychiatric illness. We emphasise the need to explore intercultural predisposing and precipitating factors for a more complete psychodynamic understanding of psychiatric illnesses among the multiracial population of Singapore. This also adds to the discussion on the management of such patients with the option of formal in-depth psychotherapy in adjunct to medication. This may prevent recurrent relapses, modify suicide intent and reduce the necessity for inpatient treatment, which will be cost-effective and result in efficacious treatment.

  15. Perceived Dangerousness as Related to Psychiatric Symptoms and Psychiatric Service Use ? a Vignette Based Representative Population Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Julia F. Sowislo; Franca Gonet-Wirz; Stefan Borgwardt; Lang, Undine E.; Christian G. Huber

    2017-01-01

    Perceptions of dangerousness are an influential component of mental health stigma and can be driven by the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. Yet, no previous study compared symptoms and service use associated perceptions of dangerousness. Therefore, we conducted a representative survey (N?=?2,207) in the canton of Basel-Stadt, Switzerland. Participants were asked to answer the perceived dangerousness scale with respect to a vignette that either d...

  16. Psychopathology of the General Population Referred by Primary Care Physicians for Urgent Assessment in Psychiatric Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith McLenan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the type, severity and progression of psychiatric pathologies in a sample of 372 outpatients (age range 18–65 years referred by their primary general practitioners (GPs to an Urgent Referral Team (URT based in a psychiatric hospital in Aberdeen, Scotland. This team offers immediate appointments (1- to 7-day delays for rapid assessments and early interventions to the outpatients referred by their primary family doctors.Method: One-sample t-test and z statistic were used for data analysis. From the total population, a convenience sample of 40 people was selected and assessed to evaluate whether follow-up appointments after the first visit could reduce the severity of suicidal ideation, depression and anxiety in the outpatients seen by the URT. A two-sample t-test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess the variations in the scores during the follow-up visits.Results: We found a statistically significant prevalence of depressive disorders, comorbid with anxiety at first presentation in people who were females, white, never married, living with a partner, not studying and not in paid employment. The common presentation of borderline personality disorder and dysthymia in this population underscores its vulnerability to major socioeconomic challenges.Conclusion: The data confirmed the impact that primary care cooperation with psychiatric hospitals can have on the psychiatric system, and as a reflection, on the population’s mental health and well-being. In fact, active cooperation and early diagnosis and intervention will help detect cases at risk in the general population and reduce admissions into hospitals.

  17. Predictors of suicide in the patient population admitted to a locked-door psychiatric acute ward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roar Fosse

    Full Text Available No prior study appears to have focused on predictors of suicide in the general patient population admitted to psychiatric acute wards. We used a case-control design to investigate the association between suicide risk factors assessed systematically at admission to a locked-door psychiatric acute ward in Norway and subsequent death by suicide.From 2008 to 2013, patients were routinely assessed for suicide risk upon admission to the acute ward with a 17-item check list based on recommendations from the Norwegian Directorate of Health and Social Affairs. Among 1976 patients admitted to the ward, 40 patients, 22 men and 18 women, completed suicide within December 2014.Compared to a matched control group (n = 120, after correction for multiple tests, suicide completers scored significantly higher on two items on the check list: presence of suicidal thoughts and wishing to be dead. An additional four items were significant in non-corrected tests: previous suicide attempts, continuity of suicidal thoughts, having a suicide plan, and feelings of hopelessness, indifference, and/or aggression. A brief scale based on these six items was the only variable associated with suicide in multivariate regression analysis, but its predictive value was poor.Suicide specific ideations may be the most central risk markers for suicide in the general patient population admitted to psychiatric acute wards. However, a low predictive value may question the utility of assessing suicide risk.

  18. Sleep Quality and Factors Influencing Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Quality in the General Internal Medicine Inpatient Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Dobing

    Full Text Available Sleep quality in hospitalized Canadian General Internal Medicine patients is not well characterized. Our goals were to characterize hospital sleep quality in this population and identify potentially modifiable barriers to good sleep.GIM inpatients at a quaternary centre in Edmonton, Canada completed a survey, including the Verran-Snyder Halpern (VSH questionnaire, to characterize the previous night's sleep within 48 hours prior to discharge. A chart review was also completed to assess comorbidities, discharge diagnoses, and pharmaceutical sleep aid use.Patients reported significantly worse nighttime sleep duration in hospital compared with home (mean 5.5 versus 7.0 hours per night, p < 0.0001. Sleep quality was poor, as measured by the VSH disturbance (mean 371, effectiveness (190, and supplementation (115 subscales. Variables independently associated with poorer sleep duration in multivariable regression include prior diagnosis of sleep disorder and multi-patient occupancy rooms. Age, sex, admitting diagnosis, length of stay, frequency of vital checks, and use of sleep pharmaceuticals during the index hospitalization were not associated with sleep duration. The most frequently reported reasons for poor sleep included noise (59%, nursing interruptions (30%, uncomfortable beds (18%, bright lights (16%, unfamiliar surroundings (14%, and pain (9%.Sleep quality for GIM inpatients is significantly worse in hospital than at home. There is a need to test non-pharmacologic interventions to address the most frequently identified factors causing poor sleep hygiene for GIM inpatients.

  19. Nursing phenomena in inpatient psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frauenfelder, F.; Muller-Staub, M.; Needham, I.; Achterberg, T. van

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the question if the nursing diagnosis classification of North American Nursing Association-International (NANDA-I) describes the adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. The present study aimed to identify nursing phenomena mentioned in journal articles about the psychiatric

  20. The prevalence of personality disorder in a psychiatric and substance abuse population in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, G; Martin, J; Hickling, F W

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of personality disorders in patients admitted to the psychiatric wards of the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI). Patients (n = 100) sequentially admitted to the psychiatric wards of the UHWI were assessed for personality disorder using the gold standard of a consultant assessment using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision (DSM IV-TR) diagnostic criteria for personality disorder, the International Personality Disorder Examination Screening questionnaire (IPDE-S), and the Jamaica Personality Disorder Inventory (JPDI). The three assessment instruments identified a prevalence of personality disorder in the cohort of patients of 51% consultant DSM-IV-TR assessment, 57% JPDI and 86% IPDE-S. The prevalence rate identified by the IPDE-S was significantly higher that the local instruments used (p Jamaica is comparable to the prevalence rate of studies in other countries in a similar population.

  1. Predictors of Mental Health Review Tribunal (MHRT) outcome in a forensic inpatient population: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Amelia; Dean, Kimberlie; Fahy, Tom; Cullen, Alexis E

    2017-01-17

    Previous studies have investigated factors associated with outcome at Mental Health Review Tribunals (MHRTs) in forensic psychiatric patients; however, dynamic variables such as treatment compliance and substance misuse have scarcely been examined, particularly in UK samples. We aimed to determine whether dynamic factors related to behaviour, cooperation with treatment, and activities on the ward were prospectively associated with outcome at MHRT. At baseline, demographic, clinical, behavioural, and treatment-related factors were ascertained via electronic medical records and census forms completed by the patient's clinical team. Data on MHRTs (i.e., number attended, responsible clinician's recommendation, and outcome) were collected at a 2-year follow-up. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine factors associated with outcome among those who attended a MHRT within the follow-up period. Of the 135 forensic inpatients examined at baseline, 79 patients (59%) attended a MHRT during the 2-year follow-up period and therefore comprised the study sample. Of these 79 patients included in the current study, 28 (35%) were subsequently discharged. In univariable analyses, unescorted community leave, responsible clinician's recommendation of discharge, and restricted Mental Health Act section were associated with a greater likelihood of discharge at MHRT; whilst inpatient aggression, a recent episode of acute illness, higher total score on the Historical Clinical Risk - 20 (HCR-20), higher HCR-20 clinical and risk scores, and agitated behaviour were negatively associated with discharge (p verbal aggression, and physical violence on the ward, achieving unescorted community leave, and targeting specific items on the HCR-20 risk assessment tool, patients may be able to improve their changes of discharge at a MHRT.

  2. Association of nutritional risk and adverse medical outcomes across different medical inpatient populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Susan; Lechtenboehmer, Christian; Bally, Martina; Fehr, Rebecca; Deiss, Manuela; Faessler, Lukas; Kutz, Alexander; Steiner, Deborah; Rast, Anna C; Laukemann, Svenja; Kulkarni, Prasad; Stanga, Zeno; Haubitz, Sebastian; Huber, Andreas; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of nutritional risk and its association with multiple adverse clinical outcomes in a large cohort of acutely ill medical inpatients from a Swiss tertiary care hospital. We prospectively followed consecutive adult medical inpatients for 30 d. Multivariate regression models were used to investigate the association of the initial Nutritional Risk Score (NRS 2002) with mortality, impairment in activities of daily living (Barthel Index nutritional risk and mortality (OR/HR, 7.82; 95% CI, 6.04-10.12), impaired Barthel Index (OR/HR, 2.56; 95% CI, 2.12-3.09), time to hospital discharge (OR/HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.43-0.52), hospital readmission (OR/HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.08-1.97), and all five dimensions of QoL measures. Associations remained significant after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, and medical diagnoses. Results were robust in subgroup analysis with evidence of effect modification (P for interaction Nutritional risk is significant in acutely ill medical inpatients and is associated with increased medical resource use, adverse clinical outcomes, and impairments in functional ability and QoL. Randomized trials are needed to evaluate evidence-based preventive and treatment strategies focusing on nutritional factors to improve outcomes in these high-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How different is the care of terminal pancreatic cancer patients in inpatient palliative care units and acute hospital wards? A nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jack P; Wu, Chen-Yi; Hwang, I-Hsuan; Kao, Chien-Hui; Hung, Yi-Ping; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Li, Chung-Pin

    2016-01-08

    Inpatient palliative care is important for patients with terminal pancreatic cancer. However, the differences between inpatient palliative care and acute hospital care for inpatients with pancreatic cancer have not been explored in a population-based study. This population-based nationwide study was conducted using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database to analyze the differences between inpatient palliative care and acute hospital care for inpatients with pancreatic cancer. We identified 854 patients with terminal pancreatic cancer, who had received in-hospital end-of-life care between January 2003 and December 2006. These patients were then sub-divided and matched 1:1 (using propensity score matching) according to whether they received inpatient palliative care (n = 276) or acute hospital care (n = 276). These groups were subsequently compared to evaluate any differences in the use of aggressive procedures, prescribed medications, and medical costs. Inpatient palliative care was typically provided by family physicians (39%) and oncologists (25%), while acute hospital care was typically provided by oncologists (29%) and gastroenterologists (24%). The inpatient palliative care group used natural opium alkaloids significantly more frequently than the acute hospital care group (84.4% vs. 56.5%, respectively; P care group also had shorter hospital stays (10.6 ± 11.1 days vs. 20.6 ± 16.3 days, respectively; P care units received more frequent pain control treatments, underwent fewer aggressive procedures, and incurred lower medical costs. Therefore, inpatient palliative care should be considered a viable option for patients with terminal pancreatic cancer.

  4. Psychiatric Hospital Bed Numbers and Prison Population Sizes in 26 European Countries: A Critical Reconsideration of the Penrose Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüml, Victor; Waldhör, Thomas; Kapusta, Nestor D; Vyssoki, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a revived interest in the validity of the Penrose hypothesis, which was originally postulated over 75 years ago. It suggests an inverse relationship between the numbers of psychiatric hospital beds and the sizes of prison population. This study aims to investigate the association between psychiatric hospital beds and prison populations in a large sample of 26 European countries between 1993 and 2011. The association between prison population sizes and numbers of psychiatric hospital beds was assessed by means of Spearman correlations and modeled by a mixed random coefficient regression model. Socioeconomic variables were considered as covariates. Data were retrieved from Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union. Mean Spearman correlation coefficients between psychiatric beds and prison population showed a significant negative association (-0.35; p = hypothesis. Notably, the results of the mixed-model show a significant variation in the magnitude and direction of the association of psychiatric hospital bed numbers and the prison population sizes between countries. In this sense, our results challenge the prevalent opinion that a reduction of psychiatric beds subsequently leads to increasing incarcerations. These findings also work against the potential stigmatization of individuals suffering from mental disorders as criminals, which could be an unintentional byproduct of the Penrose hypothesis.

  5. Psychiatric services in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmebarek, Zoubir

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the current provision of psychiatric services in Algeria - in particular, in-patient and out-patient facilities, child psychiatry and human resources. Education, training, associations and research in the field of mental health are also briefly presented. The challenges that must dealt with to improve psychiatric care and to comply with international standards are listed, by way of conclusion.

  6. Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders among the Rural Geriatric Population: A Pilot Study in Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreejith S. Nair

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing life expectancy around the world, an outstanding achievement of our century, has brought with it new public health challenges. India is the second most populous country in the world, with over 72 million inhabitants above 60 years of age as of 2001. The life expectancy in India increased from 32 years in 1947 to over 66 years in 2010, with 8.0% of the population now reaching over 60 years of age. Few studies in India target the health, especially mental health, of this geriatric population. This study aims to estimate the current prevalence of psychiatric disorders in the geriatric population of the rural area of Singanodi,Karnataka, India.Methods: This cross sectional, epidemiological, community-based study was conducted in a rural health training area of Singanodi, Raichur District, Karnataka, India.The General Health Questionnaire-12, Mini Mental State Examination, and Geriatric Depression Scale were administered to 366 participants. Chi square tests with Yates correction were utilized for statistical analysis using SPSS 19.0 software.Results:We found that 33.9% of the geriatric population in the selected province were above the threshold for mental illness based on the GHQ-12 questionnaire. Females had a higher prevalence of mental disorder at 77.6% (152 out of 196 as compared to males who had a prevalence of 42.4% (72 out of 170. The most common psychiatric disorder was depression (21.9%, and generalized anxiety was present in 10.7% of the study population. Prevalence of cognitive impairment was 16.3%, with a significantly higher percentage of  affected individuals in 80+ age group.Conclusion: Mental disorders are common among elderly people, but they are not well documented in rural India. The assessment of psychiatric disorder prevalence will help strengthen psycho-geriatric services and thus improve the quality of life of the elderly.  A system that ensures comprehensive health care will have to be developed for

  7. Characteristics of aggression among psychiatric inpatients by ward type in Japan: Using the Staff Observation Aggression Scale - Revised (SOAS-R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Makiko; Noda, Toshie; Sugiyama, Naoya; Yoshihama, Fumihiro; Miyake, Michi; Ito, Hiroto

    2017-12-01

    Aggressive behaviour by psychiatric patients is a serious issue in clinical practice, and adequate management of such behaviour is required, with careful evaluation of the factors causing the aggression. To examine the characteristics of aggressive incidents by ward type, a cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted for 6 months between April 2012 and June 2013 using the Staff Observation Aggression Scale - Revised, Japanese version (SOAS-R) in 30 wards across 20 Japanese psychiatric hospitals. Participating wards were categorized into three types based on the Japanese medical reimbursement system: emergency psychiatric, acute psychiatric, and standard wards (common in Japan, mostly treating non-acute patients). On analyzing the 443 incidents reported, results showed significant differences in SOAS-R responses by ward type. In acute and emergency psychiatric wards, staff members were the most common target of aggression. In acute psychiatric wards, staff requiring patients to take medication was the most common provocation, and verbal aggression was the most commonly used means. In emergency psychiatric wards, victims felt threatened. In contrast, in standard wards, both the target and provocation of aggression were most commonly other patients, hands were used, victims reported experiencing physical pain, and seclusion was applied to stop their behaviour. These findings suggest that ward environment was an important factor influencing aggressive behaviour. Ensuring the quality and safety of psychiatric care requires understanding the characteristics of incidents that staff are likely to encounter in each ward type, as well as implementing efforts to deal with the incidents adequately and improve the treatment environment. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  8. Platelet monoamine oxidase activity as a biological marker in a Swedish forensic psychiatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålenheim, E G; von Knorring, L; Oreland, L

    1997-03-24

    Platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activities were determined in 58 non-psychotic males at forensic psychiatric examinations. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of platelet MAO activity as a biological marker in forensic psychiatry, a clinical field with growing need of safe predictors for both treatment outcome and behavior. The study population was heterogeneous with respect to clinical and personality disorders and personality traits. The results confirmed the role of platelet MAO activity as a biological marker for stable personality traits such as impulsiveness, monotony avoidance and aggressiveness. Disorders with high frequencies of these personality traits such as borderline personality disorder and type II alcoholism could secondarily be associated with low levels of platelet MAO activity, whereas no such associations could be found regarding other clinical or personality disorders. Neither psychopathy as assessed by the means of PCL-R nor behavior such as abuse or criminality could be associated with platelet MAO activity. The conclusion is that, due to its close relationship with stable personality traits, platelet MAO activity serves a marker for vulnerability also in forensic psychiatric populations. On the other hand it is not a marker for clinical or personality disorders, or behavior per se.

  9. The Use of Telemedicine and Mobile Technology to Promote Population Health and Population Management for Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvey, Carolyn; Fortney, John

    2017-10-16

    This article discusses recent applications in telemedicine to promote the goals of population health and population management for people suffering psychiatric disorders. The use of telemedicine to promote collaborative care, self-monitoring and chronic disease management, and population screening has demonstrated broad applicability and effectiveness. Collaborative care using videoconferencing to facilitate mental health specialty consults has demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of depression, PTSD, and also ADHD in pediatric populations. Mobile health is currently being harnessed to monitor patient symptom trajectories with the goal of using machine learning algorithms to predict illness relapse. Patient portals serve as a bridge between patients and providers. They provide an electronically secure shared space for providers and patients to collaborate and optimize care. To date, research has supported the effectiveness of telemedicine in promoting population health. Future endeavors should focus on developing the most effective clinical protocols for using these technologies to ensure long-term use and maximum effectiveness in reducing population burden of mental health.

  10. Combined effects of physical illness and comorbid psychiatric disorder on risk of suicide in a national population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ping; Hawton, Keith; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Webb, Roger

    2014-06-01

    People with physical illness often have psychiatric disorder and this comorbidity may have a specific influence on their risk of suicide. To examine how physical illness and psychiatric comorbidity interact to influence risk of suicide, with particular focus on relative timing of onset of the two types of illness. Based on the national population of Denmark, individual-level data were retrieved from five national registers on 27 262 suicide cases and 468 007 gender- and birth-date matched living controls. Data were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Both suicides and controls with physical illness more often had comorbid psychiatric disorder than their physically healthy counterparts. Although both physical and psychiatric illnesses constituted significant risk factors for suicide, their relative timing of onset in individuals with comorbidity significantly differentiated the associated risk of suicide. While suicide risk was highly elevated when onsets of both physical and psychiatric illness occurred close in time to each other, regardless which came first, psychiatric comorbidity developed some time after onset of physical illness exacerbated the risk of suicide substantially. Suicide risk in physically ill people varies substantially by presence of psychiatric comorbidity, particularly the relative timing of onset of the two types of illness. Closer collaboration between general and mental health services should be an essential component of suicide prevention strategies. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  11. Psychiatric Status across Body Mass Index in a Mediterranean Spanish Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Gutiérrez-Bedmar

    Full Text Available Mental and body weight disorders are among the major global health challenges, and their comorbidity may play an important role in treatment and prevention of both pathologies. A growing number of studies have examined the relationship between psychiatric status and body weight, but our knowledge is still limited.The present study aims to investigate the cross-sectional relationships of psychiatric status and body mass index (BMI in Málaga, a Mediterranean city in the South of Spain.A total of 563 participants were recruited from those who came to his primary care physician, using a systematic random sampling, non-proportional stratified by BMI categories. Structured clinical interviews were used to assess current Axes-I and II mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR. BMI was calculated as weight (Kg divided by square of height in meters (m2. Logistic regression was used to investigate the association between BMI and the presence of any mental disorder. BMI was introduced in the models using restricted cubic splines.We found that high BMI values were directly associated with mood and adjustment disorders, and low BMI values were directly associated with avoidant and dependent personality disorders (PDs. We observed an inverse relationship between low BMI values and cluster A PDs. There were not significant relationships between anxiety or substance-related disorders and BMI.Psychiatric status and BMI are related in a Mediterranean Spanish population. A multidisciplinary approach to both pathologies becomes increasingly more necessary.

  12. Headache complaints associated with psychiatric comorbidity in a population-based sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benseñor I.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency at which people complain of any type of headache, and its relationship with sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in São Paulo, Brazil. A three-step cluster sampling method was used to select 1,464 subjects aged 18 years or older. They were mainly from families of middle and upper socioeconomic levels living in the catchment area of Instituto de Psiquiatria. However, this area also contains some slums and shantytowns. The subjects were interviewed using the Brazilian version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 1.1. (CIDI 1.1 by a lay trained interviewer. Answers to CIDI 1.1 questions allowed us to classify people according to their psychiatric condition and their headaches based on their own ideas about the nature of their illness. The lifetime prevalence of "a lot of problems with" headache was 37.4% (76.2% of which were attributed to use of medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, and 23.8% attributed to nervousness, tension or mental illness. The odds ratio (OR for headache among participants with "nervousness, tension or mental illness" was elevated for depressive episodes (OR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.4, dysthymia (OR, 3.4; 95%CI, 1.6-7.4 and generalized anxiety disorder (OR, 4.3; 95%CI, 2.1-8.6, when compared with patients without headache. For "a lot of problems with" headaches attributed to medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, the risk was also increased for dysthymia but not for generalized anxiety disorder. These data show a high association between headache and chronic psychiatric disorders in this Brazilian population sample.

  13. Headache complaints associated with psychiatric comorbidity in a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseñor, I M; Tófoli, L F; Andrade, L

    2003-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency at which people complain of any type of headache, and its relationship with sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in S o Paulo, Brazil. A three-step cluster sampling method was used to select 1,464 subjects aged 18 years or older. They were mainly from families of middle and upper socioeconomic levels living in the catchment area of Instituto de Psiquiatria. However, this area also contains some slums and shantytowns. The subjects were interviewed using the Brazilian version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 1.1. (CIDI 1.1) by a lay trained interviewer. Answers to CIDI 1.1 questions allowed us to classify people according to their psychiatric condition and their headaches based on their own ideas about the nature of their illness. The lifetime prevalence of "a lot of problems with" headache was 37.4% (76.2% of which were attributed to use of medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, and 23.8% attributed to nervousness, tension or mental illness). The odds ratio (OR) for headache among participants with "nervousness, tension or mental illness" was elevated for depressive episodes (OR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.4), dysthymia (OR, 3.4; 95%CI, 1.6-7.4) and generalized anxiety disorder (OR, 4.3; 95%CI, 2.1-8.6), when compared with patients without headache. For "a lot of problems with" headaches attributed to medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, the risk was also increased for dysthymia but not for generalized anxiety disorder. These data show a high association between headache and chronic psychiatric disorders in this Brazilian population sample.

  14. Association of Fluid Intelligence and Psychiatric Disorders in a Population-Representative Sample of US Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Katherine M; Platt, Jonathan; Kaufman, Alan S; McLaughlin, Katie A

    2017-02-01

    Despite long-standing interest in the association of psychiatric disorders with intelligence, few population-based studies of psychiatric disorders have assessed intelligence. To investigate the association of fluid intelligence with past-year and lifetime psychiatric disorders, disorder age at onset, and disorder severity in a nationally representative sample of US adolescents. National sample of adolescents ascertained from schools and households from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication-Adolescent Supplement, collected 2001 through 2004. Face-to-face household interviews with adolescents and questionnaires from parents were obtained. The data were analyzed from February to December 2016. DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed with the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview, and included a broad range of fear, distress, behavior, substance use, and other disorders. Disorder severity was measured with the Sheehan Disability Scale. Fluid IQ measured with the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test, normed within the sample by 6-month age groups. The sample included 10 073 adolescents (mean [SD] age, 15.2 [1.50] years; 49.0% female) with valid data on fluid intelligence. Lower mean (SE) IQ was observed among adolescents with past-year bipolar disorder (94.2 [1.69]; P = .004), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (96.3 [0.91]; P = .002), oppositional defiant disorder (97.3 [0.66]; P = .007), conduct disorder (97.1 [0.82]; P = .02), substance use disorders (alcohol abuse, 96.5 [0.67]; P Intelligence was not associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, and anxiety disorders other than specific phobia, and was positively associated with past-year major depression (mean [SE], 100 [0.5]; P = .01). Associations of fluid intelligence with lifetime disorders that had remitted were attenuated compared with past-year disorders, with the exception of separation anxiety disorder. Multiple past

  15. Suicide Attempts and Family History of Suicide in Three Psychiatric Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremeau, Fabien; Staner, Luc; Duval, Fabrice; Correa, Humberto; Crocq, Marc-Antoine; Darreye, Angelina; Czobor, Pal; Dessoubrais, Cecile; Macher, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The influence of a family history of suicide on suicide attempt rate and characteristics in depression, schizophrenia, and opioid dependence was examined. One hundred sixty inpatients with unipolar depression, 160 inpatients with schizophrenia, and 160 opioid-dependent patients were interviewed. Overall, a family history of suicide was associated…

  16. Psychiatric hospital treatment of children with autism and serious behavioral disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Matthew; Gabriels, Robin L

    2014-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder are psychiatrically hospitalized much more frequently than children in the general population. Hospitalization occurs primarily because of externalizing behaviors and is associated with behavioral disturbance, impaired emotion regulation, and psychiatric comorbidity. Additionally, a lack of practitioner and/or administrator training and experience with this population poses risks for denial of care by third-party payers or treatment facilities, inadequate treatment, extended lengths of stay, and poor outcomes. Evidence and best practices for the inpatient psychiatric care of this population are presented. Specialized treatment programs universally rely on multidisciplinary approaches, including behaviorally informed interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. "We Have to Be Satisfied with the Scraps": South African Nurses' Experiences of Care on Adult Psychiatric Intellectual Disability Inpatient Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capri, Charlotte; Buckle, Chanellé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migrating nursing labour inadvertently reinforces South Africa's care drain, contributes to a global care crisis and forces us to reconsider migration motivation. This paper highlights issues that complicate psychiatric intellectual disability nursing care and identifies loci for change in an attempt to redress this care challenge.…

  18. Extremism, religion and psychiatric morbidity in a population-based sample of young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coid, Jeremy W; Bhui, Kamaldeep; MacManus, Deirdre; Kallis, Constantinos; Bebbington, Paul; Ullrich, Simone

    2016-12-01

    There is growing risk from terrorism following radicalisation of young men. It is unclear whether psychopathology is associated. To investigate the population distribution of extremist views among UK men. Cross-sectional study of 3679 men, 18-34 years, in Great Britain. Multivariate analyses of attitudes, psychiatric morbidity, ethnicity and religion. Pro-British men were more likely to be White, UK born, not religious; anti-British were Muslim, religious, of Pakistani origin, from deprived areas. Pro- and anti-British views were linearly associated with violence (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.51, 95% CI 1.38-1.64, PReligion is protective but may determine targets of violence following radicalisation. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  19. Beyond trauma-focused psychiatric epidemiology: bridging research and practice with war-affected populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kenneth E; Kulkarni, Madhur; Kushner, Hallie

    2006-10-01

    This article examines the centrality of trauma-focused psychiatric epidemiology (TFPE) in research with war-affected populations. The authors question the utility of the dominant focus on posttraumatic stress disorder and other disorders of Western psychiatry, and they identify a set of critical research foci related to mental health work with communities affected by political violence. Core assumptions of TFPE and its roots in logical positivism and the biomedical model of contemporary psychiatry are explored. The authors suggest that an alternative framework--social constructivism--can serve as a bridge between researchers and practitioners by helping to refocus research efforts in ways that are conceptually and methodologically more attuned to the needs of war-affected communities and those working to address their mental health needs. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  20. Psychiatric disorders in long-term sickness absence -- a population-based cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Bech, Per

    2009-01-01

    examined persons in Phase 2 showed by binomial tests the following frequencies: any psychiatric disorder 57%, any depression 42%, and any anxiety 18%. In Phase 1, representative for everyone on LSA, the frequencies were 48% for any psychiatric disorder, 35% for any depression, 15% for any anxiety, and 7......% for any somatoform disorder. Multivariable analyses showed that female sex and unemployment were predictors of a psychiatric disorder, whereas living with children below 18 years and being a skilled worker carried a reduced risk of a psychiatric disorder. CONCLUSIONS: The high frequency of psychiatric...

  1. Associations between Pathological Gambling and Psychiatric Comorbidity among Help-Seeking Populations in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem gambling is complex and often comorbid with other mental health problems. Unfortunately, gambling studies on comorbid psychiatric disorders among Chinese communities are extremely limited. The objectives of this study were to (a determine the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders among treatment-seeking pathological gamblers; (b compare the demographic profiles and clinical features of pathological gamblers with and without comorbid psychiatric disorders; (c explore the associations between pathological gambling and psychiatric disorders and their temporal relationship. Participants (N=201 who sought gambling counseling were examined by making Axis-I diagnoses including mood disorders, schizophrenia spectrum disorders, substance use disorders, anxiety disorders, and adjustment disorder. Results showed that 63.7% of participants had lifetime comorbid psychiatric disorder. The most common comorbid psychiatric mental disorders were mood disorders, adjustment disorder, and substance use disorders. Pathological gamblers with psychiatric comorbidities were significantly more severe in psychopathology, psychosocial functioning impairment, and gambling problems than those without the disorders.

  2. Effects of psychiatric history and cognitive performance in old-age depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra ePantzar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits in old-age depression vary as a function of multiple factors; one rarely examined factor is long-term psychiatric history. We investigated effects of psychiatric history on cognitive performance in old-age depression and in remitted persons. In the population-based SNAC-K study, older persons (≥60 years without dementia were tested with a cognitive battery and matched to the Swedish National Inpatient Register (starting 1969. Participants were grouped according to current depression status and psychiatric history and compared to healthy controls (n=96. Group differences were observed for processing speed, attention, executive functions and verbal fluency. Persons with depression and psychiatric inpatient history (n=20 and late-onset depression (n=49 performed at the lowest levels, whereas cognitive performance in persons with self-reported recurrent unipolar depression (n=52 was intermediate. Remitted persons with inpatient history of unipolar depression (n=38 exhibited no cognitive deficits. Heart disease burden, physical inactivity, and cumulative inpatient days modulated the observed group differences in cognitive performance. Among currently depressed persons, those with inpatient history and late onset performed at the lowest levels. Importantly, remitted persons showed no cognitive deficits, possibly reflecting the extended time since the last admission (m=15.6 years. Thus, the present data suggest that cognitive deficits in unipolar depression may be more state- than trait-related. Information on profiles of cognitive performance, psychiatric history, and health behaviors may be useful in tailoring individualized treatment.

  3. Second-Generation Antipsychotic Utilization and Metabolic Parameter Monitoring in an Inpatient Pediatric Population: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolt, Valerie D; Kibler, Alexandra Victoria; Wilkening, G Lucy; Fabian, Tanya J

    2017-04-01

    Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are prescribed for a variety of indications and are strongly associated with adverse metabolic effects. Studies of pediatric outpatients have revealed several deficiencies in monitoring practices for adverse effects associated with SGAs. Our objective was to characterize SGA prescribing and metabolic parameter monitoring (MPM) in an inpatient pediatric population. Patients aged parameters used by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) to define metabolic syndrome: waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, and blood pressure. The primary outcome was the percent of patients with completed MPM, defined as all parameters being available within the patient's EMR in any form, except estimates. Secondary outcomes included percent of patients with existing metabolic syndrome or obesity according to IDF criteria, average total daily dose of individual SGAs, and frequency of individual SGA utilization. Data were analyzed utilizing univariate descriptive statistics. A total of 243 patients met inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. For the primary outcome, 13.2% (n = 32) of patients had completed MPM for all parameters. Blood pressure was the most frequently documented parameter (n = 241; 99.2%), whereas waist circumference was the least (n = 67; 28%). Risperidone was the most commonly prescribed SGA (n = 99; 41%; average daily dose 1.92 mg). Compared with outpatient studies, rates of documented MPM for certain parameters (i.e., fasting blood glucose, lipids) is higher for pediatric inpatients treated with SGAs. However, several monitoring deficiencies are still noted.

  4. Comorbidities of psychiatric and headache disorders in Nepal: implications from a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risal, Ajay; Manandhar, Kedar; Holen, Are; Steiner, Timothy J; Linde, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Headache disorders, anxiety and depression - the major disorders of the brain - are highly comorbid in the western world. Whether this is so in South Asia has not been investigated, but the question is of public-health importance to countries in the region. We aimed to investigate associations, and their direction(s), between headache disorders (migraine, tension-type headache [TTH] and headache on ≥15 days/month) and psychiatric manifestations (anxiety, depression and neuroticism), and how these might affect quality of life (QoL). In a nationwide, cross-sectional survey of the adult Nepalese population (N = 2100), trained interviewers applied: 1) a culturally-adapted version of the Headache-Attributed Restriction, Disability, Social Handicap and Impaired Participation (HARDSHIP) questionnaire to diagnose headache disorders; 2) a validated Nepali version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to detect anxiety (HADS-A), depression (HADS-D) and comorbid anxiety and depression (HADS-cAD); 3) a validated Nepali version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised Short Form-Neuroticism (EPQRS-N); and 4) the World Health Organization Quality of Life 8-question scale (WHOQOL-8). Associations with headache types were analysed using logistic regression for psychiatric caseness and linear regression for neuroticism. Adjustments were made for age, gender, household consumption, habitat, altitude and use of alcohol and marijuana. HADS-A was associated with any headache (p = 0.024), most strongly headache on ≥15 days/month (AOR = 3.2) followed by migraine (AOR = 1.7). HADS-cAD was also associated with any headache (p = 0.050, more strongly among females than males [p = 0.047]) and again most strongly with headache on ≥15 days/month (AOR = 2.7), then migraine (AOR = 2.3). Likewise, neuroticism was associated with any headache (p Nepal, with negative consequences for QoL. These findings call for reciprocal awareness, and

  5. Social Contextual Links to Emotion Regulation in an Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Population: Do Gender and Symptomatology Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Molly; Zeman, Janice; Erdley, Cynthia; Lisa, Ludmila; Homan, Kendra; Sim, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Background: The regulation of emotion is essential for adaptive functioning. However, delineating the pathways of emotion regulation (ER) processes that lead to psychological adaptation remains under-studied, with mixed evidence for the specificity vs. generality of ER deficits in relation to specific forms of psychopathology. To examine this…

  6. The customer is always right: patients' perceptions of psychiatric nursing actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, I; Roberson, E

    1995-01-01

    In this age of consumerism, consideration should be given to patients' perceptions of interactions with the health care provider as a factor in assessing the quality of care provided. This article describes a study of 100 psychiatric inpatients in a large urban medical center who evaluated 50 commonly used psychiatric nursing actions. Significant differences were found between the general psychiatric patient population and the substance abuse population in perception of helpfulness and frequency of performance with 7 of the 50 nursing actions. As the consumer's perception of the effectiveness of nursing actions is determined, emphasis can be given to those interventions when planning patient care.

  7. The training value of working with armed forces inpatients in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Burgh, H Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Over the last 10 years, the UK armed forces (UKAF) have been involved in operations worldwide. Mental health in the armed forces (AF) has been the subject of considerable interest in part because of a perceived added risk of psychological distress in this population. Inpatient psychiatric services are provided through partnerships with NHS hospitals. The Cavell Centre, Peterborough's acute inpatient psychiatric unit has up to four beds for service personnel, under the care of a civilian consultant psychiatrist and his AF Foundation Year 2 doctor (F2). This was the only Ministry of Defence (MoD) inpatient unit which had a training post for an AF doctor, but the post ended in August 2014 with the closure of MoD Hospital Unit Peterborough (MDHU(P)). This article outlines the differences in civilian and AF inpatient care and discusses the training value of AF doctors managing service personnel who are psychiatric inpatients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Crime and Psychiatric Disorders Among Youth in the US Population: An Analysis of National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Kendell L.; Smith, Philip H.; Westphal, Alexander; Zonana, Howard V.; McKee, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Current knowledge regarding psychiatric disorders and crime in youth is limited to juvenile justice and community samples. This study examined relationships between psychiatric disorders and self-reported crime involvement in a sample of youth representative of the US population. Method The National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement (N=10,123; ages 13–17; 2001–2004) was used to examine the relationship between lifetime DSM-IV-based diagnoses, reported crime (property, violent, other), and arrest history. Logistic regression compared the odds of reported crime involvement with specific psychiatric disorders to those without any diagnoses, and examined the odds of crime by psychiatric comorbidity. Results Prevalence of crime was 18.4%. Youth with lifetime psychiatric disorders, compared to no disorders, had significantly greater odds of crime, including violent crime. For violent crime resulting in arrest, conduct disorder (CD; OR=57.5; 95% CI=30.4,108.8), alcohol use disorders (OR=19.5; 95% CI=8.8,43.2), and drug use disorders (OR=16.1; 95% CI=9.3,27.7) had the greatest odds with similar findings for violent crime with no arrest. Psychiatric comorbidity increased the odds of crime. Youth with 3 or more diagnoses (16.0% of population) accounted for 54.1% of those reporting arrest for violent crime. Youth with at least 1 diagnosis committed 85.8% of crime, which was reduced to 67.9% by removing those with CD. Importantly, 88.2% of youth with mental illness report never committing any crime. Conclusion Our findings highlight the importance of improving access to mental health services for youthful offenders in community settings given the substantial associations found between mental illness and crime in this nationally representative epidemiological sample. PMID:25062596

  9. Personality traits as predictors of inpatient aggression in a high-security forensic psychiatric setting: prospective evaluation of the PCL-R and IPDE dimension ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Calvin M; Hogue, Todd E; Daffern, Michael; Mannion, Aisling; Howells, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    The Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder (DSPD) initiative in England and Wales provides specialized care to high-risk offenders with mental disorders. This study investigated the predictive utility of personality traits, assessed using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) and the International Personality Disorder Examination, with 44 consecutive admissions to the DSPD unit at a high-security forensic psychiatric hospital. Incidents of interpersonal physical aggression (IPA) were observed for 39% of the sample over an average 1.5-year period following admission. Histrionic personality disorder (PD) predicted IPA, and Histrionic, Borderline, and Antisocial PDs all predicted repetitive (2+ incidents of) IPA. PCL-R Factor 1 and Facets 1 and 2 were also significant predictors of IPA. PCL-R Factor 1 and Histrionic PD scores were significantly associated with imminence of IPA. Results were discussed in terms of the utility of personality traits in risk assessment and treatment of specially selected high-risk forensic psychiatric patients in secure settings.

  10. Nursing Diagnoses in Inpatient Psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frauenfelder, F.; Achterberg, T. van; Needham, I.; Staub, M. Muller

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study explored how well NANDA-I covers the reality of adult inpatient psychiatric nursing care. METHODS: Patient observations documented by registered nurses in records were analyzed using content analysis and mapped with the classification NANDA-I. FINDINGS: A total of 1,818 notes

  11. Association between income trajectories in childhood and psychiatric disorder: a Swedish population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkenstam, Emma; Cheng, Siwei; Burström, Bo; Pebley, Anne R; Björkenstam, Charlotte; Kosidou, Kyriaki

    2017-07-01

    Childhood family income variation is an understudied aspect of households' economic context that may have distinct consequences for children. We identified trajectories of childhood family income over a 12-year period, and examined associations between these trajectories and later psychiatric disorders, among individuals born in Sweden between 1987 and 1991 (n=534 294). We used annual income data between the ages of 3-14 years and identified 5 trajectories (2 high-income upward, 1 downward and 2 low-income upward trajectories). Psychiatric disorders in the follow-up period after age 15 were defined from International Classification of Disease (ICD)-codes in a nationwide patient register. Multiadjusted risks for all psychiatric disorders, as well as for specific psychiatric diagnoses, were calculated as HRs with 95% CIs. Of the 5 identified income trajectories, the constant low and the downward trajectories were particularly associated with later psychiatric disorder. Children with these trajectories had increased risks for psychiatric disorder, including mood, anxiety, psychotic disorders and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The association remained, even after adjusting for important variables including parental psychiatric disorder. In contrast, the relationship was reversed for eating disorders, for which children in higher income trajectories had elevated risks. Findings show that children growing up in a household characterised by low or decreasing family income have an increased risk for psychiatric disorder. Continued work is needed to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in psychiatric disorders. Policies and interventions for psychiatric disorders should consider the socioeconomic background of the family as an important risk or protective factor. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. [Social integration and contacts to reference persons of the normal social environment in inpatient treatment in the psychiatric hospital. A prospective catamnestic study of patients admitted for the first time with schizophrenic and cyclothymic psychoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcker, F M

    1984-01-01

    Fifty first-admission inpatients (27 women, 23 men; mean age 35.1 years) with schizophrenia (n = 35) or affective disorders (n = 15) participated in a standardized, half-open interview about contact with people outside the hospital. The frequency of contact was compared with outcome, as based on a 1-year follow-up. Nearly all patients (48 of 50) had "direct" contact with relatives and friends during the week (means = 3/week): 45 patients had visitors, 13 went home on weekends. Thirty-five patients had contact with the outside by telephone, and 21 by letter; only 12 patients indicated no "indirect" contact. The frequency of contact had no relationship to sex, age or diagnosis. The significant factors were: structure of the patient's family, his/her educational and occupational level, social network, means of admission, conditions of hospitalization, and length of stay. The distance between the patient's residence and the hospital markedly influenced the frequency of visits and weekend holidays. The importance of frequent interaction with the usual social environment was verified by follow-up: 11 patients with rare or only average contact had unfavorable results (readmission or suicide by 1 year after discharge or long-term hospitalization); on the other hand, none of the patients with frequent direct contact outside the hospital showed poor results. There is no reason for indiscriminate criticism of the relatives of psychiatric inpatients according to etiological hypotheses of "family research"; above all, patients without relationships with a family or friends have to be regarded as at risk.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The influence of borderline personality features on inpatient adolescent suicide risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalch, Matthew M; Hopwood, Christopher J; Fehon, Dwain C; Grilo, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents and suicidal behavior is one of the primary risk factors for youth psychiatric hospitalizations. A number of studies indicate that depression and substance abuse are associated with suicide risk in this population, but less is known about the role of borderline personality features or their incremental influence over other known risk factors in indicating suicidal behavior among adolescents. This study examined whether borderline features were associated with suicide risk when controlling for symptoms of depression and substance abuse in a sample of adolescents hospitalized in an inpatient psychiatric facility. Self-report data from 477 adolescent psychiatric inpatients were used to test hypotheses about the association of borderline features with suicide risk after controlling for other common risk factors. Borderline features were significantly related to suicide risk even after accounting for symptoms of depression and substance abuse. These findings underscore the clinical value of routinely assessing borderline features among adolescents.

  14. Relationships between attempted suicide, temperamental vulnerability, and violent criminality in a Swedish forensic psychiatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålenheim, E G

    2001-11-01

    The relationship between suicide attempts and different vulnerability factors was investigated in 61 male subjects during forensic psychiatric examination. Personality traits and psychopathy were determined by means of the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP) and the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R). Clinical diagnoses were determined by the use of Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R (SCID). Platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity was investigated in 58 subjects. Suicide attempters had extremely low socialization and high impulsive aggression. This was independent of a history of repeatedly criminal violence or not. They had higher PCL-R scores and lower levels of platelet MAO activity than non-attempters. No relationship was found between suicide attempts and repeated violent criminality. However, among the subjects with repeated criminal violence there was a highly significant difference between suicide attempters and non-attempters, indicating different personality profiles in violent offenders with and without suicidal behavior. Suicidal behavior was significantly associated with borderline personality disorder, but not with any other single DSM-III-R disorder. The results show a far more severe personality disturbance in suicide attempters than in other violent patients in this type of population. Suicidal behavior should therefore be evaluated and treated per se.

  15. Autism and other psychiatric comorbidity in neurofibromatosis type 1: evidence from a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shruti; Lehtonen, Annukka; Huson, Susan M; Emsley, Richard; Trump, Dorothy; Evans, D Gareth; Green, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    To investigate psychopathology in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), particularly the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomatology, using a population-based sampling approach. Standard questionnaire screen reports were analysed for ASD (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS), ADHD (Conners' Parent Rating Scale- Revised, CPRS-R), and other psychiatric morbidity (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, SDQ) from parents and teachers of children aged from 4 to 16 years (112 females, 95 males) on the UK North West Regional Genetic Service register for NF1. Parental response rate was 52.7% (109/207 children; 59 females, 50 males, mean age 9 y 11 mo, SD 3 y 3 mo). The SRS showed that in 29.4% (32/109) of children, autism was in the severe, clinical range (T-score>75) and in 26.6% (29/109) in the mild to moderate range (T-score 60-75). CPRS-R scores showed that in 53.8% (57/106) of children autism was in the clinical ADHD range (ADHD index T-score>65). Based on their scores on the SDQ total difficulties scale, 41.5% (44/106) of children were in the abnormal range and 14.2% (15/106) were in the borderline range. Twenty-five per cent (26/104) of children met criteria for both clinical autism and ADHD. This representative population-based sample of children with NF1 indicates a high prevalence of ASD symptoms associated with NF1 as well as substantial co-occurrence with ADHD symptoms. The findings clarify the psychopathology of NF1 and show the disorder as a potentially important single-gene cause for autism symptoms. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Psychiatric disorders after epilepsy diagnosis: a population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Ju Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychiatric manifestations after occurrence of epilepsy have often been noted. However, the association between newly diagnosed epilepsy and psychiatric disorders afterward is not completely understood. We conducted two longitudinal cohorts for patients with and without epilepsy to investigate the risk factors and hazard ratios of developing psychiatric disorders after patients were newly diagnosed with epilepsy. METHODS: We identified 938 patients with a new diagnosis of epilepsy and 518,748 participants without epilepsy from the National Health Insurance Research Database in 2000-2002 and tracked them until 2008. We compared the incidence of developing psychiatric disorders between the two cohorts, evaluated risk factors and measured the associated hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs of developing psychiatric disorders. FINDINGS: The incidences of psychiatric disorders for people with and without epilepsy were 94.1 and 22.6 per 1000 person-years, respectively. After adjusting the covariates, the epilepsy cohort showed the highest risks in mental retardation (HR 31.5, 95% CI 18.9 to 52.4, bipolar disorder (HR 23.5, 95% CI 11.4 to 48.3 and alcohol or drug psychosis (HR 18.8, 95% CI 11.1 to 31.8 among psychiatric complications developed after newly diagnosed epilepsy. The risk increased with epileptic general seizure and frequency of outpatient visits for epilepsy, as well as with emergency room visits and hospitalizations for epilepsy, and with older age. Chronologically, the highest risk occurred in the first year after epilepsy diagnosis (HR 11.4, 95% CI 9.88 to 13.2. CONCLUSION: Various psychiatric disorders were demonstrated after newly diagnosed epilepsy and closely related to general seizure and use of medical services for epilepsy. This shows a need for integrated psychiatric care for patients newly diagnosed with epilepsy, especially in the first year.

  17. The influence of institutional characteristics on length of stay for psychiatric patients: a national database study in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woojin; Cho, Woo Hyun; Yoon, Chung Won

    2009-03-01

    The institutionalization of psychiatric patients has put a tremendous burden on many societies, but few studies have examined the effects of institutional characteristics on patient length of stay (LOS). This paper investigated the association between institutional characteristics and LOS for 160,517 psychiatric patients in South Korea by applying a two-level modeling technique to administrative claims databases covering the entire patient population. Patient LOS, expressed in terms of days, was analyzed by taking account of institutional type, ownership, location, inpatient capacity, staffing, and patient demographics. The characteristics of inpatients were used as control variables and consisted of gender, age, sub-diagnosis, and the type of national health security program. The main findings of this study are: (1) patient LOS was 69% longer at psychiatric hospitals than at tertiary-care hospitals; (2) neither location nor inpatient capacity was associated with LOS; (3) larger staffs reduced LOS; and (4), LOS increased with a higher proportion of male inpatients, inpatients > or =65 years old, or inpatients diagnosed with organic or schizophrenic disorders, possibly through contextual effects. The results of this study suggest that researchers and policy makers could improve their assessment of psychiatric patient LOS and its association with health outcome by taking into account institutional characteristics and using multi-level analyses.

  18. [Forensic psychiatric patients in Denmark].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Tina Gram; Valbak, Lone; Perto, Gurli; Reinert, Kjeld

    2006-06-05

    In Denmark the number of forensic psychiatric patients is increasing. The objective of this study was to explore whether the increased number of forensic psychiatric patients has been reflected in the use of psychiatric inpatient facilities. Furthermore, we wanted to investigate differences in the treatment of various diagnostic groups of forensic patients and of forensic and non-forensic patients with schizophrenia. Information about admissions and outpatient contact was extracted from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register for all Danish patients sentenced to psychiatric treatment in the period 1994-2003. Furthermore, a group of first-admission forensic patients suffering from schizophrenia was compared to a control group of first-admission non-forensic patients with schizophrenia, matched for sex, age and time of admission. The number of forensic psychiatric patients increased markedly in the period 1994-2003; at the same time, the use of inpatient facilities for this group of patients did not increase to a similar degree but actually decreased. Forensic patients in the group F20-F29 spent more time in hospital than did forensic patients with affective disorders and personality disorders. Forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia had significantly longer periods of hospitalization than did non-forensic patients with schizophrenia. Forensic psychiatric patients' use of psychiatric inpatient facilities during the last 10 years did not increase to the extent expected relative to the increasing number of forensic psychiatric patients. This raises the question of whether these patients are receiving necessary and sufficient treatment.

  19. Cohabitation patterns among patients with severe psychiatric disorders in the entire Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A F; Olsbjerg, M; Andersen, P K

    2012-01-01

    with schizophrenia and men with bipolar disorder had the highest RR of commencing cohabitation with a cohabitant with a similar diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Cohabitation among individuals with severe psychiatric disorders is increased. This has implications for research and for the clinical management of patients.......BACKGROUND: Assortative mating has been demonstrated in mental disorders but the extent of cohabitation between patients with clinically diagnosed psychiatric disease has been poorly explored. Method We conducted a register-based study of all Danes between 18 and 70 years of age in a 13-year...... observational period, linking data on individuals' contacts with psychiatric services with data on individuals' cohabitation status. Two different Poisson regression analyses were performed: the first comparing the rates of commencing cohabitation with a psychiatric patient between individuals, depending...

  20. Social class, social mobility and risk of psychiatric disorder--a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiikkaja, Sanna; Sandin, Sven; Malki, Ninoa; Modin, Bitte; Sparén, Pär; Hultman, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    This study explored how adult social class and social mobility between parental and own adult social class is related to psychiatric disorder. In this prospective cohort study, over 1 million employed Swedes born in 1949-1959 were included. Information on parental class (1960) and own mid-life social class (1980 and 1990) was retrieved from the censuses and categorised as High Non-manual, Low Non-manual, High Manual, Low Manual and Self-employed. After identifying adult class, individuals were followed for psychiatric disorder by first admission of schizophrenia, alcoholism and drug dependency, affective psychosis and neurosis or personality disorder (N=24,659) from the Swedish Patient Register. We used Poisson regression analysis to estimate first admission rates of psychiatric disorder per 100,000 person-years and relative risks (RR) by adult social class (treated as a time-varying covariate). The RRs of psychiatric disorder among the Non-manual and Manual classes were also estimated by magnitude of social mobility. The rate of psychiatric disorder was significantly higher among individuals belonging to the Low manual class as compared with the High Non-manual class. Compared to High Non-manual class, the risk for psychiatric disorder ranged from 2.07 (Low Manual class) to 1.38 (Low Non-manual class). Parental class had a minor impact on these estimates. Among the Non-manual and Manual classes, downward mobility was associated with increased risk and upward mobility with decreased risk of psychiatric disorder. In addition, downward mobility was inversely associated with the magnitude of social mobility, independent of parental class. Independently of parental social class, the risk of psychiatric disorder increases with increased downward social mobility and decreases with increased upward mobility.

  1. Social class, social mobility and risk of psychiatric disorder--a population-based longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Tiikkaja

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study explored how adult social class and social mobility between parental and own adult social class is related to psychiatric disorder. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, over 1 million employed Swedes born in 1949-1959 were included. Information on parental class (1960 and own mid-life social class (1980 and 1990 was retrieved from the censuses and categorised as High Non-manual, Low Non-manual, High Manual, Low Manual and Self-employed. After identifying adult class, individuals were followed for psychiatric disorder by first admission of schizophrenia, alcoholism and drug dependency, affective psychosis and neurosis or personality disorder (N=24,659 from the Swedish Patient Register. We used Poisson regression analysis to estimate first admission rates of psychiatric disorder per 100,000 person-years and relative risks (RR by adult social class (treated as a time-varying covariate. The RRs of psychiatric disorder among the Non-manual and Manual classes were also estimated by magnitude of social mobility. RESULTS: The rate of psychiatric disorder was significantly higher among individuals belonging to the Low manual class as compared with the High Non-manual class. Compared to High Non-manual class, the risk for psychiatric disorder ranged from 2.07 (Low Manual class to 1.38 (Low Non-manual class. Parental class had a minor impact on these estimates. Among the Non-manual and Manual classes, downward mobility was associated with increased risk and upward mobility with decreased risk of psychiatric disorder. In addition, downward mobility was inversely associated with the magnitude of social mobility, independent of parental class. CONCLUSIONS: Independently of parental social class, the risk of psychiatric disorder increases with increased downward social mobility and decreases with increased upward mobility.

  2. Comorbid Visual and Psychiatric Disabilities Among the Chinese Elderly: A National Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chao; Wang, Zhenjie; Li, Ning; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2017-12-01

    To estimate the prevalence of, and association between, co-morbid visual and psychiatric disabilities among elderly (>65 years-of-age) persons in China. Random representative samples were obtained using multistage, stratified, cluster sampling, with probabilities proportional to size. Standard weighting procedures were used to construct sample weights that reflected this multistage, stratified cluster sampling survey scheme. Logistic regression models were used to elucidate associations between visual and psychiatric disabilities. Among the Chinese elderly, >160,000 persons have co-morbid visual and psychiatric disabilities. The weighted prevalence among this cohort is 123.7 per 100,000 persons. A higher prevalence of co-morbid visual and psychiatric disabilities was found in the oldest-old (pvisual disability was significantly associated with a higher risk of having a psychiatric disability among persons aged ≥80 years-of-age [adjusted odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.54]. A significant number of Chinese elderly persons were living with co-morbid visual and psychiatric disabilities. To address the challenge of these co-morbid disorders among Chinese elders, it is incumbent upon the government to implement additional and more comprehensive prevention and rehabilitation strategies for health-care systems, reinforce health promotion among the elderly, and improve accessibility to health-care services.

  3. Filicide in offspring of parents with severe psychiatric disorders: a population-based cohort study of child homicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, T M; Munk-Olsen, T; Mortensen, P B; Abel, K M; Appleby, L; Webb, R T

    2011-05-01

    Although rare in absolute terms, risk of homicide is markedly elevated among children of parents with mental disorders. Our aims were to examine risk of child homicide if 1 or both parents had a psychiatric history, to compare effects by parental sex and diagnostic group, and to assess likelihood of child homicide being perpetrated by parents according to their psychiatric history. A prospective, register-based cohort study using the entire Danish population born between January 1, 1973, and January 1, 2007, was conducted. Follow-up of the cohort members began on their date of birth and ended on January 1, 2007; their 18th birthday; their date of death; or their date of emigration, whichever came first. We used the Danish national registers from 1973 to 2007 to study homicide risk between children whose parents were previously admitted to a psychiatric hospital, including diagnosis-specific analyses, versus their unexposed counterparts. In addition, we used police records during 2000 to 2005 to examine whether or not 1 of the parents was the perpetrator. Rates of homicide were analyzed using survival analysis. Children of parents previously admitted to a psychiatric hospital had an overall higher risk of being homicide victims (MRR = 8.94; 95% CI, 6.56-12.18). The risk differed according to parental sex and psychiatric diagnosis (ICD-8 and ICD-10 criteria). The absolute risk of homicide was 0.009% if neither parent had been admitted before the birth of their child and 0.051% if 1 of the parents had previously been admitted. During 2000 to 2005, 88% of the child homicide cases were filicide victims. This percentage was not significantly different for parents with a previous psychiatric admission versus those without such a history. In the large majority of Danish child-homicide cases, a parent was the perpetrator, regardless of whether there had been parental admission to a psychiatric hospital. Children of parents previously admitted had a higher risk of being

  4. Pilot intervention study of a low-salt diet with monomagnesium di-L-glutamate as an umami seasoning in psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Rumiko; Ishida, Mayumi; Kimura, Eiichiro; Matsumoto, Hideki; Arai, Heii

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia patients have an elevated prevalence of stroke and cardiovascular risk factors, such as elevated body mass index, hypertension, and hyperlipidaemia. This pilot study investigated the influence of a low-sodium diet using umami seasoning on food intake and clinical parameters in schizophrenia patients. A single-blind crossover intervention study was conducted in 15 clinical schizophrenia patients given a low-sodium diet with or without umami seasoning, monomagnesium di-L-glutamate, for 2 weeks. After the initial 2-week intervention, there was a 2-week washout period, and then the interventions were switched. Daily body weight, body mass index, abdominal circumference, blood pressure, and nutrient intake for each subject were determined. The results showed that subjects given monomagnesium di-L-glutamate had an approximately 25.9% reduction in dietary sodium. Furthermore, daily energy intake did not decrease, and no significant changes in body weight, body mass index, abdominal circumference, blood pressure, and nutrient intake were observed. The use of umami seasonings, such as monomagnesium di-L-glutamate, might be an effective long-term strategy for psychiatric patients requiring restricted sodium intake. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  5. Interventions to reduce the use of seclusion and restraint in inpatient psychiatric settings: what we know so far a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Justin Newton

    2010-07-01

    In recent times, much attention has been focused on the reduction of seclusion and restraint in psychiatric settings. This paper analyzes evidence available from evaluations of single seclusion and/or restraint reduction programmes. A total of 29 papers were included in the review. Seven key strategy types emerged from the analysis: (i) policy change/leadership; (ii) external review/debriefing; (iii) data use; (iv) training; (v) consumer/family involvement; (vi) increase in staff ratio/crisis response teams; and (vii) programme elements/changes. Outcomes indicate that a range of reduction programmes are successful in reducing the frequency and duration of seclusion and restraint use, while at the same time maintaining a safe environment. The development of new seclusion and restraint reduction programmes should include strong leadership from local management; external seclusion and restraint review committees or post-incident debriefing and analysis; broad-based staff training and programme changes at a local level. Behavioural and cognitive-behavioural programmes appear to be very useful in child and adolescent services. Further systematic research should be conducted to more fully understand which elements of successful programmes are the most powerful in reducing incidents of seclusion and restraint.

  6. Psychiatric Residents' Needs for Education about Informed Consent, Principles of Ethics and Professionalism, and Caring for Vulnerable Populations: Results of a Multisite Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shaili; Lapid, Maria I.; Dunn, Laura B.; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined psychiatric residents' perceived needs for education in informed consent, principles of ethics and professionalism, and treating vulnerable populations. Method: A written survey was distributed to psychiatric residents (N = 249) at seven U.S. residency programs in 2005. The survey contained 149 questions in 10…

  7. Social networks, social support and psychiatric symptoms: social determinants and associations within a multicultural community population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Natasha; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Hotopf, Matthew; Hatch, Stephani L

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about how social networks and social support are distributed within diverse communities and how different types of each are associated with a range of psychiatric symptoms. This study aims to address such shortcomings by: (1) describing the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of social networks and social support in a multicultural population and (2) examining how each is associated with multiple mental health outcomes. Data is drawn from the South East London Community Health Study; a cross-sectional study of 1,698 adults conducted between 2008 and 2010. The findings demonstrate variation in social networks and social support by socio-demographic factors. Ethnic minority groups reported larger family networks but less perceived instrumental support. Older individuals and migrant groups reported lower levels of particular network and support types. Individuals from lower socioeconomic groups tended to report less social networks and support across the indicators measured. Perceived emotional and instrumental support, family and friend network size emerged as protective factors for common mental disorder, personality dysfunction and psychotic experiences. In contrast, both social networks and social support appear less relevant for hazardous alcohol use. The findings both confirm established knowledge that social networks and social support exert differential effects on mental health and furthermore suggest that the particular type of social support may be important. In contrast, different types of social network appear to impact upon poor mental health in a more uniform way. Future psychosocial strategies promoting mental health should consider which social groups are vulnerable to reduced social networks and poor social support and which diagnostic groups may benefit most.

  8. Genetics-Based Population Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Risperidone in a Psychiatric Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Frederik; Guidi, Monia; Choong, Eva; von Gunten, Armin; Conus, Philippe; Csajka, Chantal; Eap, Chin B

    2015-12-01

    High interindividual variability in plasma concentrations of risperidone and its active metabolite, 9-hydroxyrisperidone, may lead to suboptimal drug concentration. Using a population pharmacokinetic approach, we aimed to characterize the genetic and non-genetic sources of variability affecting risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone pharmacokinetics, and relate them to common side effects. Overall, 150 psychiatric patients (178 observations) treated with risperidone were genotyped for common polymorphisms in NR1/2, POR, PPARα, ABCB1, CYP2D6 and CYP3A genes. Plasma risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone were measured, and clinical data and common clinical chemistry parameters were collected. Drug and metabolite concentrations were analyzed using non-linear mixed effect modeling (NONMEM(®)). Correlations between trough concentrations of the active moiety (risperidone plus 9-hydroxyrisperidone) and common side effects were assessed using logistic regression and linear mixed modeling. The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 phenotype explained 52% of interindividual variability in risperidone pharmacokinetics. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of the active moiety was found to be 28% higher in CYP2D6 poor metabolizers compared with intermediate, extensive and ultrarapid metabolizers. No other genetic markers were found to significantly affect risperidone concentrations. 9-hydroxyrisperidone elimination was decreased by 26% with doubling of age. A correlation between trough predicted concentration of the active moiety and neurologic symptoms was found (p = 0.03), suggesting that a concentration >40 ng/mL should be targeted only in cases of insufficient, or absence of, response. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2D6 play an important role in risperidone, 9-hydroxyrisperidone and active moiety plasma concentration variability, which were associated with common side effects. These results highlight the importance of a personalized dosage adjustment during risperidone

  9. Neurological, psychiatric, ophthalmological, and endocrine complications in giant male prolactinomas: An observational study in Algerian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Chentli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prolactinomas are less frequent, but more invasive in males. Giant ones (≥4 cm are extremely rare in literature. Their neurological, psychiatric and endocrine complications are life threatening. Our aim was to report the largest mono center series in order to analyze their frequency, their characteristics, and their complications. Subjects and Methods: All patients had clinical examination, hormonal, ophthalmological, and radiological assessment based on computed tomography scan and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Positive diagnosis was based on clinical symptoms, high prolactin ± immunohistochemy study. Mixed adenomas were excluded by hormonal exploration and immunohistochemy. For those who received medical treatment only, a reduction in tumor size was considered a supplementary positive point for the diagnosis. Results: Among 154 male prolactinomas seen between 1987 and 2013, we observed 44 giant tumors (28.5%. Median age = 36 years, and 38.3% were under 30. Median tumor height = 53.95 mm (40-130 and median prolactin = 15,715 ng/ml (n < 20. Solid and cystic aspect ± calcifications was observed in 25%. 42 had cavernous sinuses invasion. Other invasions were: Posterior= 65.9%, anterior= 63.6%, temporal= 15.9% and frontal = 9%. For endocrine complications: Hypogonadism = 98.4%, thyrotroph and corticotroph deficits were seen in respectively 34%, and 32%. Posterior pituitary insufficiency was observed in one case. For ophthalmological complications: Optic atrophy = 46%, Ptosis = 6.8%, diplopia/strabismus = 4.5%. Neurological complications were: Memory loss and/or unconsciousness = 18.2%, epilepsy = 15.9%, frontal syndrome = 9% and obstructive hydrocephalus = 6.8%. Conclusion: Giant prolactinomas account for 28% in our population. Severe neurological complications are frequent. But, obstructive hydrocephalus is rare, which argues for a slow progression.

  10. Smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug use among adolescents with psychiatric disorders compared with a population based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangerud, Wenche Langfjord; Bjerkeset, Ottar; Holmen, Turid Lingaas; Lydersen, Stian; Indredavik, Marit Sæbø

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated frequencies of smoking, alcohol use, and illicit drug use by diagnostic category in 566 adolescent psychiatric patients, comparing this sample with 8173 adolescents from the general population in Norway who completed the Young-HUNT 3 survey. Frequencies of current alcohol use were high in both samples but were lower among psychiatric patients. Compared with adolescents in the general population, adolescents in the clinical sample had a higher prevalence of current smoking and over four times higher odds of having tried illicit drugs. In the clinical sample, those with mood disorders reported the highest frequencies of smoking, alcohol use, and illicit drug use, whereas those with autism spectrum disorders reported the lowest frequencies. Our results show an increased prevalence of risky health behaviors among adolescents with psychiatric disorders compared with the general population. The awareness of disorder-specific patterns of smoking and substance use may guide preventive measures. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical and demographical profile of inpatient psychiatry referrals in a multispecialty teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Niranjan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research in consultation-liaison psychiatry is important clinically because of high incidence of coexistence of psychiatric and medical disorders in patients attending psychiatry and general healthcare systems. In contrast to west, research about liaison psychiatry in India has been minimal. Thus a study about understanding clinical and sociodemographic profile patterns of inpatient psychiatry referrals was undertaken to enhance our knowledge of this field. Objective: To describe the clinical and socio-demographic profile of inpatient psychiatry referrals in a multispecialty teaching hospital. Materials and methods: The study population comprised all consecutive inpatients who were referred for psychiatric consultation from other departments of a multispecialty teaching hospital over a period of six months. In a semi-structured proforma, socio-demographic profile of patients, referring departments, reason of referral, psychiatric diagnosis, and physical illness diagnosis were recorded and analysed using descriptive statistics. Results: A total of 356 patients were referred for psychiatric consultation, 55.9% were males and 44.1% were females. Majority of patients belonged to 20-40 years age group (37.9%. Department of medicine made majority of the psychiatric referrals (50.6%; commonest reason for referral was abnormal behaviour (30.9%, followed by suicidal/self-harm acts (17.9%, and past psychiatric history (10.9%. The most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorders were delirium (17.9%, followed by organic psychosis/mood disorder (14.8%, substance related disorder (12.9%, and depression (12.9%. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for raising awareness among all physicians and medical staff regarding early recognition and prompt referral for psychiatric problems. Also further research is warranted, especially longitudinal studies with outcome variables and various clinical processes related to consultation-liaison psychiatry.

  12. Sociodemographic and psychiatric predictors of attrition in a prospective psychiatric epidemiological study among the general population. Result of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Ron; van Dorsselaer, Saskia; Tuithof, Marlous; ten Have, Margreet

    2013-11-01

    In prospective psychiatric epidemiological studies, attrition at follow-up can be selective, and can bias the research findings. Therefore, knowledge of predictors of attrition and of its different types (noncontact, refusal, inability to participate) is of importance. By means of (multinomial) logistic regression analyses, predictors of attrition were studied in the first 3-year follow-up of the second Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS-2), a prospective psychiatric epidemiological study among 6646 subjects of the general population aged 18-64 years. Baseline sociodemographic characteristics, physical health, mental disorders and their clinical characteristics, and experience with the previous interview were studied as predictors of attrition and of its different types. The attrition rate at follow-up was 20.2%. Refusal (14.2%) was more common than noncontact (4.6%) and inability to participate (1.4%). Compared to respondents, nonrespondents were more often younger, lower educated, unemployed and born outside the Netherlands. A less positive experience with the baseline interview and shorter interview duration also predicted attrition. Any 12-month mental disorder, the categories and separate mental disorders, and their clinical characteristics, were not significantly associated with attrition, after controlling for sociodemographics. Sociodemographic predictors and experience with the baseline interview differed between the three types of attrition, but these types were also hardly or not associated with previous mental disorders. The authors conclude that bias due to selective attrition was limited to sociodemographics and experience with the baseline interview. Mental health status at baseline was not of influence, possibly due to the large time investment to persuade respondents to re-participate and to find them in case of noncontact or removal to an unknown address. During follow-up waves of future prospective studies it is

  13. Pregnancy Complications Following Prenatal Exposure to SSRIs or Maternal Psychiatric Disorders: Results From Population-Based National Register Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Heli; Sourander, Andre; Gissler, Mika; Gyllenberg, David; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; McKeague, Ian W; Artama, Miia; Brown, Alan S

    2015-12-01

    Using national register data, the authors examined the relationship between prenatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment and pregnancy complications, accounting for psychiatric diagnoses related to SSRI use. This was a population-based prospective birth cohort study using national register data. The sampling frame included 845,345 offspring, representing all singleton live births in Finland between 1996 and 2010. Pregnancies were classified as exposed to SSRIs (N=15,729), unexposed to SSRIs but with psychiatric diagnoses (N=9,652), and unexposed to medications and psychiatric diagnoses (N=31,394). Pregnancy outcomes in SSRI users were compared with those in the unexposed groups. Offspring of mothers who received SSRI prescriptions during pregnancy had a lower risk for late preterm birth (odds ratio=0.84, 95% CI=0.74-0.96), for very preterm birth (odds ratio=0.52, 95% CI=0.37-0.74), and for cesarean section (odds ratio=0.70, 95% CI=0.66-0.75) compared with offspring of mothers unexposed to medications but with psychiatric disorders. In contrast, in SSRI-treated mothers, the risk was higher for offspring neonatal complications, including low Apgar score (odds ratio=1.68, 95% CI=1.34-2.12) and monitoring in a neonatal care unit (odds ratio=1.24, 95% CI=1.14-1.35). Compared with offspring of unexposed mothers, offspring of SSRI-treated mothers and mothers unexposed to medications but with psychiatric disorders were both at increased risk of many adverse pregnancy outcomes, including cesarean section and need for monitoring in a neonatal care unit. In a large national birth cohort, treatment of maternal psychiatric disorders with SSRIs during pregnancy was related to a lower risk of preterm birth and cesarean section but a higher risk of neonatal maladaptation. The findings provide novel evidence for a protective role of SSRIs on some deleterious reproductive outcomes, possibly by reducing maternal depressive symptoms. The divergent findings suggest

  14. Inpatient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowers, Simon G; Rowlands, Laura

    2005-07-01

    Inpatient services constitute the most highly specialized child and adolescent mental health provision and cater for the most severe disorders in this age group. In view of a number of mapping and audit initiatives in the UK in recent years and changing influences on admission policies worldwide, it is timely to review their function and effectiveness. Recent attention has focused on describing service configurations and auditing against standards. National surveys of cost, referral processes and patient satisfaction are in progress in the UK. There seems to be an international trend toward a more severe, comorbid and aggressive patient group being admitted to inpatient services. There is a shortage of quality research into clinical outcomes of inpatient treatment, but controlled trials comparing hospital treatment with intensive community management are emerging. Inpatient descriptive studies and uncontrolled outcome studies predominate in the literature. Although many children and adolescents benefit from admission to mental health inpatient facilities, the specific advantages of admission over intensive community management are uncertain.

  15. [Validation of the QFS measuring the frequency and satisfaction in social behaviours in psychiatric adult population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, A; Weber Rouget, B; Gex-Fabry, M; Maercker, A; Guimon, J

    2006-01-01

    Although everyone working in routine mental health services recognizes the scientific and ethical importance to ensure that treatments being provided are of highest quality, there is a clear lack of consensus regarding what outcome domains to include, what measure of assessment to use and, moreover, who to question when assessing. Since the fifties, social functioning is considered as an important dimension to take into account for treatment planning and outcome measuring. But for many years, symptoms scales have been considered as sufficient outcome measures and social functioning improvement expected on the basis of symptoms alleviation. As symptoms and social adjustment sometimes appear relatively independent, no accurate conclusion concerning the patient's social functioning can so be driven on the basis of his clinical symptoms. More attention has then been directed toward the development of instruments specifically intended to measure the extent and nature of social functioning impairments observed in most psychiatric syndromes. Many of these instruments are designed to be completed by caregivers or remain time consuming and difficult to use routinely. Presently, in clinical practice, there is a need to rely on simple and brief instruments considering patients'perspective about their social adjustment as a function of time. The aim of this study is to present a new instrument, the QFS, initially developed in order to assess social functioning in patients involved in group psychotherapy programs conducted in a specialist mental health setting, as well as its psychometric characteristics. It was designed to be completed in less than 10 minutes and the questions are phrased in a simple and redundant way, in order to limit problems inherent to illiteracy or language comprehension. The QFS is a 16 items self-report instrument that assesses both the frequency of (8 items) and the satisfaction with (8 items) various social behaviours adopted during the 2 weeks

  16. Crime and psychiatric disorders among youth in the US population: an analysis of the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Kendell L; Smith, Philip H; Westphal, Alexander; Zonana, Howard V; McKee, Sherry A

    2014-08-01

    Current knowledge regarding psychiatric disorders and crime in youth is limited to juvenile justice and community samples. This study examined relationships between psychiatric disorders and self-reported crime involvement in a sample of youth representative of the US population. The National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement (N = 10,123; ages 13-17 years; 2001-2004) was used to examine the relationship between lifetime DSM-IV-based diagnoses, reported crime (property, violent, other), and arrest history. Logistic regression compared the odds of reported crime involvement with specific psychiatric disorders to those without any diagnoses, and examined the odds of crime by psychiatric comorbidity. Prevalence of crime was 18.4%. Youth with lifetime psychiatric disorders, compared to no disorders, had significantly greater odds of crime, including violent crime. For violent crime resulting in arrest, conduct disorder (CD) (odds ratio OR = 57.5; 95% CI = 30.4, 108.8), alcohol use disorders (OR = 19.5; 95% CI = 8.8, 43.2), and drug use disorders (OR = 16.1; 95% CI = 9.3, 27.7) had the greatest odds with similar findings for violent crime with no arrest. Psychiatric comorbidity increased the odds of crime. Youth with 3 or more diagnoses (16.0% of population) accounted for 54.1% of those reporting arrest for violent crime. Youth with at least 1 diagnosis committed 85.8% of crime, which was reduced to 67.9% by removing individuals with CD. Importantly, 88.2% of youth with mental illness reported never having committed any crime. Our findings highlight the importance of improving access to mental health services for youthful offenders in community settings, given the substantial associations found between mental illness and crime in this nationally representative epidemiological sample. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... IOM Institute of Medicine IPF Inpatient psychiatric facility IPPS inpatient prospective payment system... 2012, FY 2013, and FY 2014 Payment Determinations 6. RHQDAPU Program Disaster Extensions and Waivers 7...

  18. Risk of Psychiatric Disorders following Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Tung Lee

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is the most common functional gastrointestinal (GI disorder observed in patients who visit general practitioners for GI-related complaints. A high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities, particularly anxiety and depressive disorders, has been reported in patients with IBS. However, a clear temporal relationship between IBS and psychiatric disorders has not been well established.We explored the relationship between IBS and the subsequent development of psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, and sleep disorder.We selected patients who were diagnosed with IBS caused by gastroenteritis, according to the data in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort was formed of patients without IBS who were matched according to age and sex. The incidence rate and the hazard ratios (HRs of subsequent new-onset psychiatric disorders were calculated for both cohorts, based on psychiatrist diagnoses.The IBS cohort consisted of 4689 patients, and the comparison cohort comprised 18756 matched control patients without IBS. The risks of depressive disorder (HR = 2.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.30-3.19, anxiety disorder (HR = 2.89, 95% CI = 2.42-3.46, sleep disorder (HR = 2.47, 95% CI = 2.02-3.02, and bipolar disorder (HR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.34-4.46 were higher in the IBS cohort than in the comparison cohort. In addition, the incidence of newly diagnosed depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, and sleep disorder remained significantly increased in all of the stratified follow-up durations (0-1, 1-5, ≥5 y.IBS may increase the risk of subsequent depressive disorder, anxiety disorder, sleep disorder, and bipolar disorder. The risk ratios are highest for these disorders within 1 year of IBS diagnosis, but the risk remains statistically significant for more than 5 years. Clinicians should pay particular attention to psychiatric

  19. Inpatient Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kayla

    2016-12-01

    Inpatient violence constitutes a major concern for staff, patients, and administrators. Violence can cause physical injury and psychological trauma. Although violence presents a challenge to inpatient clinicians, it should not be viewed as inevitable. By looking at history of violence, in addition to clinical and other historical factors, clinicians can identify which patients present the most risk of exhibiting violent behavior and whether the violence would most likely flow from psychosis, impulsivity, or predatory characteristics. With that information, clinicians can provide environmental and treatment modifications to lessen the likelihood of violence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dissociative Disorders Among Chinese Inpatients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A.; Keyes, Benjamin B.; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study consisted of 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria for Mental Disorders, Version 3 (CCMD-3). All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation, the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. Ninety-six randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or on the self-report measure dissociation. A total of 28 (15.3%, after weighting of the data) patients received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 (0.53%, after weighting) patients. Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% versus 22.1%), but the two groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China. PMID:20603768

  1. Dissociative disorders among Chinese inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A; Keyes, Benjamin B; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study were 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders, Version 3. All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation (the Dissociative Experiences Scale), and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. A total of 96 randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview (the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or who did not complete the self-report dissociation measure. A total of 28 patients (15.3%, after weighting of the data) received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 patients (0.53%, after weighting). Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% vs. 22.1%), but the 2 groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China.

  2. Relationship between metabolic syndrome and multinodular non-toxic goiter in an inpatient population from a geographic area with moderate iodine deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendina, D; De Filippo, G; Mossetti, G; Zampa, G; Muscariello, R; Benvenuto, G; Vivona, C L; Ippolito, S; Galante, F; Lombardi, G; Biondi, B; Strazzullo, P

    2012-04-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance predispose individuals to the development of both metabolic syndrome and non-toxic nodular thyroid diseases. The aim of this observational, cross-sectional study is to evaluate the relationship between metabolic syndrome and multinodular nontoxic goiter in an inpatient population from a geographic area with moderate iodine deficiency. We examined 1422 Caucasian euthyroid inpatients. Thyroid volume was determined by ultrasound of the neck. A fine-needle aspiration biopsy was performed to evaluate single thyroid nodules and dominant nodules ≥15 mm in euthyroid multinodular goiter. The diagnosis of metabolic syndrome was made according to the criteria of the American Heart Association/ National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Of the sample, 277 patients had clinical evidence of multinodular nontoxic goiter, 461 met the criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome, and 132 were found to have both conditions. After adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, nicotinism, parity, alcohol intake, thyroid function, and metabolic syndrome- related pharmacological treatment, metabolic syndrome was found to be an independent risk factor for the occurrence of multinodular non-toxic goiter. The relationship between metabolic syndrome and multi nodular non-toxic goiter was apparent in both men and women. In this study of euthyroid inpatients, we demonstrate that metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for the occurrence of multinodular non-toxic goiter in a geographic area with moderate iodine deficiency. We propose that patients meeting the criteria for metabolic syndrome should be screened for the presence of multinodular non-toxic goiter.

  3. Differences in aerobic fitness between inpatients and outpatients with severe mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Daae-Qvale Holmemo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackgroundPatients with severe mental disorders have increased mortality, and cardiovascular disease (CVD accounts for a large part. Physical inactivity and low aerobic fitness have been recognized as significant risk factors for CVD. In this study, we investigated the differences in aerobic fitness and physical activity between in- and outpatients with severe mental disorders. Method and subjectsFifty in- and outpatients from a regional psychiatric department were included. The patients filled in a questionnaire on physical activity and completed a clinical examination. An estimation of aerobic fitness was calculated for each patient, using gender, age, waist circumference, resting heart rate and physical activity level as variables.ResultsInpatients had lower estimated aerobic fitness than outpatients (VO₂peak 42 vs 50 mL•kg-1•min-1, p<0.001. Compared to population data matched for age and gender, inpatients had lower aerobic fitness, while outpatients were not different from the population average.ConclusionInpatients at a psychiatric department had lower estimated aerobic fitness than outpatients, and a lower aerobic fitness compared to the general population. Our findings suggest that inpatients with severe mental disorders should be considered a high risk group for CVD.

  4. Insomnia and hypersomnia in major depressive episode: Prevalence, sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffroy, Pierre A; Hoertel, Nicolas; Etain, Bruno; Bellivier, Frank; Delorme, Richard; Limosin, Frédéric; Peyre, Hugo

    2018-01-15

    To examine (i) the frequency of different sleep complaints (early wake-up, trouble falling asleep, hypersomnia) and their co-occurrence and (ii) the sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity associated with each type of sleep profiles. Data were drawn from the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a nationally representative survey of the US adult population (wave 1, 2001-2002; wave 2, 2004-2005). The primary analyses were limited to 3573 participants who had a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of major depressive episode (MDE) between the two waves. We used a multiple regression model to estimate the strength of independent associations between self-reported sleep complaints, sociodemographic characteristics and lifetime psychiatric comorbidity. Most of participants with MDE (92%) reported significant sleep complaints, from whom 85.2% had insomnia and 47.5% hypersomnia symptoms. The prevalence rates were for insomnia "only" of 48.5%, hypersomnia "only" of 13.7%, and their co-occurrence of 30.2%. We found that several sociodemographic characteristics (gender, age, education, individual and familial income, marital status) and psychiatric disorders (bipolar disorders, post-traumatic disorders and panic disorder) were significantly and independently associated with different sleep profiles. The co-occurrence of insomnia (especially early wake-up) and hypersomnia presented with a two-/three- fold increase risk of bipolar disorders. Definitions of sleep complaints were qualitative and subjective. Sleep complaints are prevalent and heterogeneous in expression during MDE. Sleep disturbance profiles are associated with specific patterns of comorbidity. Our findings highlight the importance of continued research on sleep complaints during MDE while taking into account psychiatric comorbidity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychiatric symptomatology and personality in a population of primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Biała

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available introduction and objective. Psychiatric disorders (and their high rates of prevalence in primary care have been widely analyzed, but the problem of underdiagnosis remains unresolved. This becomes increasingly more important in rural health centres in the face of lack of epidemiological data from these centres. The aim of this study is focused on the relationship between general health, psychiatric symptomatology and personality characteristics in the context of an adequate diagnosis. materials and methods. 518 primary care patients in 6 Polish urban clinical centres were studied using (in order of administration: a sociodemographic questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R. results. The investigated sample was representative for urban primary care patients. The findings confirmed a significant association between neuroticism and general health. The strongest relation with current functioning and mental distress of the patients (GHQ general score was observed in case of symptoms of anxiety and insomnia. The symptoms of depression may be the most difficult to identify (psychiatric symptoms assessed using GHQ sub-scales. conclusions. According to the GHQ assumptions and confirmed by the presented study, sub-threshold psychiatric symptomatology affects the functioning of primary care patients and their general health. This correlates with personality factors. Improving adequacy of diagnosis becomes extremely important, as it may often be the only chance for appropriate therapy of mental problems for people living in rural areas due to lower availability of specialistic mental services. Further epidemiological studies concerning rural primary care and prevalence of the spectrum of mental disorders need to be conducted.

  6. Unnatural causes of death and suicide among former adolescent psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Kim, Chang Yoon; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-02-01

    Compared with the general population, adolescent psychiatric patients are subject to premature death from all causes, but suicide-specific mortality rates in this population have not been carefully investigated. Therefore, we examined the high mortality due to unnatural causes, particularly suicide, using standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) relative to sex, diagnosis, and type of psychiatric service. A total of 3,029 patients aged 10-19 years presented to the outpatient clinic of a general hospital in Seoul, Korea, or were admitted to that hospital for psychiatric disorders from January 1995 to December 2006. Unnatural causes mortality risk and suicide mortality risk in these patients were compared with those in sex- and age-matched subjects from the general Korean population. The SMR for unnatural causes was 4.6, and for suicide it was 7.8. Female subjects, the young, and inpatients had the highest risks for unnatural causes of death or suicide. Among the different diagnostic groups, patients with psychotic disorders, affective disorders, and personality disorders had significantly increased SMRs for unnatural causes, and those with psychotic disorders, affective disorders, and disruptive behavioral disorders had significantly increased SMRs for suicide. The risks of unnatural death and suicide are high in adolescent psychiatric inpatients in Korea, but not as high in adolescent outpatients. Effective preventative measures are required to reduce suicide mortality in adolescent psychiatric patients, particularly female patients admitted for general psychiatric care. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Innovative Strength-Based Care in Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Deanna P; Garrison, David; Bartlett, Joanne

    2016-08-01

    Child and adolescent psychiatric units serve the highest risk, most vulnerable populations in the mental health delivery system. This article describes the integration of a strength-based approach with a traditional, medical model of psychiatric care on an acute inpatient unit. A strength-based framework allows for increased focus on exploring patients' goals, strengths, relationships, skills, and family communication within the hospital setting. The process of integration of strength-based care is described, followed by discussion of the implementation and evaluation of interventions, including mindfulness, family movie, narrative, and animal-assisted therapies. Innovative interventions led to improvement in patient symptoms, unit culture, and patient, family, and staff satisfaction. A strong emphasis on strength-based, multidisciplinary treatment has enhanced patient care, as the goals of acute inpatient admission are broadened to include more than diagnosis and medication management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Polygenic risk for five psychiatric disorders and cross-disorder and disorder-specific neural connectivity in two independent populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianqi Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Major psychiatric disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, autism (AUT, bipolar disorder (BD, major depressive disorder (MDD, and schizophrenia (SZ, are highly heritable and polygenic. Evidence suggests that these five disorders have both shared and distinct genetic risks and neural connectivity abnormalities. To measure aggregate genetic risks, the polygenic risk score (PGRS was computed. Two independent general populations (N = 360 and N = 323 were separately examined to investigate whether the cross-disorder PGRS and PGRS for a specific disorder were associated with individual variability in functional connectivity. Consistent altered functional connectivity was found with the bilateral insula: for the left supplementary motor area and the left superior temporal gyrus with the cross-disorder PGRS, for the left insula and right middle and superior temporal lobe associated with the PGRS for autism, for the bilateral midbrain, posterior cingulate, cuneus, and precuneus associated with the PGRS for BD, and for the left angular gyrus and the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex associated with the PGRS for schizophrenia. No significant functional connectivity was found associated with the PGRS for ADHD and MDD. Our findings indicated that genetic effects on the cross-disorder and disorder-specific neural connectivity of common genetic risk loci are detectable in the general population. Our findings also indicated that polygenic risk contributes to the main neurobiological phenotypes of psychiatric disorders and that identifying cross-disorder and specific functional connectivity related to polygenic risks may elucidate the neural pathways for these disorders.

  9. Risk factors of coercion among psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christoffer; Starkopf, Liis; Hastrup, Lene Halling

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Reducing the use of coercion among patients with mental disorders has long been a political priority. However, risk factors for coercive measures have primarily been investigated in smaller studies. To reduce the use of coercion, it is crucial to identify people at risk which we aim to do...... measure (21.9%). Clinical characteristics were the foremost predictors of coercion and patients with organic mental disorder had the highest increased risk of being subjected to a coercive measure (OR = 5.56; 95% CI = 5.04, 6.14). The risk of coercion was the highest in the first admission and decreased...... with the number of admissions (all p income countries (all p 

  10. Adolescent loneliness and psychiatric morbidity in the general population: Identifying "at risk" groups using latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevlin, Mark; Murphy, Siobhan; Murphy, Jamie

    2014-11-01

    Previous research has shown that loneliness is strongly associated with both physical and psychological ill health, particularly among adolescents. Factor analytic research has also shown that loneliness is a multi-dimensional construct, characterized by e.g. feelings of isolation, and relational and collective connectedness. While factor analytic representations of the phenomenon effectively illustrate the structure and form of the loneliness construct, they may not adequately capture its expression in the population within, among and across individuals. The current study modelled the expression of loneliness among a population sample of Northern Irish adolescents using latent class analysis. Data from the Young Life and Times Survey (2011) was used to identify the fewest groups of adolescents in the population characterized by discrete and shared loneliness profiles based on their responses to the UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-LS). Individual "at risk" status for psychiatric morbidity was then assessed on the basis of LCA-group membership. Four groups of adolescents were identified: 1) high loneliness, characterized predominantly by feelings of isolation, 2) intermediate loneliness (two groups), and a baseline group with low levels of loneliness. While all groups were more likely to screen positive for psychiatric morbidity compared with the baseline group, notable risk, however, was attributable to specific isolation experiences or disconnectedness, that characterized both the profiles of the high loneliness group and the similar, but less severe, intermediate loneliness group. Loneliness is distributed throughout the adolescent population; however, among a significant minority, loneliness is predominantly characterized by feelings of isolation and is strongly indicative of psychological ill health.

  11. The Effect of EMDR and CBT on Low Self-esteem in a General Psychiatric Population: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffioen, Brecht T; van der Vegt, Anna A; de Groot, Izaäk W; de Jongh, Ad

    2017-01-01

    Although low self-esteem has been found to be an important factor in the development and maintenance of psychopathology, surprisingly little is known about its treatment. This study investigated the effectiveness of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), regarding their capacities in enhancing self-esteem in a general psychiatric secondary health care population. A randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups was used. Participants were randomly allocated to either 10 weekly sessions of EMDR (n = 15) or CBT (n = 15). They were assessed pre-treatment, after each session, post treatment and at 3 months follow-up on self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and Credibility of Core Beliefs), psychological symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory), social anxiety, and social interaction (Inventory of Interpersonal Situations) (IIS). The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA for the complete cases (n = 19) and intention-to-treat (n = 30) to examine differences over time and between conditions. Both groups, EMDR as well as CBT, showed significant improvements on self-esteem, increasing two standard deviations on the main parameter (RSES). Furthermore, the results showed significant reductions in general psychiatric symptoms. The effects were maintained at 3 months follow-up. No between-group differences could be detected. Although the small sample requires to exercise caution in the interpretation of the findings, the results suggest that, when offering an adequate number of sessions, both EMDR and CBT have the potential to be effective treatments for patients with low self-esteem and a wide range of comorbid psychiatric conditions. This study was registered at www.trialregister.nl with identifier NTR4611.

  12. The Effect of EMDR and CBT on Low Self-esteem in a General Psychiatric Population: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brecht T. Griffioen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although low self-esteem has been found to be an important factor in the development and maintenance of psychopathology, surprisingly little is known about its treatment. This study investigated the effectiveness of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR therapy and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT, regarding their capacities in enhancing self-esteem in a general psychiatric secondary health care population. A randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups was used. Participants were randomly allocated to either 10 weekly sessions of EMDR (n = 15 or CBT (n = 15. They were assessed pre-treatment, after each session, post treatment and at 3 months follow-up on self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and Credibility of Core Beliefs, psychological symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory, social anxiety, and social interaction (Inventory of Interpersonal Situations (IIS. The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA for the complete cases (n = 19 and intention-to-treat (n = 30 to examine differences over time and between conditions. Both groups, EMDR as well as CBT, showed significant improvements on self-esteem, increasing two standard deviations on the main parameter (RSES. Furthermore, the results showed significant reductions in general psychiatric symptoms. The effects were maintained at 3 months follow-up. No between-group differences could be detected. Although the small sample requires to exercise caution in the interpretation of the findings, the results suggest that, when offering an adequate number of sessions, both EMDR and CBT have the potential to be effective treatments for patients with low self-esteem and a wide range of comorbid psychiatric conditions. This study was registered at www.trialregister.nl with identifier NTR4611.

  13. The Effect of EMDR and CBT on Low Self-esteem in a General Psychiatric Population: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffioen, Brecht T.; van der Vegt, Anna A.; de Groot, Izaäk W.; de Jongh, Ad

    2017-01-01

    Although low self-esteem has been found to be an important factor in the development and maintenance of psychopathology, surprisingly little is known about its treatment. This study investigated the effectiveness of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), regarding their capacities in enhancing self-esteem in a general psychiatric secondary health care population. A randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups was used. Participants were randomly allocated to either 10 weekly sessions of EMDR (n = 15) or CBT (n = 15). They were assessed pre-treatment, after each session, post treatment and at 3 months follow-up on self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and Credibility of Core Beliefs), psychological symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory), social anxiety, and social interaction (Inventory of Interpersonal Situations) (IIS). The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA for the complete cases (n = 19) and intention-to-treat (n = 30) to examine differences over time and between conditions. Both groups, EMDR as well as CBT, showed significant improvements on self-esteem, increasing two standard deviations on the main parameter (RSES). Furthermore, the results showed significant reductions in general psychiatric symptoms. The effects were maintained at 3 months follow-up. No between-group differences could be detected. Although the small sample requires to exercise caution in the interpretation of the findings, the results suggest that, when offering an adequate number of sessions, both EMDR and CBT have the potential to be effective treatments for patients with low self-esteem and a wide range of comorbid psychiatric conditions. This study was registered at www.trialregister.nl with identifier NTR4611. PMID:29167649

  14. Incidência de conduta violenta e antissocial em população psiquiátrica forense Incidence of violent and antisocial behavior in a forensic psychiatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisieux Elaine de Borba Telles

    2011-01-01

    incidence of violent and antisocial behaviors in a mental hospital population, and to describe the implementation of a systematic method to record this phenomenon. METHOD: A cohort was selected among the psychiatric inpatients at Maurício Cardoso Forensic Psychiatry Institute (Instituto Psiquiátrico Forense Maurício Cardoso, IPFMC. Yudofsky's Overt Aggression Scale (OAS and Tengström et al.'s Follow-Up Questionnaire were used. During a 1-year follow-up period, episodes of violent and antisocial behavior were evaluated daily and recorded on both the scale and the questionnaire. The population sample included 68 male patients randomly selected among the committed inpatients at IPFMC. RESULTS: The incidence of violent/antisocial behavior along the period assessed was 200 episodes involving 50 patients. Aggressions and antisocial behavior occurred mainly in daytime. The interventions most commonly used were verbal management, patient isolation, and intramuscular medication. CONCLUSION: For the first time, the occurrence of violent and antisocial behavior was measured in a forensic psychiatric population.

  15. Patterns of psychiatric and physical comorbidities associated with panic disorder in a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-H; Lin, H-C

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to document a range of risk of psychiatric and physical comorbidities among PD patients using a nationwide population-based dataset in Taiwan. A total of 3672 patients with at least three consensus diagnoses with PD were included, together with 18 360 matched controls without PD. Logistic regression analyses were performed after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. After adjusting for the patients' sex, age and geographic region, patients with PD were more likely to have major depressive disorder (OR = 23.45), bipolar disorder (OR = 15.54), cardiac dysrhythmia (OR = 15.12), coronary heart disease (OR = 7.69), myocardial infarction (OR = 6.55), irritable bowel syndrome (OR = 4.82), peptic ulcers (OR = 4.30), cerebrovascular disease (OR = 3.61), hypertension (OR = 3.31), epilepsy (OR = 3.07), hepatitis (OR = 2.70), hyperlipidemia (OR = 2.20), asthma (OR = 2.17), schizophrenia (OR = 2.14), neoplasms (OR = 2.02), renal disease (OR = 1.89) and diabetes (OR = 1.26), compared to patients in the comparison cohort. We conclude that PD is associated with an array of psychiatric and physical illnesses. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Predictive validity of a five-item symptom checklist to screen psychiatric morbidity and suicide ideation in general population and psychiatric settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yi Wu

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: The BSRS-5R was validated as an efficient checklist to screen for psychiatric morbidity and suicide ideation in the general public. The result is valuable in translating into general medical and community settings for early detection of suicide ideation.

  17. Increasing HIV Testing in Inpatient Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway, Martha; Mangurian, Christina; Carraher, Noah; Momenzadeh, Amanda; Leary, Mark; Lee, Emily K; Dilley, James W

    2017-10-23

    People with serious mental illness (SMI) are at elevated risk of HIV infection, but do not receive HIV tests regularly. Inpatient psychiatric admissions provide opportunities for HIV testing. This study retrospectively examined the impact of three sequential interventions designed to increase HIV testing on an acute inpatient psychiatry service: (1) advocacy by an administrative champion, (2) an on-site HIV counselor, and (3) a clinician championing HIV testing. Demographic and HIV testing data were extracted from hospital data systems for 11,360 admissions of HIV-negative patients to an inpatient psychiatry service between 2006 and 2012. Relationships among interventions, length of stay, patient demographics, and receipt of an HIV test were examined using general estimating equation methods. In the year prior to the intervention, 7.2% of psychiatric inpatients received HIV tests. After 1 year of administrative advocacy, 11.2% received tests. Following the HIV counseling intervention, 25.1% of patients were tested. After the counseling intervention ended, continued administrative and clinical advocacy was associated with further increases in testing. In the final year studied, 30.3% of patients received HIV tests. Patients with shorter inpatient stays and those of Black or Asian race/ethnicity were less likely to be tested. Further, 1.6% of HIV tests were positive. Three interventions of varying intensity were associated with a 5-fold increase in HIV testing on an acute inpatient psychiatry service. Nonetheless, 70% of inpatients were not tested. Continued efforts are needed to increase HIV testing in inpatient psychiatric settings. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Suicide after absconding from inpatient care in England: an exploration of mental health professionals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Isabelle M; Clements, Caroline; Saini, Pooja; Rahman, Mohammad Shaiyan; Shaw, Jenny; Appleby, Louis; Kapur, Nav; Windfuhr, Kirsten

    2016-06-01

    Absconding from inpatient care is associated with suicide risk in psychiatric populations. However, little is known about the real world context of suicide after absconding from a psychiatric ward or the experiences of clinical staff caring for these patients. To identify the characteristics of inpatients who died by suicide after absconding and to explore these and further key issues related to suicide risk from the perspective of clinical staff. A mixed-methods study using quantitative data of all patient suicides in England between 1997 and 2011 and a thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with 21 clinical staff. Four themes were identified as areas of concern for clinicians: problems with ward design, staffing problems, difficulties in assessing risk, and patient specific factors. Results suggest that inpatients who died by suicide after absconding may have more complex and severe illness along with difficult life events, such as homelessness. Closer monitoring of inpatients and access points, and improved risk assessments are important to reduce suicide in this patient group.

  19. Homeless and Housed Inpatients with Schizophrenia: Disparities in Service Access upon Discharge from Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burra, Tara A.; Hwang, Stephen W.; Rourke, Sean B.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in services available at the time of discharge for homeless and housed psychiatric inpatients. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient unit. Thirty homeless individuals and 21 housed controls (matched for diagnosis, gender,…

  20. Psychiatric morbidity, quality of life, and perceived social support among elderly population: a community-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The growth in the elderly population means an inevitable increase in general physical health, psychobiological and mental health-related problems. Aim of the study: The present study aims to examine psychiatric morbidity, quality of life, and perceived social support among elderly population. Research design: A cross-sectional community-based study was conducted. People in age group of 60 years and above, who were permanent members of their respective households of Ranga Pukri Para and Dekargaon village in Tezpur, Sonitpur district of Assam, were the sample for the present study. One thousand four hundred and ninety adult populations had been identified as sample frame from the electorate list. One hundred and four people of age 60 years and above had been identified from the list for the study purpose. Random sampling method was used for selection of the sample. Semi-structured socio-demographic datasheet, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12, CAGE questionnaire, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF scale were administered to the respondents. Results: Based on the GHQ-12 score, it was found that 24% of the respondents showed an indication of mental health problems and from the CAGE score, it indicated that 13% of the respondents were found to be misusing or was in dependence in alcohol. The result from the present study indicated that elderly population was getting more family social support, followed by friends and from significant others. The result indicated that the mean score was low in the domain of social relationships. Environment domain was high followed by physical health and psychological domains of WHOQOL-BREF. Conclusion: In the elderly population, overall health can be influenced by multiple factors, including a person’s physical, psychological, behavioural, and social factors. The mental health professionals can provide resources, services

  1. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... Medicine IPF Inpatient psychiatric facility IPPS inpatient prospective payment system IRF Inpatient... IQR Program Disaster Extensions or Waivers 11. Electronic Health Records (EHRs) a. Background b... Wage Index 1. Secretary's Report to Congress on Wage Index Reform 2. Institute of Medicine (IOM) Study...

  2. Addiction Potential of Cigarettes With Reduced Nicotine Content in Populations With Psychiatric Disorders and Other Vulnerabilities to Tobacco Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Stephen T; Heil, Sarah H; Sigmon, Stacey C; Tidey, Jennifer W; Gaalema, Diann E; Hughes, John R; Stitzer, Maxine L; Durand, Hanna; Bunn, Janice Y; Priest, Jeff S; Arger, Christopher A; Miller, Mollie E; Bergeria, Cecilia L; Davis, Danielle R; Streck, Joanna M; Reed, Derek D; Skelly, Joan M; Tursi, Lauren

    2017-10-01

    A national policy is under consideration to reduce the nicotine content of cigarettes to lower nicotine addiction potential in the United States. To examine how smokers with psychiatric disorders and other vulnerabilities to tobacco addiction respond to cigarettes with reduced nicotine content. A multisite, double-blind, within-participant assessment of acute response to research cigarettes with nicotine content ranging from levels below a hypothesized addiction threshold to those representative of commercial cigarettes (0.4, 2.3, 5.2, and 15.8 mg/g of tobacco) at 3 academic sites included 169 daily smokers from the following 3 vulnerable populations: individuals with affective disorders (n = 56) or opioid dependence (n = 60) and socioeconomically disadvantaged women (n = 53). Data were collected from March 23, 2015, through April 25, 2016. After a brief smoking abstinence, participants were exposed to the cigarettes with varying nicotine doses across fourteen 2- to 4-hour outpatient sessions. Addiction potential of the cigarettes was assessed using concurrent choice testing, the Cigarette Purchase Task (CPT), and validated measures of subjective effects, such as the Minnesota Nicotine Withdrawal Scale. Among the 169 daily smokers included in the analysis (120 women [71.0%] and 49 men [29.0%]; mean [SD] age, 35.6 [11.4] years), reducing the nicotine content of cigarettes decreased the relative reinforcing effects of smoking in all 3 populations. Across populations, the 0.4-mg/g dose was chosen significantly less than the 15.8-mg/g dose in concurrent choice testing (mean [SEM] 30% [0.04%] vs 70% [0.04%]; Cohen d = 0.40; P addiction potential in populations that are highly vulnerable to tobacco addiction. Smokers with psychiatric conditions and socioeconomic disadvantage are more addicted and less likely to quit and experience greater adverse health impacts. Policies to reduce these disparities are needed; reducing the nicotine content in

  3. Dissociative disorders in a psychiatric institute in India--a selected review and patterns over a decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K; Desai, Geetha; Shaligram, Deepika

    2010-09-01

    The prevalence--and type--of dissociative disorders is considered to vary across cultures and over time. The aim of the study was to examine patterns of dissociative disorders among subjects attending psychiatric services over a period of 10 years. The sample consisted of both inpatients and outpatients attending a psychiatric hospital between 1999 and 2008. Information of those subjects diagnosed to have dissociative disorders was reviewed. A semi-structured proforma was used to collect information about demographic details and diagnosis. A total of 893 patients had been diagnosed with dissociative disorder over the past decade: 591 (66%) were outpatients and 302 (34%) were inpatients. The proportion of patients diagnosed with dissociative disorders ranged between 1.5 and 15.0 per 1,000 for outpatients and between 1.5 and 11.6 per 1,000 for inpatients. The majority of patients were diagnosed with dissociative motor disorder (43.3% outpatients, 37.7% inpatients), followed by dissociative convulsions (23% outpatients, 27.8% inpatients). Female preponderance was seen across all sub-types of dissociative disorder except dissociative fugue. Dissociative disorders are still commonly diagnosed in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Dissociative motor disorders and dissociative convulsions are the most common disorders. Unlike in the West, dissociative identity disorders were rarely diagnosed; instead, possession states were commonly seen in the Indian population, indicating cross-cultural disparity.

  4. The implementation and evaluation of cognitive milieu therapy for dual diagnosis inpatients: A pragmatic clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jørn; Oestrich, Irene; Austin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    milieu therapy (CMT) among a group of dual diagnosis inpatients. CMT is an integrated treatment for both mental illness and substance abuse based on cognitive behavioral principles and carried out within a supportive inpatient environment. A convenience sample of dual diagnosis inpatients (N = 136......Dual diagnosis is chronic psychiatric condition involving serious mental illness and substance abuse. Experts recommend the integration of treatment for concurrent substance abuse and serious psychiatric problems. The following pragmatic trial examined the implementation and outcomes of cognitive...

  5. Coexisting Psychiatric Problems and Stressful Life Events in Adults with Symptoms of ADHD--A Large Swedish Population-Based Study of Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichs, Bettina; Igl, Wilmar; Larsson, Henrik; Larsson, Jan-Olov

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the associations of subtypes of adult ADHD with other psychiatric problems, stressful life events, and sex differences. Method: Odds ratios were calculated using information from 17,899 participants from a population-based survey of adult twins born in Sweden between 1959 and 1985. Results: Symptoms of attention deficit…

  6. Screening for Psychiatric Disorders in a Total Population of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Challenging Behaviour Using the PAS-ADD Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David; Lowe, Kathy; Matthews, Helen; Anness, Val

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has suggested a variety of possible relationships between the presence of symptoms of psychiatric disorder and challenging behaviours in people with intellectual disability. This study explores this relationship in a total population sample of adults with challenging behaviour. Materials and Methods: Over 800 service…

  7. Childhood ADHD Is Strongly Associated with a Broad Range of Psychiatric Disorders during Adolescence: A Population-Based Birth Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimasu, Kouichi; Barbaresi, William J.; Colligan, Robert C.; Voigt, Robert G.; Killian, Jill M.; Weaver, Amy L.; Katusic, Slavica K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To evaluate associations between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid psychiatric disorders using research-identified incident cases of ADHD and population-based controls. Methods: Subjects included a birth cohort of all children born 1976-1982 remaining in Rochester, MN after age five (n = 5,718). Among them we…

  8. Seasonality of hospital admissions and birth dates among inpatients with eating disorders: a nationwide population-based retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Sung; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Chien, Wu-Chien

    2016-10-15

    Seasonal variation exists in the psychopathology of eating disorders. However, it is still unknown whether there is seasonal variation in eating disorder symptom severity. This study investigated seasonal trends in hospital admissions and birth dates among patients with eating disorders in Taiwan (25°N). Subgroup analyses by gender and comorbid affective disorders were also of interest. Data on all hospital admissions between 2000 and 2013 were collected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, and 1954 patients with eating disorders were identified. Hospital admissions and birth dates were recorded by day. The four seasons and cross-seasons were defined by solstices and equinoxes. The expected distribution of births was determined using data from all patients hospitalized from 2000 to 2013 (n = 13,139,306). Hospital admissions among patients with eating disorders exceeded the rate of expected hospital admissions in the summer season (p dates among these patients did not differ from the expected distributions. Interestingly, hospital admissions among patients with comorbid affective disorders exceeded the rates of hospital admissions among non-affective patients during the spring (p = 0.004). Moreover, the number of non-affective patients born during autumn exceeded the birth rates of affective patients during this season (p = 0.001). Gender and comorbid affective disorders were not associated with cross-seasonal differences in either hospitalizations or dates of birth. Affective psychopathology in inpatients with eating disorders may substantially contribute to symptom severity that waxes and wanes with the seasons. Moreover, the seasonal distribution of birth dates was significantly different in patients without comorbid affective disorders.

  9. Prevalence of Psychiatric Diagnoses and Challenging Behaviors in a Community-Based Population of Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Ian; Pollard, Jill; McClean, Brian; MacAuley, Niall; Hastings, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested substantial variation in prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disability (ID) and also differential patterns of associations between psychiatric disorders and challenging behaviors in people with ID. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of specific…

  10. Changes in attitudes towards mental disorders and psychiatric treatment 1976-2014 in a Swedish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnezami, Helia Faghir; Jacobsson, Lars; Edin-Liljegren, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Mental illness has always been subject to stigma and discrimination. There are a number of studies on public attitudes towards people with mental illness. Long-term studies, however, examining changes over time are scarce. The aim of this study was to examine potential changes concerning attitudes between 1976 and 2014 in Vilhelmina, a community in northern Sweden. A postal questionnaire was sent out to a random sample of 500 adults aged 18-70 years. The same questionnaire has previously been used in 1976 and 2003. The attitudes towards people with mental illness have not generally become more positive over the years. In 2014 almost a quarter of the population still think that "people with mental illness commit violentX acts more than others". Even more people in 2014 than in 1976 agree to the statement that "mental illness harms the reputation more than a physical disease" (77.2% versus 52.8%). People with low educational level have more negative views than people with higher education. Younger respondents, attitude towards medication since 1976. Attitudes towards mental illness and mentally ill people have not changed substantially over time.

  11. Antidepressant use during pregnancy and psychiatric disorders in offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Agerbo, Esben; Ingstrup, Katja G

    2017-01-01

    in children, defined as first day of inpatient or outpatient treatment for psychiatric disorders. Hazard ratios of psychiatric disorders were estimated using Cox regression models.Results Overall, psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 32 400 children. The adjusted 15 year cumulative incidence of psychiatric......Objective To investigate the association between in utero exposure to antidepressants and risk of psychiatric disorders.Design Population based cohort study.Setting Danish national registers.Participants 905 383 liveborn singletons born during 1998-2012 in Denmark and followed from birth until July...... disorders was 8.0% (95% confidence interval 7.9% to 8.2%) in the unexposed group, 11.5% (10.3% to 12.9%) in the antidepressant discontinuation group, 13.6% (11.3% to 16.3%) in the continuation group, and 14.5% (10.5% to 19.8%) in the new user group. The antidepressant continuation group had an increased...

  12. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Nicks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1% requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years, with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140 versus 340 min, CI (304–375; <0.001 when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198 compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue.

  13. The use of psychiatric services by young adults who came to Sweden as teenage refugees: a national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhica, H; Almquist, Y; Rostila, M; Hjern, A

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the patterns of use of different forms of psychiatric care in refugees who settled in Sweden as teenagers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the use of different forms of psychiatric care from 2009 to 2012 in a population of 35 457 refugees, aged from 20 to 36, who had settled in Sweden as teenagers between 1989 and 2004. These findings were compared with 1.26 million peers from the same birth cohorts in the general Swedish population. Unaccompanied and accompanied refugees were more likely to experience compulsory admission to a psychiatric hospital compared with the native Swedish population, with hazard ratios (HRs) of 2.76 (1.86-4.10) and 1.89 (1.53-2.34), respectively, as well as psychiatric inpatient care, with HRs of 1.62 (1.34-1.94) and 1.37 (1.25-1.50). Outpatient care visits by the young refugees were similar to the native Swedish population. The longer the refugees had residency in Sweden, the more they used outpatient psychiatric care. Refugees born in the Horn of Africa and Iran were most likely to undergo compulsory admission, with HRs of 3.98 (2.12-7.46) and 3.07 (1.52-6.19), respectively. They were also the groups who were most likely to receive inpatient care, with HRs of 1.55 (1.17-2.06) and 1.84 (1.37-2.47), respectively. Our results also indicated that the use of psychiatric care services increased with the level of education in the refugee population, while the opposite was true for the native Swedish population. In fact, the risks of compulsory admissions were particularly higher among refugees who had received a secondary education, compared with native Swedish residents, with HRs of 4.72 (3.06-7.29) for unaccompanied refugees and 2.04 (1.51-2.73) for accompanied refugees. Young refugees received more psychiatric inpatient care than the native Swedish population, with the highest rates seen in refugees who were not accompanied by their parents. The discrepancy between the use of inpatient and outpatient care

  14. [The psychiatric comorbidity of anorexia nervosa: A comparative study in a population of French and Greek anorexic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountza, M; Garyfallos, G; Ploumpidis, D; Varsou, E; Gkiouzepas, I

    2017-11-01

    The current study had two objectives: (1) to access the psychiatric comorbidity in axis I and axis II (according to DSM-IV) of anorexia nervosa in a sample of 60 anorexic patients; (2) to compare the features of the psychiatric comorbidity between the two groups of French and Greek anorexic patients who participated in the study, as well as to compare some psychological and behavioral aspects of their anorectic psychopathology. Sixty anorexic patients, thirty French and thirty Greek, aged between 18 and 60 years, referred for evaluation and therapy at the unit of eating disorders at the "Institut national Marcel-Rivière of the MGEN" (hôpital de La Verrière, France) and at the unit of eating disorders of the First Department of Psychiatry of EGINITIO University Psychiatric Hospital in Athens (Greece), were accessed with the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT26), Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI), Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL90R), Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Version 5.0.0 and the International Personality Disorder Examination. The comparison between the Greek and French patient populations did not show significant differences in age, socio-educational status, family status and BMI. French patients were hospitalized more regularly than Greek patients (χ 2 (1)=6.65, P=0.01) and psychotropic drug therapy was more common in French anorexic patients (χ 2 (1)=4.59, P=0.06). The results of the EAT 26 questionnaire in Greek and French patients show an average of 34.93 (±18.54) in total, with no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The results of EDI show a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the subscale 3 (body dissatisfaction) in which the Greeks scored on average at 9.40 and the French at 14.90 (t (58)=3.09, PGreeks) showed a personality disorder. The most common personality disorder was borderline personality disorder (40%), followed by obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (26.6%) and avoidant

  15. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L. Gabriels

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and/or intellectual disabilities (ID are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children’s hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33% and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days. Available data from a subset of patients (=43 in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes.

  16. Cotard syndrome in neurological and psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Aguilar-Venegas, Luis C; Crail-Melendez, Daniel; Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Nente, Francisco; Mendez, Mario F

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the frequency and characteristics of Cotard syndrome among neurological and psychiatric inpatients at a tertiary referral center. All inpatients from the National Institute of Neurology of Mexico (March 2007-May 2009) requiring neuropsychiatric consultation were reviewed. Among 1,321 inpatient consultations, 63.7% had neurological disease and one (0.11%) had viral encephalitis and Cotard syndrome. Of inpatients, 36.2% had pure psychiatric disorders and three (0.62%) had Cotard syndrome, associated with psychotic depression, depersonalization, and penile retraction (koro syndrome). This review discusses potential mechanisms for Cotard syndrome, including the role of a perceptual-emotional dissociation in self-misattribution in the deliré des negations.

  17. Gender differences in the use of psychiatric outpatient specialist services in Tromsø, Norway are dependent on age: a population-based cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anne Helen; Høye, Anne

    2015-10-22

    Overall, men are less likely than women to seek health care services for mental health problems, but differences between genders in higher age groups are equivocal. The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between gender and the use of psychiatric outpatient specialist services in Norway, both in a general population and in a subpopulation with self-reported anxiety and/or depression. Using questionnaires from 12,982 participants (30-87 years) in the cross-sectional sixth Tromsø Study (2007-8) we estimated proportions reporting anxiety/depression, and proportions using psychiatric outpatient specialist services in a year. By logistic regressions we studied the association between gender and the use of psychiatric outpatient specialist services. Analyses were adjusted for age, marital status, income, education, self-reported degree of anxiety/depression, and GP visits last year. Analyses were also performed for genders separately. Anxiety/depression was reported by 21.5 % of women and 12.3 % of men in the general population. Visits to psychiatric outpatient services during one year were reported by 4.6 % of women and 3.3 % of men. The general population's probability of a visit was significantly lower among men compared to women in ages 30-49 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.58, confidence interval [CI] 0.39-0.84, p-value [p] = 0.004), whereas men used services slightly more than women in ages 50 years and over (OR 1.36, CI 1.00-1.83, p = 0.047). Among those with anxiety/depression 13.5 % of women and 10.5 % of men visited psychiatric outpatient services in a year. We found no statistically significant gender differences in the use of services in this subgroup. Other factors associated with services use in women with anxiety/depression were higher education, more severe anxiety/depression, and GP visits the last year, whereas in men only a more severe anxiety/depression was associated with psychiatric outpatient visits. Overall, the use of

  18. Programa de informação para alívio da ansiedade de familiares de doentes internados em psiquiatria Programa de información para el alivio de la ansiedad de enfermos internados en psiquiatria Information program for the relief of anxiety in the families of psychiatric in-patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Filipe Nabais Neves Renca

    2010-12-01

    Spielberger (STAI-Y1 adaptado para la población portuguesa por Daniel (1996. Constatamos que la ansiedad en el grupo experimental disminuyó significativamente de 87,00 a 60,29 mientras que en el grupo control permaneció prácticamente inalterada, 83,88 en el primer momento a 82,50 en el 2º. Concluimos que, tras el enfoque efectuado en la aplicación del guión estructurado, los niveles de ansiedad de las familias, en relación a la patología psiquiátrica de su familiar y de todo lo que esa patología involucra en relación al (des equilibrio familiar, disminuyeron, siendo que se aceptó de forma más positiva la patología psiquiátrica, ya que ésta fue desmitificada.The aim of this project was to evaluate the effect of an information program on anxiety in the family of patients admitted to a psychiatric unit for the first time. The present article is a report of a quantitative investigation: a quasi-experimental study with a control group and before and after evaluation. A non-probabilistic convenience sample was used, made up of the families of people having their first in-patient psychiatric treatment at DPSM Guarda. The data were collected using an instrument based on the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (Inventário de Ansiedade Estado de Spielberger, validated for the Portuguese population by Daniel (1996. It was found that anxiety in the experimental group decreased statistically significantly from 87,00 to 60,29 while in the control group it remained practically unaltered, from 83,88 at the first measurement to 82,50. In conclusion, after application of the structured guidance, anxiety levels in the families in relation to the psychiatric pathology of their relative and of what that pathology involved in relation to family equilibrium and imbalance decreased; in this way, the psychiatric pathology was accepted once it was demystified.

  19. Increase in sickness absence with psychiatric diagnosis in Norway: a general population-based epidemiologic study of age, gender and regional distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brage Sören

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of sickness absence with psychiatric diagnoses from 1994–2000, and the distribution across gender, age groups, diagnostic groups and regions in a general population. Methods The population at risk was defined as all individuals aged 16–66 years who were entitled to sickness benefits in 1994, 1996, 1998 and 2000 (n = 2,282,761 in 2000. All individuals with a full-time disability pension were excluded. The study included approximately 77% of the Norwegian population aged 16–66 years. For each year, the study base started on 1 January and ended on 31 December. Individuals that were sick-listed for more than 14/16 consecutive days with a psychiatric diagnosis on their medical certificate were selected as cases. Included in this study were data for Norway, the capital city Oslo and five regions in the southeast of the country. Results Sickness absence with psychiatric diagnoses increased in all age groups, in women and men, and in all regions. At the national level, the cumulative incidence increased in women from 1.7% in 1994 to 4.6% in 2000, and in men from 0.8% in 1994 to 2.2% in 2000. The highest cumulative incidence was found in middle-aged women and men (30–59 years. Women had a higher incidence than men in all stratification groups. The cumulative incidences in 2000 varied between 4.6% to 5.6% in women in the different regions, and for men the corresponding figures were 2.1% to 3.2%. Throughout the four years studied, women in Oslo had more than twice as high incidence levels of sickness absence with alcohol and drug diagnoses as the country as a whole. There were some differences between regions in sickness absence with specific psychiatric diagnoses, but they were small and most comparisons were non-significant. Conclusion Sickness absence with psychiatric diagnoses increased between 1994 and 2000 in Norway. The increase was highest in the middle-aged, and in women

  20. Effect of hopelessness on the links between psychiatric symptoms and suicidality in a vulnerable population at risk of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Patricia; Tarrier, Nicholas; Dunn, Graham; Shaw, Jennifer; Awenat, Yvonne; Ulph, Fiona; Pratt, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of two risk factors working together on a measure of suicide probability in a highly vulnerable group who were male prisoners identified as being at risk of self harm. The first risk factor was psychiatric symptoms, including general psychiatric symptoms and symptoms of personality disorder. The second risk factor was psychological precursors of suicidal thoughts and behaviours which were defeat, entrapment, and hopelessness. Sixty-five male prisoners from a high secure prison in NW England, UK, were recruited, all of whom were considered at risk of suicide by prison staff. General psychiatric symptoms and symptoms of personality disorders predicted the probability of suicide. Hopelessness amplified the strength of the positive relationship between general psychiatric symptoms and suicide probability. These amplification effects acted most strongly on suicidal ideation as opposed to negative self evaluations or hostility. In contrast, defeat, entrapment and hopelessness did not affect the relationship between personality disorders and suicide probability. Clinical assessments of highly vulnerable individuals, as exemplified by prisoners, should include measures of a range of general psychiatric symptoms, together with measures of psychological components, in particular perceptions of hopelessness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Short-term diagnostic stability among re-admitted psychiatric in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prospective and retrospective consistency of diagnoses among readmitted psychiatric in-patients at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya. Method: Admission and discharge diagnoses among a consecutive sample of 114 psychiatric in-patients readmitted at the Moi Teaching ...

  2. Association of psychiatric co-morbidity and efficacy of treatment in chronic daily headache in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity in patients of chronic daily headache (CDH and compare the efficacy of treatment between various type of headache associated with psychiatric co-morbidity. Materials and Methods: Prospective case control cohort study, 92 consecutive patients of CDH meeting eligibility criteria. The diagnosis of various subtypes of CDH was made according to the IHS criteria. Age, sex, educational, marital and socioeconomic status, matched controls were also selected. Patients were evaluated with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI scale at the time of enrolment and at 3 months. Results: CDH accounted for 28% of all headache patients. The mean age of presentation was 30.2 ± 10.3 years, male: Female ratio of 28:64 and mean duration of 4.56 ± 0.56 years. Chronic migraine (CM accounted for 59 patients, chronic tension type headache (CTTH 22 patients, new daily persistent headache (NDPH 3 patients and miscellaneous 8 patients. Psychiatric co-morbidity was present in 53.3% patients with CDH, and was more common in CM (62.7% as compared to CTTH (36.4%. Single psychiatric co-morbidity was seen in 26 patients, while 23 patients had multiple co-morbidity. Major depressive episode, anxiety disorder, agoraphobia and dysthymia were significant psychiatric co-morbidities. Patients with CM were treated with topiramate or divalproex sodium ER and CTTH were treated with amitriptyline. 55 patients came for follow up at 3 months, improvement in headache was seen in 29 patients. Conclusion: Psychiatric co-morbidity was present in more than 50% patients with CDH and its presence along with a duration of ≥2 years was associated with a poor response to treatment.

  3. Dissociative Disorders Among Chinese Inpatients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A.; Keyes, Benjamin B.; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, TianHong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study consisted of 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria for Mental Disorders, Version 3 (CCMD-3). All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation, the Dissociative Experiences...

  4. Psychiatric Disorders in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Prevalence, Comorbidity, and Associated Factors in a Population-Derived Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonoff, Emily; Pickles, Andrew; Charman, Tony; Chandler, Susie; Loucas, Tom; Baird, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    A study on autism spectrum disorders is conducted because its early onset, lifelong persistence, and high levels of associated impairment is turning it into a major public health concern. Results show that psychiatric disorders are common in children with autism spectrum disorders but there were few associations between putative risk factors and…

  5. [Prescription drug abuse in elderly psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterling, Tilman; Schneider, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    Due to demographic changes there will be a fraction of elderly patients with substance use disorders. However, only a few data have been published about elderly abusers of prescription drugs. Since substance abuse is frequently comorbid with psychiatric disorders, treatment in a psychiatric hospital is often needed. In this explorative study elderly people with prescription drug abuse who required psychiatric inpatient treatment should be characterized. This study was part of the gerontopsychiatry study Berlin (Gepsy-B), an investigation of the data of all older inpatients (≥ 65 years) admitted to a psychiatric hospital within a period of 3 years. Among 1266 documented admissions in 110 cases (8.7 %) (mean age: 75.7 ± 7.1 years) prescription drug abuse, mostly of benzodiazepines was diagnosed. Females showed benzodiazepine abuse more often than males. In only a small proportion of the cases the reason for admission was withdrawal of prescribed drugs. 85.5 % suffered from psychiatric comorbidity, mostly depression. As risk factors for abuse depressive symptoms (OR: 3.32) as well as concurrent nicotine (OR: 2.69) or alcohol abuse (OR: 2.14) were calculated. Psychiatric inpatient treatment was primarily not necessary because of prescription drug abuse but because of other psychopathological symptoms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. 75 FR 23851 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... medical education I-O Input-Output IOM Institute of Medicine IPF Inpatient psychiatric facility IPPS... Determinations 6. RHQDAPU Program Disaster Extensions and Waivers 7. Proposed Chart Validation Requirements for...

  7. The ethical landscape of professional care in everyday practice as perceived by staff: A qualitative content analysis of ethical diaries written by staff in child and adolescent psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelto-Piri Veikko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although there has been some empirical research on ethics concerning the attitudes and approaches of staff in relation to adult patients, there is very little to be found on child and adolescent psychiatric care. In most cases researchers have defined which issues are important, for instance, coercive care. The aim of this study was to provide a qualitative description of situations and experiences that gave rise to ethical problems and considerations as reported by staff members on child and adolescent psychiatric wards, although they were not provided with a definition of the concept. Methods The study took place in six child and adolescent psychiatric wards in Sweden. All staff members involved with patients on these wards were invited to participate. The staff members were asked to keep an ethical diary over the course of one week, and data collection comprised the diaries handed in by 68 persons. Qualitative content analysis was used in order to analyse the diaries. Results In the analysis three themes emerged; 1 good care 2 loyalty and 3 powerlessness. The theme ‘good care’ contains statements about the ideal of commitment but also about problems living up to the ideal. Staff members emphasized the importance of involving patients and parents in the care, but also of the need for professional distance. Participants seldom perceived decisions about coercive measures as problematic, in contrast to those about pressure and restrictions, especially in the case of patients admitted for voluntary care. The theme ‘loyalty’ contains statements in which staff members perceived contradictory expectations from different interested parties, mainly parents but also their supervisor, doctors, colleagues and the social services. The theme ‘powerlessness’ contains statements about situations that create frustration, in which freedom of action is perceived as limited and can concern inadequacy in relation to patients and

  8. The ethical landscape of professional care in everyday practice as perceived by staff: A qualitative content analysis of ethical diaries written by staff in child and adolescent psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto-Piri, Veikko; Engström, Karin; Engström, Ingemar

    2012-07-09

    Although there has been some empirical research on ethics concerning the attitudes and approaches of staff in relation to adult patients, there is very little to be found on child and adolescent psychiatric care. In most cases researchers have defined which issues are important, for instance, coercive care. The aim of this study was to provide a qualitative description of situations and experiences that gave rise to ethical problems and considerations as reported by staff members on child and adolescent psychiatric wards, although they were not provided with a definition of the concept. The study took place in six child and adolescent psychiatric wards in Sweden. All staff members involved with patients on these wards were invited to participate. The staff members were asked to keep an ethical diary over the course of one week, and data collection comprised the diaries handed in by 68 persons. Qualitative content analysis was used in order to analyse the diaries. In the analysis three themes emerged; 1) good care 2) loyalty and 3) powerlessness. The theme 'good care' contains statements about the ideal of commitment but also about problems living up to the ideal. Staff members emphasized the importance of involving patients and parents in the care, but also of the need for professional distance. Participants seldom perceived decisions about coercive measures as problematic, in contrast to those about pressure and restrictions, especially in the case of patients admitted for voluntary care. The theme 'loyalty' contains statements in which staff members perceived contradictory expectations from different interested parties, mainly parents but also their supervisor, doctors, colleagues and the social services. The theme 'powerlessness' contains statements about situations that create frustration, in which freedom of action is perceived as limited and can concern inadequacy in relation to patients and violations in the workplace. The ethical considerations described by

  9. Psychiatric Diagnoses in Individuals with Non-Syndromic Oral Clefts: A Danish Population-Based Cohort Study.

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    Dorthe Almind Pedersen

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the risk of psychiatric diagnoses in individuals with non-syndromic oral clefts (OC compared with individuals without OC, including ages from 1 to 76 years.Linking four Danish nationwide registers, we investigated the risk of psychiatric diagnoses at Danish psychiatric hospitals during the period 1969-2012 for individuals born with non-syndromic OC in Denmark 1936-2009 compared with a cohort of 10 individuals without OC per individual with OC, matched by sex and birth year. The sample included 8,568 individuals with OC, observed for 247,821 person-years, and 85,653 individuals without OC followed for 2,501,129 person-years.A total of 953 (11.1% of the individuals with OC (9.6% for cleft lip (CL, 10.8% for cleft lip and palate (CLP and 13.1% for cleft palate (CP and 8,117 (9.5% in the comparison group had at least one psychiatric diagnosis. Cox proportional hazard regression model revealed that individuals with OC had significantly higher risk of a psychiatric diagnosis (hazard ratio (HR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.12-1.28. When examining cleft type, no difference was found for CL (HR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.90-1.17, but CLP was associated with a small increased risk (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.01-1.26, whereas individuals with CP had the largest increased risk (HR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.30-1.62. The largest differences were found in schizophrenia-like disorders, mental retardation and pervasive developmental disorders, but we found no increased risk of mood disorders and anxiety-related disorders.Individuals with non-syndromic OC had significantly higher risk of psychiatric diagnoses compared with individuals without OC. However, the elevated risk was observed for individuals with CLP and CP but not for individuals with CL and the absolute risk increase was modest.

  10. Psychiatric Diagnoses in Individuals with Non-Syndromic Oral Clefts: A Danish Population-Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Dorthe Almind; Wehby, George L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Christensen, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the risk of psychiatric diagnoses in individuals with non-syndromic oral clefts (OC) compared with individuals without OC, including ages from 1 to 76 years. Methods Linking four Danish nationwide registers, we investigated the risk of psychiatric diagnoses at Danish psychiatric hospitals during the period 1969–2012 for individuals born with non-syndromic OC in Denmark 1936–2009 compared with a cohort of 10 individuals without OC per individual with OC, matched by sex and birth year. The sample included 8,568 individuals with OC, observed for 247,821 person-years, and 85,653 individuals without OC followed for 2,501,129 person-years. Results A total of 953 (11.1%) of the individuals with OC (9.6% for cleft lip (CL), 10.8% for cleft lip and palate (CLP) and 13.1% for cleft palate (CP)) and 8,117 (9.5%) in the comparison group had at least one psychiatric diagnosis. Cox proportional hazard regression model revealed that individuals with OC had significantly higher risk of a psychiatric diagnosis (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.12–1.28). When examining cleft type, no difference was found for CL (HR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.90–1.17), but CLP was associated with a small increased risk (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.01–1.26), whereas individuals with CP had the largest increased risk (HR = 1.45, 95% CI: 1.30–1.62). The largest differences were found in schizophrenia-like disorders, mental retardation and pervasive developmental disorders, but we found no increased risk of mood disorders and anxiety-related disorders. Conclusion Individuals with non-syndromic OC had significantly higher risk of psychiatric diagnoses compared with individuals without OC. However, the elevated risk was observed for individuals with CLP and CP but not for individuals with CL and the absolute risk increase was modest. PMID:27223812

  11. Borderline intellectual functioning is associated with poor social functioning, increased rates of psychiatric diagnosis and drug use--a cross sectional population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigi, Karny; Werbeloff, Nomi; Goldberg, Shira; Portuguese, Shirly; Reichenberg, Abraham; Fruchter, Eyal; Weiser, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Borderline intellectual functioning is defined by the DSM IV as an IQ range that is between one to two standard deviations below the mean (71borderline intellectual functioning is associated with various mental disorders, problems in everyday functioning, social disability and poor academic or occupational achievement. Using data from the Israeli military, we retrieved the social and clinical characteristics of 76,962 adolescents with borderline intellectual functioning and compared their social functioning, psychiatric diagnoses and drug abuse with those of 96,580 adolescents with average IQ (± 0.25 SD from population mean). The results demonstrated that the borderline intellectual functioning group had higher rates of poor social functioning compared to the control group (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.85-1.94). Individuals with borderline intellectual functioning were 2.37 times more likely to have a psychiatric diagnosis (95% CI=2.30-2.45) and 1.2 times more likely to use drugs (95% CI=1.07-0.35) than those with average IQ. These results suggest that adolescents with borderline intellectual functioning are more likely to suffer from psychiatric disorders, poor social functioning and drug abuse than those with average intelligence, and that borderline intellectual functioning is a marker of vulnerability to these poor outcomes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The PsyCoLaus study: methodology and characteristics of the sample of a population-based survey on psychiatric disorders and their association with genetic and cardiovascular risk factors

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    Middleton Lefkos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Psychiatric arm of the population-based CoLaus study (PsyCoLaus is designed to: 1 establish the prevalence of threshold and subthreshold psychiatric syndromes in the 35 to 66 year-old population of the city of Lausanne (Switzerland; 2 test the validity of postulated definitions for subthreshold mood and anxiety syndromes; 3 determine the associations between psychiatric disorders, personality traits and cardiovascular diseases (CVD, 4 identify genetic variants that can modify the risk for psychiatric disorders and determine whether genetic risk factors are shared between psychiatric disorders and CVD. This paper presents the method as well as sociodemographic and somatic characteristics of the sample. Methods All 35 to 66 year-old persons previously selected for the population-based CoLaus survey on risk factors for CVD were asked to participate in a substudy assessing psychiatric conditions. This investigation included the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies to elicit diagnostic criteria for threshold disorders according to DSM-IV and algorithmically defined subthreshold syndromes. Complementary information was collected on potential risk and protective factors for psychiatric disorders, migraine and on the morbidity of first-degree relatives, whereas the collection of DNA and plasma samples was already part of the original CoLaus survey. Results A total of 3,691 individuals completed the psychiatric evaluation (67% participation. The gender distribution of the sample did not differ significantly from that of the general population in the same age range. Although the youngest 5-year band of the cohort was underrepresented and the oldest 5-year band overrepresented, participants of PsyCoLaus and individuals who refused to participate revealed comparable scores on the General Health Questionnaire, a self-rating instrument completed at the somatic exam. Conclusion Despite limitations resulting from the relatively low

  13. Nationwide population-based cohort study of psychiatric disorders in individuals with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome or hypermobility syndrome and their siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlöf, Martin; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Almqvist, Catarina; Serlachius, Eva; Ludvigsson, Jonas F

    2016-07-04

    To assess the risk of psychiatric disorders in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and hypermobility syndrome. Nationwide population-based matched cohort study. EDS, hypermobility syndrome and psychiatric disorders were identified through Swedish national registries. Individuals with EDS (n = 1,771) were matched with comparison individuals (n = 17,710). Further, siblings to individuals with EDS who did not have an EDS diagnosis themselves were compared with matched comparison siblings. Using conditional logistic regression, risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, attempted suicide, suicide and schizophrenia were estimated. The same analyses were conducted in individuals with hypermobility syndrome (n = 10,019) and their siblings. EDS was associated with ASD: risk ratio (RR) 7.4, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 5.2-10.7; bipolar disorder: RR 2.7, CI 1.5-4.7; ADHD: RR 5.6, CI 4.2-7.4; depression: RR 3.4, 95 % CI 2.9-4.1; and attempted suicide: RR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.7-2.7, but not with suicide or schizophrenia. EDS siblings were at increased risk of ADHD: RR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.4-3.3; depression: RR 1.5, 95 % CI 1.1-1.8; and suicide attempt: RR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.4-2.3. Similar results were observed for individuals with hypermobility syndrome and their siblings. Individuals with EDS and hypermobility syndrome are at increased risks of being diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. These risk increases may have a genetic and/or early environmental background as suggested by evidence showing that siblings to patients have elevated risks of certain psychiatric disorders.

  14. Uso do Datasus para avaliação dos padrões das internações psiquiátricas, Rio Grande do Sul Use of Datasus to evaluate psychiatric inpatient care patterns in Southern Brazil

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    Rafael Henriques Candiago

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a construção e o teste de rotina para análise das interna-ções psiquiátricas pelo Sistema Único de Saúde, a partir de seu banco de dados (Datasus, e analisar as características e tendências dessas internações. MÉTODOS: Foram extraídos dados das autorizações de internação hospitalar dos anos de 2000 a 2004, no Rio Grande do Sul. Os dados referentes a 91.233 internações foram processados por meio de sintaxes pelo programa SPSS, tendo sido testada a confiabilidade das rotinas. Foram descritas as freqüências das internações em hospitais gerais e psiquiátricos, e os principais diagnósticos, com análise de tendências por modelos de regressão polinomial. RESULTADOS: As confiabilidades intra e interavaliador foram de 100%. Observou-se tendência de crescimento na proporção das internações por transtornos de humor e de diminuição naquelas por esquizofrenia e por transtornos orgânicos. A proporção de internações por transtorno por uso de substâncias manteve-se estável. Houve tendência crescente na proporção do número de internações psiquiátricas em hospitais gerais, apresentando um crescimento de 97,7% no período. CONCLUSÕES: Foram evidenciadas a confiabilidade e a viabilidade das rotinas apresentadas, sugerindo o uso dos arquivos do Sistema de Informações Hospitalares como fonte de dados para a avaliação contínua das internações psiquiátricas pelo Sistema Único de Saúde. As alterações observadas nas proporções de internações psiquiátricas podem ter sido devido às mudanças: no tipo de pacientes; no padrão de diagnósticos, conhecido como viés de diagnóstico orientado pelo tratamento; e na legislação.OBJECTIVE: To describe the construction and testing of a routine to assess psychiatric hospitalizations in the Brazilian Health System based on its database (DATASUS, and to assess characteristics and trends of these hospitalizations. METHODS: Data were extracted

  15. Inpatient Mental Health Recapture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-07

    FINAL REPORT DATES COVERED (From - To) JULY 2008 TO AUG 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE lnpatient Mental Health Recapture 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...provides 28 Medical/Surgical inpatient beds, 6 ICU beds, and full spectrum outpatient clinical services (Table l). EACH maintained inpatient mental health...Global War on Terrorism (GWOT), EACH experienced a significant increase in the amount of inpatient mental health purchased in the Colorado Springs

  16. Satisfaction of patients hospitalised in psychiatric hospitals: a randomised comparison of two psychiatric-specific and one generic satisfaction questionnaires

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    Cléopas Agatta

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is interest in measuring the satisfaction of patients discharged from psychiatric hospitals, it might be important to determine whether surveys of psychiatric patients should employ generic or psychiatry-specific instruments. The aim of this study was to compare two psychiatric-specific and one generic questionnaires assessing patients' satisfaction after a hospitalisation in a psychiatric hospital. Methods We randomised adult patients discharged from two Swiss psychiatric university hospitals between April and September 2004, to receive one of three instruments: the Saphora-Psy questionnaire, the Perceptions of Care survey questionnaire or the Picker Institute questionnaire for acute care hospitals. In addition to the comparison of response rates, completion time, mean number of missing items and mean ceiling effect, we targeted our comparison on patients and asked them to answer ten evaluation questions about the questionnaire they had just completed. Results 728 out of 1550 eligible patients (47% participated in the study. Across questionnaires, response rates were similar (Saphora-Psy: 48.5%, Perceptions of Care: 49.9%, Picker: 43.4%; P = 0.08, average completion time was lowest for the Perceptions of Care questionnaire (minutes: Saphora-Psy: 17.7, Perceptions of Care: 13.7, Picker: 17.5; P = 0.005, the Saphora-Psy questionnaire had the largest mean proportion of missing responses (Saphora-Psy: 7.1%, Perceptions of Care: 2.8%, Picker: 4.0%; P P Conclusion Despite differences in the intended target population, content, lay-out and length of questionnaires, none appeared to be obviously better based on our comparison. All three presented advantages and drawbacks and could be used for the satisfaction evaluation of psychiatric inpatients. However, if comparison across medical services or hospitals is desired, using a generic questionnaire might be advantageous.

  17. Comparison of the GHQ-36, the GHQ-12 and the SCL-90 as psychiatric screening instruments in the Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holi, Matti M; Marttunen, Mauri; Aalberg, Veikko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the screening properties of two General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) versions and the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90), and to evaluate them as psychiatric screening instruments in Finland. We administered the GHQ-36 and the SCL-90 to psychiatric outpatients (n=207) and to a community sample (n=315). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to estimate the screening performance of the two instruments and of the GHQ-12 extracted from the GHQ-36. The screening properties of the scales were found to be good and similar. Suggested optimal cut-off points were 3/4 for the GHQ-12, 8/9 for the GHQ-36 and 0.90/0.91 for the SCL-90. In conclusion, the scales functioned equally well in screening. This favors the GHQ-12 for pure screening. When information on the symptom level is also needed, the GHQ-36 and the SCL-90 become better choices. The cut-off points presented here should be considered in the future Finnish psychiatric screening studies.

  18. Inpatient rehabilitation outcomes in patients with malignant spinal cord compression compared to other non-traumatic spinal cord injury: A population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Christian D; Voth, Jennifer; Jaglal, Susan B; Craven, B Catharine

    2015-11-01

    To compare and describe demographic characteristics, clinical, and survival outcomes in patients admitted for inpatient rehabilitation following malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) or other causes of non-traumatic spinal cord injury (NT-SCI). A retrospective cohort design was employed, using data retrieved from administrative databases. Rehabilitation facilities or designated rehabilitation beds in Ontario, Canada, from April 2007 to March 2011. Patients with incident diagnoses of MSCC (N = 143) or NT-SCI (N = 1,274) admitted for inpatient rehabilitation. Demographic, impairment, functional outcome (as defined by the Functional Independence Measure (FIM)), discharge, healthcare utilization, survival, and tumor characteristics. There was a significant improvement in the FIM from admission to discharge (mean change 20.1 ± 14.3, rehabilitation goals (75.5%) at comparable rates to patients with NT-SCI (69.7 and 81.3%). Despite compromised survival, patients with MSCC make clinically significant functional gains and exhibit favorable discharge outcomes following inpatient rehabilitation. Current administrative data suggests the design and scope of inpatient rehabilitation services should reflect the unique survival-related prognostic factors in patients with MSCC.

  19. Epidemiology and prognostic factors of inpatient mortality of Guillain-Barré syndrome: A nationwide population study over 14years in Asian country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Li-Syue; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Wu, Yung-Tsan; Tsao, Chang-Huei; Wu, Yung-Fu; Chien, Wu-Chien; Chang, Chih-Ya

    2016-10-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the characteristics of inpatient mortality from Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), which is a rare and potentially life-threatening polyradiculoneuropathy, in an Asian country, as there are few big-data studies regarding this topic. We obtained data regarding patients with GBS from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database admission records. We identified patients with a discharge diagnosis of GBS during 2000-2013 using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification code (357.0), and evaluated their baseline characteristics, clinical complications, and risk factors. We identified 5469 patients with GBS, and the crude incidence of GBS was 1.71 per 100,000 person-years. The inpatient mortality rate was 1.61% (88/5469) and 55 deaths (62.5% of all deaths) occurred before day 19 of the hospitalization (mainly during the progressive phase). The predictors of inpatient mortality included older age, a greater comorbidity burden (especially catastrophic illness), endotracheal intubation, mechanical ventilation, cardiac complications, and systemic infection. In contrast, patients who were admitted to a medical center or Neurology Department exhibited a higher survival rate. This 14-year nationwide study included the largest analysis of Asian patients with GBS to date, and identified various prognostic factors that predicted inpatient mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... I-O Input-Output IOM Institute of Medicine IPF Inpatient psychiatric facility IPFQR Inpatient... Disorders of the Circulatory System) a. Discharge/Transfer to Designated Disaster Alternative Care Site b... Program e. Proposed Disaster/Extraordinary Circumstance Waivers under the Hospital VBP Program 10...

  1. Understanding the management of people seeking voluntary psychiatric hospitalization who do not meet the criteria for inpatient admission: a qualitative study of mental health liaison nurses working in accident and emergency departments in the north of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Iain; McGowan, Linda

    2015-02-01

    Mental health liaison nurses assess people who self-present at accident and emergency departments seeking inpatient admission, however not all presentations meet the criteria for admission. Little is known about how liaison nurses manage this client group. This qualitative study explored how liaison nurses manage this client group. This study used the think aloud technique to recreate clinical scenarios of clients requesting admission who do not meet the criteria for such admission. Participants were then subsequently interviewed. Eighteen liaison nurses working in hospitals across the North of England participated. Data were analysed using framework analysis methods. Findings indicate that the liaison nurses use a variety of therapeutic skills and methods in managing this client group. Liaison nurses were found to 'sell' crisis and home-based treatment as an equivalent, or superior in quality, to hospital care. However, the existing evidence base does not fully support this assertion. Liaison nurses face numerous difficulties in this role. In the absence of any formalized training, liaison nurses rely on their own clinical knowledge and expertise. Implications for future service provision and further research are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Polygenic Risk Score, Parental Socioeconomic Status, Family History of Psychiatric Disorders, and the Risk for Schizophrenia: A Danish Population-Based Study and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerbo, Esben; Sullivan, Patrick F; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Pedersen, Carsten B; Mors, Ole; Børglum, Anders D; Hougaard, David M; Hollegaard, Mads V; Meier, Sandra; Mattheisen, Manuel; Ripke, Stephan; Wray, Naomi R; Mortensen, Preben B

    2015-07-01

    Schizophrenia has a complex etiology influenced both by genetic and nongenetic factors but disentangling these factors is difficult. To estimate (1) how strongly the risk for schizophrenia relates to the mutual effect of the polygenic risk score, parental socioeconomic status, and family history of psychiatric disorders; (2) the fraction of cases that could be prevented if no one was exposed to these factors; (3) whether family background interacts with an individual's genetic liability so that specific subgroups are particularly risk prone; and (4) to what extent a proband's genetic makeup mediates the risk associated with familial background. We conducted a nested case-control study based on Danish population-based registers. The study consisted of 866 patients diagnosed as having schizophrenia between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2006, and 871 matched control individuals. Genome-wide data and family psychiatric and socioeconomic background information were obtained from neonatal biobanks and national registers. Results from a separate meta-analysis (34,600 cases and 45,968 control individuals) were applied to calculate polygenic risk scores. Polygenic risk scores, parental socioeconomic status, and family psychiatric history. Odds ratios (ORs), attributable risks, liability R2 values, and proportions mediated. Schizophrenia was associated with the polygenic risk score (OR, 8.01; 95% CI, 4.53-14.16 for highest vs lowest decile), socioeconomic status (OR, 8.10; 95% CI, 3.24-20.3 for 6 vs no exposures), and a history of schizophrenia/psychoses (OR, 4.18; 95% CI, 2.57-6.79). The R2 values were 3.4% (95% CI, 2.1-4.6) for the polygenic risk score, 3.1% (95% CI, 1.9-4.3) for parental socioeconomic status, and 3.4% (95% CI, 2.1-4.6) for family history. Socioeconomic status and psychiatric history accounted for 45.8% (95% CI, 36.1-55.5) and 25.8% (95% CI, 21.2-30.5) of cases, respectively. There was an interaction between the polygenic risk score and family history

  3. Psychiatric disorders and functional impairment among disaster victims after exposure to a natural disaster: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ajmal; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to examine psychiatric morbidity and functional impairment after a natural disaster. Norwegian tourists who survived the 2004 tsunami in Khao Lak (n = 63), a severely affected area in Thailand, were interviewed in person 2.5 years after the disaster. The examination included the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, the PTSD module of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders, the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS), the Global Assessment of Functioning function score (GAF-F), and questions covering background characteristics and disaster exposure. The most prevalent disorders were specific phobia (30.2%), agoraphobia (17.5%), social anxiety disorder (11.1%), PTSD (11.1%), major depressive disorder (MDD, 11.1%), and dysthymic disorder (DD, 11.1%). In 24 of the 40 respondents with a current psychiatric disorder, symptoms had originated after the tsunami. The post-tsunami 2.5 year incidence of PTSD and MDD was 36.5% and 28.6%, respectively. Multivariable regression analysis showed that the depressive disorders (MDD and DD) and PTSD were associated with self-reported functional impairment (WSAS), and the depressive disorders were associated with clinician assessed functional impairment (GAF-F). Small sample size and high education may limit the generalizability of the results. Depression and anxiety disorders were common among disaster victims 2.5 years after the 2004 tsunami. Psychiatric disorders other than PTSD, especially depressive disorders, are of clinical importance when considering long-term mental health effect of disasters. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Inpatient management of borderline personality disorder at Helen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this report was to establish a profile of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) admitted to the acute inpatient psychiatric assessment unit at the Helen Joseph Hospital, in Johannesburg, over the course of 1 year. Methods: A retrospective record review was conducted to investigate the ...

  5. Aggressive Behaviour and Mental Illness: A Study of in-patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the magnitude and pattern of aggressive behaviour among psychiatric in-patients and identity associated socio-demographic and clinical factors. The studywas cross-sectional in design. Among patients admitted to theNeuro-psychiatricHospital, Aro (and its Lantoro annex), Abeokuta between January 1 to ...

  6. Gambling disorders, gambling type preferences, and psychiatric comorbidity among the Thai general population: Results of the 2013 National Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assanangkornchai, Sawitri; McNeil, Edward B.; Tantirangsee, Nopporn; Kittirattanapaiboon, Phunnapa

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims To estimate the prevalence of problem and pathological gambling, gender and age-group differences in gambling types, and comorbidities with other psychiatric disorders among the Thai general population. Methods Analysis was conducted on 4,727 participants of Thailand’s 2013 National Mental Health Survey, a multistage stratified cluster survey, using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Diagnoses of problem and pathological gambling and other psychiatric disorders were based on the DSM-IV-TR criteria with the following additional criteria for gamblers: more than 10 lifetime gambling episodes and a single year loss of at least 365 USD from gambling. Results The estimated lifetime prevalence rates of pathological and problem gambling were 0.90% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.51–1.29] and 1.14% (95% CI: 0.58–1.70), respectively. The most popular type of gambling was playing lotteries [69.5%, standard error (SE) = 1.9], the prevalence of which was significantly higher among females and older age groups. The most common psychiatric disorders seen among pathological gamblers were alcohol abuse (57.4%), nicotine dependence (49.5%), and any drug use disorder (16.2%). Pathological gambling was highly prevalent among those who ever experienced major depressive episodes (5.5%), any drug dependence (5.1%), and intermittent explosive disorder (4.8%). The association between pathological gambling was strongest with a history of major depressive episode [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 10.4, 95% CI: 2.80–38.4]. Conclusion The study confirms the recognition of gambling disorders as a public health concern in Thailand and suggests a need for culturally specific preventive measures for pathological gamblers and those with a history of substance use disorders or major depression. PMID:27648744

  7. Psychiatric disorders in Danish children aged 5-7 years: A general population study of prevalence and risk factors from the Copenhagen Child Cohort (CCC 2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elberling, Hanne; Linneberg, Allan; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka; Houman, Tine; Goodman, Robert; Mette Skovgaard, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about the presentation of psychopathology in preschool age and associated risk factors is fundamental to preventive intervention before schooling. To investigate the full spectrum of psychiatric diagnoses in general population children at the period of transition from preschool to school. A sample of 1585 children from the Copenhagen Child Cohort, CCC2000 aged 5-7 years was assessed using the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) with diagnostic classification by experienced clinicians. Perinatal, sociodemographic and socio-economic data was obtained from Danish national registries. The prevalence of any ICD-10 psychiatric disorder was 5.7% (95%CI: 4.4-7.1). Pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) were found in 1.3% (95%CI: 0.8-1.8) and behavioural and hyperkinetic disorders were found in 1.5% (95%CI: 0.9-2.1) and 1.0% (95%CI: 0.4-1.6), respectively. Emotional disorders were found in 2.9% (95%CI: 1.9-40). More boys were diagnosed with PDD, behavioural disorders and tics. No gender differences were found in hyperactivity disorders (HD) and emotional disorders. Co-morbidity was frequent, in particular between HD and PDD, but also between HD and emotional disorder and behavioural disorder. Teenage mothers, single parents and low household income the first two years after the child's birth were associated with a three-to fourfold increased risk of psychiatric disorder in the child at age 5-7 years. The study results point to two "windows of opportunity" for prevention. In the earliest postnatal years, prevention should target families at socio-economic risk; and in the years before schooling, intervention should focus on children with symptoms of PDD, HD, and behavioural disorders.

  8. Gambling disorders, gambling type preferences, and psychiatric comorbidity among the Thai general population: Results of the 2013 National Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assanangkornchai, Sawitri; McNeil, Edward B; Tantirangsee, Nopporn; Kittirattanapaiboon, Phunnapa

    2016-09-01

    Background and aims To estimate the prevalence of problem and pathological gambling, gender and age-group differences in gambling types, and comorbidities with other psychiatric disorders among the Thai general population. Methods Analysis was conducted on 4,727 participants of Thailand's 2013 National Mental Health Survey, a multistage stratified cluster survey, using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Diagnoses of problem and pathological gambling and other psychiatric disorders were based on the DSM-IV-TR criteria with the following additional criteria for gamblers: more than 10 lifetime gambling episodes and a single year loss of at least 365 USD from gambling. Results The estimated lifetime prevalence rates of pathological and problem gambling were 0.90% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.51-1.29] and 1.14% (95% CI: 0.58-1.70), respectively. The most popular type of gambling was playing lotteries [69.5%, standard error (SE) = 1.9], the prevalence of which was significantly higher among females and older age groups. The most common psychiatric disorders seen among pathological gamblers were alcohol abuse (57.4%), nicotine dependence (49.5%), and any drug use disorder (16.2%). Pathological gambling was highly prevalent among those who ever experienced major depressive episodes (5.5%), any drug dependence (5.1%), and intermittent explosive disorder (4.8%). The association between pathological gambling was strongest with a history of major depressive episode [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 10.4, 95% CI: 2.80-38.4]. Conclusion The study confirms the recognition of gambling disorders as a public health concern in Thailand and suggests a need for culturally specific preventive measures for pathological gamblers and those with a history of substance use disorders or major depression.

  9. Suicide Behaviors in Adult Inpatients with Mental Disorders in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Gao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study examined the tendency and suicidal behavior rates of Chinese adult inpatients with different types of mental disorders from 2010 to 2015. The aim was to provide some interesting clues for further studies. Methods: Adult patients with mental disorders who were hospitalized in Beijing Anding hospital from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015 were included. Chi-square tests were used to compare the difference among inpatients with mental disorders by gender and year. Frequency, trend and suicidal behavior rates of inpatients with mental disorders were graphed. Results: A total of 17,244 psychiatric adult inpatients were included in our study. About 53.2% of the inpatients had mood disorders, followed by schizophrenia, which accounted for 34.6%. The proportion of female inpatients with mental disorders was larger than that of males (52.6% to 47.4%. Of the total, 3296 psychiatric inpatients were recognized as having suicidal behaviors. The rate of suicidal behavior among all inpatients was 19.1%, and it varied over the years. The suicidal behavior rate of female inpatients with mood disorders was much higher than that of the corresponding male inpatients. Conclusions: The presence of suicidal behavior varied among people with different types of mental disorders. For each type of mental illness, identifying the risk of specific suicide behavior would help tailor-make preventive efforts accordingly.

  10. Suicide Behaviors in Adult Inpatients with Mental Disorders in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Fan, Hua; Di, Fei; Xia, Xue; Long, Haiying; Zhu, Huiping

    2017-03-03

    Background: This study examined the tendency and suicidal behavior rates of Chinese adult inpatients with different types of mental disorders from 2010 to 2015. The aim was to provide some interesting clues for further studies. Methods: Adult patients with mental disorders who were hospitalized in Beijing Anding hospital from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015 were included. Chi-square tests were used to compare the difference among inpatients with mental disorders by gender and year. Frequency, trend and suicidal behavior rates of inpatients with mental disorders were graphed. Results: A total of 17,244 psychiatric adult inpatients were included in our study. About 53.2% of the inpatients had mood disorders, followed by schizophrenia, which accounted for 34.6%. The proportion of female inpatients with mental disorders was larger than that of males (52.6% to 47.4%). Of the total, 3296 psychiatric inpatients were recognized as having suicidal behaviors. The rate of suicidal behavior among all inpatients was 19.1%, and it varied over the years. The suicidal behavior rate of female inpatients with mood disorders was much higher than that of the corresponding male inpatients. Conclusions: The presence of suicidal behavior varied among people with different types of mental disorders. For each type of mental illness, identifying the risk of specific suicide behavior would help tailor-make preventive efforts accordingly.

  11. The implementation and evaluation of cognitive milieu therapy for dual diagnosis inpatients: A pragmatic clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jørn; Oestrich, I.; Austin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    ) was assessed pre- and post-intervention from an inpatient setting where CMT was the mode of treatment. Psychopathology was measured using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and substance abuse measured with the DrugCheck scale, breath/urine samples, and the Severity of Dependence Scale. Functioning......Dual diagnosis is chronic psychiatric condition involving serious mental illness and substance abuse. Experts recommend the integration of treatment for concurrent substance abuse and serious psychiatric problems. The following pragmatic trial examined the implementation and outcomes of cognitive...... milieu therapy (CMT) among a group of dual diagnosis inpatients. CMT is an integrated treatment for both mental illness and substance abuse based on cognitive behavioral principles and carried out within a supportive inpatient environment. A convenience sample of dual diagnosis inpatients (N = 136...

  12. A Positive Behavioral Approach for Aggression in Forensic Psychiatric Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolisano, Peter; Sondik, Tracey M; Dike, Charles C

    2017-03-01

    Aggression toward self and others by complex patients admitted to forensic psychiatric settings is a relatively common yet extremely difficult behavior to treat. Traditional interventions in forensic inpatient settings have historically emphasized control and management over treatment. Research over the past several years has demonstrated the value of behavioral and psychosocial treatment interventions to reduce aggression and to increase prosocial skill development in inpatient forensic population. Positive behavioral support (PBS) offers a comprehensive approach that incorporates the science of applied behavioral analysis (ABA) in support of patients with challenging behaviors, including aggression and violence. In this article, we describe a PBS model to treat aggression in forensic settings. PBS includes a comprehensive functional assessment, along with four basic elements: ecological strategies, positive programming, focused support strategies, and reactive strategies. Other key components are described, including data collection, staff training, fidelity checks to ensure correct implementation of the plan, and ongoing monitoring and revision of PBS strategies, according to treatment outcomes. Finally, a behavioral consultation team approach within the inpatient forensic setting is recommended, led by an assigned doctoral-level psychologist with specialized knowledge and training in behavioral methods. The behavioral consultation team works directly with the unit treatment team and the identified patient to develop, implement, and track a plan that may extend over several weeks to several months including transition into the community. PBS can offer a positive systemic impact in forensic inpatient settings, such as providing a nonpharmacologic means to address aggression, reducing the incidences of restraint and seclusion, enhancing staff proficiency in managing challenging patient presentations, and reducing recidivism when used as part of the bridge to

  13. [Tobacco smoking and psychiatric intensive care unit: Impact of the strict smoking ban on the risk of violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumaza, S; Lebain, P; Brazo, P

    2015-06-01

    Tobacco smoking is the main cause of death among mentally ill persons. Since February 2007, smoking has been strictly forbidden in French covered and closed psychiatric wards. The fear of an increased violence risk induced by tobacco withdrawal is one of the most frequent arguments invoked against this tobacco ban. According to the literature, it seems that the implementation of this ban does not imply such a risk. All these studies compared inpatients' violence risk before and after the tobacco ban in a same psychiatric ward. We aimed to analyse the strict tobacco withdrawal consequences on the violence risk in a retrospective study including patients hospitalised in a psychiatric intensive care unit of the university hospital of Caen during the same period. We compared clinical and demographic data and the violence risk between the smoker group (strict tobacco withdrawal with proposed tobacco substitution) and the non-smoker group (control group). In order to evaluate the violence risk, we used three indicators: a standardised scale (the Bröset Violence Checklist) and two assessments specific to the psychiatric intensive care setting ("the preventing risk protocol" and the "seclusion time"). The clinical and demographic data were compared using the Khi2 test, Fisher test and Mann-Whitney test, and the three violence risk indicators were compared with the Mann-Whitney test. Firstly, comparisons were conducted in the total population, and secondly (in order to eliminate a bias of tobacco substitution) in the subgroup directly hospitalised in the psychiatric intensive care setting. Finally, we analysed in the smoker group the statistical correlation between tobacco smoking intensity and violence risk intensity using a regression test. A population of 72 patients (50 male) was included; 45 were smokers (62.5%) and 27 non-smokers. No statistically significant differences were found in clinical and demographic data between smoker and non-smoker groups in the whole

  14. Validation of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) with Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Lance P.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Hollander, Beth L. G.; Dyl, Jennifer; Rizzo, Christie J.; Steinley, Douglas L.; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the concurrent validity of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) for adolescent inpatients aged 12 to 18. The results reveal moderate agreement between ChIPS diagnoses and Schedule for Affective Disorder sand Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime version diagnoses.

  15. Psychiatric Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sullivan, Patrick F; Agrawal, Arpana; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2018-01-01

    into biologically, clinically, and therapeutically meaningful insights. The emerging findings suggest that we are entering a phase of accelerated genetic discovery for multiple psychiatric disorders. These findings are likely to elucidate the genetic portions of these truly complex traits, and this knowledge can...... then be mined for its relevance for improved therapeutics and its impact on psychiatric practice within a precision medicine framework. [AJP at 175: Remembering Our Past As We Envision Our Future November 1946: The Genetic Theory of Schizophrenia Franz Kallmann's influential twin study of schizophrenia in 691...

  16. Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility - Conditions

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of inpatient rehabilitation facilities with data on the number of times people with Medicare who had certain medical conditions were treated in the last year.

  17. Trends in peptic ulcer disease and the identification of Helicobacter Pylori as a causative organism: Population-based estimates from the US nationwide inpatient sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronislava Bashinskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptic ulcer disease can lead to serious complications including massive hemorrhage or bowel perforation. The modern treatment of peptic ulcer disease has transitioned from the control of gastric acid secretion to include antibiotic therapy in light of the identification of Helicobacter pylori as a causative infectious organism. We sought to determine trends related to this discovery by using a national database. Materials and Methods: Patient discharges with peptic ulcer disease and associated sequelae were queried from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1993 to 2007, under the auspices of a data user agreement. To account for the Nationwide Inpatient Sample weighting schema, design-adjusted analyses were used. Standard error was calculated using SUDAAN software (Research Triangle International, NC, USA. Results: Decreases in the incidences of gastrointestinal perforation, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and surgical procedures most specific to peptic ulcer disease were statistically significant over the study period [range of P value (two tailed = 0.000 - 0.00353; significant at P < 0.001 to < 0.01]. The incidence of H. pylori rose dramatically, peaking at an estimated 97,823 cases in 1998 [SE = 3155; 95% CI = 6,184]. Since that time it has decreased and then stabilized. Conclusions: The identification of H. pylori as the causative agent in the majority of peptic ulcer disease has revolutionized the understanding and management of the disease. Medical conditions and surgical procedures associated with end-stage peptic ulcer disease have significantly decreased according to analysis of selected index categories. Resident physician education objectives may need to be modified in light of these trends. Review Criteria: We reviewed patients with peptic ulcer disease. The database used was the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1993 to 2007. Message for the Clinic: Medical therapy has resulted in decreased morbidity from H. pylori infection as it

  18. Comparison of the effects of air pollution on outpatient and inpatient visits for asthma: a population-based study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Hsien Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A nationwide asthma survey on the effects of air pollution is lacking in Taiwan. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the time trend and the relationship between air pollution and health care services for asthma in Taiwan. METHODS: Health care services for asthma and ambient air pollution data were obtained from the National Health Insurance Research database and Environmental Protection Administration from 2000 through 2009, respectively. Health care services, including those related to the outpatient and inpatient visits were compared according to the concentration of air pollutants. RESULTS: The number of asthma-patient visits to health-care facilities continue to increase in Taiwan. Relative to the respective lowest quartile of air pollutants, the adjusted relative risks (RRs of the outpatient visits in the highest quartile were 1.10 (P-trend  = 0.013 for carbon monoxide (CO, 1.10 (P-trend  = 0.015 for nitrogen dioxide (NO2, and 1.20 (P-trend <0.0001 for particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≦ 10 µm (PM10 in the child group (aged 0-18. For adults aged 19-44, the RRs of outpatient visits were 1.13 (P-trend = 0.078 for CO, 1.17 (P-trend = 0.002 for NO2, and 1.13 (P-trend <0.0001 for PM10. For adults aged 45-64, the RRs of outpatient visits were 1.15 (P-trend = 0.003 for CO, 1.19 (P-trend = 0.0002 for NO2, and 1.10 (P-trend = 0.001 for PM10. For the elderly (aged ≥ 65, the RRs of outpatient visits in were 1.12 (P-trend  = 0.003 for NO2 and 1.10 (P-trend  = 0.006 for PM10. For inpatient visits, the RRs across quartiles of CO level were 1.00, 1.70, 1.92, and 1.86 (P-trend  = 0.0001 in the child group. There were no significant linear associations between inpatient visits and air pollutants in other groups. CONCLUSIONS: There were positive associations between CO levels and childhood inpatient visits as well as NO2, CO and PM10 and outpatient visits.

  19. Integrating forensically and civilly committed adult inpatients in a treatment mall program at a state hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Steven L; Sheitman, Brian B; Barboriak, Peter N; Harmon, Susan H; Paesler, Betty T; Gordon, Pamela A; Kelly, Shirley Y; Geller, Jeffrey L

    2009-02-01

    This brief report presents outcome data from a 350-bed state psychiatric hospital that integrated its adult forensically and civilly committed inpatient populations within one rehabilitative program. Dorothea Dix Hospital, located in Raleigh, North Carolina, used the "treatment mall" model to offer all of its resources to all adult patients in a centralized setting. Program participation of 100 patients from two long-term civil units was compared with program participation of 94 patients from the hospital's medium- and maximum-security forensic units. The forensic patients were significantly less likely to refuse to join or to leave a group, and they were better engaged in their treatment. The use of restrictive interventions and the incidence of assault were minimal for both groups. The experience at Dorothea Dix Hospital suggests that integrating these populations in rehabilitative programming is not only fiscally responsible but also clinically promising, with no evidence of greater disruptiveness attributable to forensic patients.

  20. Naturalistic evaluation of inpatient treatment of mania in a private Brazilian psychiatric hospital Avaliação naturalística do tratamento da mania em um hospital psiquiátrico particular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Madalena Volpe

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical practices on the treatment of mania in a Brazilian hospital, and to compare them to other international similar reports and practice guidelines. METHODS: Chart revision of 425 consecutive admissions (269 patients for the treatment of manic or mixed episodes (ICD-10 criteria in a private psychiatric hospital of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, from 1996 to 2000. The rates of utilization of each antimanic medication and ECT were compared to those reported in similar international observational studies (X², bicaudate, alpha =0.05. RESULTS: The observed frequencies of use of each treatment modality were: lithium (71.5%; carbamazepine (34.8%; valproate (9.4%; antipsychotics (83.3%; benzodiazepines (62.4%; antidepressants (7.5% and ECT (33.2%. The differences detected between local practice and international guidelines were: lower rate of valproate and higher rate of carbamazepine prescription; the use of sine wave devices for ECT; frequent concomitant use of ECT with lithium (72.3%, benzodiazepines (46.8% and/or carbamazepine (31.2%. CONCLUSION: These results suggest the need to develop national practice guidelines for the treatment of mania and for the use of ECT, and to promote their propagation through specific medical educational programs, aiming at the standardization of practices based on the available scientific evidence.OBJETIVO: Descrever as práticas clínicas no tratamento da mania em um hospital brasileiro e compará-las com aquelas descritas e recomendadas nas publicações internacionais. MÉTODOS: Revisão dos prontuários de 425 internações consecutivas (269 pacientes para episódios maníacos ou mistos (CID-10 em um hospital psiquiátrico privado de Belo Horizonte (MG, de 1996 a 2000. As freqüências de utilização dos diversos medicamentos e de ECT foram comparadas com as descritas em estudos observacionais estrangeiros (X², bicaudado, alfa =0,05. RESULTADOS: As freqüências observadas de uso de

  1. Subjective sleep quality and sleep duration of patients in a psychiatric hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Matthias J; Olschinski, Christiane; Kundermann, Bernd; Cabanel, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Sleep complaints and sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. During hospitalization the patients? condition may be even worse but little is known about the subjective sleep quality in psychiatric hospitals. Thus, we have investigated subjective sleep quality and mean sleep duration in patients with different psychiatric disorders at the end of hospitalization. For a period of one year, inpatients of a psychiatric hospital with diagnosis of substance use...

  2. The role of consulting psychiatrists for obstetric and gynecologic inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huang-Li; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hsu, Shi-Chieh; Hsiao, Mei-Chun; Juang, Yeong-Yuh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the consultation psychiatry service to the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department in a general hospital, focusing on referral patterns and consultation recommendations. A retrospective review of the medical charts and consultation records of obstetric and gynecological patients referred for psychiatric consultation from Dec. 2003 to Nov. 2009 was performed. One hundred and eleven patients were referred during the 6-year period, a psychiatric referral rate of 0.11% among 99,098 obstetric and gynecologic admissions. Obstetric and gynecologic consultations comprised 0.64% of all psychiatric consultations. The most common reasons for referral were depression (52.25%), past psychiatric history (31.53%), insomnia (29.73%) and confusion (24.32%). The most common DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses were depressive disorder (37.84%), schizophrenia and other psychoses (20.72%), delirium (17.12%) and adjustment disorder (10.81%). The most frequent physical diagnoses of referred patients were neoplasms (72.97%), infectious diseases (42.34%) and complications of pregnancy and puerperium (17.12%). Recommendations included pharmacological intervention (89.19%) and psychological management (72.07%). The psychiatric referral rate of obstetric and gynecological inpatients was relatively low compared with that of other departments. More collaboration and liaison between gynecologists and consultation psychiatrists may provide better care for obstetric and gynecological inpatients.

  3. Locked doors in acute inpatient psychiatry: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, M; Bowers, L; Jones, J; Simpson, A; Haglund, K

    2009-04-01

    Many acute inpatient psychiatric wards in the UK are permanently locked, although this is contrary to the current Mental Health Act Code of Practice. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning locked doors in acute psychiatric inpatient wards, an extensive literature search was performed in SAGE Journals Online, EBM Reviews, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE Psychiatry, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google, using the search terms 'open$', 'close$', '$lock$', 'door', 'ward', 'hospital', 'psychiatr', 'mental health', 'inpatient' and 'asylum'. A total of 11 empirical papers were included in the review. Both staff and patients reported advantages (e.g. preventing illegal substances from entering the ward and preventing patients from absconding and harming themselves or others) and disadvantages (e.g. making patients feel depressed, confined and creating extra work for staff) regarding locked doors. Locked wards were associated with increased patient aggression, poorer satisfaction with treatment and more severe symptoms. The limited literature available showed the urgent need for research to determine the real effects of locked doors in inpatient psychiatry.

  4. Inpatient Blood Glucose Management of Diabetic Patients in a Large ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admissions are mostly related to diabetes itself, but the frequency of admissions for problems not related to diabetes is increasing as the prevalence of diabetes increases in the population. Proper inpatient glycaemic management is important for improving patient outcome and for reducing the risk of inpatient complications.

  5. [Social psychiatric service as a cornerstone of psychiatric community care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, P; Tiggemann, H G

    1991-12-01

    Psychiatric care has gradually been shifting in Germany from its original inpatient basis to outpatient and complementary treatment. This shift of emphasis resulted in a transfer of psychiatry-political responsibility to communal bodies and hence also to communal public health services. Sociopsychiatric service ranks high in communal psychiatric care setups, since it promotes cooperation and helps to coordinate efforts in individual cases in respect of focal points on which such care is centered. For the future, an expert commission has suggested that the various institutions actively engaged in community psychiatric care should team up in each region. This applies in particular to mobile services visiting the patients in their homes, and to the offices providing contracts to sociopsychiatric services of public health offices. Despite positive outlooks there are also quite a few negative aspects of present-day practice. One of them is poor definition of tasks and functions of communal sociopsychiatric services, whereas another one are the unsatisfactory quantitative and qualitative means at their disposal. It is also too often overlooked that psychiatric patients and disabled persons are entitled to compensation insurance payments to promote their rehabilitation, as provided for by individual legislation in the various German laender. To tap these sources sufficiently well, sociopsychiatric services must be better equipped in every respect. The professional competence of social workers and physicians, as well as of the relevant staff, must be safeguarded by continuing education and specialist training measures.

  6. Psychiatric Comorbidity, Social Aspects and Quality of Life in a Population-Based Cohort of Expecting Fathers with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Simone Frizell; Veiby, Gyri; Bjørk, Marte Helene; Engelsen, Bernt A.; Daltveit, Anne-Kjersti; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate psychiatric disorders, adverse social aspects and quality of life in men with epilepsy during partner’s pregnancy. Method We used data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, including 76,335 men with pregnant partners. Men with epilepsy were compared to men without epilepsy, and to men with non-neurological chronic diseases. Results Expecting fathers in 658 pregnancies (mean age 31.8 years) reported a history of epilepsy, 36.9% using antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) at the onset of pregnancy. Symptoms of anxiety or depression were increased in epilepsy (7.0% and 3.9%, respectively) vs. non-epilepsy (4.6% and 2.5%, respectively, p = 0.004 and 0.023), and so were new onset symptoms of depression (2.0% vs. 1.0%, p Low self-esteem (2.5%) and low satisfaction with life (1.7%) were more frequent among fathers with epilepsy compared to fathers without epilepsy (1.3% and 0.7%, respectively, p = 0.01 and 0.010). Adverse social aspects and life events were associated with epilepsy vs. both reference groups. Self-reported diagnoses of ADHD (2.2%) and bipolar disorder (1.8%) were more common in epilepsy vs. non-epilepsy (0.4% and 0.3%, respectively, p = 0.002 and 0.003) and non-neurological chronic disorders (0.5% and 0.5%, respectively, p = 0.004 and 0.018). A screening tool for ADHD symptoms revealed a higher rate compared to self-reported ADHD (9.5% vs. 2.2%, p low self-esteem, and low satisfaction with life. Focus on mental health in fathers with epilepsy during and after pregnancy is important. The use of screening tools can be particularly useful to identify those at risk. PMID:26637130

  7. Severe MUPS in a sick-listed population: a cross-sectional study on prevalence, recognition, psychiatric co-morbidity and impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koopmans Petra C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS have a high prevalence in the general population and are associated with psychiatric morbidity. There are indications that MUPS are an important determinant of frequent and long-term disability. The primary objective was to assess the prevalence of MUPS in sick-listed-employees and its associations with depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, health anxiety, distress and functional impairment. Secondary objectives were to investigate the classification of the occupational health physicians (OHPs, their opinions about the causes as well as the attributions of the employee. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 489 sick-listed employees from 5 OHP group practices, MUPS, depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, health anxiety, distress and functional impairment were assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ, the Whitely Index (WI, the Four- Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ and the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36. We used a cut off score of 15 on the PHQ for the categorisation of severe MUPS. The opinions of the OHPs were evaluated by means of a separate questionnaire with regard to the presence of employees physical symptoms, and the symptoms attributions, and the diagnoses of the OHPs. Results Severe MUPS had a prevalence of 15.1% in this population of sick-listed employees. These employees had 4-6 times more depressive and anxiety disorders, and were more impaired. Female gender and PHQ-9 scores were determinants of severe MUPS. Most of the time the OHPs diagnosed employees with severe MUPS as having a mental disorder. The employees attributed their physical symptoms in 66% to mental or to both mental and physical causes. Conclusion The prevalence of severe MUPS is higher in long-term sick-listed employees than in the non-sick- listed working population and at least equals the prevalence in the general practice population. Severe MUPS are associated with

  8. Ecological momentary assessment and smartphone application intervention in adolescents with substance use and comorbid severe psychiatric disorders: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Benarous

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Context: Substance Use Disorders (SUDs are highly prevalent among inpatient adolescents with psychiatric disorders. In this population, substance use and other psychiatric outcomes can reinforce one another. Despite the need for integrated interventions in youths with dual diagnoses, few specific instruments are available. App-based technologies have shown promising results to help reduce substance use in adolescents, but their applicability in youths with associated severe psychiatric disorders is poorly documented. We aim to evaluate the feasibility of an ecological momentary assessment (EMA intervention for all substance users, and of a smart-phone application for cannabis users (Stop-Cannabis, for outpatient treatment after hospital discharge. Methods and analysis: All inpatient adolescents with psychiatric disorders hospitalized between 2016 and 2018 in a university hospital will be systematically screened for SUD and, if positive, will be assessed by an independent specialist addiction team. Participants with confirmed SUDs will be invited and helped to download an EMA app and, if required, the Stop-Cannabis app the week preceding hospital discharge. Information about the acceptability and use of both apps and the validity of EMA data in comparison to clinical assessments will be assessed after 6 months and one year.Discussion: This research has been designed to raise specific issues for consideration regarding the sequence between substance use, contextual factors, and other psychiatric symptoms among adolescents with comorbid severe psychiatric disorders. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved will inform the development of integrated treatment for dual disorders at that age.Ethics and dissemination: The study has already been approved and granted. Dissemination will include presentations at international congresses as well as publications in peer-reviewed journals.Trial registration: European Clinical Trials Database: Number

  9. Ecological Momentary Assessment and Smartphone Application Intervention in Adolescents with Substance Use and Comorbid Severe Psychiatric Disorders: Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarous, Xavier; Edel, Yves; Consoli, Angèle; Brunelle, Julie; Etter, Jean-François; Cohen, David; Khazaal, Yasser

    2016-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) are highly prevalent among inpatient adolescents with psychiatric disorders. In this population, substance use and other psychiatric outcomes can reinforce one another. Despite the need for integrated interventions in youths with dual diagnoses, few specific instruments are available. App-based technologies have shown promising results to help reduce substance use in adolescents, but their applicability in youths with associated severe psychiatric disorders is poorly documented. We aim to evaluate the feasibility of an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) intervention for all substance users, and of a smartphone application for cannabis users (Stop-Cannabis), for outpatient treatment after hospital discharge. All inpatient adolescents with psychiatric disorders hospitalized between 2016 and 2018 in a university hospital will be systematically screened for SUD and, if positive, will be assessed by an independent specialist addiction team. Participants with confirmed SUDs will be invited and helped to download an EMA app and, if required, the Stop-Cannabis app, the week preceding hospital discharge. Information about the acceptability and use of both apps and the validity of EMA data in comparison to clinical assessments will be assessed after 6 months and 1 year. This research has been designed to raise specific issues for consideration regarding the sequence between substance use, contextual factors, and other psychiatric symptoms among adolescents with comorbid severe psychiatric disorders. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved will inform the development of integrated treatment for dual disorders at that age. The study has already been approved and granted. Dissemination will include presentations at international congresses as well as publications in peer-reviewed journals. European Clinical Trials Database: Number 2016-001999-30.

  10. Clinical and demographic profile of cancer patients in a consultation-liaison psychiatric service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Albuquerque Citero

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT: An almost 50% prevalence of psychiatric disorders among cancer patients has prompted a series of studies on consultation-liaison psychiatry. Nonetheless, there are few reports on the epidemiological factors involving comorbidity between cancer and psychiatric disorders. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the epidemiological profile of cancer inpatients referred to the consultation-liaison psychiatric service in an oncology hospital during its first year of activity. TYPE OF STUDY: Descriptive study. SETTING: Tertiary-care teaching hospital. PARTICIPANTS: 319 patients referred 412 times to the consultation-liaison psychiatry service. PROCEDURES: From August 97 to July 98, an appraisal was made of data on all admissions registered at the Hospital do Câncer, and also all referrals registered at the consultation-liaison psychiatry service. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: The demographics and patients' clinical data, the type and flow of the request, and the evaluation conducted by the service were analyzed and comparisons with the hospital data were made. The distribution of the number of referrals was used to construct a profile of patients who had repeatedly used the service. RESULTS: Psychiatric diagnoses were found in 59% of the cases. Forty-three percent of these required medication, 18.3% needed psychotherapy, 22.1% family intervention and 20.5% guidance from the staff. Over 22.8% of the consultations were reevaluations, mainly involving younger male patients with worst prognoses. These patients required lengthier and more elaborate intervention, and had higher prevalence of depressive and behavioral disorders. CONCLUSION: A younger and mainly male population of non-surgical oncological cases was referred to the consultation-liaison psychiatric service during its first year of activity. The psychiatric disorder prevalence was higher than expected, and consisted predominantly of mood disorders. We detected a priority group, namely the reevaluated

  11. A National Survey of Psychiatric Mother and Baby Units in England

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Howard, Louise M; Slade, Mike; Johnson, Sonia; Gregoire, Alain; Elkin, Amanda; Gilburt, Helen

    2009-01-01

    This study identified all mother and baby units (MBUs) (defined in this study as inpatient psychiatric units where mothers and babies could be admitted that had at least four beds and were separate from other wards...

  12. Psychiatric Comorbidity, Social Aspects and Quality of Life in a Population-Based Cohort of Expecting Fathers with Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Frizell Reiter

    Full Text Available To investigate psychiatric disorders, adverse social aspects and quality of life in men with epilepsy during partner's pregnancy.We used data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, including 76,335 men with pregnant partners. Men with epilepsy were compared to men without epilepsy, and to men with non-neurological chronic diseases.Expecting fathers in 658 pregnancies (mean age 31.8 years reported a history of epilepsy, 36.9% using antiepileptic drugs (AEDs at the onset of pregnancy. Symptoms of anxiety or depression were increased in epilepsy (7.0% and 3.9%, respectively vs. non-epilepsy (4.6% and 2.5%, respectively, p = 0.004 and 0.023, and so were new onset symptoms of depression (2.0% vs. 1.0%, p < 0.031 and anxiety (4.3% vs. 2.3%, p = 0.023. Low self-esteem (2.5% and low satisfaction with life (1.7% were more frequent among fathers with epilepsy compared to fathers without epilepsy (1.3% and 0.7%, respectively, p = 0.01 and 0.010. Adverse social aspects and life events were associated with epilepsy vs. both reference groups. Self-reported diagnoses of ADHD (2.2% and bipolar disorder (1.8% were more common in epilepsy vs. non-epilepsy (0.4% and 0.3%, respectively, p = 0.002 and 0.003 and non-neurological chronic disorders (0.5% and 0.5%, respectively, p = 0.004 and 0.018. A screening tool for ADHD symptoms revealed a higher rate compared to self-reported ADHD (9.5% vs. 2.2%, p < 0.001.Expecting fathers with epilepsy are at high risk of depression and anxiety, adverse socioeconomic aspects, low self-esteem, and low satisfaction with life. Focus on mental health in fathers with epilepsy during and after pregnancy is important. The use of screening tools can be particularly useful to identify those at risk.

  13. Concurrent Medical and Psychiatric Disorders among Schizophrenic and Neurotic Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Bruno R.; Pai, Shaila

    Although the occurrence of medical illnesses in psychiatric patients is quite high, medical illnesses manifested by psychiatric symptoms are often overlooked. The higher mortality rates among psychiatric patients when compared to the general population may be a reflection of neglect or inadequate treatment of the psychiatric patients' medical…

  14. A Study of the Use and Interpretation of Standardized Suicide Risk Assessment: Measures within a Psychiatrically Hospitalized Correctional Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horon, Robert; McManus, Todd; Schmollinger, Justine; Barr, Tiffany; Jimenez, Megan

    2013-01-01

    The reliability, validity, and utility of the Adult Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire (ASIQ), Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSS), and Reasons for Attempting Suicide Questionnaire (RASQ) with correctional mental health populations was evaluated. Evidence was found indicating good to excellent reliability for all…

  15. The Potential Utility of the Patient Health Questionnaire as a Screener for Psychiatric Comorbidity in a Chronic Disabling Occupational Musculoskeletal Disorder Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asih, Sali; Mayer, Tom G; Bradford, E McKenna; Neblett, Randy; Williams, Mark J; Hartzell, Meredith M; Gatchel, Robert J

    2016-02-01

    The patient health questionnaire (PHQ) is designed for screening psychopathology in primary care settings. However, little is known about its clinical utility in other chronic pain populations, which usually have high psychiatric comorbidities. A consecutive cohort of 546 patients with chronic disabling occupational musculoskeletal disorder (CDOMD) was administered and compared upon psychosocial assessments, including the PHQ and a structured clinical interview for DSM-IV (SCID). Four PHQ modules were assessed: major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and alcohol use disorders (AUD) [including both alcohol abuse and dependence]. Based on the SCID diagnosis, sensitivity and specificity were determined. The specificity of the PHQ ranged from moderate to high for all 4 PHQ modules (MDD, 0.79; GAD, 0.67; PD, 0.89; AUD, 0.97). However, the sensitivity was relatively low: MDD (0.58); GAD (0.61); PD (0.49); and AUD (0.24). The PHQ was also associated with psychosocial variables. Patients whose PHQ showed MDD, GAD, or PD reported significantly more depressive symptoms and perceived disability than patients who did not (Ps pain than those without (Ps comorbidity in patients with CDOMD. The low sensitivity of the PHQ in this population, however, remains a weakness of the PHQ. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  16. The psychiatric and behavioural characteristics of individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS): An Irish population study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prasad, S E

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is a growingbody of evidence which indicates an unequivocal association between 22qllDS and schizophrenia. Deletion of 22qll is recognised as the third highest risk for the development of schizophrenia, with only a greater risk conferred by being the child of 2 parents with schizophrenia or the monozygotic co-twin of an affected individual. The challenge for clinicians and researchers is to identify early vulnerability traits, symptoms or disorders which may be associated with or predict a later emerging psychotic disorder, so that at risk individuals maybe identified, monitored and treated early to improve outcomes. Identification of these early traits or symptoms firstly requires detailed analysis of the behavioural phenotype in individuals with 22qllDS. The current study aims to define the prevalence and correlates of psychiatric disorders in a population cohort of individuals with 22qllDS in Ireland. The data gained from the study will provide the foundation for future longitudinal studies of risk factors of psychosis in 22qllDS. Methods: Forty-five individuals with 22qllDS (mean age = 14.6, SD 8.94) and 27 sibling controls (mean age = 12.2, SD 4.12) participated in the study. The rate of psychiatric and behavioural disorders was investigated through a range of semi-structured interviews and standardised questionnaires. This is the first study to use the Comprehensive Assessment of at Risk Mental State (CAARMS), a tool which has been designed to identify a possible prodromal state. Results: Individuals with 22qllDS had high rates of psychiatric disorders and had significant difficulties with social and school functioning (p < 0.0001) compared to sibling controls. The most frequently occurring were attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (29%, p = 0.001) and anxiety disorders (31%, p = 0.021). Eight individuals (18%) with 22qllDS exhibited subthreshold psychotic symptoms (mean age = 13, SD 2.8, range 7–16 years) and had significantly higher

  17. Transitioning Children from Psychiatric Hospitals to Schools: The Role of the Special Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Joan B.; Savina, Elena A.

    2010-01-01

    Over a quarter of a million U.S. students each year reside for a period of time in a psychiatric inpatient hospital setting to receive mental health treatment. Following inpatient treatment, most children are transitioned from the hospital into a regular school setting. Little is known about how these transitions are managed by hospital or school…

  18. Screening for bipolar disorders: Clinical utilization of the Mood Disorders Questionnaire on an inpatient mood disorders unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Simon; Palmer, Brian A; Lapid, Maria I; Poppe, Kathleen A; Alarcon, Renato D; Frye, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    The Mood Disorders Questionnaire (MDQ) is a widely used screening instrument for bipolar disorders. The MDQ has seldom been used in the inpatient setting, and we report a clinical, real-world inpatient validation. Between April 2011 and August 2013, patients admitted to the inpatient Mood Disorders Unit completed an MDQ as part of their admission process. Patients with a discharge diagnosis of unipolar or bipolar disorders were included. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each number of questionnaire items checked positive, as well as the symptoms clustered around the same time and with moderate impairment in functioning. A total of 1330 patient MDQ's were identified, and after excluding incomplete MDQ's and non-unipolar or bipolar diagnoses (e.g. anxiety, adjustment, or schizoaffective diagnoses), 860 MDQ's remained. One hundred fifty four patients (18%) were diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and 706 (82%) with unipolar depressive disorder. The average length of stay was 7.6 days. The optimal cutoff score was 8, resulting in a sensitivity/specificity of 86%/71%, compared to 92%/64% with a cutoff of 7. Retrospective study using clinical diagnoses instead of research instrument diagnoses. The sensitivity of the MDQ in an inpatient mood disorders setting was higher than an outpatient psychiatric population, but the specificity was lower. A cutoff of 8 instead of the recommended outpatient cutoff of 7 was optimal. In today's busy clinical practices, a screening instrument for bipolar disorder is still useful, and the MDQ can be effectively utilized on an inpatient psychiatry mood disorders unit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. How can a change in the operating system of the mental health review board promote the discharge of long-term hospitalized psychiatric patients? A case study of Seoul city

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Myung-Soo; Lim, Hee-Young; Kim, Youngki; Lee, Yong-Suk

    2014-01-01

    .... In contrast to there are many components which leads to long length of stay of psychiatric patients in Korean situation such as low and fixed medical fee for psychiatric inpatient treatment, shortage...

  20. The impact of ADHD symptoms and global impairment in childhood on working disability in mid-adulthood: a 28-year follow-up study using official disability pension records in a high-risk in-patient population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mordre Marianne

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with ADHD have been associated with more employment difficulties in early adulthood than healthy community controls. To examine whether this association is attributable specifically to disturbance of activity and attention (ADHD or to psychopathology in general, we wanted to extend existing research by comparing the rate of mid-adulthood working disabilities for individuals diagnosed with ADHD as children with the rate for clinical controls diagnosed with either conduct disorder, emotional disorder or mixed disorder of conduct and emotions. Methods Former Norwegian child-psychiatric in-patients (n = 257 were followed up 17–39 years after hospitalization by record linkage to the Norwegian national registry of disability pension (DP awards. Based on the hospital records, the patients were re-diagnosed according to ICD-10. Associations between the diagnoses, other baseline factors and subsequent DP were investigated using Kaplan–Meier survival analyses and logrank testing. Results At follow-up, 19% of the participants had received a DP award. In the logrank testing, ADHD was the only disorder associated with a subsequent DP, with 30% being disabled at follow-up (p = 0.01. Low psychosocial functioning (assessed by the Children’s Global Assessment Scale at admission uniquely predicted future DP (p = 0.04. Conclusions ADHD in childhood was highly associated with later receiving a DP. Our finding of worse prognosis in ADHD compared with other internalizing and externalizing disorders in mid-adulthood supports the assumption of ADHD being specifically linked to working disability. Assessment of psychosocial functioning in addition to diagnostic features could enhance prediction of children who are most at risk of future disability.

  1. "FIND Technology": investigating the feasibility, efficacy and safety of controller-free interactive digital rehabilitation technology in an inpatient stroke population: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, M L; Cannell, J; Callisaya, M L; Moles, E; Rathjen, A; Lane, K; Tyson, A; Smith, S

    2016-04-16

    Stroke results in significant disability, which can be reduced by physical rehabilitation. High levels of repetition and activity are required in rehabilitation, but patients are typically sedentary. Using clinically relevant and fun computer games may be one way to achieve increased activity in rehabilitation. A single-blind randomized controlled trial will be conducted to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of novel stroke-specific rehabilitation software. This software uses controller-free client interaction and inertial motion sensors. Elements of feasibility include recruitment into the trial, ongoing participation (adherence and dropout), perceived benefit, enjoyment and ease of use of the games. Efficacy will be determined by measuring activity and using upper-limb tasks as well as measures of balance and mobility. The hypothesis that the intervention group will have increased levels of physical activity within rehabilitation and improved physical outcomes compared with the control group will be tested. Results from this study will provide a basis for discussion of feasibility of this interactive video technological solution in an inpatient situation. Differences in activity levels between groups will be the primary measure of efficacy. It will also provide data on measures of upper-limb function, balance and mobility. ACTRN12614000427673 . Prospectively registered 17 April 2014.

  2. Why did the savant syndrome not spread in the population? A psychiatric example of a developmental constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeger, Annemie; van der Maas, Han L J; Raijmakers, Maartje E J; Galis, Frietson

    2009-03-31

    A developmental constraint is a mechanism that limits the possibility of a phenotype to evolve. There is growing evidence for the existence of developmental constraints in the biological literature. We hypothesize that a developmental constraint prevents the savant syndrome, despite its positive aspects, from spreading in the population. Here, the developmental constraint is the result of the high interactivity among body parts in an early stage in embryological development, namely early organogenesis or the phylotypic stage. The interactivity during this stage involves all components of the embryo, and as a result mutations that affect one part of the embryo also affect other parts. We hypothesize that a mutation, which gives rise to the development of the positive aspects of the savant syndrome (e.g., an impressive memory capacity), will virtually always have a deleterious effect on the development of other phenotypic traits (e.g., resulting in autism and/or impaired motor coordination). Thus, our hypothesis states that the savant syndrome cannot spread in the population because of this developmental constraint. The finding that children with savant syndrome often have autism and physical anomalies, which are known to be established during early organogenesis, supports our hypothesis.

  3. Psychiatric medication use before and after the onset of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents: A population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli Farsani, S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/396025064; Abdullah-Koolmees, Heshu; Souverein, Patrick C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/243074948; De Boer, Anthonius|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/266775098

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies showed a bidirectional association between type 2 diabetes and psychiatric disorders in adults. There is limited information available about the association of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. Objectives: To assess the extent of

  4. Prevalence of the catatonic syndrome in an acute inpatient sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella eStuivenga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In this exploratory open label study we investigated the prevalence of catatonia in an acute psychiatric inpatient population. In addition, differences in symptom presentation of catatonia depending on the underlying psychiatric illness were investigated.METHODS: 130 patients were assessed with the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS and the Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS. A factor analysis was conducted in order to generate 6 catatonic symptom clusters. Composite scores based on this principal component analysis were calculated. RESULTS: When focusing on the first 14 items of the BFCRS, 101 patients (77.7% had at least 1 symptom scoring 1 or higher, whereas 66 patients (50.8% had at least 2 symptoms. Interestingly, when focusing on the DSM-5 criteria of catatonia, 22 patients (16.9% could be considered for this diagnosis. Furthermore, different symptom profiles were found, depending on the underlying psychopathology. Psychotic symptomatology correlated strongly with excitement symptomatology (r=.528,p<.001 and to a lesser degree with the stereotypy/mannerisms symptom cluster (r=.289; p=.001 and the echo/perseveration symptom cluster (r=.185;p=.035. Similarly, manic symptomatology correlated strongly with the excitement symptom cluster (r=.596;p<.001 and to a lesser extent with the stereotypy/mannerisms symptom cluster (r=.277;p=.001.CONCLUSION: There was a high prevalence of catatonic symptomatology. Depending on the criteria being used, we noticed an important difference in exact prevalence, which makes it clear that we need clear-cut criteria. Another important finding is the fact that the catatonic presentation may vary depending on the underlying pathology, although an unambiguous delineation between these catatonic presentations cannot be made. Future research is needed to determine diagnostical criteria of catatonia which are clinically

  5. Acute psychiatric disorders in foreign domestic workers in Hong Kong: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Phyllis W L; Cheng, Judy G Y; Chow, Dickson L Y; Ungvari, G S; Leung, C M

    2009-11-01

    To explore the psychopathology of foreign domestic workers (FDWs) who had an acute psychiatric disorder in Hong Kong. This was a retrospective chart review. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from case records of FDWs who were admitted for the first time as inpatients for psychiatric treatment to three regional hospitals of the same catchment area in Hong Kong between 2000 and 2004. Relevant socio-demographic data on local FDWs and the general population of Hong Kong were obtained from local government departments. Twenty-seven Filipino and 14 Indonesian FDWs presenting with their first and so far only psychiatric admission were identified. There were significantly more FDWs who were single or never married in the sample. Filipino FDWs tended to fall ill after 4 years of service in Hong Kong while the corresponding figure for Indonesian FDWs was 2 years. Indonesian FDWs were older and had less access to social and medical services than their Filipino counterparts. Home sickness and marital problems were more commonly identified as stressors rather than work-related difficulties. Acute and Transient Psychotic Disorder (ICD-10) was diagnosed in over 60% of the subjects, making FDWs two times more vulnerable than local women of similar age for this illness. FDWs constitute a vulnerable group in terms of psychiatric morbidity. Concerted political, social and psychological efforts would be require to alleviate the distress faced by this particularly disadvantaged subset of female expatriates.

  6. Barometric pressure, emergency psychiatric visits, and violent acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schory, Thomas J; Piecznski, Natasha; Nair, Sunil; el-Mallakh, Rif S

    2003-10-01

    Associations between human behaviour and psychiatric decompensation and weather variables have been inconsistent. We studied the association of certain weather variables (specifically, humidity, wind speed, and barometric pressure) with emergent psychiatric presentations, psychiatric admissions, incidence of violent crimes, and suicides in a metropolitan area. We performed a retrospective study for the year 1999 in a mid-sized city. We included all documented emergent psychiatric visits to the city's psychiatric emergency room. We obtained violence data from the city police department and suicide data from the country medical examiner. The data suggest that total numbers of acts of violence and emergency psychiatry visits are significantly associated with low barometric pressure. Psychiatric inpatient admissions and suicides are not associated with any of the weather variables investigated. While alternate conclusions can be drawn, we propose that the data support the interpretation that low barometric pressure is associated with an increase in impulsive behaviours. Additional investigation is warranted.

  7. Prevalence of childhood physical and sexual abuse in veterans with psychiatric diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koola, Maju Mathew; Qualls, Clifford; Kelly, Deanna L; Skelton, Kelly; Bradley, Bekh; Amar, Richard; Duncan, Erica J

    2013-04-01

    We examined the prevalence of childhood (≤ 18 years) physical and sexual abuse reported among patients admitted to the psychiatric inpatient service and the differential rates of this abuse associated with psychiatric diagnoses. This study consisted of a retrospective chart review of 603 patients admitted to a psychiatric ward during a period of 1 year at Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center who had data on childhood physical and sexual abuse. The prevalence of reported childhood physical or sexual abuse in this inpatient clinical population was 19.4% (117/603). The prevalence of reported physical abuse was 22.6% (19/84) in the women and 12.0% (62/519) in the men (p = 0.008); the prevalence of sexual abuse was 33.3% (28/84) in the women and 7.7% (40/519) in the men (p abuse than did those without these disorders. More patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) reported physical and sexual abuse than did those without these disorders. Stratifying by race, sex, and diagnoses, multivariate analyses showed that the women with PTSD had a greater likelihood to report physical abuse (p = 0.03) and sexual abuse histories (p = 0.008) than did the women without PTSD. The men with substance-induced mood disorder (p = 0.01) were more likely to report physical abuse compared with the men without substance-induced mood disorder. Screening for abuse in patients with depressive disorders and PTSD is warranted to tailor individualized treatments for these patients. More research is needed to better understand the potential implications of childhood abuse on psychiatric diagnoses.

  8. The psychological impact of September 11 terrorism on Australian inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark; Jenkins, Kym

    2004-09-01

    To investigate the psychological impact on Australian hospital patients of the media coverage of the September 11 (9/11) terrorist attack. Thirty psychiatry and 26 matched medical and surgical inpatients were assessed. Both reported and observed distress was common. Women reported significantly more distress than men. Individuals with psychiatric illness were significantly more varied in their attribution of cause for 9/11. Seven patients (29%) with pre-existing psychosis became delusional surrounding the events, but there were no significant differences between the psychiatry and the medical and surgical inpatients. Clinical impressions were confirmed, namely, that a large proportion of hospital inpatients were adversely affected by TV footage of the 9/11 terrorist attack. Most vulnerable were those already with a mental disorder, particularly those with a pre-existing psychotic illness.

  9. Impact of social-psychiatric services and psychiatric clinics on involuntary admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emons, Barbara; Haussleiter, Ida Sybille; Kalthoff, Jörg; Schramm, Anja; Hoffmann, Knut; Jendreyschak, Jasmin; Schaub, Markus; Armgart, Carina; Juckel, Georg; Illes, Franciska

    2014-11-01

    Germany provides a wide range of highly developed mental health care to its citizens. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing the voluntariness of admissions to psychiatric hospitals. Especially the impact of demographic factors of the region, characteristics of the psychiatric hospitals and characteristics of the psychosocial services was analyzed. A retrospective analysis of hospital admission registers from 13 German adult psychiatric hospitals in 2009 was conducted. Public data on the regional psychiatric accommodation and demographic situation were added. Hospitals were dichotomously divided according to their index of involuntary admissions. Group comparisons were performed between the clinics with low and high involuntary admission indices. Analysis was conducted with clinical, psychiatric provision and demographic data related to inpatients in the Landschaftsverbands Westfalen-Lippe (LWL)-PsychiatryNetwork. Especially the range of services provided by the social-psychiatric services in the region such as number of supervised patients and home visits had an influence on the proportion of involuntary admissions to a psychiatric hospital. Some demographic characteristics of the region such as discretionary income showed further influence. Contrary to our expectations, the characteristics of the individual hospital seem to have no influence on the admission rate. Social-psychiatric services show a preventive impact on involuntary acute psychiatry interventions. Sociodemographic factors and patient variables play a role with regard to the number of involuntary hospitalizations, whereas characteristics of hospitals seemed to play no role. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Association between cig