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Sample records for psychiatric illness interview

  1. Confirming mental health care in acute psychiatric wards, as narrated by persons experiencing psychotic illness: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebergsen, Karina; Norberg, Astrid; Talseth, Anne-Grethe

    2016-01-01

    It is important that mental health nurses meet the safety, security and care needs of persons suffering from psychotic illness to enhance these persons' likelihood of feeling better during their time in acute psychiatric wards. Certain persons in care describe nurses' mental health care as positive, whereas others report negative experiences and express a desire for improvements. There is limited research on how persons with psychotic illness experience nurses' mental health care acts and how such acts help these persons feel better. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore, describe and understand how the mental health nurses in acute psychiatric wards provide care that helps persons who experienced psychotic illness to feel better, as narrated by these persons. This study had a qualitative design; 12 persons participated in qualitative interviews. The interviews were transcribed, content analysed and interpreted using Martin Buber's concept of confirmation. The results of this study show three categories of confirming mental health care that describe what helped the participants to feel better step-by-step: first, being confirmed as a person experiencing psychotic illness in need of endurance; second, being confirmed as a person experiencing psychotic illness in need of decreased psychotic symptoms; and third, being confirmed as a person experiencing psychotic illness in need of support in daily life. The underlying meaning of the categories and of subcategories were interpreted and formulated as the theme; confirming mental health care to persons experiencing psychotic illness. Confirming mental health care acts seem to help persons to feel better in a step-wise manner during psychotic illness. Nurses' openness and sensitivity to the changing care needs of persons who suffer from psychotic illness create moments of confirmation within caring acts that concretely help the persons to feel better and that may enhance their health. The results show the

  2. The psychiatric interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2012-01-01

    that are historically rooted in logical positivism and behaviorism. These theoretical approaches marked decisively the so-called "operational revolution in psychiatry" leading to the creation of DSM-III. This paper attempts to examine the theoretical assumptions that underlie the use of a fully structured psychiatric...... person), actionable format, used for classification, treatment, and research. Our central thesis is that psychiatry targets the phenomena of consciousness, which, unlike somatic symptoms and signs, cannot be grasped on the analogy with material thing-like objects. We claim that in order to perform...... faithful distinctions in this particular domain, we need a more adequate approach, that is, an approach that is guided by phenomenologically informed considerations. Our theoretical discussion draws upon clinical examples derived from structured and semi-structured interviews. We conclude that fully...

  3. Cultural relativism and psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrega, H

    1989-07-01

    Psychiatry has had a long-standing association with sociology and, especially, cultural anthropology. These social sciences have been influential in developing the concept of cultural relativism and applying it to psychiatry, sometimes in a challenging way and with much detriment. The concept has been used by some antipsychiatrists in attempts to discredit psychiatric practice. Contemporary psychiatrists endorsing a form of biological determinism have tended to either disregard the concept or judge it as trivial if not nonsensical. This study describes the concept of cultural relativism, reviews its applications to illness, and analyzes its implications from a historical and theoretical point of view. Its varied aspects, power, and limitations are discussed.

  4. Insomnia comorbid to severe psychiatric illness

    OpenAIRE

    Soehner, Adriane M.; Kaplan, Katherine A; Harvey, Allison G.

    2013-01-01

    In psychiatric illness, there is a growing body of evidence indicating that sleep disturbances exert a detrimental influence on the course of these disorders and contribute to impaired function. Even when psychiatric disorders are successfully treated or stabilized, insomnia and other sleep disturbances often fail to remit. The present review focuses on sleep in two severe mental illnesses, namely bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. This article discusses the role of sleep disturbances and al...

  5. Perceived Mental Illness Stigma among Youth in Psychiatric Outpatient Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkington, Katherine S.; Hackler, Dusty; McKinnon, Karen; Borges, Cristiane; Wright, Eric R.; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the experiences of mental illness stigma in 24 youth (58.3% male, 13-24 years, 75% Latino) in psychiatric outpatient treatment. Using Link and Phelan's (2001) model of stigmatization, we conducted thematic analysis of the interview texts, examining experiences of stigma at individual and structural levels, in addition to the…

  6. EDITORIAL PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS AMONG JUVENILES AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-06-01

    Jun 1, 2003 ... PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS AMONG JUVENILES AND ADOLESCENTS IN KENYA. Twenty years ago, FGN, ..... and adolescence may show a good deal of shift from conduct disorders to mixed ...... risk factor for both perinatal and young infant death, khat chewing during pregnancy may be one of the factors ...

  7. Acupuncture therapy for psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has traditionally been used for problems including anxiety, insomnia, stress, and depression in China and other East Asian countries. A range of different neurobiological responses to acupuncture have been investigated including modulation of serotonergic, noradrenergic, and dopaminergic systems; effects on GABA and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; and inflammatory responses. Interpretation of the findings is challenging because the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders has yet to be fully elucidated. Limitations also arise from the use of animal models and the selection of appropriate control treatments. Further complexity is added by acupuncture treatment being nonstandardized with acupuncture points often selected on the basis on traditional practice and theory. Potentially promising findings require further investigation and substantiation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prolonged cannabis withdrawal in young adults with lifetime psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Randi Melissa; Fontaine, Madeleine; Nip, Emily; Zhang, Haiyue; Hanly, Ailish; Eden Evins, A

    2017-02-27

    Young adults with psychiatric illnesses are more likely to use cannabis and experience problems from use. It is not known whether those with a lifetime psychiatric illness experience a prolonged cannabis withdrawal syndrome with abstinence. Participants were fifty young adults, aged 18-25, recruited from the Boston-area in 2015-2016, who used cannabis at least weekly, completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV to identify Axis I psychiatric diagnoses (PD+ vs PD-), and attained cannabis abstinence with a four-week contingency management protocol. Withdrawal symptom severity was assessed at baseline and at four weekly abstinent visits using the Cannabis Withdrawal Scale. Cannabis dependence, age of initiation, and rate of abstinence were similar in PD+ and PD- groups. There was a diagnostic group by abstinent week interaction, suggesting a difference in time course for resolution of withdrawal symptoms by group, F(4,46)=3.8, p=0.009, controlling for sex, baseline depressive and anxiety symptoms, and frequency of cannabis use in the prior 90days. In post hoc analyses, there was a difference in time-course of cannabis withdrawal. PD- had significantly reduced withdrawal symptom severity in abstinent week one [t(46)=-2.2, p=0.03], while PD+ did not report improved withdrawal symptoms until the second abstinent week [t(46)=-4.1, p=0.0002]. Cannabis withdrawal symptoms improved over four weeks in young people with and without a lifetime psychiatric diagnosis. However, those with a psychiatric illness reported one week delayed improvement in withdrawal symptom severity. Longer duration of cannabis withdrawal may be a risk factor for cannabis dependence and difficulty quitting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Seasonality of suicides with and without psychiatric illness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yip, P.S.; Yang, K.C.; Qin, Ping

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied the seasonality of suicides among persons with and without psychiatric illness in Denmark from 1970 to 1999. A non-homogenous Poisson process was used to examine the data. The seasonality of suicides was shown to be associated with gender and their psychiatric histories...... with a declining trend of suicide incidence noted over the captured period. A mild seasonal component was reported in the period of the late 70s to early 80s (1975-1984) among females who did not have any psychiatric treatment history, while in the 80s the significant seasonality was mainly contributed by male...... suicides without a psychiatric history. Another mild possible invoked seasonality in the 90s was in males who suffered from psychiatric illness. The rest could be treated as random events. Apparently, the seasonality among suicides with psychiatric illness exists but its effect could vary in different...

  10. Psychiatric and psychosocial correlates of sexual risk behavior among adults with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Christina S; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2007-04-01

    Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. This study examined multivariate correlates of sexual risk among 152 adults with SMI receiving outpatient psychiatric treatment. Structured interviews assessed psychiatric, psychosocial, and behavioral risk factors. The majority was sexually active (65%), and many reported unprotected intercourse (73%), multiple partners (45%), and sex trading (21%) in the past year. Logistic regression models found that sexual behaviors were differentially associated with non-psychotic disorder, psychiatric symptoms, substance abuse, childhood sexual abuse, romantic partnership, and social support (all ps < .05). Findings underscore the need for targeted HIV prevention interventions that address psychiatric and psychosocial risk factors.

  11. Risk factors for bulimia nervosa: a controlled study of parental psychiatric illness and divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumann, C E; Yates, W R

    1994-01-01

    Twenty five women with normal-weight bulimia nervosa were compared with 25 age- and weight-matched women without bulimia nervosa on measures of parental psychiatric illness. Case and control probands, as well as their parents, completed the Family History Research Diagnostic Criteria (FH-RDC) interview and a battery of self-report instruments. Case probands and controls were divided into two groups based on evidence for parental psychiatric illness. The assignment of parental psychiatric illness was made by (a) a positive parental history of alcoholism or depression from the FH-RDC; or (b) evidence of parental major depression, alcoholism, or personality disorder from the self-report measures. Parental psychiatric illness occurred significantly more frequently for case probands compared to the control probands (64% vs. 24%, odds ratio = 5.6, 95% Cl = 1.7-19.2). Parental psychiatric illness was also associated with parental divorce (Fisher's exact p = .023) and a trend toward lower ratings of paternal but not maternal relationship by case probands. This study suggests parental psychiatric illness may be a risk factor for bulimia nervosa and may contribute to environmental effects through increased rates of divorce and impaired paternal relationships.

  12. Psychiatric Patients Experiences with Mechanical Restraints: An Interview Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klas Lanthén

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine psychiatric patients’ experience of mechanical restraints and to describe the care the patients received. Background. All around the world, threats and violence perpetrated by patients in psychiatric emergency inpatient units are quite common and are a prevalent factor concerning the application of mechanical restraints, although psychiatric patients’ experiences of mechanical restraints are still moderately unknown. Method. A qualitative design with an inductive approach were used, based on interviews with patients who once been in restraints. Results. This study resulted in an overbridging theme: Physical Presence, Instruction and Composed Behaviour Can Reduce Discontent and Trauma, including five categories. These findings implicated the following: information must be given in a calm and sensitive way, staff must be physically present during the whole procedure, and debriefing after the incident must be conducted. Conclusions. When mechanical restraints were unavoidable, the presence of committed staff during mechanical restraint was important, demonstrating the significance of training acute psychiatric nurses correctly so that their presence is meaningful. Nurses in acute psychiatric settings should be required to be genuinely committed, aware of their actions, and fully present in coercive situations where patients are vulnerable.

  13. Munchausen syndrome mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine physical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Jaime; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Xavier, Miguel; Gusmão, Ricardo

    2010-11-29

    Munchausen syndrome is a disorder in which patients intentionally produce symptoms mimicking physical or psychiatric illnesses with the aim to assume the sick role and to gain medical attention. Once a patient receives a Munchausen syndrome diagnosis every complaint made thence tends to be regarded with scepticism by clinical staff. However, it is possible that a bona fide illness, which might be disregarded, may coexist in these patients. We report a case of MS mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine acute physical illness. Despite the initial doubts about the veracity of the latter, due to its prompt recognition, treatment was successful.

  14. Validation of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) with Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Lance P.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Hollander, Beth L. G.; Dyl, Jennifer; Rizzo, Christie J.; Steinley, Douglas L.; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the concurrent validity of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (ChIPS) for adolescent inpatients aged 12 to 18. The results reveal moderate agreement between ChIPS diagnoses and Schedule for Affective Disorder sand Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime version diagnoses.

  15. Virtual reality job interview training for individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Ginger, Emily J; Wright, Michael; Wright, Katherine; Boteler Humm, Laura; Olsen, Dale; Bell, Morris D; Fleming, Michael F

    2014-09-01

    Services are available to help support existing employment for individuals with psychiatric disabilities; however, there is a gap in services targeting job interview skills that can help obtain employment. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of Virtual Reality Job Interview Training (VR-JIT) in a randomized controlled trial. Participants were randomized to VR-JIT (n = 25) or treatment-as-usual (TAU) (n = 12) groups. VR-JIT consisted of 10 hours of simulated job interviews with a virtual character and didactic online training. The participants attended 95% of laboratory-based training sessions and found VR-JIT easy to use and felt prepared for future interviews. The VR-JIT group improved their job interview role-play performance (p ≤ 0.05) and self-confidence (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and follow-up as compared with the TAU group. VR-JIT performance scores increased over time (R = 0.65). VR-JIT demonstrated initial feasibility and efficacy at improving job interview skills and self-confidence. Future research may help clarify whether this intervention is efficacious in community-based settings.

  16. HIV infection and psychiatric illness | Owe-Larsson | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Patients with HIV infection are at an increased risk of psychiatric illness. Major depressive disorder and subsyndromal depressive symptoms, as well as anxiety disorder and substance abuse are more prevalent among HIV infected individuals than among the general population. HIV-associated neurocognitive ...

  17. Pattern of psychiatric illnesses among elderly patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However relatively few studies have been conducted on the pattern of psychiatric illnesses among the elderly in this environment. More over , with changing demographics, there is a need for more information. Objective: The objectives of this study were to: (1) examine the sociodemographic and clinical variables of patients ...

  18. Understanding interpersonal function in psychiatric illness through multiplayer economic games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Casas, Brooks; Chiu, Pearl H

    2012-07-15

    Interpersonal factors play significant roles in the onset, maintenance, and remission of psychiatric conditions. In the current major diagnostic classification systems for psychiatric disorders, some conditions are defined by the presence of impairments in social interaction or maintaining interpersonal relationships; these include autism, social phobia, and the personality disorders. Other psychopathologies confer significant difficulties in the social domain, including major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and psychotic disorders. Still other mental health conditions, including substance abuse and eating disorders, seem to be exacerbated or triggered in part by the influence of social peers. For each of these and other psychiatric conditions, the extent and quality of social support is a strong determinant of outcome such that high social support predicts symptom improvement and remission. Despite the central role of interpersonal factors in psychiatric illness, the neurobiology of social impairments remains largely unexplored, in part due to difficulties eliciting and quantifying interpersonal processes in a parametric manner. Recent advances in functional neuroimaging, combined with multiplayer exchange games drawn from behavioral economics, and computational/quantitative approaches more generally, provide a fitting paradigm within which to study interpersonal function and dysfunction in psychiatric conditions. In this review, we outline the importance of interpersonal factors in psychiatric illness and discuss ways in which neuroeconomics provides a tractable framework within which to examine the neurobiology of social dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Correctional Officers and the Incarcerated Mentally Ill: Responses to Psychiatric Illness in Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanek, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Based on ethnographic fieldwork in a U.S. men’s prison, I investigate how this social and cultural context structures relations between correctional officers and inmates with severe mental illness. Utilizing interpretivist perspectives, I explore how these relations are structured by trust, respect, and meanings associated with mental illness. Officers’ discretionary responses to mentally ill inmates included observations to ensure psychiatric stability and flexibility in rule enforcement and were embedded within their role to ensure staff and inmate safety. Officers identified housing, employment, and social support as important for inmates’ psychiatric stability as medications. Inmates identified officers’ observation and responsiveness to help seeking as assisting in institutional functioning. These findings demonstrate that this prison’s structures and values enable officers’ discretion with mentally ill inmates, rather than solely fostering custodial responses to these inmates’ behaviors. These officers’ responses to inmates with mental illness concurrently support custodial control and the prison’s order. PMID:25219680

  20. Theophylline toxicity leading to suicidal ideation in a patient with no prior psychiatric illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kapoor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Suicidal behavior is a common psychiatric emergency and is associated with psychiatric illness and history of prior suicide attempts. Neuropsychiatric manifestations related to theophylline toxicity are well described in literature. We report a case of theophylline toxicity manifesting as suicidal ideation in a patient with no prior psychiatric illness.

  1. Enabling healthy living: Experiences of people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Marjut; Sandgren, Anna; Carlsson, Ing-Marie; Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that people with severe mental illness have a reduced life expectancy and a greater risk of being affected by preventable physical illnesses such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. There are still, however, only a few published studies focusing on what enables healthy living for this group. This study thus aimed to describe what enables healthy living among people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services. The data were collected in qualitative interviews (n = 16) and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The interviews resulted in an overall theme "Being regarded as a whole human being by self and others", which showed the multidimensional nature of health and the issues that enable healthy living among people with severe mental illness. Three categories emerged: (i) everyday structure (ii), motivating life events and (iii) support from significant others. The results indicate that a person with severe mental illness needs to be encountered as a whole person if healthy living is to be enabled. Attaining healthy living requires collaboration between the providers of care, help and support. Health care organizations need to work together to develop and provide interventions to enable healthy living and to reduce poor physical health among people with severe mental illness. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Psychiatric Illness: Redefining the Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians who encounter patients in the emergency department with chest pain, palpitations, or shortness of breath may often find it difficult to differentiate diagnosis of panic attacks from acute coronary syndrome or Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy. Redefining and understanding the pathophysiological relationship of psychiatric illness including anxiety, depression, or panic attacks and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy may help clinicians implement a more effective and beneficial model of care for this affliction that is being found to be increasingly more common in today’s age.

  3. Illnesses of the will in 'pre-psychiatric' times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Kathleen; Kumbier, Ekkehardt; Herpertz, Sabine C

    2010-09-01

    Since its emergence as a medical discipline in its own right, i.e. since the end of the eighteenth century, disorders of the will have constituted a major area of interest for psychiatrists. But even before then, in 'pre-psychiatric' times so to speak, there were occasional descriptions of illnesses of the will or, in the nomenclature used at the time,'ambiguous emotional states of minds'.This study presents some very early attempts to tackle and explain the problems of amentia occulta, manie sons délire and monomania in German literature, concentrating on works written from a medical and philosophical perspective. Beginning with the differentiation between will and reason, this study explores some concepts in which the will was perceived as a possible cause of mental illness and thus became a topic of medical interest.

  4. Cannabis Use during Adolescent Development: Susceptibility to Psychiatric Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Benjamin; Miller, Michael L.; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis use is increasingly pervasive among adolescents today, even more common than cigarette smoking. The evolving policy surrounding the legalization of cannabis reaffirms the need to understand the relationship between cannabis exposure early in life and psychiatric illnesses. cannabis contains psychoactive components, notably Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), that interfere with the brain’s endogenous endocannabinoid system, which is critically involved in both pre- and post-natal neurodevelopment. Consequently, THC and related compounds could potentially usurp normal adolescent neurodevelopment, shifting the brain’s developmental trajectory toward a disease-vulnerable state, predisposing early cannabis users to motivational, affective, and psychotic disorders. Numerous human studies, including prospective longitudinal studies, demonstrate that early cannabis use is associated with major depressive disorder and drug addiction. A strong association between schizophrenia and cannabis use is also apparent, especially when considering genetic factors that interact with this environmental exposure. These human studies set a foundation for carefully controlled animal studies which demonstrate similar patterns following early cannabinoid exposure. Given the vulnerable nature of adolescent neurodevelopment and the persistent changes that follow early cannabis exposure, the experimental findings outlined should be carefully considered by policymakers. In order to fully address the growing issues of psychiatric illnesses and to ensure a healthy future, measures should be taken to reduce cannabis use among teens. PMID:24133461

  5. Cannabis use during adolescent development: susceptibility to psychiatric illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eChadwick

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis use is increasingly pervasive among adolescents today, even more common than cigarette smoking. The evolving policy surrounding the legalization of cannabis reaffirms the need to understand the relationship between cannabis exposure early in life and psychiatric illnesses. Cannabis contains psychoactive components, notably Δ9-tetrahydrocannbinol (THC, that interfere with the brain’s endogenous endocannabinoid system, which is critically involved in both pre- and post-natal neurodevelopment. Consequently, THC and related compounds could potentially usurp normal adolescent neurodevelopment, shifting the brain’s developmental trajectory towards a disease-vulnerable state, predisposing early cannabis-users to motivational, affective and psychotic disorders. Numerous human studies, including prospective longitudinal studies, demonstrate that early cannabis use is associated with major depressive disorder and drug addiction. A strong association between schizophrenia and cannabis use is also apparent, especially when considering genetic factors that interact with this environmental exposure. These human studies set a foundation for carefully controlled animal studies which demonstrate similar patterns following early cannabinoid exposure. Given the vulnerable nature of adolescent neurodevelopment and the persistent changes that follow early cannabis exposure, the experimental findings outlined should be carefully considered by policymakers. In order to fully address the growing issues of psychiatric illnesses and to ensure a healthy future, measures should be taken to reduce cannabis use among teens.

  6. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient's at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient's symptoms and improve the individual's quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Literature review was done by using the keywords "home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing" from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015.

  7. Psychiatric diagnoses and psychoactive medication use among nonsurgical critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunsch, Hannah; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Johansen, Martin B

    2014-01-01

    , the absolute risk of new psychiatric diagnoses was low but higher than hospitalized patients: 0.5% vs 0.2% over the first 3 months (adjusted HR, 3.42; 95% CI, 1.96-5.99; P general population cohort (0.02%; adjusted HR, 21.77; 95% CI, 9.23-51.36; Pmedication....... CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Prior psychiatric diagnoses are more common in critically ill patients than in hospital and general population cohorts. Among survivors of critical illness, new psychiatric diagnoses and psychoactive medication use is increased in the months after discharge. Our data suggest both......IMPORTANCE: The relationship between critical illness and psychiatric illness is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To assess psychiatric diagnoses and medication prescriptions before and after critical illness. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Population-based cohort study in Denmark of critically ill patients...

  8. Medical students' attitudes to psychiatric illness in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Robert P; Roberts, Lesley M; Lawrie, Stephen; Jones, Lisa A; Humphreys, Martin S

    2008-11-01

    Previous research has shown that general practitioners (GPs) hold negative attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia, which do not simply reflect the nature or chronic aspects of the illness. This study aimed to describe the attitudes and predicted behaviour of medical students towards patients with mental illness in a primary care setting and to investigate whether these were affected by the students' level of training. A sample of 1239 students from the University of Birmingham Medical School were each given one of four case vignettes, all of which were identical except that the patient involved was described as having a previous diagnosis of, respectively, schizophrenia, depression, diabetes or no illness. Students rated their level of agreement with 12 attitudinal statements relating to the vignette. A total of 1081 (88%) students responded to the questionnaire. Students were generally less favourable in their responses to patients with either schizophrenia or depression. They would not be as happy to have them on their list, believed they would consume more time and considered they would be less likely to comply with advice and treatment. They expressed more concern about the risk of violence, the potential welfare of children and the possibility of illegal drug and excessive alcohol use. General clinical and psychiatric training had little effect on these reactions. Patients with mental illness provoke less favourable responses in medical students, which are not altered by furthering education. Undergraduate primary care-based mental health education should be re-evaluated to ensure that students develop an empathetic and positive approach to mental health patients and their treatment.

  9. HIV risk behavior of psychiatric patients with mental illness: a sample of Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland; McKinnon, Karen; Campos, Lorenza Nogueira; Melo, Ana Paula Souto; Wainberg, Milton

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of HIV among psychiatric patients is higher than general population rates worldwide. Many risk behaviors have been identified in studies from both developing and developed countries, though sampling limitations restrict the generalizability of their results. The objective of this study was to report findings from the first national sample of psychiatric patients about lifetime practice of unsafe sex and associated factors. A national multicenter sample of adults with mental illness was randomly selected from 26 public mental health institutions throughout Brazil. Sociodemographic, sexual behavior and clinical data were obtained from person-to-person interviews and blood was collected for serology testing. Logistic regression was used for analysis. The overall prevalence of lifetime unprotected sex was 80.3%. Married, older, female patients, those with multiple partners and living with children or partners only and those with less severe psychiatric diagnosis more often practised unsafe sex. Risk behavior assessment is a critical tool for clinicians to be able to determine needed HIV-related services for their clients and ensure appropriate follow-through with care and prevention. Interventions that address situational risks in psychiatric patients' lives-institutional and individual- and increase their ability to make informed decisions about their sexual health are urgently needed.

  10. Diagnosing depression in the medically ill: validity of a lay-administered structured diagnostic interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, B M; Kirchner, J E; Hamilton, G; Harrell, R; Smith, G R

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the validity of structured psychiatric diagnostic interviews in medically ill patients will advance the ability to conduct research into the treatment and management of these disorders in general medical settings. We compared the University of Michigan version of the CIDI (Composite International Diagnostic Interview) for major depression to a clinical gold standard, derived through Spitzer's Longitudinal, Expert, All Data (LEAD) criteria based on the SCID-III-R. A convenience sample of medical inpatients was administered the SCID-III-R and the CIDI for major depression in random order. A physician panel reviewed the SCID interview and other pertinent data and determined whether patients had a lifetime or current (past month) diagnosis of major depression. The CIDI was scored with and without hierarchical exclusions for mania, hypomania, substance use, or medical illness. When the UM-CIDI was scored for a lifetime diagnosis of major depression without hierarchical exclusions, agreement above chance (kappa) was very good (kappa = 0.67) between the CIDI and the physician panel and good (kappa = 0.46) when the UM-CIDI was scored with exclusions. Agreement above chance for diagnosis of a recent disorder was better for UM-CIDI scoring with exclusions (kappa = 0.51) compared to scoring without exclusions (kappa = 0.43). Predictive value-positive was excellent in both scoring versions for a lifetime diagnosis (82%) and good to very good for current depression (46% and 62%). In all cases predictive value-negative was very good to excellent (77-93%). Discordant cases were almost uniformly due to difficulties in attribution of symptoms to medical illnesses. We conclude that the CIDI can perform acceptably as a research instrument to diagnose major depression in medically ill patients, potentially supplemented by clinician review of cases identified by the CIDI with current disorder.

  11. Psychiatric Illness in a Cohort of Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnema, Margje; Boer, Harm; Collin, Philippe; Maaskant, Marian A.; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance T. R. M.; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested an association between PWS and comorbid psychiatric illness. Data on prevalence rates of psychopathology is still scarce. This paper describes a large-scale, systematic study investigating the prevalence of psychiatric illness in a Dutch adult PWS cohort. One hundred and two individuals were screened for psychiatric…

  12. Psychiatric disorders and leukocyte telomere length: Underlying mechanisms linking mental illness with cellular aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindqvist, D.; Epel, E.S.; Mellon, S.H.; Penninx, B.W.; Revesz, D.; Verhoeven, J.E.; Reus, V.I.; Lin, J.; Mahan, L.; Hough, C.M.; Rosser, R.; Bersani, F.S.; Blackburn, E.H.; Wolkowitz, O.M.

    2015-01-01

    Many psychiatric illnesses are associated with early mortality and with an increased risk of developing physical diseases that are more typically seen in the elderly. Moreover, certain psychiatric illnesses may be associated with accelerated cellular aging, evidenced by shortened leukocyte telomere

  13. Interviews with psychiatric inpatients about professional intervention with regard to their children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A R; Goldschmidt, V V

    1996-01-01

    A description of mentally ill parents' experience and points of view concerning professional intervention in relation to their young children is presented in this paper. The results are from an interview survey designed with the purpose of improving the basis for cooperation between mentally ill......% of the children. In most cases their views were in accordance with those of the mentally ill parents. Clinical implications concerning planning of intervention in regard to children of mentally ill parents are discussed....

  14. Zimbabwean diabetics' beliefs about health and illness: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelm, Katarina; Mufunda, Esther

    2010-05-12

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing globally, with the greatest increase in Africa and Asia. In Zimbabwe a threefold increase was shown in the 1990s. Health-related behaviour is important in maintaining health and is determined by individual beliefs about health and illness but has seen little study. The purpose of the study was to explore beliefs about health and illness that might affect self-care practice and health care seeking behaviour in persons diagnosed with DM, living in Zimbabwe. Exploratory study. Consecutive sample from a diabetes clinic at a central hospital. Semi-structured interviews were held with 21 persons aged 19-65 years. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Health was described as freedom from disease and well-being, and individual factors such as compliance with advice received and drugs were considered important to promote health. A mixture of causes of DM, predominantly individual factors such as heredity, overweight and wrong diet in combination with supernatural factors such as fate, punishment from God and witchcraft were mentioned. Most respondents did not recognize the symptoms of DM when falling ill but related the problems to other diseases, e.g. HIV, malaria etc. Limited knowledge about DM and the body was indicated. Poor economy was mentioned as harmful to health and a consequence of DM because the need to buy expensive drugs, food and attend check-ups. Self-care was used to a limited extent but if used, a combination of individual measures, household remedies or herbs and religious acts such as prayers and holy water were frequently used, and in some cases health care professionals were consulted. Limited knowledge about DM, based on beliefs about health and illness including biomedical and traditional explanations related to the influence of supernatural forces, e.g. fate, God etc., were found, which affected patients' self-care and care-seeking behaviour. Strained economy was stated to be a factor of the

  15. Zimbabwean diabetics' beliefs about health and illness: an interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufunda Esther

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus (DM is increasing globally, with the greatest increase in Africa and Asia. In Zimbabwe a threefold increase was shown in the 1990s. Health-related behaviour is important in maintaining health and is determined by individual beliefs about health and illness but has seen little study. The purpose of the study was to explore beliefs about health and illness that might affect self-care practice and health care seeking behaviour in persons diagnosed with DM, living in Zimbabwe. Methods Exploratory study. Consecutive sample from a diabetes clinic at a central hospital. Semi-structured interviews were held with 21 persons aged 19-65 years. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results Health was described as freedom from disease and well-being, and individual factors such as compliance with advice received and drugs were considered important to promote health. A mixture of causes of DM, predominantly individual factors such as heredity, overweight and wrong diet in combination with supernatural factors such as fate, punishment from God and witchcraft were mentioned. Most respondents did not recognize the symptoms of DM when falling ill but related the problems to other diseases, e.g. HIV, malaria etc. Limited knowledge about DM and the body was indicated. Poor economy was mentioned as harmful to health and a consequence of DM because the need to buy expensive drugs, food and attend check-ups. Self-care was used to a limited extent but if used, a combination of individual measures, household remedies or herbs and religious acts such as prayers and holy water were frequently used, and in some cases health care professionals were consulted. Conclusions Limited knowledge about DM, based on beliefs about health and illness including biomedical and traditional explanations related to the influence of supernatural forces, e.g. fate, God etc., were found, which affected patients' self-care and care

  16. Attitudes of college students toward mental illness stigma and the misuse of psychiatric medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Amanda M; Merlo, Lisa J

    2011-02-01

    Mental illness stigma remains a significant barrier to treatment. However, the recent increase in the medical and nonmedical use of prescription psychiatric medications among college students seems to contradict this phenomenon. This study explored students' attitudes and experiences related to psychiatric medications, as well as correlates of psychiatric medication misuse (ie, attitudes toward mental illness and beliefs about the efficacy of psychiatric medications). Data were collected anonymously via self-report questionnaires from April 2008 to February 2009. Measures included the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test, the Drug Abuse Screening Test, Day's Mental Illness Stigma Scale, the Attitudes Toward Psychiatric Medication scale, and the Psychiatric Medication Attitudes Scale. Participants included 383 university students (59.2% female), recruited on the campus of a large state university or through online classes offered through the same university. High rates of psychiatric medication misuse were shown (13.8%) when compared to rates of medical use (6.8%), and students with prescriptions for psychiatric drugs were also more likely to be misusers (χ(2) = 20.60, P < .001). Psychiatric medication misusers reported less stigmatized beliefs toward mental illness, including lower anxiety around the mentally ill (t = 3.26, P < .001) as well as more favorable attitudes toward psychiatric medications (t = 2.78, P < .01) and stronger beliefs in the potential for recovery from mental illness (t = -2.11, P < .05). Students with more stigmatized beliefs had greater concerns about psychiatric medications and less favorable beliefs regarding their effectiveness. Reasons for misuse varied by medication class, with 57.1% of stimulant misusers noting help with studying as their primary reason for use and 33.3% of benzodiazepine misusers noting attempts to get high or "party" as their primary reason for misuse. Results suggest the need for improved education regarding the

  17. Validation of the Mental Illness Sexual Stigma Questionnaire (MISS-Q) in a sample of Brazilian adults in psychiatric care

    OpenAIRE

    WAINBERG, MILTON; Pala, Andrea Norcini; Cournos, Francine; McKinnon, Karen

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective We evaluated the psychometric properties of a new instrument “Mental Illness Sexual Stigma Questionnaire” (MISS-Q). Methods We interviewed 641 sexually active adults (ages 18-80) attending public outpatient psychiatric clinics in Rio de Janeiro about their stigma experiences. Results Nine factors were extracted through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and labeled: ‘individual discrimination by others’; ‘staff willingness to talk about sexuality’; ‘staff and family pr...

  18. Comparing Mental Illness Stigma among Nurses in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

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    Ebrahimi Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stigma can complicate people’s mental health problems by affecting different sides of personal life, increasing negative attitudes, causing discriminatory behavior towards them, and reducing the chances of recovery and returning to normal life. This research aims to compare the stigma of mental illness among nurses working in psychiatric and non-psychiatric wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. A total of 240 nurses participated in this descriptive and analytic study. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI Scale, which is a 40-item self-report questionnaire. All data were analyzed using SPSS 13. The majority of nurses have a medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness, and there is no significant relation between the type of wards and mean stigma scores. After eliminating factors such as mental illness in nurses and their families, it seems that only working with people with mental illness in psychiatric wards is not enough to create a positive attitude toward them. Additionally, the less physical activity and taking advantage of legal benefits of work hardship for psychiatric nurses, low income, and stigma toward psychiatric nursing, probably may make a difference in inclining to work in psychiatry ward between the two groups in spite of relatively equal stigma scores.

  19. Characteristics of mentally ill offenders from 100 psychiatric court reports

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    Al-Zahrani Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing probability that the psychiatrist will, willingly or not, come into contact with mentally ill offenders in the course of their practice. There are increasing rates of violence, substance abuse and other psychiatric disorders that are of legal importance. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the rates of different mental disorders in 100 court reports and to investigate the characteristics of mentally ill offenders. Methods All cases referred from different departments of the legal system to the forensic committee for assessment of legal accountability over 13-months duration were included. A specially designed form was prepared for data collection. Cases were classified into five groups: murder, robbery, financial offences, violent and simple offences and a group for other offences. Data were subjected to statistical analysis and comparisons between different groups of subjects were performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Men constituted 93% of cases. In all, 73% of offenders were younger than 40 years old. Schizophrenia cases made up 13% of the total, substance related cases constituted 56% and amphetamine cases alone made up 21%; 10% of cases were antisocial personality disorders, and 51% of cases were classified as having a low education level. Unemployment was found in 34% of cases. The final decision of the forensic committee was full responsibility in 46% of cases and partial responsibility in 11% of cases, with 33% considered non-responsible. A total of 58% of cases had had contact with psychiatric healthcare prior to the offence and in 9% of cases contact had been in the previous 12 weeks. A history of similar offences was found in 32% of cases. In all, 14% of the offences were murders, 8% were sexual crimes, and 31% were violent/simple crimes. Conclusions The ability of the legal system to detect cases was good, while the ability of the healthcare system to predict

  20. Designing clinical interviewing training courses for psychiatric residents: a practical primer for interviewing mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Shawn Christopher; Green, Ron; Barney, Christine; Cole, Stephen; Lapetina, Graciana; Baker, Bruce

    2007-06-01

    This article provides a no-nonsense primer for the design of effective clinical interviewing programs and the use of interviewing mentors. Principles for smoothly integrating educational tools such as direct observation, role-playing, the use of videotaping and facilic supervision are described. A sample core curriculum syllabus is provided including a comprehensive listing of core educational goals with regard to clinical interviewing skills.

  1. Childhood-Onset Bipolar Disorder: Evidence for Increased Familial Loading of Psychiatric Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Richard; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Strober, Michael; Gill, Mary Kay; Valeri, Sylvia; Chiappetta, Laurel; Ryan, Neal; Leonard, Henrietta; Hunt, Jeffrey; Iyengar, Satish; Keller, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether childhood-onset bipolar disorder (BP) is associated with an increased psychiatric family history compared with adolescent-onset BP. Method: Semistructured psychiatric interviews were conducted for 438 youth with BP spectrum disorders. To evaluate the effects of age at onset and psychiatric family history, the sample…

  2. Patient-provider communication over social media: perspectives of adolescents with psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Samuel H; Klingensmith, Katherine; McLaughlin, Paige; Qayyum, Zheala; van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I

    2016-02-01

    Social media is an increasingly dominant platform for communication, especially among adolescents. Statements from professional bodies and a growing body of empirical evidence support a role for social media in improving provider-patient interactions. In psychiatry, particular concerns exist about the suitability of this style of communication. Very limited data are available exploring how patients would like to incorporate social media into their communication with their psychiatric providers. We conducted a qualitative study with 20 adolescents attending the Yale Psychiatric Hospital Intensive Outpatient Programme. Interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Participants highlighted how social media could allow for constant access to a mental health provider, provide a less anxiety-provoking mode of communication, and allow for them to be monitored in a more on-going fashion. However, participants also identified many potential risks associated with these applications, including the potential for anxiety if a provider was not able to respond immediately, and a sense that online interactions would be less rich overall. Our findings suggest that adolescents are open to the idea of communicating with mental health providers over social media and are able to describe a number of instances where this could be of value. The risks participants described, as well as concerns raised by existing literature, indicate the need for further work and protocol development in order for social media to be a feasible tool for communication between providers and adolescents with psychiatric illness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Oral nanomedicine approaches for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-02-10

    Psychiatric illnesses are a leading cause of disability and morbidity globally. However, the preferred orally dosed pharmacological treatment options available for depression, anxiety and schizophrenia are often limited by factors such as low drug aqueous solubility, food effects, high hepatic first-pass metabolism effects and short half-lives. Furthermore, the discovery and development of more effective psychotropic agents has stalled in recent times, with the majority of new drugs reaching the market offering similar efficacy, but suffering from the same oral delivery concerns. As such, the application of nanomedicine formulation approaches to currently available drugs is a viable option for optimizing oral drug delivery and maximizing treatment efficacy. This review focuses on the various delivery challenges encountered by psychotropic drugs, and the ability of nanomedicine formulation strategies to overcome these. Specifically, we critically review proof of concept in vitro and in vivo studies of nanoemulsions/microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, dendrimers, polymeric micelles, nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers and nanosuspensions, and provide new insight into the various mechanisms for improved drug performance. The advantages and limitations of current oral nanomedicine approaches for psychotropic drugs are discussed, which will provide guidance for future research directions and assist in fostering the translation of such delivery systems to the clinical setting. Accordingly, emphasis has been placed on correlating the in vitro/in vivo performance of these nanomedicine approaches with their potential clinical outcomes and benefits for patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Do persons with severe mental illness who consume the psychiatric rehabilitation basket of services in Israel have better outcomes than those who do not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, David; Werbeloff, Nomi; Gelkopf, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Since the implementation of the legislation of the Rehabilitation of the Mentally Disabled in the Community Law a decade ago, an increasing number of people have been receiving the psychiatric rehabilitation 'basket of service', yet the impact of these services has barely been studied. The purpose of the present study is to examine whether people with severe mental illness in Israel who consume psychiatric rehabilitation services report better outcomes than people with severe mental illness who are eligible and have applied for psychiatric rehabilitation services but have not yet utilized them. 1,191 persons with severe mental illness (595 psychiatric rehabilitation service users and 596 nonusers) completed face-to-face interviews. Differences in quality of life, general satisfaction and psychiatric symptoms between psychiatric rehabilitation service users and non-users were examined using Analysis of Covariance controlling for the potential confounding effects of age and marital status. Adjusted comparisons of quality of life, general satisfaction and psychiatric symptoms revealed that psychiatric rehabilitation service users had better outcomes than non-users: they reported better quality of life and greater satisfaction alongside fewer psychiatric symptoms. The most striking difference between the groups was found in the domain of employment and income, with non-psychiatric rehabilitation service users scoring 0.9 effect sizes below psychiatric rehabilitation service users. The current study, based on a relatively large sample, provides support for the effectiveness of the psychiatric rehabilitation 'basket of services'. Future studies including clinicians ratings of more objective aspects of functioning may provide a broader picture of the association between psychiatric rehabilitation service utilization and outcome.

  5. Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Children with Autism: Interview Development and Rates of Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyfer, Ovsanna T.; Folstein, Susan E.; Bacalman, Susan; Davis, Naomi O.; Dinh, Elena; Morgan, Jubel; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2006-01-01

    The Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia was modified for use in children and adolescents with autism by developing additional screening questions and coding options that reflect the presentation of psychiatric disorders in autism spectrum disorders. The modified instrument, the Autism Comorbidity Interview-Present and…

  6. Translation Challenges and Strategies: The ASL Translation of a Computer-Based, Psychiatric Diagnostic Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Louise A.; Egnatovitch, Reginald; Eckhardt, Elizabeth; Goldstein, Marjorie; Goldstein, Richard A.; Steinberg, Annie G.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the translation goals, challenges, strategies, and solutions employed in the development of a computer-based, self administered, psychiatric diagnostic instrument, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for the Deaf (D-DIS-IV) in American Sign Language (ASL) with English captions. The article analyzes the impact of the…

  7. Psychiatric outcomes associated with chronic illness in adolescence: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Ann Marie; Deighton, Jessica; Stansfeld, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    Recent years have seen an increased focus on the high rates of psychiatric comorbidities in adults with chronic illness. This systematic review explored whether chronic illness in adolescents was similarly associated with poor psychiatric outcomes. The literature search identified 129 articles, only 5 of which were indicated to be at a low risk of methodological bias. Four of these articles found a strong relationship between asthma in adolescence and an increase in the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders, while the remaining article, which focused on diabetes mellitus, indicated similarly increased rates of psychiatric illness. Trends among the remaining studies suggested that many illnesses were not associated with poor adolescent mental health. Please note that chronic conditions with a neurological aetiology were excluded from the main review due to indications of qualitative differences in comorbidities. Findings highlight that the well-being of adolescents with chronic illness warrants a specific research focus. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Views of practitioners of alternative medicine toward psychiatric illness and psychiatric care: a study from Solapur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holikatti, Prabhakar C; Kar, Nilamadhab

    2015-01-01

    It is common knowledge that patients seek treatment for psychiatric illnesses from various sources including the alternative medicine. Views and attitudes of clinicians often influence the provision of appropriate mental health care for these patients. In this context, it was intended to study the views of the practitioners of alternative medicine toward psychiatric disorders, patients and interventions. The study was conducted as a questionnaire-based survey among a sample of practitioners of alternative medicine specifically Ayurveda and Homeopathy, who were practicing in Solapur and adjoining areas of Maharashtra and Karnataka states in India. A semi-structured Attitudinal Inventory for Psychiatry questionnaire was used. Demographic and professional data were collected. Out of 62 practitioners approached, 50 responded (80.6%). There were no significant differences in the views of practitioners toward psychiatry and psychiatrists based on respondents' gender, place of residence, location of practice, type of alternative medicine, exposure to psychiatric patients, or if they knew someone with psychiatric illness. Attitudes were generally positive, but variable. Among negative observations were that approximately 60% of respondents felt that a patient can be disadvantaged by being given a psychiatric label and 58% believed that emotions are difficult to handle. A considerable proportion (40%) of the respondents felt doctors other than psychiatrists were unable to identify psychiatric disorders. This study's findings suggest that practitioners of alternative medicine have mixed views about mental illness, patients and treatment. Some of their negative views and perceived inability to identify psychiatric disorders may be addressed through further training, information sharing and collaborative work.

  9. A Brazilian version of the "Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes" (ChIPS A versão brasileira do "Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes" (ChIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella G. S. de Souza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: The advance of research in child and adolescent psychiatry in Brazil heavily depends on the existence of instruments for the investigation of psychiatric syndromes adapted to Brazilian Portuguese. METHODS: This article describes a careful process of translation of the Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes for the purpose of use in research in Brazil. The Children's Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes has a version for parents (P-ChIPs and a version for children (ChIPS. In this article, the sections of P-ChIPS referring to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional-defiant disorder, conduct disorder, mania/hypomania, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and psychotic disorders were translated to Brazilian Portuguese. The sections of the ChIPS referring to substance use disorders, social anxiety disorder, specific phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disoder, separation anxiety disorder, post-traumatic disorders and depression/dysthimia were also adapted. Each section was translated by two independent translators and later discussed in a committee composed of experts in the field of Psychiatry and a professional of the field of linguistics. RESULT: A final version containing an interview for the main psychiatric syndromes was defined. CONCLUSION: The translated P-ChIPS is a helpful instrument in children and adolescent clinical evaluation.OBJETIVO: O avanço em pesquisa em psiquiatria da infância e adolescência no Brasil depende da existência de instrumentos para a investigação de síndromes psiquiátricas adaptadas à Língua Portuguesa. Este artigo descreve um cuidadoso processo de tradução do Children´s Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes para o uso em pesquisa no Brasil. MÉTODOS: O Children´s Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes tem uma versão para pais (P-ChIPs e uma versão para as crianças (ChIPs. Nesse artigo, as seções do P-ChIPs referentes ao transtorno do déficit de aten

  10. Concerns about career stigma by military parents of children with psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Matheson, Grace; Gaither, George A; Logan, Nate

    2008-02-01

    Stigma is known to have deleterious effects on individuals with psychiatric disorders as well as their family members. In this study, we examined stigma with regard to career concerns among active duty members of the Air Force with children who have psychiatric disorders. Albeit a weak relationship, a bivariate correlation confirmed a significant relationship between the child's mental health utilization (i.e., severity of illness) and participants concerns about the potential effects on their military (r = 0.423, p careers. These findings indicate that among military members with children who have psychiatric disorders, illness severity significantly relates to concerns about the impact of stigma on careers, particularly military careers.

  11. Racial Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes after Psychiatric Hospital Discharge among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M.; Newhill, Christina E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial disparities in mental health outcomes have been widely documented in noninstitutionalized community psychiatric samples, but few studies have specifically examined the effects of race among individuals with the most severe mental illnesses. A sample of 925 individuals hospitalized for severe mental illness was followed for a year after…

  12. Women and children exposed to domestic violence: themes in maternal interviews about their children's psychiatric diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Joan A

    2010-02-01

    Twelve mothers who had experienced domestic violence and whose children had received psychiatric diagnoses before school age were interviewed. An attachment based tool, the Reaction to Diagnosis Interview, was employed as it accesses maternal representational content. Using psychodynamic and attachment based models as a theoretical framework, content analysis was performed and four thematic categories emerged from the data: intense negative emotionality and suffering; diminished cognitive coping and dysregulation; preoccupation with trauma related material; and constricted causal attributions. Thematic categories as well as inter-relationships among themes are described and discussed in terms of current literature.

  13. Frequency and correlates of comorbid psychiatric illness in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Demographic, personal, psychiatric and substance-use history, in addition to mental state examination on admission, were collected from the case notes. Results. The largest group of patients (n=56, 40%) had not been abstinent from heroin use since drug debut, and most had been arrested for drug-related activities ...

  14. Richard von Krafft-Ebing's views on the etiology of major psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, E J; Kendler, K S

    2013-07-01

    While best known in the anglophonic world for his work on sexual deviations and his advocacy for degeneration theory, Richard Krafft-Ebing (RKE) (1840-1902) was a major figure in late-19th century European psychiatry and author of the most widely read German psychiatric textbook of that era. With the goal of (re-)introducing his work to an anglophonic audience, we review and provide an historical context for RKE's etiologic theory of major psychiatric illness. RKE saw psychiatric disorders as multifactorial, arising from two sets of etiologic factors: predisposing and exciting. Exciting causes were either psychological or physical, while predisposing causes were either general (e.g. sex, occupation, age) or individual-specific. Three major individual-specific risk factors were of particular importance: heredity, personality and education/rearing. Hereditary factors were typically the most important but were usually non-specific in their effect with the forms of psychiatric illness often differing in close relatives. He emphasized the importance of the 'neuropathic personality,' which rendered affected individuals sensitive to the pathogenic effects of various exciting influences. Poor rearing could also substantially increase risk for major mental illness. RKE saw the influences of hereditary and rearing factors on psychiatric illness as often mediated through a neuropathic personality. While RKE believed in degeneration theory and emphasized the potential etiologic importance of masturbation in psychiatric illness, his clinical writings were otherwise characterized by a broad-minded and sensible approach that lacked the narrowness of the strongly brain-based or psychoanalytic psychiatric schools which were very influential during and shortly after his life.

  15. Psychiatric morbidities among mentally ill wives of Nepalese men working abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhana Ratna Shakya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Husband working abroad may have not only favorable outcomes for wives and other family members but also adverse consequences, including psychological problems. Present study intended to look into psychiatric morbidity profiles of the Nepalese female psychiatric patients and the stressors related with their husband working abroad. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based descriptive study with convenient sampling method. Hundred consecutive female psychiatric patients, with the particular stressor, coming into the contact of the investigating team were enrolled within the study period of 12 months. The psychiatric morbidities/diagnoses were sorted out according to the International classification of disease and infirmity, 10 th edition (ICD-10 criteria. Results: Average age of the enrolled cases was 29 years. Nearly half of the women were illiterate or barely literate. Some other stressors, besides the one of husband working abroad were found to precipitate the illness in about 60%, main being relational and health problems. Common presenting complaints were mood, anxiety, and physical symptoms. Almost 30% of the subjects had some mental illness in their past too and similar proportion had in their blood relatives. About one-third admitted to use substances, mainly alcohol and cigarettes. The common psychiatric diagnoses were mood, anxiety, neurotic, and stress-related disorders. Nearly 10% had presented for suicide attempt. Conclusions: The status of husband working abroad may have adverse consequences in mental health of women. Mood affect, anxiety, and stress-related disorders are common psychiatric illness among them.

  16. Psychiatric morbidities among mentally ill wives of Nepalese men working abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Dhana Ratna

    2014-01-01

    Husband working abroad may have not only favorable outcomes for wives and other family members but also adverse consequences, including psychological problems. Present study intended to look into psychiatric morbidity profiles of the Nepalese female psychiatric patients and the stressors related with their husband working abroad. This is a hospital-based descriptive study with convenient sampling method. Hundred consecutive female psychiatric patients, with the particular stressor, coming into the contact of the investigating team were enrolled within the study period of 12 months. The psychiatric morbidities/diagnoses were sorted out according to the International classification of disease and infirmity, 10(th) edition (ICD-10) criteria. Average age of the enrolled cases was 29 years. Nearly half of the women were illiterate or barely literate. Some other stressors, besides the one of husband working abroad were found to precipitate the illness in about 60%, main being relational and health problems. Common presenting complaints were mood, anxiety, and physical symptoms. Almost 30% of the subjects had some mental illness in their past too and similar proportion had in their blood relatives. About one-third admitted to use substances, mainly alcohol and cigarettes. The common psychiatric diagnoses were mood, anxiety, neurotic, and stress-related disorders. Nearly 10% had presented for suicide attempt. The status of husband working abroad may have adverse consequences in mental health of women. Mood affect, anxiety, and stress-related disorders are common psychiatric illness among them.

  17. Transplant in a patient with comorbid psychiatric illness: an ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyum, Eric N; Brown, Douglas; Zihni, Ahmed M; Keune, Jason D; Hong, Barry A; Kodner, Ira J; Ray, Shuddhadeb

    2014-11-01

    This article addresses a difficult ethical dilemma that transplant surgeons may potentially encounter: whether a patient with a psychiatric illness is a good candidate for a liver transplant. This case study illustrates the challenges involved when considering the ethical principles of patient self-determination, distributive justice of scarce medical resources, "social worth," and protection of vulnerable patient populations. Are patients with psychiatric illness able to provide consent for transplantation? Is it possible to avoid misallocating valuable donor organs and, at the same time, fairly allocate these resources? This article seeks to answer these questions and provide insight into this ethical dilemma.

  18. Prevalence of substance use and association with psychiatric illness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A lifetime prevalence rate of 48.4% use of substances was found. The prevalence rate of current use of alcohol was 36.3%; cannabis 28.3%; cigarette 14.5%; Cocaine 0.8%; snuff/fumes 2.4%; Pain killers and kola nuts 1.6%. About 51.7% of the subjects used two or more substances. Substance use preceded first psychiatric ...

  19. Assessing the diagnostic validity of a structured psychiatric interview in a first-admission hospital sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, Julie; Revsbech, Rasmus; Sæbye, Ditte

    2012-01-01

    The use of structured psychiatric interviews performed by non-clinicians is frequent for research purposes and is becoming increasingly common in clini-cal practice. The validity of such interviews has rarely been evaluated empirically. In this study of a sample of 100 diagnostically heterogeneous......, first-admitted inpatients, the results of an assessment with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), yielding a DSM-IV diagnosis and performed by a trained non-clinician, were compared with a consensus lifetime best diagnostic estimate (DSM-IV) by two experienced research clinicians, based...... performed by non-clinicians are not recommendable for clinical work and should only be used in research with certain precautions. It is suggested that a revival of systematic theoretical and practical training in psychopathology is an obvious way forward in order to improve the validity and therapeutic...

  20. Differences between Western and African models of psychiatric illness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    causation is ascribed to mental illness even if, as often happens, a dual ... disorder. She presented with classic manic features and responded well to treatment. At the time of assessment by the TH, the patient was not psychotic and her mood was only marginally .... concerned with wealth, was, 'Why are you so concerned.

  1. Psychiatric aspec ts of chronic physical illness in adolescence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-05-18

    May 18, 2008 ... The onset of adolescence coincides with an increase in risk-taking behaviours, antisocial behaviours, treatment non-adherence and a rise in the prevalence of mood, substance, eating and personality disorders. The onset of chronic illnesses with an unpredictable course in adolescence appears to herald ...

  2. Identifying the mechanisms for workplace burden of psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Souvik; Chatterji, Pinka; Lahiri, Kajal

    2014-02-01

    Although previous research indicates that mental disorders detract from labor market outcomes, little is known about which psychiatric symptoms are most important. The objective of this study was to identify the mechanisms, or most important symptoms, through which psychiatric disorders affect labor market outcomes. We focus on major depressive episode, panic attack, social phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder. Our approach builds on prior work in that we consider the effects of symptoms both among individuals meeting and among individuals not meeting the diagnostic criteria for mental disorders. Data were obtained from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication and the National Latino and Asian American Study. We used a structural equation model with latent indices for mental disorders, where the indices are generated from the model using multiple indicators (symptoms) and multiple causes of the disorders. The outcomes were current employment/labor force participation, weeks worked in last year, and number of work absences in the last month among employed individuals. We found that for major depressive episode, symptoms of insomnia/hypersomnia, indecisiveness, severe emotional distress, and fatigue are crucial for labor market outcomes. In the case of generalized anxiety disorder, the length of the episode, symptoms relating to difficulty controlling worry, and symptoms of worry/anxiety/nervousness causing significant emotional distress were most detrimental for work outcomes. Social phobia and panic attack were not associated with labor market outcomes. Our findings suggest that interventions targeting these particular symptoms may be most helpful in improving work functioning.

  3. What helps or undermines adolescents' anticipated capacity to cope with mental illness stigma following psychiatric hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tally

    2015-05-01

    Better understanding of the individual and environmental factors that promote adolescents' use of more or less adaptive coping strategies with mental illness stigma would inform interventions designed to bolster youth resilience. This cross-sectional study draws on data from research on adolescents' well-being after discharge from a first psychiatric hospitalization to explore the relationships between anticipated coping in reaction to a hypothetical social stigma scenario, and various factors conceptualized as 'coping resource' and 'coping vulnerability' factors. Focusing on coping strategies also identified in the companion article, we hypothesize that primary and secondary control engagement coping would relate to more coping resource and less coping vulnerability factors, and the opposite would be true for disengagement, aggression/confrontation and efforts to disconfirm stereotypes. Data were elicited from interviews with 102 adolescents within 7 days of discharge. Hypothesized coping resource factors included social resources, optimistic illness perceptions, better hospital experiences and higher self-esteem. Vulnerability factors included more previous stigma experiences, desire for concealment of treatment, more contingent self-worth, higher symptom levels and higher anticipated stress. Multivariate ordinary least squares (OLS) regression was used to analyze associations between coping strategy endorsement and correlates. Although some coping correlates 'behaved' contrary to expectations, for the most part, our hypotheses were confirmed. As expected, youth anticipating reacting to the stigmatizing situation with greater disengagement, aggression/confrontation or efforts to disconfirm stenotypes rated significantly lower on 'coping resources' such as self-esteem and higher on vulnerability factors such as symptom severity. The opposite was true for youth who anticipated exercising more primary and secondary control engagement coping. This study begins to

  4. Parenting and Psychiatric Rehabilitation : Can Parents With Severe Mental Illness Benefit From a New Approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ende, Peter C.; van Busschbach, Jooske T.; Nicholson, Joanne; Korevaar, Eliza L.; van Weeghel, Jaap

    Objective: The aim of this pilot implementation study was to explore the initial experiences with and impact of Parenting with Success and Satisfaction (PARSS), a psychiatric rehabilitation and recovery-based, guided self-help intervention, for parents with severe mental illnesses. Methods: Changes

  5. Work and Psychiatric Illness in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Implications for Career Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Annie; Miller, Judi

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the influence of Maori culture upon psychiatric service provision in Aotearoa/New Zealand and the implications of this for career counselling of people with experience of mental illness in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The research explored the experiences of a group of women in Aotearoa/New Zealand who have been diagnosed with…

  6. New Research into General Psychiatric Services for Adults with Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There are a variety of models for the mental health care of adults with comorbid intellectual disability (ID) and mental illness. There has been a long-running debate as to whether this should be provided by general psychiatric or specialised ID services. A previous review concluded that there was no clear evidence to support either…

  7. Motivation for Psychiatric Treatment in Outpatients with Severe Mental Illness : Different Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Jochems (Eline)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe main aim of the current thesis was to empirically test and compare three current theoretical models of motivation for treatment in the context of outpatient psychiatric care for patients with severe mental illness (SMI). In a literature review (Chapter 2), we argued that

  8. Categorizing "frequent visitors" in the psychiatric emergency room: a semistructured interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Nurses can become demoralized and hostile toward frequent visitors in psychiatric emergency rooms because of the number of visits. The aim of this study was to develop more knowledge about the ways in which nurses categorize frequent visitors. Eleven nurses were interviewed, and their categorizing...... through the emergency room and/or there was poor rapport with the nurses....... practices were examined from a social constructionist perspective. The results showed that the nurses did not categorize frequent visitors as particularly unlikeable or difficult to treat. Like other visitors, they could be categorized as difficult if they obstructed a smooth flow of successful referrals...

  9. The identification of psychiatric illness by primary care physicians: the effect of patient gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, P D; Burns, B J; Nycz, G R

    1990-01-01

    This study tested several hypotheses about why women are more likely than men to have psychiatric disorders noted by their primary care physicians. Patients were screened for mental disorders using the General Health Questionnaire. A stratified sample was assessed using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. Information on utilization and identification of mental health problems was abstracted from the medical records. The study was conducted at a multispecialty group practice in a semirural area of Wisconsin. Study participants consisted of a stratified probability sample of 247 patients seeking primary care. Patients with a psychiatric illness who were relatively frequent users of the clinic were most likely to be identified by a physician as having a mental health problem. When psychiatric illness and utilization rates were statistically controlled, men and women had comparable identification rates.

  10. Combined effects of physical illness and comorbid psychiatric disorder on risk of suicide in a national population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ping; Hawton, Keith; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Webb, Roger

    2014-06-01

    People with physical illness often have psychiatric disorder and this comorbidity may have a specific influence on their risk of suicide. To examine how physical illness and psychiatric comorbidity interact to influence risk of suicide, with particular focus on relative timing of onset of the two types of illness. Based on the national population of Denmark, individual-level data were retrieved from five national registers on 27 262 suicide cases and 468 007 gender- and birth-date matched living controls. Data were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Both suicides and controls with physical illness more often had comorbid psychiatric disorder than their physically healthy counterparts. Although both physical and psychiatric illnesses constituted significant risk factors for suicide, their relative timing of onset in individuals with comorbidity significantly differentiated the associated risk of suicide. While suicide risk was highly elevated when onsets of both physical and psychiatric illness occurred close in time to each other, regardless which came first, psychiatric comorbidity developed some time after onset of physical illness exacerbated the risk of suicide substantially. Suicide risk in physically ill people varies substantially by presence of psychiatric comorbidity, particularly the relative timing of onset of the two types of illness. Closer collaboration between general and mental health services should be an essential component of suicide prevention strategies. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  11. The neuropsychology of self-reflection in psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippi, Carissa L; Koenigs, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The development of robust neuropsychological measures of social and affective function-which link critical dimensions of mental health to their underlying neural circuitry-could be a key step in achieving a more pathophysiologically-based approach to psychiatric medicine. In this article, we summarize research indicating that self-reflection (the inward attention to personal thoughts, memories, feelings, and actions) may be a useful model for developing such a paradigm, as there is evidence that self-reflection is (1) measurable with self-report scales and performance-based tests, (2) linked to the activity of a specific neural circuit, and (3) dimensionally related to mental health and various forms of psychopathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ethical considerations in deep brain stimulation for psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ryan A; Halpern, Casey H; Baltuch, Gordon H; O'Reardon, John P; Caplan, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an efficacious surgical treatment for many conditions, including obsessive-compulsive disorder and treatment-resistant depression. DBS provides a unique opportunity to not only ameliorate disease but also to study mood, cognition, and behavioral effects in the brain. However, there are many ethical questions that must be fully addressed in designing clinical research trials. It is crucial to maintain sound ethical boundaries in this new era so as to permit the proper testing of the potential therapeutic role DBS may play in ameliorating these devastating and frequently treatment-refractory psychiatric disorders. In this review, we focus on the selection of patients for study, informed consent, clinical trial design, DBS in the pediatric population, concerns about intentionally or inadvertently altering an individual's personal identity, potential use of DBS for brain enhancement, direct modification of behavior through neuromodulation, and resource allocation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Asymmetry of /sup 3/H- imipramine binding may predict psychiatric illness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demeter, E.; Tekes, K.; Majorossy, K.; Palkovits, M.; Soos, M.; Magyar, K.; Somogyl, E.

    1989-01-01

    The B/sub max/ and Kd values for /sup 3/H-imipramine binding were measured in post-mortem human brains from drug-free selected psychiatric subject homicide victims and normal controls. The two groups were comparable in age and gender. The number of imipramine binding sites in the frontal cortices of psychiatric subjects had significantly higher B/sub max/ values in the left hemisphere than in the right hemisphere. Inversely, the number of imipramine binding sites in the frontal cortices of normal controls were significantly higher in the right brain than in the left brain. It was postulated that the inhibiting effect of central serotonin has weakened in psychiatric cases, therefore the changes of presynaptic serotonergic activity might be associated with psychiatric illness in the left hemisphere of human brain.

  14. Psychiatric illnesses in inflammatory bowel diseases - psychiatric comorbidity and biological underpinnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Jarosław; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Dudek, Dominika

    2016-12-23

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a group of chronic medical conditions comprising Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis that involves increased frequency of mental disorders. The most common psychiatric disorders in inflammatory bowel disease are depression and anxiety, however, some epidemiologic and biological evidence suggest that other disorders like bipolar disorder occur more often. Biological mechanisms concerning both inflammatory bowel disease and depression or anxiety explain susceptibility to developing mental disorders in inflammatory bowel disease. Interactions of brain gut-axis, immunological disturbances, oxidative stress and vagus nerve dysfunction play a role in pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease and mental disorders as well. Significance of these factors was covered in this paper. Psychiatric comorbidity in IBD may affect course of intestinal disease. It can increase requency and severity of relapses and hinder the treatment so knowledge about relationship between IBD and mental health appears to be vital for proper management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. Competency of psychiatric residents in the treatment of people with severe mental illness before and after a community psychiatry rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Melinda; Romero-Gonzalez, Mauricio; Gonzalez, Gerardo; Klee, Anne; Kirwin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    psychiatric rehabilitation is an evidence-based service with the goal of recovery for people with severe mental illness. Psychiatric residents should understand the services and learn the principles of psychiatric rehabilitation. This study assessed whether a 3-month rotation in a psychiatric rehabilitation center changes the competency level of second-year psychiatric residents in evidence-based treatment of severe mental illness. the study is a prospective, case-control comparison using the validated Competency Assessment Instrument (CAI), which measures 15 provider competencies critical to recovery, rehabilitation, and empowerment for people with severe mental illness, providing a score for each competency. Participants were second-year psychiatric residents attending a 3-month rotation at the Community Reintegration Program, a psychiatric rehabilitation day program. The authors administered the CAI at the beginning and the end of the residents' 3-month rotation in order to assess change in their competency in psychiatric rehabilitation. The authors also administered the CAI to a comparison group of second-year psychiatric residents who did not rotate through the Community Reintegration Program, and therefore had no formal training in psychiatric rehabilitation. a 3-month rotation in psychiatric rehabilitation significantly improved residents' competency in the domains of goal functioning, client preferences, holistic approach, skills, and team value relative to nonrotating residents. a brief community psychiatry rotation in the second year of residency likely improves some skills in the treatment of people with severe mental illness. Future research should evaluate year-long electives and public psychiatry fellowships.

  16. Validity of Chinese Version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-3.0 in Psychiatric Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Composite International Diagnostic Interview-3.0 (CIDI-3.0 is a fully structured lay-administered diagnostic interview for the assessment of mental disorders according to ICD-10 and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV criteria. The aim of the study was to investigate the concurrent validity of the Chinese CIDI in diagnosing mental disorders in psychiatric settings. Methods: We recruited 208 participants, of whom 148 were patients from two psychiatric hospitals and 60 healthy people from communities. These participants were administered with CIDI by six trained lay interviewers and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I, gold standard by two psychiatrists. Agreement between CIDI and SCID-I was assessed with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. Individual-level CIDI-SCID diagnostic concordance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve and Cohen′s K. Results: Substantial to excellent CIDI to SCID concordance was found for any substance use disorder (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.926, any anxiety disorder (AUC = 0.807 and any mood disorder (AUC = 0.806. The concordance between the CIDI and the SCID for psychotic and eating disorders is moderate. However, for individual mental disorders, the CIDI-SCID concordance for bipolar disorders (AUC = 0.55 and anorexia nervosa (AUC = 0.50 was insufficient. Conclusions: Overall, the Chinese version of CIDI-3.0 has acceptable validity in diagnosing the substance use disorder, anxiety disorder and mood disorder among Chinese adult population. However, we should be cautious when using it for bipolar disorders and anorexia nervosa.

  17. Psychiatric Illness and Behavioural Problems in Adults with Learning Disability and Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoumitro Deb

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively collected data on the rate and type of psychiatric illness and behavioural problems on 143 adults with learning disability and epilepsy. 55% behavioural problems. 19% verbal aggression and temper tantrums, and 13% injurious behaviour. The overall rates of behavioural problems and different types of behaviours found in the current study cohort are similar to what was found before in learning disabled adults in general, as well as in epileptic and non-epileptic learning disabled adults. Psychiatric diagnosis was made in 12.6% combined diagnosis of schizophrenia, delusional disorder and schizo-affective disorder was most common (5% diagnosis of depressive episode (3% bipolar affective disorder.

  18. The effect of psychiatric illness and labour market status on suicide; at healthy worker effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben

    2005-01-01

    admitted to a psychiatric hospital within the past year are at increased suicide risk. Patients who are unemployed, social benefits recipients, disability pensioners, or otherwise marginalised on the labour market have a suicide risk of 0.60 (95% CI: 0.46 to 0.78), 0.41 (0.23 to 0.74), 0.70 (0.45 to 1......STUDY OBJECTIVE: To describe the association between labour market status and death by suicide with focus on admission with a psychiatric disorder. DESIGN: Nested case-control study. Data from routine registers. SETTING: Entire Danish population. PARTICIPANTS: 9011 people aged 25-60 years who...... structural model is applied. CONCLUSIONS: Although the results show an increased suicide mortality associated with unemployment and labour market marginalisation in the general population, the results suggest little or an inverse association between unemployment and suicide in people with psychiatric illness...

  19. Relation between psychiatric disorder and abnormal illness behaviour in patients undergoing operations for cervical discectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, R.; Creed, F; Hughes, D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To test the hypothesis that depression in patients being considered for cervical disc surgery is associated with severe organic pathology. Secondly, to test whether depression and abnormal illness attitudes recorded preoperatively would predict poorer recovery.
METHODS—Seventy four patients with pain and disability from cervical arthrosis were examined during investigations before potential cervical surgery. The prevalence of psychiatric disorder was assessed using...

  20. Assessment of explanatory models of mental illness: effects of patient and interviewer characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghane, S.; Kolk, A.M.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Explanatory models (EMs) refer to patients’ causal attributions of illness and have been shown to affect treatment preference and outcome. Reliable and valid assessment of EMs may be hindered by interviewer and respondent disparities on certain demographic characteristics, such as

  1. Pedagogical Mediation as an Educational Strategy for Students with Mental Illness in alphabetization level offered in the National Psychiatric Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Hidalgo-Montoya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the work of teachers in the Open Education Program of the National Psychiatric Hospital (Costa Rica and identifies the learning barriers of the student population. It aims at promoting educational delivery strategies adapted to the needs of the community attending the literacy level. This is a qualitative study with a participatory action research design. Information was collected through interviews to teachers, observation, and pedagogical mediation with the teachers of the program. The results indicate that the pedagogical mediation methodology contributed to improve the access of students to the curriculum. Among the conclusions, it is recommended to implement significant curriculum modifications focused on the student population and a classroom methodology adjusted to the different learning needs. Finally, it is recommended to have an interdisciplinary team to support the teaching staff working with students with mental illness.

  2. Validation of the Mental Illness Sexual Stigma Questionnaire (MISS-Q in a sample of Brazilian adults in psychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Wainberg

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective We evaluated the psychometric properties of a new instrument “Mental Illness Sexual Stigma Questionnaire” (MISS-Q. Methods We interviewed 641 sexually active adults (ages 18-80 attending public outpatient psychiatric clinics in Rio de Janeiro about their stigma experiences. Results Nine factors were extracted through exploratory factor analysis (EFA and labeled: ‘individual discrimination by others’; ‘staff willingness to talk about sexuality’; ‘staff and family prohibitions’; ‘sexual devaluation of self’; ‘perceived attractiveness’; ‘mental illness concealment’; ‘perceived sexual role competence’; ‘withdrawal’; and ‘locus of social-sexual control’. ‘Withdrawal’ and ‘locus of social-sexual control’ showed poor psychometric properties and were excluded from further analysis. The remaining seven factors had high factorial loadings (.39 to .86, varying from sufficient to optimal reliability (Ordinal α ranged from .57 to .88, and good convergent and discriminant validity. Conclusions The resulting MISS-Q is the first instrument assessing mental illness sexual stigma with demonstrated psychometric properties. It may prove useful in reducing stigma, protecting sexual health, and promoting recovery.

  3. Emotional reactions to involuntary psychiatric hospitalization and stigma-related stress among people with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Müller, Mario; Lay, Barbara; Corrigan, Patrick W; Zahn, Roland; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf

    2014-02-01

    Compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient treatment can be experienced as disempowering and stigmatizing by people with serious mental illness. However, quantitative studies of stigma-related emotional and cognitive reactions to involuntary hospitalization and their impact on people with mental illness are scarce. Among 186 individuals with serious mental illness and a history of recent involuntary hospitalization, shame and self-contempt as emotional reactions to involuntary hospitalization, the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor, self-stigma, empowerment as well as quality of life and self-esteem were assessed by self-report. Psychiatric symptoms were rated by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. In multiple linear regressions, more self-stigma was predicted independently by higher levels of shame, self-contempt and stigma stress. A greater sense of empowerment was related to lower levels of stigma stress and self-contempt. These findings remained significant after controlling for psychiatric symptoms, diagnosis, age, gender and the number of lifetime involuntary hospitalizations. Increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment in turn predicted poorer quality of life and reduced self-esteem. The negative effect of emotional reactions and stigma stress on quality of life and self-esteem was largely mediated by increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment. Shame and self-contempt as reactions to involuntary hospitalization as well as stigma stress may lead to self-stigma, reduced empowerment and poor quality of life. Emotional and cognitive reactions to coercion may determine its impact more than the quantity of coercive experiences. Interventions to reduce the negative effects of compulsory admissions should address emotional reactions and stigma as a stressor.

  4. Burnout and psychiatric morbidity among medical students entering clinical training: a three year prospective questionnaire and interview-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runeson Bo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental distress among medical students is often reported. Burnout has not been studied frequently and studies using interviewer-rated diagnoses as outcomes are rarely employed. The objective of this prospective study of medical students was to examine clinically significant psychiatric morbidity and burnout at 3rd year of medical school, considering personality and study conditions measured at 1st year. Methods Questionnaires were sent to 127 first year medical students who were then followed-up at 3rd year of medical school. Eighty-one of 3rd year respondents participated in a diagnostic interview. Personality (HP5-i and Performance-based self-esteem (PBSE-scale were assessed at first year, Study conditions (HESI, Burnout (OLBI, Depression (MDI at 1st and 3rd years. Diagnostic interviews (MINI were used at 3rd year to assess psychiatric morbidity. High and low burnout at 3rd year was defined by cluster analysis. Logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of high burnout and psychiatric morbidity, controlling for gender. Results 98 (77% responded on both occasions, 80 (63% of these were interviewed. High burnout was predicted by Impulsivity trait, Depressive symptoms at 1st year and Financial concerns at 1st year. When controlling for 3rd year study conditions, Impulsivity and concurrent Workload remained. Of the interviewed sample 21 (27% had a psychiatric diagnosis, 6 of whom had sought help. Unadjusted analyses showed that psychiatric morbidity was predicted by high Performance-based self-esteem, Disengagement and Depression at 1st year, only the later remained significant in the adjusted analysis. Conclusion Psychiatric morbidity is common in medical students but few seek help. Burnout has individual as well as environmental explanations and to avoid it, organisational as well as individual interventions may be needed. Early signs of depressive symptoms in medical students may be important to address. Students

  5. Burnout and psychiatric morbidity among medical students entering clinical training: a three year prospective questionnaire and interview-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Marie E; Runeson, Bo

    2007-04-12

    Mental distress among medical students is often reported. Burnout has not been studied frequently and studies using interviewer-rated diagnoses as outcomes are rarely employed. The objective of this prospective study of medical students was to examine clinically significant psychiatric morbidity and burnout at 3rd year of medical school, considering personality and study conditions measured at 1st year. Questionnaires were sent to 127 first year medical students who were then followed-up at 3rd year of medical school. Eighty-one of 3rd year respondents participated in a diagnostic interview. Personality (HP5-i) and Performance-based self-esteem (PBSE-scale) were assessed at first year, Study conditions (HESI), Burnout (OLBI), Depression (MDI) at 1st and 3rd years. Diagnostic interviews (MINI) were used at 3rd year to assess psychiatric morbidity. High and low burnout at 3rd year was defined by cluster analysis. Logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of high burnout and psychiatric morbidity, controlling for gender. 98 (77%) responded on both occasions, 80 (63%) of these were interviewed. High burnout was predicted by Impulsivity trait, Depressive symptoms at 1st year and Financial concerns at 1st year. When controlling for 3rd year study conditions, Impulsivity and concurrent Workload remained. Of the interviewed sample 21 (27%) had a psychiatric diagnosis, 6 of whom had sought help. Unadjusted analyses showed that psychiatric morbidity was predicted by high Performance-based self-esteem, Disengagement and Depression at 1st year, only the later remained significant in the adjusted analysis. Psychiatric morbidity is common in medical students but few seek help. Burnout has individual as well as environmental explanations and to avoid it, organisational as well as individual interventions may be needed. Early signs of depressive symptoms in medical students may be important to address. Students should be encouraged to seek help and adequate facilities

  6. Hostility during admission interview as a short-term predictor of aggression in acute psychiatric male inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, Alfonso; Kustermann, Stefano; Di Genio, Massimo; Siracusano, Alberto

    2003-12-01

    A critical step for improving the prediction of on-ward violence is the identification of variables that are not only consistently associated with an increased risk of aggression but also easily evaluated during the admission interview. The goal of this prospective study was to assess the predictive utility of hostility during admission interview. The sample consisted of 80 newly admitted male patients with heterogeneous DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses recruited from the psychiatric ward of an urban public hospital. Psychiatric symptoms at admission were assessed with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). Aggressive behavior during the first week of hospitalization was measured with the Modified Overt Aggression Scale. Data were collected between January and June 1998. In a multiple regression model, BPRS items hostility and tension-excitement emerged as significant predictors of verbal aggression, whereas thinking disturbance (high) and suspiciousness-uncooperativeness (low) emerged as significant predictors of aggression against objects. In contrast, when aggression was treated as a binary dependent variable in a logistic model, hostility during the admission interview had no utility in predicting on-ward aggressive behavior. This study confirms the importance of distinguishing between different types of aggression to improve the accuracy of predictions of violence. The findings suggest that the question whether hostility is a useful short-term predictor of aggression in psychiatric inpatients cannot be answered conclusively. The predictive utility of hostility was relatively high for predicting verbal aggression but was negligible for predicting other types of aggressive behavior.

  7. Attitudes of Brazilian Medical Students Towards Psychiatric Patients and Mental Illness: A Quantitative Study Before and After Completing the Psychiatric Clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha Neto, Helio Gomes; Rosenheck, Robert A; Stefanovics, Elina A; Cavalcanti, Maria Tavares

    2017-06-01

    The authors evaluated whether a psychiatric clerkship reduces stigmatized attitudes towards people with mental illness among medical students. A 56-item questionnaire was used to assess the attitudes of medical students towards patients with mental illness and their beliefs about its causes before and after their participation in their psychiatric clerkship at a major medical school in Rio de Janeiro. Exploratory factor analysis identified four factors, reflecting "social acceptance of people with mental illness," "normalizing roles for people with mental illness in society," "non-belief in supernatural causes for mental illness," and "belief in bio-psychosocial causes for mental illness." Analysis of variance was used to evaluate changes in these factors before and after the clerkship. One significant difference was identified with a higher score on the factor representing social acceptance after as compared to before the clerkship (p = 0.0074). No significant differences were observed on the other factors. Participation in a psychiatric clerkship was associated with greater social acceptance but not with improvement on other attitudinal factors. This may reflect ceiling effects in responses before the clerkship concerning supernatural and bio-psychosocial beliefs about causes of mental illness that left little room for change.

  8. Psychiatric illness in patients referred to a dermatology-psychiatry clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, P W; Higgins, E M; du Vivier, A W; Wessely, S

    1997-01-01

    There is a recognized psychiatric morbidity among those who attend dermatology clinics. We aimed to determine the pattern of psychological and social problems among patients referred to a liaison psychiatrist within a dermatology clinic. Notes from 149 patients were reviewed and more detailed assessments performed in a subgroup of 32 consecutive referrals. All but 5% merited a psychiatric diagnosis. Of these, depressive illness accounted for 44% and anxiety disorders, 35%. Less common general psychiatric disorders included social phobia, somatization disorder, alcohol dependence syndrome, obsessive-convulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, anorexia nervosa, and schizophrenia. Classical disorders such as dermatitis artefacta and delusional hypochondriasis were uncommon. Commonly, patients presented with longstanding psychological problems in the context of ongoing social difficulties rather than following discrete precipitants. Psychiatric intervention resulted in clinical improvement in most of those followed up. Of the dermatological categories 1) exacerbation of preexisting chronic skin disease; 2) symptoms out of proportion to the skin lesion; 3) dermatological nondisease; 4) scratching without physical signs, the commonest were dermatological nondisease and exacerbation of chronic skin disease. Anxiety was common in those from all dermatological categories. Patients with dermatological nondisease had the highest prevalence of depression. Skin patients with significant psychopathology may go untreated unless referred to a psychiatrist. The presence of dermatological nondisease or symptoms out of proportion to the skin disease should particularly alert the physician to the possibility of underlying psychological problems.

  9. Fatal foodborne Clostridium perfringens illness at a state psychiatric hospital--Louisiana, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    Clostridium perfringens, the third most common cause of foodborne illness in the United States (1), most often causes a self-limited, diarrheal disease lasting 12-24 hours. Fatalities are very rare, occurring in illness (2). On May 7, 2010, 42 residents and 12 staff members at a Louisiana state psychiatric hospital experienced vomiting, abdominal cramps, and diarrhea. Within 24 hours, three patients had died. The three fatalities occurred among patients aged 41-61 years who were receiving medications that had anti-intestinal motility side effects. For two of three decedents, the cause of death found on postmortem examination was necrotizing colitis. Investigation by the Louisiana Office of Public Health (OPH) and CDC found that eating chicken served at dinner on May 6 was associated with illness. The chicken was cooked approximately 24 hours before serving and not cooled in accordance with hospital guidelines. C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) was detected in 20 of 23 stool specimens from ill residents and staff members. Genetic testing of C. perfringens toxins isolated from chicken and stool specimens was carried out to determine which of the two strains responsible for C. perfringens foodborne illness was present. The specimens tested negative for the beta-toxin gene, excluding C. perfringens type C as the etiologic agent and implicating C. perfringens type A. This outbreak underscores the need for strict food preparation guidelines at psychiatric inpatient facilities and the potential risk for adverse outcomes among any patients with impaired intestinal motility caused by medications, disease, and extremes of age when exposed to C. perfringens enterotoxin.

  10. Physical morbidity in elderly psychiatric inpatients: prevalence and possible relations between the major mental disorders and physical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamis, D; Ball, C

    2000-03-01

    This study examines the prevalence of physical morbidity in elderly psychiatric inpatients and the possible relationships between major psychiatric disorders (organic mental disorders, schizophrenic and mood disorders) and physical illnesses. The clinical implications of such relationships are discussed. Data were obtained from two old age psychiatry wards over a six month period. Seventy-nine subjects were studied and information was obtained from their medical files. Demographic characteristics, psychiatric diagnosis, number of physical illnesses and number of body systems affected were collected. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the psychiatric groups on continuous outcome data and chi(2) test to compare psychiatric groups on categorical data. Seventy-five per cent of subjects had at least one physical illness. The number of medical illnesses was independent from the psychiatric disorder. Subjects with mood disorders, and especially depression, were more likely to suffer from hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular illnesses than subjects with schizophrenic or organic disorders. Subjects with organic disorders had the lowest prevalence of endocrine disease and diabetes. It was concluded the link between mood disorders (depression), cardiovascular diseases and hypertension could be of a 'cause/effect' type or are the results of a survivor effect. The high prevalence of physical morbidity has implications for training and continuing professional development of those in Old Age Psychiatry Services. It should also be taken into consideration when the location of services is being decided.

  11. Differences between youth with a single suicide attempt and repeaters regarding their and their parents history of psychiatric illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ida Skytte; Christiansen, Erik; Juul Larsen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine predictors of repeated suicide attempts in young people, focusing on psychiatric illness. A longitudinal population-based register study of all adolescents born in Denmark between 1984 and 2006 was conducted. Greater numbers of hospitalizations......, psychiatric diagnoses, and psychopharmacological medications prescribed to youth before and after the index attempt were risk factors for repeated suicide attempts. Parental diagnoses and drug prescriptions following a child's first suicide attempt moderated the risk of repeated attempts. Psychiatric illness...... is a strong predictor of repeated suicide attempts in young people, and those with co-morbid diagnoses are at increased risk of repeated suicide attempts. Treatment of psychiatric illness in the parents after their child's first suicide attempt is a potential protective factor....

  12. Faculty perceptions of accommodations, strategies, and psychiatric advance directives for university students with mental illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockelman, Karin F; Scheyett, Anna M

    2015-12-01

    Universities across the country struggle with the legal and ethical dilemmas of how to respond when a student shows symptoms of serious mental illness. This mixed-method study provides information on faculty knowledge of mental health problems in students, their use of available accommodations and strategies, and their willingness to accept psychiatric advance directives (PADs) as helpful interventions for managing student crises. Participants were 168 faculty members at a large, public, Southern university. A web-based survey was used to collect quantitative self-report data as well as qualitative data in the form of open-ended questions. Quantitative data are presented with descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The majority of faculty surveyed have an overall supportive stance and are willing to provide accommodations to students with a mental illness. The most common advantage faculty see in a PAD is support of student autonomy and choice, and the primary concern voiced about PADs is that students with mental illness will have poor judgment regarding the contents of the PADs they create. PADs may be effective recovery tools to help university students with mental illnesses manage crises and attain stability and academic success. For PADs to be effective, university faculty and administration will need to understand mental illnesses, the strategies students need to manage mental health crises, and how PADs can play a role in supporting students. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Impact of psychiatric and social characteristics on HIV sexual risk behavior in Puerto Rican women with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Emily Lenore Goldman; Loue, Sana; Sajatovic, Martha; Tisch, Daniel J

    2010-11-01

    Latinos in the United States have been identified as a high-risk group for depression, anxiety, and substance abuse. HIV/AIDS has disproportionately impacted Latinos. Review findings suggest that HIV-risk behaviors among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are influenced by a multitude of factors including psychiatric illness, cognitive-behavioral factors, substance use, childhood abuse, and social relationships. To examine the impact of psychiatric and social correlates of HIV sexual risk behavior in Puerto Rican women with SMI. Data collected longitudinally (from 2002 to 2005) in semi-structured interviews and from non-continuous participant observation was analyzed using a cross-sectional design. Bivariate associations between predictor variables and sexual risk behaviors were examined using binary and ordinal logistic regression. Linear regression was used to examine the association between significant predictor variables and the total number of risk behaviors the women engaged in during the 6 months prior to baseline. Just over one-third (35.9%) of the study population (N = 53) was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and GAF scores ranged from 30 to 80 with a median score of 60. Participants ranged in age from 18 to 50 years (M = 32.6 ± 8.7), three-fourths reported a history of either sexual or physical abuse or of both in childhood, and one-fourth had abused substances in their lifetimes. Bivariate analyses indicated that psychiatric and social factors were differentially associated with sexual risk behaviors. Multivariate linear regression models showed that suffering from increased severity of psychiatric symptoms and factors and living below the poverty line are predictive of engagement in a greater number of HIV sexual risk behaviors. Puerto Rican women with SMI are at high risk for HIV infection and are in need of targeted sexual risk reduction interventions that simultaneously address substance abuse prevention and treatment, childhood abuse, and the

  14. The dappled nature of causes of psychiatric illness: replacing the organic–functional/hardware–software dichotomy with empirically based pluralism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, KS

    2012-01-01

    Our tendency to see the world of psychiatric illness in dichotomous and opposing terms has three major sources: the philosophy of Descartes, the state of neuropathology in late nineteenth century Europe (when disorders were divided into those with and without demonstrable pathology and labeled, respectively, organic and functional), and the influential concept of computer functionalism wherein the computer is viewed as a model for the human mind–brain system (brain = hardware, mind = software). These mutually re-enforcing dichotomies, which have had a pernicious influence on our field, make a clear prediction about how ‘difference-makers’ (aka causal risk factors) for psychiatric disorders should be distributed in nature. In particular, are psychiatric disorders like our laptops, which when they dysfunction, can be cleanly divided into those with software versus hardware problems? I propose 11 categories of difference-makers for psychiatric illness from molecular genetics through culture and review their distribution in schizophrenia, major depression and alcohol dependence. In no case do these distributions resemble that predicted by the organic–functional/hardware–software dichotomy. Instead, the causes of psychiatric illness are dappled, distributed widely across multiple categories. We should abandon Cartesian and computer-functionalism-based dichotomies as scientifically inadequate and an impediment to our ability to integrate the diverse information about psychiatric illness our research has produced. Empirically based pluralism provides a rigorous but dappled view of the etiology of psychiatric illness. Critically, it is based not on how we wish the world to be but how the difference-makers for psychiatric illness are in fact distributed. PMID:22230881

  15. The dappled nature of causes of psychiatric illness: replacing the organic-functional/hardware-software dichotomy with empirically based pluralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S

    2012-04-01

    Our tendency to see the world of psychiatric illness in dichotomous and opposing terms has three major sources: the philosophy of Descartes, the state of neuropathology in late nineteenth century Europe (when disorders were divided into those with and without demonstrable pathology and labeled, respectively, organic and functional), and the influential concept of computer functionalism wherein the computer is viewed as a model for the human mind-brain system (brain=hardware, mind=software). These mutually re-enforcing dichotomies, which have had a pernicious influence on our field, make a clear prediction about how 'difference-makers' (aka causal risk factors) for psychiatric disorders should be distributed in nature. In particular, are psychiatric disorders like our laptops, which when they dysfunction, can be cleanly divided into those with software versus hardware problems? I propose 11 categories of difference-makers for psychiatric illness from molecular genetics through culture and review their distribution in schizophrenia, major depression and alcohol dependence. In no case do these distributions resemble that predicted by the organic-functional/hardware-software dichotomy. Instead, the causes of psychiatric illness are dappled, distributed widely across multiple categories. We should abandon Cartesian and computer-functionalism-based dichotomies as scientifically inadequate and an impediment to our ability to integrate the diverse information about psychiatric illness our research has produced. Empirically based pluralism provides a rigorous but dappled view of the etiology of psychiatric illness. Critically, it is based not on how we wish the world to be but how the difference-makers for psychiatric illness are in fact distributed.

  16. Simulated job interview skill training for people with psychiatric disability: feasibility and tolerability of virtual reality training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Morris D; Weinstein, Andrea

    2011-09-01

    The job interview is an important step toward successful employment and often a significant challenge for people with psychiatric disability. Vocational rehabilitation specialists can benefit from a systematic approach to training job interview skills. The investigators teamed up with a company that specializes in creating simulated job interview training to create software that provides a virtual reality experience with which learners can systematically improve their job interview skills, reduce their fears, and increase their confidence about going on job interviews. The development of this software is described and results are presented from a feasibility and tolerability trial with 10 participants with psychiatric disability referred from their vocational service programs. Results indicate that this representative sample had a strongly positive response to the prototype job interview simulation. They found it easy to use, enjoyed the experience, and thought it realistic and helpful. Almost all described the interview as anxiety provoking but that the anxiety lessened as they became more skilled. They saw the benefit of its special features such as ongoing feedback from a "coach in the corner" and from being able to review a transcript of the interview. They believed that they could learn the skills being taught through these methods. Participants were enthusiastic about wanting to use the final product when it becomes available. The advantages of virtual reality technology for training important skills for rehabilitation are discussed.

  17. An elective psychiatric course to reduce pharmacy students' social distance toward people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipaula, Bethany A; Qian, Jingjing; Mehdizadegan, Niki; Simoni-Wastila, Linda

    2011-05-10

    To determine whether an elective course on mental health could reduce pharmacy students' social distance toward people with severe mental illness. Course activities included assigned readings, class discussions, student presentations, review of video and other media for examples of social distance, presentations by patients with mental illness, and visits to hospitalized patients in a variety of psychiatric settings. The Social Distance Scale (SDS) was administered at the beginning and end of the semester to students enrolled in the elective and to a comparator group of students not enrolled in the course. Pharmacy students who did not complete the elective had significantly higher SDS scores than students who completed the elective (18.7 vs. 15.6, p < 0.001). Students enrolled in the course had lower precourse SDS scores, were more likely than their peers to have a personal association with mental illness, and had a decrease in precourse to postcourse scores. A course designed to reduce stigma towards the mentally ill can reduce pharmacy students' social distance.

  18. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Correspondence between Mental Health Clinician Report and Structured Parent Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnick, Nicole; Chlebowski, Colby; Baker-Ericzén, Mary; Dyson, Margaret; Garland, Ann; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Publicly funded mental health services are critical in caring for children with autism spectrum disorder. Accurate identification of psychiatric comorbidity is necessary for effective mental health treatment. Little is known about psychiatric diagnosis for this population in routine mental health care. This study (1) examined correspondence…

  19. ROLE OF MATERNAL CHILDHOOD TRAUMA ON PARENTING AMONG DEPRESSED MOTHERS OF PSYCHIATRICALLY ILL CHILDREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Maureen; Cyranowski, Jill M.; Cheng, Yu; Swartz, Holly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Independently, maternal depression and maternal history of childhood abuse confer risk for impaired parenting. These associations may be compounded when depressed mothers with histories of childhood abuse are faced with the challenge of parenting offspring who themselves struggle with mental health problems. This study examined the relationships among maternal history of childhood abuse, maternal depression, and parenting style in the context of parenting a psychiatrically ill child, with an emphasis on examining maternal emotional abuse and neglect. We hypothesized that maternal childhood emotional abuse would be associated with maladaptive parenting strategies (lower levels of maternal acceptance and higher levels of psychological control), independent of maternal depression severity and other psychosocial risk factors. Method Ninety-five mother-child dyads (children ages 7–18) were recruited from child mental health centers where children were receiving treatment for at least one internalizing disorder. Participating mothers met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. Mothers reported on their own childhood abuse histories and children reported on their mothers’ parenting. Results Regression analyses demonstrated that maternal childhood emotional abuse was associated with child reports of lower maternal acceptance and greater psychological control, controlling for maternal depression severity, and other psychosocial risk factors. Conclusions When treating psychiatrically ill children, it is important for a child’s clinician to consider mothers’ childhood abuse histories in addition to their history of depression. These mothers appear to have additional barriers to effective parenting. PMID:23649503

  20. Role of maternal childhood trauma on parenting among depressed mothers of psychiatrically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Maureen; Cyranowski, Jill M; Cheng, Yu; Swartz, Holly A

    2013-09-01

    Independently, maternal depression and maternal history of childhood abuse confer risk for impaired parenting. These associations may be compounded when depressed mothers with histories of childhood abuse are faced with the challenge of parenting offspring who themselves struggle with mental health problems. This study examined the relationships among maternal history of childhood abuse, maternal depression, and parenting style in the context of parenting a psychiatrically ill child, with an emphasis on examining maternal emotional abuse and neglect. We hypothesized that maternal childhood emotional abuse would be associated with maladaptive parenting strategies (lower levels of maternal acceptance and higher levels of psychological control), independent of maternal depression severity and other psychosocial risk factors. Ninety-five mother-child dyads (children ages 7-18) were recruited from child mental health centers where children were receiving treatment for at least one internalizing disorder. Participating mothers met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. Mothers reported on their own childhood abuse histories and children reported on their mothers' parenting. Regression analyses demonstrated that maternal childhood emotional abuse was associated with child reports of lower maternal acceptance and greater psychological control, controlling for maternal depression severity, and other psychosocial risk factors. When treating psychiatrically ill children, it is important for a child's clinician to consider mothers' childhood abuse histories in addition to their history of depression. These mothers appear to have additional barriers to effective parenting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Childhood- versus adolescent-onset antisocial youth with conduct disorder: psychiatric illness, neuropsychological and psychosocial function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki A Johnson

    Full Text Available The present study investigates whether youths with childhood-onset antisocial behavior have higher rates of psychiatric illness, neuropsychological and psychosocial dysfunction than youths who engage in antisocial behavior for the first time in adolescence. Prior studies have generally focused on single domains of function in heterogeneous samples. The present study also examined the extent to which adolescent-onset antisocial behavior can be considered normative, an assumption of Moffitt's dual taxonomy model.Forty-three subjects (34 males, 9 females, mean age = 15.31, age range 12-21 with a diagnosis of conduct disorder (CD were recruited through Headspace Services and the Juvenile Justice Community Centre. We compared childhood-onset antisocial youths (n = 23 with adolescent-onset antisocial youths (n = 20 with a conduct disorder, across a battery of psychiatric, neuropsychological and psychosocial measures. Neuropsychological function of both groups was also compared with normative scores from control samples.The childhood-onset group displayed deficits in verbal learning and memory, higher rates of psychosis, childhood maltreatment and more serious violent behavior, all effects associated with a large effect size. Both groups had impaired executive function, falling within the extremely low range (severely impaired.Childhood-onset CD displayed greater cognitive impairment, more psychiatric symptoms and committed more serious violent offences. The finding of severe executive impairment in both childhood- and adolescent-onset groupings challenges the assumption that adolescent-onset antisocial behavior is a normative process.

  2. Recommendations to reduce inequalities for LGBT people facing advanced illness: ACCESSCare national qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Hodson, Matthew; Wee, Bee; Almack, Kathryn; Johnson, Katherine; Daveson, Barbara A; Koffman, Jonathan; McEnhill, Linda; Harding, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or trans (LGBT) people have higher risk of certain life-limiting illnesses and unmet needs in advanced illness and bereavement. ACCESSCare is the first national study to examine in depth the experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness. To explore health-care experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness to elicit views regarding sharing identity (sexual orientation/gender history), accessing services, discrimination/exclusion and best-practice examples. Semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews analysed using thematic analysis. In total, 40 LGBT people from across the United Kingdom facing advanced illness: cancer ( n = 21), non-cancer ( n = 16) and both a cancer and a non-cancer conditions ( n = 3). In total, five main themes emerged: (1) person-centred care needs that may require additional/different consideration for LGBT people (including different social support structures and additional legal concerns), (2) service level or interactional (created in the consultation) barriers/stressors (including heteronormative assumptions and homophobic/transphobic behaviours), (3) invisible barriers/stressors (including the historical context of pathology/criminalisation, fears and experiences of discrimination) and (4) service level or interactional facilitators (including acknowledging and including partners in critical discussions). These all shape (5) individuals' preferences for disclosing identity. Prior experiences of discrimination or violence, in response to disclosure, were carried into future care interactions and heightened with the frailty of advanced illness. Despite recent legislative change, experiences of discrimination and exclusion in health care persist for LGBT people. Ten recommendations, for health-care professionals and services/institutions, are made from the data. These are simple, low cost and offer potential gains in access to, and outcomes of, care for LGBT people.

  3. Effects of two different psychiatric nursing courses on nursing students' attitudes towards mental illness, perceptions of psychiatric nursing, and career choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Zekiye Çetinkaya; Günüşen, Neslihan Partlak; İnan, Figen Şengün; Ince, Sevecen Çelik; Sari, Ayşe

    This quasi-experimental study was carried out to compare the attitudes towards psychiatry patients of students educated with problem-based learning and students educated with a traditional method in western Turkey. The students' perceptions of psychiatric nursing and their career choices were also evaluated. The sample consisted of 202 students; 130 were educated with a problem-based learning model and 72 were educated with a traditional method. Students educated with the problem-based learning method developed more positive attitudes towards mental illness after the psychiatric nursing course in comparison with students educated with the traditional method. Students educated with the traditional method preferred psychiatric nursing in comparison with nursing students educated with problem-based learning. It is important that the psychiatric nursing curriculum includes topics and programs that will create awareness in students regarding stigmatization of mental illness and its effects. In addition, we suggest that studies are performed to determine the perceptions of students towards psychiatric nursing and the factors that affect their career choices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mental illness stigma among nurses in psychiatric wards of teaching hospitals in the north-west of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Namdar, Hossein; Vahidi, Maryam

    2012-11-01

    Stigma is one of the obstacles in the treatment and regaining the mental health of people with mental illness. The aim was determination of mental illness stigma among nurses in psychiatric wards. This study was conducted in psychiatric wards of teaching hospitals in Tabriz, Urmia, and Ardabil in the north-west of Iran. This research is a descriptive analysis study in which 80 nurses participated. A researcher-made questionnaire was used, which measured demographic characteristics and mental illness stigma in the three components of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral. All data were analyzed using SPSS13 software and descriptive and analytical statistics. Majority of nurses (72.5%) had medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness. About half of them (48.8%) had great inclination toward the social isolation of patients. The majority of them (62.5%) had positive emotional responses and 27.5% had stereotypical views. There was a significant correlation between experience of living with and kinship of nurses to person with mental illness, with prejudice toward and discrimination of patients. There was also a significant correlation between interest in the continuation of work in the psychiatric ward and prejudice, and also between educational degree and stereotypical views. The data suggest there is a close correlation between the personal experience of nurses and existence of mental illness stigma among them. Therefore, the implementation of constant educational programs on mental illness for nurses and opportunities for them to have direct contact with treated patients is suggested.

  5. Frequency and correlates of comorbid psychiatric illness in patients with heroin use disorder admitted to Stikland Opioid Detoxification Unit, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Dannatt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is a lack of studies addressing the frequency and correlates of comorbidities among heroin users admitted for treatment in South Africa (SA. Objective. To assess the frequency and correlates of psychiatric comorbidity among patients with heroin use disorder admitted to the Opioid Detoxification Unit at Stikland Hospital in the Western Cape, SA. Method. Participants (N=141 were assessed for psychiatric illness (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, comorbid substance use disorders (World Health Organization’s Alcohol Smoking Substance Involvement Screening Tool, and legal and social problems (Maudsley Addiction Profile. Demographic, personal, psychiatric and substance-use history, in addition to mental state examination on admission, were collected from the case notes. Results. The largest group of patients (n=56, 40% had not been abstinent from heroin use since drug debut, and most had been arrested for drug-related activities (n=117, 83% and had family conflicts related to use (n=135, 96%. Nicotine was the most common comorbid substance of dependence (n=137, 97% and methamphetamine was the most common comorbid substance abused (n=73, 52%. The most common comorbid psychiatric illness was previous substance-induced psychosis (n=42, 30% and current major depressive disorder (n=37, 26%. Current major depressive disorder was significantly associated with females (p=0.03, intravenous drug use (p=0.03, alcohol use (p=0.02, and a higher number of previous rehabilitation attempts (p=0.008. Conclusion. Patients with heroin use disorders present with high rates of psychiatric comorbidities, which underscores the need for substance treatment services with the capacity to diagnose and manage these comorbidities.

  6. Suicide, alcoholism, and psychiatric illness among union forces during the U.S. Civil War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, B Christopher; Smith, Jeffrey A

    2012-10-01

    Little is known about post-combat psychological reactions of warriors prior to the Twentieth Century. We estimated rates of suicide, alcohol abuse, and probable psychiatric illness among Union Forces during the U.S. Civil War via examination of data compiled by the Union Army. White active-duty military personnel suicide rates ranged from 8.74 to 14.54 per 100,000 during the war, and surged to 30.4 the year after the war. For blacks, rates ranged from 17.7 in the first year of their entry into the war (1863), to 0 in their second year, and 1.8 in the year after the war. Rates for most other relevant domains, including chronic alcoholism, "nostalgia," and insanity, were extremely low (Civil War, a brutal modern war with vastly higher casualty rates than recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multidisciplinary View of Alcohol Use Disorder: From a Psychiatric Illness to a Major Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Gitto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorder is a significant health problem being a cause of increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. Alcohol-related illness has a relevant economic impact on the society and a negative influence on the life of patients and their family members. Psychosocial support might be useful in the management of people affected by alcohol use disorder since psychiatric and pharmaceutical approaches show some limits. In fact, many drugs are accessible for the treatment of alcohol disorder, but only Baclofen is functional as an anti-craving drug in patients with advanced liver disease. The alcohol-related liver damage represents the most frequent cause of advanced liver disease in Europe, and it is the main cause of death among adults with high alcohol consumption. The multidisciplinary action of clinical-psychologists, psychiatrics and hepatologists, is essential in the management of patients with alcohol liver disease especially in the case of liver transplantation. In general, the multidisciplinary approach is necessary in prevention, in framing patients and in the treatment. More resources should be used in prevention and research with the main aim of decreasing the harmful alcohol consumption.

  8. Job Offers to Individuals With Severe Mental Illness After Participation in Virtual Reality Job Interview Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Fleming, Michael F; Wright, Michael A; Jordan, Neil; Humm, Laura Boteler; Olsen, Dale; Bell, Morris D

    2015-11-01

    Individuals with severe mental illness have low employment rates, and the job interview presents a critical barrier for them to obtain competitive employment. Prior randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicated that virtual reality job interview training (VR-JIT) improved job interviewing skills among trainees. This study assessed whether VR-JIT participation was associated with greater odds of receiving job offers in the six-months after completion of training. To assess the efficacy of VR-JIT, trainees (N=39) in the method and a comparison group (N=12) completed a brief survey approximately six months after participating in the RCTs. Primary vocational outcome measures included receiving a job offer and number of weeks searching for employment. A larger proportion of trainees than comparison participants received a job offer (51% versus 25%, respectively). Trainees were more likely to receive a job offer than comparison participants (odds ratio=9.64, p=.02) after analyses accounted for cognition, recency of last job, and diagnosis. Trainees had greater odds of receiving a job offer for each completed VR-JIT trial (odds ratio=1.41, p=.04), and a greater number of completed VR-JIT trials predicted fewer weeks of searching for employment (β=-.74, p=.02). Results provide preliminary support that VR-JIT is a promising intervention associated with enhanced vocational outcomes among individuals with severe mental illness. Given that participants had minimal access to standardized vocational services, future research could evaluate the effectiveness of VR-JIT among individuals with and without access to standardized vocational services as well as evaluate strategies to implement VR-JIT within a large community mental health service provider.

  9. Valuing psychiatric patients' stories: belief in and use of the supernatural in the Jamaican psychiatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Caryl C A B; Carpenter, Karen A; Peltzer, Karl; Weaver, Steve

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine illness presentation and understand how psychiatric patients make meaning of the causes of their mental illnesses. Six Jamaican psychiatric patients were interviewed using the McGill Illness Narrative Interview Schedule. Of the 6, 3 representative case studies were chosen. The hermeneutic phenomenological approach and the common sense model were used in the formulation of patients' explanatory models. Results indicate that psychiatric patients actively conceptualized the causes and resultant treatment of their mental illnesses. Patients' satisfaction and compliance with treatment were dependent on the extent to which practitioners' conceptualization matched their own, as well as practitioners' acknowledgement of patients' concerns about causation, prognosis, and treatment.

  10. Determinants of mental illness stigma for adolescents discharged from psychiatric hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tally

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the factors that increase the risk for enacted mental illness stigma (i.e. rejection, devaluation and exclusion) as perceived by the stigmatized person. This is particularly true for the population of adolescents diagnosed with a mental illness. The aim of this study was to address this question and examine select social and clinical factors that predict enacted stigma (self-reported) with research that follows eighty American adolescents for 6 months following a first psychiatric hospitalization. Drawing on social identity theory, and research on stigma-threatening environments, social group identification and social support, this study tested four hypotheses: affiliation or identification with higher status and lower status peers predicts more and less stigma respectively (H1); a greater and more supportive social network, and more perceived family support predict less stigma (H2); greater severity of internalizing and externalizing symptoms predicts more stigma (H3); and poorer school functioning predicts more stigma (H4). Results indicated that about 70% of adolescents reported experiencing enacted stigma (at 6 months); disrespect or devaluation was more common than outright social rejection. Using OLS regression analyses, the results provided partial support for H1, H3 and H4, while H2 was not supported. The baseline factors found to be most predictive of enacted stigma ratings at 6-months were: affiliating with more friends with mental health problems, identifying with the 'populars' peer group, higher internalizing symptom ratings, and self-reported disciplinary problems at school. These four factors remained significant when controlling for initial enacted stigma ratings, pointing to their importance in determining changes in social stigma experiences in the follow-up period. They also remained significant when controlling for perceived public stigma ratings at follow-up, indicating that the findings were not due to generalized

  11. Trends in suicide risk associated with hospitalized psychiatric illness: a case-control study based on danish longitudinal registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ping; Nordentoft, Merete; Hansen Høyer, Eyd

    2006-01-01

    is mainly accounted for by the reduction among patients who had been discharged from psychiatric hospitals for more than 1 year. For patients who had been discharged from hospitals within 1 year, the reduction is similar to that of the general population; while for patients hospitalized for treatment...... at the time of suicide or the index date, the reduction in suicide rate is relatively slower. Such trends hold for all diagnostic groups. Further analyses stratified by age indicate that the faster reduction in suicide rate associated with history of hospitalized psychiatric illness is more pronounced among...... patients aged 36 years and older. CONCLUSION: The reduction in suicide rate is substantial for patients who have been discharged from psychiatric hospitals for more than 1 year and for middle-aged and older patients. Recent improvement in psychiatric care and treatment and promotion of new generation...

  12. [A survey on the prejudice and the stereotypes of mental illness in two communities with or without psychiatric Residential Facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltro, Franco; Raimondo, Antonella; Porzio, Clementina; Nugnes, Teresa; Ciampone, Vittorina

    2005-01-01

    Description of prejudice and stereotypes of mental illness in two samples with or without psychiatric Residential Facilities in their communities. It has been evaluated if the ongoing naturalistic relationship with the mentally ill was sufficient to modify the stigma of mental illness. The study has been carried out in 7 small towns with Residential Facilities and in 7 small towns without Residential Facilities on a sample of 560 people. Each respondent was asked to fill the Questionnaire on the Opinions about Mental Illness-General Population's version (QO-GP). Data on 557 respondents (99.5%) were collected. The most frequent opinion in the general sample was to reject the possibility to admit patients to Psychiatric Hospital. The significance (p stereotypes of mental illness. The results outline that the ongoing naturalistic relationship do not modify the stereotypes of mental illness, but only some aspects of prejudice (care and civil rights). As a consequence we need to plan structured, effective and more specific educational campaigns on mental illnesses.

  13. Interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvale, Steinar; Brinkmann, Svend

    Interviewet spiller en afgørende rolle i en stor del kvalitativ forskning. Men det er samtidig en kompleks disciplin, der rummer mange faldgruber og kræver fintfølende analytiske kompetencer. I denne bog giver Steinar Kvale og Svend Brinkmann en introduktion til de teoretiske og praktiske aspekte...... disciplin gennem en præsentation af dets syv stadier, hvor forfatterne klæder læseren fagligt på til at planlægge og foretage interviews....

  14. Predicting mental conditions based on "history of present illness" in psychiatric notes with deep neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tung; Kavuluru, Ramakanth

    2017-11-01

    Applications of natural language processing to mental health notes are not common given the sensitive nature of the associated narratives. The CEGS N-GRID 2016 Shared Task in Clinical Natural Language Processing (NLP) changed this scenario by providing the first set of neuropsychiatric notes to participants. This study summarizes our efforts and results in proposing a novel data use case for this dataset as part of the third track in this shared task. We explore the feasibility and effectiveness of predicting a set of common mental conditions a patient has based on the short textual description of patient's history of present illness typically occurring in the beginning of a psychiatric initial evaluation note. We clean and process the 1000 records made available through the N-GRID clinical NLP task into a key-value dictionary and build a dataset of 986 examples for which there is a narrative for history of present illness as well as Yes/No responses with regards to presence of specific mental conditions. We propose two independent deep neural network models: one based on convolutional neural networks (CNN) and another based on recurrent neural networks with hierarchical attention (ReHAN), the latter of which allows for interpretation of model decisions. We conduct experiments to compare these methods to each other and to baselines based on linear models and named entity recognition (NER). Our CNN model with optimized thresholding of output probability estimates achieves best overall mean micro-F score of 63.144% for 11 common mental conditions with statistically significant gains (ptext segment averaging 300 words, it is a good predictor for a few conditions such as anxiety, depression, panic disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Proposed CNN and RNN models outperform baseline approaches and complement each other when evaluating on a per-label basis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. The duality of suffering and trust: abused women's experiences of general psychiatric care--an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örmon, Karin; Torstensson-Levander, Marie; Sunnqvist, Charlotta; Bahtsevani, Christel

    2014-08-01

    To elucidate how women subjected to physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse experience the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after the disclosure of abuse. Violence against women is a major global public health issue, which has an impact on women's lives and mental health as well as generating frequent hospital admission. Qualitative design with an inductive approach. Interviews with nine women who were recipients of general psychiatric care and had disclosed experiences of abuse to a member of staff were conducted. Qualitative inductive content analysis was used. The overall theme emerging from the narratives, 'dependency as a reality containing a duality of suffering and trust,' links the categories together. Each subcategory is presented in relation to the categories 'being belittled,' 'being misinterpreted' and 'being cared for.' Experiences of care as caring and noncaring were found in the narratives. Caring could include situations experienced as the women being acknowledged and listened to, situations where staff approached and supported the women in a sensitive way. Experiences of noncaring were when the abuse was disregarded, and when the women were not believed in, were left with burdens of guilt and were offended. A noncaring environment focused primarily on the diagnosis, and the experienced abuse was seen as secondary. Abused women are subjected to psychiatric environments where staff are divided into groups of those who believed in and supported the abused women and those who regarded experiences of abuse as a secondary issue and focused on the mental disorder. This study provides knowledge of how abused women experience the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after the disclosure of abuse. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Predisposition to emotional distress and psychiatric illness amongst doctors: the role of unconscious and experiential factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W D

    1991-12-01

    This paper explores the contribution of unconscious and experiential factors in accounting for the high rates of depression, alcohol and drug abuse and suicide within the medical profession. The first part of the paper reviews the literature on motivations to study medicine and proposes that, for some doctors, a component of their decision is a response to unconscious drives to compensate for childhood experiences of parental impotence, or emotional neglect. The second part of the paper utilizes the theoretical framework of Kohut to argue that these childhood experiences may also result in the development of a narcissistic disturbance, and a vulnerable self-esteem. A model is outlined of how this may contribute to the development of emotional distress and psychiatric illness through the creation of a state of dependence on patients, emotional detachment and the denial of personal vulnerability. It is proposed that preventative strategies will need to include changing the emotionally 'abusive' nature of medical education, which tends to exacerbate this process.

  17. Smoking Characteristics of Adults With Selected Lifetime Mental Illnesses: Results From the 2007 National Health Interview Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight-Eily, Lela R.; Davis, Shane P.; Dube, Shanta R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated smoking prevalence, frequency, intensity, and cessation attempts among US adults with selected diagnosed lifetime mental illnesses. Methods. We used data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey on 23 393 noninstitutionalized US adults to obtain age-adjusted estimates of smoking prevalence, frequency, intensity, and cessation attempts for adults screened as having serious psychological distress and persons self-reporting bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder or hyperactivity, dementia, or phobias or fears. Results. The age-adjusted smoking prevalence of adults with mental illness or serious psychological distress ranged from 34.3% (phobias or fears) to 59.1% (schizophrenia) compared with 18.3% of adults with no such illness. Smoking prevalence increased with the number of comorbid mental illnesses. Cessation attempts among persons with diagnosed mental illness or serious psychological distress were comparable to attempts among adults without mental illnesses or distress; however, lower quit ratios were observed among adults with these diagnoses, indicating lower success in quitting. Conclusions. The prevalence of current smoking was higher among persons with mental illnesses than among adults without mental illnesses. Our findings stress the need for prevention and cessation efforts targeting adults with mental illnesses. PMID:20966369

  18. Assessing the diagnostic validity of a structured psychiatric interview in a first-admission hospital sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Revsbech, Rasmus; Sæbye, Ditte

    2012-01-01

    , first-admitted inpatients, the results of an assessment with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), yielding a DSM-IV diagnosis and performed by a trained non-clinician, were compared with a consensus lifetime best diagnostic estimate (DSM-IV) by two experienced research clinicians, based...

  19. Mental illness and parenthood: being a parent in secure psychiatric care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Fiona R; Macinnes, Douglas l; Parrott, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Background Research into parenting and mental illness seldom includes forensic mental health service users, despite its relevance to therapeutic, family work and risk management. Aims This study aimed to understand the experiences of parents and the variety of parenting roles maintained during admission to a secure forensic hospital. Methods Narrative interviews with 18 parents (eight mothers and 10 fathers) at an English medium security hospital were analysed thematically, using the framework approach. The proportion of patients who are parents and their contact patterns with their children were estimated from records. Results About a quarter of men and 38% of women were parents. Parenthood was of central importance to their emotional life, spanning experiences of loss, shame and failed expectations, joy, responsibility and hope. Fewer fathers maintained contact with their children than mothers yet fatherhood remained a vital aspect of men's identities, with impact on their self-esteem. Parenting during lengthy admissions – while constrained and dependent on professional support and surveillance – ranged from sending gifts and money to visits and phone calls. Offending was seen as a particularly shameful aspect of admission, contributing to distancing from the children and difficulty explaining detention to them. Conclusions Such complex experiences call for multidisciplinary knowledge and skills. Provision of focused therapy, as well as appropriate visiting spaces, creative approaches to contact time and support for patients in explaining their mental illness and detention to their children are recommended. © 2015 The Authors. Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25754133

  20. Family history of psychiatric illness as a risk factor for schizoaffective disorder: a Danish register-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Licht, Rasmus Wentzer

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schizoaffective disorder may be related to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, but no population-based studies, to our knowledge, have investigated this association in families. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a psychiatric history of schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder......, or schizophrenia among parents and siblings is a risk factor for developing a schizoaffective disorder, and whether a specific pattern of family history of psychiatric illness exists in persons with schizoaffective disorder compared with persons with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. DESIGN: Register-based cohort...... study. SETTING: Denmark. COHORT: The 2.4 million persons born in Denmark after 1952. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relative risks of the 3 illnesses estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: In total, 1925 persons had a schizoaffective disorder, 3721 had a bipolar disorder, and 12 501 had schizophrenia...

  1. Emotional and cardiovascular reactivity to a child-focused interpersonal stressor among depressed mothers of psychiatrically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyranowski, Jill M; Swartz, Holly A; Hofkens, Tara L; Frank, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Impairment in maternal interpersonal function represents a risk factor for poor psychiatric outcomes among children of depressed mothers. However, the mechanisms by which this effect occurs have yet to be fully elucidated. Elevated levels of emotional or physiological reactivity to interpersonal stress may impact depressed mothers' ability to effectively negotiate child-focused conflicts. This effect may become particularly pronounced when depressed mothers are parenting a psychiatrically ill child. The current feasibility study evaluated mothers' emotional and cardiovascular reactivity in response to an acute, child-focused stress task. Twenty-two depressed mothers of psychiatrically ill children were recruited from a larger clinical trial; half were randomly assigned to receive an adapted form of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-MOMS), while the other half received treatment as usual (TAU). For comparison purposes, a matched sample of 22 nondepressed mothers of psychiatrically healthy children was also evaluated. Depressed mothers receiving minimal-treatment TAU displayed the greatest increases in depressed mood, heart rate, and diastolic blood pressure in response to the child-focused stress task, and significantly differed from the relatively low levels of reactivity observed among nondepressed mothers of healthy children. In contrast, depressed mothers receiving IPT-MOMS displayed patterns of reactivity that fell between these extreme groups. Maternal stress reactivity was associated not only with maternal psychiatric symptoms, but also with levels of chronic parental stress and maternal history of childhood emotional abuse. Future, more definitive research is needed to evaluate depressed mothers' interpersonal stress reactivity, its amenability to treatment, and its long-term impact on child psychiatric outcomes. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Thinking of psychiatric disorders as "normal" illness. Data from a questionnaire on social stigma: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavormina, Maurilio Giuseppe Maria; Tavormina, Giuseppe; Nemoianni, Eugenio; Franza, Francesco; d'Errico, Immacolata; Spurio, Maria Grazia; Tavormina, Romina; Zdanowicz, Nicolas; De Mesmaeker, Stephanie; Harangozó, Judit; Nyulászi, Anna; Bulyáki, Tünde; Urlic, Ivan; Russo, Andrea; Agius, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Prejudice and stigma about mental illness is still present in society. Patients suffer both from the disease, and from the marginalization behavior exhibited by others towards them and their families. Psychiatric professionals may also become ill and suffer for the same reason. The authors of this international multicenter study have set themselves the question of whether there may be prejudice and/or stigma among psychiatric professionals towards their suffering colleagues, among patients towards nursing staff affected by the same disease and between patients themselves. Using two standardized questionnaires which have been tested, but have not been used before they have studied 207 mental health professionals and 407 patients, of Italian, Belgian, Hungarian and Croatian nationalities. The results show that there are in fact prejudices among Mental Health Professionals about colleagues suffering from mental illness because they responded that such persons cannot treat well patients with their own pathology. However Mental Health Professionals do not demonstrate behaviors which are not frankly marginalizing or stigmatizing towards colleagues suffering from mental illness. On the other hand, among patients the prevailing view was that psychiatric professionals who suffer from mental illness, can better understand the sick, because they are also suffering. This is in analogy with the Jungian theory of the "wounded healer" in the myth of the centaur Chiron. Patients did not demonstate rejection or marginalization behavior towards other sick patients. Finally both the professionals and the patients tend to be cautious in relating to healthy persons and tend not to disclose their suffering for fear of being misjudged or marginalized.

  3. Continuity Between Interview-Rated Personality Disorders and Self-Reported DSM-5 Traits in a Danish Psychiatric Sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Anderson, Jaime; Simonsen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    diagnoses found in DSM-5 Section II, specified sets of facets are configured into familiar PD types. The current study aimed to evaluate the continuity across the Section II and III models of PDs. A sample of 142 psychiatric outpatients were administered the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 and rated...... showed that, overall, the interview-rated DSM-5 Section II disorders were most strongly associated with expected self-reported Section III traits. Results also supported the addition of facets not included in the proposed Section III PD criteria. These findings partly underscore the continuity between...... the Section II and III models of PDs and suggest how it may be enhanced; however, additional research is needed to further evaluate where continuity exists, where it does not exist, and how the traits system could be improved. (PsycINFO Database Record...

  4. Mental Illness Is Not Associated with Adherence to Colorectal Cancer Screening: Results from the California Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siantz, Elizabeth; Wu, Brian; Shiroishi, Mark; Vora, Hita; Idos, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-specific death in the USA. Evidence suggests people with mental illness are less likely to receive preventive health services, including cancer screening. We hypothesized that mental illness is a risk factor for non-adherence to colorectal cancer-screening guidelines. We analyzed results of the 2007 California Health Interview Survey to test whether mental illness is a risk factor for non-adherence to colorectal cancer-screening recommendations among individuals age 50 or older (N = 15,535). This cross-sectional dataset is representative of California. Screening was defined as either fecal occult blood testing during the preceding year, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy during the preceding 5 years. Mental illness was identified using the Kessler K6 screening tool. Associations were evaluated using weighted multivariate logistic regressions. Mental illness was not associated with colorectal cancer-screening adherence (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.63-1.25). Risk factors for non-adherence included being female (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.09-1.44), delaying accessing health care during the previous year (OR 1.89; 95% CI 1.56-2.29). Unlike previous studies, this study did not find a relationship between mental illness and colorectal cancer-screening adherence. This could be due to differences in study populations. State-specific healthcare policies involving care coordination for individuals with mental illness could also influence colorectal cancer-screening adherence in California.

  5. Clinical profile of acutely ill psychiatric patients admitted to a general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-01-30

    Jan 30, 2006 ... surrounding primary care clinics or hospitals and from ambulatory community psychiatric clinics. After screening and initial treatment, service users were referred to other specialized units such as the forensic, adolescent, psychotherapy and eating disorder units of the two psychiatric hospitals on the circuit.

  6. Predictors of patient communication in psychiatric medication encounters among veterans with serious mental illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Samantha M; Medoff, Deborah R; Brown, Clayton H; Fang, Lijuan; Dixon, Lisa B; Klingaman, Elizabeth A; Park, Stephanie G; Kreyenbuhl, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Person-centered psychiatric services rely on consumers actively sharing personal information, opinions, and preferences with their providers. This research examined predictors of consumer communication during appointments for psychiatric medication prescriptions. The Roter Interaction Analysis System was used to code recorded Veterans Affairs psychiatric appointments with 175 consumers and 21 psychiatric medication prescribers and categorize communication by purpose: biomedical, psychosocial, facilitation, or rapport-building. Regression analyses found that greater provider communication, symptomology, orientation to psychiatric recovery, and functioning on the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status Attention and Language indices, as well as consumer diagnostic label, were positive predictors of consumer communication, though the types of communication impacted varied. Provider communication is the easiest variable to intervene on to create changes in consumer communication. Future research should also consider how cognitive and symptom factors may impact specific types of consumer communication in order to identify subgroups for targeted interventions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Developing and Validating a Tablet Version of an Illness Explanatory Model Interview for a Public Health Survey in Pune, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giduthuri, Joseph G.; Maire, Nicolas; Joseph, Saju; Kudale, Abhay; Schaetti, Christian; Sundaram, Neisha; Schindler, Christian; Weiss, Mitchell G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mobile electronic devices are replacing paper-based instruments and questionnaires for epidemiological and public health research. The elimination of a data-entry step after an interview is a notable advantage over paper, saving investigator time, decreasing the time lags in managing and analyzing data, and potentially improving the data quality by removing the error-prone data-entry step. Research has not yet provided adequate evidence, however, to substantiate the claim of fewer errors for computerized interviews. Methodology We developed an Android-based illness explanatory interview for influenza vaccine acceptance and tested the instrument in a field study in Pune, India, for feasibility and acceptability. Error rates for tablet and paper were compared with reference to the voice recording of the interview as gold standard to assess discrepancies. We also examined the preference of interviewers for the classical paper-based or the electronic version of the interview and compared the costs of research with both data collection devices. Results In 95 interviews with household respondents, total error rates with paper and tablet devices were nearly the same (2.01% and 1.99% respectively). Most interviewers indicated no preference for a particular device; but those with a preference opted for tablets. The initial investment in tablet-based interviews was higher compared to paper, while the recurring costs per interview were lower with the use of tablets. Conclusion An Android-based tablet version of a complex interview was developed and successfully validated. Advantages were not compromised by increased errors, and field research assistants with a preference preferred the Android device. Use of tablets may be more costly than paper for small samples and less costly for large studies. PMID:25233212

  8. The relations between violence exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, secondary traumatization, vicarious post traumatic growth and illness attribution among psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerach, Gad; Shalev, Tal Ben-Itzchak

    2015-06-01

    This study examined posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSD), secondary traumatization (ST) and vicarious posttraumatic growth (VG) among Israeli psychiatric nurses (PN) who were compared to community nurses (CN). Furthermore, we examined the contribution of PN perceptions of the etiology of their patients' mental illness to their PTSD, ST and VG. Results show that PN reported higher levels of both PTSD and ST symptoms, but lower levels of VG, as compare to CN. While ST symptoms were positively related to VG among CN, PTSD and ST symptoms were negatively associated among PN. Finally, exposure to patients' violence, PTSD or ST symptoms, and illness attribution dimensions of 'powerful others', predicted nurses' VG. PN are an at-risk population for work-related stress residues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [A Teaching Experience: Psychiatric Interview on a Simulated Scenario With the Participation of Actors of the Altergesto Theater Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt Galeano, Wendy; Castrillón Muñoz, Eduardo; Godoy Jaimes, Kristy Alejandra; Matheus Lamus, Johanna; Ramírez Rivera, Sandra Milena; Ríos Castañeda, Sandra Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Simulation has been used as a learning tool in different disciplines and professions, including medicine and its specialties. Its usefulness is directly related to the integration of objectives, contents, methodologies and specific resources in each area of knowledge. To describe the development of an educational experience implemented in the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Cali (Cali, Colombia) with medical students of Human Behavior II program, between 2012 and 2013. This experience was performed with simulated patients played by actors of the Altergesto theater group, that were interviewed by students under the supervision of psychiatrists and teachers of the subject, using the Simulated Hospital of the University. A historical development recall of the teaching sequence was made from the first half of 2012 to the second half of 2013, a statement of pedagogical objectives, and a description of the teaching-learning strategies. 158 interviews were conducted over a period of two years during which it was necessary to raise methodological solutions to adapt this teaching sequence to the content and objectives of the subject. The high-fidelity simulation, integrating actors who represent psychiatric patients mixed with the technology of a Simulated Hospital was useful to achieve compliance with the objectives proposed in the course of Human Behavior II, as a part of the program of Medicine at the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Cali. In parallel, the construction of experience as an interdisciplinary project and the practical approach of this strategy may impact on cognitive, emotional, behavioral dimensions of the participants, encouraging meaningful learning. An easy access database for the collected material and the study of the effects of this strategy in the formation of long-term students is needed. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Does /sup 3/H-imipramine binding asymmetry indicate psychiatric illness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demeter, E.; Somogyi, E.; Tekes, K.; Majorossy, K.; Arato, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have accepted that serotonin is essentially an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human brain, so we propose that it is precisely this inhibiting effect that has weakened in psychiatric cases. We have investigated the asymmetry of tritiated imipramine binding sites (Bmax) in the frontal cortices of homicide victims (n = 6) and controls (n = 6) who died of natural causes. Of these homicide victimes examined in our experiment, five proved to have been psychiatric cases and one case had no psychiatric record. The two groups were comparable in age, gender and postmortem delay. The number of imipramine binding sites (Bmax) in the frontal cortices of controls was significantly higher in the right hemisphere than in the left hemisphere. But the homicide victims who were psychiatric cases had significantly higher (Bmax) values in the left hemisphere. While we only found higher Bmax values in the left hemisphere of homicide victims with mental diseases, our data may serve to prove the direct role of the serotonergic mechanism in the development of psychiatric cases. 15 refs.

  11. Experimental psychiatric illness and drug abuse models: from human to animal, an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical animal models have supported much of the recent rapid expansion of neuroscience research and have facilitated critical discoveries that undoubtedly benefit patients suffering from psychiatric disorders. This overview serves as an introduction for the following chapters describing both in vivo and in vitro preclinical models of psychiatric disease components and briefly describes models related to drug dependence and affective disorders. Although there are no perfect animal models of any psychiatric disorder, models do exist for many elements of each disease state or stage. In many cases, the development of certain models is essentially restricted to the human clinical laboratory domain for the purpose of maximizing validity, whereas the use of in vitro models may best represent an adjunctive, well-controlled means to model specific signaling mechanisms associated with psychiatric disease states. The data generated by preclinical models are only as valid as the model itself, and the development and refinement of animal models for human psychiatric disorders continues to be an important challenge. Collaborative relationships between basic neuroscience and clinical modeling could greatly benefit the development of new and better models, in addition to facilitating medications development.

  12. The role of lateral habenula-dorsal raphe nucleus circuits in higher brain functions and psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Bei-Lin; Yang, Shao-Jun; Rusak, Benjamin

    2015-01-15

    Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) play an important role in regulation of many physiological functions. The lateral nucleus of the habenular complex (LHb) is closely connected to the DRN both morphologically and functionally. The LHb is a key regulator of the activity of DRN serotonergic neurons, and it also receives reciprocal input from the DRN. The LHb is also a major way-station that receives limbic system input via the stria medullaris and provides output to the DRN and thereby indirectly connects a number of other brain regions to the DRN. The complex interactions of the LHb and DRN contribute to the regulation of numerous important behavioral and physiological mechanisms, including those regulating cognition, reward, pain sensitivity and patterns of sleep and waking. Disruption of these functions is characteristic of major psychiatric illnesses, so there has been a great deal of interest in how disturbed LHb-DRN interactions may contribute to the symptoms of these illnesses. This review summarizes recent research related to the roles of the LHb-DRN system in regulation of higher brain functions and the possible role of disturbed LHb-DRN function in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Motivational aftercare planning to better care: Applying the principles of advanced directives and motivational interviewing to discharge planning for people with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisely, Steve; Wyder, Marianne; Dietrich, Josie; Robinson, Gail; Siskind, Dan; Crompton, David

    2017-02-01

    Improving the input of people with mental illness into their recovery plans can potentially lead to better outcomes. In the present study, we evaluated the introduction of motivational aftercare planning (MAP) into the discharge planning of psychiatric inpatients. MAP is a manualized intervention combining motivational interviewing with advance directives. We measured changes in the level of patient input into discharge planning following training staff in the use of MAP. This included the following: (i) documentation of early relapse signs along with successful past responses; (ii) evidence of aftercare planning; and (iii) the use of the patients' own words in the plan. We used a ward-level controlled before-and-after design comparing one intervention ward with two control wards. We used anonymized recovery plans, with a goal of 50 plans per ward before and after the intervention, to look for evidence of patient input into care planning with a standardized checklist. There were also qualitative interviews with individuals discharged from the unit. We reviewed 100 intervention ward plans and 197 control ones (total n = 297). There were no significant differences in recovery plans from intervention and control wards at baseline. Following MAP training, the intervention ward improved significantly (e.g. identification of triggers increased from 52 to 94%, χ2  = 23.3, d.f. =1, P control wards. The qualitative data (n = 20 interviews) showed improvements in participants' experiences of discharge planning. MAP increased inpatient input into discharge planning and was valued by participants. The effect on subsequent health service use needs evaluation. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  14. Study of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with headache using a short structured clinical interview in a rural neurology clinic in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soaham Dilip Desai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders are common in patients attending neurology clinics with headache. Evaluation of psychiatric comorbidity in patients with headache is often missed in the busy neurology clinics. Aims: To assess the prevalence of Axis-I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders in patients with primary headache disorders in a rural-based tertiary neurology clinic in Western India. Settings and Design : A cross-sectional observation survey was conducting assessing all patients with migraine, tension-type headache and chronic daily headache attending the Neurology Clinic of Shree Krishna Hospital, a rural medical teaching hospital in Karamsad, in Gujarat in Western India. Materials and Methods: A total of 101 consecutive consenting adults with headache were interviewed using Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I., a structured diagnostic clinical interview to assess prevalence of Axis-I DSM-IV psychiatric disorders. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics were calculated using SPSS software version 16 and a binomial regression model was used to study the relationship of psychiatric co-morbidity with patient-related factors. Results: 49 out of 101 (48.5% patients with headache suffered from depressive disorders (dysthymia or depression or suicidality, 18 out of 101 patients with headache (17.90% suffered from anxiety related disorders (generalized anxiety disorder or agoraphobia or social phobia or panic disorder. Conclusions: Axis-I psychiatric disorders are a significant comorbidity among patients with headache disorders. M.I.N.I. can be used as a short, less time consuming instrument to assess all patients with headache disorders.

  15. Cortico-Striatal-Thalamic Loop Circuits of the Orbitofrontal Cortex: Promising Therapeutic Targets in Psychiatric Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettes, Peter; Schulze, Laura; Downar, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Corticostriatal circuits through the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) play key roles in complex human behaviors such as evaluation, affect regulation and reward-based decision-making. Importantly, the medial and lateral OFC (mOFC and lOFC) circuits have functionally and anatomically distinct connectivity profiles which differentially contribute to the various aspects of goal-directed behavior. OFC corticostriatal circuits have been consistently implicated across a wide range of psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and substance use disorders (SUDs). Furthermore, psychiatric disorders related to OFC corticostriatal dysfunction can be addressed via conventional and novel neurostimulatory techniques, including deep brain stimulation (DBS), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Such techniques elicit changes in OFC corticostriatal activity, resulting in changes in clinical symptomatology. Here we review the available literature regarding how disturbances in mOFC and lOFC corticostriatal functioning may lead to psychiatric symptomatology in the aforementioned disorders, and how psychiatric treatments may exert their therapeutic effect by rectifying abnormal OFC corticostriatal activity. First, we review the role of OFC corticostriatal circuits in reward-guided learning, decision-making, affect regulation and reappraisal. Second, we discuss the role of OFC corticostriatal circuit dysfunction across a wide range of psychiatric disorders. Third, we review available evidence that the therapeutic mechanisms of various neuromodulation techniques may directly involve rectifying abnormal activity in mOFC and lOFC corticostriatal circuits. Finally, we examine the potential of future applications of therapeutic brain stimulation targeted at OFC circuitry; specifically, the role of OFC brain stimulation in the growing field

  16. Cortico-Striatal-Thalamic Loop Circuits of the Orbitofrontal Cortex: Promising Therapeutic Targets in Psychiatric Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Downar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Corticostriatal circuits through the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC play key roles in complex human behaviors such as evaluation, affect regulation and reward-based decision-making. Importantly, the medial and lateral OFC (mOFC and lOFC circuits have functionally and anatomically distinct connectivity profiles which differentially contribute to the various aspects of goal-directed behavior. OFC corticostriatal circuits have been consistently implicated across a wide range of psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD, and substance use disorders (SUDs. Furthermore, psychiatric disorders related to OFC corticostriatal dysfunction can be addressed via conventional and novel neurostimulatory techniques, including deep brain stimulation (DBS, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS, and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. Such techniques elicit changes in OFC corticostriatal activity, resulting in changes in clinical symptomatology. Here we review the available literature regarding how disturbances in mOFC and lOFC corticostriatal functioning may lead to psychiatric symptomatology in the aforementioned disorders, and how psychiatric treatments may exert their therapeutic effect by rectifying abnormal OFC corticostriatal activity. First, we review the role of OFC corticostriatal circuits in reward-guided learning, decision-making, affect regulation and reappraisal. Second, we discuss the role of OFC corticostriatal circuit dysfunction across a wide range of psychiatric disorders. Third, we review available evidence that the therapeutic mechanisms of various neuromodulation techniques may directly involve rectifying abnormal activity in mOFC and lOFC corticostriatal circuits. Finally, we examine the potential of future applications of therapeutic brain stimulation targeted at OFC circuitry; specifically, the role of OFC brain stimulation in the

  17. Stroke survivors with severe mental illness: Are they at-risk for increased non-psychiatric hospitalizations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavius Robert Lilly

    Full Text Available This study examined outcomes for two groups of stroke survivors treated in Veteran Health Administration (VHA hospitals, those with a severe mental illness (SMI and those without prior psychiatric diagnoses, to examine risk of non-psychiatric medical hospitalizations over five years after initial stroke.This retrospective cohort study included 523 veterans who survived an initial stroke hospitalization in a VHA medical center during fiscal year 2003. The survivors were followed using administrative data documenting inpatient stroke treatment, patient demographics, disease comorbidities, and VHA hospital admissions. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to examine the relationship between patients with and without SMI diagnosis preceding the stroke and their experience with non-psychiatric medical hospitalizations after the stroke.The study included 100 patients with SMI and 423 without SMI. Unadjusted means for pre-stroke non-psychiatric hospitalizations were higher (p = 0.0004 among SMI patients (1.47 ± 0.51 compared to those without SMI (1.00 ± 1.33, a difference which persisted through the first year post-stroke (SMI: 2.33 ± 2.46; No SMI: 1.74 ± 1.86; p = 0.0004. Number of non-psychiatric hospitalizations were not significantly different between the two groups after adjustment for patient sociodemographic, comorbidity, length of stay and inpatient stroke treatment characteristics. Antithrombotic medications significantly lowered risk (OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.49-0.73 for stroke-related readmission within 30 days of discharge.No significant differences in medical hospitalizations were present after adjusting for comorbid and sociodemographic characteristics between SMI and non-SMI stroke patients in the five-year follow-up. However, unadjusted results continue to draw attention to disparities, with SMI patients experiencing more non-psychiatric hospitalizations both prior to and up to one year after their initial stroke. Additionally

  18. Bachelor of nursing student' attitude towards people with mental illness and career choices in psychiatric nursing. An Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmi, Poreddi; Thimmaiah, Rohini; Chandra, Rama; BadaMath, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    To examine undergraduate nursing student' attitudes toward people with mental illness and mental health nursing. This was a cross sectional descriptive study carried out among conveniently selected nursing students (N=116). Data was collected through self- reported questionnaires. Majority of the participants agreed that the theoretical (81.1%) and clinical placement (85.4%) was adequate. Similarly, 62.9% would like to apply for a post-basic program in Psychiatric nursing and 69.8% of the students intend to pursue their career as mental health nurses. However, a majority expressed that people with mental illness are unpredictable (80.2%), cannot handle too much responsibility(71.5%), more likely to commit offences or crimes (84.5%) and more likely to be violent (44%). Negative stereotype domain had significant relationships with future career (r=-0.2, p= 0.003), course effectiveness (r=-0.4, pstudents (r=-.3, pstudents towards people with mental illness. Innovative teaching strategies and appropriate changes in the nursing curriculum is required to prepare future nurses to deal mental health problems effectively.

  19. Bachelor of nursing student' attitude towards people with mental illness and career choices in psychiatric nursing. An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poreddi Vijayalakshmi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine undergraduate nursing student' attitudes toward people with mental illness and mental health nursing. Methodology. This was a cross sectional descriptive study carried out among conveniently selected nursing students (N=116. Data was collected through self- reported questionnaires. Results: Majority of the participants agreed that the theoretical (81.1% and cpnical placement (85.4% was adequate. Similarly, 62.9% would pke to apply for a post-basic program in Psychiatric nursing and 69.8% of the students intend to pursue their career as mental health nurses. However, a majority expressed that people with mental illness are unpredictable (80.2%, cannot handle too much responsibipty (71.5%, more pkely to commit offences or crimes (84.5% and more pkely to be violent (44%. Negative stereotype domain had significant relationships with future career (r=-0.2, p= 0.003, course effectiveness (r=-0.4, p<0.001, valuable contribution (r=-0.3, p<0.001 and readiness of the students (r=-.3, p<.000 domains. Conclusion. There is an urgent need to address these negative perceptions among nursing students towards people with mental illness. Innovative teaching strategies and appropriate changes in the nursing curriculum is required to prepare future nurses to deal mental health problems effectively.

  20. Psychiatric disorders among the elderly on non-psychiatric wards in an African setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasujja, Noeline; Musisi, Seggane; Walugembe, James; Wallace, Daphne

    2007-08-01

    The elderly are vulnerable to illness and particularly to psychiatric illness. Many mentally ill elderly patients end up on non-psychiatric wards owing to somatization of their illnesses. Even for these patients, a psychiatric diagnosis may not be made. The literature on the elderly in Uganda is very scanty. This study aims to establish the prevalence and factors associated with psychiatric disorders among elderly patients admitted to non-psychiatric wards. We carried out a descriptive cross-sectional study of 127 consenting elderly patients. They were administered a standardized questionnaire comprising the Self Reporting Questionnaire 25, the Mini-mental State Examination and the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV. Study variables included socio-demographic characteristics, physical illnesses, psychiatric disorders and the treatment given. The rate of psychiatric morbidity was 48%. The sex ratio was 1:1; however, women had a higher rate of psychiatric illness than men, 54.6% and 41.3% respectively. Being widowed or separated and having cancer were associated with SRQ>5, p=0.02 and p=0.04 respectively. Depressive disorders were the most common at 25.2% and were more common in women. Increasing age was associated with dementia (pUganda. Particular attention should be given to the psychological health of elderly people admitted to general hospitals.

  1. "Wind illness' or somatic depression? A case study in psychiatric anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenbruch, M

    1983-10-01

    A 46-year-old mother with a history of chronic headaches and other symptoms, and a clinical diagnosis (in Western terms) of depression, ascribed her condition to non-observance of Chinese postpartum ritual. The characteristic features of "wind illness' are described. Western medicine proved useless but acupuncture was beneficial. The case underlines the importance of understanding the patient's own view of his/her illness and its causes in arriving at a correct diagnosis and intervening effectively: this is particularly true when the gap between the doctor's and the patient's cultures is wide. The value of the distinction between the disease (the pathological process, which may be universal) and an episode of illness (the personal and cultural construction of disease) is emphasized.

  2. The influence of mental illness and criminality self-stigmas and racial self-concept on outcomes in a forensic psychiatric sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Michelle L; Vayshenker, Beth; Rotter, Merrill; Yanos, Philip T

    2015-06-01

    Research has increasingly explored mental illness self-stigma: when people with mental illness believe that society's negative beliefs are true of them. Self-stigma predicts poorer functional and treatment outcomes. Stigma research has typically investigated the impact of a single stigma on people, without considering the potential effects of multiple stigmatizing labels. People with mental illness and a history of criminal conviction, however, may experience multiple stigmas related to mental illness and criminal history. This study investigated the impact of the combination of multiple stigmatized identities on self-esteem, depression, therapeutic alliance, and treatment adherence in a forensic psychiatric sample. It extended previous research on mental illness self-stigma to a forensic psychiatric sample. Participants (N = 82) were people with mental illness and a history of criminal conviction recruited from their treatment sites. Participants completed self-report questionnaires focused on mental illness and criminality self-stigma, racial self- concept, self-esteem, depression, working alliance, and medication/psychosocial treatment adherence. Researchers confirmed demographics through a chart review and treatment adherence from participants' clinicians. Multiple regression analyses examined the relationship between self-stigma and outcome variables. Mental illness self-stigma, racial self-concept, and to a lesser extent criminality self-stigma were associated with reduced self-esteem (p ≤ .05) and medication adherence (p ≤ .05). Criminality self-stigma also appeared to magnify the effects of racial and mental illness self-stigma on outcomes. This study shows that self-stigma related to involvement in the criminal justice system may further contribute to the impact of mental illness self-stigma on important outcomes. Future research and interventions may tailor self-stigma interventions to a forensic psychiatric population. (c) 2015 APA, all rights

  3. Social Tie Characteristics and Psychiatric Rehabilitation Outcomes among Adults with Serious Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chih-Chin; Chronister, Julie Ann

    2012-01-01

    Social support has achieved national attention as a key component of the mental health recovery paradigm for persons with serious mental illness (SMI). The aim of this study was to investigate the amount of variance accounted for by four social tie characteristics (social network orientation, emotional support, tangible support, and negative…

  4. Mental illness and parenthood: being a parent in secure psychiatric care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parrott, F.R.; Macinnes, D.I.; Parrott, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research into parenting and mental illness seldom includes forensic mental health service users, despite its relevance to therapeutic, family work and risk management. Aims: This study aimed to understand the experiences of parents and the variety of parenting roles maintained during

  5. Creativity and psychiatric illness: the search for a missing link--an historical context for current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, E; Sabbe, B; De Hert, M

    2013-01-01

    Creativity is an important human quality upon which many achievements of humankind are based. Defined as the ability to produce something that is novel and useful or meaningful, it is difficult to operationalize for research. This text provides an overview of the historical and cultural context of this research. The assumption that creativity is related to psychiatric vulnerability dates back to antiquity. The modern interest in the subject stems from the romantic era and gained a scientific aura in the 19th century. In the 20th century, a further entanglement of creativity and psychopathology came about through the influence of patient artists on regular art. Psychometric, psychodiagnostic and genetic research supports a connection between creativity and psychiatric illness within the bipolar-psychotic continuum, with schizotypy/thymotypy as prototypes of creativity-related disorders. Evolutionary hypotheses link the schizophrenia paradox to a survival advantage through enhanced creative ability. The relevance of scientific research in this complex and heterogeneous area can be increased if creativity and psychopathology are further operationalized and if underlying art concepts are made explicit and placed in a broader cultural context. There is a continuing need for meaningful definitions and measures, as well as a multidisciplinary collaboration. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. The long-term co-occurrence of psychiatric illness and behavioral problems following child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Nina L; Luebbers, Stefan; Ogloff, James Rp; Cutajar, Margaret; Mullen, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    There is a growing body of research investigating the relationship between child sexual abuse and a range of adverse outcomes. However, very little is known about the long-term co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders and behavioral problems among this vulnerable population, or the interaction between characteristics of the abuse, such as the nature and timing of the child sexual abuse, and the extent of subsequent adversities. This study aimed to determine the rate and co-occurrence of mental health morbidity, criminal justice system contact, and fatal self-harm among medically confirmed victims of child sexual abuse, and to identify abuse variables associated with a greater likelihood of cumulative adverse experiences. The forensic medical records of 2759 cases of child sexual abuse assessed between 1964 and 1995 were linked with public psychiatric, criminal justice and coronial administrative databases between 13 and 44 years following abuse. Cases were compared to 2677 matched comparisons from the general population. Abuse victims were more likely (odds ratio = 7.2, 95% confidence interval = [4.9, 10.4], p mental illness. Relative to comparisons, female victims demonstrated the largest increase in odds for cumulative outcomes (odds ratio = 9.8, 95% confidence interval = [5.8, 16.8], p Sexual abuse, particularly during adolescence (ages 12-16 years), appears to be a risk factor for co-occurring adverse experiences. This study identifies particular groups of child sexual abuse victims as at-risk and requiring targeted intervention.

  7. Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes: Impact on Weight, Quality of Life, and Psychiatric Symptoms in Veterans With Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Jillian M; Erickson, Zachary D; Meyer, Hilary B; Baker, Matthew R; Gelberg, Hollie A; Arnold, Irina Y; Kwan, Crystal; Chamberlin, Valery; Rosen, Jennifer A; Shah, Chandresh; Hellemann, Gerhard; Lewis, Melissa M; Nguyen, Charles; Sachinvala, Neena; Amrami, Binyamin; Pierre, Joseph M; Ames, Donna

    2017-09-01

    Veterans with mental illness tend to have shorter life spans and suboptimal physical health because of a variety of factors. These factors include poor nutrition, being overweight, and smoking cigarettes. Nonphysical contributors that may affect quality of life are the stigma associated with mental illness, social difficulties, and spiritual crises. Current mental health treatment focuses primarily on the delivery of medication and evidence-based psychotherapies, which may not affect all the above areas of a Veteran's life as they focus primarily on improving psychological symptoms. Clinicians may find greater success using integrative, comprehensive, multifaceted programs to treat these problems spanning the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual domains. These pilot studies test an adjunctive, holistic, behavioral approach to treat mental illness. This pilot work explores the hypotheses that engagement in a greater number of therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) leads to improvement in quality of life, reduction of psychiatric symptoms, and weight loss. Institutional Review Boards for human subjects at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Greater Los Angeles and Long Beach Healthcare Systems approved pilot study activities at their sites. Pilot Study 1 was a prospective survey study of Veterans with mental illness, who gained weight on an atypical antipsychotic medication regimen, participating in a weight management study. At each session of the 1-year study, researchers asked a convenience sample of 55 Veterans in the treatment arm whether they engaged in each of the eight TLCs: exercise, nutrition/diet, stress management and relaxation, time in nature, relationships, service to others, religious or spiritual involvement, and recreation. Pilot Study 2 applied the TLC behavioral intervention and examined 19 Veterans with mental illness, who attended four classes about TLCs, received individual counseling over 9 weeks, and maintained journals to track TLC practice

  8. Traumatic events in childhood and their association with psychiatric illness in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdolini, Norma; Attademo, Luigi; Agius, Mark; Ferranti, Laura; Moretti, Patrizia; Quartesan, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Child maltreatment is a well-known condition that is currently considered to be associated with the development of severe psychiatric conditions. Consequently, the authors decided to review the current literature in order to give a complete scenario of the situation in the world and to give recommendations about prevention and treatment as well as research goals. An electronic search was conducted through the means of MEDLINE database in order to find the most up to date peer-reviewed papers, including only those papers published in 2015. 15 papers were included and analyzed the current situation in different countries: US (n.3), Australia (n.2), Ireland (n.2), Israel (n.2), China (n.2), Indonesia (n.1), Pakistan (n.1) and Norway (n.1). Even though sexual abuse has been studied extensively, both physical and emotional abuse and neglect appear to be more represented within the population of patients that had suffered from abuse. Psychiatric disorders (mainly personality disorders, depression and anxiety), interpersonal, social and legal outcomes are important consequences of child maltreatment. Interventions and strategies are needed at different levels, from prevention to treatment and further research is important in order to better understand the phenomenon.

  9. [Mental illness in the former Dutch Indies--four psychiatric syndromes: amok, latah, koro and neurasthenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelsman, M; Eckhardt, P P

    2007-12-22

    --At the beginning of the 20th century Dutch psychiatrists in the former Dutch Indies encountered exotic psychiatric syndromes and variant expressions of psychopathological diseases that were also prevalent in Europe. --The amok and latah syndromes were reported relatively frequently and were considered typical endemic psychopathologies. Amok is an acute condition of insanity in which the affected individual, a man, attempts to kill others. Latah is a shock-like condition in which the affected individual, a woman, mimics the movements and sounds of those nearby against her will. --The koro syndrome is considered a typical but rare psychosis seen primarily among the Chinese population of the former Dutch Indies. Patients have a recurring fear of the penis retracting into the body. --A diagnosis of 'tropical neurasthenia' was frequently made in Europeans for what today would be referred to as dysthymic disorder or minor depressive disorder.

  10. The Organization of the Psychiatric Service and Criminality Committed by the Mentally Ill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramp, Peter; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Over the past 40 years, a marked deinstitutionalisation in favour of social and community psychiatry has taken place in many countries. During this same period of time, there has been an increase in the number of mentally ill criminals. The purpose of this study is to analyse...... of the changing treatment structure by relating response variables to explanatory variables. The long-term effect was analysed in the form of between county analysis with both single and multiple regressions. Results: Bed closure had no immediate effect on either the number of forensic patients or serious...

  11. Brief Report: Understanding Crisis Behaviors in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder--Iceberg Assessment Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Kate H.; Barnes, Julia C.; Young, Nicholas D.; Gabriels, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at risk for emotional dysregulation and behavior problems that can escalate to levels requiring psychiatric hospitalization. Evaluating the etiology of such behaviors can be challenging for health care providers, as individuals with ASD can have difficulty self-reporting concerns.…

  12. Oregon's Gun Relief Program for Adjudicated Mentally Ill Persons: The Psychiatric Security Review Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Juliet; Bloom, Joseph D

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the State of Oregon's implementation of two programs designed to comply with federal gun laws regarding reporting individuals who have received mental health adjudications in criminal and civil courts. One mandate requires that states submit names of adjudicated individuals to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) while the second requires that the state establish a qualifying gun restoration program for those disqualified from gun ownership. In 2009, Oregon's Legislature developed an administrative approach to gun restoration and assigned the responsibility for conducting these hearing to the Oregon Psychiatric Security Review Board (PSRB). The PSRB is a state administrative board that has existed since 1977 and has been primarily focused on the supervision and treatment of adult and juvenile insanity acquittees. The gun restoration program began in 2010, but to date has only received three completed petitions requesting restoration of firearm rights. The article concludes with a discussion that surmises why very few of the Oregonians who are listed in NICS have submitted petitions for relief. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The new asylums in the community: severely ill psychiatric patients living in psychiatric supported housing facilities. A Danish register-based study of prognostic factors, use of psychiatric services, and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Pedersen, Marianne G; Pedersen, Carsten B

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reorganization of psychiatric treatment in Denmark involved a declining number of psychiatric long-stay beds and an increasing number of psychiatric supported housing facilities in the community. Very few studies have focused on the population in such facilities. METHODS: Information...... was generated combining addresses of supported psychiatric housing facilities with information from the Danish Civil Registration System to create a case register of persons living in supported psychiatric housing facilities. Through linkage with the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, we examined predictors...... of becoming a resident in a psychiatric housing facility, use of psychiatric services around the time of entrance to a supported psychiatric housing facility, and mortality rates for residents in a psychiatric housing facility compared to non-residents and to persons in the general population who never...

  14. Excess mortality in people with mental illness: findings from a Northern Italy psychiatric case register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starace, Fabrizio; Mungai, Francesco; Baccari, Flavia; Galeazzi, Gian Maria

    2017-12-22

    People with mental disorders show mortality rates up to 22.2 times higher than that of the general population. In spite of progressive increase in life expectancy observed in the general population, the mortality gap of people suffering from mental health problems has gradually widened. The aim of this paper was to study mortality rates in people suffering from mental illness in a cohort of people (16,981 subjects) in the local mental health register of the province of Modena during the decade 2006-2015. Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) were calculated to compare the mortality of people with mental disorders to the mortality of people living in the province of Modena and the excess of mortality was studied in relation to the following variables: gender, age group, diagnosis and causes of death. In addition, Poisson regression analysis was performed to study the association between patient characteristics and mortality. An overall excess mortality of 80% was found in subjects under the care of mental health services as compared to the reference population (SMR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.7-1.9). Subjects in the 15-44 year group presented the highest SMR (9.2, 95% CI 6.9-11.4). The most prevalent cause of death was cancer (28.1% of deaths). At the Poisson regression, the diagnosis "Substance abuse and dependence" showed the highest relative risk (RR) (4.00). Moreover, being male, single, unemployed and with a lower qualification was associated with higher RRs. Our study confirms that subjects with mental illness have higher SMR. Noteworthy, the overall higher risk of mortality was observed in the younger age group.

  15. Mediation analysis of critical time intervention for persons living with serious mental illnesses: assessing the role of family relations in reducing psychiatric rehospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Andrew; Lukens, Ellen P; Herman, Daniel B

    2014-03-01

    Critical Time Intervention (CTI) is a time-limited care coordination intervention designed to reduce homelessness and other adverse outcomes for persons living with serious mental illness during the transition period between institutions and community living. This study assesses whether CTI improves the quality of family relationships between family members and individuals living with serious mental illness, and examines whether changes in quality of family relationship mediated the association between the intervention and psychiatric rehospitalization outcomes. This study utilizes data from a randomized controlled trial that assessed the effect of CTI in preventing homelessness. Following discharge from inpatient psychiatric treatment in New York City, 150 previously homeless persons living with serious mental illness were randomly assigned to receive usual services only or 9 months of CTI in addition to usual services. Findings from mixed-effects regression models indicated that those assigned to the CTI group reported greater frequency of family contact and greater improvement in satisfaction with family relations than the comparison group during the 18-month follow-up period. Mediation analysis revealed that greater improvement in satisfaction with family relations mediated the effect of CTI on psychiatric rehospitalization outcome, but only at a modest level. These findings suggest that a relatively brief but targeted intervention delivered at the point of hospital discharge may contribute to strengthening family relations and that improvement in perceived family relationship quality can contribute to a reduction in psychiatric rehospitalization.

  16. A semi-structured, phenomenologically oriented psychiatric interview: Descriptive congruens in assessing anomalous subjective experience and mental status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Parnas, Josef Stefan Stanislaw

    2012-01-01

    , phenomenological-oriented semi-structured interview. Limitations: The major limitation of the study is a relatively small sample size, conditioned by the time-consuming nature of the individual interviews. Second, we should have included a measurement of reliability in a less experiencedrecently EASE...

  17. A semi-structured, phenomenologically oriented psychiatric interview: Descriptive congruens in assessing anomalous subjective experience and mental status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Parnas, Josef Stefan Stanislaw

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The contemporary methodology in obtaining psychopathological information relies almost exclusively on the use of structured questionnaires and interview schedules. These interviews yield high interrater reliability and reduce cost. The assessments of anomalous self-experience and of me......-introduced rater, since it is that kind of researchers that are typically enrolled for the empirical data collections....

  18. Human trafficking and severe mental illness: an economic analysis of survivors' use of psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Maria; Oram, Siân; Howard, Louise M; Trevillion, Kylee; Byford, Sarah

    2016-07-19

    Previous studies have found a high prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among survivors of human trafficking. European countries are required to assist trafficked people in their psychological recovery, but there are no rigorous data on the costs of doing so. The objectives of this study were to quantify the use of secondary mental health services by survivors of human trafficking; to estimate the cost of survivors' use of secondary mental health services provided by the UK National Health Service (NHS); and to identify factors that predict higher costs of mental health service provision. Historical cohort study of psychiatric patients who had experienced human trafficking. The South London and Maudsley NHS Trust (SLaM) Biomedical Research Centre Case Register Interactive Search (CRIS) database was used to identify anonymised full patient records of patients who had experienced human trafficking and who had accessed SLaM mental health services between 2007 and 2012. Data were extracted on socio-demographic and trafficking characteristics and contacts with mental health services. Total costs were calculated by multiplying each resource use item by an appropriate unit cost. Factors that predicted high mental health service costs were analysed using regression models. One hundred nineteen patients were included in the analysis. Mean total mental health service costs per patient were £27,293 (sd 80,985) and mean duration of contact with services was 1490 (sd 757) days (approximately 4 years). Regression analysis showed that higher costs were associated with diagnosis of psychotic disorder (p trafficking violence (p = 0.06). Patients diagnosed with psychotic disorders cost approximately £32,635 more than patients with non-psychotic disorders/psychological distress but no formal diagnosis and patients whose clinical notes documented pre-trafficking violence cost £88,633 more than patients for whom pre-trafficking violence was not

  19. Patient emergency assessment following deliberate self-poisoning with benzodiazepines: Can cognitive markers predict recall of the psychiatric interview? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, J; Pariente, J; Dimeglio, C; Gandia, P; Lemesle, B; Giron, A; Franchitto, N; Schmitt, L; Very, E

    2017-10-01

    In cases of deliberate self-poisoning (DSP), patients often ingest benzodiazepines (BZDs), known to alter memory. Experts recommend recovery of the patient's cognitive capacity before psychiatric assessment. Unfortunately, there is no validated tool in common practice to assess whether sufficient cognitive recovery has occurred after DSP with BZDs to ensure patient memory of the assessment. The aim of the study was to identify cognitive functions and markers which predict preserved memory of the mental health care plan proposed at the emergency department after DSP. We recruited patients admitted for DSP with BZDs and control patients. At the time of the psychiatric assessment, we performed cognitive tests and we studied the relationship between these tests and the scores of a memory test performed 24 h after. In comparison with the control group, we found memory impairment in the BZD group. We found significant impairment on the Trail Making Test A (TMT A) in the BZD group in comparison with the control group, while TMT A and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) Coding test scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Attentional functions tested by WAIS Coding test and TMT A were correlated with memory score. It could be profitable to assess it in clinical practice prior to a psychiatric interview.

  20. Is There a Need for Early Palliative Care in Patients With Life-Limiting Illnesses? Interview Study With Patients About Experienced Care Needs From Diagnosis Onward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernaert, Kim; Deliens, Luc; De Vleminck, Aline; Devroey, Dirk; Pardon, Koen; Block, Lieve Van den; Cohen, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The early integration of specialist palliative care has been shown to benefit the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer. In order to explore whether other seriously ill people and people at even earlier phases would also benefit from early palliative care, we conducted 18 qualitative interviews with people having cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, heart failure, or dementia at different phases of the illness trajectory about how they experienced care needs related to their disease from diagnosis onward. Respondents experienced needs within the different domains of palliative care at different stages of the illness and different illness types or duration of the illness. This study contributes to the understanding of primary care needs of patients for whom palliative care (not necessarily specialized palliative care) could be beneficial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Chronic psychiatric status and satisfaction with life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrindell, W.A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch; Luteijn, F.

    The present study represents the first to administer the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) as part of a. semi-structured interview to a large sample of psychiatric patients with severe mental illness. psychometric appraisal of the SWLS demonstrated that figures on its internal structure were quite

  2. The Principle of Symmetry from the Respondents' Perspective: Possessions, Apparitions and Mental Illnesses in Research Interviews with Clerics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Konopásek

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In our current research project, we study how experiences such as hearing the voice of the Lord or having a vision of Virgin Mary are dealt with in psychiatry and Catholic pastoral practice. How is the status of these phenomena negotiated by the participants? Under what conditions do they become instances of legitimate religious experience or, alternatively, symptoms of mental illness? We approach the study of these issues "symmetrically"—we do not prefer a priori medical or spiritual explanations. Some time ago, we demonstrated and explained such an approach (which is common, e.g., in contemporary sociology of science, and its relevance for our research, in an analytic paper on the movie "The Exorcism of Emily Rose" (released in 2005. The paper discusses a highly ambiguous relationship, pictured in the film, between medical and spiritual interpretation of the story of a young girl who was considered possessed by demons and who died after unsuccessful exorcism (KONOPÁSEK & PALEČEK, 2006. The question that has inspired this paper is: can such a symmetrical approach be of any relevance also for people we are studying? In an attempt to get an answer, we have interviewed four Catholic priests on this particular issue. The priests had been asked to watch the movie on Emily Rose and read our paper on it in preparation for the interview. Based on the subsequent discussions (and also on some other empirical data of our current research, we wanted to shed some light on whether and in what ways our specific epistemic perspective coheres with the views and positions of our respondents. It turned out that this reflexive research experiment not only helped to clarify points of mis/understanding between us and our respondents, but also contributed to our own appreciation of the role of symmetry in our current research project as well as in the studied social practice. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1101129

  3. Markers of DNA/RNA damage from oxidation as predictors of a registry-based diagnosis of psychiatric illness in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Anders; Siersma, Volkert; Davidsen, Annette S.

    2018-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a potential biological mediator of the higher rates of psychiatric illness (PI) observed after the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We investigated validated urinary markers of systemic DNA/RNA damage from oxidation (8-oxodG/8-oxoGuo respectively) as predictors of incident PI...... in hospital care were included in the registries, and the conclusion thus only applies to these individuals....

  4. A randomized controlled clinical trial of a nurse-led structured psychosocial intervention program for people with first-onset mental illness in psychiatric outpatient clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wai-Tong; Bressington, Daniel

    2015-09-30

    This study aimed to test the effectiveness of a nurse-led structured psychosocial intervention program in Chinese patients with first-onset mental illness. A single-blind, parallel group, randomized controlled trial design was used. The study involved 180 participants with mild to moderate-severe symptoms of psychotic or mood disorders who were newly referred to two psychiatric outpatient clinics in Hong Kong. Patients were randomly assigned to either an eight-session nurse-led psychosocial intervention program (plus usual care) or usual psychiatric outpatient care (both n=90). The primary outcome was psychiatric symptoms. Outcomes were measured at recruitment, one week and 12 months post-intervention. Patients in the psychosocial intervention group reported statistically significant improvements in symptoms compared to treatment as usual. There were also significant improvements in illness insight and perceived quality of life and reduction in length of re-hospitalizations over the 12-month follow-up. The findings provide evidence that the nurse-led psychosocial intervention program resulted in improved health outcomes in Chinese patients with first-onset mental illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 'Islamic fatalism': life and suffering among Bangladeshi psychiatric patients and their families in London--an interview study 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Roland; Dein, Simon

    2013-01-01

    An interview study of 44 Bangladeshi patients and relatives in eastern London demonstrated frequent appeals to God and deprecation of personal agency. This paper offers an interpretation of this apparent 'fatalism', which argues for the logical downplaying of human agency and ambition in archaic Arabia, contemporary rural Sylhet and among first generation Sylheti migrants in London.

  6. Qualitative analysis of interviews of future non-affective psychotic disorder patients and non-psychiatric controls: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Rubinstein

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: The findings of this unique historical-prospective qualitative analysis of interviews performed before the onset of psychosis, confirmed previous findings of premorbid abnormality of future non-affective psychosis patients. Using qualitative analysis enabled obtaining a more in-depth understanding of the real-life experience of the premorbid period among patients with non-affective psychotic disorders.

  7. Risk of suicide, deliberate self-harm and psychiatric illness after the loss of a close relative: A nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldin, Mai-Britt; Ina Siegismund Kjaersgaard, Maiken; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Thorlund Parner, Erik; Li, Jiong; Prior, Anders; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2017-06-01

    The loss of a close relative is a common event, yet it is associated with increased risk of serious mental health conditions. No large-scale study has explored up to now the importance of the bereaved person's relation to the deceased while accounting for gender and age. We performed a nationwide Danish cohort study using register information from 1995 through 2013 on four sub-cohorts including all persons aged ≥18 years exposed to the loss of a child, spouse, sibling or parent. We identified 1,445,378 bereaved persons, and each was matched by gender, age and family composition to five non-bereaved persons. Cumulative incidence proportions were calculated to estimate absolute differences in suicide, deliberate self-harm and psychiatric illness. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to calculate hazard ratios while adjusting for potential confounders. Results revealed that the risk of suicide, deliberate self-harm and psychiatric illness was increased in the bereaved cohorts for at least 10 years after the loss, particularly during the first year. During that year, the risk difference was 18.9 events in 1,000 persons after loss of a child (95% CI: 17.6-20.1) and 16.0 events in 1,000 persons after loss of the spouse (95% CI: 15.4-16.6). Hazard ratios were generally highest after loss of a child, in younger persons, and after sudden loss by suicide, homicide or accident. One in three persons with a previous psychiatric diagnosis experienced suicide, deliberate self-harm or psychiatric illness within the first year of bereavement. In conclusion, this study shows that the risk of suicide, deliberate self-harm and psychiatric illness is high after the loss of a close relative, especially in susceptible subgroups. This suggests the need for early identification of high-risk persons displaying adjustment problems after loss of a close family member, in order to reduce the risk of serious mental health outcomes. © 2017 World Psychiatric Association.

  8. Electronic cigarettes and mental illness: Reviewing the evidence for help and harm among those with psychiatric and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Kathryn; Valentine, Gerald; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2017-06-01

    Adults with mental illness (MI) use combustible tobacco at increased rates and have greater difficulty quitting smoking. Given the increasing popularity of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), their use by those with MI has important health implications. While preliminary evidence suggests potential benefits of e-cigarette use for those with MI, well-controlled, systematic research examining appeal, correlates, and consequences of e-cigarette use in this vulnerable population is lacking. This review evaluated current knowledge of e-cigarette use and potential for help and/or harm among adults with MI. The search strategy resulted in k = 88 reports, of which k = 9 were deemed relevant. E-cigarette use is prevalent among those with MI, as is concurrent use of e-cigarettes and combustibles. E-cigarettes appeal to those with MI as a viable alternative to combustible tobacco, and their use does not appear to exacerbate nicotine addiction or psychiatric symptoms. However, the long-term impact of e-cigarette use on combustible tobacco use and other health indices is largely unknown. Rigorous research and improved knowledge regarding risks and benefits of e-cigarette use within this vulnerable population are needed to inform whether special consideration is warranted towards those with MI in developing tobacco control policies and health communications. Recommendations for future e-cigarette research include improved assessment of the following: 1) psychodiagnostic variability, 2) flavor preferences, 3) the longitudinal impact on combustible tobacco use, and 4) impact of tobacco product communications. As with combustible cigarettes, individuals with MI may display unique e-cigarette use patterns from that of the general population. (Am J Addict 2017;26:306-315). Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Cinemeducation in Psychiatry: A Seminar in Undergraduate Medical Education Combining a Movie, Lecture, and Patient Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnigk, Olaf; Schreiner, Julia; Reimer, Jens; Emami, Roya; Naber, Dieter; Harendza, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric educators are often faced with students' negative attitudes toward psychiatry. A new type of seminar has been established in order to enable students to gain a deeper understanding of psychiatric illness. Method: A "cinemeducation seminar," combining a movie, a lecture, and a patient interview, has been established as part…

  10. Pilot evaluation of the impact of structured child-centered interventions on psychiatric symptom profile of parents with serious somatic illness: struggle for life trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Mika; Repo, Jenni; Wahlberg, Karl-Erik; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Sami

    2012-01-01

    This is a trial of cancer patients who are seriously somatically ill and of how their distress affects their spouse or children. In the pilot phase the authors examined whether there are changes in psychiatric symptom profile of seriously somatically ill and healthy parents between assessments concerning a situation before the onset of parental illness, in current situation before intervention and 4 months after the intervention. The study is a family cluster, randomized, controlled treatment trial for parents and children in families with a parent who has a serious somatic illness. Global Severity Index (GSI) and psychiatric symptom profile of parents was assessed with the Symptoms Checklist-90 for adults. At pilot evaluation phase of the Struggle for Life trial, a total of 19 families (16 patients, 15 spouses) participated in the baseline assessment conducted before intervention, and 10 families (seven patients, seven spouses) also at the 4-month follow-up after the intervention. The interventions used in this study were the short Let's Talk about Children including two meetings with parents and more intensive Family Talk Intervention consisting of six to eight meetings with parents, children, and whole family. At the 4-month follow-up the GSI score of the patients and spouses was significantly decreased compared to the baseline score. At the baseline the GSI score of the patients was at the same level as that of the psychiatric outpatient sample, whereas at the 4-month follow-up it was at the same level as in the general population. This study lends support to previous studies that recommend that treatment practice should include structured interventions with parents concerning parenting and the wellbeing of children.

  11. Psychiatric illness, socioeconomic status, and marital status in people committing suicide: a matched case-sibling-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben; Qin, Ping; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2006-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Suicides cluster in both families and persons with psychiatric disorders and socioeconomic disadvantages. This study compares these factors between suicide cases, their siblings, and population based controls in an attempt to evaluate both the familial and the individual element...... and controls in exposure to hospitalised psychiatric disorders and socioeconomic disadvantages, although these factors contribute to the familial aggregation of suicides....

  12. Psychiatric disorders of patients seeking obesity treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hung-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obese and overweight people have a higher risk of both chronic physical illness and mental illness. Obesity is reported to be positively associated with psychiatric disorders, especially in people who seek obesity treatment. At the same time, obesity treatment may be influenced by psychological factors or personality characteristics. This study aimed to understand the prevalence of mental disorders among ethnic Chinese who sought obesity treatment. Methods Subjects were retrospectively recruited from an obesity treatment center in Taiwan. The obesity treatments included bariatric surgery and non-surgery treatment. All subjects underwent a standardized clinical evaluation with two questionnaires and a psychiatric referral when needed. The psychiatric diagnosis was made thorough psychiatric clinic interviews using the SCID. A total of 841 patients were recruited. We compared the difference in psychiatric disorder prevalence between patients with surgical and non-surgical treatment. Results Of the 841 patients, 42% had at least one psychiatric disorder. Mood disorders, anxiety disorders and eating disorders were the most prevalent categories of psychiatric disorders. Females had more mood disorders and eating disorders than males. The surgical group had more binge-eating disorder, adjustment disorder, and sleep disorders than the non-surgical group. Conclusion A high prevalence of psychiatric disorders was found among ethnic Chinese seeking obesity treatment. This is consistent with study results in the US and Europe.

  13. "Nothing is absolute in life": understanding uncertainty in the context of psychiatric genetic counseling from the perspective of those with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippman, Catriona; Lohn, Zoe; Ringrose, Andrea; Inglis, Angela; Cheek, Joanna; Austin, Jehannine C

    2013-10-01

    No genetic tests are currently clinically available for serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Rather, the full spectrum of genetic variants that confer susceptibility remain unknown, and estimates of probability of condition recurrence typically have the form of ranges rather than single absolute numbers. Genetic counselors have been shown to feel that the information that can be provided for patients with serious mental illness could be more confusing than helpful. However, how those with serious mental illness perceive this uncertainty remains unknown. So, to investigate this, individuals with serious mental illness participated in a psychiatric genetic counseling (GC) session and responded to a single open ended question about their reactions towards the uncertainty that they encountered in their GC session immediately and one month post-counseling (from which themes were identified), and completed the Genetic Counseling Satisfaction Scale immediately post-session (descriptive statistics applied). While some of the 37 participants were disappointed with the uncertainty, twice as many were unconcerned. Overall, responses from immediately and one month after GC were very similar; participants were very satisfied with, and found value in GC despite uncertainty, and four approaches to coping with uncertainty emerged. Ultimately, these findings offer insight into providing GC for those with serious mental illness, and potentially could be applied to other areas of GC where uncertainty lies, with downstream impact on GC practice and future research.

  14. “Nothing is absolute in life”: Understanding uncertainty in the context of psychiatric genetic counseling from the perspective of those with serious mental illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippman, Catriona; Lohn, Zoe; Ringrose, Andrea; Inglis, Angela; Cheek, Joanna; Austin, Jehannine C

    2013-01-01

    No genetic tests are currently clinically available for serious mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Rather, the full spectrum of genetic variants that confer susceptibility remain unknown, and estimates of probability of condition recurrence typically have the form of ranges rather than single absolute numbers. Genetic counselors have been shown to feel that the information that can be provided for patients with serious mental illness could be more confusing than helpful. However, how those with serious mental illness perceive this uncertainty remains unknown. So, to investigate this, individuals with serious mental illness participated in a psychiatric genetic counseling (GC) session and responded to a single open ended question about their reactions towards the uncertainty that they encountered in their GC session immediately and one month post-counseling (from which themes were identified), and completed the Genetic Counseling Satisfaction Scale immediately post-session (descriptive statistics applied). While some of the 37 participants were disappointed with the uncertainty, twice as many were unconcerned. Overall, responses from immediately and one month after GC were very similar; participants were very satisfied with, and found value in GC despite uncertainty, and four approaches to coping with uncertainty emerged. Ultimately, these findings offer insight into providing GC for those with serious mental illness, and potentially could be applied to other areas of GC where uncertainty lies, with downstream impact on GC practice and future research. PMID:23604904

  15. Family history of psychiatric illness as a risk factor for schizoaffective disorder: a Danish register-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Licht, Rasmus W

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schizoaffective disorder may be related to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, but no population-based studies, to our knowledge, have investigated this association in families. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a psychiatric history of schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder,...

  16. A SHOCKING REQUIREMENT IN THE LAW ON NEGLIGENCE LIABILITY FOR PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS: LIVERPOOL WOMEN'S HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST V RONAYNE [2015] EWCA CIV 588.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Andrew S; Burrows, John H

    2016-01-01

    The Ronayne case concerned a husband who suffered a psychiatric illness, described as an adjustment disorder, in seeing the condition of his wife who was the primary victim of admitted medical negligence. His claim for compensation, as a 'secondary victim', failed because he could not satisfy the legal requirement that there must be a sudden shocking event. This commentary criticises that requirement which appears to make no medical sense. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Likelihood of obtaining Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) and SIRS-2 elevations among forensic psychiatric inpatients with screening elevations on the Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmire, David M; Tarescavage, Anthony M; Gottfried, Emily D

    2016-12-01

    The Miller Forensic Assessment of Symptoms Test (M-FAST) was designed as a screening measure for feigned psychiatric symptoms. When M-FAST Total Scores are elevated (raw score ≥6), the test manual recommends follow-up with a more comprehensive measure of feigning, such as the widely used and researched Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS) or the revised version of the test (SIRS-2). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate how often M-FAST screening elevations are associated with subsequent elevations on the SIRS or SIRS-2. The sample included archival data from 100 forensic psychiatric inpatients who obtained M-FAST Total Score elevations ≥6 during screening and were subsequently administered the SIRS (that was also rescored using SIRS-2 criteria). Among examinees who elevated the M-FAST over the recommended cutoff, 66.0% met standard SIRS feigning criteria, 42% met SIRS-2 criteria for feigning, and 81.0% obtained at least 1 SIRS/SIRS-2 elevation in the Probable Feigning range or higher. These results are consistent with the M-FAST manual guidelines, which support the use of the ≥6 M-FAST cutoff score to screen for potential feigning (but not as an independent marker of feigning). A higher M-FAST cutoff score of ≥16 was associated with subsequently meeting full SIRS criteria for feigning in 100.0% of protocols. Because the SIRS criteria were designed to have very low false positive rates, these findings indicate that more confident assertions about feigning can be made when elevations reach this level on the MFAST. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Research Review: Test-retest reliability of standardized diagnostic interviews to assess child and adolescent psychiatric disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Laura; Comeau, Jinette; Wang, Li; Vitoroulis, Irene; Boyle, Michael H; Bennett, Kathryn

    2018-02-19

    A better understanding of factors contributing to the observed variability in estimates of test-retest reliability in published studies on standardized diagnostic interviews (SDI) is needed. The objectives of this systematic review and meta-analysis were to estimate the pooled test-retest reliability for parent and youth assessments of seven common disorders, and to examine sources of between-study heterogeneity in reliability. Following a systematic review of the literature, multilevel random effects meta-analyses were used to analyse 202 reliability estimates (Cohen's kappa = ҡ) from 31 eligible studies and 5,369 assessments of 3,344 children and youth. Pooled reliability was moderate at ҡ = .58 (CI 95% 0.53-0.63) and between-study heterogeneity was substantial (Q = 2,063 (df = 201), p reliability varied across informants for specific types of psychiatric disorder (ҡ = .53-.69 for parent vs. ҡ = .39-.68 for youth) with estimates significantly higher for parents on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder and the broad groupings of externalizing and any disorder. Reliability was also significantly higher in studies with indicators of poor or fair study methodology quality (sample size reliability of SDIs and the usefulness of these tools in both clinical and research contexts. Potential remedies include the introduction of standardized study and reporting requirements for reliability studies, and exploration of other approaches to assessing and classifying child and adolescent psychiatric disorder. © 2018 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  19. Interviewing techniques for the Asian-American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Sue

    2006-05-01

    The cultures of racial and ethnic minorities influence many aspects of mental illness, including communication styles, symptoms, coping strategies, family and community support, and willingness to seek treatment. This article presents the effects of Asian American/Pacific Islanders' beliefs and behaviors related to mental health. Strategies to enhance the process and outcomes of the psychiatric interview with members of this populatior are addressed.

  20. Further Evidence of a Cohort Effect in Bipolar Disorder: More Early Onsets and Family History of Psychiatric Illness in More Recent Epochs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert M; Kupka, Ralph; Keck, Paul E; McElroy, Susan L; Altshuler, Lori L; Frye, Mark A; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Leverich, Gabriele S; Nolen, Willem A

    2016-08-01

    Given that a cohort effect is rarely mentioned as one of the possible contributors to the increased incidence of childhood-onset bipolar disorder in the United States, we reexamined evidence for the phenomenon within our outpatient Bipolar Collaborative Network. 968 outpatients (mean age, 41 years) with DSM bipolar disorder from 1995 to 2002 from 4 sites in the United States and 3 in the Netherlands and Germany (abbreviated as Europe) gave informed consent and provided detailed demographic, illness, and family history information on a patient questionnaire. Family history of bipolar disorder, depression, suicide attempt, alcohol abuse, substance abuse, and "other" illness was collected for each parent and the 4 grandparents. Age at onset and family history of illness burden were then assessed as a function of the age of the patient at network entry. Data for patients aged 35 years or older (n = 613) were included in the first analysis. Compared to older patients, those who were younger when they entered the network had an earlier age at onset of their bipolar disorder (r = 0.33, P bipolar disorder and greater burden of psychiatric disorders in 2 generations of direct progenitors of our patients. The resulting likely increase in severity of bipolar illness in future generations based on this earlier age at onset and increased familial loading, particularly in the United States, deserves focused clinical and public health attention and attempts at amelioration. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. Being a fellow patient to a critically ill patient leads to feelings of anxiety - An interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jannie; Bonnevie Lundby, Trine; Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard

    2016-01-01

    of the situation can lead to anxiety, a feeling of being forced into patient inter-action and the lack of professional support. Health professionals should have a central role in supporting the fellow patients and communicating with them about their experiences and this does not seem to be fulfilled sufficiently......Objectives To explore in-patients’ experiences being a fellow patient to patients who become critically ill. Design The study was designed as a qualitative phenomenological study. Setting The study was conducted in a surgical ward of a hospital in Denmark. Subjects Fifteen fellow patients...... to patients, who became critically ill. Results Three key themes emerged from the analysis of the data: patients’ interaction, anxiety, and professional support. These findings demonstrated the importance of understanding how patients experienced being a fellow patient to patients, who become critically ill...

  2. Psychiatric care or social defense? The origins of a controversy over the responsibility of the mentally ill in French forensic psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protais, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    While some countries like Belgium chose a penal system clearly inspired by social-defense theories for mentally disturbed criminals, the French law hasn't been consistent and varies from the enlightened classical law and social-defense law. Indeed paragraph 1 of article 122-1 states that people whose discernment or control is abolished by a psychiatric disorder are non-responsible respecting the classical logic of law. On the other hand, Paragraph 2 of Article 122-1 allows the mentally ill to be judged responsible whereas no institution exists to take care about them. Then the system of psychiatric care in prisons present as a solution for professionals wishing to promote a system where people are punished and socially rehabilitated. Thus these forensic psychiatrists don't refer to paragraph 1 of article 122-1 and even people presenting serious mental disorders are considered responsible. Moreover, if a controversy has always existed between psychiatrists who argue a large conception of mental irresponsibility and professionals who defend the right to punish and to conclude that responsibility even for mentally disturbed criminals, the controversy becomes more important in French forensic psychiatry after the Second World War. If until the 1970s the practice of imposing responsibility for mentally ill individuals shows itself as a humanism, it occurs more within a security perspective today. © 2013.

  3. Effect of VAPE about mother and infant health on knowledge among primary caregivers of patients with postpartum psychiatric illness:- A pre-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sailaxmi; Thomas, Linsu; Desai, Geetha

    2017-08-01

    Post partum psychiatric illnesses are quiet common nowadays, which can interfere with postnatal care of both mother and infant. The present study was a one group pre-test - post-test design, adopted with an aim to enhance the knowledge on mother infant health among primary caregivers of mothers with postpartum psychiatric illnesses conducted in the mother-baby unit, NIMHANS, Bengaluru. Twenty five subjects who met the inclusion criteria were recruited through convenience sampling. After the pilot study, data was collected with a researcher developed tool. The Video Assisted Psycho-Education [VAPE] consisted of three sessions lasting for thirty minutes, taken over three consecutive days following the pre-test. Post-test was done immediately after the last session. Effectiveness of the intervention was established by McNemar test, Paired t-test and Wilcoxon Sign Ranks test. Analysis revealed statistically significant (pVAPE sessions. There was no statistically significant association between the pre-intervention knowledge score and the socio-demographic variables of the study subjects. The study findings revealed that the VAPE programme was effective in increasing the knowledge of the primary caregivers on mother infant health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Randomized Clinical Trial of the Effectiveness of a Home-Based Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurse Intervention: Outcomes for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy P. Hanrahan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with serious mental illness have greater risk for contracting HIV, multiple morbidities, and die 25 years younger than the general population. This high need and high cost subgroup face unique barriers to accessing required health care in the current health care system. The effectiveness of an advanced practice nurse model of care management was assessed in a four-year random controlled trial. Results are reported in this paper. In a four-year random controlled trial, a total of 238 community-dwelling individuals with HIV and serious mental illness (SMI were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n=128 or to a control group (n=110. Over 12 months, the intervention group received care management from advanced practice psychiatric nurse, and the control group received usual care. The intervention group showed significant improvement in depression (P=.012 and the physical component of health-related quality of life (P=.03 from baseline to 12 months. The advanced practice psychiatric nurse intervention is a model of care that holds promise for a higher quality of care and outcomes for this vulnerable population.

  5. Gender-related influences of parental alcoholism on the prevalence of psychiatric illnesses: Analysis of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter T.; Desai, Rani A.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Offspring of individuals with alcoholism are at increased risk for psychiatric illness, but the effects of gender on this risk are not well known. In this study we tested the hypothesis that the gender of the parent with alcoholism and the gender of offspring affect the association between parental alcoholism and offspring psychiatric illness. Method We analyzed the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) data to examine the gender-specific prevalence of Axis I and Axis II disorders in 23,006 male and 17,368 female respondents with and without a history of paternal or maternal alcoholism. Adjusted odds-ratios were calculated for the disorders based on gender and presence of maternal or paternal alcoholism. Results Maternal or paternal alcoholism was associated with a higher prevalence of every disorder examined, regardless of the gender of offspring. Gender-related differences in prevalences were present in nearly all examined disorders and the association between parental alcoholism and offspring psychiatric disorders was significantly different in men and women. These differences included stronger associations in female offspring of men with alcoholism (alcohol abuse without dependence); in female offspring of women with alcoholism (mania, nicotine dependence, alcohol abuse, and schizoid personality disorder); in male offspring of men with alcoholism (mania); and in male offspring of women with alcoholism (panic disorder). Conclusions Interactions between gender and parental alcoholism were specific to certain disorders but varied in their effects, and in general female children of women with alcoholism appear at greatest risk for adult psychopathology. PMID:20645936

  6. Impact of psychiatric education and training on attitude of medical students towards mentally ill: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of studies from the western world have explored the negative beliefs held by individuals towards people with mental illness. The knowledge of attitude and awareness of undergraduate medical students towards psychiatry, mental health and mental disorders is of utmost importance. Objective: The current study aims at assessment of attitudes of medical students towards mental illness and mentally ill. Materials and Methods: The study used a cross-sectional survey design. The instruments used included Beliefs toward Mental Illness (BMI scale, Attitudes to Mental Illness Questionnaire (AMIQ. ANOVA was carried out to compare the in between group differences for the four study groups. Additionally Bonferroni correction was used to conduct the post hoc analysis. Results: The interns were significantly more likely to agree with the statement that the mental disorders are recurrent; less likely to be of thought that the behavior of people with mental disorders is unpredictable; more likely to disagree with the fact that diagnosis of depression as described in the case vignette was going to damage the career of the individual; more likely to agree with the option of inviting a depressed person to a party; more likely to believe in fact that mentally ill individuals are more likely to be criminals as compared to medical students in different professional years. Conclusions: Adequate modifications to existing medical curriculum would help improve attitude of medical students towards mentally ill.

  7. Empathy toward Patients with Mental Illness among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Impact of a Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Marwa Abd El-Gawad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an ability and skill that can be learned and developed through appropriate education and practice. While the importance of nurses' empathy is widely acknowledged, little is known about the impact of passing through the psychiatric nursing and mental health educational experience at the Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University on…

  8. [Major psychiatric disorders and filicide: a descriptive analysis of filicides perpetrated by women with psychotic mental illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczki, Ágnes; Lukács-Miszler, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to reflect on the connection between maternal filicide and major psychiatric disorders based on international literature, and analysis of filicides perpetrated by women and ending with compulsory medical treatment based on a not guilty by reason of insanity verdict. For the purpose of the analysis we collected cases back to 1993 from the archives of the Forensic Observation and Psychiatric Institution (IMEI), when a female perpetrator committed homicide against her blood-related offspring, after which she spent her compulsory medical treatment in the Institution. We had 14 cases which were only descriptively analysed due to the low number of cases. We collected data through overview of the documentation of the patients. We focused on several factors: demographic characteristics of the victims, characteristics of the homicidal act, demographic and psychiatric characteristics of the perpetrators. Most importantly, our results show interesting findings in the field of gender distribution of the victims. In relation to suicide risk, our results concur with previous findings pointing out its strong connection with filicide. Furthermore, our findings point out the relevance of schizoaffective disorder, as it was the most frequent diagnosis in our cases. We make our conclusions primarily in regard of prevention, we emphasise the strongest risk factors according to the results, which can draw the clinical practitioner's attention to the danger of filicide.

  9. Perceived mental illness stigma and HIV risk behaviors among adult psychiatric outpatients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkington, Katherine S; McKinnon, Karen; Mann, Claudio Gruber; Collins, Pamela Y; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Wainberg, Milton L

    2010-02-01

    We examined the associations between perceived mental illness stigma and HIV risk and protective behaviors among adults with severe mental illness (SMI) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We measured mental illness stigma across three domains ("Personal Experiences," "Perceived Attractiveness," and "Relationship Discrimination"), and examined the relationship between experiences of stigma in each domain and HIV risk and protective behaviors over the past 3 months in 98 outpatients with SMI. Those who reported greater "Relationship Discrimination" stigma were significantly more likely to be sexually active and to have unprotected sex; they were significantly less likely to report deliberately having fewer partners as a way to protect themselves from HIV. The role of stigma in unprotected sexual behavior should be examined further and considered in any HIV prevention intervention for people with SMI.

  10. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 APA*

  11. Validation of the Portuguese version of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being scale (FACIT-Sp 12) among Brazilian psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Lucchetti, Alessandra Lamas Granero; de Bernardin Gonçalves, Juliane Piasseschi; Vallada, Homero P

    2015-02-01

    Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being scale (FACIT-Sp 12) is one of the most used and most validated instruments for assessing spiritual well-being in the world. Some Brazilian studies have used this instrument without, however, assessing its psychometric properties. The present study aims to validate the Portuguese version of the FACIT-Sp 12 among Brazilian psychiatric inpatients. A self-administered questionnaire, covering spiritual well-being (FACIT-Sp 12), depression, anxiety, religiosity, quality of life, and optimism, was administered. Of those who met the inclusion criteria, 579 patients were invited to participate and 493 (85.1 %) were able to fill out the FACIT-Sp 12 twice (test and retest). Subsequently, the validation analysis was carried out. Estimation of test-retest reliability, discriminant, and convergent validity was determined by the Spearman's correlation test, and the internal consistency was examined by the Cronbach's alpha. The sample was predominantly male (63.9 %) with a mean age of 35.9 years, and the most common psychiatric condition was bipolar disorder (25.7 %) followed by schizophrenia (20.4 %), drug use (20.0 %), and depression (17.6 %) according to ICD-10. The total FACIT-Sp 12 scale as well as the subscales demonstrated high internal consistency (coefficient alphas ranging from 0.893 for the total scale to 0.655 for the Meaning subscale), good convergent and divergent validity, and satisfactory test-retest reliability (rho = 0.699). The Portuguese version of FACIT-Sp 12 is a valid and reliable measure to use in Brazilian psychiatric inpatients. The availability of a brief and broad measure of spiritual well-being can help the study of spirituality and its influence on health by researchers from countries that speak the Portuguese language.

  12. Narrative interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Claire; Kirkpatrick, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Narrative interviews place the people being interviewed at the heart of a research study. They are a means of collecting people's own stories about their experiences of health and illness. Narrative interviews can help researchers to better understand people's experiences and behaviours. Narratives may come closer to representing the context and integrity of people's lives than more quantitative means of research. Methodology Researchers using narrative interview techniques do not set out with a fixed agenda, rather they tend to let the interviewee control the direction, content and pace of the interview. The paper describes the interview process and the suggested approach to analysis of narrative interviews, We draw on the example from a study that used series of narrative interviews about people's experiences of taking antidepressants. Limitations Some people may find it particularly challenging to tell their story to a researcher in this way rather than be asked a series of questions like in a television or radio interview. Narrative research like all qualitative research does not set out to be generalisable and may only involve a small set of interviews.

  13. Integrated Care Increases Treatment and Improves Outcomes of Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Psychiatric Illness or Substance Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Samuel B; Bräu, Norbert; Cheung, Ramsey; Liu, Lin; Sanchez, Courtney; Sklar, Marisa; Phelps, Tyler E; Marcus, Sonja G; Wasil, Michelene M; Tisi, Amelia; Huynh, Lia; Robinson, Shannon K; Gifford, Allen L; Asch, Steven M; Groessl, Erik J

    2015-11-01

    Patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with psychiatric disorders and/or substance abuse face significant barriers to antiviral treatment. New strategies are needed to improve treatment rates and outcomes. We investigated whether an integrated care (IC) protocol, which includes multidisciplinary care coordination and patient case management, could increase the proportion of patients with chronic HCV infection who receive antiviral treatment (a combination of interferon-based and direct-acting antiviral agents) and achieve a sustained virologic response (SVR). We performed a prospective randomized trial at 3 medical centers in the United States. Participants (n = 363 patients attending HCV clinics) had been screened and tested positive for depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and/or substance use; they were assigned randomly to groups that received IC or usual care (controls) from March 2009 through February 2011. A midlevel mental health practitioner was placed at each HCV clinic to provide IC with brief mental health interventions and case management, according to formal protocol. The primary end point was SVR. Of the study participants, 63% were non-white, 51% were homeless in the past 5 years, 64% had psychiatric illness, 65% were substance abusers within 1 year before enrollment, 57% were at risk for post-traumatic stress disorder, 71% had active depression, 80% were infected with HCV genotype 1, and 23% had advanced fibrosis. Over a mean follow-up period of 28 months, a greater proportion of patients in the IC group began receiving antiviral therapy (31.9% vs 18.8% for controls; P = .005) and achieved a SVR (15.9% vs 7.7% of controls; odds ratio, 2.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-4.44; P = .018). There were no differences in serious adverse events between groups. Integrated care increases the proportion of patients with HCV infection and psychiatric illness and/or substance abuse who begin antiviral therapy and achieve SVRs, without serious

  14. [Religious/spiritual well-being in mentally ill persons II: the development of a short scale and comparison scores for clinical psychiatric groups and healthy controls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterrainer, Human-Friedrich; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Multidimensional Inventory for Religious/Spiritual Well-Being (MI-RSWB) was successfully applied in several clinical as well as non-clinical studies. However, the original version of the scale often showed to be as too comprehensive especially for clinical surroundings. There for the aim of this study is to develop a short version of the scale comprising 12 items. Based on a sample representative of the Austrian general population (N = 1,500), a first MI-RSWB short version is developed by means of factor- and reliability analysis. Furthermore the new short version of the scale is initially validated through several indicators of mental illness. The MI-RSWB short version shows convincing psychometric properties. The total scale as well as the sub scales exhibit at least a sufficient internal consistency. A significant negative association with several indicators of psychiatric illness is also confirmed for the short version of the scale. The MI-RWSB 12 scale is especially recommended for further research focusing on the clinical relevance of religiosity and spirituality.

  15. Disentangling depression and anxiety in relation to neuroticism, extraversion, suicide, and self-harm among adult psychiatric inpatients with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subica, Andrew M; Allen, Jon G; Frueh, B Christopher; Elhai, Jon D; Fowler, J Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about depression-anxiety comorbidity and its association with personality traits and suicide/self-harm in adult psychiatric inpatients with serious mental illness (SMI), impacting clinical assessment and treatment. This study sought to determine the symptom structure of depression-anxiety comorbidity and its relation to neuroticism, extraversion, and suicide/self-harm behaviour in this high-risk population. Nine hundred and sixty-two adults receiving inpatient care at a private psychiatric hospital completed questionnaires at admission. Confirmatory factor analyses compared a bifactor solution specifying a general distress factor and two specific depression and anxiety factors against unidimensional and correlated factors solutions. The bifactor solutions' factors were subsequently correlated with neuroticism and extraversion subscales and pre-hospitalization suicide/self-harm behaviours. The bifactor model rendered superior fit to sample data and a robust general factor - accounting for 77.61% of common item variance - providing the first evidence for a tripartite structure of depression and anxiety among adult inpatients. The bifactor solution-outputted independent general distress, depression, and anxiety factors positively correlated with neuroticism, the personality dimension corresponding to trait negative affectivity. The general distress and depression factors associated with recent self-harm, but factors showed no associations with prior suicidal behaviour. In adult psychiatric inpatients, general distress substantially underlies comorbid depression and anxiety symptom variation and may contribute to recent incidence of self-harm. Transdiagnostic assessments and interventions targeting general distress may temper depression, anxiety, and self-harm in adult inpatients. Clinical implications Depression-anxiety comorbidity symptomology in adult psychiatric inpatients is primarily composed of general distress. General distress and specific

  16. HIV-infection and psychiatric illnesses - A double edged sword that threatens the vision of a contained epidemic: The Greater Stockholm HIV Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallow, Amadou; Ljunggren, Gunnar; Wändell, Per; Wahlström, Lars; Carlsson, Axel C

    2017-01-01

    The Greater Stockholm HIV Cohort Study is an initiative to provide longitudinal information regarding the health of people living with HIV. Our aim was to explore the prevalence of HIV and its association with psychiatric co-morbidities. All patients with a recorded diagnosis of HIV (any position of the ICD-10 codes B20-B24) were identified during the period 2007-2014 and related to the total population in Stockholm by January 1, 2015, N = 2.21 million. The age at diagnosis, gender, and first occurrence of an HIV diagnosis was recorded. Analyses were done by age and gender. Prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidities amongst HIV patients were recorded. Age-adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated with logistic regression for prevalent psychiatric co-morbidities in HIV infected individuals compared to the prevalence in the general population. The total prevalence of HIV was 0.16%; females 0.10% (n = 1134) and males 0.21% (n = 2448). HIV-infected people were more frequently diagnosed with psychiatric illnesses and drug abuse. In females and males with HIV-diagnosis respectively, drug dependence disorder was 7.5 (7.76% vs 1.04%) and 5.1 (10.17% vs 1.98%) times higher, psychotic disorders were 6.3 (2.65% vs 0.42%) and 2.9 (1.43% vs 0.49%) times higher, bipolar disorder was 2.5 (1.41% vs 0.57%) and 3 (1.02% vs 0.34%) times higher, depression diagnosis was 1.5 (8.47% vs 5.82%) and 3.4 (10.17% vs 2.97%) higher, trauma-related disorder was 1.5 (6.00% vs 4.10%) respectively 2.9 (4.45% vs 1.56%) times higher, anxiety disorder was 1.2 (6.88% vs 5.72%) and 2.2 (6.54% vs 2.93%) times higher than in their non-infected peers. Despite effective ART, many individuals with HIV have an impaired mental health and a history of drug abuse that may threaten the vision of a contained epidemic. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A role for autonomic cardiac control in the effects of oxytocin on social behaviour and psychiatric illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S Quintana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative evidence over the last decade indicates that intranasally administered oxytocin (OT has a major impact on social behavior and cognition. In parallel, researchers have also highlighted the effects of OT on cardiovascular and autonomic nervous system regulation. Taken at face value, these two streams of research appear largely unrelated. However, another line of evidence highlights a key role for autonomic cardiac control in social behavior and cognition. In this review, we suggest that autonomic cardiac control may moderate the relationship between OT and social behavior. We also highlight the importance of autonomic cardiac control in psychiatric disorders of social dysfunction and suggest that heart rate variability (HRV – an index of autonomic cardiac control – may play a key role in patient response in treatment trials of OT.

  18. Agreement for depression diagnosis between DSM-IV-TR criteria, three validated scales, oncologist assessment, and psychiatric clinical interview in elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhondali W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wadih Rhondali,1 Gilles Freyer,2 Virginie Adam,3 Marilène Filbet,4 Martine Derzelle,5 Gaelle Abgrall-Barbry,6 Sophie Bourcelot,7 Jean-Louis Machavoine,8 Muriel Chomat-Neyraud,9 Olivier Gisserot,10 Rémi Largillier,11 Annick Le Rol,12 Frank Priou,13 Pierre Saltel,14 Claire Falandry15 1Clinique Mon Repos, Clinea, Marseille, France; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Université Lyon 1, Pierre-Benite, France; 3Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine Alexis Vautrin, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France; 4Palliative Unit, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Université Lyon 1, Pierre-Benite, France; 5Institut Jean Godinot, Reims, France; 6Tenon Hospital, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France; 7Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France; 8Centre François Baclesse, Caen, France; 9Centre Hospitalier de la région d’Annecy, Pringy, France; 10Hôpital d’Instruction des Armées Sainte-Anne, Toulon, France; 11Centre Azuréen de Cancérologie, Mougins, France; 12Medical Oncology, Hôpital Perpétuel Secours, Levallois-Perret, France; 13Medical Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Départemental Les Oudairies, La Roche-sur-Yon, France; 14Supportive Care Department, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France; 15Geriatrics and Oncology Unit, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Université Lyon 1, Pierre-Bénite, France Background: Depression, a major outcome in cancer patients, is often evaluated by physicians relying on their clinical impressions rather than patient self-report. Our aim was to assess agreement between patient self-reported depression, oncologist assessment (OA, and psychiatric clinical interview (PCI in elderly patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC.Methods: This analysis was a secondary endpoint of the Elderly Women AOC Trial 3 (EWOT3, designed to assess the impact of geriatric covariates, notably depression, on survival in patients older than 70 years of age. Depression was assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale-30 (GDS, the Hospital

  19. Translating person-centered care into practice: A comparative analysis of motivational interviewing, illness-integration support, and guided self-determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoffmann, Vibeke; Hörnsten, Åsa; Storbækken, Solveig; Graue, Marit; Rasmussen, Bodil; Wahl, Astrid; Kirkevold, Marit

    2016-03-01

    Person-centred care [PCC] can engage people in living well with a chronic condition. However, translating PCC into practice is challenging. We aimed to compare the translational potentials of three approaches: motivational interviewing [MI], illness integration support [IIS] and guided self-determination [GSD]. Comparative analysis included eight components: (1) philosophical origin; (2) development in original clinical setting; (3) theoretical underpinnings; (4) overarching goal and supportive processes; (5) general principles, strategies or tools for engaging peoples; (6) health care professionals' background and training; (7) fidelity assessment; (8) reported effects. Although all approaches promoted autonomous motivation, they differed in other ways. Their original settings explain why IIS and GSD strive for life-illness integration, whereas MI focuses on managing ambivalence. IIS and GSD were based on grounded theories, and MI was intuitively developed. All apply processes and strategies to advance professionals' communication skills and engagement; GSD includes context-specific reflection sheets. All offer training programs; MI and GSD include fidelity tools. Each approach has a primary application: MI, when ambivalence threatens positive change; IIS, when integrating newly diagnosed chronic conditions; and GSD, when problem solving is difficult, or deadlocked. Professionals must critically consider the context in their choice of approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Arachidonic acid drives postnatal neurogenesis and elicits a beneficial effect on prepulse inhibition, a biological trait of psychiatric illnesses.

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    Motoko Maekawa

    Full Text Available Prepulse inhibition (PPI is a compelling endophenotype (biological markers for mental disorders including schizophrenia. In a previous study, we identified Fabp7, a fatty acid binding protein 7 as one of the genes controlling PPI in mice and showed that this gene was associated with schizophrenia. We also demonstrated that disrupting Fabp7 dampened hippocampal neurogenesis. In this study, we examined a link between neurogenesis and PPI using different animal models and exploring the possibility of postnatal manipulation of neurogenesis affecting PPI, since gene-deficient mice show biological disturbances from prenatal stages. In parallel, we tested the potential for dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, arachidonic acid (ARA and/or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, to promote neurogenesis and improve PPI. PUFAs are ligands for Fabp members and are abundantly expressed in neural stem/progenitor cells in the hippocampus. Our results are: (1 an independent model animal, Pax6 (+/- rats, exhibited PPI deficits along with impaired postnatal neurogenesis; (2 methylazoxymethanol acetate (an anti-proliferative drug elicited decreased neurogenesis even in postnatal period, and PPI defects in young adult rats (10 weeks when the drug was given at the juvenile stage (4-5 weeks; (3 administering ARA for 4 weeks after birth promoted neurogenesis in wild type rats; (4 raising Pax6 (+/- pups on an ARA-containing diet enhanced neurogenesis and partially improved PPI in adult animals. These results suggest the potential benefit of ARA in ameliorating PPI deficits relevant to psychiatric disorders and suggest that the effect may be correlated with augmented postnatal neurogenesis.

  1. [Psychiatry and the assessment of human destructiveness: on the question of drawing the line between the "normal" concept of evil and psychiatric illnesses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterhuber, Hartmann

    2008-01-01

    Every culture in this world demands that its members comply with a few basic rules: Respect for and maintenance of the health and life of others are recognised as worldwide ethical norms just as much as consideration for the economic basis of existence of others. When these are exceeded, they are punished in all social systems. If there is no severe mental disturbance, the responsibility for a crime or for socially damaging or non-conformist behaviour lies with the individual himself. The question, whether a person could have acted differently in a defined situation on the basis of his personality characteristics and his neural constitution, leads to diverse answers. Is anti-social, criminal behaviour a "disturbance in itself" or the result of a personality structure which has been defined as an illness or an organic deficit? The widest branches of science are occupied with this topic: psychiatry, psychology and philosophy, neural sciences and sociology, jurisprudence and ethics. The list could be continued. The results of personality research along with findings concerning neural mis-connections and the discourse regarding free will in contrast to deterministic interpretations are undoubtedly of particular relevance. On the basis of research results from the scientific disciplines mentioned above, the author concludes that people with socially damaging or radically "evil" behaviour are a very heterogeneous group with strongly varying personality profiles, unfavourable family socialisation conditions and often varied neuro-physiological disturbances, but that responsibility for the crimes they are accused of lies with them as long as their disposition and discretion capacity has not been impaired or removed through serious psychiatric illness.Without classifying them as patients, as our fellow citizens, they deserve our due care and recognition of their human dignity.

  2. Abnormal Glucocorticoid Receptor mRNA and Protein Isoform Expression in the Prefrontal Cortex in Psychiatric Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Duncan; Tsai, Shan Yuan; Woon, Heng Giap; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon

    2011-01-01

    Stress has been implicated in the onset and illness course of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The effects of stress in these disorders may be mediated by abnormalities of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, and its corticosteroid receptors. We investigated mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and protein expression of multiple GRα isoforms, in the prefrontal cortex of 37 schizophrenia cases and 37 matched controls. Quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting, and luciferase assays were employed. In multiple regression analysis, schizophrenia diagnosis was a significant predictor of total GR mRNA expression (pschizophrenia cases relative to controls. No significant effect of diagnosis on MR mRNA was detected. At the protein level, no significant predictors of total GRα protein or the full-length GRα isoform were identified. However, schizophrenia diagnosis was a strong predictor (pschizophrenia cases (80.4%) relative to controls. This finding was replicated in a second cohort of 35 schizophrenia cases, 34 bipolar disorder cases, and 35 controls, in which both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder diagnoses were significant predictors of putative GRα-D1 abundance (pschizophrenia cases. Luciferase assays demonstrated that the GRα-D1 isoform can activate transcription at glucocorticoid response elements. These findings confirm total GR mRNA reductions in schizophrenia and provide the first evidence of GR protein isoform abnormalities in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. PMID:21881570

  3. The effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in the treatment of depression and depressive symptoms in other psychiatric and medical illnesses: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Clayton; Devicari Cheda, Julio Nelson; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Veras, Andre Barciela; Cardoso, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    International interest on the benefits of using the steroid hormone Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on various aspects of human health, including the regulation of mood, is increasing. This study aimed to review the scientific literature on the use of DHEA in the treatment of depression and depressive symptoms in other psychiatric and medical illnesses. PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Virtual Health Library (VHL) databases were independently searched by two researchers using the following terms: depression, treatment, DHEA, and mood. Clinical studies were considered eligible when subjects were treated with DHEA and psychological assessments of depression were conducted. No time limits or language for this research were imposed. One 183 references were identified, and 22 references were selected to compose this review. Significant improvements related to the use of DHEA in patients with depression were observed, in addition to improvements in depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia, anorexia nervosa, HIV and adrenal insufficiency. No significant improvements were observed regarding depressive symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia; the results observed in patients with autoimmune diseases and healthy individuals remain contradictory. Although the selected studies demonstrated good methodological applications, most studies consisted of small samples, and only 3 studies were conducted in a young population. Therefore, we concluded that the studies published to date indicate promising results regarding the use of DHEA in the treatment of depression and depressive symptoms, especially in depression that is mild or resistant to conventional therapy.

  4. A 4q35.2 subtelomeric deletion identified in a screen of patients with co-morbid psychiatric illness and mental retardation

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    Blackwood Douglas HR

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptic structural abnormalities within the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes have been the focus of much recent research because of their discovery in a percentage of people with mental retardation (UK terminology: learning disability. These studies focused on subjects (largely children with various severities of intellectual impairment with or without additional physical clinical features such as dysmorphisms. However it is well established that prevalence of schizophrenia is around three times greater in those with mild mental retardation. The rates of bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder have also been reported as increased in people with mental retardation. We describe here a screen for telomeric abnormalities in a cohort of 69 patients in which mental retardation co-exists with severe psychiatric illness. Methods We have applied two techniques, subtelomeric fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH and multiplex amplifiable probe hybridisation (MAPH to detect abnormalities in the patient group. Results A subtelomeric deletion was discovered involving loss of 4q in a patient with co-morbid schizoaffective disorder and mental retardation. Conclusion The precise region of loss has been defined allowing us to identify genes that may contribute to the clinical phenotype through hemizygosity. Interestingly, the region of 4q loss exactly matches that linked to bipolar affective disorder in a large multiply affected Australian kindred.

  5. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS: A Three-Factor Model of Psychopathology in Marginally Housed Persons with Substance Dependence and Psychiatric Illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle J Giesbrecht

    Full Text Available Rates of psychopathology are elevated in marginalized and unstably housed persons, underscoring the need for applicable clinical measures for these populations. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS is a clinical instrument principally developed for use in schizophrenia to identify the presence and severity of psychopathology symptoms. The current study investigates whether a reliable and valid PANSS factor structure emerges in a marginally housed, heterogeneous sample recruited from the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver where substance use disorders and psychiatric illness are pervasive. Participants (n = 270 underwent structured clinical assessments including the PANSS and then were randomly assigned to either exploratory (EFA or confirmatory factor analytic (CFA subsamples. EFA pointed to a novel three factor PANSS. This solution was supported by CFA. All retained items (28 out of 30 load significantly upon hypothesized factors and model goodness of fit analyses are in the acceptable to good range. Each of the three first-order factor constructs, labeled Psychosis/Disorganized, Negative Symptoms/Hostility, and Insight/Awareness, contributed significantly to measurement of a higher-order psychopathology construct. Further, the latent structure of this 3-factor solution appears temporally consistent over one-year. This PANSS factor structure appears valid and reliable for use in persons with multimorbidity, including substance use disorders. The structure is somewhat distinct from existing solutions likely due to the unique characteristics of this marginally housed sample.

  6. Relationship of Stigma to HIV Risk Among Women with Mental Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Pamela Y.; Elkington, Katherine S.; von Unger, Hella; Sweetland, Annika; Wright, Eric R.; Zybert, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Urban women with severe mental illness (SMI) are vulnerable to stigma and discrimination related to mental illness and other stigmatized labels. Stigma experiences may increase their risk for negative health outcomes, such as HIV infection. This study tests the relationship between perceived stigma and HIV risk behaviors among women with SMI. The authors interviewed 92 women attending community mental health programs using the Stigma of Psychiatric Illness and Sexuality Among Women Questionna...

  7. HIV risk behavior of psychiatric patients with mental illness: a sample of Brazilian patients Comportamento de risco para o HIV de pacientes psiquiátricos: uma amostra de pacientes brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Drew Crosland Guimarães

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of HIV among psychiatric patients is higher than general population rates worldwide. Many risk behaviors have been identified in studies from both developing and developed countries, though sampling limitations restrict the generalizability of their results. The objective of this study was to report findings from the first national sample of psychiatric patients about lifetime practice of unsafe sex and associated factors. METHOD: A national multicenter sample of adults with mental illness was randomly selected from 26 public mental health institutions throughout Brazil. Sociodemographic, sexual behavior and clinical data were obtained from person-to-person interviews and blood was collected for serology testing. Logistic regression was used for analysis. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of lifetime unprotected sex was 80.3%. Married, older, female patients, those with multiple partners and living with children or partners only and those with less severe psychiatric diagnosis more often practised unsafe sex. DISCUSSION: Risk behavior assessment is a critical tool for clinicians to be able to determine needed HIV-related services for their clients and ensure appropriate follow-through with care and prevention. Interventions that address situational risks in psychiatric patients' lives-institutional and individual- and increase their ability to make informed decisions about their sexual health are urgently needed.OBJETIVO: A prevalência do HIV em pacientes psiquiátricos é maior do que na população geral em diversos países. Diversos comportamentos de risco têm sido identificados em estudos em países desenvolvidos e em desenvolvimento. Entretanto, limitações amostrais restringem a generalização dos resultados em sua grande maioria. O objetivo deste trabalho foi apresentar resultados do primeiro estudo representativo de uma amostra nacional de pacientes psiquiátricos sobre a prática do sexo desprotegido e seus

  8. Spiritual distress: an indigenous model of nonpsychotic mental illness in primary care in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, V

    1995-08-01

    Spiritual models of illness causation are common in Africa. This article reports an investigation of some clinical correlates of patients who believe that their problem has a spiritual cause. A cross-sectional survey of random attenders at primary health care clinics and traditional medical practitioners (TMP) in Harare (n = 302) was performed. Interviews included eliciting of explanatory models, indigenous and etic psychiatric measures. Spiritual models of illness were held by half the subjects. Patients who hold this model had higher levels of mental disorder and were more likely to have a mental illness as judged by the patient, care provider and psychiatric measures. The symptoms of such patients resemble the construct of anxiety. Such patients are more likely to consult TMP and to have a chronic illness. Spiritual models of illness may represent an indigenous model to explain the distressing symptoms of nonpsychotic mental illness. Including them in training of primary health care providers may improve the recognition of mental illness.

  9. A Lifetime Prevalence of Comorbidity Between Bipolar Affective Disorder and Anxiety Disorders: A Meta-analysis of 52 Interview-based Studies of Psychiatric Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Behrouz; Mitchell, Alex J.; Nutt, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Bipolar affective disorder has a high rate of comorbidity with a multitude of psychiatric disorders and medical conditions. Among all the potential comorbidities, co-existing anxiety disorders stand out due to their high prevalence. Aims To determine the lifetime prevalence of comorbid anxiety disorders in bipolar affective disorder under the care of psychiatric services through systematic review and meta-analysis. Method Random effects meta-analyses were used to calculate the lifetime prevalence of comorbid generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder in bipolar affective disorder. Results 52 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The rate of lifetime comorbidity was as follows: panic disorder 16.8% (95% CI 13.7–20.1), generalised anxiety disorder 14.4% (95% CI 10.8–18.3), social anxiety disorder13.3% (95% CI 10.1–16.9), post-traumatic stress disorder 10.8% (95% CI 7.3–14.9), specific phobia 10.8% (95% CI 8.2–13.7), obsessive compulsive disorder 10.7% (95% CI 8.7–13.0) and agoraphobia 7.8% (95% CI 5.2–11.0). The lifetime prevalence of any anxiety disorders in bipolar disorder was 42.7%. Conclusions Our results suggest a high rate of lifetime concurrent anxiety disorders in bipolar disorder. The diagnostic issues at the interface are particularly difficult because of the substantial symptom overlap. The treatment of co-existing conditions has clinically remained challenging. PMID:26629535

  10. A Lifetime Prevalence of Comorbidity Between Bipolar Affective Disorder and Anxiety Disorders: A Meta-analysis of 52 Interview-based Studies of Psychiatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Behrouz; Mitchell, Alex J; Nutt, David

    2015-10-01

    Bipolar affective disorder has a high rate of comorbidity with a multitude of psychiatric disorders and medical conditions. Among all the potential comorbidities, co-existing anxiety disorders stand out due to their high prevalence. To determine the lifetime prevalence of comorbid anxiety disorders in bipolar affective disorder under the care of psychiatric services through systematic review and meta-analysis. Random effects meta-analyses were used to calculate the lifetime prevalence of comorbid generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobia, agoraphobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder in bipolar affective disorder. 52 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The rate of lifetime comorbidity was as follows: panic disorder 16.8% (95% CI 13.7-20.1), generalised anxiety disorder 14.4% (95% CI 10.8-18.3), social anxiety disorder13.3% (95% CI 10.1-16.9), post-traumatic stress disorder 10.8% (95% CI 7.3-14.9), specific phobia 10.8% (95% CI 8.2-13.7), obsessive compulsive disorder 10.7% (95% CI 8.7-13.0) and agoraphobia 7.8% (95% CI 5.2-11.0). The lifetime prevalence of any anxiety disorders in bipolar disorder was 42.7%. Our results suggest a high rate of lifetime concurrent anxiety disorders in bipolar disorder. The diagnostic issues at the interface are particularly difficult because of the substantial symptom overlap. The treatment of co-existing conditions has clinically remained challenging.

  11. ‘Islamic fatalism’: life and suffering among Bangladeshi psychiatric patients and their families in London – an interview study 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Roland; Dein, Simon

    2013-01-01

    An interview study of 44 Bangladeshi patients and relatives in eastern London demonstrated frequent appeals to God and deprecation of personal agency. This paper offers an interpretation of this apparent ‘fatalism’, which argues for the logical downplaying of human agency and ambition in archaic Arabia, contemporary rural Sylhet and among first generation Sylheti migrants in London. PMID:24670160

  12. Concurrent Medical and Psychiatric Disorders among Schizophrenic and Neurotic Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Bruno R.; Pai, Shaila

    Although the occurrence of medical illnesses in psychiatric patients is quite high, medical illnesses manifested by psychiatric symptoms are often overlooked. The higher mortality rates among psychiatric patients when compared to the general population may be a reflection of neglect or inadequate treatment of the psychiatric patients' medical…

  13. Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, a number of components related to psychiatric diagnosis have come under criticism for their inaccuracies and inadequacies. Neurobiologists and anthropologists have particularly criticized the rigidity of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopat...

  14. Co-occurrence of psychiatric and medical morbidity in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, L G; Tessler, R C; Nycz, G R

    1983-02-01

    This study examines the co-occurrence of psychiatric and medical morbidity in primary care patients utilizing a health care clinic in Marshfield, Wisconsin. Previous research has shown that individuals with psychiatric disorders have higher rates of medical illness than people without psychiatric illness, but most prior studies have tended to confound the measures of psychiatric and medical morbidity. In addition, appropriate controls for bias resulting from different medical utilization patterns have sometimes been absent. The present study reports the medical diagnoses of persons who had been assessed for psychiatric disorder with a standardized psychiatric interview using research diagnostic criteria independent of their medical assessment. Psychiatric diagnoses are analyzed in relation to medical diagnoses at the time of the interview and for a one-year period--six months before and six months after that date. The results indicate that persons with mental disorder diagnoses have significantly more morbidity for the one-year study period. Although considerable congruence exists in the physical diagnoses recorded for both groups, those with mental disorders are more likely to have diagnoses of the digestive and genitourinary systems. Some sex differences are also explored.

  15. Mental illness sexual stigma: Implications for health and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainberg, Milton L; Cournos, Francine; Wall, Melanie M; Norcini Pala, Andrea; Mann, Claudio Gruber; Pinto, Diana; Pinho, Veronica; McKinnon, Karen

    2016-06-01

    The majority of people in psychiatric care worldwide are sexually active, and studies have revealed sharply elevated rates of HIV infection in that group compared with the general population. Recovery-oriented treatment does not routinely address sexuality. We examined the relationship between gender, severe mental illness diagnosis, and stigma experiences related to sexuality among people in psychiatric outpatient care. Sexually active adults attending 8 public outpatient psychiatric clinics in Rio de Janeiro (N = 641) were interviewed for psychiatric diagnosis and stigma experiences. Stigma mechanisms well-established in the literature but not previously examined in relation to sexuality were measured with the Mental Illness Sex Stigma Questionnaire, a 27-item interview about stigma in sexual situations and activities. Experiences of stigma were reported by a majority of participants for 48% of questionnaire items. Most people reported supportive attitudes toward their sexuality from providers and family members. Those with severe mental illness diagnoses showed greater stigma on individual discrimination and structural stigma mechanisms than did those with nonsevere mental illness diagnoses, whereas there was no difference on the social psychological processes (internalized stigma) mechanism. Regardless of diagnosis or gender, a majority of participants devalued themselves as sexual partners. Adults in psychiatric outpatient care frequently reported stigma experiences related to aspects of their sexual lives. From the perspectives of both HIV prevention and recovery from mental illness, examinations of the consequences of stigma in the sexual lives of people in psychiatric care and improving their measurement would have wide applicability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Clinical experience and institutional in a Department of Mental Health: The multifamily groups for parents and children with psychiatric illness in the time of post-modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisella Ferraris

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The following work shows the beginning and development of a multifamily group, involving mental health professionals, parents and psychiatric patients, in a mental health center. The group goals and the main functions of this setting, will be described, observing also the social and community changes, occurring in recent years. Finally, starting from the analysis of the major psychoanalysis research findings, the concepts of inter-subjectivity, therapeutic alliance and institution's role regarding the psychiatric patients’ treatment, will be deepened. Keywords: Department of Mental Health; Multifamily group; Community changes; Therapeutic alliance; Psychiatric patients

  17. Somatization and illness behaviour in a neurology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, F; Firth, D; Timol, M; Metcalfe, R; Pollock, S

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and thirty-three female patients admitted to a neurological ward were fully investigated for the presence of organic neurological disease, and assessed for psychiatric disorder and illness behaviour, using the Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS) and the Illness Behaviour Questionnaire (IBQ). The likelihood of the presenting symptoms being due to organic disease was expressed by the neurologists on a visual analogue scale and the psychiatrists used a similar technique to describe whether the symptoms could be the result of psychiatric disorder. Many patients either had clear organic disease or somatic presentation of psychiatric disorder 'somatization', but one-third fell between these two extremes and either had a complex mixture of the two types of illness or could not be accurately diagnosed. The IBQ scores were raised in those with psychiatric disorder but did not help to explain why some patients present to the neurologists with symptoms that are unexplained by either organic disease or psychiatric disorder. Close liaison between neurologists and psychiatrists increases the detection of psychiatric disorder but some patients would require long-term follow-up to understand the true nature of the underlying disorder.

  18. Psychiatric disorders and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "SH. Akhondzadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are common in women during their childbearing years. Special considerations are needed when psychotic disorders present during pregnancy. Early identification and treatment of psychiatric disorders in pregnancy can prevent morbidity in pregnancy and in postpartum with the concomitant risks to mother and baby. Nevertheless, diagnosis of psychiatric illnesses during pregnancy is made more difficult by the overlap between symptoms of the disorders and symptoms of pregnancy. In majority of cases both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy should be considered. However, psychiatric disorders in pregnancy are often under treated because of concerns about potential harmful effects of medication. This paper reviews findings about the presentation and course of major psychiatric disorders during pregnancy.

  19. [ADHD in adult psychiatric outpatients: prevalence and comorbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Şahut; Fıstıkcı, Nurhan; Keyvan, Ali; Bilici, Mustafa; Çalışkan, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adult psychiatric outpatients. Moreover, comorbid psychiatric diagnoses in adults with ADHD were determined. Patients with and without ADHD were compared regarding DSM Axis I-II comorbidity and sociodemographic characteristics. The study included patients that presented for the first time to a psychiatric outpatient clinic during a 3-month period and were evaluated for adult ADHD. A sociodemographic form, Wender Utah Rating Scale, Turgay's Adult ADD/ADHD Evaluation Scale, Structured Clinical Interview I and II, Symptom Check List-90-R, and Beck Depression Inventory were administered. The study included 246 patients. Among the 39 patients diagnosed with ADHD, 25 were female (64.1%) and 14 were male (35.9%), and the mean age was 27.38 ± 8.3 years. The prevalence of ADHD in adult psychiatric patients was 15.9%. Adults with ADHD usually presented due to comorbid psychiatric problems; major depression (43%), generalized anxiety disorder (23%), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (17%) were the most common comorbid diagnoses. Substance abuse (58.9%) and attempted suicide (38.5%) were among the most prevalent psychiatric problems. The present findings show that ADHD is an important comorbidity in adult patients that present to psychiatric clinics, and may cause serious mental health problems or complicate mental illness.

  20. Facing the challenges and building solutions in clinical psychiatric nursing in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, Kourosh; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, Alireza; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Mohammadpour, Ali

    2012-10-01

    Psychiatric nurses play an important role in the process of caring for mentally ill patients and are continually faced with the numerous challenges and complex issues related to this field. This study aimed to understand the perspectives of psychiatric nurses regarding the issues they face while providing care and examine the possible solutions for improvement of inpatient care in clinical settings. The study adopted a qualitative approach that utilized a content analysis of audio taped, semi-structured interviews that had been conducted with 24 nurses. Two main themes emerged from the data. The first, Challenges in Providing Care within Psychiatric Wards, had the following subthemes: Politics and Rules of Organization, Safety and Security Issues, Uncertainty about the Role, Lack of Trained Staff, and Sociocultural Issues. The second theme, Solutions for Improving Psychiatric Care, had the subthemes of Empowerment across four domains: Psychiatric Nurses, Mentally Ill Patients and their Families, The Psychiatric Mental Health System, and the Cultural Context. The results indicated that if nurses are expected to provide optimal nursing care within a psychiatric ward, then there is a need for a stable and responsible organizational structure, skilled psychiatric nurses, and community-based care along with an anti-stigma program.

  1. Families living with parental mental illness and their experiences of family interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzelius, M; Plantin, L; Östman, M

    2017-09-14

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Coping with parental mental illness in families can be challenging for both children and parents. Providing evidence-based family interventions to families where a parent has a mental illness can enhance the relationships in the family. Although psychiatric research has shown that evidence-based family interventions may improve the communication and understanding of parental mental illness, there is a lack in this area of research from an everyday clinical context. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Our study reinforces the fact that parents with mental illnesses are searching for support from psychiatric services in order to talk to their children about their illness. The finding that under-age children comply when they are told by their parents to join an intervention in psychiatric services supporting the family is something not observed earlier in research. This study once more illuminates the fact that partners of a person with parental mental illness are seldom, in an obvious way, included in family support interventions. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Psychiatric services, and especially mental health nurses, have an important task in providing families with parental mental illness with support concerning communication with their children and in including the "healthy" partner in family support interventions. Introduction Although research has shown that evidence-based family interventions in research settings improve the communication and understanding of parental mental illness, there is a lack of knowledge about interventions in an everyday clinical context. Aim This study explores how families with parental mental illness experience family interventions in a natural clinical context in psychiatric services. Method Five families with children aged 10-12 were recruited from psychiatric services in southern Sweden and interviewed in a manner inspired by naturalistic inquiry and content analysis. Both

  2. Recovery in involuntary psychiatric care: is there a gender difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Ulla-Karin

    2013-10-01

    Research on recovery from mental illness and the influence of compulsory psychiatric institutional care has revealed the complexity of this concept. There is also limited knowledge regarding the impact of gender-role expectations in these contexts, and how such expectations may influence both the care and individuals' recovery processes. To explore women's and men's perceptions of the impact of compulsory inpatient care on recovery from severe mental illness. Grounded theory was used to analyse 30 first-person accounts of recovery from mental illness, elicited via interviews with individuals who had been compulsorily treated in hospital and diagnosed with a severe mental illness. Inpatient care at an early stage was crucial for the informants' recovery. However, there was ambivalence in their perceptions of the impact of compulsory inpatient care. The narratives confirmed gender differences as well as gender stereotypes. The results have implications for recovery research, in that they emphasise the importance of understanding recovery as a gender-influenced process.

  3. Estudo de validade da escala de sobrecarga de familiares cuidadores de pacientes psiquiátricos Burden of care in relatives of psychiatric patients: validity study of the Family Burden Interview Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Bandeira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A sobrecarga de familiares cuidadores de pacientes psiquiátricos tem sido amplamente estudada por pesquisas internacionais, usando escalas validadas, mas raramente no Brasil, talvez devido à carência de escalas validadas deste construto. OBJETIVO: Esta pesquisa avaliou a validade da versão brasileira da escala Family Burden Interview Schedule (FBIS-BR. MÉTODO: Participaram cem familiares de pacientes psiquiátricos de três instituições psiquiátricas de Minas Gerais, entrevistados com aplicação de um questionário sociodemográfico e três escalas de medida: FBIS-BR, BI e SRQ-20. RESULTADOS: A validade de critério da escala FBIS-BR foi analisada pela sua correlação com a escala BI, já validada para o Brasil e que avalia o mesmo construto, obtendo-se correlações significativas, entre 0,23 e 0,69 (p Family caregivers burden has been frequently reported in international researches using validated scales, but rarely in Brazil, perhaps due to the restrict availability of burden scales. OBJECTIVE: The present study examined the validity of the Brazilian version of the Family Burden Interview Schedule (FBIS-BR. METHOD: A sample of 100 family caregivers of psychiatric patients attending three public outpatient services were interviewed with the application of three scales: FBIS-BR, BI and SRQ-20. Socio-demographic data were collected with a standardized form. RESULTS: Criterion validity of the FBIS-BR scale was investigated analyzing its correlation with the BI scale, which evaluates the same construct of family burden and the significant scores obtained varied between 0.23 e 0.69 (p<0.01. The construct validity of the FBIS-BR scale was evaluated analyzing its correlation with the SRQ-20 scale, which evaluates a different but related construct of psychological disturbance, and the significant scores obtained varied between 0.31 e 0.49. CONCLUSION: The FBIS-BR scale has good criterion and construct validity indicators to evaluate family

  4. Midlife suicide risk, partner's psychiatric illness, spouse and child bereavement by suicide or other modes of death: a gender specific study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben

    2005-01-01

    been first admitted with a psychiatric disorder after 31 December two years earlier was 6.9 (95% CI 3.6 to 13.0), whereas their male counterpart experienced a risk of 3.9 (2.7 to 5.6); p value gender difference = 0.39. Men who had lost their partner by suicide or other causes of death experienced......STUDY OBJECTIVE: To describe gender specific suicide rates associated with partner's psychiatric disorder, loss of a spouse, or child by suicide or other causes, being a parent, and marital status. DESIGN: Nested case-control study. Information on causes of death, psychiatric admission, marital...... status, children, and socioeconomic factors was obtained from routine registers. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 9011 people aged 25-60 years who committed suicide; 180 220 age-gender matched controls; 111 172 marital partners; 174 672 children. MAIN RESULTS: The suicide risk in women whose partner had...

  5. [Ability to detect psychiatric disorders by the family physician].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Elustondo, Sofía; Reneses, Blanca; Navalón, Aida; Martín, Olga; Ramos, Isabel; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    To determine the ability of family physicians to detect psychiatric disorders, comparing the presence of psychiatric disorders detected using validated tests and referrals by family physicians. Cross-sectional, two-phase study. Primary healthcare centres in an urban area of Madrid. Patients between 18 and 65years attending primary healthcare centres for non-administrative purposes. To detect psychiatric disorders in the waiting room, an interview was performed using GHQ-28 and MULTICAGE CAD-4 in the screening phase (considered positive: score of 6 or higher on the GHQ-28 or a score 2 or higher on MULTICAGE CAD-4). Patients with a positive score and 20% with negative were recruited for the second phase (case identification) using MINI interview. During family physician consultation, the patient gave his doctor a card with an identification number to record the presence of psychiatric illness in his/her opinion and whether there was treatment with psychotropic drugs. A total of 628 subjects participated. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders corrected by two phase methodology was 31.7% (95%CI: 27.9 to 35.5). Of the 185 patients with a psychiatric disorder detected, 44.2% (95%CI: 36.7 to 51.7) were identified as patients with psychiatric disorders by their family physician. Disorders best detected were: hypomania, dysthymic disorder, depressive episode with melancholic symptoms, and panic disorder. A significant percentage of patients with possible psychiatric disorders detected with validated test have not been identified by their family physician. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Mental Illness And Brain Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedrick Jeffrey D.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has become common to say psychiatric illnesses are brain diseases. This reflects a conception of the mental as being biologically based, though it is also thought that thinking of psychiatric illness this way will reduce the stigma attached to psychiatric illness. If psychiatric illnesses are brain diseases, however, it is not clear why psychiatry should not collapse into neurology, and some argue for this course. Others try to maintain a distinction by saying that neurology deals with abnormalities of neural structure while psychiatry deals with specific abnormalities of neural functioning. It is not clear that neurologists would accept this division, nor that they should. I argue that if we take seriously the notion that psychiatric illnesses are mental illnesses we can draw a more defensible boundary between psychiatry and neurology. As mental illnesses, psychiatric illnesses must have symptoms that affect our mental capacities and that the sufferer is capable of being aware of, even if they are not always self-consciously aware of them. Neurological illnesses, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis, may be diagnosed even if they are silent, just as the person may not be aware of having high blood pressure or may suffer a silent myocardial infarction. It does not make sense to speak of panic disorder if the person has never had a panic attack, however, or of bipolar disorder in the absence of mood swings. This does not mean psychiatric illnesses are not biologically based. Mental illnesses are illnesses of persons, whereas other illnesses are illnesses of biological individuals.

  7. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  8. Mental illness disclosure in Chinese immigrant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang-Pei; Lai, Grace Ying-Chi; Yang, Lawrence

    2013-07-01

    Support from social networks is imperative to mental health recovery of persons with mental illness. However, disclosing mental illness may damage a person's participation in networks due to mental illness stigma, especially in Chinese immigrant communities where social networks (the guanxi network) have specific social-cultural significance. This study focused on mental illness disclosure in Chinese immigrant communities in New York City. Fifty-three Chinese psychiatric patients were recruited consecutively from 2 Chinese bilingual psychiatric inpatient units from 2006 to 2010. Two bilingual psychologists interviewed each participant once in a semistructured interview, including 6 questions on mental illness disclosure. Conventional content analysis was applied to conceptualize the phenomenon. Results showed that participants voluntarily disclosed to a circle of people composed primarily of family and relatives. The decisions and strategies to disclose depended on participants' consideration of 3 critical elements of social relationships. Ganqing, affection associated with relationship building, ultimately determined who had the privilege to know. Renqing, the moral code of reciprocal kindness, further influenced disclosure decisions and what participants anticipated as responses to disclosure. Lastly, concerns over preserving face (lian), a construct representing personal and familial dignity, oftentimes prohibited disclosure. Additionally, in this tight-knit network, involuntary disclosure could happen without participants' permission or knowledge. Participants commonly suffered from stigma after disclosure. However, half of our participants reported situations in which they experienced little discriminatory treatment, and some experienced support and care as a result of cultural dynamics. Recommendations for culturally sensitive practice to facilitate mental illness disclosure among Chinese immigrants were discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all

  9. Mental illness disclosure in Chinese immigrant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang-pei; Ying-Chi Lai, Grace; Yang, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Support from social networks is imperative to mental health recovery of persons with mental illness. However, disclosing mental illness may damage a person’s participation in networks due to mental illness stigma, especially in Chinese-immigrant communities where social networks (the guanxi network) has specific social-cultural significance. This study focused on mental illness disclosure in Chinese-immigrant communities in New York City. Fifty-three Chinese psychiatric patients were recruited consecutively from two Chinese bilingual psychiatric inpatient units from 2006 to 2010. Two bilingual psychologists interviewed each participant once in a semi-structured interview, including 6 questions on mental illness disclosure. Conventional content analysis was applied to conceptualize the phenomenon. Results showed that participants voluntarily disclosed to a circle of people composed primarily of family and relatives. The decisions and strategies to disclose depended on participants’ consideration of three critical elements of social relationships. Ganqing, affection associated with relationship-building, ultimately determined who had the privilege to know. Renqing, the moral code of reciprocal kindness, further influenced disclosure decisions and what participants anticipated as responses to disclosure. Lastly, concerns over preserving face (lian), a construct representing personal and familial dignity, oftentimes prohibited disclosure. Additionally, in this tight-knit network involuntary disclosure could happen without participants’ permission or knowledge. Participants commonly suffered from stigma after disclosure. However, half of our participants reported situations where they experienced little discriminatory treatment and some experienced support and care as a result of cultural dynamics. Recommendations for culturally sensitive practice to facilitate mental illness disclosure among Chinese immigrants were discussed. PMID:23647389

  10. Patients' Appraisal of Psychiatric Trainee Interview Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellsop, Graham W.; MacDonald, Joanna; El Badri, Selim; Menkes, David

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this pilot project was to explore the extent to which judgments made by psychiatrist examiners accord with those of patients in postgraduate clinical examinations, so as to inform further consideration of the role of patients in such assessments. Method: Senior psychiatrist examiners (N=8) and patients (N=30) rated 16 aspects…

  11. Relatives' Perspective on the Terminally Ill Patients Who Died after Euthanasia or Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Interview Study in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Jean-Jacques; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.; Muller, Martien T.; van der Wal, Gerrit; van der Heide, Agnes; van der Maas, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    This study used retrospective interviews with 87 relatives to describe the experiences of patients who died by euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (EAS) in the Netherlands. Most of the patients suffered from cancer (85%). The relatives were most often a partner (63%) or a child (28%) of the patient. Before explicitly requesting EAS most…

  12. Women with a history of childhood sexual abuse. Long-term social and psychiatric aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ellids; Lau, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    The socio-demographics and psychiatric diagnoses in a clinical sample of women with a history of mainly intrafamilial childhood sexual abuse (CSA) are described. The women were referred to five psychiatric centres for incest group psychotherapy. Data were gathered using interviews and self......-administered questionnaires. Over a period of 2.5 years, 385 women with mean age of 33 years were referred with a history of CSA. Three hundred and forty of those had experienced intrafamilial CSA. The average age at first abuse was 6.8 years, and it lasted for a mean of 6 years. The women had been abused by a mean of 1...... was a brother. The women suffered from a broad spectrum of psychiatric symptoms and illnesses. More than half of the women had previously received psychiatric treatment. Compared to a random sample of the general female population, these women were less advantaged with regards to education, financial...

  13. The excess mortality of patients with diabetes and concurrent psychiatric illness is markedly reduced by structured personal diabetes care. A 19-year follow up of the randomized controlled study Diabetes Care in General Practice (DCGP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Julie Rask; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Davidsen, Annette Sofie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of an intervention in Type 2 diabetic patients with concurrent psychiatric illness (PI) and compare this with the effectiveness in patients without PI. METHOD: In the Diabetes Care in General Practice trial, 1381 patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes...... were randomized to 6 years of structured personal diabetes care or routine diabetes care (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01074762). In this observational post-hoc analysis, the effectiveness of the intervention for diabetes in 179 patients with concurrent PI was analyzed. RESULTS: During the 19-year follow......-up period, patients with PI in the structured personal care group experienced a lower risk for all-cause mortality [105.3 vs. 140.4 events per 1000 patient-years; hazard ratio (HR): 0.63, P=0.023, multivariably adjusted], diabetes-related death (66.0 vs. 95.1; HR: 0.57, P=0.015), any diabetes...

  14. Prior trauma and psychiatric history as risk factors for intentional and unintentional injury in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Meaghan L; Creamer, Mark; Elliott, Peter; Bryant, Richard; McFarlane, Alexander; Silove, Derrick

    2009-02-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that injury survivors are at increased risk for having experienced traumatic events before their injury or having a lifetime psychiatric history. We aimed to extend the previous research by examining in the same sample whether trauma history or lifetime psychiatric history represented risk pathways to injury for intentional or unintentional injury survivors. We also aimed to describe the co-occurrence between trauma history and psychiatric history in unintentionally injured survivors. In this multisited study, randomly selected injury survivors admitted to five trauma services in three states of Australia (April 2004 to February 2006) completed two structured clinical interviews that assessed their history of traumatic life events and lifetime psychiatric disorder (n = 1,167). chi analyses were conducted to compare the lifetime prevalence of traumatic events and psychiatric history for intentional and unintentional injury with population norms. Both intentional and unintentional injury survivors were at increased risk for reporting all types of trauma and reporting all measured psychiatric diagnoses compared with population norms. The majority of unintentional injury survivors with a psychiatric history were likely to have a trauma history. In this study, we identified that prior trauma or prior psychiatric illness may represent risk for injury in both intentionally and unintentionally injured survivors. The results highlight the need for injury-care services to address mental health issues in injury patients as part of routine care.

  15. Psychological and psychiatric symptoms of terminally ill patients with cancer and their family caregivers in the home-care setting: A nation-wide survey from the perspective of bereaved family members in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayakawa, Makoto; Ogawa, Asao; Konno, Michiko; Kurata, Akiko; Hamano, Jun; Morita, Tatsuya; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Aoyama, Maho; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-12-01

    The psychological and psychiatric symptoms of terminally ill cancer patients are highly problematic and have been associated with greater burden among caregivers. Until now, the extent of these problems in the home care setting was unclear. This retrospective study was conducted as part of a nationwide survey from the perspective of bereaved family members in Japan (J-HOPE3). The bereaved family members rated the symptoms of delirium and suicidal ideation of patients with cancer, and the sleeplessness and depressed mood of family caregivers utilizing home care services in the one month before the patients' deaths. Regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with caregivers' sleeplessness or depressed mood. Of the 532 subjects analyzed, between 17% and 65% of patients experienced various symptoms of delirium, and 27% suicidal ideation. Among family caregivers, 60% experienced sleeplessness and 35% experienced depressed mood at least once during the week. Caregivers' psychological symptoms were associated with their own poor health status, being the spouse of the patient, and the patients' psychological or psychiatric symptoms. To manage patients' symptoms, 11% of caregivers had consulted psychiatrists or psychologists while another 11% wanted to do so. Psychological problems assessed were common among patients with cancer and their family caregivers in the one month of home care prior to the patient's death. An effective complementary care system, run by home-visit physicians, nurses, and experts in mental disorders, is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship between aggression, interpersonal style, and therapeutic alliance during short-term psychiatric hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Amy; Daffern, Michael; Foley, Fiona

    2012-02-01

    Aggression during psychiatric hospitalization is frequent, problematic, and a major challenge for nurses and mental health services more generally. The strength of the therapeutic alliance between nursing staff and patients has been posited as an important protective factor that can limit the likelihood of aggression. This study examined the relationship between interpersonal style, perceived coercion, and psychiatric symptoms on the therapeutic alliance between patients and staff, and how each, in turn, is related to aggression. Participants in this study were 79 patients admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital. Each participant was interviewed to determine perceived coercion, symptoms of psychiatric illness, interpersonal style, and therapeutic alliance. Incidents of aggression were recorded at discharge through a review of incident forms, file review, and interviews with unit nursing staff. The results showed that a hostile-dominant interpersonal style and symptoms of paranoia predicted poor therapeutic alliance, contributing 14% of the variance in therapeutic alliance scores. A dominant interpersonal style predicted aggression towards staff. Therapeutic alliance, perceived coercion, and symptoms of psychiatric illness did not predict aggression. Implications for engagement in treatment and the prevention of aggression are discussed. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Avaliação de desempenho do Self-Reporting Questionnaire como instrumento de rastreamento psiquiátrico: um estudo comparativo com o Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Performance of the Self-Reporting Questionnaire as a psychiatric screening questionnaire: a comparativestudy with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Maffasioli Gonçalves

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O SRQ (Self-Reporting Questionnaire é um instrumento de rastreamento psiquiátrico originalmente composto por 30 itens. A versão brasileira do SRQ-20 (versão com as 20 questões para rastreamento de transtornos mentais não-psicóticos foi validada no início da década de 1980. O objetivo deste estudo foi validar a versão brasileira do SRQ-20 e dos cinco itens de rastreamento de transtorno por uso de álcool oriundos do SRQ-30, comparando com entrevista psiquiátrica usando SCID-IV-TR (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR como padrão-ouro. O estudo foi conduzido em Santa Cruz do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, com 485 indivíduos (54,8% mulheres, idade média 40,04. Os 5 itens de rastreamento de transtornos por uso de álcool mostraram sensibilidade baixa (66%. O SRQ-20 apresentou como ponto de corte ideal 7/8, com sensibilidade de 86,33% e especificidade de 89,31%. O poder discriminante para diagnóstico psiquiátrico do SRQ-20 foi 0,91. O coeficiente Cronbach alfa foi 0,86.The SRQ (Self-Reporting Questionnaire is a psychiatric screening tool that originally included 30 questions. The Brazilian version of SRQ-20 (a version that includes the 20 items for non-psychotic mental disorders was validated in the early 1980s. The objective of the present study was to validate the Brazilian version of SRQ-20 and the 5 items for alcohol-related disorders as compared to the SCID-IV-TR (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR as the gold standard. The study was conducted in Santa Cruz do Sul, a small town in southern Brazil, with 485 subjects (54.8% females, mean age 40.04 years. The 5 items for alcohol-related disorders showed low sensitivity (66%. The optimum cutoff value for SRQ-20 was 7/8, with 86.33% sensitivity and 89.31% specificity. The discriminant power of SRQ-20 for psychiatric screening was 0.9, and Cronbach's alpha was 0.86.

  18. Mental illness stigma, secrecy and suicidal ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oexle, N; Ajdacic-Gross, V; Kilian, R; Müller, M; Rodgers, S; Xu, Z; Rössler, W; Rüsch, N

    2017-02-01

    Whether the public stigma associated with mental illness negatively affects an individual, largely depends on whether the person has been labelled 'mentally ill'. For labelled individuals concealing mental illness is a common strategy to cope with mental illness stigma, despite secrecy's potential negative consequences. In addition, initial evidence points to a link between stigma and suicidality, but quantitative data from community samples are lacking. Based on previous literature about mental illness stigma and suicidality, as well as about the potential influence of labelling processes and secrecy, a theory-driven model linking perceived mental illness stigma and suicidal ideation by a mediation of secrecy and hopelessness was established. This model was tested separately among labelled and unlabelled persons using data derived from a Swiss cross-sectional population-based study. A large community sample of people with elevated psychiatric symptoms was examined by interviews and self-report, collecting information on perceived stigma, secrecy, hopelessness and suicidal ideation. Participants who had ever used mental health services were considered as labelled 'mentally ill'. A descriptive analysis, stratified logistic regression models and a path analysis testing a three-path mediation effect were conducted. While no significant differences between labelled and unlabelled participants were observed regarding perceived stigma and secrecy, labelled individuals reported significantly higher frequencies of suicidal ideation and feelings of hopelessness. More perceived stigma was associated with suicidal ideation among labelled, but not among unlabelled individuals. In the path analysis, this link was mediated by increased secrecy and hopelessness. Results from this study indicate that among persons labelled 'mentally ill', mental illness stigma is a contributor to suicidal ideation. One explanation for this association is the relation perceived stigma has with

  19. Psychiatric patient and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joginder Pal Attri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with psychiatric illnesses are prescribed long-term drug treatment, and the anaesthesiologist must be aware of potential interactions with anaesthetic agents. Psychotropic drugs often given in combination with each other or with other non-psychiatric drugs generally exert profound effects on the central and peripheral neurotransmitter and ionic mechanisms. Hence, prior intake of these drugs is an important consideration in the management of the patient about to undergo anaesthesia and surgery. This article highlights the effects of anaesthetics on patients taking antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and lithium carbonate. The risk that should be considered in the perioperative period are the extent of surgery, the patient′s physical state, anaesthesia, the direct and indirect effects of psychotropics, risk of withdrawal symptoms and risk of psychiatric recurrence and relapse.

  20. [Qualitative methods in psychiatric research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Claudia; Glaesmer, Heide

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the usage of qualitative methods in psychiatric research and presents the qualitative approach in more detail. Recent original empirical work of a German psychiatric journal was systematically reviewed. Methods used to collect and analyse the information are detailed. One third of the articles used a solely qualitative research design. One further article applied a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Three kinds of the qualitative interviews were used (in depth, narrative and problem-focussed interview). Additionally, focus groups (group discussions) and qualitative content analysis were applied by studies. Qualitative approaches are an integral part of psychiatric research. Further work should assure to use adequate sampling strategies.

  1. Barriers in the treatment of psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric illnesses are very common in prevalence. But not everyone who has a mental illness gets a psychiatric consultation. The causes are many. First, many time people don’t recognise and accept mental illnesses in them as a result of lack of insight and awareness. Secondly, even if they know they have a mental illness, they don’t feel comfortable in disclosing it. Third, after knowing that they have some problems which require help from a doctor, they don’t know whom to consult, where to consult, and how to consult. Fourth, in spite of all possible awareness, there may not be psychiatric facilities nearby. Thus, it becomes utmost necessary to discuss those factors which stop people with psychiatric illnesses to get adequate help so that remedial steps could be taken.

  2. Screening for psychiatric morbidity in an accident and emergency department.

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, G; Hindley, N; Rajiyah, G; Rosser, R

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and twenty A&E Department daytime attenders were screened for psychiatric disorder in a two stage procedure. Thirty-three patients were identified as General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 'cases' of whom 28 agreed to a psychiatric interview using the Clinical Interview Schedule. Twenty-eight GHQ 'non-cases' were also interviewed. A psychiatric diagnosis was made in 24 patients, 21 of whom were GHQ cases. Patients were more likely to suffer from psychiatric morbidity if the presenting...

  3. Prevalence of Mental Illness among Homeless People in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larina Chi-Lap Yim

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence and correlates of mental illness in homeless people in Hong Kong and explored the barriers preventing their access to health care. Ninety-seven Cantonese-speaking Chinese who were homeless during the study period were selected at random from the records of the three organisations serving the homeless population. The response rate was 69%. Seventeen subjects could not give valid consent due to their poor mental state, so their responses were excluded from the data analysis. A psychiatrist administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I disorders (SCID-I and the Mini -Mental State Examination. Consensus diagnoses for subjects who could not complete the SCID-I were established by three independent psychiatrists.The point prevalence of mental illness was 56%. Seventy-one percent of the subjects had a lifetime history of mental illness, 30% had a mood disorder, 25% had an alcohol use disorder, 25% had a substance use disorder, 10% had a psychotic disorder, 10% had an anxiety disorder and 6% had dementia. Forty-one percent of the subjects with mental illness had undergone a previous psychiatric assessment. Only 13% of the subjects with mental illness were receiving psychiatric care at the time of interview. The prevalence of psychotic disorders, dementia and the rate of under treatment are hugely underestimated, as a significant proportion (18% of the subjects initially selected were too ill to give consent to join the study.The low treatment rate and the presence of this severely ill and unreached group of homeless people reflect the fact that the current mode of service delivery is failing to support the most severely ill homeless individuals.

  4. Psychiatric aspects of induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, Nada L

    2011-08-01

    Approximately one third of the women in the United States have an abortion during their lives. In the year 2008, 1.21 million abortions were performed in the United States (Jones and Koolstra, Perspect Sex Reprod Health 43:41-50, 2011). The psychiatric outcomes of abortion are scientifically well established (Adler et al., Science 248:41-43, 1990). Despite assertions to the contrary, there is no evidence that abortion causes psychiatric problems (Dagg, Am J Psychiatry 148:578-585, 1991). Those studies that report psychiatric sequelae suffer from severe methodological defects (Lagakos, N Engl J Med 354:1667-1669, 2006). Methodologically sound studies have demonstrated that there is a very low incidence of frank psychiatric illness after an abortion; women experience a wide variety of feelings over time, including, for some, transient sadness and grieving. However, the circumstances that lead a woman to terminate a pregnancy, including previous and/or ongoing psychiatric illness, are independently stressful and increase the likelihood of psychiatric illness over the already high baseline incidence and prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders among women of childbearing age. For optimal psychological outcomes, women, including adolescents, need to make autonomous and supported decisions about problem pregnancies. Clinicians can help patients facing these decisions and those who are working through feelings about having had abortions in the past.

  5. Exploring the Strengths of Patients With Psychiatric Disorders: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoudi, Jahangir; Oreyzi, HamidReza; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Professional nurses typically pay significantly more attention to the weaknesses rather than strengths of their psychiatric patients. Thus, new approaches to care are needed to discover the strengths of these patients and to provide effective encouragement during the caring process. However, little is currently known regarding the strengths that psychiatric patients possess during their illness and healing. The current study aimed to explore the self-perceptions and experiences of psychiatric patients regarding their strengths. Psychiatric patients were recruited through purposive sampling in Isfahan, Iran, from July to December 2012. Variables such as age, gender, and diagnosis were used to vet potential participants to ensure adequate sample diversity. All of the qualified individuals were informed verbally and in writing regarding the information that they would be asked to provide during the interview process, and the researchers obtained written and oral informed consent from each before enrolment. Twenty-one semistructured, qualitative interviews were conducted, and content analysis was performed to identify the themes. Four major themes emerged from the interviews, including (a) life with spiritual factors, (b) responsibility, (c) love of learning, and (d) sources of support. A repertoire of strengths was identified among the participants. Furthermore, all of the participants voiced the opinion that healthcare providers rarely focused on their strengths. Therefore, mental health professionals, particularly nurses, should pay closer attention to the strengths of their psychiatric patients to use these strengths in advancing their care.

  6. Increases in multiple psychiatric disorders in parents and grandparents of patients with bipolar disorder from the USA compared with The Netherlands and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert M; Leverich, Gabriele S; Kupka, Ralph; Keck, Paul E; McElroy, Susan L; Altshuler, Lori L; Frye, Mark A; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Nolen, Willem A

    2015-10-01

    We previously found that compared with Europe more parents of the USA patients were positive for a mood disorder, and that this was associated with early onset bipolar disorder. Here we examine family history of psychiatric illness in more detail across several generations. A total of 968 outpatients (average age 41) with bipolar disorder from four sites in the USA and three in the Netherlands and Germany (abbreviated as Europe) gave informed consent and provided detailed demographic and family history information on a patient questionnaire. Family history of psychiatric illness (bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, suicide attempt, alcohol abuse, substance abuse, and other illness) was collected for each parent, four grandparents, siblings, and children. Parents of the probands with bipolar disorder from the USA compared with Europe had a significantly higher incidence of both unipolar and bipolar mood disorders, as well as each of the other psychiatric conditions listed above. With a few exceptions, this burden of psychiatric disorders was also significantly greater in the grandparents, siblings, and children of the USA versus European patients. The increased complexity of psychiatric illness and its occurrence over several generations in the families of patients with bipolar disorder from the USA versus Europe could be contributing to the higher incidence of childhood onsets and greater virulence of illness in the USA compared with Europe. These data are convergent with others suggesting increased both genetic and environmental risk in the USA, but require replication in epidemiologically-derived populations with data based on interviews of the family members.

  7. Low levels of physical activity in patients with severe mental illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe, Lene; Lund, H

    2013-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and Type 2 diabetes, both being highly prevalent in patients with severe mental illness. Though physical activity has become an important issue in psychiatric treatment and rehabilitation in the past decade......, systematic evaluations of physical activity level in psychiatric populations could be more disseminated. Aim: The primary aim of the study was to investigate the physical activity level of psychiatric patients in comparison with healthy controls. Methods: Patients with severe mental illness (n =47......) and a group of healthy controls (n =28) matched on sex and age reported their physical activity level using the Physical Activity Scale (PAS). PAS was administered as an interview in relation to patients and as a questionnaire in relation to healthy controls. Results: Patients had statistically significant...

  8. University students' views on the utility of psychiatric advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheyett, Anna M; Rooks, Adrienne

    2012-01-01

    Rates of serious mental illnesses (SMIs) among university students are increasing, and universities are struggling with how to respond to students who show SMI symptoms. Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) allow individuals, when well, to document their wishes for treatment during a psychiatric crisis. This project explored the feasibility of using PADs in university settings by examining students' views towards PADs. Forty university students with SMIs were recruited for this study from 1 large university. A mixed-methods design was used, with both quantitative survey instruments and qualitative interviews with students. Respondents were positive about PAD utility for students. Respondents saw PADs as beneficial because PADs gave students control over their treatment. However, students also considered PADs potentially problematic because PAD use raised a risk of breaching student privacy and stigmatizing students with SMIs. Although a promising intervention for students with SMI, this approach requires further research.

  9. Preventing HIV Among U.S. Women of Color With Severe Mental Illness: Perceptions of Mental Health Care Providers Working in Urban Community Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y.

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with...

  10. Brazilian version of the Burden Interview scale for the assessment of burden of care in carers of people with mental illnesses Versão brasileira da escala Burden Interview para avaliação de sobrecarga em cuidadores de indivíduos com doenças mentais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Scazufca

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Burden on informal carers of people with mental or physical illnesses has been studied for a long time. Several standardized instruments for the assessment of carer's burden have been developed. The Burden Interview is one of the most frequently used instruments. The aim of the present study is to examine the internal consistency and validity of the Brazilian version of the Burden Interview, designed to examine the burden in carers of individuals with mental illnesses. METHODS: Carers of patients with a diagnosis of depression, aged 60 or over, were assessed for burden (Burden Interview, emotional distress (SRQ-20 and their perception of patients' behavioral and mood disturbances (Behavioral and Mood Disturbance Scale - BMD. Socio-demographic information of patients and carers was collected with a standardized form. The reliability of the Burden Interview was assessed through its internal consistency. Construct validity was assessed through the exam of the associations of carers' burden with their perception of patients' behavioral and mood disturbances, and the carers' burden with carers' distress. RESULTS: Eighty-two carers of elderly patients with depression were included, being forty-eight (58,5% women. The internal consistency was good, with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.87. The associations between total scores of the Burden Interview and total scores of the SRQ-20 (r=0.37, p=0.001, and between total scores of the Burden Interview with total scores of BMD (r=0.54, p=0.001 were strong, and similar to other studies that examined those associations, indicating a good construct validity of the Brazilian version of the Burden Interview. DISCUSSION: The Brazilian version of the Burden Interview is a standardized and valid instrument that can be used in the study of the impact of mental and physical illnesses on informal carers.OBJETIVO: Sobrecarga em cuidadores informais de pessoas com transtornos mentais ou com doenças físicas tem

  11. The Effect of Clinical Psychiatric Training on Medical Students' Belief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    femi oloka

    The Effect of Clinical Psychiatric Training on Medical Students'. Belief and .... ill lead to strained social interaction, low self-esteem, ...... psychiatry and mental illness in a Malaysian medical school. ... english/media/vol_3.pdf (accessed. January ...

  12. Timeline interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain and discuss timeline interviews as a method for doing life history research. It is a ‘how to’ article explaining the strengths and weaknesses of using a timeline when conducting qualitative interviews. The method allows the interviewee to participate...... in the reporting of the interview which may give raise to ownership and sharing of the analytical power in the interview situation. Exactly for this reason, it may not be the most appropriate method for interviewing elites or for conducting insider interviews where positionality can be at play. The use...... of the timeline should not lead the nterviewer or the interviewee to assume linearity and coherence; it is an rganising principle for the events. It provides an opportunity for linking the story with the wider social, political and environmental context during the interview. hile the method is very suitable...

  13. Zero Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Barbara A.; Frank, Austin C.

    1976-01-01

    Students who made an initial appointment for counseling but did not keep it are compared with students who kept appointments at a counseling center or psychiatric service. Impulsiveness appears to be the main characteristic distinguishing the "no shows" from the "shows". A few other differences were observed, especially for women. (Author)

  14. Perceived Social Support among Mentally Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandana Pokharel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social support is the perception that one is cared for, has assistance available from significant others and its benefit is by buffering stress by influencing the ability to adjust and live with illness. Social support can uplift the quality and subjective wellbeing of people. The objective of this study was to examine the perceived social support and factors influencing it among mentally ill patients. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out. Ninety cases aged more than 18 years visiting outpatient of psychiatric department and diagnosed as a case of mental illness for at least a year were included. Instruments used were self-developed proforma and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Interview technique was used to collect the data. Results: Majority (60% of the patients perceive social support from family, 28% of the patients perceive social support from significant others. Regression analysis showed that the perceived social support is influenced by employment status, type of family one lives in and physical illness. It is not influenced by gender, subjective financial status and frequency of hospitalization. Conclusion: Perceived social support is influenced by employment status, type of family one lives in and physical illness. Majority (60% of the patients perceive social support from family.

  15. Headache complaints associated with psychiatric comorbidity in a population-based sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benseñor I.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency at which people complain of any type of headache, and its relationship with sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in São Paulo, Brazil. A three-step cluster sampling method was used to select 1,464 subjects aged 18 years or older. They were mainly from families of middle and upper socioeconomic levels living in the catchment area of Instituto de Psiquiatria. However, this area also contains some slums and shantytowns. The subjects were interviewed using the Brazilian version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 1.1. (CIDI 1.1 by a lay trained interviewer. Answers to CIDI 1.1 questions allowed us to classify people according to their psychiatric condition and their headaches based on their own ideas about the nature of their illness. The lifetime prevalence of "a lot of problems with" headache was 37.4% (76.2% of which were attributed to use of medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, and 23.8% attributed to nervousness, tension or mental illness. The odds ratio (OR for headache among participants with "nervousness, tension or mental illness" was elevated for depressive episodes (OR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.4, dysthymia (OR, 3.4; 95%CI, 1.6-7.4 and generalized anxiety disorder (OR, 4.3; 95%CI, 2.1-8.6, when compared with patients without headache. For "a lot of problems with" headaches attributed to medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, the risk was also increased for dysthymia but not for generalized anxiety disorder. These data show a high association between headache and chronic psychiatric disorders in this Brazilian population sample.

  16. Headache complaints associated with psychiatric comorbidity in a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseñor, I M; Tófoli, L F; Andrade, L

    2003-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency at which people complain of any type of headache, and its relationship with sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in S o Paulo, Brazil. A three-step cluster sampling method was used to select 1,464 subjects aged 18 years or older. They were mainly from families of middle and upper socioeconomic levels living in the catchment area of Instituto de Psiquiatria. However, this area also contains some slums and shantytowns. The subjects were interviewed using the Brazilian version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 1.1. (CIDI 1.1) by a lay trained interviewer. Answers to CIDI 1.1 questions allowed us to classify people according to their psychiatric condition and their headaches based on their own ideas about the nature of their illness. The lifetime prevalence of "a lot of problems with" headache was 37.4% (76.2% of which were attributed to use of medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, and 23.8% attributed to nervousness, tension or mental illness). The odds ratio (OR) for headache among participants with "nervousness, tension or mental illness" was elevated for depressive episodes (OR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.4), dysthymia (OR, 3.4; 95%CI, 1.6-7.4) and generalized anxiety disorder (OR, 4.3; 95%CI, 2.1-8.6), when compared with patients without headache. For "a lot of problems with" headaches attributed to medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, the risk was also increased for dysthymia but not for generalized anxiety disorder. These data show a high association between headache and chronic psychiatric disorders in this Brazilian population sample.

  17. How often and how consistently do symptoms directly precede criminal behavior among offenders with mental illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jillian K; Skeem, Jennifer; Kennealy, Patrick; Bray, Beth; Zvonkovic, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Although offenders with mental illness are overrepresented in the criminal justice system, psychiatric symptoms relate weakly to criminal behavior at the group level. In this study of 143 offenders with mental illness, we use data from intensive interviews and record reviews to examine how often and how consistently symptoms lead directly to criminal behavior. First, crimes rarely were directly motivated by symptoms, particularly when the definition of symptoms excluded externalizing features that are not unique to Axis I illness. Specifically, of the 429 crimes coded, 4% related directly to psychosis, 3% related directly to depression, and 10% related directly to bipolar disorder (including impulsivity). Second, within offenders, crimes varied in the degree to which they were directly motivated by symptoms. These findings suggest that programs will be most effective in reducing recidivism if they expand beyond psychiatric symptoms to address strong variable risk factors for crime like antisocial traits. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Levels of explanation in psychiatric and substance use disorders: implications for the development of an etiologically based nosology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kendler, K S

    2012-01-01

    The soft medical model for psychiatric illness, which was operationalized in DSM-III, defines psychiatric disorders as syndromes with shared symptoms, signs, course of illness and response to treatment...

  19. Psychiatric disorders in myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Inés Ybarra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG. METHOD: Forty-one patients with MG answered to a structured psychiatric interview (MINI-Plus. RESULTS: Eleven (26.1% patients were diagnosed with a depressive disorder and 19 (46.3% were diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Patients with dysthymia were older (p=0.029 and had longer disease duration (p=0.006. Patients with social phobia also had longer disease duration (p=0.039. CONCLUSION: Psychiatric disorders in MG are common, especially depressive and anxiety disorders.

  20. Schizophrenia and relationships: the effect of mental illness on sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östman, Margareta; Björkman, Ann-Christine

    2013-04-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the impact of mental illness on the sexuality of patients with a schizophrenic disorder who live in the community in a long-term relationship with a partner. We conducted qualitative, in-depth interviews with five such patients who were in treatment at a psychiatric outpatient clinic, and three of their partners. The data were analyzed by thematic analysis and identified the following areas of concern: relationships outweigh sexuality; uncertainties about one’s sexual capacity; the dwindling of sexual fantasies, feelings of desire, and satisfaction; and, a lack of communication and support in sexual matters. Both patients and partners reported feeling overlooked by psychiatric services as sexual beings. They also expressed dissatisfaction with a patient-therapist treatment model that excluded their partners. Our findings indicate that dysfunctional sexuality affects both patients suffering from severe mental illness and their partners. Patients and partners deplore the lack of opportunity to discuss questions related to their sexuality and long-term relationships with psychiatric clinicians. Sexual problems arising from, or exacerbated by, schizophrenia require supportive services, whether in the form of general, psychiatric, or couples therapy.

  1. Child psychiatric disorders in a primary care Arab population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Al-Sabosy, Moza; Saeed, Mohammed; Sabri, Sufyan

    2004-01-01

    Physical and psychiatric comorbidity is relatively common in general practice but there have been few systematic studies using clinical interviews of children attending the primary care services in the Arab population, and none from the Gulf countries. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and nature of child psychiatric morbidity in primary care in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Systematic psychiatric evaluations were carried out on consecutive children aged 6 to 18 years visiting their primary care doctors in Al Ain. The sample consisted of 141 (50.7%) boys and 137 (49.3%) girls. Forty-three percent of the 278 children received a DSM-IV diagnosis. Of these, 46 (38%) were males and 74 (62%) were females. However, only 1.1% (3/120) of the patients consulted general practitioners for a primary psychiatric symptom. The most common diagnosis was anxiety disorder followed by depression. Obsessive compulsive disorder was present in 11%, conduct disorder in 7%, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in 3% of those with a diagnosis. A statistically significant association was found between DSM-IV caseness and female gender, higher number of children in the household, relationship problems in the family, physical illness and family history of psychiatric disorder. Other factors that did not show any significant association were age, nationality, socioeconomic status, parental education or occupation, scholastic performance or developmental delay in the child, or parental consanguinity. Our findings suggest that psychiatric disorders are common among young people of Arab origin attending primary care facilities, and that doctors need to be vigilant about this possibility.

  2. Oral Hygiene and Oral Flora Evaluation in Psychiatric Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: The World Health Organization has stated that psychiatric patients are a group of people who have oral and dental illnesses. Aims: The aims of this study were to document the oral hygiene of individuals with chronic psychiatric illness, to determine the extraoral and intraoral findings, to detect the dominant ...

  3. Psychiatric Morbidity among Street Children in Duhok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezar Ismet Taib

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Due, in part, to family constraints in dealing with the economical burden of raising a family, a wave of street children is sweeping the developing world. Such children are prone to both somatic and mental illnesses. This is the first ever study that has been conducted to explore the psychopathology among street children in the Duhok Governorate. Methods The study was conducted between March 2004 and May 2005 in Duhok City among street children who attended the Zewa Center—the only center for street children in the region at the time of the study. Among a total of 107 eligible children, 100 agreed to participate (93% response rate. A modified family map (genogram was used to obtain demographic data from the children and their caregivers through semi-structured interviews. In addition, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents (MINI-KID structured interviews were conducted with the children. Results The study found that 98% of children worked on the street because of the economic need and pressure on their families. There was high rate of parental illiteracy (90% of fathers and 95% of mothers, and 61% of respondents were shown to have at least one psychiatric disorder. A high percentage (57% of these children suffered from anxiety disorders including posttraumatic stress disorders (29%. Ten percent had depression, and 5% had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Conclusion Street children in Duhok seem to be working children due to their families’ needs.

  4. Puerperal Psychiatric Disorders: A 6 - Year Retrospective Review at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: About 1.7% of new cases seen during the period had a post partum psychiatric disorder. Depression (50%) was the commonest type of post-partum psychiatric illness, followed by mania (21.3%), bipolar affective disorder (12.5%) and schizophrenia (10.3%). Most had onset of psychiatric symptoms less than 4 ...

  5. The Effect of Clinical Psychiatric Training on Medical Students' Belief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background to the study: Medical student's attitude towards people with mental illness (PWMI) is very important for the future care of psychiatric patients. It has been postulated that psychiatric education could lead to a reduction in negative attitude towards PWMI. Objective: To assess the effect of clinical psychiatric training ...

  6. Which skills boost service provider confidence when managing people presenting with psychiatric emergencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poremski, Daniel; Lim, Xin Ya; Kunjithapatham, Ganesh; Koh, Doris; Alexander, Mark; Cheng, Lee

    2016-12-01

    The way service seekers interact with the staff at emergency services has been shown to influence the standard of care, especially in the case of certain psychiatric manifestations. Staff reactions to psychiatric complaints have been linked to their comfort dealing with these types of service users as well as their competencies understanding the illness. It is therefore vital to understand which skills increase confidence in treating psychiatric emergencies. Twenty-six open-ended convergent interviews were conducted with staff working in a psychiatric emergency department. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Participants reported several non-technical skills which developed from exclusively serving people with psychiatric emergencies: 1) Vigilance allowed staff to be sensitive to minor changes in behavior which precede psychiatric emergencies. 2) The ability to negotiate and find tangible solutions was particularly important when dealing with psychiatric complaints which may not have tangible resolutions. 3) The ability to appraise social support networks allowed staff to plan follow-up actions and ensure continuity of care when support was available. 4) The ability to self-reflect allowed participants to learn from their experience and avoid burnout, frustration, and fatigue. Participants also reported several other clinical skills which they gained during training, including teamwork, de-escalating techniques and risk assessment. Tentatively speaking, these skills improve staff's confidence when treating psychiatric emergencies. Certain skills may be generalized to staff working in medical emergency departments who frequently encounter psychiatric complaints. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  7. Comparison of psychiatric morbidity in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and non-ulcer dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta Kumar Padhy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The present study aimed to find psychiatric morbidity, stress, anxiety, and depression in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and compare it with patients having non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD. Methods: This case NUD study compared 50 patients each with IBS and NUD. The two groups were compared on demographic data, psychiatric diagnosis using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis 1 disorders, anxiety levels using the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A, and depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D. The Presumptive Stressful Life Events Scale (PSLES was used to measure stress. Results: The cases of IBS were more likely to be of female gender (P = 0.012, married (P = 0.009, and employed (P < 0.001. Psychiatric diagnoses were more common in the cases of IBS than NUDs (88% vs. 30%, P< 0.001, the most common being major depression and somatization disorder. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were more common in patients with IBS (P < 0.001 for HAM-A and HAM-D. Logistic regression revealed that having IBS and increased age were independent predictors of having a psychiatric diagnosis. Conclusions: IBS is associated with the considerable degree of psychiatric morbidity. Adequate attention should be paid toward comorbid psychiatric illnesses, and prompt treatment should be instituted.

  8. Relatives’ experiences of the Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation approach: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrika Jormfeldt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Boston Psychiatric Rehabilitation (BPR approach is individualized and characterized by being based entirely on the individual's unique needs and preferences in the areas of working, learning, social contacts, and living environment. Relatives of clients in mental health services influence the client's possibilities for recovery by their everyday relationship. Relatives have, however, traditionally had a subordinated role in the care of their mentally ill family member. The perspective of relatives is an important aspect in the development of new approaches to psychiatric rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was thus to describe and explore relatives’ experiences of the BPR approach. Ten relatives of clients in mental health services taking part in the BPR were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed with a qualitative content analysis method to explore relatives’ experiences of the BPR intervention in a county in Sweden. The findings from the interviews could be summarized in the theme “To meet the clients’ needs” consisting of three categories: “Dependence on staffs’ competence,” “Responsibility for user involvement,” and “The necessity for coordination between authorities and caregivers.” The findings suggest that relatives may contribute with important information about clients’ needs related to outcome of care. Relatives’ perspectives may be of importance in future development of BPR. Further research about the relatives’ role in psychiatric rehabilitation is needed as well as studies that compare different kinds of psychiatric rehabilitation from the perspective of relatives.

  9. Gender, status, and psychiatric labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroska, Amy; Harkness, Sarah K; Brown, Ryan P; Thomas, Lauren S

    2015-11-01

    We examine a key modified labeling theory proposition-that a psychiatric label increases vulnerability to competence-based criticism and rejection-within task- and collectively oriented dyads comprised of same-sex individuals with equivalent education. Drawing on empirical work that approximates these conditions, we expect the proposition to hold only among men. We also expect education, operationalized with college class standing, to moderate the effects of gender by reducing men's and increasing women's criticism and rejection. But, we also expect the effect of education to weaken when men work with a psychiatric patient. As predicted, men reject suggestions from teammates with a psychiatric history more frequently than they reject suggestions from other teammates, while women's resistance to influence is unaffected by their teammate's psychiatric status. Men also rate psychiatric patient teammates as less powerful but no lower in status than other teammates, while women's teammate assessments are unaffected by their teammate's psychiatric status. Also as predicted, education reduces men's resistance to influence when their teammate has no psychiatric history. Education also increases men's ratings of their teammate's power, as predicted, but has no effect on women's resistance to influence or teammate ratings. We discuss the implications of these findings for the modified labeling theory of mental illness and status characteristics theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A1 Ain Community Psychiatric Survey. I. Prevalence and socio-demographic correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Saleh, M T; Ghubash, R; Daradkeh, T K

    2001-01-01

    Psychiatric community studies are essential for the planning and development of psychiatric services, as well as being helpful in examining the socio-demographic correlates of mental disorders in a given community. Few such studies have been carried out to date in the Arabian peninsula. This paper forms part of a multipurpose community psychiatric survey conducted in A1 Ain in the United Arab Emirates. The findings regarding lifetime prevalence and psychiatric morbidity are reported. A total of 1394 (n = 1394) adults systematically sampled from Al Ain community were assessed with a modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) as well with other instruments: the new screening psychiatric instrument, Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20), and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis 1 disorders (SCID) screening module. Lifetime prevalence and 1-week prevalence rates of mental distress as measured by screening instruments were estimated as well as the lifetime prevalence rate of CIDI ICD-10 psychiatric disorders. The sensitivity of the CIDI interview to correctly pick up distressed subjects, as well as those who had undergone previous treatment for a psychiatric disorder, was also calculated. Associations between socio-demographic risk factors and ICD-10 psychiatric disorder as well as with mental distress were also examined by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Overall lifetime prevalence of ICD-10 psychiatric disorder was found to be 8.2% (95% CI: 6.7-9.7), while the 1-week prevalence rate of mental distress as measured by the SRQ-20 was 15.6% (95% CI: 11.8-19.5) and the lifetime prevalence rate of mental distress as measured by the new screening instrument was 18.9% (95% CI: 11.5-25.9). The CIDI interview correctly picked up 42% of subjects who had received previous psychiatric treatment and 51% of the distressed. Mood disorders and anxiety (neurotic) disorders were more common in women and alcohol and substance use

  11. Perceived illness intrusion among patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapat Usha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis therapy is extremely stressful as it interferes with all spheres of daily acti-vities of the patients. This study is aimed at understanding the perceived illness intrusion among pa-tients on hemodialysis (HD and to find the association between illness intrusion and patient demo-graphics as well as duration of dialysis. A cross sectional study involving 90 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD stage V, on HD was performed during the period from 2005 to 2006. The subjects included were above 18 years of age, willing, stable and on dialysis for at least two months. Patients with psychiatric co-morbidity were excluded. A semi-structured interview schedule covering socio-demographics and a 13 item illness intrusion checklist covering the various aspects of life was ca-rried out. The study patients were asked to rate the illness intrusion and the extent. The data were ana-lyzed statistically. The mean age of the subjects was 50.28 ± 13.69 years, males were predominant (85%, 73% were married, 50% belonged to Hindu religion, 25% had pre-degree education, 25% were employed and 22% were housewives. About 40% and 38% of the study patients belonged to middle and upper socio-economic strata respectively; 86% had urban background and lived in nuclear fami-lies. The mean duration on dialysis was 24 ± 29.6 months. All the subjects reported illness intrusion to a lesser or greater extent in various areas including: health (44%, work (70% finance (55%, diet (50% sexual life (38% and psychological status (25%. Illness had not intruded in areas of rela-tionship with spouse (67%, friends (76%, family (79%, social (40% and religious functions (72%. Statistically significant association was noted between illness intrusion and occupation (P= 0.02.

  12. Definitions and diagnoses: cultural implications of psychiatric help-seeking and psychiatrists' definitions of the situation in psychiatric emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, A D

    1979-12-01

    This paper explores lay and psychiatric actors' definitions of mental illness by focusing on several aspects of emergency psychiatric diagnosis. First, it considers psychiatric diagnosis as a social and cultural process in which mental illnesses are defined with increasing specificity as individuals move from lay to psychiatric contexts. Second, the paper considers variation in psychiatric residents' conceptions of mental illness, their role in emergency contexts, and lastly, their diagnostic styles. Diagnostic styles are shown to exist and to be grounded in residents' definitions of the situation. It is suggested that the variation in psychiatrists' definitions of the psychiatric situation, especially as regards etiology, plays a prominent, but as yet unnoted, role in producing variability in psychiatric diagnosis. It is also argued that actors' definitions are cultural, grounded in non-professional lay ideology, and are not products of secondary professional socialization.

  13. Psychiatric Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sullivan, Patrick F; Agrawal, Arpana; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2018-01-01

    into biologically, clinically, and therapeutically meaningful insights. The emerging findings suggest that we are entering a phase of accelerated genetic discovery for multiple psychiatric disorders. These findings are likely to elucidate the genetic portions of these truly complex traits, and this knowledge can...... then be mined for its relevance for improved therapeutics and its impact on psychiatric practice within a precision medicine framework. [AJP at 175: Remembering Our Past As We Envision Our Future November 1946: The Genetic Theory of Schizophrenia Franz Kallmann's influential twin study of schizophrenia in 691...

  14. Diagnostic Efficiency among Psychiatric Outpatients of a Self-Report Version of a Subset of Screen Items of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders (SCID-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germans, Sara; Van Heck, Guus L.; Masthoff, Erik D.; Trompenaars, Fons J. W. M.; Hodiamont, Paul P. G.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the identification of a 10-item set of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) items, which proved to be effective as a self-report assessment instrument in screening personality disorders. The item selection was based on the retrospective analyses of 495 SCID-II interviews. The…

  15. Motivational interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Kamilla; Humaidan, Peter; Sørensen, Lise H

    2013-01-01

    of motivational interviewing (intervention group, n = 110), 64 received motivational support by phone or e-mail only and 13 women did not wish any motivational support (control group, n = 77). The mean weight loss and decrease in BMI was greater in the intervention group compared with the control group (9.3 kg...

  16. Knowledge of family members on the rights of individuals affected by mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Moreno

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation was to understand what family members know about the rights of individuals affected by mental illness. To this end, a qualitative exploratory study was conducted. A semi-structured interview was used for data collection. Eighteen family members were interviewed at a psychosocial care center (CAPS and a civil society organization (CSO located in a municipality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, between March and September 2013. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis and the following categories were constructed: mental health services and the rights of individuals affected by mental illness. We were able to infer that in addition to drug-based therapy, mental health services must provide therapeutic activities. Family members of those affected by mental illness were unaware of the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform Law and mentioned the following rights: welfare benefits, free public transport, basic food basket and medications.

  17. Social support, health, and illness: a complicated relationship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, R

    2011-01-01

    .... A useful resource for clinical practitioners and researchers, Social Support, Health, and Illness addresses the effects of intimate support on a wide variety of medical and psychiatric conditions...

  18. Suicide in Neurologic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas, David B.; Anderson, C. Alan

    2002-11-01

    The risk of attempted or completed suicide is increased in patients with migraine with aura, epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and Huntington's disease. Contrary to the general perception that the risk of suicide among patients with Alzheimer's disease and other dementing conditions is low, several reports suggest that the risk of suicide in these patients increases relative to the general population. Some patients at risk for neurologic disorders are also at increased risk for suicide; in particular, the risk of suicide is increased among persons at risk for Huntington's disease, independent of the presence or absence of the Huntington's gene mutation. The risk of attempted or completed suicide in neurologic illness is strongly associated with depression, feelings of hopelessness or helplessness, and social isolation. Additional suicide risk factors in persons with neurologic illness include cognitive impairment, relatively younger age (under 60 years), moderate physical disability, recent onset or change in illness, a lack of future plans or perceived meaning in life, recent losses (personal, occupational, or financial), and prior history of psychiatric illness or suicidal behavior. Substance dependence, psychotic disorders, anxiety disorders, and some personality disorders (eg, borderline personality disorder) may also contribute to increased risk of suicide among persons with neurologic illnesses. Identification and aggressive treatment of psychiatric problems, especially depression, as well as reduction of modifiable suicide risk factors among patients with neurologic illness is needed to reduce the risk of attempted and completed suicide in this population.

  19. Patients' descriptions of nursing interventions supporting quality of life in acute psychiatric wards: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, Anneli; Hätönen, Heli; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Välimäki, Maritta

    2008-11-01

    People with mental disorders suffer from impaired quality of life (QoL). In psychiatric hospital wards nurses are in a close relationship with patients and have good opportunities to support patients' QoL. Still, relatively little is known about patients' perceptions related to nursing interventions by which nurses can support the QoL of patients with severe mental illness. To explore patients' perceptions of nursing interventions in supporting patients' QoL in acute psychiatric inpatient settings. Explorative descriptive study design. The study was conducted in seven acute 24-h psychiatric wards of general hospitals in Southern Finland. Thirty-five inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder or delusional disorder. The data were generated through semi-structured interviews and processed by means of qualitative content analysis. Five main categories of patients' perceptions of nursing interventions were identified to support QoL from patients' descriptions: empowering interventions, social interventions, activating interventions, security interventions and interventions to support physical health. Impaired QoL of patients with severe mental illness can be supported in acute psychiatric wards through nursing interventions. However, we are not sure how effective these interventions are. Thus, research on the effectiveness of nursing interventions to support patients' QoL is needed.

  20. EDITORIAL PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS AMONG JUVENILES AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-06-01

    Jun 1, 2003 ... arteries was involved. Figure 1 illustrates the anatomy of the coronary arteries and the different areas of ... Anatomy of the major coronary arteries. In general, several statements can be made about the pattern of ...... Streptocococcus Milleri which is a harmless commensal of oral cavity had been implicated.

  1. Dyspepsia in chronic psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mookhoek, E.J.; Meijs, V.M.M.; Loonen, A.J.M.; Leufkens, H.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: We report on dyspeptic complaints among patients hospitalized in the long-stay ward of a general psychiatric hospital. Methods: A representative sample of the patients was interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results: Eighty percent of the patients reported one or more

  2. The checkered history of American psychiatric epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Allan V; Grob, Gerald N

    2011-12-01

    American psychiatry has been fascinated with statistics ever since the specialty was created in the early nineteenth century. Initially, psychiatrists hoped that statistics would reveal the benefits of institutional care. Nevertheless, their fascination with statistics was far removed from the growing importance of epidemiology generally. The impetus to create an epidemiology of mental disorders came from the emerging social sciences, whose members were concerned with developing a scientific understanding of individual and social behavior and applying it to a series of pressing social problems. Beginning in the 1920s, the interest of psychiatric epidemiologists shifted to the ways that social environments contributed to the development of mental disorders. This emphasis dramatically changed after 1980 when the policy focus of psychiatric epidemiology became the early identification and prevention of mental illness in individuals. This article reviews the major developments in psychiatric epidemiology over the past century and a half. The lack of an adequate classification system for mental illness has precluded the field of psychiatric epidemiology from providing causal understandings that could contribute to more adequate policies to remediate psychiatric disorders. Because of this gap, the policy influence of psychiatric epidemiology has stemmed more from institutional and ideological concerns than from knowledge about the causes of mental disorders. Most of the problems that have bedeviled psychiatric epidemiology since its inception remain unresolved. In particular, until epidemiologists develop adequate methods to measure mental illnesses in community populations, the policy contributions of this field will not be fully realized. © 2011 Milbank Memorial Fund.

  3. Annual Interviews

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Annex II, page 1, Section 3 of the Administrative Circular no. 26 (Rev. 5) states that "The annual interview shall usually take place between 15 November of the reference year and 15 February of the following year." Following the meeting of the Executive Board on 7 December 2004 and the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 19 January 2005, it has been decided, for the advancement exercise of 2005, to extend this period until 15 March 2005. Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  4. Stigmatization of psychiatric symptoms and psychiatric service use: a vignette-based representative population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowislo, Julia F; Lange, Claudia; Euler, Sebastian; Hachtel, Henning; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan; Lang, Undine E; Huber, Christian G

    2017-06-01

    Background There is evidence for two different types and/or sources of mental illness stigma, namely the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. However, no current study has compared the two. Furthermore, gaps exist in our knowledge of both types of stigma. Little is known about the perceived stigma of specific psychiatric service treatment environments, for instance forensic settings. In addition, systematic research on stigma attached to symptoms of personality disorders in the general population is scarce, and for borderline personality disorder, nonexistent. Methods We conducted a representative survey of the general population (N = 2207) in the canton of Basel-Stadt, Switzerland. Participants were asked to read a vignette depicting either the psychiatric symptoms of a fictitious character or a psychiatric service institution to which the character had been admitted, and indicate desired social distance (an indicator for stigma). Type of symptoms, type of psychiatric service, dangerousness, and gender were systematically varied between vignettes. Findings Desired social distance was significantly lower in relation to psychiatric service use than to psychiatric symptoms. Overall, symptoms of alcohol dependency, behavior endangering others, and the fictitious character's being male tend to increase stigmatization. Interestingly, the character's being hospitalized in a psychiatric unit at a general hospital and also respondent familiarity with psychiatric services tend to decrease stigmatization. Interpretation Familiarity of the general population with psychiatric patients should be increased. Furthermore, treatment in psychiatric units located within general hospitals should be promoted, as such treatment is associated with decreased stigma.

  5. Mental illness and the media: an assessment of attitudes and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas, M; el-Guebaly, N; Peterkin, A; Green, M; Harper, D

    1985-02-01

    Media coverage of psychiatric issues will reflect or influence public perceptions of the mentally ill. In order to explore the relationship between psychiatry and the media, an attitudinal questionnaire was administered to a systematic sample of 20 reporters, 20 psychiatrists, 20 medical outpatients with no psychiatric history, and 40 psychiatric inpatients. In addition, 4 psychiatric patients who had personal experience with media coverage were interviewed to determine the impact. Their stories are presented as clinical vignettes. The results of the questionnaire survey show that media reporters are no less accepting of mental illness than the other groups. A regression analysis of attitudinal predictors elicit education as more significant than age and media exposure. Yet low scores for the coverage by the media of mental illness were given by all groups with psychiatrists tending to be most critical. Reasons offered by reporters included "sensationalism sells" along with cost and time factors. Recommendations for both reporters and psychiatrists groups were collated, aiming at improving communication and ensuring a more positive emphasis and greater accuracy of media coverage of mental health issues.

  6. Psychiatric aspects of dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, J S; Ford, C V; Rimoin, D L

    1976-02-01

    Sixteen adult dwarfs - 11 with achondroplasia and 5 with hypopituitarism - were studied by means of psychiatric interviews and psychological tests. There were no significant differences between the two groups; in general, the subjects had achieved a satisfactory life adjustment despite the stress of having bodies uniquely different from those of the general population. They had secure identities as "little people" and successfully used coping mechanisms such as a sense of humor and a pleasant interpersonal style. Male dwarfs tended to experience more emotional distress than female dwarfs.

  7. THE ASSOCIATION OF AFRICAN AMERICANS’ PERCEPTIONS OF NEIGHBORHOOD CRIME AND DRUGS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simning, Adam; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Conwell, Yeates

    2011-01-01

    Background Many African Americans are socioeconomically disadvantaged and live in neighborhoods containing chronic sources of stress. Although environmental stressors can contribute to the development of mental illness, there is a paucity of national studies examining the association of neighborhood crime and drug problems with psychiatric disorders. This study aims to determine if higher levels of perceived neighborhood problems are associated with greater prevalence of 12-month and lifetime psychiatric disorders among African Americans. Methods To do so, we used cross-sectional data from the National Survey of American Life, which interviewed a nationally-representative sample of 3,570 African Americans. Results Of these African Americans, nearly 20% and 40% reported that crime and drug use are problems in their neighborhoods. Respondents reporting high levels of perceived neighborhood crime or drug problems are 1.5 to 2.9 times more likely to have a 12-month psychiatric disorder and 1.4 to 2.1 times more likely to have a lifetime psychiatric disorder compared to other respondents. After accounting for sociodemographics and chronic disease, neighborhood crime remains associated with 12-month mood, 12-month substance use, and lifetime substance use disorders, whereas neighborhood drug problems remain significantly associated with 12-month and lifetime anxiety and substance use disorders. Conclusions Among African Americans perceived neighborhood problems are widespread and positively associated with psychiatric disorders. Consideration of neighborhood context is important to more comprehensively understand mental illness and its treatment in this population. PMID:21863282

  8. The association of African Americans' perceptions of neighborhood crime and drugs with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simning, Adam; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Conwell, Yeates

    2012-07-01

    Many African Americans are socioeconomically disadvantaged and live in neighborhoods containing chronic sources of stress. Although environmental stressors can contribute to the development of mental illness, there is a paucity of national studies examining the association of neighborhood crime and drug problems with psychiatric disorders. This study aims to determine if higher levels of perceived neighborhood problems are associated with greater prevalence of 12-month and lifetime psychiatric disorders among African Americans. To do so, we used cross-sectional data from the National Survey of American Life, which interviewed a nationally representative sample of 3,570 African Americans. Of these African Americans, nearly 20 and 40% reported that crime and drug use are problems in their neighborhoods, respectively. Respondents reporting high levels of perceived neighborhood crime or drug problems are 1.5-2.9 times more likely to have a 12-month psychiatric disorder and 1.4-2.1 times more likely to have a lifetime psychiatric disorder compared to the other respondents. After accounting for sociodemographics and chronic disease, neighborhood crime remains associated with 12-month mood, 12-month substance use, and lifetime substance use disorders, whereas neighborhood drug problems remain significantly associated with 12-month and lifetime anxiety and substance use disorders. Among African Americans perceived neighborhood problems are widespread and positively associated with psychiatric disorders. Consideration of neighborhood context is important to more comprehensively understand mental illness and its treatment in this population.

  9. Patients' Perspectives on Stigma of Mental Illness(An Egyptian Study in a private hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad eSidhom

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study is concerned with the stigma of mental illness. It examines the subjective element of the experience of stigma among a sample of in-patients with different mental disorders. The sample was taken from consecutive admissions of in-patients meeting ICD-10 criteria for mental disorders who had capacity to decide on participation in the study and were willing to respond to the structured interview. The study was undertaken in an Egyptian private psychiatric hospital. The structured clinical interview included aspects of the emotional, behavioral and cognitive effects of having a psychiatric diagnosis on in-patients with various diagnostic labels in an Egyptian psychiatric hospital. It also studied whether this effect changes with specific disorders, total duration of illness or sociodemographic variables as gender, age or educational level. The study illustrated the core items of stigmatization attached to the diagnosis of mental illness (Sidhom et al, 2012, which more than half of the participants responded affirmatively. The study aimed to explore the most prevailing aspects of stigma or social disadvantage; hoping that this may offer a preliminary guide for clinicians to address these issues in their practice.

  10. Structured Clinical Interviews and the Inferential Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigh, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews history of psychiatric nosology and the use of interview data as a vehicle for formulating clinical inferences. Focuses on qualities of structured interviews as well as procedures for constructing these indices and methods for establishing their psychometric properties. Reviews practical and theoretical limitations relating to formal…

  11. How does self stigma differ across people with psychiatric diagnoses and rheumatoid arthritis, and how does it impact on self-esteem and empowerment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker, Elizabeth; Brown, June; Henderson, Claire

    2016-12-01

    Self stigmatising attitudes have been found in people who have psychiatric diagnoses, however, research assessing self stigma in physical illnesses is rare. It is known that receiving a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can affect a person's identity and self esteem. This study aimed to compare levels of self stigma, self esteem and empowerment between people diagnosed with psychiatric illnesses and people diagnosed with RA to establish whether self stigma, and specifically endorsement of negative stereotypes, is associated with self esteem and empowerment across these two groups. A total of 202 participants (psychiatric group n = 102; RA group n = 100) were interviewed using the Internalised Stigma of Mental Illness scale (ISMI), or the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale- Rheumatoid Arthritis (ISMI-RA), the Index of Self Esteem (ISE) and the Mental Health Confidence Scale (MHCS). Overall, the psychiatric group had higher self stigma scores (2.5 vs. 2.2, p stigma scores. ISMI/ISMI-RA was associated with the ISE and the MHCS. The stereotype endorsement subscale of the ISMI/ISMI-RA was not related to self esteem or empowerment in either group. Interventions that aim to decrease self stigma and increase self esteem could focus on alienation.

  12. Language, subjectivity and participation in psychiatric institutions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringer, Agnes

    psychiatric facilities in Denmark: an outpatient psychiatric long-term treatment clinic and a closed psychiatric ward. The applied methods are participant observation, interviews with patients and professionals and analysis of documents. Employing discursive and narrative approaches, the aim of the project...

  13. Psychiatric disorder in male veterans and nonveterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norquist, G S; Hough, R L; Golding, J M; Escobar, J I

    1990-05-01

    Prevalences of Diagnostic Interview Schedule/DSM-III psychiatric disorders for male veterans and nonveterans from four war eras were estimated using data from over 7500 male community respondents interviewed by the Epidemiologic Catchment Area program at five geographic areas across the country. Veterans serving after Vietnam (Post-Vietnam era) had greater lifetime and 6-month prevalences of psychiatric disorder than their nonveteran counterparts, whereas the reverse tended to be the case for the Vietnam, Korean, and World War II war eras. Comparisons across war eras revealed a trend for more psychiatric disorder, especially substance abuse, in younger veterans and nonveterans than in older respondents.

  14. Consequences of receipt of a psychiatric diagnosis for completion of college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Justin; Eisenberg, Daniel; Kilbourne, Amy M

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent associations between DSM-IV psychiatric disorders and the failure to complete college among college entrants. Data were from the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). The sample included 15,800 adults, aged 22 years and older, who at least entered college. Diagnoses were made with the NESARC survey instrument, the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disability Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version. The large sample permitted analysis of multiple psychiatric disorders in the same multivariable logistic regression models. Given the frequent comorbidity of these disorders, this approach is an important step toward disentangling the independent roles of disorders in postsecondary educational outcomes. Evaluation of the independent associations between specific psychiatric disorders and postsecondary educational attainment showed that five diagnoses were positively and significantly associated with the failure to graduate from college. Four were axis I diagnoses: bipolar I disorder, marijuana use disorder, amphetamine use disorder, and cocaine use disorder. One was an axis II diagnosis: antisocial personality disorder. This study provides new data on DSM-IV diagnoses associated with the failure to complete postsecondary education. The findings suggest that psychiatric factors play a significant role in college academic performance, and the benefits of prevention, detection, and treatment of psychiatric illness may therefore include higher college graduation rates.

  15. Focusing on psychiatric patients′ strengths: A new vision on mental health care in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zargham-Boroujeni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying and using the strengths of patients, in practice, is a new territory. Today, the need to educate nurses and psychiatric patients about positive psychology in practice and the importance of understanding and focusing on strengths is clear. However, little is known about the strengths the psychiatric patients use and experience. Thus, this study has been designed and conducted in order to understand how people with psychiatric disorders demonstrate their strengths. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 13 semi-structured, qualitative interviews with patients and 2 focus groups with nurses were carried out. In addition, a qualitative content analysis was used to identify significant strengths. Results: Based on the results, the four main strengths consisted of: Finding a meaning in daily living, work as enduring strength, entertaining activities, and positive relationship. Patients also reported that health care providers rarely focused on patients′ strengths, and experts confirmed these findings. Our findings indicate that patients′ own strengths are a pivotal factor in getting through their illness from their perspective. Conclusions: Despite the enduring legacy of pessimism regarding psychiatric patients, these people have a repertoire of strengths. Nurses should, therefore, have a greater focus on eliciting and nourishing psychiatric patients′ strengths in their care. It is suggested that the theoretical and practical aspects of patients′ strengths be incorporated in nursing school curricula.

  16. Explaining lifetime criminal arrests among clients of a psychiatric probation and parole service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, P; Draine, J

    1999-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which sociodemographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, substance abuse problems, and the array of lifetime criminal behavior may explain lifetime arrests among offenders supervised by the psychiatric probation and parole service. Three hundred twenty-five clients with new cases at a psychiatric probation and parole service in a large urban center were screened for major psychiatric disorders. They were also interviewed for socio-demographic characteristics, mental health treatment history, criminal behavior, and arrest history. Hierarchical block multiple regression analysis tested a model explaining lifetime arrests. After controlling for age and other demographic variables, the number of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations and lifetime occurrences of mania diagnosis significantly explained lifetime arrests. The total model explained about 10 percent of the variance in lifetime arrests after controlling for opportunity variables, which explained 45 percent. The explanatory power of lifetime hospitalizations and mania support the contention that symptoms, rather than diagnosis, may be the most important clinical factor in explaining criminal arrest among persons with mental illness. Implications for psychiatric services include the development of effective jail diversion programs.

  17. Diagnostic efficiency among psychiatric outpatients of a self-report version of a subset of screen items of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders (SCID-II).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germans, S.; Heck, G.L. van; Masthoff, E.D.M.; Trompenaars, F.J.; Hodiamont, P.P.G.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the identification of a 10-item set of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) items, which proved to be effective as a self-report assessment instrument in screening personality disorders. The item selection was based on the retrospective

  18. Psychiatric Thoughts in Ancient India*

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Abhyankar

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry.

  19. Psychiatric thoughts in ancient India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry.

  20. Psychiatric Thoughts in Ancient India*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding psychiatric thoughts in ancient India is attempted. Besides interesting reading, many of the concepts are still relevant and can be used in day-to-day practice especially towards healthy and happy living. Certain concepts are surprisingly contemporary and valid today. They can be used in psychotherapy and counselling and for promoting mental health. However, the description and classification of mental illness is not in tune with modern psychiatry. PMID:25838724

  1. [Psychiatric care in South Tyrol -- an example of coordination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pycha, Roger; Conca, Andreas

    2006-02-01

    The Tyrol's division after the two World Wars cut the South Tyrol off from every relevant aspect of psychiatric care. First attempts towards a community psychiatric system weren't sufficiently sustained by politicians. Only in the 90 ty's was the association of relatives of mentally ill people able to sensitize public and politicians to the need for an adequate psychiatric care system. Since 1996 an excellent psychiatric plan has been in existence, 80 % of which has to date been able to be put into practice. Since 1997 mentally ill people have founded their own self-help-organization and influenced the planning process.

  2. [Prophecy and mental illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishne, Tali; Harary, Eran

    2005-09-01

    It is a well known platitude that a mentally ill person may "think that he is God" or "believes that he is the Messiah". Despite the generalization and shallowness of this attitude, sometimes psychotic patients indeed have delusions with contents of divine revelation, messianic assignments or prophetic power. In this current article we examine the different connections between prophecy and mental condition, especially psychotic. We present sources that combine prophecy and insanity, and also possible psychiatric interpretation of these situations. Finally, we present the attitude of the Rambam to prophecy and the personality characteristics of the prophet, limiting the possibility of the mentally ill patient who pretends to be a prophet.

  3. Ethics in Psychiatric Research: Issues and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Shobhit; Kuppili, Pooja Patnaik; Pattanayak, Raman Deep; Sagar, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Psychiatric research has increased remarkably over recent decades to help in understanding the current trends and better therapeutic options for illness. On the other hand, there is also a trend toward higher rates of retraction of published papers in the recent years. Ethics is required to maintain and increase the overall quality and morality of research. Psychiatric research faces several unique ethical challenges. Ethical guidelines are very important tool of research which safeguards par...

  4. Burnout of caregivers: a comparison between partners of psychiatric patients and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermeyer, Matthias C; Bull, Nadine; Bernert, Sebastian; Dietrich, Sandra; Kopf, Andrea

    2006-08-01

    Care of a person with mental illness involves multiple burdens, possibly leading to burnout. This study compares partners of persons with schizophrenia and depression with nursing staff based on dimensions of burnout. Nursing staff and partners of patients with schizophrenia or depression were consecutively recruited from psychiatric hospitals and interviewed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory. No significant differences were found in the three dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) for the two groups of caregivers. About one fourth of the respondents in both groups showed a high degree of burnout. Professional and nonprofessional caregivers face a similar degree of burden and need support to perform their caretaking tasks.

  5. Psychiatry trainees' views and educational needs regarding the care of patients with a life-limiting illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Benjamin C; Proskurin, Helen; Kelly, Brian; Lovell, Melanie R; Ilchef, Ralf; Clayton, Josephine M

    2017-04-01

    People with a life-limiting physical illness experience high rates of significant psychological and psychiatric morbidity. Nevertheless, psychiatrists often report feeling ill-equipped to respond to the psychiatric needs of this population. Our aim was to explore psychiatry trainees' views and educational needs regarding the care of patients with a life-limiting physical illness. Using semistructured interviews, participants' opinions were sought on the role of psychiatrists in the care of patients with a life-limiting illness and their caregivers, the challenges faced within the role, and the educational needs involved in providing care for these patients. Interviews were audiotaped, fully transcribed, and then subjected to thematic analysis. A total of 17 psychiatry trainees were recruited through two large psychiatry training networks in New South Wales, Australia. There were contrasting views on the role of psychiatry in life-limiting illness. Some reported that a humanistic, supportive approach including elements of psychotherapy was helpful, even in the absence of a recognizable mental disorder. Those who reported a more biological and clinical stance (with a reliance on pharmacotherapy) tended to have a nihilistic view of psychiatric intervention in this setting. Trainees generally felt ill-prepared to talk to dying patients and felt there was an educational "famine" in this area of psychiatry. They expressed a desire for more training and thought that increased mentorship and case-based learning, including input from palliative care clinicians, would be most helpful. Participants generally feel unprepared to care for patients with a life-limiting physical illness and have contrasting views on the role of psychiatry in this setting. Targeted education is required for psychiatry trainees in order to equip them to care for these patients.

  6. Psychiatric emergencies (part II): psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Dain, S

    2013-02-01

    In this Part II psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases are discussed. "Comorbidity phenomenon" defines the not univocal interrelation between medical illnesses and psychiatric disorders, each other negatively influencing morbidity and mortality. Most severe psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, show increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease, related to poverty, use of psychotropic medication, and higher rate of preventable risk factors such as smoking, addiction, poor diet and lack of exercise. Moreover, psychiatric and organic disorders can develop together in different conditions of toxic substance and prescription drug use or abuse, especially in the emergency setting population. Different combinations with mutual interaction of psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders are defined by the so called "dual diagnosis". The hypotheses that attempt to explain the psychiatric disorders and substance abuse relationship are examined: (1) common risk factors; (2) psychiatric disorders precipitated by substance use; (3) psychiatric disorders precipitating substance use (self-medication hypothesis); and (4) synergistic interaction. Diagnostic and therapeutic difficulty concerning the problem of dual diagnosis, and legal implications, are also discussed. Substance induced psychiatric and organic symptoms can occur both in the intoxication and withdrawal state. Since ancient history, humans selected indigene psychotropic plants for recreational, medicinal, doping or spiritual purpose. After the isolation of active principles or their chemical synthesis, higher blood concentrations reached predispose to substance use, abuse and dependence. Abuse substances have specific molecular targets and very different acute mechanisms of action, mainly involving dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems, but finally converging on the brain's reward pathways, increasing dopamine in nucleus accumbens. The most common

  7. Care, Closeness, and Becoming "Better": Transformation and Therapeutic Process in American Adolescent Psychiatric Custody

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katie Rose Hejtmanek

    2016-01-01

      In the United States, young people are remanded to psychiatric custody for the institutionalized treatment of mental illness, behavior disorders, and emotional disturbances, and forced to participate...

  8. Technological Advances in Psychiatric Nursing: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, Andrea C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and treating mental illness has improved in many ways as a result of the fast pace of technological advances. The technologies that have the greatest potential impact are those that (1) increase the knowledge of how the brain functions and changes based on interventions, (2) have the potential to personalize interventions based on understanding genetic factors of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, and (3) use information technology to provide treatment in the absence of an adequate mental health workforce. Technologies are explored for psychiatric nurses to consider. Psychiatric nurses are encouraged to consider the experiences of psychiatric patients, including poor health, stigmatization, and suffering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY IN A CHILDREN'S HOME1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, P. K.; Agarwal, A. K; Gupta, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY Sixty-two inmates of a children's home were examined by using a symptom check list and Hindi adaptation of Stanford Binet Intelligence Scale—Form LM (1960). A high proportion (69.4%) of the inmates had one or other psychiatric problem. Mild mental retardation (I. Q. 50—70) was most common (40.3%), 11.3% were diagnosed as having unsocialized disturbance of conduct. Four most common psychiatric symptoms were stealing, quarrelsome behaviour, destructive behaviour and bed wetting. No significant correlation was found between psychiatric illnesses and present age, duration of stay and age at entry into the home. PMID:22058478

  10. Psychiatric aspects of chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Abhishek; Lolak, Sermsak

    2009-06-01

    Chronic lung diseases continue to be common and cause significant morbidity and mortality. There is a complex interplay between psychiatric issues and pulmonary diseases. This review aims to summarize the recent literature and advances involving psychiatric aspects of lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, restrictive lung disease, and cystic fibrosis. The authors include the latest findings in epidemiology, impact, etiology, screening, and management of psychiatric and pulmonary comorbidity. The relationship between mental health and lung disease, as it is between mental health and other physical illnesses, is multifactorial. Further studies continue to clarify issues and treatment guidelines for this comorbidity.

  11. Parricide: Psychiatric morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunjić Bojana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Parricide is defined as a murder of parents by their children; the patricide is murder of father, while matricide is murder of mother. This entity is classified as homicide, but it differs in the fact that victims are parents and the killers are their children. Mostly, it is associated with psychiatric morbidity. OBJECTIVE To describe sociodemographic and psychopathological characteristics of parricide committers and to analyze circumstances of parricide and psychiatric morbidity in order to achieve better recognition and prevention of risks. METHOD This retrospective study included all homicide autopsy records (1991-2005 performed at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Medical School, University of Belgrade. For further analyses, all parricide records were selected out. The study analyzed all available parameters, which concerned parricide committers, victims and the act itself. Methods of descriptive statistics were used. RESULTS Between 1991 and 2005, there were 948 cases of homicide; of these, 3.5% were parricides. The committers of parricide were on average 31.2±11.9 years old, 87.8% were males, 60.6% with psychiatric symptoms most commonly with schizophrenia, alcohol dependence, personality disorder etc. Victims were on average 63.7±11.9 years old, 54.5% males, and 21.2% had a diagnosed mental illness. CONCLUSION Parricide is a rare kind of homicide accounting for 3% of all homicides. Committers are mostly unemployed males in early adulthood who have mental disorder. The phenomenon of parricide deserves a detailed analysis of the committer (individual bio-psycho-social profile and the environ- mental factors (family, closely related circumstances to enable a precise prediction of the act and prevention of the fatal outcome, which logically imposes the need of further studies.

  12. Foodborne Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a high amount of pesticides. Symptoms of foodborne illness depend on the cause. They can be mild ... can help prevent foodborne illnesses. Most people with foodborne illness get better on their own. It is important ...

  13. Dissociative identity disorder in psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkin, A; Ghisalbert, D; Dimatou, S; Jin, C; Sethi, M

    1998-06-01

    The aim of this study was to replicate reports of a high rate of dissociative identity disorder in psychiatric inpatients. Subjects were 100 randomly selected women, 16-50 years old, who had recently been admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital. Diagnoses were made by two interviewers through use of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders. One percent (N = 1) of the interviewed subjects had dissociative identity disorder. Contrary to previous studies, the authors found a low rate of dissociative identity disorder, perhaps because of the different methodology used.

  14. Psychiatric screening in the emergency department: validation of the General Health Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, I; Haughey, L; Baraff, L J

    1985-09-01

    Both a 28-item psychiatric scale, the Goldberg General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) were administered to 25 emergency department patients to determine the validity of the GHQ as a screening instrument for psychopathology in the emergency department setting. There was a significant association (P = 0.0343) between GHQ scores and DIS assessment. The sensitivity of the GHQ in this series was 55.6% and the specificity was 87.5% when compared with the DIS. This suggests that the GHQ may prove to be a valuable screening tool for patients with somatic complaints to detect unsuspected psychiatric illness in the emergency department.

  15. Moral learning in psychiatric rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitvast, J E; Widdershoven, G A M; Abma, T A

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate moral learning in persons with a psychiatric disability who participated in a nursing intervention, called the photo-instrument. This intervention is a form of hermeneutic photography. The findings are based on a multiple case study of 42 patients and additional interviews with eight of them. Photo groups were organized within three settings of psychiatric services: ambulatory as well as clinical, all situated in the Netherlands. Data were analysed according to hermeneutic and semiotic principles. Two cases are presented. Findings show that voice and face are concepts that help to identify elements of moral learning in the rehabilitation process of persons with a psychiatric disability. During the process patients become more aware of their responsibilities towards themselves and others.

  16. Culture in la clínica: Evaluating the utility of the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) in a Mexican outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Stege, Alyssa M; Yarris, Kristin Elizabeth

    2017-08-01

    While the classification of psychiatric disorders has been critiqued for failing to adequately account for culture, the inclusion of the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) in the DSM-5 has been viewed as a promising development for the inclusion of cultural factors in diagnosis and treatment of mental illness. In this study, we assess the appropriateness, acceptability, and clinical utility of the CFI among outpatients in a Mexican psychiatric hospital. Our assessment included observations of psychiatric residents' application of the CFI with 19 patients during routine outpatient visits, along with pre- and post-CFI interviews to determine providers' and patients' views of the CFI. The CFI was generally well received by providers and patients, viewed as a way of building trust and increasing providers' understanding of contextual factors influencing mental illness, such as social support. However, the CFI questions specifically related to "culture" were of limited effect and both patients and providers did not view them as useful. We discuss implications for the clinical assessment of cultural factors influencing mental health and illness and for the incorporation of the CFI in Mexican clinical settings.

  17. Too similar, too different: the paradoxical dualism of psychiatric stigma

    OpenAIRE

    Gergel, Tania

    2014-01-01

    Challenges to psychiatric stigma fall between a rock and a hard place. Decreasing one prejudice may inadvertently increase another. Emphasising similarities between mental illness and ‘ordinary’ experience to escape the fear-related prejudices associated with the imagined ‘otherness’ of persons with mental illness risks conclusions that mental illness indicates moral weakness and the loss of any benefits of a medical model. An emphasis on illness and difference from normal experience risks a ...

  18. Mechanism of Action for Obtaining Job Offers With Virtual Reality Job Interview Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Smith, Justin D; Fleming, Michael F; Jordan, Neil; Brown, C Hendricks; Humm, Laura; Olsen, Dale; Bell, Morris D

    2017-07-01

    Four randomized controlled trials revealed that virtual-reality job interview training (VR-JIT) improved interviewing skills and the odds of obtaining a job offer among trainees with severe mental illness or autism spectrum disorder. This study assessed whether postintervention interviewing skills mediated the relationship between completion of virtual interviews and receiving job offers by six-month follow-up. VR-JIT trainees (N=79) completed pre- and posttest mock interviews and a brief survey approximately six months later to assess whether they received a job offer. As hypothesized, analyses indicated that the number of completed virtual interviews predicted greater posttest interviewing skills (β=.20, 95% posterior credible interval [PCI]=.08-.33), which in turn predicted trainees' obtaining a job offer (β=.28, 95% PCI=.01-.53). VR-JIT may provide a mechanism of action that helps trainees with various psychiatric diagnoses obtain job offers in the community. Future research can evaluate the community-based effectiveness of this novel intervention.

  19. The Effect of Clinical Psychiatric Training on Medical Students' Belief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    femi oloka

    Background to the study: Medical student's attitude towards people with mental illness (PWMI) is very important for the future care of psychiatric patients. .... Nigeria. The College provides training for medical and dental ..... friendship with. PWMI.

  20. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in older patients admitted to psychiatric hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongen, S.; Kramers, C.; O'Mahony, D.; Feuth, T.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Ahmed, A.I.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing including potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and potential prescription omissions (PPOs) and to assess related risk factors in older people with major psychiatric illness.

  1. Psychosocial and Psychiatric Factors Associated with Adolescent Suicide: A Case-Control Psychological Autopsy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portzky, Gwendolyn; Audenaert, Kurt; van Heeringen, Kees

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of psychosocial and psychiatric risk factors of adolescent suicide by means of a case-control psychological autopsy study. Relatives and other informants of 19 suicide victims and 19 matched psychiatric controls were interviewed by means of a semi-structured interview schedule. Psychiatric controls included…

  2. The Role of Neighborhood Factors and Community Stigma in Predicting Community Participation Among Persons With Psychiatric Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Lauren; Yanos, Philip T; Stefancic, Ana; Alexander, Mary Jane; Harney-Delehanty, Brianna

    2017-09-15

    This study examined the association between neighborhood characteristics, stigma related to mental illness reported by local community members, and measures of perceived stigma and community participation among individuals with psychiatric disabilities living in independent scattered-site housing or in congregate housing in three neighborhoods in the New York City metropolitan area. Neighborhood characteristics were drawn from the 2010 U.S. Census. Surveys focusing on attitudes and intended behavior toward people with mental illness were administered to 608 general community members, and clinical interviews were conducted with 343 persons with psychiatric disabilities. Of neighborhood characteristics, both greater socioeconomic disadvantage and more "suburban values" (lower housing density and greater political conservativism) predicted more perpetrated stigma reported by community members. There was no significant relationship between stigma reported by community members and perceived stigma among participants with psychiatric disabilities. Community stigma predicted vocational involvement and demonstrated interaction effects with housing, such that persons living in congregate housing demonstrated more community participation in communities with more stigma, whereas persons living in scattered-site housing demonstrated less participation in these communities. Perceived stigma was significantly negatively related to community participation. Findings suggest that effects of neighborhood characteristics and community stigma on people with psychiatric disabilities are complex and are partly conditioned by housing context.

  3. ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY AMONG ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS- A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshimi Borgohain; Deepak Chaudhury; Mahibul Islam Mollah; Subhankar Paul

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) among adolescent psychiatric patient is rarely used and studies in this regard are also rare, while its need is of great importance. Aim of this study was to study the prevalence of ECT in common psychiatric illnesses among adolescent age group, where it is indicated and outcome of ECT in those psychiatric patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS All data were collected retrospectively from the chart review for those adolescents aged betwee...

  4. Psychiatric Psychosocial Rebilibation in Nigeria; What Needs to be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerians who suffer from severe mental illness also need psychiatric psychosocial rehabilitation. Despite the availability of a wide range of mental health services in Nigeria, majority of Nigerians with mental health relatively have their needs unmet. To fill this unmet gap, Nigerian psychiatrists should also make psychiatric ...

  5. The Role of a Psychiatric Pharmacist in College Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caley, Charles F.; Webber, Donna; Kurland, Michael; Holmes, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Published evidence indicates there is a growing prevalence of psychiatric illnesses on college campuses, and that approximately one quarter of students may be taking psychotropic medications. But attracting and retaining experienced mental health care professionals to college health settings is a challenging task. The psychiatric pharmacist is one…

  6. Long stay patients in a psychiatric hospital in Lagos, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    confinement or long-stay for psychiatrically ill offenders.5,6. Over the years, these asylums were converted to fully- ... study center; or, in the alternative provision of mid–way facilities for their rehabilitation. Key Words: Long-stay; Psychiatric hospital; ..... The DSM–III concepts of schizophrenic disorder and schizophrenifrom ...

  7. Sleep in Children With Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramtekkar, Ujjwal; Ivanenko, Anna

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disturbances are common in pediatric psychiatric disorders and constitute key elements in diagnostic symptomatology of various primary psychiatric disorders including bipolar disorder, depression, and anxiety disorder. Although sleep is not included in key defining criteria of some impairing illnesses such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia, these disorders present with a very high prevalence of sleep disturbances. The interaction between sleep and psychopathology is very complex with significant interrelationship in development, severity, and prognosis of psychiatric disorders and comorbid sleep disturbances. The research ranging from small intervention case series to large epidemiologic studies have demonstrated the role of specific sleep complaints in specific psychiatric diagnoses. However, the research using objective instruments such as polysomnography and actigraphy remains limited in youth with psychiatric disorders. The intervention studies using pharmaceutical treatment specifically focusing on sleep disturbances in psychiatric disorders are also sparse in the pediatric literature. Early identification of sleep disturbances and behavioral management using cognitive behavior therapy-based tools appear to be the most effective approach for treatment. The use of psychotropic medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for the treatment of primary psychiatric disorder often alleviate the psychological barriers for sleep but may lead to emergence of other sleep issues such as restless leg syndrome. The safety and efficacy data of hypnotics for primary sleep disorders are limited in pediatrics and should be avoided or used with extreme caution in children with comorbid sleep and psychiatric problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Recovery and severe mental illness: The role of romantic relationships, intimacy, and sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Marie-Eve; Groleau, Danielle; Whitley, Rob

    2016-06-01

    The overall aim of this article is to examine the self-defined role of romantic relationships, intimacy and sexuality in recovery from severe mental illness. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 35 people with severe mental illness, accompanied by participant observation. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The vast majority of participants considered a supportive relationship that was emotionally or sexually intimate to be a key facilitator and indicator of recovery. However, only a small minority of participants were actually in such a relationship. Participants reported numerous barriers to forming and maintaining such relationships such as financial strain and enduring stigma against people with mental illness. Addressing relational and intimate needs have not been a focus of traditional psychiatric services. As such, some form of "supported dating" within the field of psychosocial rehabilitation may be an essential development to foster an oft-overlooked but important aspect of recovery. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Psychiatric nursing education in Nebraska: 1989-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, M D; Pierce, A; Roach, R; Shanahan, C; Loch, E

    1991-01-01

    The academic and clinical content of psychiatric nursing curricula in the registered nurse basic educational programs in Nebraska for academic year 1989-1990 was explored by the Nebraska Sub-group of the Nursing Curriculum and Training Task Force of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill. The review includes literature regarding the history, development, and future trends of psychiatric nursing; factors affecting nursing student attitudes toward psychiatric patients; basic content included in psychiatric and psychosocial nursing curricula; and concepts essential in working with the seriously, persistently mentally ill. Contrary to current trends in the United States, all Nebraska schools of nursing have a generic psychiatric nursing course taught by clinical specialists in psychiatric-mental health nursing. Hands-on clinical time spent with patients with psychiatric diagnoses as well as those with psychosocial needs varies from 84 to 200 hr per semester. Not all students are exposed to patients with severe and persistent mental illness. Fewer than 5% of Nebraska graduates choose psychiatric nursing as their area of practice. The authors express grave concern for the future of psychiatric nursing education. Implications for curriculum revision and replication studies are suggested.

  10. Sexual networks and HIV risk of people with severe mental illness in institutional and community-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric R; Gayman, Mathew

    2005-09-01

    This study examines the sexual networks and HIV risk of clients with severe mental illness in treatment in institutional and community care settings. Data were gathered through structured interviews with 401 clients at three community mental health centers and two state psychiatric hospitals. Results indicate that community clients are more likely than hospital patients to be currently sexually active and to engage in high-risk sexual behavior whereas hospitalized patients tend to have more transient sexual relationships with partners who also have a mental illness. These findings suggest that mental health treatment settings may be shaping the HIV epidemic among psychiatric patients because of the impact they have on the structure of clients' sexual networks.

  11. PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY IN A NIGERIAN NEUROLOGY CLINIC

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-28

    May 28, 2013 ... medication effects and psychological reactions to the illness. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a good example of a disabling neurological disorder and it is now apparent that the underlying neurodegenerative disorder is a major cause of psychiatric disturbances even though the psychological reactions to the ...

  12. Physician assisted death in psychiatric practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewoud, J.H.; van der Maas, P.J.; van der Wal, G.; Hengeveld, M.W.; Tholen, A.J.; Schudel, W.J.; van der Heide, A.

    1997-01-01

    Background: In 1994 the Dutch Supreme Court ruled that in exceptional instances, physician-assisted suicide might be justifiable for patients with unbearable mental suffering but no physical illness. We studied physician- assisted suicide and euthanasia in psychiatric practice in the Netherlands.

  13. Psychiatric and Societal Impacts of Terrorism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grieger, Thomas A

    2006-01-01

    ... is one consequence of terrorism. Even emotional and behavioral changes that do not reach the level of a diagnosable disorder may contribute significantly to the overall health burden resulting from terrorist attacks. Psychiatric disorders will occur in a relatively small percentage of the exposed population. The course of illness for those in whom suc...

  14. Psychiatric morbidity and quality of life in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Mine; Oflaz, Serap Batmaz; Kocaman, Nazmiye; Ozseker, Ferhan; Gelincik, Ash; Büyüköztürk, Suna; Ozkan, Sedat; Colakoğlu, Bahattin

    2007-07-01

    Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is a frequently occurring disease that has a great impact on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients and seems to be associated with a number of psychological factors. To determine the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in patients with CIU and to determine HRQL of CIU patients compared with controls. A semistructured interview form, a generic form of the HRQL questionnaire (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey [SF-36]), and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis Disorders (SCID-I) were administered to CIU patients who presented to the Allergy Department of the University of Istanbul (from January 1 to April 30, 2005). Healthy subjects matched sociodemographically with the study group were used as the control group. Eighty-four CIU patients and 75 controls were included in the study. The mean +/- SD age of the study participants was 36.83 +/- 10.26 years, and 84% were women. The mean +/- SD duration of the disease was 6.34 +/- 7.2 years, and symptoms were intermittent in 51%. The SCID-I revealed a psychiatric diagnosis in 60% of the patients. In terms of the distribution of psychiatric diagnoses, the most frequently occurring diagnosis was depressive disorders (40%). Most patients (81%) believed that their illnesses were due to stress. The subdomains on the SF-36 measurements were significantly lower than those of the control subjects (P < or = .005). The physical function, vitality, and mental health subdomains of the SF-36 in the patients with a psychiatric diagnosis were significantly lower (P < .05). These findings suggested that psychiatric morbidity is high among ICU patients and is detrimental to their quality of life.

  15. Recent illicit drug use among psychiatric patients in Brazil: a national representative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Almeida Nahas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate factors associated to illicit drug use among patients with mental illness in Brazil according to gender. METHODS A cross-sectional representative sample of psychiatric patients (2,475 individuals was randomly selected from 11 hospitals and 15 public mental health outpatient clinics. Data on self-reported illicit drug use and sociodemographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics were obtained from face-to-face interviews. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations with recent illicit drug use. RESULTS The prevalence of any recent illicit drug use was 11.4%. Men had higher prevalence than women for all substances (17.5% and 5.6%, respectively. Lower education, history of physical violence, and history of homelessness were associated with drug use among men only; not professing a religion was associated with drug use in women only. For both men and women, younger age, current hospitalization, alcohol and tobacco use, history of incarceration, younger age at sexual debut, and more than one sexual partner were statistically associated with illicit drug use. CONCLUSIONS Recent illicit drug use among psychiatric patients is higher than among the general Brazilian population and it is associated with multiple factors including markers of psychiatric severity. Our data indicate the need for the development of gender-based drug-use interventions among psychiatric patients in Brazil. Integration of substance use treatment strategies with mental health treatment should be a priority.

  16. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders among visitors to faith healers in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosaimi, Fahad D.; Alshehri, Youssef; Alfraih, Ibrahim; Alghamdi, Ayedh; Aldahash, Saleh; Alkhuzayem, Haifa; Albeeeshi, Haneen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among visitors to Faith Healers (FHs) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We also studied the sociodemographic profiles for these visitors, in addition to their past psychiatric history, reason(s) for seeking FH help, and past and current treatment experience with FHs. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among the visitors (n=321) to a number of faith healing settings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia using a specially designed questionnaire and validated Arabic version of The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Results: Most of the participants were young adults (35.1±10.8 years) and males with intermediate and secondary levels of education who had not sought medical help prior to their visits. A high proportion of the FH visitors have diagnosable mental illnesses. Depressive and anxiety disorders were the most prevalent among the study participants; few visitors were affected by psychotic or bipolar disorders. Conclusions: The present study provides insight for understanding the type of patients with psychiatric disorders who visit Faith Healers.(FHs). The study highlights the tendency of psychiatric patients in Saudi Arabia to visit FHs, which could reflect the importance of further studies to clarify the impact of FHs on the management of those patients. PMID:25225530

  17. Somali Refugees' Perceptions of Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettmann, Joanna E; Penney, Deb; Clarkson Freeman, Pamela; Lecy, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 13% of the U.S. population is comprised of foreign-born individuals, with Somalis constituting one of the largest resettled groups. Research suggests that, among Somali refugees, rates of mental illness are high. Yet research shows Somalis underutilize mental health services. Understanding their perceptions of mental illness and its cures may help practitioners to design more effective treatments for this population. Thus, this pilot study investigated Somali refugees' perceptions of mental illness and its treatments. Using purposive sampling, this qualitative study interviewed 20 Somali refugees using a semi-structured interview guide. Qualitative analysis yielded participants' perceptions of mental illness through their descriptions of physical symptoms accompanying mental illness, the stigma of mental illness, causes of mental illness, medical and non-medical treatments for mental illness, spirit possession causing mental illness, and the Qur'an as treatment for mental illness. Such information may help practitioners in the United States approach Somali clients in the most culturally coherent manner.

  18. How a Stressed Local Public System Copes With People in Psychiatric Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Rebecca; La, Elizabeth Holdsworth; Morrissey, Joseph; Hall, Marissa; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Blouin, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    In order to bolster the public mental health safety net, we must first understand how these systems function on a day-to-day basis. This study explored how individual attributes and organizational interdependencies within one predominantly urban US county affected responses to individuals’ needs during psychiatric crises. We interviewed clinicians and managers within the crisis response network about people at immediate risk of psychiatric hospitalization, what had happened to them during their crises, and factors affecting services provided (N = 94 individuals and 9 agencies). Social network diagrams depicted patterns of referrals between agencies. Iterative coding of interview transcripts was used to contextualize the social network findings. Often, agencies saw crises through to resolution. However, providers also limited the types of people they served, leaving many people in crisis in limbo. This study illustrates how attributes of individuals with mental illness, service providers and their interactions, and state and federal policies intersect to shape the trajectories of individuals during psychiatric crises. Understanding both the structures of current local systems and their contexts may support continued evolution toward a more humane and robust safety net for some of our society’s most vulnerable members. PMID:23065371

  19. Psychiatric morbidity following Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, D; Mellman, T A; Mendoza, L M; Kulick-Bell, R; Ironson, G; Schneiderman, N

    1996-07-01

    The nature of psychiatric morbidity in previously non-ill subjects from the area most affected by Hurricane Andrew was investigated at 6-12 months posthurricane. Preliminary associations of morbidity with personal and event-related risk factors were also determined. Fifty one percent (31/61) met criteria for a new-onset disorder, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 36%, major depression (MD) in 30%, and other anxiety disorders in 20%. Thirty four subjects (56%) had significant symptoms persisting beyond 6 months. Having sustained "severe damage" was the risk factor most strongly associated with outcome. Our data underscore the range of psychiatric morbidity related to a natural disaster, and suggest a relationship to chronic stressors.

  20. Qualitative study on the placement of Huntington disease patients in a psychiatric hospital: perceptions of Maltese nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Josianne; Cassar, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with adult or juvenile Huntington disease can be cared for within psychiatric hospitals. In this paper, nurses' perceptions about the appropriateness of a psychiatric setting for these patients were explored. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 Maltese nurses involved in the care of these individuals. Their responses were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified from this study: (i) Huntington disease is not a mental illness; (ii) the lack of specialized staff and equipment within a psychiatric setting; and (iii) a need for alternative care options. The findings provide an insight into the perceptions of nurses, as they play a key role in the care and management of individuals with Huntington disease in a psychiatric setting. The findings demonstrated the need to provide alternative residential options in the community, and to improve the care and support provided both within psychiatric hospitals and the community through staff education and the provision of necessary facilities and equipment. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Health habits, attitudes and behavior towards oral health of psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. People with psychiatric disorders are at high risk of oral diseases due to the impact of their primary psychiatric condition and the side-effects of antipsychotic medications. Objective. The aim of this study was to identify habits, attitudes and behavior towards oral health of hospitalized psychiatric patients with psychotic disorders, including mood disorders with psychotic characteristics, as well as to identify factors that could influence those habits, attitudes and behavior. Methods. The experimental group consisted of 186 hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders (87 males and 99 females, aged from 18 to 59 years (mean age 46.0±8.0 years. The control group consisted of 186 healthy persons matched for age and gender. Data were obtained by using specially designed questionnaires with questions about the subjects' social, economic and demographic characteristics, as well as their habits, attitudes and behaviour concerning their oral health, in a form of a standardized interview. Other medical data were collected from medical documentation of disease history. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t-test, Chi-square test, ANOVA, Logistic Regression and simultaneous multiple regression. Results. Psychiatric patients have worse habits, attitudes and behavior concerning their oral health in comparison with healthy persons (p<0.001: they wash their teeth more rarely and in a shorter time, have less knowledge of oral diseases and their effect on general health, and visit their dentist more rarely. The obtained results depend on social, economic and demographic characteristics and on the underlying illness of patients. Conclusion. Health educational work concerning oral health of patients should be included in psychiatric treatment, as a part of an existing therapy with the aim of improving the general quality of their life.

  2. Preventing HIV among U.S. women of color with severe mental illness: perceptions of mental health care providers working in urban community clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with patients and train providers in the cultural considerations of cross-cultural mental health care are needed to help prevent HIV among women of color with SMI.

  3. Preventing HIV Among U.S. Women of Color With Severe Mental Illness: Perceptions of Mental Health Care Providers Working in Urban Community Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y.

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with patients and train providers in the cultural considerations of cross-cultural mental health care are needed to help prevent HIV among women of color with SMI. PMID:23394326

  4. Psychiatric (Axis I) and personality (Axis II) disorders and subjective psychiatric symptoms in chronic tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlsten, Hanna; Taiminen, Tero; Karukivi, Max; Sjösten, Noora; Nikkilä, Johanna; Virtanen, Juuso; Paavola, Janika; Joutsa, Juho; Niinivirta-Joutsa, Katri; Takala, Mari; Holm, Anu; Rauhala, Esa; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Johansson, Reijo; Jääskeläinen, Satu K

    2017-11-30

    Chronic tinnitus has been associated with several psychiatric disorders. Only few studies have investigated these disorders using validated diagnostic interviews. The aims were to diagnose psychiatric and personality disorders with structured interviews, to assess self-rated psychiatric symptoms and elucidate temporal relations between psychiatric disorders and tinnitus. Current and lifetime DSM-IV diagnoses of axis-I (psychiatric disorders) and axis-II (personality disorders) were assessed using structured clinical interviews (SCID-I and -II). Current subjective psychiatric symptoms were evaluated via self-rating instruments: the Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90), the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). 83 patients (mean age 51.7, 59% men) with chronic, disturbing tinnitus and a median Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score of 32. The rates of lifetime and current major depression were 26.5% and 2.4%. The lifetime rate of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (type C) was 8.4%. None of the patients had cluster B personality disorder or psychotic symptoms. The SCL-90 subscales did not differ from the general population, and median DES score was low, 2.4. Tinnitus patients are prone to episodes of major depression and often also have obsessive-compulsive personality features. Psychiatric disorders seem to be comorbid or predisposing conditions rather than consequences of tinnitus. Clinical trial reference: ClinicalTrials.gov (ID NCT 01929837).

  5. Chronic pain and psychiatric morbidity: a comparison between patients attending specialist orthopedics clinic and multidisciplinary pain clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wing S; Chen, Phoon P; Yap, Jackequaline; Mak, Kan Hing; Tam, Barry Ka H; Fielding, Richard

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations between chronic pain and psychiatric morbidity using interview-based assessments of psychiatric symptomatology. We compared the prevalence of common mental disorder (CMD; consistent with neurotic and somatic symptoms, fatigue, and negative affect), depression, and anxiety disorder(s), and associated factors with these psychiatric illnesses among Chinese patients with chronic pain attending specialist orthopedics clinic and multidisciplinary pain clinic. A total of 370 patients with chronic pain were recruited from an Orthopedics Clinic (N=185) and a Pain Clinic (N=185) in Hong Kong. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Individual scores for neurotic symptoms and neurotic disorders (including depression and four types of anxiety disorders) were also calculated. The reported lifetime prevalence rates of CMD were 35.3% and 75.3% for the Orthopedics and Pain Clinic samples, respectively. Rates of depression and anxiety disorders in the Pain Clinic (57.1% and 23.2%, respectively) were significantly higher than those in the Orthopedics sample (20.2% and 5.9%, respectively) (all P<0.001). Pain characteristics including number of pain sites, pain duration, pain intensity, and pain interference were all significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity after controlling for sociodemographic factors. Pain duration and litigation/compensation status consistently predicted concurrent pain intensity and disability. Chronic pain is associated with psychiatric morbidity. The higher rate of depression than anxiety disorder(s) among patients with chronic pain is consistent with previous studies that have found depression to be highly prevalent in chronic pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading cause of disability. Untreated mental illness can cause severe emotional, behavioral and physical health problems. Complications sometimes linked to mental illness include: Unhappiness and decreased enjoyment of life ...

  7. Long stay patients in a psychiatric hospital in Lagos, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. In psychiatric practice, some mentally ill patients spend their life in continuous or prolonged hospitalization; that is, as long stay patients.1,2 This is due among other reasons to severe mental illness with poor symptom control, substance dependence, homelessness and abandonment by the patients' relatives.3 ...

  8. The Effect of Clinical Psychiatric Training on Medical Students' Belief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    femi oloka

    implication for the future care of psychiatric patients. No doubt, medical students' attitudes are key factors in determining their willingness to deal with mentally ill patients, even in general practice. Stigma and negative attitudes towards the mentally ill lead to strained social interaction, low self-esteem, loss of employment and ...

  9. Bullying behaviour in schools, socioeconomic position and psychiatric morbidity: a cross-sectional study in late adolescents in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magklara Konstantina

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullying is quite prevalent in the school setting and has been associated with the socioeconomic position and psychiatric morbidity of the pupils. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between bullying and socioeconomic status in a sample of Greek adolescents and to examine whether this is confounded by the presence of psychiatric morbidity, including sub-threshold forms of illness. Methods 5,614 adolescents aged 16-18 years old and attending 25 senior high schools were screened and a stratified random sample of 2,427 were selected for a detailed interview. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed with a fully structured psychiatric interview, the revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R, while bullying was assessed with the revised Olweus bully/victim questionnaire. The following socio-economic variables were assessed: parental educational level and employment status, financial difficulties of the family and adolescents' school performance. The associations were investigated using multinomial logit models. Results 26.4% of the pupils were involved in bullying-related behaviours at least once monthly either as victims, perpetrators or both, while more frequent involvement (at least once weekly was reported by 4.1%. Psychiatric morbidity was associated with all types of bullying-related behaviours. No socioeconomic associations were reported for victimization. A lower school performance and unemployment of the father were significantly more likely among perpetrators, while economic inactivity of the mother was more likely in pupils who were both victims and perpetrators. These results were largely confirmed when we focused on high frequency behaviours only. In addition, being overweight increased the risk of frequent victimization. Conclusions The prevalence of bullying among Greek pupils is substantial. Perpetration was associated with some dimensions of adolescents' socioeconomic status, while victimization

  10. Bullying behaviour in schools, socioeconomic position and psychiatric morbidity: a cross-sectional study in late adolescents in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Bullying is quite prevalent in the school setting and has been associated with the socioeconomic position and psychiatric morbidity of the pupils. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between bullying and socioeconomic status in a sample of Greek adolescents and to examine whether this is confounded by the presence of psychiatric morbidity, including sub-threshold forms of illness. Methods 5,614 adolescents aged 16-18 years old and attending 25 senior high schools were screened and a stratified random sample of 2,427 were selected for a detailed interview. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed with a fully structured psychiatric interview, the revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R), while bullying was assessed with the revised Olweus bully/victim questionnaire. The following socio-economic variables were assessed: parental educational level and employment status, financial difficulties of the family and adolescents' school performance. The associations were investigated using multinomial logit models. Results 26.4% of the pupils were involved in bullying-related behaviours at least once monthly either as victims, perpetrators or both, while more frequent involvement (at least once weekly) was reported by 4.1%. Psychiatric morbidity was associated with all types of bullying-related behaviours. No socioeconomic associations were reported for victimization. A lower school performance and unemployment of the father were significantly more likely among perpetrators, while economic inactivity of the mother was more likely in pupils who were both victims and perpetrators. These results were largely confirmed when we focused on high frequency behaviours only. In addition, being overweight increased the risk of frequent victimization. Conclusions The prevalence of bullying among Greek pupils is substantial. Perpetration was associated with some dimensions of adolescents' socioeconomic status, while victimization showed no socioeconomic

  11. [The Basel Interview for Psychosis (BIP): structure, reliability and validity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecher-Rössler, A; Ackermann, T; Uttinger, M; Ittig, S; Koranyi, S; Rapp, C; Bugra, H; Studerus, E

    2015-02-01

    Although several instruments have been developed to identify patients with an at-risk mental state (ARMS) for psychosis and first episode of psychosis (FEP), up to now there were no instruments for a detailed assessment of risk factors and indicators of emerging psychosis and the temporal development of psychiatric symptoms over the whole life span in these patients. We therefore developed the Basle Interview for Psychosis (BIP). The aim of this study is to describe the development of the BIP and to report about its psychometric properties. The BIP is a comprehensive semi-structured interview that was developed for the Basel early detection of psychoses (FePsy) study. Its items were derived from the most important risk factors and indicators of psychosis described in the literature and from several existing instruments. It contains the following six sections: 1) social and physical development and family, 2) signs and symptoms, 3) vulnerability, 4) help-seeking behavior, 5) illness insight, 6) evaluation of the interview. To estimate the inter-rater reliabilities of the items of sections 2 and 3, 20 interviews were conducted and rated by 8 well-trained raters. The factorial structure of the BIP section "signs and symptoms" was explored in a sample of 120 ARMS and 77 FEP patients. On the basis of the discovered factorial structure, we created new subscales and assessed their reliabilities and validities. Of the 153 studied items of sections 2 and 3, 150 (98 %) were rated with sufficiently high agreement (inter-rater reliability > 0.4). The items of section "signs and symptoms" could be grouped into 5 subscales with predominantly good to very good internal consistencies, homogeneities, and discriminant and convergent validities. Predictive validities could be demonstrated for the subscales "Positive Psychotic Symptoms", "Disturbance of Thinking" and the total score. The BIP is the first interview for comprehensively assessing risk factors and indicators of

  12. Dropping out of outpatient psychiatric treatment: a preliminary report of a 2-year follow-up of 1500 psychiatric outpatients in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaie, Habibolah; Rezaie, Leeba; de Jong, Desiree M

    2013-01-01

    Outpatient psychiatric treatment provides both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for a large portion of psychiatric patients. Dropping out, or early termination of treatment, may be considered a common barrier to outpatient's psychiatric treatment. There are limited studies on this issue in Iran. The current study aimed to examine rates, predictors and reasons of dropping out of an outpatient psychiatric treatment. In this 6-month cohort study, 1500 outpatients who visited 10 psychiatrist's offices in the Iranian city of Kermanshah were recruited and followed for 2 years (2009-2011) for recommended treatments including admission to hospital, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy and a combination of both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. Characteristics of patients who dropped out of the current study were collected, and reasons for dropping out were collected via phone or in person interview. Dropouts were prevalent in prescribed treatments. Pretreatment (primary) dropout rates in psychotherapy treatment were 4 times greater than dropout rates in pharmacotherapy treatment (80% and 20%, respectively). There were significance differences between dropouts and non-dropouts of pharmacotherapy with respect to patient characteristics; younger age, male gender, low level of education, unemployment, lack of insurance, new cases and divorce were more prevalent among dropouts (P<.001). With regard to diagnosis, dropping out was more prevalent among patients with substance-related disorders, schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders when compared to other diagnoses (P<.001). Commonly reported reasons for dropping out included overslept and too ill to attend treatment and fear of becoming addicted to prescribed psychotropic medication (30% and 18%, respectively). Lack of confidence in therapist ability and lack of confidence in the efficacy of the treatment were more prevalent in patients who dropped out of psychotherapy (P<.001). Patient dropout is a common problem in outpatient

  13. Predictors and course of vocational status, income, and quality of life in people with severe mental illness: a naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordt, Carlos; Müller, Brigitte; Rössler, Wulf; Lauber, Christoph

    2007-10-01

    Due to high unemployment rates, people with mental illness are at risk of poverty and are deprived of the social and psychological functions of work, such as the provision of social support, structuring of time, and self-esteem, with a negative effect on their perceived quality of life (QoL). Two distinct processes are held responsible for the low work force participation of people with mental illness: 'Social underachievement' and 'social decline'. Social underachievement signifies that, due to early illness onset, the educational attainment of people with mental illness is low and entry to the labor market fails. Social decline, on the other hand, describes the loss of competitive employment after illness onset, followed by prolonged periods of unemployment and difficulties to re-enter the labor market. This study examines how social underachievement and decline are reflected in the course of vocational status, income, and QoL of people with severe mental illness in the years after a psychiatric admission in a naturalistic longitudinal design. A total of 176 participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or affective disorders were interviewed during an index hospitalization in two large psychiatric hospitals in Zurich. Follow-up interviews were conducted 12 and 30 months after. Random coefficient models (multilevel models) were used to examine simultaneously the predictors and course of the variables of interest. A low number of psychiatric hospitalizations, a higher educational degree, a diagnosis of schizophrenia, and years of work experience predicted a higher vocational status. Vocational status decreased in first-admission participants with prolonged hospitalizations during the follow-up period. Income did not change over time and was positively influenced by a higher age of illness onset, competitive employment, higher education, and not having had a longer hospitalization recently. Subjective QoL significantly improved and was rated higher by people with any

  14. Paraphilias in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Patrick J; Odlaug, Brian L; Thomarios, Nick; Davis, Andrew A; Buchanan, Stephanie N; Meyer, Craig S; Grant, Jon E

    2010-05-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the prevalence of paraphilias in an adult inpatient psychiatric population. One hundred twelve consecutive, voluntarily admitted, adult male psychiatric inpatients were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Sexual Disorders Module, Male Version, to assess the rates of DSM-IV paraphilias. Fifteen patients (13.4%) reported symptoms consistent with at least one lifetime DSM-IV paraphilia. The most common paraphilias were voyeurism (n = 9 [8.0%]), exhibitionism (n = 6 [5.4%]), and sexual masochism (n = 3 [2.7%]). Patients who screened positive for a paraphilia had significantly more psychiatric hospitalizations (P = .006) and, on a trend level, were more likely to have attempted suicide. In addition, patients with paraphilias were significantly more likely to report having been sexually abused than patients without a paraphilia (P = paraphilia. Paraphilias appear to be more common in adult male psychiatric inpatients than previously estimated. The study also demonstrated that these disorders were not screened for by the treating physician and thus may go untreated. Further, larger-scale studies are necessary in order to further examine the rates of these disorders in the general population.

  15. Conceptions of mobile emergency service health professionals concerning psychiatric emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Bonfada

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Under the Brazilian Psychiatric Reformation, assistance to psychological seizures represents a challenge for the emergency services. Therefore, the objective of this paper is the analysis of the conceptions of health professionals who work at the Mobile Emergency Service in Natal on psychiatric emergency care. This paper is, then, a qualitative study that used interviews as tools for collecting information. By using thematic analysis, the speeches were grouped into three categories: the stigma on patients and the professionals' fear of services interventions in psychiatric emergencies; having psychiatric emergencies regarded as harmful to patients and others' security; psychiatric emergencies being taken as patients' aggressiveness or severe depression. The data collected indicate that the interviewed professionals' ideas are supported by elements associated with the ideology that insanity implies social segregation and dangerousness. Thus, the survey prompted reflection on relevant issues to the process of psychiatric reformation implementation.

  16. Perpetuating stigma? Differences between advertisements for psychiatric and non-psychiatric medication in two professional journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Juliet L H

    2010-02-01

    Continuing debates regarding advertising and the pharmaceutical industry, and others detailing the continued stigmatization of mental health problems. To establish whether there are any differences in advertisements for psychiatric and non-psychiatric medication aimed at health professionals. Quantitative (t-tests, Chi-squared) and qualitative analysis of all unique advertisements for medication that appeared in two professional journals (the British Medical Journal and the British Journal of Psychiatry) between October 2005 and September 2006 was undertaken. Close attention was paid to both images and text used in the advertisements. Significant differences were found between advertisements for psychiatric and non-psychiatric medication in both quantitative and qualitative analysis: advertisements for psychiatric medication contain less text and are less likely to include specific information about the actual drug than non-psychiatric medication advertisements; images used in advertisements for psychiatric medication are more negative than those used for non-psychiatric medication, and are less likely to portray people in everyday situations. A distinction between mental health problems and other forms of ill health is clearly being maintained in medication advertisements; this has potentially stigmatizing consequences, both for professional and public perceptions. There are also troubling implications in light of the debates surrounding Direct to Consumer Advertising.

  17. Genetic Counselling for Psychiatric Disorders: Accounts of Psychiatric Health Professionals in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Sian; Arribas-Ayllon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Genetic counselling is not routinely offered for psychiatric disorders in the United Kingdom through NHS regional clinical genetics departments. However, recent genomic advances, confirming a genetic contribution to mental illness, are anticipated to increase demand for psychiatric genetic counselling. This is the first study of its kind to employ qualitative methods of research to explore accounts of psychiatric health professionals regarding the prospects for genetic counselling services within clinical psychiatry in the UK. Data were collected from 32 questionnaire participants, and 9 subsequent interviewees. Data analysis revealed that although participants had not encountered patients explicitly demanding psychiatric genetic counselling, psychiatric health professionals believe that such a service would be useful and desirable. Genomic advances may have significant implications for genetic counselling in clinical psychiatry even if these discoveries do not lead to genetic testing. Psychiatric health professionals describe clinical genetics as a skilled profession capable of combining complex risk communication with much needed psychosocial support. However, participants noted barriers to the implementation of psychiatric genetic counselling services including, but not limited to, the complexities of uncertainty in psychiatric diagnoses, patient engagement and ethical concerns regarding limited capacity.

  18. Psychiatric comorbidities in women with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigo, Danielle; Anskis, Alicia M; Smyth, Joshua M

    2012-03-01

    Although the physical consequences of Celiac Disease are well studied, less is known about co-occurring psychiatric symptoms. This study examines psychiatric risk and comorbidities of women with Celiac Disease, who may be at increased risk for psychiatric symptoms (e.g. depression, and disordered eating behaviours). Women (N = 177) with Celiac Disease responded to an extensive web-mediated survey assessing dietary compliance, illness symptoms, psychiatric functioning, and disordered eating. Despite high reported dietary compliance, patients reported marked illness symptoms and impaired quality of life. A substantial minority endorsed symptoms that met criteria for the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders: 37% (n = 65) met the threshold suggesting depression, and 22% (n = 39) for disordered eating. Participants whose symptoms exceeded these clinical thresholds reported greater perceived stress and reduced overall mental health, relative to women below the clinical cutoffs. Despite largely adhering to a gluten-free diet, a substantial subset of women with Celiac Disease report clinically relevant symptoms of depression and disordered eating; such symptoms are associated with increased psychosocial distress in other domains. These results suggest potential to improve the patient well-being through attention to psychosocial care, in addition to existing dietary recommendations for individuals with Celiac Disease.

  19. Impulse control disorders in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Levine, Laura; Kim, Daniel; Potenza, Marc N

    2005-11-01

    The authors' goal was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients. They used the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview, a semistructured clinical interview assessing pathological gambling, trichotillomania, kleptomania, pyromania, intermittent explosive disorder, compulsive buying, and compulsive sexual behavior, to screen 204 consecutively admitted psychiatric inpatients. One hundred twelve of the inpatients were women (54.9%), and the mean age of the 204 inpatients was 40.5 years (SD=13.2, range=18-83). Patients whose screen was positive for an impulse control disorder were evaluated with structured clinical interviews. Sixty-three patients (30.9%) were diagnosed with at least one current impulse control disorder. The most common impulse control disorders were compulsive buying (N=19 [9.3%]), kleptomania (N=16 [7.8%]), and pathological gambling (N=14 [6.9%]). Patients with and without co-occurring impulse control disorders did not differ significantly from each other on demographic measures or number or type of psychiatric diagnoses other than impulse control disorders. Impulse control disorders appear common among psychiatric inpatients. Additional, larger studies are needed to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in the general population and specific psychiatric groups.

  20. Sexual risk behavior among persons dually diagnosed with severe mental illness and substance use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Christina S

    2006-03-01

    Persons dually diagnosed with severe mental illness (SMI) and substance use disorder (SUD) have disproportionately high rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). This study examined the relationship between multiple sexual risk behaviors among persons with active, remitted, and no SUD. Participants were 152 adults with SMI recruited from multiple treatment sites. A structured interview assessed the participants' psychiatric, psychosocial, and behavioral factors. Rates of sexual risk behavior in the past 3 months were high and differed across the SUD groups. Multivariate logistic regression models found that lifetime SUD predicted sexual activity and partner-related risk whereas active substance abuse predicted condom-related risk. The results also support indirect effects of interpersonal and psychiatric factors (e.g., romantic partnership and psychotic disorder). Findings underscore the need for integrated HIV/STI prevention interventions targeting dually diagnosed patients.

  1. Epigenetic signaling in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Catherine J; Bagot, Rosemary C; Labonté, Benoit; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-10-09

    Psychiatric disorders are complex multifactorial illnesses involving chronic alterations in neural circuit structure and function. While genetic factors are important in the etiology of disorders such as depression and addiction, relatively high rates of discordance among identical twins clearly indicate the importance of additional mechanisms. Environmental factors such as stress or prior drug exposure are known to play a role in the onset of these illnesses. Such exposure to environmental insults induces stable changes in gene expression, neural circuit function, and ultimately behavior, and these maladaptations appear distinct between developmental and adult exposures. Increasing evidence indicates that these sustained abnormalities are maintained by epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions. Indeed, transcriptional dysregulation and associated aberrant epigenetic regulation is a unifying theme in psychiatric disorders. Aspects of depression and addiction can be modeled in animals by inducing disease-like states through environmental manipulations (e.g., chronic stress, drug administration). Understanding how environmental factors recruit the epigenetic machinery in animal models reveals new insight into disease mechanisms in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. co-morbid psychiatric disorders in nigerian patients suffering ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    28-item General Health Questionnaires and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales were used for first stage screening while the second stage interview utilised the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule. Results: The prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was 37.5% and 12.5% in the study and control groups respectively.

  3. Perceived illness intrusions among continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Bapat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the perceived illness intrusion of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD patients, to examine their demographics, and to find out the association among demographics, duration of illness as well as illness intrusion, 40 chronic kidney disease stage V patients on CAPD during 2006-2007 were studied. Inclusion criteria were patients′ above 18 years, willing, stable, and completed at least two months of dialysis. Those with psychiatric co-morbidity were excluded. Sociodemographics were collected using a semi-structured interview schedule. A 14-item illness intrusion checklist covering various aspects of life was administered. The subjects had to rate the illness intrusion in their daily life and the extent of intrusion. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi square test of association. The mean age of the subjects was 56.05 ± 10.05 years. There was near equal distribution of gender. 82.5% were married, 70.0% belonged to Hindu religion, 45.0% were pre-degree, 25.0% were employed, 37.5% were housewives and 30.0% had retired. 77.5% belonged to the upper socioeconomic strata, 95.0% were from an urban background and 65.0% were from nuclear families. The mean duration of dialysis was 19.0 ± 16.49 months. Fifty-eight percent of the respondents were performing the dialysis exchanges by themselves. More than 95.0%were on three or four exchanges per day. All the 40 subjects reported illness intrusion in their daily life. Intrusion was perceived to some extent in the following areas: health 47.5%, work 25.0%, finance 37.5%, diet 40.0%, and psychological 50.0%. Illness had not intruded in the areas of relationship with spouse 52.5%, sexual life 30.0%, with friends 92.5%, with family 85.5%, social functions 52.5%, and religious functions 75.0%. Statistically significant association was not noted between illness intrusion and other variables. CAPD patients perceived illness intrusion to some extent in their daily life

  4. Sexual Attitude Reassessment for Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincin, Jerry; Wise, Shirley

    1979-01-01

    Sexuality programs are one part of the program at Thresholds, a rehabilitation center for psychiatric patients (17 to 50 years old). A 16 week sexuality group includes seven phases: initial interview; beginning group development (health care, contraception, reproduction, sexuality); masturbation; intercourse; homosexuality; coed group discussion;…

  5. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  6. Community psychiatric nurses and the care co-ordinator role: squeezed to provide 'limited nursing'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Alan

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports a study illuminating the factors that either facilitate or constrain the ability of community psychiatric nurses, in their role as care co-ordinators, to meet service users' and carers' needs. The Care Programme Approach is the key policy underpinning community-focused mental health services in England, but has been unevenly implemented and is associated with increased inpatient bed use. The care co-ordinator role is central to the Care Programme Approach and is most often held by community psychiatric nurses, but there has been little research into how this role is performed or how it affects the work of community psychiatric nurses and their ability to meet the needs of service users. A multiple case study of seven sectorised community mental health teams was employed over 2 years using predominantly qualitative methods including participant observation, semi-structured interviews and document review. The data were collected in one National Health Service trust in south England between 1999 and 2001. Additional duties and responsibilities specifically associated with the care co-ordinator role and multidisciplinary working, combined with heavy workloads, produced 'limited nursing', whereby community psychiatric nurses were unable to provide evidence-based psychosocial interventions that are recognized to reduce relapse amongst people with severe mental illness. The role of the Care Programme Approach care co-ordinator was not designed to support the provision of psychosocial interventions. Consequently, community psychiatric nurses in the co-ordinator role are faced with competing demands and are unable to provide the range of structured, evidence-based interventions required. This may partially account for the increased inpatient bed use associated with the Care Programme Approach.

  7. Free will perceptions and psychiatric symptoms in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman de Mamani, A; Gurak, K; Maura, J; Martinez de Andino, A; Weintraub, M J; Mejia, M

    2016-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Some research suggests that holding a free will perspective may offer mental health and physical health benefits. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study is the first to examine links between free will perceptions and psychiatric symptoms in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Study results suggest that helping people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia to recognize situations where they do have some freedom of choice over their actions and emotional reactions (free will) may assist them in improving their experiences and better managing their symptoms. Introduction Some research indicates that having a strong sense that one possesses free will may be associated with better psychological and physical health. This study is the first to examine the relationship between free will perceptions and psychiatric symptoms in patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Method Thirty-two participants were interviewed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale to assess symptom severity and the Free Will Subscale of the Free Will and Determinism Scale to assess free will perceptions. Results As hypothesized, a negative association was found between free will perceptions and total symptom severity, though it appears that this was mainly accounted for by positive symptoms. A content analysis was also conducted to qualitatively examine how patients conceptualize the construct of free will and its role in coping with their own mental illness. Discussion Study results suggest that holding a free will perspective may mitigate psychiatric symptoms in patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Thus, psychiatric nurses and other mental health clinicians may improve current treatments for schizophrenia by helping patients recognize situations where they do have some freedom of choice over their actions and emotional reactions (free will) to stressful life events. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND SLEEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystal, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Psychiatric disorders and sleep are related in important ways. In contrast to the longstanding view of this relationship which viewed sleep problems as symptoms of psychiatric disorders, there is growing experimental evidence that the relationship between psychiatric disorders and sleep is complex and includes bi-directional causation. In this article we provide the evidence that supports this point of view, reviewing the data on the sleep disturbances seen in patients with psychiatric disorders but also reviewing the data on the impact of sleep disturbances on psychiatric conditions. Although much has been learned about the psychiatric disorders-sleep relationship, additional research is needed to better understand these relationships. This work promises to improve our ability to understand both of these phenomena and to allow us to better treat the many patients with sleep disorders and with psychiatric disorders. PMID:23099143

  9. Adult Neurogenesis and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Cameron, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that adult neurogenesis, the production of new neurons in adulthood, may play a role in psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Medications and other treatments for mental disorders often promote the proliferation of new neurons; the time course for maturation and integration of new neurons in circuitry parallels the delayed efficacy of psychiatric therapies; adverse and beneficial experiences similarly affect development of mental illness and neurogenesis; and ablation of new neurons in adulthood alters the behavioral impact of drugs in animal models. At present, the links between adult neurogenesis and depression seem stronger than those suggesting a relationship between new neurons and anxiety or schizophrenia. Yet, even in the case of depression there is currently no direct evidence for a causative role. This article reviews the data relating adult neurogenesis to mental illness and discusses where research needs to head in the future. PMID:25178407

  10. [Cerebral hydatic cyst and psychiatric disorders. Two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asri, F; Tazi, I; Maaroufi, K; El Moudden, A; Ghannane, H; Ait Benali, S

    2007-01-01

    unconscious of his disorders. The patient has first been put under classical neuroleptic 9 mg/day of Haloperidol and 200 mg/day of chlorpromazine. The diagnosis of schizophrenia has been kept according to criteria of DSM IV. The PANSS (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) was to 137 (score on a positive scale was to 34, score on a negative scale was to 35 and the general psychopathologie scale was to 58). One week after his hospitalization, he developed headache with subconfusion, a cerebral scanning has been made in emergency and showed a voluminous cyst in oval foramen compressing the mesencephalon strongly. The cyst was well limited, hypodense, not taking the contrast, and without intracerebral oedema, the diagnosis of cerebral hydatic cyst has been made. The complementary exploration didn't show any other localizations, and biologic exam results didn't show any particular anomalies. The patient has been operated in neurosurgery. The immediate evolution was favorable with disappearance of confusion and absence of complications. The patient was lost of view. Six months after, the patient has been readmitted to the psychiatric emergency. He dropped his neuroleptic treatment. He was aggressive, raving, hallucinated and depersonalized. The global score to the PANSS was 63. He has been put back under neuroleptics. Three weeks after improvement and passage of the PANSS to 30, the patient went out. We couldn't have a cerebral scanner of control because the patient had no medical assurance and no money for cerebral scanner. Case 2 - Patient aged of 53 years, father of four children, uneducated, native and resident of Marrakech, confectioner as profession. He is in contact with dogs since 12 years. He has been brought to the psychiatric emergencies by his family after an agitation. The history of his illness seemed to go back at eight months ago, by the progressive apparition of an instability, sleep disorders, hostility, associated with an emotional lability. To the interview he

  11. Child and Interviewer Race in Forensic Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Amy K; Mackey, Tomiko D; Langendoen, Carol; Barnard, Marie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential effect of child race and interviewer race on forensic interviewing outcomes. The results of the regression analysis indicated that child race and interviewer race had a significant effect on interview outcome category (no findings, inconclusive, or findings consistent with sexual abuse). Furthermore, the results indicate that the interaction of child and interviewer race had predictive value for rates of findings consistent with sexual abuse but not in the direction predicted. Cross-race dyads had significantly higher rates of interview outcomes consistent with sexual abuse. These findings suggest that more research into the effect of race on disclosure of child sexual abuse is needed.

  12. Neuroreceptor imaging in psychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankle, W.G. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY, (United States). Coll. of Physicians and Surgeons; Laruelle, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). New York State Psychiatric Inst.

    2002-11-01

    Molecular imaging, the study of receptors, transporters and enzymes, as well as other cellular processes, has grown in recent years to be one of the most active neuroimaging areas. The application of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) techniques to the study of psychiatric illness has lead to increased understanding of disease processes as well as validated, in vivo, theories of illness etiology. Within the field of psychiatry these techniques have been applied most widely to the study of schizophrenia. Studies within schizophrenia are largely limited to either the dopamine or serotonin system. This is due in large part to the availability of suitable radiotracers as well as the current theories on the etiology of the illness. Two basic study designs are used when studying schizophrenia using molecular imaging and make up the majority of studies reviewed in this manuscript. The first type, termed ''clinical studies'', compares the findings from PET and SPECT studies in those with schizophrenia to normal controls in an attempt to understand the pathophysiology of the illness. The second study design, termed ''occupancy studies'', uses these techniques to enhance the understanding of the mechanism of action of the medications used in treating this illness. This review will focus on the findings of molecular imaging studies in schizophrenia, focusing, for the most part, on the serotonin and dopamine systems. Emphasis will be placed on how these findings and techniques are currently being used to inform the development of novel treatments for schizophrenia. (author)

  13. Too similar, too different: the paradoxical dualism of psychiatric stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergel, Tania Louise

    2014-08-01

    Challenges to psychiatric stigma fall between a rock and a hard place. Decreasing one prejudice may inadvertently increase another. Emphasising similarities between mental illness and 'ordinary' experience to escape the fear-related prejudices associated with the imagined 'otherness' of persons with mental illness risks conclusions that mental illness indicates moral weakness and the loss of any benefits of a medical model. An emphasis on illness and difference from normal experience risks a response of fear of the alien. Thus, a 'likeness-based' and 'unlikeness-based' conception of psychiatric stigma can lead to prejudices stemming from paradoxically opposing assumptions about mental illness. This may create a troubling impasse for anti-stigma campaigns.

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea: management considerations in psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heck T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Taryn Heck,1 Monica Zolezzi21Pharmacy Department, University of Alberta Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 2Clinical Pharmacy and Practice, College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, QatarAbstract: Psychiatric disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA are often comorbid. However, there is limited information on the impact of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms, on how to manage psychiatric pharmacotherapy in patients presenting with OSA, or on the effectiveness and challenges of OSA treatments in patients with comorbid mental illness. As such, the objective of this article is to provide an overview of some epidemiological aspects of OSA and treatment considerations in the management of OSA in individuals with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Predefined keywords were used to search for relevant literature in electronic databases. Data show that OSA is particularly prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. The medical care that patients with these comorbidities require can be challenging, as some of the psychiatric medications used by these patients may exacerbate OSA symptoms. As such, continuous positive airway pressure continues to be the first-line treatment, even in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. However, more controlled studies are required, particularly to determine continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with mental illness, the impact of treating OSA on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of the use of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, psychiatric disorders, comorbidity, psychotropic medications

  15. Maternal attachment style and psychiatric history as independent predictors of mood symptoms in the immediate postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce Nanni, Roberta; Troisi, Alfonso

    2017-04-01

    There is evidence that both a past history of psychiatric illness and insecure attachment put women at risk for mood disturbances in the postpartum period. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether maternal insecure attachment is a risk factor for mood symptoms in the immediate postpartum period independently of the confounding effect of maternal psychiatric history. A convenience sample of 120 mothers was assessed prenatally with the Maternal History of Mood Disturbances (MHMD), the Relationship Questionnaire (RQ), and in the first week after delivery with the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Mothers with higher scores on the preoccupied and fearful attachment scales had more severe postpartum anxiety and depression symptoms but only fearful attachment remained a significant predictor of postpartum anxiety when the significant effect of maternal history of mood disturbances was included in the model. Our diagnostic assessment focused on mood symptoms, not disorders, and we limited psychometric assessment to the immediate postpartum period and did not collect longitudinal data to ascertain whether the relationship between maternal insecure attachment and postpartum mood disturbances changed over time. Our results show the necessity to assess prior psychiatric symptoms in studies of maternal attachment style and postpartum mood disturbances. The finding that a mother's recall of her own psychiatric history emerged as significant predictor of postpartum mood symptoms suggests that antenatal assessment based on maternal self-report can be used in those settings where structured diagnostic interviews are not feasible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychiatric Symptoms in Youth with a History of Autism and Optimal Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orinstein, Alyssa; Tyson, Katherine E.; Suh, Joyce; Troyb, Eva; Helt, Molly; Rosenthal, Michael; Barton, Marianne L.; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Kelley, Elizabeth; Naigles, Letitia; Schultz, Robert T.; Stevens, Michael C.; Fein, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Since autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often comorbid with psychiatric disorders, children who no longer meet criteria for ASD (optimal outcome; OO) may still be at risk for psychiatric disorders. A parent interview for DSM-IV psychiatric disorders (K-SADS-PL) for 33 OO, 42 high-functioning autism (HFA) and 34 typically developing (TD) youth,…

  17. Psychiatric history in living kidney donor candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Katsuji; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Ishigooka, Jun

    2012-04-01

    To critically discuss recent studies of living kidney donor candidates with a past or current psychiatric history and to offer guidance for the psychosocial evaluation of such donors. A global consensus has been developed that active, significant mental illness and substance abuse are absolute contraindications to organ donation due to diminished ability to make a well informed, rational decision about donation or to maintain health status after donation. However, to date, there has been little information published on the suitability for donation and the long-term psychosocial and medical outcomes after donation in donors with mental health issues, especially relatively milder psychiatric disorders, or past significant psychiatric history. To resolve the ethical dilemma of whether living donor candidates with mental health issues should be allowed to donate as is their right or be considered a vulnerable group in need of protection, we need more information. Information should include careful evaluation, possible intervention and follow-up to optimize donation.

  18. Diagnostic ambivalence: psychiatric workarounds and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whooley, Owen

    2010-03-01

    In 1980 the American Psychiatric Association (APA), faced with increased professional competition, revised the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Psychiatric expertise was redefined along a biomedical model via a standardised nosology. While they were an integral part of capturing professional authority, the revisions demystified psychiatric expertise, leaving psychiatrists vulnerable to infringements upon their autonomy by institutions adopting the DSM literally. This research explores the tensions surrounding standardisation in psychiatry. Drawing on in-depth interviews with psychiatrists, I explore the 'sociological ambivalence' psychiatrists feel towards the DSM, which arises from the tension between the desire for autonomy in practice and the professional goal of legitimacy within the system of mental health professions. To carve a space for autonomy for their practice, psychiatrists develop 'workarounds' that undermine the DSM in practice. These workarounds include employing alternative diagnostic typologies, fudging the numbers (or codes) on official paperwork and negotiating diagnoses with patients. In creating opportunities for patient input and resistance to fixed diagnoses, the varied use of the DSM raises fundamental questions for psychiatrists about the role of the biomedical model of mental illness, especially its particular manifestation in the DSM.

  19. Recovery from serious mental illness: trajectories, characteristics, and the role of mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Carla A; Perrin, Nancy A; Leo, Michael C; Janoff, Shannon L; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H; Paulson, Robert I

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective was to identify trajectories of recovery from serious mental illnesses. METHODS A total of 177 members (92 women; 85 men) of a not-for-profit integrated health plan participated in a two-year mixed-methods study of recovery (STARS, the Study of Transitions and Recovery Strategies). Diagnoses included schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, and affective psychosis. Data sources included self-reported standardized measures, interviewer ratings, qualitative interviews, and health plan data. Recovery was conceptualized as a latent construct, and factor analyses and factor scores were used to calculate recovery trajectories. Individuals with similar trajectories were identified through cluster analyses. RESULTS Four trajectories were identified-two stable (high and low levels of recovery) and two fluctuating (higher and lower). Few demographic or diagnostic factors differentiated clusters at baseline. Discriminant analyses for trajectories found differences in psychiatric symptoms, physical health, satisfaction with mental health clinicians, resources and strains, satisfaction with medications, and mental health service use. Those with higher scores on recovery factors had fewer psychiatric symptoms, better physical health, greater satisfaction with mental health clinicians, fewer strains and greater resources, less service use, better quality of care, and greater satisfaction with medication. Consistent predictors of trajectories included psychiatric symptoms, physical health, resources and strains, and use of psychiatric medications. CONCLUSIONS Having access to good-quality mental health care-defined as including satisfying relationships with clinicians, responsiveness to needs, satisfaction with psychiatric medications, receipt of services at needed levels, support in managing deficits in resources and strains, and care for general medical conditions-may facilitate recovery. Providing such care may improve recovery

  20. Age of onset of bipolar disorder: Combined effect of childhood adversity and familial loading of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert M; Altshuler, Lori L; Kupka, Ralph; McElroy, Susan L; Frye, Mark A; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Keck, Paul E; Leverich, Gabriele S; Nolen, Willem A

    2016-10-01

    Family history and adversity in childhood are two replicated risk factors for early onset bipolar disorder. However, their combined impact has not been adequately studied. Based on questionnaire data from 968 outpatients with bipolar disorder who gave informed consent, the relationship and interaction of: 1) parental and grandparental total burden of psychiatric illness; and 2) the degree of adversity the patient experienced in childhood on their age of onset of bipolar disorder was examined with multiple regression and illustrated with a heat map. The familial loading and child adversity vulnerability factors were significantly related to age of onset of bipolar and their combined effect was even larger. A heat map showed that at the extremes (none of each factor vs high amounts of both) the average age of onset differed by almost 20 years (mean = 25.8 vs 5.9 years of age). The data were not based on interviews of family members and came from unverified answers on a patient questionnaire. Family loading for psychiatric illness and adversity in childhood combine to have a very large influence on age of onset of bipolar disorder. These variables should be considered in assessment of risk for illness onset in different populations, the need for early intervention, and in the design of studies of primary and secondary prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Interplay of identities: a narrative study of self-perceptions among immigrants with severe mental illness from the former Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaifel, Evgeny; Mirsky, Julia

    2015-02-01

    This study explored the self-perceptions of individuals with mental illness who immigrated from the Former Soviet Union (FSU) to Israel. In particular, we examined the double stigma borne by these individuals as new immigrants and psychiatric patients, which may threaten their identity and render them at risk for social marginalization. We interviewed 12 FSU immigrants diagnosed with severe mental illness (SMI), who had been hospitalized in psychiatric facilities in the past and, at the time of the interview, were residing in community rehabilitation centers. Their narratives revealed that they constructed multiple identities for themselves: as bearers of Russian culture, as Soviet Jews, as normative immigrants, and only lastly as consumers of mental health services. In the case of FSU newcomers with mental illness immigration may serve as a normalizing and positive experience. Study findings suggest that stressing patients' identity as mentally ill may be counterproductive in their rehabilitation; instead, clinicians may consider working to mobilize patients' personal and cultural assets and helping them reinstate a more complex self-perception. Further research is needed to explore how immigration may affect self-perceptions of individuals with SMI from other cultural groups. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. Comorbidity of dementia and psychiatric disorders in older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummans, T A; Smith, G E; Lin, S C; Waring, S C; Kokmen, E

    1997-01-01

    To further investigate the relationship between psychiatric disorders and dementia in elderly patients, the authors drew a population-based, age-stratified random sample from residents of Rochester, Minnesota, age 65 and older. A trained paramedic completed a 90-minute screening interview, including the Symptom Checklist-90, Mini-Mental State Exam, and Auditory-Verbal Learning Test. Persons failing the screens were interviewed by a psychiatrist and a neurologist. DSM-III-R diagnoses were assigned for dementia and other psychiatric disorders. Of 201 participants, 37 were evaluated further by both neurologist and psychiatrist. One received a psychiatric diagnosis alone. Dementia alone was present in four people. Concurrent psychiatric diagnoses and dementia were found in 17 subjects. Much of the psychopathology found in older persons occurs in people with cognitive impairment. Current diagnostic nosology may not be able to capture the interrelatedness of psychiatric syndromes and cognitive impairment in elderly patients.

  3. Manejo do paciente com transtornos relacionados ao uso de substância psicoativa na emergência psiquiátrica Management of patients with substance use illnesses in psychiatric emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Abrantes do Amaral

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Transtornos por uso de substâncias são prevalentes em setores de emergência gerais e psiquiátricos, atingindo taxas de 28% das ocorrências em prontos-socorros gerais. Todavia, profissionais dos setores de emergência identificam menos que 50% dos casos de problemas relacionados ao álcool. Este artigo visa fornecer base fundamentada em evidências para o tratamento específico a pacientes que preencham os critérios diagnósticos de transtornos por uso de substâncias e que se apresentam ao pronto-socorro em quadros de intoxicação ou abstinência. MÉTODO: Uma revisão sobre o tema foi realizada na base de dados Medline, usando-se os descritores "intoxicação aguda", "abstinência", "álcool", "cocaína", "cannabis", "opioides", "inalantes" e "manejo", tendo o inglês como idioma. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: O cuidado de pessoas com transtornos por uso de substâncias deve conter: avaliação completa (médica geral e psiquiátrica, tratamento dos quadros diagnosticados (abstinência, intoxicação e quadros clínicos que caracterizem uma emergência, sensibilização do paciente para realizar tratamento, se for necessário, e elaboração de encaminhamento.OBJECTIVE: Substance use disorders are prevalent in emergency departments in medical and psychiatric services, reaching rates of 28% of cases in medical emergency departments. However, professionals in the emergency department identify less than 50% of cases of alcohol-related problems. This article aims to provide evidence-based interventions for the specific treatment to patients who meet diagnostic criteria for substance use disorders and who present to emergency rooms during intoxication or abstinence. METHOD: A literature review was performed on Medline database, using the descriptors "acute intoxication", "withdrawal", "alcohol", "cocaine", "cannabis", "opioid", "inhalant", "management", using English as the language. RESULTS: AND CONCLUSION: The care of persons with

  4. Health professionals' familiarity and attributions to mental illness

    OpenAIRE

    Aghukwa Nkereuwem Chikaodiri

    2010-01-01

    A few months from the time of this survey, the nearly completed inpatient psychiatric facility within the Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital’s complex would be ready for admissions. Understanding the health workers’ level of experience of mental illness and their likely behavioural responses towards people with psychiatric illness, therefore, should be a good baseline to understanding their likely reactions towards admitting such patients within a general hospital setting. The study, which used a p...

  5. Multidisciplinary teams in the field of mental illness care

    OpenAIRE

    Dudová, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Submitted thesis occupies with the process of formation of multidisciplinary team, which becomes an instrument of care to services dealing with mental illness treatment in the case of transformation of psychiatric care from institutional to sphere of community services. In psychiatrical community-based services as we know them today, multidisciplinatory cooperation should provide more complex and effective help for people with mental illness. The theoretical part of the thesis consists of inf...

  6. [SEXUALITY IN PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALIZATION: REALITY VERSUS POLICY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Anat; Weil, Gabriel; Rubinstein, Ludmila

    2016-12-01

    Psychiatric hospitalization might be a necessity for certain groups of patients with mental illness, involving acute symptoms and substantial disability which do not allow independent living in the community. In such situations, it is crucial to enable inpatients to enjoy the best possible quality of life, including the right for sexual autonomy as a basic human right. Satisfying sexual life is part of meaningful life and plays an important role in personal and social recovery. On the other hand, sexual relations in psychiatric wards raise many dilemmas, including the need to protect inpatients from sexual abuse and victimization, particularly when mental illness involves judgment deficits and decreased ability to express autonomous will. In spite of its' importance, this subject receives little attention in policy guidelines and clinical practice and is largely ignored. The article reviews literature examining various aspects of sexual behavior in psychiatric facilities, revealing ethical dilemmas, risks and the role of policy guidelines to address this subject. We present viewpoints of practitioners, consumers and family members concerning sexual behavior in psychiatric hospitalization. We conclude with implications that emerge from accumulated knowledge with regard to policy making and proposed frameworks for change.

  7. Reinternação em hospital psiquiátrico: a compreensão do processo saúde/doença na vivência do cotidiano Reinternamiento en hospital psiquiátrico: la comprensión del proceso salud/enfermedad en la vivencia del cotidiano Readmission to a psychiatric hospital: the comprehension of the health/illness process through the experience of daily life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Moraes Salles

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho é recorte de uma investigação que buscou identificar o cotidiano de pessoas com transtornos mentais, que sofrem reinternações psiquiátricas. Nesse percurso foi possível evidenciar que esses sujeitos expressam diversas concepções do processo saúde/doença mental e que caracterizam as formas de tratamento que se utilizam. Utilizou-se como metodologia a abordagem qualitativa fundamentada no conceito de cotidiano da autora Agnes Heller. As entrevistas de pacientes e familiares foram submetidas à análise de discurso que, entre outros resultados, revelou que essa população passou a ter novas ferramentas e possibilidades para compreender a loucura e a assistência ao doente mental.Este trabajo es recorte de una investigación que buscó identificar el cotidiano de personas con trastornos mentales, que sufren reinternamientos psiquiátricos. En este recorrido fue posible evidenciar que esos sujetos expresan diversas concepciones del proceso salud/enfermedad mental y que caracterizan las formas de tratamiento utilizados. En la metodología se utilizó el abordaje cualitativo fundamentado en el concepto de cotidiano de la autora Agnes Heller. Las entrevistas de pacientes y familiares fueron sometidas al análisis de discurso que, entre otros resultados, reveló que esa población pasó a tener nuevas herramientas y posibilidades para comprender la locura y la asistencia al enfermo mental.This study is part of a research that aimed at identifying the daily life of people with mental disruptions who are re-admitted to psychiatric hospitals. It was possible to pinpoint that these individuals express several conceptions of the health/mental illness process and that they also distinguish the kinds of treatment they go through. As far as methodology is concerned the study used the qualitative approach based on Agnes Heller's concept of daily life. The interviews with patients and their relatives were submitted to speech analysis

  8. Caregivers' difficulties in activating long-term mental illness patients with low self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdner, A; Magnusson, A

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to describe psychiatric caregivers' perceptions of self-esteem and activities for patients with long-term mental illness. The study design used a qualitative approach, based on an open lifeworld perspective. A total of 13 caregivers at four psychiatric hospital units in a large Swedish city were interviewed about their views on patients' physical activity and/or other pastimes, as well as their self-esteem and its bearing on the patients' well-being. According to the caregivers, it is up to the patients themselves to decide what they wish to occupy themselves with. In the same time the caregivers' opinions are that patients have difficulties to occupy themselves. The caregivers believe that patients' disability is based in a lack of self-esteem, commitment and capacity to realize their wishes. The caregivers in this study argue that activities are valuable for self-esteem and physical health of people with long-term mental illness. The caregivers consider that it is the patient's responsibility to initiate their needs of activities. This means that the caregivers do not use their knowledge about the importance of activities for the patient's health. Search terms: activity, caregivers, mental illness. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing.

  9. The impact of adverse child and adult experiences on recovery from serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumbo, Scott P; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo H; Paulson, Robert I; Green, Carla A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare effects of adverse childhood experiences and adverse adult experiences on recovery from serious mental illnesses. As part of a mixed-methods study of recovery from serious mental illnesses, we interviewed and administered questionnaires to 177 members of a not-for-profit health plan over a 2-year period. Participants had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, affective psychosis, schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder. Data for analyses came from standardized self-reported measures; outcomes included recovery, functioning, quality of life, and psychiatric symptoms. Adverse events in childhood and adulthood were evaluated as predictors. Child and adult exposures to adverse experiences were high, at 91% and 82%, respectively. Cumulative lifetime exposure to adverse experiences (childhood plus adult experiences) was 94%. In linear regression analyses, adverse adult experiences were more important predictors of outcomes than adverse childhood experiences. Adult experiences were associated with lower recovery scores, quality of life, mental and physical functioning and social functioning and greater psychiatric symptoms. Emotional neglect in adulthood was associated with lower recovery scores. Early and repeated exposure to adverse events was common in this sample of people with serious mental illnesses. Adverse adult experiences were stronger predictors of worse functioning and lower recovery levels than were childhood experiences. Focusing clinical attention on adult experiences of adverse or traumatic events may result in greater benefit than focusing on childhood experiences alone. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Psychiatric referrals in two general hospitals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doongaji D

    1989-07-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study was undertaken to compare the patterns of psychiatric referrals in two general hospitals in Bombay viz. the King Edward Memorial Hospital (64 cases and the Jaslok Hospital and Research Centre (62 cases. It was observed that depressive symptoms were the most common presenting symptoms in these patients attending either of the hospitals. Similarly, the commonest diagnoses were depression and organic mental disorder. Attempted suicide with organophosphorous compounds was the commonest reason for hospitalization at K.E.M. Hospital (p less than 0.001. A significant number of these patients were females (p less than 0.05. The psychiatric referrals at Jaslok had been hospitalized mainly for suspected medical or neurological illness (p less than 0.001. These patients belonged to higher economic strata and hence had a better paying capacity compared to patients at KEM hospital, a significant number of whom were unemployed (p less than 0.001. The duration of pre-referred illness of patients and their stay at Jaslok hospital were longer as compared to those at KEM Hospital (p less than 0.01. The number of non-relevant special investigations carried out on patients in Jaslok was more (p less than 0.01. Further analysis of diagnoses revealed that a significant number of patients at KEM Hospital were admitted as primary psychiatric illness (p less than 0.05.

  11. Psychiatric nursing menbers' reflections on participating in group-based clinical supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Angel, Sanne; Traynor, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a report of an interview study exploring psychiatric hospital nursing staff members' reflections on participating in supervision. Clinical supervision is a pedagogical process designed to direct, develop, and support clinical nurses. Participation rates in clinical supervision...... they influence participation rates. Twenty-two psychiatric hospital nursing staff members were interviewed with a semistructured interview guide. Interview transcripts were interpreted by means of Ricoeur's hermeneutic method. The respondents understood clinical supervision to be beneficial, but with very...

  12. Relationship of stigma to HIV risk among women with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Pamela Y; Elkington, Katherine S; von Unger, Hella; Sweetland, Annika; Wright, Eric R; Zybert, Patricia A

    2008-10-01

    Urban women with severe mental illness (SMI) are vulnerable to stigma and discrimination related to mental illness and other stigmatized labels. Stigma experiences may increase their risk for negative health outcomes, such as HIV infection. This study tests the relationship between perceived stigma and HIV risk behaviors among women with SMI. The authors interviewed 92 women attending community mental health programs using the Stigma of Psychiatric Illness and Sexuality Among Women Questionnaire. There were significant relationships between personal experiences of mental illness and substance use accompanying sexual intercourse; perceived ethnic stigma and having a riskier partner type; and experiences of discrimination and having a casual or sex-exchange partner. Higher scores on relationship stigma were associated with a greater number of sexual risk behaviors. The findings underscore the importance of exploring how stigma attached to mental illness intersects with other stigmatized labels to produce unique configurations of HIV risk. HIV risk reduction interventions and prevention research should integrate attention to stigmatized identities in the lives of women with SMI. PsycINFO Database Record 2009 APA.

  13. Science and Politics: The Role of Conversion Therapies in the American Psychiatric Association’s Declassification of Homosexuality as a Psychiatric Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kenefick, Emily

    2011-01-01

    On December 15th, 1973, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) declassified homosexuality as a mental illness by removing it from its official catalogue of psychiatric diagnoses, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Its removal is typically reported to reflect the efforts of homophile activist groups who, in opposition to the APA’s illness model of homosexuality, staged radical political and social protest in the early 1970’s (Bayer, 1987; Drescher & Merlino, 2...

  14. Heat Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... humidity, sweating just isn't enough. Your body temperature can rise to dangerous levels and you can ... Heatstroke - a life-threatening illness in which body temperature may rise above 106° F in minutes; symptoms ...

  15. Foodborne Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of foodborne illnesses and prevent dehydration in adults: drinking plenty of liquids such as fruit juices, sports ... teeth, or using ice made from tap water drinking unpasteurized milk or milk products eating raw fruits and vegetables, ...

  16. Psychiatric care in the German prison system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the nature of medical care within the German penal system. German prison services provide health care for all inmates, including psychiatric care. The reached level of equivalence of care and ethical problems and resource limitations are discussed and the way of legislation in this field since 2006 reform on federal law is described. The article summarizes basic data on German prison health care for mentally ill inmates. The legislation process and factors of influence are pointed out. A description of how psychiatric care is organized in German prisons follows. It focuses on the actual legal situation including European standards of prison health care and prevention of torture, psychiatric care in German prisons themselves, self harm and addiction. Associated problems such as blood born diseases and tuberculosis are included. The interactions between prison staff and health care personal and ethic aspects are discussed. The legislation process is still going on and there is still a chance to improve psychiatric care. Mental health problems are the major challenge for prison health care. Factors such as special problems of migrants, shortage of professionals and pure statistic data are considered. The paper provides a general overview on psychiatric services in prison and names weak points and strengths of the system.

  17. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry.

  18. Dame Cicely Saunders: An Omega Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Presents interview with Dame Cicely Saunders, founder of international hospice care movement. Saunders describes her background and experiences that led her to form the hospice movement and discusses the need for pain control for terminally ill patients. Saunders also notes her opposition to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. (NB)

  19. On the Moral Acceptability of Physician-Assisted Dying for Non-Autonomous Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varelius, Jukka

    2016-05-01

    Several authors have recently suggested that the suffering caused by mental illness could provide moral grounds for physician-assisted dying. Yet they typically require that psychiatric-assisted dying could come to question in the cases of autonomous, or rational, psychiatric patients only. Given that also non-autonomous psychiatric patients can sometimes suffer unbearably, this limitation appears questionable. In this article, I maintain that restricting psychiatric-assisted dying to autonomous, or rational, psychiatric patients would not be compatible with endorsing certain end-of-life practices commonly accepted in current medical ethics and law, practices often referred to as 'passive euthanasia'. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Breast cancer: demands of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveys, B J; Klaich, K

    1991-01-01

    This study explores the qualitative experience of illness demands from the woman's own perspective by asking, "What is the impact of breast cancer on the daily lives of women of childbearing age?" Semistructured interviews with 79 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer were transcribed and analyzed to discern illness demands. Content analysis yielded 14 domains of illness demands: treatment issues, change in life context or perspective, acceptance of the illness, social interaction or support, physical changes, reconstructing the self, uncertainty, loss, making comparisons, acquiring new knowledge, making choices, mortality issues, financial or occupational concerns, and making a contribution. Illness demands are experienced in every aspect of a woman's life, including her identity, daily routines, family and social experience, and her perception of the past, present, and future. This study details in the women's own language the considerable adjustments brought on by a diagnosis of breast cancer.

  1. Psychiatric services in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmebarek, Zoubir

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the current provision of psychiatric services in Algeria - in particular, in-patient and out-patient facilities, child psychiatry and human resources. Education, training, associations and research in the field of mental health are also briefly presented. The challenges that must dealt with to improve psychiatric care and to comply with international standards are listed, by way of conclusion.

  2. The Impact of Illness Identity on Recovery from Severe Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanos, Philip T; Roe, David; Lysaker, Paul H

    2010-04-01

    The impact of the experience and diagnosis of mental illness on one's identity has long been recognized; however, little is known about the impact of illness identity, which we define as the set of roles and attitudes that a person has developed in relation to his or her understanding of having a mental illness. The present article proposes a theoretically driven model of the impact of illness identity on the course and recovery from severe mental illness and reviews relevant research. We propose that accepting a definition of oneself as mentally ill and assuming that mental illness means incompetence and inadequacy impact hope and self-esteem, which further impact suicide risk, coping, social interaction, vocational functioning, and symptom severity. Evidence supports most of the predictions made by the model. Implications for psychiatric rehabilitation services are discussed.

  3. Exploring the perceptions of psychiatric patients regarding marijuana use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Scrooby

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There is limited understanding on marijuana use by psychiatric patients, specifically with regard as to why they continue to smoke marijuana despite the negative consequences, such as readmittance to psychiatric hospitals following marijuana-induced psychosis. It is, therefore, important to understand why psychiatric patients continue to use marijuana, despite experiencing its negative effects. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the perceptions of psychiatric patients with regard to marijuana use in Potchefstroom, North West Province, as well as to formulate recommendations for nursing education, nursing research and nursing practice, with the aim of reducing the readmission of psychiatric patients following marijuana-induced psychosis. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was followed in order to give ‘voice’ to the perceptions of psychiatric patients about marijuana use. Purposive sampling was utilised to identify participants who complied with selection criteria. The sample size was determined by data saturation, which was reached after 10 individual interviews with psychiatric patients. Unstructured individual interviews were utilised to gather data after written approval from the Ethics committee of the North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus, North West Provincial Department of Health, the clinical manager of the psychiatric hospital where data were collected, as well as from the psychiatric patients. The co-coder and the researcher analysed the data independently. The findings of this study include perceptions of psychiatric patients on the use of marijuana, the negative effects of marijuana use, marijuana use and mental illness, and quitting marijuana. Recommendations were formulated for nursing education, nursing research as well as for nursing practice.

    Opsomming

    Insig in die gebruik van marijuana deur psigiatriese pasiënte is beperk, spesifiek met

  4. Primary Psychiatric Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Mercan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of these dermatological diseases is entirely psychiatric origin. These patients show overconcern to their skin or self inflicted dermatoses unconsciously instead of facing with their real problems. In this group, delusions, dermatitis artefacta, trichotillomania, body dysmorphic disorder can be seen. They use denial as defence mechanism to their real psychiatric problems and prefer to apply dermatology instead of psychiatry. Dermatologist should be very careful before asking psychiatric consultation. Denial mechanism help patients to overcome agressive impulses like suicide or prevent further psychiatric damage like psychosis. Dermatologist should see these patients with short and frequent intervals with a good empathic approach. This will help to progress a powerful patient doctor relationship which will lead to a psychiatric evaluation.

  5. Perinatal psychiatric episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Olsen, Trine; Maegbaek, M L; Johannsen, B M

    2016-01-01

    and childbirth, which suggests differences in the underlying etiology. We further speculate varying treatment incidence and prevalence in pregnancy vs postpartum may indicate that the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 peripartum specifier not adequately describes at-risk periods......Perinatal psychiatric episodes comprise various disorders and symptom severity, which are diagnosed and treated in multiple treatment settings. To date, no studies have quantified the incidence and prevalence of perinatal psychiatric episodes treated in primary and secondary care, which we aimed...... psychiatric facilities, 2.5 births were followed by an episode treated at outpatient psychiatric facility and 12 births by GP-provided pharmacological treatment. We interpret our results the following way: treated severe and moderate psychiatric disorders have different risk patterns in relation to pregnancy...

  6. Screening for psychiatric morbidity in an accident and emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, G; Hindley, N; Rajiyah, G; Rosser, R

    1990-09-01

    One hundred and twenty A&E Department daytime attenders were screened for psychiatric disorder in a two stage procedure. Thirty-three patients were identified as General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) 'cases' of whom 28 agreed to a psychiatric interview using the Clinical Interview Schedule. Twenty-eight GHQ 'non-cases' were also interviewed. A psychiatric diagnosis was made in 24 patients, 21 of whom were GHQ cases. Patients were more likely to suffer from psychiatric morbidity if the presenting complaint was other than minor trauma. There were trends for psychiatric morbidity to be associated with not being married and living in Bloomsbury Health District (No Fixed Abode or resident) or Northeast London. Sixty-nine percent of cases had a positive past psychiatric history. Ten of 12 cases (83%) requiring primary care intervention were not registered with a GP. It is suggested that appropriate intervention would be for A&E Departments to routinely facilitate such registration. In addition, resources need to be released to make 9am to 5pm walk-in psychiatric services commonplace.

  7. Psychotropic Medication Refusal: Reasons and Patients′ Perception at a Secure Forensic Psychiatric Treatment Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajide O Adelugba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor adherence to prescribed medication regimens can undermine the effectiveness of medications. This study was conducted to determine the demographic profile of forensic psychiatric inpatients refusing medications and to identify the reasons for refusal. Data were collected through interviews using a questionnaire including Drug Attitude Inventory-10. Medication refusal was more common among Aboriginals (68%, n = 34 than Caucasians (32%, n = 16 and was highest among the patients 21-30 years of age (44%, n = 22. Antisocial personality disorder and substance use disorder featured prominently among patients refusing medications. The main reasons for medication refusal were inconvenience (34%, n = 17 followed by side effects (22%, n = 11, ineffective medication (20%, n = 10, illness-related (16%, n = 8, and no reasons (8%, n = 6. Antipsychotic medications topped the list of the major classes of medications refused followed by Antidepressants and Mood Stabilizers.

  8. Disability status, disease parameters, defense styles, and ego strength associated with psychiatric complications of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyphantis, Thomas N; Christou, Konstantinos; Kontoudaki, Stavroula; Mantas, Christos; Papamichael, George; Goulia, Panagiota; Konitsiotis, Spyros; Mavreas, Venetsanos

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify disease parameters, defensive styles and ego strength measurements associated with various forms of psychiatric complications in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Seventy-nine patients with MS participated in the study and 158 healthy subjects matched for age and sex served as controls. A wide range of clinical information was collected and the following self-report instruments were used: General Health Questionnaire, Symptom Distress Check List, Defense Style Questionnaire, MMPI Ego Strength Scale and Hostility and Direction of Hostility Questionnaire. The odds of being assessed with a psychiatric diagnosis upon interview were 6.7 times greater among patients compared to controls and 9.3 times greater among patients with recent-onset MS compared to patients with long-term disease. Psychiatric complications of MS were closely associated with age of the disease onset and the degree of disability due to MS. Additionally, higher rates of introverted hostility, adoption of maladaptive ego defenses and weakened ego strength were also closely associated with several forms of psychological distress, especially depressive symptoms. MS patients experience elevated symptoms of psychological distress, especially depressive symptoms, which are most closely associated with disease parameters. However, the crucial role of various personality traits such as ego defenses and hostility features in the psychiatric symptom formation also appear to contribute to the development of depressive symptoms. Clinicians involved in the clinical management of patients with MS should identify and modify treatment if these specific personality markers that indicate the exhaustion of the patient's resources to cope with the physical and psychological stress of the illness are present.

  9. Sexual risk behaviours and sexual abuse in persons with severe mental illness in Uganda: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric Lundberg

    Full Text Available Persons with severe mental illness (SMI engage in risky sexual behaviours and have high prevalence of HIV in high-income countries. Little is known about sexual behaviours and HIV risk among persons with SMI in sub-Saharan Africa. In this qualitative study we explored how SMI may influence sexual risk behaviours and sexual health risks in Uganda. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 7 male and 13 female psychiatric patients aged 18-49 years. Participants were interviewed in hospital when clinically stable and capable of giving informed consent. Interview transcripts were analysed using manifest content analysis, generating the categories: (1 casual sex during illness episodes, (2 rape by non-partners, (3 exploitation by partners, (4 non-monogamous partners, and (5 sexual inactivity. Our findings suggest that SMI exacerbated sexual vulnerability in the women interviewed, by contributing to casual sex, to exploitative and non-monogamous sexual relationships, and to sexual assault by non-partners. No link could be established between SMI and increased sexual risk behaviours in the men interviewed, due to a small sample of men, and given that men's accounts showed little variability. Our findings also suggest that SMI caused sexual inactivity due to decreased sexual desire, and in men, due to difficulties forming an intimate relationship. Overall, our study highlights how SMI and gender inequality can contribute to the shaping of sexual risk behaviours and sexual health risks, including HIV risk, among persons with SMI in this Ugandan setting.

  10. Sexual risk behaviours and sexual abuse in persons with severe mental illness in Uganda: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Patric; Johansson, Eva; Okello, Elialilia; Allebeck, Peter; Thorson, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Persons with severe mental illness (SMI) engage in risky sexual behaviours and have high prevalence of HIV in high-income countries. Little is known about sexual behaviours and HIV risk among persons with SMI in sub-Saharan Africa. In this qualitative study we explored how SMI may influence sexual risk behaviours and sexual health risks in Uganda. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 7 male and 13 female psychiatric patients aged 18-49 years. Participants were interviewed in hospital when clinically stable and capable of giving informed consent. Interview transcripts were analysed using manifest content analysis, generating the categories: (1) casual sex during illness episodes, (2) rape by non-partners, (3) exploitation by partners, (4) non-monogamous partners, and (5) sexual inactivity. Our findings suggest that SMI exacerbated sexual vulnerability in the women interviewed, by contributing to casual sex, to exploitative and non-monogamous sexual relationships, and to sexual assault by non-partners. No link could be established between SMI and increased sexual risk behaviours in the men interviewed, due to a small sample of men, and given that men's accounts showed little variability. Our findings also suggest that SMI caused sexual inactivity due to decreased sexual desire, and in men, due to difficulties forming an intimate relationship. Overall, our study highlights how SMI and gender inequality can contribute to the shaping of sexual risk behaviours and sexual health risks, including HIV risk, among persons with SMI in this Ugandan setting.

  11. Arabic-speaking religious leaders' perceptions of the causes of mental illness and the use of medication for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Jacqueline; Deane, Frank P

    2013-11-01

    The Arabic-speaking clergy is highly revered and considered the first point of contact for people who suffer from mental illness within their community. The current study aimed to explore the beliefs of Arabic-speaking religious leaders regarding the causes of mental illness and the use of medication for their treatment. Participants consisted of 170 Arabic-speaking clerics of Muslim (n = 85) and Christian (n = 85) denominations residing in Sydney, Australia. A questionnaire was administered during face-to-face interviews and included items regarding the causes of mental illness and beliefs about whether psychiatric medications were viewed as helpful or harmful. Most of the Arabic-speaking clerics viewed drug and alcohol addiction and psychosocial factors as the most important causes of mental illness. Biological causes such as a chemical imbalance in the brain were less frequently endorsed. Although medications were viewed by most religious clerics as helpful in the treatment of mental illness, there were also concerns about the potential harms of medications, particularly among Muslim clerics. Muslim clerics also endorsed the religious causes for mental illness, such as spiritual poverty, as being more important more so than did Christian clerics. The beliefs of Arabic-speaking religious leaders influence how they respond to people with mental illness and may determine whether they refer people to professional mental health services or not. Understanding their perspectives allows opportunities to share information to facilitate collaborative work in the care of Arabic-speaking people with mental illness. Arabic-speaking religious leaders need to be better educated about the mechanisms of action and benefits of medication in the treatment of mental illness.

  12. Challenges to HIV prevention in psychiatric settings: Perceptions of South African mental health care providers

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Pamela Y.

    2006-01-01

    Mental health services in South Africa increasingly feel the brunt of the AIDS epidemic. Despite the high prevalence of infection in the psychiatric setting, HIV risk reduction interventions targeting South Africans with psychiatric illness remain few and far between. The attitudes of mental health care providers about sexual relations and HIV among people with mental illness continue to influence the extent to which these issues are addressed in care settings. This study examines these attit...

  13. Oxytocin and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Nur Say

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that plays critical role in mother-infant bonding, pair bonding and prosocial behaviors. Several neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, alcohol/substance addiction, aggression, suicide, eating disorders and personality disorders show abnormalities of oxytocin system. These findings have given rise to the studies searching therapeutic use of oxytocin for psychi-atric disorders. The studies of oxytocin interventions in psychiatric disorders yielded potentially promising findings. This paper reviews the role of oxytocin in emotions, behavior and its effects in psychiatric disorders. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 102-113

  14. Interview as intraviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kit Stender

    2014-01-01

    do not merely refer to passive entities but must be understood as matter that matters. To illustrate my points I will analyse how bringing a puppet with me to interviews with 4-6 year old children seemed to interfere with the interview situation creating unforeseen diversions in ways that influenced......In this article I will illustrate how our understanding of the interview situation changes when we rethink it with some of the concepts from Karen Barad’s notion of agential realism. With concepts such as ‘apparatuses’, ‘phenomena‘, ‘intra-action’ and ‘material-discursive’ (Barad, 2007) it becomes...... possible to focus more extensively on how matter matters in the interview situation. Re-thinking the interview as an intraview1, I argue that Barad’s concepts will enhance our awareness not only of how the researcher affects the interview but also of how certain kinds of materiality in interview situations...

  15. Coding interview questions concepts, problems, interview questions

    CERN Document Server

    Karumanchi, Narasimha

    2016-01-01

    Peeling Data Structures and Algorithms: * Programming puzzles for interviews * Campus Preparation * Degree/Masters Course Preparation * Instructor’s * GATE Preparation * Big job hunters: Microsoft, Google, Amazon, Yahoo, Flip Kart, Adobe, IBM Labs, Citrix, Mentor Graphics, NetApp, Oracle, Webaroo, De-Shaw, Success Factors, Face book, McAfee and many more * Reference Manual for working people

  16. Deliberate self-harm before psychiatric admission and risk of suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatric illness and deliberate self-harm (DSH) are major risk factors of suicide. In largely 15 % of psychiatric admissions in Denmark, the patient had an episode of DSH within the last year before admission. This study examined the survival and predictors of suicide in a suicidal high...

  17. Diarrheal Illness

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-08-30

    Dr. Steve Monroe, director of CDC’s Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, discusses diarrheal illness, its causes, and prevention.  Created: 8/30/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/31/2011.

  18. Psychiatric aspects of cancer in the aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxman, T E; Silberfarb, P M

    1987-01-01

    The greatest risk factor for cancer is ageing, yet little is known about the epidemiology and treatment of psychiatric disorders in the aged cancer population. This is particularly true for the group over 75 years of age. Four important areas of psychiatric treatment relevant to the aged cancer patient are: illness behaviour, cognitive disorders, depression and psychosocial adaptation. Within these areas the following four conclusions can be made: (a) Symptom presentation and health promoting practices are two important aspects of illness behaviour that affect the detection and prevention of cancer in the aged. (b) It is likely that there will be an increased co-occurrence of dementia and cancer, raising important issues of treatment and informed consent. (c) There appears to be evidence that depression in cancer patients does not increase with age. (d) Similar to depression, despite widely differing methods and age cutoffs, the results of several studies have shown that psychosocial adaptation to cancer is maintained with age. With respect to psychiatric treatment, no patient should be denied full use of appropriate therapy on grounds of old age alone, and more attention should be given to the systematic detection and evaluation of reversible cognitive disorders.

  19. Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with Diabetes Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alireza Sajjadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders are important complications of chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus.Materials and method: In this descriptive study, 80 patients with diabetes type 2 referred to diabetes clinic of Zahedan in 2009. They were selected by simple randomized method, screened by General Health Questionnaire and assessed by psychiatric interview, if it was necessary.Results: Totally, 67.5% required an interview and 43.75% were diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder. Major depression were more prevalent (13.5% than adjustment disorders (15%.Conclusion: High prevalence of depression and adjustment disorder in diabetic patients needs psychiatric assessment and treatment as the main part, in the diabetes clinics

  20. Improvement of psychiatric symptoms in youth following resolution of sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, Talia; Sidell, Douglas; Gans, Hayley; Brown, Kayla; Farhadian, Bahare; Gustafson, Melissa; Sherr, Janell; Thienemann, Margo; Frankovich, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports a role for inflammation in psychiatric illness, and the onset or exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms may follow non-CNS infections. Here, we provide the first detailed description of obsessive-compulsive and related psychiatric symptoms arising concurrently with sinusitis. We reviewed the charts of 150 consecutive patients evaluated in our Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndromes clinic for documented sinusitis as defined by the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. Sinusitis treatments, sinonasal imaging, and neuropsychiatric symptoms before, during, and after sinusitis onset were noted. Patients were included in the final review if they had a clear diagnosis of isolated sinusitis (without concurrent illness and/or immunodeficiency), and were evaluated during an episode of sinusitis. 10/150 (6.6%) patients had isolated sinusitis at the time of their neuropsychiatric deterioration. Eight patients received antibiotics to treat sinusitis, three of whom also received sinus surgery. Neuropsychiatric symptoms improved in all eight patients concurrent with resolution of sinusitis per parent report and clinician assessment. One patient did not follow through with recommended sinus surgery or antibiotics and her psychiatric symptoms persisted. One patient was lost to follow-up. Improvement of psychiatric symptoms correlated with resolution of sinus disease in this retrospective study. Identification, treatment, and resolution of underlying infections, including sinusitis, may have the potential to change the trajectory of some neuropsychiatric illnesses. Randomized clinical trials are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Compulsive buying and psychiatric comorbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Astrid; Mühlhans, Barbara; Silbermann, Andrea; Müller, Ulrike; Mertens, Christian; Horbach, Thomas; Mitchell, James E; de Zwaan, Martina

    2009-08-01

    Compulsive buying is an excessive behavior that has begun to receive attention from researchers in recent years. The current study provides an overview of research on compulsive buying and examines the psychiatric co-morbidity in a German female treatment seeking compulsive buying sample in comparison with age and gender-matched normal buying control groups. Thirty women suffering from compulsive buying disorder, 30 community controls, and 30 bariatric surgery candidates were assessed with the German versions of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnoses (SCID). Women with compulsive buying disorder showed significantly higher prevalence rates of affective, anxiety, and eating disorders compared to community controls, and suffered significantly more often from affective and anxiety disorders compared to bariatric surgery candidates. The compulsive buying group presented with the highest rates of personality disorders, most commonly avoidant, depressive, obsessive-compulsive, and borderline personality disorder, and reported the highest prevalence rates of other impulse control disorders, especially for intermittent explosive disorder. The findings suggest an elevated psychiatric co-morbidity in patients with compulsive buying disorder.

  2. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide - Table of Contents Facts For Families Guide - View by Topic Chinese Facts for Families Guide ... Psychiatric Evaluation No. 52; Updated October 2017 Evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist is appropriate for any child or adolescent ...

  3. Psychiatric Diagnoses among an HIV-Infected Outpatient Clinic Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Enbal; Önen, Nur F; Donovan, Michael F; Rosenburg, Neal; Overton, E Turner

    2016-01-01

    As individuals with HIV infection are living longer, the management of psychiatric disorders has increasingly been incorporated into comprehensive care. Individuals were recruited from an outpatient HIV clinic to assess the prevalence and related associations of current psychiatric disorders and biomarkers. Of the 201 participants who completed the interviews, the median age was 43.5 years, and the majority was male and African American. Most were receiving HIV therapy and 78% of those had achieved virologic suppression. Prevalent psychiatric diagnoses included major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety, and agoraphobia. Alcohol and cocaine/crack abuse and dependence were common substance use disorders. Current receipt of HIV therapy was less common among those diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. Agoraphobia was the only disorder associated with unsuppressed viral load. Psychiatric and substance use disorders are highly prevalent among an urban HIV clinic population, although we identified few associations between psychiatric diagnoses and HIV diseases status. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity.......Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity....

  5. What are individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) dealing with in a competitive labor market? Two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Hang

    2015-06-05

    Understanding individual experiences is crucial for consumer-centered practice and policy. However, limited literature has thoroughly explored individual employment experiences outside of rehabilitation programs. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the challenges that two individuals with severe mental illness (SMI) had experienced in competitive employment settings. Through in-depth interviews followed by an inductive qualitative analysis, the barriers that restrained them from obtaining and keeping a job were identified. Even though the two cases had dissimilar backgrounds and diagnoses, they had both been struggling with multiple problems including psychiatric symptoms, medications, and social stigma. The findings indicate that a flexible work schedule and a supportive work environment are important to their work participation. However, many competitive employment settings did not allow them to have a flexible schedule for frequent medical leaves. The stigma toward mental illness was also prevalent in various workplaces they worked at. The implications for policy and practice are discussed.

  6. Firearm Anticipatory Guidance Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy J.; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Mrdjenovich, Adam J.; Price, Joy A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Most suicides (60%) are committed with firearms, and most (80%) of individuals attempting suicide meet diagnostic criteria for mental illness. This study assessed the prevalence of firearm injury prevention training in psychiatric residency programs. Methods: A three-wave mail survey was sent to the directors of 179 psychiatric…

  7. Oral hygiene and oral flora evaluation in psychiatric patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Context: The World Health Organization has stated that psychiatric patients are a group of people who have oral and dental illnesses. Aims: The aims of this study .... Erosion. 12. Abfraction. 1. Table 4: Distribution of the microorganisms. Microorganism species. Number (%). Gram‑positive microorganisms.

  8. An assessment of psychiatric disturbances in graves disease in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-06-01

    Jun 1, 2012 ... Impaired quality of life leads to a vicious cycle of greater psychological distress and poor productivity.[1] Therefore in this study we have tried to explore the symptomatology and types of psychiatric illness in Graves' disease and to evaluate therapeutic outcomes in such dysfunction. An assessment of ...

  9. Predictors of frequent visits to a psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Aagaard, Andreas; Buus, Niels

    2014-01-01

    of the psychiatric emergency room throughout the whole period. Furthermore, the emergence and continual presence of the predictors: severe mental illness (1999-onwards), substance abuse (2002-onwards) and sheltered housing (2002-2003-2005-onwards) indicated changes in the general profile of frequent visitors...

  10. Physician-assisted death in psychiatric practice in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewoud, JH; van der Maas, PJ; vanderWal, G; Hengeveld, MW; Tholen, AJ; Schudel, WJ; vanderHeide, A

    1997-01-01

    Background In 1994 the Dutch Supreme Court ruled that in exceptional instances, physician-assist ed suicide might be justifiable for patients with unbearable mental suffering but no physical illness. We studied physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia in psychiatric practice in the Netherlands.

  11. Profile of forensic psychiatric inpatients referred to the Free State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. An accused found unfit to stand trial and/or not criminally responsible for his/her actions because of mental illness, is declared a state patient by the court. Aim. The aim of the study was to analyse the biographical data and relevant particulars of forensic psychiatric inpatients who were admitted to the Free State ...

  12. A Controlled Comparison of Psychiatric Day Treatment and Inpatient Hospitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Stephen; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Seriously ill female psychiatric patients (N=59) were randomly assigned to an inpatient or day service. Data indicate the day treatment is, on the whole, superior to inpatient treatment in subjective distress, community functioning, family burden, total hospital cost, and days of attachment to the hospital program. (Author)

  13. Prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome among psychiatric patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal illness characterized by abdominal pain, bloating and bowel disturbance, which may either be constipation or diarrhea with no detectable organic pathologic process. About 70-90% of patients with IBS have psychiatric comorbidity, such as depression, ...

  14. Pattern and Prevalence of Psychiatric Consultations in Other Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    Ickovics J, Hamburger M, Vianhov D. part of proactive measures to reduce. Mortality, CD4 cell count decline, and stigmatizations of mental illnesses among depressive symptoms among HIV- non-psychiatricclinicians. Epidemiology women: longitudinal. REFERENCES. 1. American Psychiatric Association,. Diagnostic and ...

  15. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among medical practitioners in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mental health problems can affect anybody including Doctors. It can be related to nature of our work and personal factors. Mental ill health includes a range of conditions like depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety and psychosis. Objective: To determine the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among Medical ...

  16. [Burden of psychiatric diseases in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente P, Benjamín; Kohn, Robert; Saldivia B, Sandra; Rioseco S, Pedro

    2007-12-01

    Chile has one of the highest disease burdens caused by neuropsychiatric illnesses in the world, according to WHO, reaching to 31%. Major depression and alcohol use disorders are ranked first and second in attributed disability among adults. Nearly one-third of the population has had a psychiatric disorder in their lifetime, and 22.2% in the past year. Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent conditions, followed by major depression and alcohol abuse. Currently, mental health accounts for 2.3%) of the health care budget, which is less than some neighboring countries. The availability of 1.3 psychiatric beds per 10,000 inhabitants, is less than the mean of lower-income countries. Moreover, 81% are for chronic rather than acute care. Chile has 4.0 psychiatrist per 100,000 inhabitants, which is lower than other countries in Latin America. Only 38.5% of those patients with a psychiatric diagnosis receive any kind of mental health care, whether from a specialist or primary care. There is a perception among lay persons, that psychiatric treatments lack efficacy, despite evidence demonstrating the contrary. Not addressing the treatment gap in mental health has serious public health implications.

  17. Life-history interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    My first encounter with life history research was during my Ph.D. research. This concerned a multi-method study of nomadic mobility in Senegal. One method stood out as yielding the most interesting and in-depth data: life story interviews using a time line. I made interviews with the head...... of the nomadic households and during these I came to understand the use of mobility in a complex context of continuity and change, identity and belonging in the Fulani community. Time line interviews became one of my favourite tool in the years to follow, a tool used both for my research in various settings...... of a time line for making life story interviews. I decided that the lack of authoritative literature should not omit me from teaching my students how to make a time line interview. After an introduction, they had to use the tool for making an interview each other concerning their learning journey to DPU...

  18. A reforma psiquiátrica no Brasil: contextualização e reflexos sobre o cuidado com o doente mental na família La reforma psiquiátrica en Brasil: contexto y reflejos sobre el cuidado con el enfermo mental en la familia Psychiatric reform in Brazil: contextualization and consequences regarding the care for the mentally ill in their family environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alda Martins Gonçalves

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho analisa as conseqüências da reforma psiquiátrica brasileira sobre o cuidado do doente mental na família. Trata-se de um estudo descritivo-exploratório de abordagem qualitativa, cuja fundamentação teórico-metodológica foi orientada pelo materialismo histórico-dialético. Os sujeitos da pesquisa foram onze mulheres que cuidam de doente mental em família. A análise de seus discursos revelou singularidades do cuidar de um doente mental na família e as dificuldades decorrentes deste processo acentuadas pela desinstitucionalização do doente mental. Concluiu-se que a mulher, cuidadora do doente mental, cumpre um papel social importante e indispensável na consolidação da reforma psiquiátrica no país.El presente trabajo analiza las consecuencias de la reforma psiquátrica basileña sobre el cuidado del enfermo mental en la familia. Se trata de un estudio descriptivo-exploratorio de abordaje cualitativo, cuya fundamentación teórico-metodológica fue orientada por el materialismo histórico-dialéctico. Los sujetos de la investigación fueron once mujeres cuidadoras de enfermos mentales. El análisis de sus discursos reveló las singularidades del cuidar de un enfermo mental. Se concluye que la mujer cuidadora del enfermo mental cumple un papel social importante e indispensable en la consolidación de la reforma psiquiátrica en el país.This work analyzes the consequences of the Brazilian psychiatric reform to the care provided to the mentally ill in their family environment. It is a descriptive and exploratory study based on a qualitative approach, using the historical-dialectic materialism as its theoretical and methodological framework. The subjects of the research were 11 women that provided care to mentally ill persons. The analysis of their discourses revealed unique aspects related to caring for the mentally ill in their family environment and the difficulties resulting from the process of

  19. Improving the physical health in long-term psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Peter; Davidsen, A.S.; Killian, R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with psychiatric illness have increased somatic morbidity and increased mortality. Knowledge of how to integrate the prevention and care of somatic illness into the treatment of psychiatric patients is required. The aims of this study were to investigate whether an intervention...... programme to improve physical health is effective. METHODS: An extension of the European Network for Promoting the Health of Residents in Psychiatric and Social Care Institutions (HELPS) project further developed as a 12-month controlled cluster-randomized intervention study in the Danish centre. Waist...... circumference was a proxy of unhealthy body fat in view of the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Waist circumference was 108 cm for men and 108 cm for women. Controlled for cluster randomization, sex, age, and body fat, the intervention group showed a small...

  20. Interview of Terry Doyle

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video productions

    2012-01-01

    An Interview with Terry Doyle, Director of Corporate Development, Nokia. This is part of a series of interviews organized by the SMS Interest Group of Strategy Practice, as part of the preparation for the 2013 SMS Special conference at Lake Geneva which is co-sponsored by ATLAS/CERN. For more information: http://geneva.strategicmanagement.net The purpose of the interviews is to provide input for academics, business practitioners and consultants about fundamental questions of strategy in enterprises.

  1. Psychiatric disorders and sleep issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Eliza L

    2014-09-01

    Sleep issues are common in people with psychiatric disorders, and the interaction is complex. Sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, can precede and predispose to psychiatric disorders, can be comorbid with and exacerbate psychiatric disorders, and can occur as part of psychiatric disorders. Sleep disorders can mimic psychiatric disorders or result from medication given for psychiatric disorders. Impairment of sleep and of mental health may be different manifestations of the same underlying neurobiological processes. For the primary care physician, key tools include recognition of potential sleep effects of psychiatric medications and familiarity with treatment approaches for insomnia in depression and anxiety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. "What matters most:" a cultural mechanism moderating structural vulnerability and moral experience of mental illness stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lawrence H; Chen, Fang-pei; Sia, Kathleen Janel; Lam, Jonathan; Lam, Katherine; Ngo, Hong; Lee, Sing; Kleinman, Arthur; Good, Byron

    2014-02-01

    To understand Chinese immigrants' experiences with mental illness stigma and mental health disparities, we integrate frameworks of 'structural vulnerability' and 'moral experience' to identify how interaction between structural discrimination and cultural engagements might shape stigma. Fifty Chinese immigrants, including 64% Fuzhounese immigrants who experienced particularly harsh socio-economical deprivation, from two Chinese bilingual psychiatric inpatient units in New York City were interviewed from 2006 to 2010 about their experiences of mental illness stigma. Interview questions were derived from 4 stigma measures, covering various life domains. Participants were asked to elaborate their rating of measure items, and thus provided open-ended, narrative data. Analysis of the narrative data followed a deductive approach, guided by frameworks of structural discrimination and "what matters most" - a cultural mechanism signifying meaningful participation in the community. After identifying initial coding classifications, analysis focused on the interface between the two main concepts. Results indicated that experiences with mental illness stigma were contingent on the degree to which immigrants were able to participate in work to achieve "what mattered most" in their cultural context, i.e., accumulation of financial resources. Structural vulnerability - being situated in an inferior position when facing structural discrimination - made access to affordable mental health services challenging. As such, structural discrimination increased healthcare spending and interfered with financial accumulation, often resulting in future treatment nonadherence and enforcing mental health disparities. Study participants' internalizing their structurally-vulnerable position further led to a depreciated sense of self, resulting in a reduced capacity to advocate for healthcare system changes. Paradoxically, the multi-layered structural marginalization experienced by Chinese

  3. Det kvalitative interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    Bogen begynder med en teoretisk funderet introduktion til det kvalitative interview gennem en skildring af de mange forskellige måder, hvorpå samtaler er blevet brugt til produktion af viden. Opmærksomheden henledes specielt på de komplementære positioner, der kendetegner det oplevelsesfokuserede...... interview (fænomenologiske positioner) og det sprogfokuserede interview (diskursorienterede positioner), som henholdsvis fokuserer på interviewsamtalen som rapporter (om interviewpersonens oplevelser) og redegørelser (foranlediget af interviewsituationen). De følgende kapitler omhandler forskellige måder...... forskningsresultater baseret på kvalitative interview....

  4. Gender differences and psychotropic polypharmacy in psychiatric patients in Brazil: a cross-sectional analysis of the PESSOAS Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Oliveira Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract: We aimed to estimate the prevalence and correlates of psychotropic polypharmacy in Brazilian psychiatric patients by gender. Sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical data were obtained through face-to-face interviews and medical charts of 2,475 patients. Psychotropic polypharmacy was defined as the use of two or more psychotropic drugs and occurred in 85.7% of men (95%CI: 83.6%-87.6% and 84.9% of women (95%CI: 82.8%-86.8%; p > 0.05. The mean number of psychotropic drugs/patient was 2.98 ± 1.23 and most common combinations included antipsychotics. Multivariate analysis showed that for both genders, previous hospitalization, severe mental illness, multiple psychiatric diagnoses and an insufficient number of professionals in the health care unit was associated with psychotropic polypharmacy. However, other correlates such as inpatient care, use of non-psychotropic drugs, living in unstable conditions and current smoking vary among them. Psychotropic polypharmacy was a common practice in this national sample. The results highlighted the need for national guidelines to manage patients with mental illness, considering the difference among genders and disease severity, to reduce the burden of polyphamacy in this population.

  5. The dialectic of friendship for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, Katherine M; Gladstone, Brenda M; Crawford, Elaine Stasiulis

    2002-01-01

    In the psychiatric literature, the meaning and importance of friendship has remained largely unexplored, subsumed under the rubric of social support or viewed as a component of community integration. Twenty-one qualitative interviews were conducted with individuals suffering from psychiatric disabilities focusing on the meaning of friendship as they described it. Analysis revealed the contrasts, contradiction and paradox of friendship for this group of people. The ongoing struggles of people with psychiatric disabilities regarding the need to connect with others and have friends, and conversely, the need to be alone and to withdraw from others, was highlighted.

  6. Measures of motivation for psychiatric treatment based on self-determination theory : Psychometric properties in Dutch psychiatric outpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochems, Eline C.; Mulder, Cornelis L.; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M.; van Dam, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Self-determination theory is potentially useful for understanding reasons why individuals with mental illness do or do not engage in psychiatric treatment. The current study examined the psychometric properties of three questionnaires based on self-determination theory—The Treatment Entry

  7. Genetics and genomics of psychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geschwind, Daniel H; Flint, Jonathan

    2015-09-25

    Large-scale genomic investigations have just begun to illuminate the molecular genetic contributions to major psychiatric illnesses, ranging from small-effect-size common variants to larger-effect-size rare mutations. The findings provide causal anchors from which to understand their neurobiological basis. Although these studies represent enormous success, they highlight major challenges reflected in the heterogeneity and polygenicity of all of these conditions and the difficulty of connecting multiple levels of molecular, cellular, and circuit functions to complex human behavior. Nevertheless, these advances place us on the threshold of a new frontier in the pathophysiological understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of psychiatric disease. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Healthy eating in persons with serious mental illnesses: understanding and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barre, Laura K; Ferron, Joelle C; Davis, Kristin E; Whitley, Rob

    2011-01-01

    To explore the understanding of a healthy diet and the barriers to healthy eating in persons with serious mental illnesses. In-depth semi-structured qualitative interviews about health behaviors were conducted in 31 individuals with serious mental illnesses. Participants were recruited from a mental health center in Chicago, Illinois, and ranged in age from 30 to 61 years old. Most participants described healthy eating as consuming fruits and vegetables, using low fat cooking methods, and limiting sweets, sodas, fast food, and/or junk food. Internal barriers to nutritional change included negative perceptions of healthy eating, the decreased taste and satiation of healthy foods, difficulty changing familiar eating habits, eating for comfort, and the prioritization of mental health. External barriers were the reduced availability and inconvenience of healthy foods, social pressures, and psychiatric medication side effects. This study revealed several modifiable barriers to healthy eating. Interventions that addressed these could aid in improving the diet and lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population. Recommendations are to provide healthy eating education that is individualized, emphasizes the health consequences of poor eating, and provides opportunities to prepare and taste healthy foods. Family and friends should be included in all educational efforts. At community mental health centers and group homes, only healthy foods should be offered. Lastly, practitioners should encourage eating a healthy diet, inquire about eating in response to emotions, and explore the impact of psychiatric medications on eating behaviors.

  9. Interviewer-perceived honesty as a mediator of racial disparities in the diagnosis of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M; Bahorik, Amber L; Newhill, Christina E; Neighbors, Harold W; Davis, Larry E

    2012-09-01

    African Americans are disproportionately diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and the factors that contribute to this disparity are poorly understood. This study utilized data from the 1995 MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study to examine the impact of racial differences in sociodemographic characteristics, clinical presentation, and perceived honesty on disparities in the diagnosis of schizophrenia among African Americans. Researchers using structured assessments of diagnostic, sociodemographic, and clinical measures interviewed African Americans (N=215) and whites (N=537) receiving inpatient care for a severe mental illness. The impact of interviewers' perceptions of the participants' honesty on racial disparities in the diagnosis of schizophrenia was assessed. African Americans (45%) were more than three times as likely as whites (19%) to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia. Disparities in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics modestly contributed to disparities in diagnostic rates. In contrast, interviewer-perceived honesty proved to be a significant predictor of racial disparities in schizophrenia diagnoses. After adjustment for perceived honesty, diagnostic disparities between African Americans and whites were substantially reduced. Mediator analyses confirmed that interviewer-perceived honesty was the only consistent mediator of the relationship between race and schizophrenia diagnosis. Interviewers' perceptions of honesty among African-American participants are important contributors to disparities in the diagnosis of schizophrenia. Clinicians' perceptions of dishonesty among African-American patients may reflect poor patient-clinician relationships. Methods of facilitating a trusting relationship between patients and clinicians are needed to improve the assessment and treatment of persons from minority groups who are seeking mental health care. (Psychiatric Services 63:875-880, 2012; doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201100388).

  10. First-onset psychotic illness: patients' and relatives' satisfaction with services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, G; King, M; Cole, E; Hoar, A; Johnson-Sabine, E

    1997-01-01

    Despite the growth in patient satisfaction studies, scant attention has been paid to the satisfaction of patients with a first episode of psychotic illness soon after presentation to services. We were particularly interested in any ethnic differences in satisfaction at this seminal stage in patient care. Using multi-item questionnaire, face-to-face interviews were conducted with patients and relatives 12 months after first contact with psychiatric services. Relatives were also questioned on support and advice issues related to after-care. Most patients and relatives were generally satisfied with the treatment, and with the 'humane' qualities of psychiatric staff, but were less satisfied with the 'hotel' aspects of hospital care. Patients, and particularly relatives, were most concerned about levels of information and advice received. Relatives were dissatisfied with after-care. There were no significant differences between Black and other patients, but some differences between their relatives. Patients born abroad were significantly more satisfied than those born in Britain, irrespective of ethnicity. Compulsory detention under the Mental Health Act was also significant in determining low satisfaction for patients and especially for their relatives. For improved care in the community patients and their relatives need to be seen as partners in care rather than as passive recipients. The issue of information-giving by psychiatric services demands serious attention. Black patients and their relatives were not especially likely to be dissatisfied.

  11. Psychological responses of terminally ill patients who are experiencing suffering: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Juarez, Rafael; Garcia-Caro, María Paz; Campos-Calderon, Concepcion; Schmidt-RioValle, Jacqueline; Gomez-Chica, Antonio; Marti-García, Celia; Cruz-Quintana, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Suffering is not only characterized by the feeling of being threatened, but also by the feeling of impotence to deal with such a threat. Literature identifies a terminal illness as a period during which several experiences implying an intense suffering are endured, but little attention has been paid to the psychological responses when reacting to threats. Identify the psychological responses that terminally ill patients put in place to face up to the demands of the end of life, as a foundation for future nursing interventions. Qualitative methodology with an interpretative phenomenological approach. Different hospitals health centers around the region of Granada (Spain). Twenty-four participants were finally chosen to take part in the research. The sampling procedure was intentional, and it was made taking into account exclusion and inclusion criteria. Patients with a cognitive impairment, who had been diagnosed with psychiatric alterations, who at that time suffered from uncontrollable symptoms such as intense pain were excluded from the sample. The patients were interviewed following a script (semistructured interview) carried out using the suggested theoretical framework. The interviews were analyzed using the sequence suggested by Strauss and Corbin: Open, axial and selective codification. The analysis of the participants' answers to the different questions of the semi-structured interview has allowed us to identify a main category "To realize that life is short". There are three categories where the different ways of facing up to the end of life concentrate: "Re-Evaluation of life", "Opportunity for growth", "Resignation/Acceptance". Nurses, have to try to alleviate the impact the terminal illness has on the subject, not only by controlling the symptoms but also encouraging the patients responses, by promoting the feeling of satisfaction in life, providing honest and sensitive information, establishing with the patient realistic goals, and facilitating a

  12. Development of an e-supported illness management and recovery programme for consumers with severe mental illness using intervention mapping, and design of an early cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beentjes, Titus A A; van Gaal, Betsie G I; Goossens, Peter J J; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2016-01-19

    E-mental health is a promising medium to keep mental health affordable and accessible. For consumers with severe mental illness the evidence of the effectiveness of e-health is limited. A number of difficulties and barriers have to be addressed concerning e-health for consumers with severe mental illness. One possible solution might be to blend e-health with face-to-face delivery of a recovery-oriented treatment, like the Illness Management & Recovery (IMR) programme. This paper describes the development of an e-health application for the IMR programme and the design of an early clustered randomized controlled trial. We developed the e-IMR intervention according to the six-step protocol of Intervention Mapping. Consumers joined the development group to address important and relevant issues for the target group. Decisions during the six-step development process were based on qualitative evaluations of the Illness Management & Recovery programme, structured interviews, discussion in the development group, and literature reviews on qualitative papers concerning consumers with severe mental illness, theoretical models, behavioural change techniques, and telemedicine for consumers with severe mental illness. The aim of the e-IMR intervention is to help consumers with severe mental illness to involve others, manage achieving goals, and prevent relapse. The e-IMR intervention consists of face-to-face delivery of the Illness Management & Recovery programme and an e-health application containing peer-testimonials on videos, follow up on goals and coping strategies, monitoring symptoms, solving problems, and communication opportunities. We designed an early cluster randomized controlled trial that will evaluate the e-IMR intervention. In the control condition the Illness Management & Recovery programme is provided. The main effect-study parameters are: illness management, recovery, psychiatric symptoms severity, self-management, quality of life, and general health. The

  13. Association between bullying and pediatric psychiatric hospitalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Hadassa; Singh, Jasmine; Ghaffar, Ayesha; de Silva, Cheryl

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Bullying is a serious public health issue. We sought to demonstrate an association between bullying victimization and hospital admissions for acute psychiatric problems. We described the demographics and types of bullying in a sample of hospitalized patients in Staten Island, NY, and compared bullying victimization scores with psychiatric versus medical admissions. Methods: Patients in grades 3–12 were recruited from the Staten Island University Hospital Inpatient Pediatrics unit and emergency department. Patients completed the validated Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire (OBQ) was analyzed to formulate a report of bullying in our sample as well as a sub-score measurement of bullying victimization. Pediatric residents simultaneously documented whether the subject was a medical versus an in-patient psychiatry admission. Statistical analysis was performed to look for an association between the victimization sub-score and a psychiatric indication for admission. Results: A total of 185 surveys were analyzed. Peak bullying occurred in 7th and 8th grades. Demographics and types of bullying in our sample were described. A strong association between bullying victimization and hospitalization for in-patient psychiatry was demonstrated. Association between bullying victimization and suicidal ideation, psychiatry, and social work consults was also shown. Concern for an association between hospitalization for psychogenic illness and bullying victimization was also raised. Conclusions: There is a significant association between bullying victimization and psychiatric hospital admissions. This raises the specter of the serious consequences of bullying as it is the first study to prospectively link hospital admissions to bullying. Studies using a valid measure of psychogenic illness to look for an association with bullying victimization are needed. PMID:29326819

  14. Creativity in ethnographic interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    2014-01-01

    to describe their everyday work life. By employing a methodological framework focusing on reflexive processes, interviews became consensual interactions, and the content of the interviews turned out to be analyses, interpretations and meaning making, that is, knowledge production. Interpretation and meaning...

  15. Questions in Reference Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Marilyn Domas

    1998-01-01

    Characterizes the questioning behavior in reference interviews preceding delegated online searches of bibliographic databases and relates it to questioning behavior in other types of interviews/settings. Compares questions asked by the information specialist and those asked by the client; findings show the information specialist dominates the…

  16. Interview, observation og dokumentanalyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maria Duclos

    2014-01-01

    Kapitlet giver et eksempel på hvordan man indenfor en mixed methods-tradition (metodekombination) kan kombinere interviews, dokumentanalyse og etnografiske observationer.......Kapitlet giver et eksempel på hvordan man indenfor en mixed methods-tradition (metodekombination) kan kombinere interviews, dokumentanalyse og etnografiske observationer....

  17. Interview with Danny Kaplan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Allan; Kaplan, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Danny Kaplan is DeWitt Wallace Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Macalester College. He received Macalester's Excellence in teaching Award in 2006 and the CAUSE/USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017. This interview took place via email on March 4-June 17, 2017. Topics covered in the interview include: (1) the current state of…

  18. Literacy and Informational Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarie, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Informational interviews are valuable tools for improving writing, editing, and interviewing skills, and they are also extremely valuable in improving the soft skills that are valued by employers, such as confidence, adaptability, the ability to set and keep deadlines, the ability to manage risk, and so on. These soft skills, this article argues,…

  19. Doing Dirty Interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Tanggaard, Lene

    in the position of a psychologist with past experiences within supervision and consultation/coaching. The framing of the interview was build around the theme “My role in keeping students out from dropping out of the Vocational Educational Training College.” We will discuss how both the interviewer...

  20. Molecular Pathways Bridging Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eZanardini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The overlap of symptoms between neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases has been reported. Neuropsychiatric alterations are commonly observed in dementia, especially in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, which is the most common clinical FTD subtype. At the same time, psychiatric disorders, like schizophrenia, can display symptoms of dementia, including features of frontal dysfunction with relative sparing of memory. In the present review we discuss common molecular features in these pathologies with a special focus on FTD. Molecules like Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF and progranulin are linked to the pathophysiology of both neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. In these brain-associated illnesses, the presence of disease-associated variants in BDNF and progranulin (GRN genes cause a reduction of circulating proteins levels, through alterations in proteins expression or secretion. For these reasons, we believe that prevention and therapy of psychiatric and neurological disorders could be achieved enhancing both BDNF and progranulin levels thanks to drug discovery efforts.

  1. Media and mental illness: Relevance to India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Padhy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Media has a complex interrelationship with mental illnesses. This narrative review takes a look at the various ways in which media and mental illnesses interact. Relevant scientific literature and electronic databases were searched, including Pubmed and GoogleScholar, to identify studies, viewpoints and recommendations using keywords related to media and mental illnesses. This review discusses both the positive and the negative portrayals of mental illnesses through the media. The portrayal of mental health professionals and psychiatric treatment is also discussed. The theories explaining the relationship of how media influences the attitudes and behavior are discussed. Media has also been suggested to be a risk factor for the genesis or exacerbation of mental illnesses like eating disorders and substance use disorders. The potential use of media to understand the psychopathology and plight of those with psychiatric disorders is referred to. The manner in which media can be used as a tool for change to reduce the stigma surrounding mental illnesses is explored.

  2. Choking risk among psychiatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamine T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Takahiko Nagamine1Division of Psychiatric Internal Medicine, Seiwakai-Kitsunan Hospital, Suzenji, JapanChoking is a life-threatening and not infrequent occurrence in psychiatric hospitals. There is, however, little information available about the risk factors or methods to prevent choking. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the 8 patients who had a cardiopulmonary arrest due to choking and received resuscitation at our hospital during the 6-year period from April 2005 to March 2011. The study involved 6 males and females, all of whom were patients with schizophrenia taking antipsychotics orally. They were aged from 56 to 79 (mean ± SD: 69.0 ± 7.5 years, with the duration of illness from 28 to 54 years (39.9 ± 7.9 years. In 6 of the 8 cases, choking was diagnosed immediately on the basis of the situation at the time of cardiopulmonary arrest. In the remaining 2 cases, cardiopulmonary arrest was initially unexplained, and choking was only diagnosed subsequently. Choking was caused by bread in all cases. Tracheal intubation was carried out in all cases and resulted in successful resuscitation, causing no subsequent change in functions compared with the prechoking condition. All 8 patients had been receiving multiple antipsychotics before the event (mean number of drugs used 2.5 ± 0.7, with a total dose level ranging from 600 to 1800 mg/day chlorpromazine equivalents (mean 1113 ± 341 mg/day. Seven of the 8 patients had mild to moderate involuntary movements, and 5 patients were diagnosed with antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia. During the 5-year period before the choking event, 7 of the 8 patients had at least 1 treatment interruption, and some patients had up to 4 interruptions.

  3. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  4. Postpartum psychiatric disorders: Early diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shashi; Pathak, Abhishek; Sharma, Indira

    2015-07-01

    Postpartum period is demanding period characterized by overwhelming biological, physical, social, and emotional changes. It requires significant personal and interpersonal adaptation, especially in case of primigravida. Pregnant women and their families have lots of aspirations from the postpartum period, which is colored by the joyful arrival of a new baby. Unfortunately, women in the postpartum period can be vulnerable to a range of psychiatric disorders like postpartum blues, depression, and psychosis. Perinatal mental illness is largely under-diagnosed and can have far reaching ramifications for both the mother and the infant. Early screening, diagnosis, and management are very important and must be considered as mandatory part of postpartum care.

  5. Aggression in psychiatric hospitalizations: a qualitative study of patient and provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, Denise; Ninkovic, Danijela; Vijayaratnam, Vinothini; Balderson, Ken; Spivak, Harold; Brook, Shelley; Robertson, David

    2016-12-01

    When the people hospitalized in psychiatric units demonstrate aggression, it harms individuals and creates legal and financial issues for hospitals. Aggression has been linked to inpatient, clinician and environmental characteristics. However, previous work primarily accessed clinicians' perspectives or administrative data and rarely incorporated inpatients' insights. This limits validity of findings and impedes comparisons of inpatient and clinician perspectives. This study explored and compared inpatient and clinician perspectives on the factors affecting verbal and physical aggression by psychiatric inpatients. This study used an interpretive theoretical framework. Fourteen inpatients and 10 clinicians were purposefully sampled and completed semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Six themes were identified at personal and organizational levels. The three person-level themes were major life stressors, experience of illness and interpersonal connections with clinicians. The three organization-level themes were physical confinement, behavioural restrictions and disengagement from treatment decisions. Aggression is perceived to have a wide range of origins spanning personal experiences and organizational policies, suggesting that a wide range of prevention strategies are needed.

  6. Efficasy of Different Psychiatric Treatment Methods of Liaison Psychiatrist in Treatment of Women with Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Sanda; Gugić, Damir; Katinić, Križo; Topić, Jelena

    2015-06-01

    Being diagnosed with breast cancer is a traumatic event that can lead to development of different mental disorders and influences all aspects of affected woman's life. Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in physically ill people still don't have clear diagnostic criteria which make diagnosis and treatment very difficult since different psychiatric therapeutic approaches have different effects. The aim was to evaluate influence of separate and combined psychotherapeutic approach (psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral) and psychopharmacotherapy on decrease of anxiety and depression in breast cancer patients. The sample consisted of 120 subjects divided into four groups. The first group of patients was treated with psychopharmacotherapy, the second group received psychotherapy, the third group was treated with the combination of psychopharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, and the fourth group of patients didn't receive any kind of psychiatric treatment. We used psychotherapeutic interview with detailed clinical assessment using DSM-IV criteria for mental disorders, specially structured non-standardized questionnaire for assessment of etiological factors in development of mental disorders, Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A), Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D). The subjects filled the questionnaires on entry, one moth and two months after the beginning of research. Psychotherapeutic treatment was conducted once a week. All of the therapeutic approaches of liaison psychiatrist applied in the treatment of women with breast cancer are successful in reduction of anxiety and depression. Liaison psychiatrist's combined approach of psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment of breast cancer patients with depression obtained better results than separate approach.

  7. Strategies for preventing excess mortality after discharge from psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Jensen, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    AbstractPatients with severe mental illness have increased risk for severe physical diseases. In addition, there is evidence that this patient group is less likely to receive standard levels of care for most physical diseases, which may contribute to their shortened life expectancy. Further, illn.......  Keywords: Psychiatric emergency room; Crisis resolution; mortality; severe mental illness...

  8. The lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimenyimana, E; Poggenpoel, M; Myburgh, C; van Niekerk, V

    2009-09-01

    Caring for good people is difficult enough; to care for people who are either aggressive or violent is even more difficult. This is what psychiatric nurses working in the psychiatric institution in which research was done are exposed to on a daily basis. The aim of the research was to explore and describe the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive, and contextual study design was utilised. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews and naïve sketches. Tesch 's (Creswell, 2004: 256) method of open coding and an independent coder were utilised for data analysis. This study shed some light on the lived experience by psychiatric nurses of aggression and violence from patients in a Gauteng psychiatric institution. The findings show that the level of violence and aggression to which psychiatric nurses are exposed is overwhelming and the consequences are alarming. The contributing factors to this violence and aggression are: the mental status and the conditions in which patients are admitted; the staff shortage; the lack of support among the members of the multidisciplinary team (MDT); and the lack of structured and comprehensive orientation among newly appointed staff members. As a result, psychiatric nurses are emotionally, psychologically, and physically affected. They then respond with the following emotions and behaviour: fear, anger, frustration, despair, hopelessness and helplessness, substance abuse, absenteeism, retaliation and the development of an "I don't care" attitude.

  9. Philosophical Hermeneutic Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne K. Vandermause PhD, RN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes, exemplifies and discusses the use of the philosophical hermeneutic interview and its distinguishing characteristics. Excerpts of interviews from a philosophical hermeneutic study are used to show how this particular phenomenological tradition is applied to research inquiry. The purpose of the article is to lay out the foundational background for philosophical hermeneutics in a way that clarifies its unique approach to interviewing and its usefulness for advancing health care knowledge. Implications for health care research and practice are addressed.

  10. Psychiatric genetic testing: Attitudes and intentions among future users and providers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laegsgaard, Mett Marri; Mors, Ole

    2008-01-01

    as a guide in this field, but the optimal utilization of genetic testing has also been recognized to depend on knowledge of the potential consumers' attitudes. To provide knowledge to inform the public debate on mental illness and genetics, and the future conducting of psychiatric genetic testing...... contradictions mirroring the bioethical dilemmas recognized in the field and variations in attitudes between groups with different levels of knowledge of genetics, different kinds of experience with mental illness, and different motives and preconceptions regarding psychiatric genetics. The contradictions...... and differences in attitudes among possible future users and providers of psychiatric genetic testing and counseling indicate ambivalence, insecurity, and perceived lack of knowledge in relation to psychiatric genetics. These results should inform further research and the future integration of psychiatric...

  11. A comprehensive psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive psychiatric service was established in 1969 in the Faroe Islands. This service was created as a department of a general hospital. The spheres covered by this department, operating in the midst of the community were: acute and chronic patients, a liaison-psychiatric service......, and an outpatient service. The number of chronic patients has not decreased, due to an influx of unruly senile patients. The close proximity of the service to the community has increased the pressure with regard to the care of such patients. Other services, such as outpatient treatment of alcoholics and neurotics...

  12. A comprehensive psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1984-01-01

    , and an outpatient service. The number of chronic patients has not decreased, due to an influx of unruly senile patients. The close proximity of the service to the community has increased the pressure with regard to the care of such patients. Other services, such as outpatient treatment of alcoholics and neurotics......A comprehensive psychiatric service was established in 1969 in the Faroe Islands. This service was created as a department of a general hospital. The spheres covered by this department, operating in the midst of the community were: acute and chronic patients, a liaison-psychiatric service...

  13. National Health Interview Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States...

  14. Interview mit Hagen Keller

    OpenAIRE

    Guglielmotti, Paola; Isabella, Giovanni; Tiziana LAZZARI; Varanini, Gian Maria

    2008-01-01

    The first part of this interview addresses the cultural, social and political milieu that shaped Hagen Keller’s education in Germany, the relations with both his mentor Gerd Tellenbach and the other scholars; the approach to prosopography to understand the power structures. Then the interview examines the Roman experience in the Sixties (a scientific and also human one); the book Adelsherrschaft und ständische Gesellschaft and the debate that has attracted; the relationship between local hist...

  15. Interview with Yakov Sinai

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Yakov Sinai is the recipient of the 2014 Abel Prize of the Norvegian Academy of Science and Letters. The interview was originally published in the September 2014 issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society.......Yakov Sinai is the recipient of the 2014 Abel Prize of the Norvegian Academy of Science and Letters. The interview was originally published in the September 2014 issue of the Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society....

  16. Mental illness and lost income among adult South Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Crick; Myer, Landon; Stein, Dan J; Williams, David R; Flisher, Alan J

    2013-05-01

    Little is known regarding the links between mental disorder and lost income in low- and middle-income countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between mental disorder and lost income in the first nationally representative psychiatric epidemiology survey in South Africa. A probability sample of South African adults was administered the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview schedule to assess the presence of mental disorders as defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, version IV. The presence of severe depression or anxiety disorders was associated with a significant reduction in earnings in the previous 12 months among both employed and unemployed South African adults (p = 0.0043). In simulations of costs to individuals, the mean estimated lost income associated with severe depression and anxiety disorders was $4,798 per adult per year, after adjustment for age, gender, substance abuse, education, marital status, and household size. Projections of total annual cost to South Africans living with these disorders in lost earnings, extrapolated from the sample, were $3.6 billion. These data indicate either that mental illness has a major economic impact, through the effect of disability and stigma on earnings, or that people in lower income groups are at increased risk of mental illness. The indirect costs of severe depression and anxiety disorders stand in stark contrast with the direct costs of treatment in South Africa, as illustrated by annual government spending on mental health services, amounting to an estimated $59 million for adults. The findings of this study support the economic argument for investing in mental health care as a means of mitigating indirect costs of mental illness.

  17. Patient experienced continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system-a study including immigrants, refugees and ethnic danes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne; Krasnik, Allan; Norredam, Marie

    2014-09-17

    The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups.

  18. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System—A Study Including Immigrants, Refugees and Ethnic Danes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne; Krasnik, Allan; Norredam, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. Conclusions: The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups. PMID:25233017

  19. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System—A Study Including Immigrants, Refugees and Ethnic Danes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasja Koitzsch Jensen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes. Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. Conclusions: The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups.

  20. Families living with chronic illness: beliefs about illness, family, and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Årestedt, Liselott; Benzein, Eva; Persson, Carina

    2015-05-01

    Beliefs can be described as the lenses through which we view the world. With emerging illness, beliefs about the illness experience become important for nurses to understand to enhance well-being and healing. The aim of this study was to illuminate illness beliefs of families living with chronic illness. A qualitative design was chosen, including repeated narrative research interviews with seven Swedish families living with chronic illness. Hermeneutic analysis was used to interpret the transcribed family interviews. The result described beliefs in families, both within and across families. Both core beliefs and secondary beliefs about illness, family, and health care were revealed. Illness beliefs have importance for how families respond to and manage situations that arise from their encounters with illness. Nurses have to make space for and listen to families' stories of illness to become aware of what beliefs may support and encourage family well-being and healing. The Illness Beliefs Model provides a touchstone whereby nurses can distinguish both individual and shared beliefs within families living with chronic illness and provide ideas for family intervention if needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Psychiatric morbidity among physically ill patients in a Ugandan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ahs.v13i1.13 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers ...

  2. Differences between Western and African models of psychiatric illness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), such as diviners, herbalists and .... elevated mood and delusions. TH assessment. The TH said that this had nothing to do with ... first question to patient 3, whose delusions were all concerned with wealth, was, 'Why are you so concerned.

  3. Psychiatric morbidity among physically ill patients in a Ugandan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    on their respective admitting wards. The co-occurrence of mental and physical disorders seems to support the mind-body interaction (substance dualism) suggested by. Descartes (1641) as described by Nadler S & Morris. K (1997).8 It proposes that although the mind and body are distinctly different, they interact and affect.

  4. Are social theories still relevant in current psychiatric practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Avasthi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current psychiatric practice is being influenced by advances in the field of molecular biology, genetic studies, neuroimaging, and psychopharmacology and the approach has become "biological." Social theories of mental illness had once revolutionized the field of psychiatry and are currently being somewhat ignored under the dazzle of biological sciences. Main social theories are functionalism, interpersonal theory, attachment theory, stress theory, and labeling theory. Each of these theories had tried to explain the genesis of psychiatric disorders in their own way. However, each theory has its own limitations and critique. Still, for a holistic approach to treat persons with mental illness, it is essential to take a biopsychosocial approach which can only be done if one understands the contribution and relevance of social theories. Nonpharmacological management has been the cornerstone of treatment of any psychiatric disorder and social theories also form the basis of various nonpharmacological modes of treatment. Overall, social theories are still very relevant in current psychiatric practice and should not be neglected. Efforts should be made to integrate social theories with other theories of mental illness for better understanding and treatment.

  5. Experiences by student nurses during clinical placement in psychiatric units in a hospital

    OpenAIRE

    W.J.C. Van Rhyn; M.R. Gontsana

    2004-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted with the aim of discovering and describing experiences of psychiatric nursing students during clinical placement in a psychiatric unit. For the purpose of the study an unstructured interview was conducted with each participant during their first placement in a psychiatric unit to identify the factors experienced as stressful. The results indicated that all eight participants experienced average to high stress. Sources of stress identified included, among oth...

  6. Portrayal of psychiatric genetics in Australian print news media, 1996-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Alex; Bonfiglioli, Catriona; Meiser, Bettina; Mitchell, Philip B; Schofield, Peter R

    2011-10-03

    To investigate how Australian print news media portray psychiatric genetics. Content and framing analysis of a structured sample of print news items about psychiatric genetics published in Australian newspapers between 1996 and 2009. Identify dominant discourses about aetiology of mental illness, and perceived clinical outcomes and implications of psychiatric genetics research. We analysed 406 eligible items about the genetics of psychiatric disorders. News coverage of psychiatric genetics has steadily increased since 1996. Items attributing the aetiology of psychiatric disorders to gene-environment interactions (51%) outnumbered items attributing only genetic (30%) or only environmental factors (20%). Of items that referred to heritability of mental illness, frames of genetic determinism (78%) occurred more frequently than probabilistic frames (22%). Of frames related to genetic prophesy, genetic optimism frames (78%) were used more frequently than frames of genetic pessimism (22%). Psychosocial and ethical implications of psychiatric genetics received comparatively relatively little coverage (23%). The analysis identified 22 predictions about psychiatric genetic discoveries and the availability of molecular-based interventions in psychiatry, most of which (20/22, 91%) failed to manifest by the predicted year. Excessive optimism about the power of genetic technology in psychiatric health care, perceived clinical benefits, and largely unfulfilled predictions about availability of these benefits could encourage unrealistic expectations about future molecular-based treatment options for mental health.

  7. The Effects of Alopecia Areata and Acne Vulgaris on Psychiatric State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taliha Çelik

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between psychiatric symptoms and alopecia areata, acne vulgaris which have their places among psychosomatic dermatoses and the effects of treatment on psychiatric symptoms.Methods: Patients with alopecia areata and acne vulgaris, and healthy people as a control were enrolled in the study. Each group consisted of 25 peoples. Hamilton depression rating scale, Beck depression inventory, Hamilton anxiety rating scale, Maudsley obsessive compulsive questionnaire, state-trait anxiety invertory-1 and state-trait anxiety invertory-2 were evaluated with each patient both before and after treatment. Control group was evaluated with the same test at first interview and three months later.Results: Depressive symptoms and anxiety levels before the treatment were found to be high in both patient groups, being more significant in alopecia group. Significant improvements in all psychiatric symptoms were observed in both groups after treatment. It is determined that trait anxiety and sensed depression signs were high in female patients in both groups. Trait anxiety and sensed depression signs in female patients in alopecia group were even higher than those in acne group. In patients with recurrence history in both groups, depression signs were observed. In alopecia group, for younger ages, response to treatment was found to be lower and increase in trait anxiety and sensed depression signs were found in these patients being parallel to increasing time of illness. Conclusion: Finding symptoms of depression and anxiety before the treatment in our study, shows the need for effective management in alopecia areata and acne vulgaris patients.

  8. Psychiatric impairment and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-12-03

    Dec 3, 2002 ... Impairment and disability assessment on psychiatric grounds has always been subjective, controversial ... informed medical advisors doing their disability assessments. Many of these advisors have expressed ..... that will empower the affected employee and that is non- stigma- tising. In order to do so it is ...

  9. Aggression in Psychiatric Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidhjelm, Jacob; Sestoft, Dorte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers are often exposed to violence and aggression in psychiatric settings. Short-term risk assessments, such as the Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC), are strong predictors of such aggression and may enable staff to take preventive measures against aggression. This study evaluated wh...

  10. Psychiatric genetics:AJP

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pippa

    their caregivers in South Africa. The heritability of the majority of the psychiatric disorders is ... linkage analyses in a cohort of Bantu-speaking black South. Africans.17-22 Areas of implied linkage to schizophrenia ... one of the studies of a Bantu-speaking schizophrenia cohort. Table I. Glossary of genetic terminology. Allele.

  11. Cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Baldaçara,Leonardo; Borgio,João Guilherme Fiorani; Lacerda,Acioly Luiz Tavares de; Jackowski,Andrea Parolin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this update article is to report structural and functional neuroimaging studies exploring the potential role of cerebellum in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. METHOD: A non-systematic literature review was conducted by means of Medline using the following terms as a parameter: "cerebellum", "cerebellar vermis", "schizophrenia", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "anxiety disorders", "dementia" and "attention deficit hyperactivity disorder". The electron...

  12. Prevalence of dissociative disorders in psychiatric outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Brad; Smolin, Yvette; Kaplan, Margaret; Legatt, Michael E; Lipschitz, Deborah

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of DSM-IV dissociative disorders in an inner-city outpatient psychiatric population. Subjects were 231 consecutive admissions (84 men and 147 women, mean age=37 years) to an inner-city, hospital-based outpatient psychiatric clinic. The subjects completed self-report measures of dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale) and trauma history (Traumatic Experiences Questionnaire). Eighty-two patients (35%) completed a structured interview for dissociative disorders (Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule). The 82 patients who were interviewed did not differ significantly on any demographic measure or on the self-report measures of trauma and dissociation from the 149 patients who were not interviewed. Twenty-four (29%) of the 82 interviewed patients received a diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in five (6%) patients. Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder diagnosis, patients with a dissociative disorder were significantly more likely to report childhood physical abuse (71% versus 27%) and childhood sexual abuse (74% versus 29%), but the two groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measure, including gender. Chart review revealed that only four (5%) patients in whom a dissociative disorder was identified during the study had previously received a dissociative disorder diagnosis. Dissociative disorders were highly prevalent in this clinical population and typically had not been previously diagnosed clinically. The high prevalence of dissociative disorders found in this study may be related to methodological factors (all patients were offered an interview rather than only those who had scored high on a screening self-report measure) and epidemiological factors (extremely high prevalence rates for childhood physical and sexual abuse were present in the overall study population).

  13. Residential treatment for homeless female veterans with psychiatric and substance use disorders: effect on 1-year clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan; Rosenheck, Robert A; Desai, Rani

    2011-01-01

    Limited evidence shows that time-limited residential treatment (RT) is beneficial for homeless people with serious mental illness. The Department of Veterans Affairs has established 11 specialty programs for homeless female veterans. We present data comparing 1-year clinical outcomes in a group of veterans who did and did not receive at least 30 days of RT. Clients of the Homeless Women Veterans Programs were invited to participate in a follow-up study. They were interviewed every 3 months for 1 year. Those who received at least 30 days of RT in the 3 months after program entry (RT group) were compared with other program participants (no or homeless women. This study, in conjunction with others, suggests that provision of stable housing may be an important element of recovery for homeless women with psychiatric problems, excluding substance use.

  14. Phobias, other psychiatric comorbidities and chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corchs, Felipe; Mercante, Juliane P P; Guendler, Vera Z; Vieira, Domingos S; Masruha, Marcelo R; Moreira, Frederico R; Bernik, Marcio; Zukerman, Eliova; Peres, Mario F P

    2006-12-01

    Comorbidity of chronic migraine (CM) with psychiatric disorders, mostly anxiety and mood disorders, is a well-recognized phenomenon. Phobias are one of the most common anxiety disorders in the general population. Phobias are more common in migraineurs than non-migraineurs. The clinical profile of phobias in CM has never been studied. We investigated the psychiatric profile in 56 patients with CM using the SCID I/P interview. Lifetime criteria for at least one mental disorder was found in 87.5% of the sample; 75% met criteria for at least one lifetime anxiety disorder and 60.7% of our sample fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for lifetime phobic avoidant disorders. Mood and anxiety scores were higher in phobic patients than in non-phobic CM controls. Number of phobias correlated with higher levels of anxiety and depression. Phobias are common in CM. Its recognition may influence its management. Early treatment may lead to better prognosis.

  15. Comorbidities and psychotic illness. Part 1: Philosophy and clinical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Mark; Aquilina, Francesca Falzon

    2014-11-01

    This article aims at addressing the implications of defining 'comorbidity' within the field of psychiatry. We have looked at the standard definition of comorbidity and then discussed whether this definition can be applied to comorbidities in psychiatry. While comorbidities in physical illness are clearly the coexistence of two independent illnesses, Comorbidities in Mental illness are the result of the polygenic nature of mental illnesses, especially in psychotic illness whether schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. As a consequence, often the comorbidities of psychiatric illness are caused by two conditions which have in common the presence of particular single nucleotide polymorphisms (snps), which regulate the metabolism of neurotransmitters or the presence of neurotrophic factors . Thus inevitably, many such comorbidities are inextricably linked. We discuss the consequences of this form of comorbidity for the description, classification, and risk profile of mental illness.

  16. Access to primary and specialized somatic health care for persons with severe mental illness: a qualitative study of perceived barriers and facilitators in Swedish health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk Brämberg, Elisabeth; Torgerson, Jarl; Norman Kjellström, Anna; Welin, Peder; Rusner, Marie

    2018-01-09

    Persons with severe mental illness (e.g. schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) have a high prevalence of somatic conditions compared to the general population. Mortality data in the Nordic countries reveal that these persons die 15-20 years earlier than the general population. Some factors explaining this high prevalence may be related to the individuals in question; others arise from the health care system's difficulty in offering somatic health care to these patient groups. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore the experiences and views of patients, relatives and clinicians regarding individual and organizational factors which facilitate or hinder access to somatic health care for persons with severe mental illness. Flexible qualitative design. Data was collected by means of semi-structured individual interviews with patients with severe mental illness, relatives and clinicians representing primary and specialized health care. In all, 50 participants participated. The main barrier to accessing somatic care is the gap between the organization of the health care system and the patients' individual health care needs. This is observed at both individual and organizational level. The health care system seems unable to support patients with severe mental illness and their psychiatric-somatic comorbidity. The main facilitators are the links between severe mental illness patients and medical departments. These links take the form of functions (i.e. systems which ensure that patients receive regular reminders), or persons (i.e. professional contacts who facilitate patients' access the health care). Health care services for patients with severe mental illness need reorganization. Organizational structures and systems that facilitate cooperation between different departments must be put in place, along with training for health care professionals about somatic disease among psychiatric patients. The links between individual and organizational levels could be

  17. Rethinking social inclusion: experiences of persons in recovery from mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yin-Ling Irene; Stanton, Megan C; Sands, Roberta G

    2014-11-01

    This qualitative study examines the relational dimension of social inclusion by exploring the ways in which persons in recovery from mental illness understand and define their relationships with various communities. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 20 participants who were heterogeneous with respect to gender, psychiatric diagnoses, sexual orientation and gender identity, and living environments. We found competencies for establishing reciprocal social relationships and taking on responsibility as citizens and community members, rendering support for the capabilities approach as a promising schema for understanding social inclusion. We propose a competencies-based framework to facilitate thoughtful, proactive, and meaningful engagement of persons in recovery with communities of their choice. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Use of the Cultural Formulation in Stockholm: a qualitative study of mental illness experience among migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpinati Rosso, Marco; Bäärnhielm, Sofie

    2012-04-01

    This paper explores the contributions of the Cultural Formulation (CF) interview to an overall understanding of patients, and focuses on the narratives of 23 newly referred patients with migrant backgrounds seeking help at a psychiatric outpatient clinic in Stockholm. Through text content analysis methods we identified five themes: displacement in space and time; mental illness as a physical disability; life events as etiological factors; concealing as a coping strategy; and being lost in a fragmented health care system. Findings indicate the need to contextualize symptoms for an in-depth comprehension of patients' phenomenology. Both clinical and policy implications are discussed. The findings suggest that a section on migration and acculturation should be added to the cultural formulation in the next edition of DSM.

  19. Prevalence of HIV, syphilis, hepatitis B and C among adults with mental illness: a multicenter study in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland; Campos, Lorenza Nogueira; Melo, Ana Paula Souto; Carmo, Ricardo Andrade; Machado, Carla Jorge; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2009-03-01

    There is evidence that patients with mental illness have increased prevalence of sexually transmitted infections, but data in Brazil are scarce. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis C and B, and syphilis among patients with mental illness in Brazil. A multicenter representative sample of adults with mental illness was randomly selected from 26 mental health institutions throughout Brazil. Sociodemographic, sexual behavior and clinical data were obtained from person-to-person interviews and blood was collected for serology testing. Seroprevalence with 95% confidence limits were obtained correcting for sampling scheme. Of the 2,475 patients interviewed, 2,238 had blood collected. Most participants were sexually active ever (88.8%) or in the last 6 months (61.6%), female (51.9%), and single (66.6%). Half of the sample had less than 5 years of schooling and the mean monthly individual income was low (US$ 210.00). Condom use was very low either during lifetime (8%) or in the last 6 months (16%). Overall seroprevalence were 1.12%, 0.80%, 1.64%, 14.7% and 2.63% for, respectively, syphilis, HIV, HBsAg, anti-HBc and anti-HCV. Seroprevalences found were higher than other populations with representative studies in Brazil, with high rates of sexual risk behavior. This is of public health concern, and prevention and care strategies for sexually transmitted infections among psychiatric patients should urgently be implemented by health authorities.

  20. Smoking, quitting, and psychiatric disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, Henri-Jean; Rollema, Hans; Svensson, Torgny H; Winterer, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco smoking among patients with psychiatric disease is more common than in the general population, due to complex neurobiological, psychological, and pharmacotherapeutic mechanisms. Nicotine dependence exposes smokers with co-occurring mental illness to increased risks of smoking-related morbidity, mortality, and to detrimental impacts on their quality of life. The neurobiological and psychosocial links to smoking appear stronger in certain comorbidities, notably depression and schizophrenia. Through its action on the cholinergic system, nicotine may have certain beneficial effects across a range of mental health domains in these patients, including improved concentration and cognition, relief of stress and depressive affect, and feeling pleasurable sensations. Despite the availability of effective smoking cessation pharmacotherapies and psychosocial interventions, as well as increasing evidence that individuals with psychiatric disorders are motivated to quit, nicotine dependence remains an undertreated and under-recognized problem within this patient population. Evidence suggests that provision of flexible and individualized treatment programs may be successful. Furthermore, the complicated relationship observed between nicotine dependence, nicotine withdrawal symptoms, and mental illness necessitates integration of close monitoring in any successful smoking cessation program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.