WorldWideScience

Sample records for psychiatric illness family

  1. Familial Aggregation and Heritability of Schizophrenia and Co-aggregation of Psychiatric Illnesses in Affected Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I-Jun; Kuo, Chang-Fu; Huang, Yu-Shu; Grainge, Matthew J; Valdes, Ana M; See, Lai-Chu; Yu, Kuang-Hui; Luo, Shue-Fen; Huang, Lu-Shuang; Tseng, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Weiya; Doherty, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Strong familial aggregation of schizophrenia has been reported but there is uncertainty concerning the degree of genetic contribution to the phenotypic variance of the disease. This study aimed to examine the familial aggregation and heritability of schizophrenia, and the relative risks (RRs) of other psychiatric diseases, in relatives of people with schizophrenia using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. The study population included individuals with affected first-degree or second-degree relatives identified from all beneficiaries (n = 23 422 955) registered in 2013. Diagnoses of schizophrenia made by psychiatrists were ascertained between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2013. Having an affected co-twin, first-degree relative, second-degree relative, or spouse was associated with an adjusted RR (95% CI) of 37.86 (30.55-46.92), 6.30 (6.09-6.53), 2.44 (1.91-3.12), and 1.88 (1.64-2.15), respectively. Compared with the general population, individuals with one affected first-degree relative had a RR (95% CI) of 6.00 (5.79-6.22) and those with 2 or more had a RR (95% CI) of 14.66 (13.00-16.53) for schizophrenia. The accountability for the phenotypic variance of schizophrenia was 47.3% for genetic factors, 15.5% for shared environmental factors, and 37.2% for non-shared environmental factors. The RR (95% CI) in individuals with a first-degree relative with schizophrenia was 3.49 (3.34-3.64) for mood disorders and 3.91 (3.35-4.57) for delusional disorders. A family history of schizophrenia is therefore associated with a higher risk of developing schizophrenia, mood disorders, and delusional disorders. Heritability and environmental factors each account for half of the phenotypic variance of schizophrenia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  2. [Educational guidance for families with mentally ill parents: a bridge between youth welfare services and psychiatric care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In the last fifteen years a lot of services were established to assist children and their mentally ill parents. To improve the preventive and therapeutic interventions in favour of these families, the cooperation between all the institutions involved has to be enhanced. Family counselling centers can play an important role as a link between the psychiatric care system and the youth welfare services. By transferring the psychiatric terminology to the families' everyday language, the counsellors help the parents and the children to share their experiences with the parental illness. To implement a consultation-hour in a psychiatric clinic is an example of how educational guidance can close the gap between the two systems and strengthen the cooperation.

  3. Family history of psychiatric illness as a risk factor for schizoaffective disorder: a Danish register-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Licht, Rasmus W

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schizoaffective disorder may be related to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, but no population-based studies, to our knowledge, have investigated this association in families. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether a psychiatric history of schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder......, or schizophrenia among parents and siblings is a risk factor for developing a schizoaffective disorder, and whether a specific pattern of family history of psychiatric illness exists in persons with schizoaffective disorder compared with persons with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. DESIGN: Register-based cohort...... study. SETTING: Denmark. COHORT: The 2.4 million persons born in Denmark after 1952. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relative risks of the 3 illnesses estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: In total, 1925 persons had a schizoaffective disorder, 3721 had a bipolar disorder, and 12 501 had schizophrenia...

  4. Family history of psychiatric illness as a risk factor for schizoaffective disorder: a Danish register-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Labouriau, Rodrigo; Licht, Rasmus Wentzer

    2005-01-01

    , or schizophrenia among parents and siblings is a risk factor for developing a schizoaffective disorder, and whether a specific pattern of family history of psychiatric illness exists in persons with schizoaffective disorder compared with persons with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. DESIGN: Register-based cohort...... study. SETTING: Denmark. COHORT: The 2.4 million persons born in Denmark after 1952. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relative risks of the 3 illnesses estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: In total, 1925 persons had a schizoaffective disorder, 3721 had a bipolar disorder, and 12 501 had schizophrenia....... The relative risk of schizoaffective disorder was 2.76 (95% confidence interval, 2.49-3.06) if a first-degree relative had a history of mental illness compared with a person with no first-degree relatives with such a history. There was an additional risk (95% confidence interval) of 2.57 (2.11-3.13), 3.23 (2...

  5. Mediation analysis of critical time intervention for persons living with serious mental illnesses: assessing the role of family relations in reducing psychiatric rehospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Andrew; Lukens, Ellen P; Herman, Daniel B

    2014-03-01

    Critical Time Intervention (CTI) is a time-limited care coordination intervention designed to reduce homelessness and other adverse outcomes for persons living with serious mental illness during the transition period between institutions and community living. This study assesses whether CTI improves the quality of family relationships between family members and individuals living with serious mental illness, and examines whether changes in quality of family relationship mediated the association between the intervention and psychiatric rehospitalization outcomes. This study utilizes data from a randomized controlled trial that assessed the effect of CTI in preventing homelessness. Following discharge from inpatient psychiatric treatment in New York City, 150 previously homeless persons living with serious mental illness were randomly assigned to receive usual services only or 9 months of CTI in addition to usual services. Findings from mixed-effects regression models indicated that those assigned to the CTI group reported greater frequency of family contact and greater improvement in satisfaction with family relations than the comparison group during the 18-month follow-up period. Mediation analysis revealed that greater improvement in satisfaction with family relations mediated the effect of CTI on psychiatric rehospitalization outcome, but only at a modest level. These findings suggest that a relatively brief but targeted intervention delivered at the point of hospital discharge may contribute to strengthening family relations and that improvement in perceived family relationship quality can contribute to a reduction in psychiatric rehospitalization.

  6. Parasitic Diseases and Psychiatric Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Mitchell Gralnick

    1994-01-01

    Distinguishing parasitic diseases from other infections and tropical medical disorders based on microbiological classification is a matter of convenience. Organic brain syndromes are associated with both protozoan and helminthic infections; side-effects of drugs commonly used to treat parasitoses may impair mood and cause anxiety, agitation or psychosis. Emotional states may in turn affect the experience of medical illness. Psychiatrically significant features of medical illness are determine...

  7. Attitudes towards people with mental illness among psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, involved family members and the general population in a large city in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bin; Fan, Ni; Nie, Sha; Zhang, Minglin; Huang, Xini; He, Hongbo; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Stigma towards people with mental illness is believed to be widespread in low and middle income countries. This study assessed the attitudes towards people with mental illness among psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, involved family members of patients in a psychiatric facility and the general public using a standard 43-item survey (N = 535). Exploratory factor analysis identified four distinctive attitudes which were then compared using Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) among the four groups, all with ties to the largest psychiatric facility in Guangzhou, China, adjusting for sociodemographic differences. Four uncorrelated factors expressed preferences for 1) community-based treatment, social integration and a biopsychosocial model of causation, 2) direct personal relationships with people with mental illness, 3) a lack of fear and positive views of personal interactions with people with mental illness, 4) disbelief in superstitious explanations of mental illness. Statistically significant differences favored community-based treatment and biopsychosocial causation (factor 1) among professional groups (psychiatrists and nurses) as compared with family members and the general public (p problems of their relatives and support in their care.

  8. Cultural relativism and psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrega, H

    1989-07-01

    Psychiatry has had a long-standing association with sociology and, especially, cultural anthropology. These social sciences have been influential in developing the concept of cultural relativism and applying it to psychiatry, sometimes in a challenging way and with much detriment. The concept has been used by some antipsychiatrists in attempts to discredit psychiatric practice. Contemporary psychiatrists endorsing a form of biological determinism have tended to either disregard the concept or judge it as trivial if not nonsensical. This study describes the concept of cultural relativism, reviews its applications to illness, and analyzes its implications from a historical and theoretical point of view. Its varied aspects, power, and limitations are discussed.

  9. Interactional aspects of care during hospitalization: perspectives of family caregivers of psychiatrically ill in a tertiary care setting in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinakaran, P; Mehrotra, Seema; Bharath, Srikala

    2014-12-01

    There are very few studies on user-perspectives about mental health care services that explore perspectives of family caregivers in India. An exploratory study was undertaken to understand the perceived importance of various aspects of interactions with mental health service providers during hospitalization, from the perspectives of family caregivers. In addition, it also aimed at documenting their actual experience of interactional aspects of care during the hospitalization of their relatives. The study was conducted on fifty family caregivers of patients with varied psychiatric diagnoses hospitalized in a tertiary psychiatric care setting in South India. Measures of Interactional aspects of care were developed to assess perceived importance of six different interactional domains of care and the actual experience of care in these domains. Provision of informational inputs and addressing of concerns raised emerged as the domains of care given highest importance. The item pertaining to 'sharing with the caregiver about different alternatives for treatment' received negative ratings in terms of actual experience by maximum number of participants (18%). Significant differences on perceived importance of four domains of interactional aspects of care (dignity, confidentiality and fairness, addressing concerns raised, informational inputs and prompt attention and consistent care) emerged between caregiver subgroups based on educational level of the caregiver, socio-economic status, hospitalization history and broad diagnostic categories. In addition, the care givers of patients with psychoses assigned significantly more positive ratings on actual experience for all the domains of interactional aspects of care. The findings have implications for further research and practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Mentally Ill Parents in Psychiatric Hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwort, Ilka; Schmitz-Buhl, Mario; Christiansen, Hanna; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2016-09-01

    Offsprings of psychiatric patients are burdened and they are at risk of developing a mental disorder themselves. All admissions in a psychiatric hospital within a period of 6 months were screened for parenthood of underaged children. They were given standardized questionnaires for child behavior (SDQ), parenting behavior and subjective need for help in parenting. 21.5 % (N = 439) of the patients had underaged children, 194 patients participated in the study. They considered their children as having more psychological/behavioral problems than a control group (N = 97). Patients with personality or affective disorders and patients with a high level of psychiatric comorbidity rated their children most problematic. Although patients did not differ from controls in the evaluation of their parenting style, they expressed a higher need for help in parenting. Parenting and education issues need to be considered in the treatment of mentally ill patients. Effective support could be a relief for families and help to prevent mental disorders in offsprings. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. The joint impact of cognitive performance in adolescence and familial cognitive aptitude on risk for major psychiatric disorders: a delineation of four potential pathways to illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Ohlsson, H; Keefe, R S E; Sundquist, K; Sundquist, J

    2018-04-01

    How do joint measures of premorbid cognitive ability and familial cognitive aptitude (FCA) reflect risk for a diversity of psychiatric and substance use disorders? To address this question, we examined, using Cox models, the predictive effects of school achievement (SA) measured at age 16 and FCA-assessed from SA in siblings and cousins, and educational attainment in parents-on risk for 12 major psychiatric syndromes in 1 140 608 Swedes born 1972-1990. Four developmental patterns emerged. In the first, risk was predicted jointly by low levels of SA and high levels of FCA-that is a level of SA lower than would be predicted from the FCA. This pattern was strongest in autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia, and weakest in bipolar illness. In these disorders, a pathologic process seems to have caused cognitive functioning to fall substantially short of familial potential. In the second pattern, seen in the internalizing conditions of major depression and anxiety disorders, risk was associated with low SA but was unrelated to FCA. Externalizing disorders-drug abuse and alcohol use disorders-demonstrated the third pattern, in which risk was predicted jointly by low SA and low FCA. The fourth pattern, seen in eating disorders, was directly opposite of that observed in externalizing disorders with risk associated with high SA and high FCA. When measured together, adolescent cognitive ability and FCA identified four developmental patterns leading to diverse psychiatric disorders. The value of cognitive assessments in psychiatric research can be substantially increased by also evaluating familial cognitive potential.

  12. Familiality of Psychiatric Disorders and Risk of Postpartum Psychiatric Episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Anna E; Maegbaek, Merete L; Liu, Xiaoqin

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Postpartum psychiatric disorders are common and morbid complications of pregnancy. The authors sought to evaluate how family history of psychiatric disorders is associated with postpartum psychiatric disorders in proband mothers with and without a prior psychiatric history by assessing...

  13. Home treatment for acute psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, C; Gadd, E M

    1990-11-03

    To determine the factors influencing the successful outcome of community treatment for severe acute psychiatric illnesses that are traditionally treated in hospital. All patients from a single electoral ward who were either admitted to hospital or treated at home over a two year period (1 October 1987 to 30 September 1989) were included in the study and their case notes audited. The second year of the study is reported. Electoral ward of Sparkbrook, Birmingham. 99 Patients aged 16-65 with severe acute psychiatric illness. 65 Patients were managed by home treatment alone; 34 required admission to hospital. The location of treatment was significantly (all p less than 0.05) influenced by social characteristics of the patients (marital state, age (in men), ethnicity, and living alone) and by characteristics of the referral (occurring out of hours; assessment taking place at hospital or police station). DSM-III-R diagnosis was more weakly associated with outcome. Violence during the episode was significantly related to admission, although deliberate self harm was not. Home treatment is feasible for most patients with acute psychiatric illness. A 24 hour on call assessment service increases the likelihood of success because admission is determined more strongly by social characteristics of the patient and the referral than by illness factors. Admission will still be required for some patients. A locally based mental health resource centre, a 24 hour on call service, an open referral system, and an active follow up policy increase the effectiveness of a home treatment service.

  14. The MMPI-2 in chronic psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Peggy; Van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Van Den Noort, Maurits; Schenkwald, Julia; Kueppenbender, Nicole; Lim, Sabina; Egger, Jos; Coenen, Anton

    2014-10-01

    While previous studies on the MMPI-2 in patients with schizophrenia and depression have used mixed samples of both early stage and chronic psychiatric patients. Here, it is investigated whether chronicity itself might have a differential effect on the MMPI-2 profiles of these patients and whether demoralization 'associated with long-term illness' affects the scales of the MMPI-2. Thirty long-term patients with schizophrenia, 30 long-term patients with depression, and 30 healthy participants completed the MMPI-2. Groups were compared on Clinical Scales and on the Restructured Clinical (RC) Scales. Patients with schizophrenia differed from patients with depression on 14 MMPI-2 scales and from healthy controls on 10 scales, generally showing mean UT-scores 65, indicating impaired functioning. Demoralization was higher in patients with depression than in patients with schizophrenia and both psychiatric groups differed from the healthy control group. It is concluded that long-term patients with depression show impaired functioning and high demoralization, while long-term patients with schizophrenia surprisingly show near normal functioning and less demoralization. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Prevalence of substance use and association with psychiatric illness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of substance use among inpatients of a Psychiatric Hospital in Uyo, Nigeria, to determine the association with onset of psychiatric illness. A total of 124 inpatients admitted into a Psychiatric Unit of the University of Uyo Teaching Hospital were assessed for substance ...

  16. Skin disorders in chronic psychiatric illness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mookhoek, E.J.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Hovens, J.E.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.; Loonen, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic psychiatric patients are prone to develop skin diseases. However, epidemiological data are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of skin complaints and dermatological disorders in residential psychiatric patients. METHODS: Ninety-one randomly chosen patients of the

  17. Skin disorders in chronic psychiatric illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mookhoek, E. J.; van de Kerkhof, P. C. M.; Hovens, J. E. J. M.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.; Loonen, A. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic psychiatric patients are prone to develop skin diseases. However, epidemiological data are scarce. Objective To describe the prevalence of skin complaints and dermatological disorders in residential psychiatric patients. Methods Ninety-one randomly chosen patients of the

  18. Families living with parental mental illness and their experiences of family interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzelius, M; Plantin, L; Östman, M

    2018-03-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Coping with parental mental illness in families can be challenging for both children and parents. Providing evidence-based family interventions to families where a parent has a mental illness can enhance the relationships in the family. Although psychiatric research has shown that evidence-based family interventions may improve the communication and understanding of parental mental illness, there is a lack in this area of research from an everyday clinical context. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Our study reinforces the fact that parents with mental illnesses are searching for support from psychiatric services in order to talk to their children about their illness. The finding that under-age children comply when they are told by their parents to join an intervention in psychiatric services supporting the family is something not observed earlier in research. This study once more illuminates the fact that partners of a person with parental mental illness are seldom, in an obvious way, included in family support interventions. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Psychiatric services, and especially mental health nurses, have an important task in providing families with parental mental illness with support concerning communication with their children and in including the "healthy" partner in family support interventions. Introduction Although research has shown that evidence-based family interventions in research settings improve the communication and understanding of parental mental illness, there is a lack of knowledge about interventions in an everyday clinical context. Aim This study explores how families with parental mental illness experience family interventions in a natural clinical context in psychiatric services. Method Five families with children aged 10-12 were recruited from psychiatric services in southern Sweden and interviewed in a manner inspired by naturalistic inquiry and content analysis. Both

  19. Comparing Mental Illness Stigma among Nurses in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahimi Hossein

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stigma can complicate people’s mental health problems by affecting different sides of personal life, increasing negative attitudes, causing discriminatory behavior towards them, and reducing the chances of recovery and returning to normal life. This research aims to compare the stigma of mental illness among nurses working in psychiatric and non-psychiatric wards in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. A total of 240 nurses participated in this descriptive and analytic study. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill (CAMI Scale, which is a 40-item self-report questionnaire. All data were analyzed using SPSS 13. The majority of nurses have a medium level of stigma toward people with mental illness, and there is no significant relation between the type of wards and mean stigma scores. After eliminating factors such as mental illness in nurses and their families, it seems that only working with people with mental illness in psychiatric wards is not enough to create a positive attitude toward them. Additionally, the less physical activity and taking advantage of legal benefits of work hardship for psychiatric nurses, low income, and stigma toward psychiatric nursing, probably may make a difference in inclining to work in psychiatry ward between the two groups in spite of relatively equal stigma scores.

  20. Instruments measuring family or caregiver burden in severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schene, A. H.; Tessler, R. C.; Gamache, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    The consequences of psychiatric disorders for family members, usually called family or caregiver burden, have been studied during the last 4 decades. During this period a variety of instruments have been developed to measure the impact of mental illness on family members, but not all instruments

  1. Psychiatric diagnoses and psychoactive medication use among nonsurgical critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunsch, Hannah; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo; Johansen, Martin B

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The relationship between critical illness and psychiatric illness is unclear. OBJECTIVE: To assess psychiatric diagnoses and medication prescriptions before and after critical illness. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Population-based cohort study in Denmark of critically ill patien...

  2. Seasonality of suicides with and without psychiatric illness in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yip, P.S.; Yang, K.C.; Qin, Ping

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied the seasonality of suicides among persons with and without psychiatric illness in Denmark from 1970 to 1999. A non-homogenous Poisson process was used to examine the data. The seasonality of suicides was shown to be associated with gender and their psychiatric histories...

  3. Primary prevention of psychiatric illness in special populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Sanders, Renata; Alexeenko, Lada; Madhusoodanan, Subramoniam

    2010-11-01

    Some populations appear to be particularly vulnerable to the development of psychiatric symptomatology related to life events and biologic or social/cultural factors. Such groups include individuals who have experienced traumatic events, military personnel, individuals with serious medical conditions, postpartum women, and immigrants. This study reviews the literature regarding primary prevention of psychiatric disorders in special populations and identifies a variety of universal, selective, and indicated prevention measures aimed at minimizing the psychiatric sequelae in these groups. The authors reviewed the literature regarding the prevention of psychiatric symptoms in trauma/abuse victims, individuals in the military, oncology patients, patients with diabetes, pregnant/postpartum women, and immigrants. The literature on primary prevention of psychiatric illness in the special populations identified is rather limited. Universal prevention may be beneficial in some instances through public awareness campaigns and disaster planning. In other instances, more specific and intensive interventions for individuals at high risk of psychiatric illness may improve outcomes, for example, crisis counseling for those who have experienced severe trauma. Primary prevention of psychiatric illness may be an attainable goal via implementation of specific universal, selected, and indicated primary prevention measures in special populations.

  4. The genomic era and serious mental illness: a potential application for psychiatric genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Jehannine C; Honer, William G

    2007-02-01

    Genetic counseling is an important clinical service that is routinely offered to families affected by genetic disorders or by complex disorders for which genetic testing is available. It is not yet routinely offered to individuals with serious mental illnesses and their families, but recent findings that beliefs about the cause of mental illness can affect an individual's adaptation to the illness suggest that genetic counseling may be a useful intervention for this population. In a genetic counseling session the counselor discusses genetic and environmental contributors to disease pathogenesis; helps individuals explore conceptions, fears, and adaptive strategies; and provides nondirective support for decision making. Expected outcomes may include reductions in fear, stigma, and guilt associated with a psychiatric diagnosis; improvements in adherence to prescribed medications; declines in risk behaviors; and reductions in misconceptions about the illness. The authors endorse a multidisciplinary approach in which a psychiatrist and genetic counselor collaborate to provide comprehensive psychiatric genetic counseling.

  5. Epidemiological studies of suicide in patients with psychiatric illness

    OpenAIRE

    Reutfors, Johan

    2010-01-01

    A link between suicide and psychiatric illness is well recognized. However, knowledge is limited as to what characterizes suicide in different mental disorders. The overall aim of the work described in this thesis was to increase the understanding of suicide in psychiatric illness. Study I: In this population-based case-control study, all suicide cases 18 years and older in Sweden from 1991 to 2003 (14,501 men and 6,174 women) were individually matched to ten controls from t...

  6. Anxiety Disorders and the Family: How families affect psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hunsley, John

    1991-01-01

    Family functioning and anxiety disorders, the most prevalent forms of psychiatric disorder, influence one another. The empirical literature on family studies of anxiety disorder (ie, aggregration of disorders within families), on parent-child relationships and anxiety disorders, and on marriage and anxiety disorders is reviewed. Finally, the challenges for patients and their families of post-traumatic stress disorder are discussed.

  7. Psychiatric illness and facebook: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veretilo, Pavel; Billick, Stephen Bates

    2012-09-01

    There is relatively little content available addressing the use of social media, such as Facebook in psychiatric populations. There has been significant growth of various social media websites in the last 10 years, such as Facebook, and yet little is written about their overall impact on this population. There are articles in the scientific literature about the use of social media in adolescents and young adults and also about its use among physicians and medical students. This article reviews the literature addressing social media and describes a therapeutic interaction with a patient with significant psychiatric comorbities and his use of social media. Furthermore, this is a unique example in current literature of an overall positive interaction and social improvement of this patient in large degree due to his use of Facebook. Physicians themselves must be very cautious in their interaction with patients online and especially via social media, while acknowledging that social media can serve as a spring board for more reclusive patients into greater societal integration.

  8. Psychiatric aspec ts of chronic physical illness in adolescence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-05-18

    May 18, 2008 ... Survival rates for children who suffer chronic physical illnesses have increased dramatically in ... may have a profound impact on development, quality of life, treatment .... emotional, cognitive and social elements. ... trigger psychiatric disorder in a parent, which in .... attainment and employment suggest mild.

  9. HIV infection and psychiatric illness | Owe-Larsson | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Patients with HIV infection are at an increased risk of psychiatric illness. Major depressive disorder and subsyndromal depressive symptoms, as well as anxiety disorder and substance abuse are more prevalent among HIV infected individuals than among the general population. HIV-associated neurocognitive ...

  10. Pattern of psychiatric illnesses among elderly patients receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than half (57.5%) were married while about a third (36.3%) were widowed. Children of subjects constituted the largest percentage (78.2%) of caregivers. The three most common psychiatric illnesses were Depression (41%), Dementia (27%) and Schizophrenia (15%). A large proportion (61.8%) of the patients attended ...

  11. Perceived Mental Illness Stigma among Youth in Psychiatric Outpatient Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkington, Katherine S.; Hackler, Dusty; McKinnon, Karen; Borges, Cristiane; Wright, Eric R.; Wainberg, Milton L.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the experiences of mental illness stigma in 24 youth (58.3% male, 13-24 years, 75% Latino) in psychiatric outpatient treatment. Using Link and Phelan's (2001) model of stigmatization, we conducted thematic analysis of the interview texts, examining experiences of stigma at individual and structural levels, in addition to the…

  12. Psychiatric morbidities among mentally ill wives of Nepalese men working abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhana Ratna Shakya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Husband working abroad may have not only favorable outcomes for wives and other family members but also adverse consequences, including psychological problems. Present study intended to look into psychiatric morbidity profiles of the Nepalese female psychiatric patients and the stressors related with their husband working abroad. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based descriptive study with convenient sampling method. Hundred consecutive female psychiatric patients, with the particular stressor, coming into the contact of the investigating team were enrolled within the study period of 12 months. The psychiatric morbidities/diagnoses were sorted out according to the International classification of disease and infirmity, 10 th edition (ICD-10 criteria. Results: Average age of the enrolled cases was 29 years. Nearly half of the women were illiterate or barely literate. Some other stressors, besides the one of husband working abroad were found to precipitate the illness in about 60%, main being relational and health problems. Common presenting complaints were mood, anxiety, and physical symptoms. Almost 30% of the subjects had some mental illness in their past too and similar proportion had in their blood relatives. About one-third admitted to use substances, mainly alcohol and cigarettes. The common psychiatric diagnoses were mood, anxiety, neurotic, and stress-related disorders. Nearly 10% had presented for suicide attempt. Conclusions: The status of husband working abroad may have adverse consequences in mental health of women. Mood affect, anxiety, and stress-related disorders are common psychiatric illness among them.

  13. Asymmetry of 3H- imipramine binding may predict psychiatric illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demeter, E.; Tekes, K.; Majorossy, K.; Palkovits, M.; Soos, M.; Magyar, K.; Somogyl, E.

    1989-01-01

    The B/sub max/ and Kd values for 3 H-imipramine binding were measured in post-mortem human brains from drug-free selected psychiatric subject homicide victims and normal controls. The two groups were comparable in age and gender. The number of imipramine binding sites in the frontal cortices of psychiatric subjects had significantly higher B/sub max/ values in the left hemisphere than in the right hemisphere. Inversely, the number of imipramine binding sites in the frontal cortices of normal controls were significantly higher in the right brain than in the left brain. It was postulated that the inhibiting effect of central serotonin has weakened in psychiatric cases, therefore the changes of presynaptic serotonergic activity might be associated with psychiatric illness in the left hemisphere of human brain

  14. Differences between Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses' family-focused practice in adult mental health services

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grant, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric nurses\\' practice with parents who have mental illness, their children and families is an important issue internationally. This study provides a comparison of Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses\\' family-focused practices in adult mental health services. Three hundred and forty three nurses across Ireland and 155 from Australia completed the Family Focused Mental Health Practice Questionnaire. Cross-country comparisons revealed significant differences, in terms of family-focused skill, knowledge, confidence and practice. Australian psychiatric nurses engaged in higher family-focused practice compared to Irish nurses. The comparative differences between countries may be attributable to differences in training, workplace support and policy.

  15. Illnesses in siblings of US patients with bipolar disorder relate to multigenerational family history and patients severity of illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Kupka, Ralph; McElroy, Susan L.; Frye, Mark A.; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Keck, Paul E.; Nolen, Willem A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients with bipolar disorder from the US have more early-onset illness and a greater familial loading for psychiatric problems than those from the Netherlands or Germany (abbreviated here as Europe). We hypothesized that these regional differences in illness burden would extend to the

  16. New frontiers in animal research of psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffman, Arie; Krystal, John H; Krystal, John J

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in neurodevelopment are thought to modify risk of numerous psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, autism, ADHD, mood and anxiety disorders, and substance abuse. However, little is known about the cellular and molecular changes that guide these neurodevelopmental changes and how they contribute to mental illness. In this review, we suggest that elucidating this process in humans requires the use of model organisms. Furthermore, we advocate that such translational work should focus on the role that genes and/or environmental factors play in the development of circuits that regulate specific physiological and behavioral outcomes in adulthood. This emphasis on circuit development, as a fundamental unit for understanding behavior, is distinct from current approaches of modeling psychiatric illnesses in animals in two important ways. First, it proposes to replace the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM) diagnostic system with measurable endophenotypes as the basis for modeling human psychopathology in animals. We argue that a major difficulty in establishing valid animal models lies in their reliance on the DSM/International Classification of Diseases conceptual framework, and suggest that the Research Domain Criteria project, recently proposed by the NIMH, provides a more suitable system to model human psychopathology in animals. Second, this proposal emphasizes the developmental origin of many (though clearly not all) psychiatric illnesses, an issue that is often glossed over in current animal models of mental illness. We suggest that animal models are essential to elucidate the mechanisms by which neurodevelopmental changes program complex behavior in adulthood. A better understanding of this issue, in animals, is the key for defining human psychopathology, and the development of earlier and more effective interventions for mental illness.

  17. Chronic physical illness, psychiatric disorder and disability in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewa, C S; Lin, E

    2000-07-01

    While agreement is growing that mental illness burdens the North American economy, how it impacts productivity--particularly compared to physical illness--is unclear. Hypothesizing that lost work days are only the tip of the iceberg, we also examined the association of mental and chronic physical illness with partial work days and days requiring extra effort to function. Data from 4225 employed individuals, aged 18-54, were analyzed. These were a subset of respondents to the Ontario Health Survey's Mental Health Supplement, a 1990/91 epidemiologic survey of households across Ontario, Canada. Psychiatric disorder was assessed using the University of Michigan' modification of WHO's Composite International Diagnostic Interview (UM-CIDI). Similar to US reports, professional/managerial groups had lower rates of affective and anxiety disorders and fewer disability days compared to the rest of the workforce. However, no single occupational group was consistently at greater risk for either physical or psychiatric problems. Even after accounting for sociodemographic characteristics and work conditions, mental and physical status had clear, but different, impacts on productivity. Physical conditions alone had a fairly constant effect across all types of disability days and were the largest contributor to total work day loss. They also significantly impacted partial and extra effort days but were far less important than conditions involving a mental disorder. Respondents with mental health problems, either alone or in combination with physical illnesses, appeared more likely to go to work but to require greater effort to function. WHO projects that mental illness will become the second most important cause of global disease burden in the next century. Our findings suggest that among working individuals, it affects productivity more subtly than does physical illness. However, with an estimated eight percent of Ontario's workforce experiencing more than two months annually of

  18. Theophylline toxicity leading to suicidal ideation in a patient with no prior psychiatric illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kapoor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Suicidal behavior is a common psychiatric emergency and is associated with psychiatric illness and history of prior suicide attempts. Neuropsychiatric manifestations related to theophylline toxicity are well described in literature. We report a case of theophylline toxicity manifesting as suicidal ideation in a patient with no prior psychiatric illness.

  19. BURDEN AND QUALITY OF LIFE– A COMPARISON OF THOSE CARING FOR PSYCHIATRICALLY ILL AND MEDICALLY ILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Rupendu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Despite epidemiological transitions, communicable diseases are widely prevalent world over, concomitantly non-communicable diseases are also on the rise. Mental and behavioural disorders account for 12% of the global burden of disease. Caregiving for both groups of patients, rests with an identified primary caregiver. Caregiving lays a great deal of burden on the caregiver, adversely affecting his quality of life. These factors influence the quality of caregiving, and thereby the long-term well-being of the patient. Differences between the two groups of caregivers has not been studied, more so in the Indian context. MATERIALS AND METHODS 60 caregivers of psychiatrically ill and 63 caregivers of the medically ill were studied. Burden of care was assessed using Elmstahl burden scale, and quality of life (QOL using WHOQOL BREF. RESULTS The socio demographic profile of both groups was similar. All subjects experienced a burden of care, with those caring for the psychiatrically ill experiencing a greater burden. QOL was poorer in the care givers of the psychiatrically ill, especially in those married, employed, and in a lower income group. The female care giver, mostly the spouse, experienced a greater burden of care and a poorer QOL. CONCLUSION Chronicity, stigma, poor insight and disabling dependence of the psychiatrically ill, are probably contributory. A higher caregiver burden and a lower QOL will influence quality of caregiving, and have an adverse effect on the course and prognosis of the illness. There is thus a need for routine assessment of the caregiver, and planned intervention for the same.

  20. Family functioning in the families of psychiatric patients: a comparison with nonclinical families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trangkasombat, Umaporn

    2006-11-01

    To examine family functioning in the families of psychiatric patients. Families of psychiatric patients and nonclinical families were compared. There were 60 families in each group. The instrument included a semistructured interview of family functioning and the Chulalongkorn Family Inventory (CFI), a self-report questionnaire designed to assess the perception of one's family. From the assessment by semistructured interview, 83.3% of psychiatric families and 45.0% of nonclinical families were found to be dysfunctional in at least one dimension. The difference was statistically significant (p dysfunctional dimensions in the psychiatric families was significantly higher than in the nonclinical control group, 3.5 +/- 1.9 and 0.98 +/- 1.5 respectively, p families were significantly lower than the control group, reflecting poor family functioning. The dysfunctions were mostly in the following dimensions: problem-solving, communication, affective responsiveness, affective involvement, and behavior control. Psychiatric families faced more psychosocial stressors and the average number of stressors was higher than the control families, 88.3% vs. 56.7% and 4.2 +/- 2.7 vs. 1.3 +/- 1.47 stressors respectively, p < 0.0001. Family functioning of psychiatric patients was less healthy than the nonclinical control. The present study underlined the significance of family assessment and family intervention in the comprehensive care of psychiatric patients.

  1. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Psychiatric Illness: Redefining the Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physicians who encounter patients in the emergency department with chest pain, palpitations, or shortness of breath may often find it difficult to differentiate diagnosis of panic attacks from acute coronary syndrome or Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy. Redefining and understanding the pathophysiological relationship of psychiatric illness including anxiety, depression, or panic attacks and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy may help clinicians implement a more effective and beneficial model of care for this affliction that is being found to be increasingly more common in today’s age.

  2. Practice Parameter for the Psychiatric Assessment and Management of Physically Ill Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 2009

    2009-01-01

    An introduction for any medical health clinician on the knowledge and skills that are needed for the psychiatric assessment and management of physically ill children and adolescents is presented. These parameters are presented to assist clinicians in psychiatric decision making.

  3. Cushing Disease Presenting as Primary Psychiatric Illness: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sean A; Rosebush, Patricia I; Smyth, Harley S; Mazurek, Michael F

    2015-11-01

    We report the case of a woman with long-standing refractory depression and psychotic features who was eventually diagnosed with Cushing disease. After surgical treatment of a pituitary adenoma, she experienced gradual psychiatric recovery and was eventually able to discontinue all psychotropic medication. We review the psychiatric components of Cushing disease, implications of psychiatric illnesses for the treatment and prognosis of Cushing disease, and potential pathophysiological mechanisms linking glucocorticoid excess to psychiatric illness.

  4. Cannabis use during adolescent development: susceptibility to psychiatric illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eChadwick

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis use is increasingly pervasive among adolescents today, even more common than cigarette smoking. The evolving policy surrounding the legalization of cannabis reaffirms the need to understand the relationship between cannabis exposure early in life and psychiatric illnesses. Cannabis contains psychoactive components, notably Δ9-tetrahydrocannbinol (THC, that interfere with the brain’s endogenous endocannabinoid system, which is critically involved in both pre- and post-natal neurodevelopment. Consequently, THC and related compounds could potentially usurp normal adolescent neurodevelopment, shifting the brain’s developmental trajectory towards a disease-vulnerable state, predisposing early cannabis-users to motivational, affective and psychotic disorders. Numerous human studies, including prospective longitudinal studies, demonstrate that early cannabis use is associated with major depressive disorder and drug addiction. A strong association between schizophrenia and cannabis use is also apparent, especially when considering genetic factors that interact with this environmental exposure. These human studies set a foundation for carefully controlled animal studies which demonstrate similar patterns following early cannabinoid exposure. Given the vulnerable nature of adolescent neurodevelopment and the persistent changes that follow early cannabis exposure, the experimental findings outlined should be carefully considered by policymakers. In order to fully address the growing issues of psychiatric illnesses and to ensure a healthy future, measures should be taken to reduce cannabis use among teens.

  5. The Stigma of Families with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jon E.; Corrigan, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article describes family stigma, which is defined as the prejudice and discrimination experienced by individuals through associations with their relatives. Methods: The authors describe family stigma and present current research related to mental illness stigma experienced by family members. Research indicates this type of stigma…

  6. Attitudes of college students toward mental illness stigma and the misuse of psychiatric medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Amanda M; Merlo, Lisa J

    2011-02-01

    Mental illness stigma remains a significant barrier to treatment. However, the recent increase in the medical and nonmedical use of prescription psychiatric medications among college students seems to contradict this phenomenon. This study explored students' attitudes and experiences related to psychiatric medications, as well as correlates of psychiatric medication misuse (ie, attitudes toward mental illness and beliefs about the efficacy of psychiatric medications). Data were collected anonymously via self-report questionnaires from April 2008 to February 2009. Measures included the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test, the Drug Abuse Screening Test, Day's Mental Illness Stigma Scale, the Attitudes Toward Psychiatric Medication scale, and the Psychiatric Medication Attitudes Scale. Participants included 383 university students (59.2% female), recruited on the campus of a large state university or through online classes offered through the same university. High rates of psychiatric medication misuse were shown (13.8%) when compared to rates of medical use (6.8%), and students with prescriptions for psychiatric drugs were also more likely to be misusers (χ(2) = 20.60, P mental illness, including lower anxiety around the mentally ill (t = 3.26, P mental illness (t = -2.11, P mental illness, the appropriate use of psychiatric medications, and the potential consequences associated with abuse of these potent drugs. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  7. Psychiatric Illness in a Cohort of Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnema, Margje; Boer, Harm; Collin, Philippe; Maaskant, Marian A.; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance T. R. M.; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested an association between PWS and comorbid psychiatric illness. Data on prevalence rates of psychopathology is still scarce. This paper describes a large-scale, systematic study investigating the prevalence of psychiatric illness in a Dutch adult PWS cohort. One hundred and two individuals were screened for psychiatric…

  8. Initiating communication about parental mental illness in families: an issue of confidence and security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihkala, Heljä; Sandlund, Mikael; Cederström, Anita

    2012-05-01

    Beardslee's family intervention (FI) is a family-based intervention to prevent psychiatric problems for children of mentally ill parents. The parents' experiences are of importance in family-based interventions. Twenty five parents were interviewed about their experiences of FI. Data were analysed by qualitative methods. Confidence and security in the professionals and in FI as a method were prerequisites for initiating communication about the parents' mental illness with the children. FI provides a solid base for an alliance with the parents and might be a practicable method when parenthood and children are discussed with psychiatric patients.

  9. Psychiatric disorders and leukocyte telomere length: Underlying mechanisms linking mental illness with cellular aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Daniel; Epel, Elissa S; Mellon, Synthia H; Penninx, Brenda W; Révész, Dóra; Verhoeven, Josine E; Reus, Victor I; Lin, Jue; Mahan, Laura; Hough, Christina M; Rosser, Rebecca; Bersani, F Saverio; Blackburn, Elizabeth H; Wolkowitz, Owen M

    2015-08-01

    Many psychiatric illnesses are associated with early mortality and with an increased risk of developing physical diseases that are more typically seen in the elderly. Moreover, certain psychiatric illnesses may be associated with accelerated cellular aging, evidenced by shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which could underlie this association. Shortened LTL reflects a cell's mitotic history and cumulative exposure to inflammation and oxidation as well as the availability of telomerase, a telomere-lengthening enzyme. Critically short telomeres can cause cells to undergo senescence, apoptosis or genomic instability, and shorter LTL correlates with poorer health and predicts mortality. Emerging data suggest that LTL may be reduced in certain psychiatric illnesses, perhaps in proportion to exposure to the psychiatric illnesses, although conflicting data exist. Telomerase has been less well characterized in psychiatric illnesses, but a role in depression and in antidepressant and neurotrophic effects has been suggested by preclinical and clinical studies. In this article, studies on LTL and telomerase activity in psychiatric illnesses are critically reviewed, potential mediators are discussed, and future directions are suggested. A deeper understanding of cellular aging in psychiatric illnesses could lead to re-conceptualizing them as systemic illnesses with manifestations inside and outside the brain and could identify new treatment targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The long-term psychiatric and medical prognosis of perinatal mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Stuebe, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The perinatal period provides an important window into a woman's long-term health. Perinatal mental illness is a common condition conferring potential serious long-term psychiatric and medical consequences for the mother and family. It is known that childbirth acts as a powerful trigger for depressive episodes in some women, and that women with histories of a mood disorder are particularly vulnerable. Some evidence links perinatal mental illness with obstetrical complications and reduced lactation initiation and duration. Therefore, perinatal mental illness may be a marker for long-term risk, and may contribute directly to subsequent cardiometabolic disease through both neuroendocrine mechanisms and the effects of mental illness on health behaviours. In clinical practice, these associations underscore the importance of screening and treating women with perinatal mental illness to ensure best possible long-term outcomes. Early screening and treatment may both mitigate the primary disease process and reduce the risk of comorbid medical conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Coping with Mental Illness in the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Agnes B.

    Utilizing the conceptual framework of coping theory, 30 family care-givers of mentally ill family members were interviewed to determine the relationship between coping effectiveness and such variables as patient characteristics, factors of the care-givers life situation, and the availability and adequacy of community supports. Care-givers were…

  12. Characteristics of mentally ill offenders from 100 psychiatric court reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Zahrani Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing probability that the psychiatrist will, willingly or not, come into contact with mentally ill offenders in the course of their practice. There are increasing rates of violence, substance abuse and other psychiatric disorders that are of legal importance. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the rates of different mental disorders in 100 court reports and to investigate the characteristics of mentally ill offenders. Methods All cases referred from different departments of the legal system to the forensic committee for assessment of legal accountability over 13-months duration were included. A specially designed form was prepared for data collection. Cases were classified into five groups: murder, robbery, financial offences, violent and simple offences and a group for other offences. Data were subjected to statistical analysis and comparisons between different groups of subjects were performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Men constituted 93% of cases. In all, 73% of offenders were younger than 40 years old. Schizophrenia cases made up 13% of the total, substance related cases constituted 56% and amphetamine cases alone made up 21%; 10% of cases were antisocial personality disorders, and 51% of cases were classified as having a low education level. Unemployment was found in 34% of cases. The final decision of the forensic committee was full responsibility in 46% of cases and partial responsibility in 11% of cases, with 33% considered non-responsible. A total of 58% of cases had had contact with psychiatric healthcare prior to the offence and in 9% of cases contact had been in the previous 12 weeks. A history of similar offences was found in 32% of cases. In all, 14% of the offences were murders, 8% were sexual crimes, and 31% were violent/simple crimes. Conclusions The ability of the legal system to detect cases was good, while the ability of the healthcare system to predict

  13. Oral nanomedicine approaches for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-02-10

    Psychiatric illnesses are a leading cause of disability and morbidity globally. However, the preferred orally dosed pharmacological treatment options available for depression, anxiety and schizophrenia are often limited by factors such as low drug aqueous solubility, food effects, high hepatic first-pass metabolism effects and short half-lives. Furthermore, the discovery and development of more effective psychotropic agents has stalled in recent times, with the majority of new drugs reaching the market offering similar efficacy, but suffering from the same oral delivery concerns. As such, the application of nanomedicine formulation approaches to currently available drugs is a viable option for optimizing oral drug delivery and maximizing treatment efficacy. This review focuses on the various delivery challenges encountered by psychotropic drugs, and the ability of nanomedicine formulation strategies to overcome these. Specifically, we critically review proof of concept in vitro and in vivo studies of nanoemulsions/microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, dendrimers, polymeric micelles, nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers and nanosuspensions, and provide new insight into the various mechanisms for improved drug performance. The advantages and limitations of current oral nanomedicine approaches for psychotropic drugs are discussed, which will provide guidance for future research directions and assist in fostering the translation of such delivery systems to the clinical setting. Accordingly, emphasis has been placed on correlating the in vitro/in vivo performance of these nanomedicine approaches with their potential clinical outcomes and benefits for patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychiatric Effects of Military Deployment on Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Trenton

    2012-01-01

    Deployments in the United States military have increased greatly in the past 10 years. Families and children are psychiatrically affected by these deployments, and recent studies are clarifying these effects. This article focuses on the psychiatric effects of deployment on children and uses a composite case example to review the use of play therapy to treat children who are having psychiatric issues related to the deployment of one or both parents. PMID:22468239

  15. [How do mentally ill parents evaluate their children's quality of life? Associations with the parent's illness and family functioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Eva; Bullinger, Monika; Jeske, Jana; Wiegand-Grefe, Silke

    2008-01-01

    To assess health-related quality of life (hrQoL) of children with a mentally ill parent, and its associations with the parent's illness (diagnoses, severity of disease, current symptoms) and family functioning, 51 mentally ill parents rated their children's hrQoL using the KINDL-R, a multidimensional hrQoL questionnaire for children. Parents rated their current psychiatric symptoms on the SCL-14 (Symptom Checklist-14) and family functioning on the FB-A ("Familienbögen"). The parents' therapists (psychologists or psychiatrists) provided psychiatric diagnoses as well as global ratings of disease severity (CGI) and patient's family functioning. Compared to the general population, parents rated their children's hrQoL significantly lower concerning the dimensions "Psychological Well-Being" and "Family': HrQoL ratings were moderately correlated with the parent's current depressive symptoms and moderately to highly correlated with family functioning from the parent's perspective. Lower depression severity and higher family functioning were associated with higher hrQoL ratings. Parents with affective disorders rated their children's hrQoL significantly lower than did parents with a diagnosis of substance abuse. Results show the importance of family functioning for parents' view of children's hrQoL and the influence of psychiatric symptoms on ill parents' reports. These findings are in line with previous results concerning potential psychological and behavioural problems in children of mentally ill parents. Family interventions and multi-informant assessment should be used in this high-risk group.

  16. Psychiatric morbidity among physically ill patients in a Ugandan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2. Department of Psychiatry, Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda ... Objective: To determine the prevalence, types and associations of psychiatric ... Conclusion: The psychiatric disorders on the general medical and surgical wards are ..... patients with bipolar depression were female, on the.

  17. Views of practitioners of alternative medicine toward psychiatric illness and psychiatric care: a study from Solapur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holikatti, Prabhakar C; Kar, Nilamadhab

    2015-01-01

    It is common knowledge that patients seek treatment for psychiatric illnesses from various sources including the alternative medicine. Views and attitudes of clinicians often influence the provision of appropriate mental health care for these patients. In this context, it was intended to study the views of the practitioners of alternative medicine toward psychiatric disorders, patients and interventions. The study was conducted as a questionnaire-based survey among a sample of practitioners of alternative medicine specifically Ayurveda and Homeopathy, who were practicing in Solapur and adjoining areas of Maharashtra and Karnataka states in India. A semi-structured Attitudinal Inventory for Psychiatry questionnaire was used. Demographic and professional data were collected. Out of 62 practitioners approached, 50 responded (80.6%). There were no significant differences in the views of practitioners toward psychiatry and psychiatrists based on respondents' gender, place of residence, location of practice, type of alternative medicine, exposure to psychiatric patients, or if they knew someone with psychiatric illness. Attitudes were generally positive, but variable. Among negative observations were that approximately 60% of respondents felt that a patient can be disadvantaged by being given a psychiatric label and 58% believed that emotions are difficult to handle. A considerable proportion (40%) of the respondents felt doctors other than psychiatrists were unable to identify psychiatric disorders. This study's findings suggest that practitioners of alternative medicine have mixed views about mental illness, patients and treatment. Some of their negative views and perceived inability to identify psychiatric disorders may be addressed through further training, information sharing and collaborative work.

  18. Racial Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes after Psychiatric Hospital Discharge among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M.; Newhill, Christina E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial disparities in mental health outcomes have been widely documented in noninstitutionalized community psychiatric samples, but few studies have specifically examined the effects of race among individuals with the most severe mental illnesses. A sample of 925 individuals hospitalized for severe mental illness was followed for a year after…

  19. The relationship between length of vocational disability, psychiatric illness, life stressors and sociodemographic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, P; Jackson, T; Kohr, R; Iezzi, T

    1997-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the relationship between vocational disability, psychiatric illness, life stressors and sociodemographic factors. Information on a variety of variables was obtained from insurance files of 147 subjects who had submitted claims for monetary compensation on grounds of psychiatric symptoms. The majority of subjects received a diagnosis of mood disorder or anxiety disorder. Extended vocational disability was associated with longer duration of psychiatric illness, rating of poorer prognosis by the treating physician, and lower income and occupational levels. Individuals with recent onset of disability reported more stressors than those experiencing extended disability. Although longer duration of psychiatric illness was associated with vocational disability, other variables play an important role in accounting for extended vocational disability.

  20. Psychiatric family history and schizophrenia risk in Denmark: which mental disorders are relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, P B; Pedersen, M G; Pedersen, C B

    2010-02-01

    A family history of schizophrenia is the strongest single indicator of individual schizophrenia risk. Bipolar affective disorder and schizo-affective disorders have been documented to occur more frequently in parents and siblings of schizophrenia patients, but the familial occurrence of the broader range of mental illnesses and their role as confounders have not been studied in large population-based samples. All people born in Denmark between 1955 and 1991 (1.74 million) were followed for the development of schizophrenia (9324 cases) during 28 million person-years at risk. Information of schizophrenia in cohort members and psychiatric history in parents and siblings was established through linkage with the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. Data were analysed using log-linear Poisson regression. Schizophrenia was, as expected, strongly associated with schizophrenia and related disorders among first-degree relatives. However, almost any other psychiatric disorder among first-degree relatives increased the individual's risk of schizophrenia. The population attributable risk associated with psychiatric family history in general was 27.1% whereas family histories including schizophrenia only accounted for 6.0%. The general psychiatric family history was a confounder of the association between schizophrenia and urbanization of place of birth. Clinically diagnosed schizophrenia is associated with a much broader range of mental disorders in first-degree relatives than previously reported. This may suggest risk haplotypes shared across many disorders and/or shared environmental factors clustering in families. Failure to take the broad range of psychiatric family history into account may bias results of all risk-factor studies of schizophrenia.

  1. Effects of Preventive Family Service Coordination for Parents With Mental Illnesses and Their Children, a RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansink, H.J.; Janssens, J.M.A.M.; Hoencamp, E.; Middelkoop, B.J.C.; Hosman, C.M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Children of parents with a mental illness (COPMI) are at increased risk for developing psychiatric disorders, especially when parenting is compromised by multiple risk factors. Due to fragmented services, these families often do not get the support they need. Can coordination between services, as

  2. Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness among Schizophrenic Patients and Their Families (Comparative Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Sahar; Zaki, Rania A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was a comparative study aiming to assess the extent of internalized stigma of mental illness among patients with schizophrenia & identify stigma as perceived by family members caring schizophrenic patients. The study was conducted in two settings 1st clinic was outpatient clinic for psychiatric patient affiliated to Abbasia…

  3. Developing the concept of family involvement and the alienation questionnaire in the context of psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertzon, Mats; Lützén, Kim; Svensson, Elisabeth; Andershed, Birgitta

    2008-12-01

    Research shows that family members of people with a mental illness often experience a lack of involvement in the psychiatric care of their relative. An interpretation of the findings of these studies raises the question of whether the family members' experience of not being involved can be conceptualized in terms of alienation towards mental health services from their encounter with psychiatric care. In order to explore this possibility, the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (FIAQ) was constructed, guided by relevant theoretical frameworks and empirical research. The content validity of the questionnaire was evaluated by two groups of experienced researchers who had sound knowledge of the theoretical frameworks used. Validity based on the response process was evaluated by the parents of people with mental illness. The reliability of the questionnaire was evaluated by a test-retest design with a group of 15 family members. The data were analyzed by a non-parametric statistical method. The results of the validity and reliability evaluations showed that of the 46 original items in the questionnaire, 28 would be useful in exploring the concept of family involvement and alienation in the context of psychiatric care. Further, minor modifications could make the FIAQ useful in exploring these concepts in other settings.

  4. Competency of Psychiatric Residents in the Treatment of People with Severe Mental Illness before and after a Community Psychiatry Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Melinda; Romero-Gonzalez, Mauricio; Gonzalez, Gerardo; Klee, Anne; Kirwin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric rehabilitation is an evidence-based service with the goal of recovery for people with severe mental illness. Psychiatric residents should understand the services and learn the principles of psychiatric rehabilitation. This study assessed whether a 3-month rotation in a psychiatric rehabilitation center changes the competency…

  5. Illnesses in siblings of US patients with bipolar disorder relate to multigenerational family history and patients severity of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert M; Altshuler, Lori L; Kupka, Ralph; McElroy, Susan L; Frye, Mark A; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Keck, Paul E; Nolen, Willem A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder from the US have more early-onset illness and a greater familial loading for psychiatric problems than those from the Netherlands or Germany (abbreviated here as Europe). We hypothesized that these regional differences in illness burden would extend to the patients siblings. Outpatients with bipolar disorder gave consent for participation in a treatment outcome network and for filling out detailed questionnaires. This included a family history of unipolar depression, bipolar disorder, suicide attempt, alcohol abuse/dependence, drug abuse/dependence, and "other" illness elicited for the patients' grandparents, parents, spouses, offspring, and siblings. Problems in the siblings were examined as a function of parental and grandparental problems and the patients' adverse illness characteristics or poor prognosis factors (PPFs). Each problem in the siblings was significantly (pUS than in those from Europe. In the US, problems in the parents and grandparents were almost uniformly associated with the same problems in the siblings, and sibling problems were related to the number of PPFs observed in the patients. Family history was based on patient report. Increased familial loading for psychiatric problems extends through 4 generations of patients with bipolar disorder from the US compared to Europe, and appears to "breed true" into the siblings of the patients. In addition to early onset, a variety of PPFs are associated with the burden of psychiatric problems in the patients' siblings and offspring. Greater attention to the multigenerational prevalence of illness in patients from the US is indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multidisciplinary View of Alcohol Use Disorder: From a Psychiatric Illness to a Major Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Gitto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorder is a significant health problem being a cause of increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. Alcohol-related illness has a relevant economic impact on the society and a negative influence on the life of patients and their family members. Psychosocial support might be useful in the management of people affected by alcohol use disorder since psychiatric and pharmaceutical approaches show some limits. In fact, many drugs are accessible for the treatment of alcohol disorder, but only Baclofen is functional as an anti-craving drug in patients with advanced liver disease. The alcohol-related liver damage represents the most frequent cause of advanced liver disease in Europe, and it is the main cause of death among adults with high alcohol consumption. The multidisciplinary action of clinical-psychologists, psychiatrics and hepatologists, is essential in the management of patients with alcohol liver disease especially in the case of liver transplantation. In general, the multidisciplinary approach is necessary in prevention, in framing patients and in the treatment. More resources should be used in prevention and research with the main aim of decreasing the harmful alcohol consumption.

  7. Multidisciplinary View of Alcohol Use Disorder: From a Psychiatric Illness to a Major Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Stefano; Golfieri, Lucia; Caputo, Fabio; Grandi, Silvana; Andreone, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use disorder is a significant health problem being a cause of increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. Alcohol-related illness has a relevant economic impact on the society and a negative influence on the life of patients and their family members. Psychosocial support might be useful in the management of people affected by alcohol use disorder since psychiatric and pharmaceutical approaches show some limits. In fact, many drugs are accessible for the treatment of alcohol disorder, but only Baclofen is functional as an anti-craving drug in patients with advanced liver disease. The alcohol-related liver damage represents the most frequent cause of advanced liver disease in Europe, and it is the main cause of death among adults with high alcohol consumption. The multidisciplinary action of clinical-psychologists, psychiatrics and hepatologists, is essential in the management of patients with alcohol liver disease especially in the case of liver transplantation. In general, the multidisciplinary approach is necessary in prevention, in framing patients and in the treatment. More resources should be used in prevention and research with the main aim of decreasing the harmful alcohol consumption. PMID:26784248

  8. A mixed methods exploration of family involvement in medical care for older adults with serious mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aschbrenner, K.A.; Pepin, R.; Mueser, K.T.; Naslund, J.A.; Rolin, S.A.; Faber, M.J.; Bartels, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many older persons with serious mental illness (SMI) suffer from high rates of comorbid medical conditions. Although families play a critical role in psychiatric illness management among adults with SMI, their contributions to improving health outcomes in this population has received

  9. Does 3H-imipramine binding asymmetry indicate psychiatric illness?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demeter, E.; Somogyi, E.; Tekes, K.; Majorossy, K.; Arato, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have accepted that serotonin is essentially an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human brain, so we propose that it is precisely this inhibiting effect that has weakened in psychiatric cases. We have investigated the asymmetry of tritiated imipramine binding sites (Bmax) in the frontal cortices of homicide victims (n = 6) and controls (n = 6) who died of natural causes. Of these homicide victimes examined in our experiment, five proved to have been psychiatric cases and one case had no psychiatric record. The two groups were comparable in age, gender and postmortem delay. The number of imipramine binding sites (Bmax) in the frontal cortices of controls was significantly higher in the right hemisphere than in the left hemisphere. But the homicide victims who were psychiatric cases had significantly higher (Bmax) values in the left hemisphere. While we only found higher Bmax values in the left hemisphere of homicide victims with mental diseases, our data may serve to prove the direct role of the serotonergic mechanism in the development of psychiatric cases. 15 refs. (author)

  10. How psychiatric patients perceive the public's stereotype of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidl, M; Lang, T; Scherer, M

    2003-05-01

    It is well established that the general public has devaluating attitudes towards psychiatric patients. In order to avoid rejection, many of these patients develop coping strategies, such as withdrawal and concealing their treatment history. These efforts are in themselves stressing, which might have negative consequences for the course of the disorder. It is not clear, however, how many and which patients do actually perceive the public's stereotype as threatening and, therefore, expect rejection. Ninety psychiatric patients and a sample of 1042 persons of the Austrian general population were asked whether they agreed with five devaluating statements about mental patients contained in a questionnaire developed by Link et al. Matched pairs comparisons and multiple logistic regression were employed in order to find out whether patients agreed with these statements to the same extent as the general population did. For the statements that most people believe that psychiatric patients are "less intelligent", "less trustworthy" and "taken less seriously", patients thought significantly less often than the general population that most people devalue mental patients. For two statements ("personal failure", "think less of") no difference was found. It seems that some psychiatric patients are less convinced than the general population that most people devalue psychiatric patients in specific respects; these patients might fear rejection less than other patients do. Those who actually fear rejection might need antistigma assistance more urgently than the first group.

  11. Components of Stigma Experience in Families of Patients with Severe Psychiatric Disorders: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    سمیرا کرملو

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the stigmatization of mental illness is a long-recognized issue, yet little is known about how the problem manifests differently across cultures. The aim of this study was to account for cultural differences in describing the experience of stigma in relatives of psychiatric patients at psychiatric ward. Qualitative data were obtained based on responses to 10 open-ended questions about stigma experience in 25 participants. The impact of stigma was rated by two encoders. The content analysis of data revealed few various categories describing caregivers’ perceptions of stigma. Main categories include: concealment, limitations, genetic attribution, and traditional beliefs in society about patient, godsend and acceptance, burden, importance of gender differences in stigma of illness. Patients with psychiatric disorders and their families suffer from stigma with an astoundingly broad range of negative attributes which may interfere with various aspects of their life. Concealment and limitations are common experience in families. Publicizing stigma experience could help modifying stigmatizing attitudes in society which may lead to healthier reactions from patients, and will enhance the course of illness.

  12. Psychiatric Illness in Mentally Retarded Adolescents: Clinical Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Gabriele

    1998-01-01

    Describes the clinical features of the most important psychiatric disorders in mentally retarded adolescents: mood disorders, psychotic disorders, severe behavioral disorders, personality disorders, anxiety disorders, and attention-deficit The impact of mental retardation on personality development is confirmed by the high psychopathological…

  13. Transplant in a patient with comorbid psychiatric illness: an ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyum, Eric N; Brown, Douglas; Zihni, Ahmed M; Keune, Jason D; Hong, Barry A; Kodner, Ira J; Ray, Shuddhadeb

    2014-11-01

    This article addresses a difficult ethical dilemma that transplant surgeons may potentially encounter: whether a patient with a psychiatric illness is a good candidate for a liver transplant. This case study illustrates the challenges involved when considering the ethical principles of patient self-determination, distributive justice of scarce medical resources, "social worth," and protection of vulnerable patient populations. Are patients with psychiatric illness able to provide consent for transplantation? Is it possible to avoid misallocating valuable donor organs and, at the same time, fairly allocate these resources? This article seeks to answer these questions and provide insight into this ethical dilemma.

  14. [How to cope with psychiatric illness in patients with epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemoto, Kousuke; Tadokoro, Yukari; Oshima, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    Almost every kind of psychiatric problems are associated with epilepsy such as psychotic states, manic as well as depressive states and anxiety attacks. Overall, the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in patients with epilepsy amounts to as high as 20-30% of all cases. Acute and chronic interictal psychoses, as well as postictal psychosis (or more precisely periictal psychosis), comprise 95% of psychosis in patients with epilepsy. Prevalence of depressive states in patients with yet active epilepsy ranges from 20-55%. Prevalence in patients with controlled epilepsy ranges from 3-9%. Depressive states comprise 50-80% of psychiatric co-morbidities in patients with epilepsy. Several studies reported that PNES amounted to as high as 30% among patients considered as candidates for epilepsy surgery due to intractable epilepsy. It is of clinical use that PNES is divided into 3 groups: The first group belongs to PNES without either intellectual disability nor epilepsy; The second group suffers from intellectual disability in addition to PNES; The third group shows both epileptic seizure and PNES. These groups need to be differently treated. After temporal lobectomy for controlling pharmacoresistant TLE, severe but transient depression possibly leading to suicide can appear, especially within the first few months after surgery.

  15. Insight into mental illness and child maltreatment risk among mothers with major psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullick, M; Miller, L J; Jacobsen, T

    2001-04-01

    This study examined the relationship between insight into mental illness and current child maltreatment risk among mothers who had a major psychiatric disorder and who had lost custody of a child because of abuse, neglect, or having placed the child at risk of harm. Specifically, a measure of insight was examined in relation to systematically observed parenting behaviors known to be correlated with past child maltreatment and in relation to a comprehensive clinical determination of risk. Forty-four mothers who had a major psychiatric disorder were independently rated for their insight into their illness, the quality of mother-child interaction, and the overall clinical risk of maltreatment. Better insight into mental illness was associated with more sensitive mothering behavior and with lower assessed clinical risk of maltreatment. The association remained when mothers with current psychotic symptoms were excluded from the analyses. Better insight did not appear to be associated with past psychotic symptoms, maternal psychiatric diagnosis, or the mother's level of education. Insight into mental illness may function as a protective factor that influences the risk of child maltreatment in mothers with mental illness. Measures of insight could be usefully incorporated into comprehensive parenting assessments for mothers with psychiatric disorders.

  16. Cardiovascular disease among severe mental illness and psychiatric medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sileshi Demelash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available People with mental illness are more likely to have serious coexisting physical health problems than the general population. Although lifestyle and genetics may contribute independent risks of cardiovascular dysfunction in schizophrenia and other serious mental illness, antipsychotic treatment also represents an important contributor to risk of cardiovascular disorder, particularly for certain drugs and for vulnerable patients. Mental health professionals and other health care provider must give emphasis to recognize the clinical signposts indicating mental health related cardiovascular problems to forestall progression to type II diabetes, cardiovascular events and premature death.

  17. Psychiatric worker and family members: pathways towards co-operation networks within psychiatric assistance services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Carbone

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The family’s role in patient care was greatly altered by Law 180. This law, introduced in Italy in 1978, led to a gradual phasing out of custodial treatment for psychiatric patients. This different mindset, which views the family as an alternative to institutionalization, leads to it being seen as an essential entity in the setting up of community service dynamics. We interviewed health professionals in order to understand obstacles of collaboration between family members and mental health care workers. The goal was to uncover actions that promote collaboration and help build alliances between families and psychiatric workers. Results showed that health professionals view the family as a therapeutic resource. Despite this view, family members were rarely included in patient treatment. The reasons is: the structures have a theoretical orientation of collaboration with the family but, for nurses not are organized a few meeting spaces with family members. Services should create moments, such as multi-family groups or groups of information, managed by nurses and not only by doctors. These occasions it might facilitate the knowledge between professionals and family members.

  18. Lodge Programs Serving Family Functions for People with Psychiatric Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaga, Esther E.; McKinney, Kathleen G.; Pfaff, Judy

    2000-01-01

    Interviews were conducted with people affiliated with lodges, a community program for people with psychiatric disabilities, about their perceptions of promising practices. Responses validated the notion that the lodge serves many of the functions of a family. Provides excerpts from interviews to supplement this theme. Discusses implications for…

  19. Coping Strategies of Family Members of Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis M. Eaton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory research paper investigated the coping strategies of families of hospitalized psychiatric patients and identified their positive and negative coping strategies. In this paper, the coping strategies of 45 family members were examined using a descriptive, correlational, mixed method research approach. Guided by the Neuman Systems Model and using the Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales and semistructured interviews, this paper found that these family members used more emotion-focused coping strategies than problem-focused coping strategies. The common coping strategies used by family members were communicating with immediate family, acceptance of their situation, passive appraisal, avoidance, and spirituality. The family members also utilized resources and support systems, such as their immediate families, mental health care professionals, and their churches.

  20. Internalized Stigma and Perceived Family Support in Acute Psychiatric In-Patient Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Gülçin; Küçük, Leyla

    2016-02-01

    This descriptive study aims to identify the relationship between internalized stigma and perceived family support in patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric unit. The sample is composed of 224 patients treated in an acute inpatient psychiatric ward in İstanbul, Turkey. The data were collected using information obtained from the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale and Social Support from Family Scale. The mean age of the patients was 37±11.56years, and the mean duration of treatment was 6.27±5.81years. Most patients had been hospitalized three or more times. Of the total number of patients, 66.1% had been taken to the hospital by family members. We noted a statistically significant negative correlation between the total scores obtained from the perceived Social Support from Family Scale and the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale. The patients were observed to stigmatize themselves more when the perceived social support from their family had decreased. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of newer technologies with existing service for family reintegration of unknown psychiatric patients: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Guru S; Telang, Ashay; Sharath, Chandra Reddy; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Haripriya, Chintala; Ramu, Praveen Shivalli; Math, Suresh Bada

    2017-10-29

    Homeless Mentally Ill (HMI) patients pose a challenge in treatment, management and rehabilitation services. HMI patients are often difficult to engage in treatment, and associated with relapse and rehospitalization, even after recovery. Family plays an important role in treatment engagement and care of the mentally ill person in India. Here, we report two unknown psychiatric patients who were reintegrated to their families using newer technologies with existing service. Newer technologies have helped in early identification of HMI families and reintegration into them. The early reintegration reduced the unnecessary detention of HMI patients inside the hospital after recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Postpartum psychiatric illness in Arab culture: prevalence and psychosocial correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghubash, R; Abou-Saleh, M T

    1997-07-01

    There have been numerous studies of the prevalence of postpartum depression and its putative risk factors in Western Europe and North America, but very few studies in developing countries including the Arab world. Ninety-five women admitted to the New Dubai Hospital in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, for childbirth were studied. All subjects were assessed in the postpartum period using clinical and socio-cultural instruments: the Self Report Questionnaire (SRQ) at day 2, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at day 7, and the Present State Examination (PSE) at week 8 +/- 2 and week 30 +/- 2 after delivery. The prevalence rate of psychiatric morbidity was 24.5% by the SRQ, 17.8% by the EPDS, and 15.8% by the PSE. A number of psychosocial factors emerged as putative risk factors for postpartum depression. The prevalence rates of postpartum psychiatric morbidity and its risk factors in this Arab culture are similar to the results obtained in numerous previous studies in industrialised countries. These findings have implications for the early detection and care of women at risk for postpartum depression.

  3. Work and Psychiatric Illness in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Implications for Career Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Annie; Miller, Judi

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the influence of Maori culture upon psychiatric service provision in Aotearoa/New Zealand and the implications of this for career counselling of people with experience of mental illness in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The research explored the experiences of a group of women in Aotearoa/New Zealand who have been diagnosed with…

  4. Parenting and psychiatric rehabilitation : Can parents with severe mental illness benefit from a new approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T. van Busschbach; Dr. Lies Korevaar; J. van Weeghel; Dr. Peter van der Ende; Joanne Nicholson

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Objective: The aim of this pilot implementation study was to explore the initial experiences with and impact of Parenting with Success and Satisfaction (PARSS), a psychiatric rehabilitation and recoverybased, guided self-help intervention, for parents with severe mental illnesses. Methods:

  5. Parenting and psychiatric rehabilitation: Can parents with severe mental illness benefit from a new approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaap van Weeghel; Dr. Peter C. van der Ende; Dr. Lies Korevaar; Jooske T. van Busschbach; Joanne Nicholson

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Objective: The aim of this pilot implementation study was to explore the initial experiences with and impact of Parenting with Success and Satisfaction (PARSS), a psychiatric rehabilitation and recovery-based, guided self-help intervention, for parents with severe mental illnesses.

  6. Parenting and Psychiatric Rehabilitation : Can Parents With Severe Mental Illness Benefit From a New Approach?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ende, Peter C.; van Busschbach, Jooske T.; Nicholson, Joanne; Korevaar, Eliza L.; van Weeghel, Jaap

    Objective: The aim of this pilot implementation study was to explore the initial experiences with and impact of Parenting with Success and Satisfaction (PARSS), a psychiatric rehabilitation and recovery-based, guided self-help intervention, for parents with severe mental illnesses. Methods: Changes

  7. Motivation for Psychiatric Treatment in Outpatients with Severe Mental Illness : Different Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Jochems (Eline)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe main aim of the current thesis was to empirically test and compare three current theoretical models of motivation for treatment in the context of outpatient psychiatric care for patients with severe mental illness (SMI). In a literature review (Chapter 2), we argued that

  8. The neuropsychology of self-reflection in psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippi, Carissa L; Koenigs, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The development of robust neuropsychological measures of social and affective function-which link critical dimensions of mental health to their underlying neural circuitry-could be a key step in achieving a more pathophysiologically-based approach to psychiatric medicine. In this article, we summarize research indicating that self-reflection (the inward attention to personal thoughts, memories, feelings, and actions) may be a useful model for developing such a paradigm, as there is evidence that self-reflection is (1) measurable with self-report scales and performance-based tests, (2) linked to the activity of a specific neural circuit, and (3) dimensionally related to mental health and various forms of psychopathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Broken homes, parental psychiatric illness, and female delinquency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offord, David R; Abrams, Nola; Allen, Nancy; Poushinsky, Mary

    1979-04-01

    Fifty-nine families with delinquent daughters were compared with 59 families, matched on socioeconomic class, with daughters of the same age who were not delinquent. The frequency of broken homes was found to be the strongest distinguishing factor between probands and controls. Parental disabilities appeared to play a part in the incidence of delinquency among girls, particularly when the disabilities result in a broken home.

  10. Ethnicity, self reported psychiatric illness, and intake of psychotropic drugs in five ethnic groups in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard-Burfield, L; Sundquist, J; Johansson, S E

    2001-09-01

    This study hypothesises that the presumed increased risk of self reported longstanding psychiatric illness and intake of psychotropic drugs among Iranian, Chilean, Turkish, and Kurdish adults, when these groups are compared with Polish adults, can be explained by living alone, poor acculturation, unemployment, and low sense of coherence. Data from a national sample of immigrants/refugees, who were between the ages of 20-44 years old, upon their arrival in Sweden between 1980 and 1989. Unconditional logistic regression was used in the statistical modelling. Sweden. 1059 female and 921 male migrants from Iran, Chile, Turkey, Kurdistan and Poland and a random sample of 3001 Swedes, all between the ages of 27-60 years, were interviewed in 1996 by Statistics Sweden. Compared with Swedes, all immigrants had an increased risk of self reported longstanding psychiatric illness and for intake of psychotropic drugs, with results for the Kurds being non-significant. Compared with Poles, Iranian and Chilean migrants had an increased risk of psychiatric illness, when seen in relation to a model in which adjustment was made for sex and age. The difference became non-significant for Chileans when marital status was taken into account. After including civil status and knowledge of the Swedish language, the increased risks for intake of psychotropic drugs for Chileans and Iranians disappeared. Living alone, poor knowledge of the Swedish language, non-employment, and low sense of coherence were strong risk factors for self reported longstanding psychiatric illness and for intake of psychotropic drugs. Iranian, Chilean, Turkish and Kurdish immigrants more frequently reported living in segregated neighbourhoods and having a greater desire to leave Sweden than their Polish counterparts. Evidence substantiates a strong association between ethnicity and self reported longstanding psychiatric illness, as well as intake of psychotropic drugs. This association is weakened by marital status

  11. Persons with major psychiatric illness in prisons--a three years study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arnab; Sengupta, Prativa; Ray, Tapas Kumar

    2009-01-01

    A research project entitled 'operation oasis' was implemented in West Bengal prisons by SEVAC, supported by the National Human Rights Commission of India for identification of the persons suffering from major psychiatric illnesses (ie, schizophrenia, psychosis not otherwise specified, mood disorder not otherwise specified) in prisons, making arrangements for their psychiatric treatment and rehabilitation and assessing the changes in them after intervention. Dum Dum Central Jail, Presidency Jail (female section), and Berhampore Central Jail were selected as the project fields. The prison inmates were screened through clinical examination and mental state examination. Among them who were found suffering from mental illness were brought under psychiatric and psychological treatment, rehabilitation and restoration. Their sociodemographical data were also collected on the basis of a structured information schedule developed by the SEVAC team. The patients were followed-up for three consecutive years (2001 to 2004). The global assessment of functioning scores of the patients recorded at the time of initiation and completion of project were compared. During the project implementation period, 3871 prison inmates (male 3527 + female 344) were screened and 10% (n = 401) were identified as suffering from major psychiatric illnesses, of which 64% (n = 258) were housed in the prisons for minor offences/stray cases and 90% (n = 363) were undertrials. The findings concluded with a global assessment of functioning score improvement with a statistical significance of p treatment and rehabilitation.

  12. Factors associated with family violence by persons with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrum, Travis; Solomon, Phyllis L

    2016-10-30

    Family violence by persons with psychiatric disorders (PD) is a highly under-researched area. The primary objective of the present analysis was to identify perpetrator, victim, and interaction/relationship factors associated with this phenomenon. The secondary objective was to examine the extent to which the relationship between caregiving and family violence was mediated by limit-setting practices used towards relatives with PD. 573 adults across the U.S. with an adult relative with PD completed an online survey. Multivariate logistic regression was performed examining the association of factors with the occurrence of family violence. Mediation was assessed with Sobel testing. Family violence was significantly associated with the following factors: perpetrator-income, illegal drug use, psychiatric hospitalization, treatment attendance, and use of medications; victim-age, employment status, income, and mental health status; interaction/relationship-parental relationship, co-residence, use of limit-setting practices, representative payeeship, and unofficial money management. Mediation was statistically significant. Increasing access to mental health and/or substance abuse treatment may decrease the risk of family violence. Interventions may benefit from attempting to decrease/modify the use of limit-setting practices. Where family representative payeeship or unofficial money management exists, it is advisable for practitioners to assess and address financial coercion and promote greater collaboration in financial decision-making. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. The challenge of unravelling family resemblance related to illness behaviour.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardol, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Dijk, L. van; Bosch, W. van den; Bakker, D.H. de

    2005-01-01

    Background: Efforts to promote health or prevent disease may conflict with patients’ habits at home. Irrespective of the national setting, families are important social contexts in which illness occurs and resolves. Family members resemble each other in their illness behaviour, even across

  14. Early life stress interactions with the epigenome: potential mechanisms driving vulnerability towards psychiatric illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Michael Foster

    2014-01-01

    Throughout the 20th century a body of literature concerning the long lasting effects of early environment was produced. Adverse experiences in early life, or early life stress (ELS), is associated with a higher risk for developing various psychiatric illnesses. The mechanisms driving the complex interplay between ELS and adult phenotype has baffled many investigators for decades. Over the last decade, the new field of neuroepigenetics has emerged as one possible mechanism by which ELS can have far reaching effects on adult phenotype, behavior, and risk for psychiatric illness. Here we review two commonly investigated epigenetic mechanisms, histone modifications and DNA methylation, and the emerging field of neuroepigenetics as they relate to ELS. We discuss the current animal literature demonstrating ELS induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression that results in altered adult phenotypes. We also briefly discuss other areas in which neuroepigenetics has emerged as a potential mechanism underlying environmental and genetic interactions. PMID:25003947

  15. Early-life stress interactions with the epigenome: potential mechanisms driving vulnerability toward psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Candace R; Olive, M Foster

    2014-09-01

    Throughout the 20th century a body of literature concerning the long-lasting effects of the early environment was produced. Adverse experiences in early life, or early-life stress (ELS), is associated with a higher risk of developing various psychiatric illnesses. The mechanisms driving the complex interplay between ELS and adult phenotype has baffled many investigators for decades. Over the last decade, the new field of neuroepigenetics has emerged as one possible mechanism by which ELS can have far-reaching effects on adult phenotype, behavior, and risk for psychiatric illness. Here we review two commonly investigated epigenetic mechanisms, histone modifications and DNA methylation, and the emerging field of neuroepigenetics as they relate to ELS. We discuss the current animal literature demonstrating ELS-induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression that results in altered adult phenotypes. We also briefly discuss other areas in which neuroepigenetics has emerged as a potential mechanism underlying environmental and genetic interactions.

  16. Ethnopsychiatric interpretations of schizophrenic illness: the problem of nervios within Mexican-American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, J H

    1988-09-01

    Among Mexican-American families, the concept of nervios (nerves) serves as a culturally meaningful illness category for a wide range of conditions, including schizophrenic disorders diagnosed according to psychiatric criteria. This article examines the nature and the meaning of nervios as a notion used by Mexican-American families to understand the schizophrenic illness of a relative. Family descriptions of the condition are presented and the emotional and symbolic meanings of the concept are discussed. The complex and somewhat ambiguous nature of folk conceptions is evidenced not only by variations in the description of nervios but also by the finding that nervios is but one way to view schizophrenic illness. It is suggested that a cultural preference for the term nervios is linked to the efforts of family members to reduce the stigma associated with a mental illness while also reinforcing the strength of family bonds and solidarity by fostering tolerant inclusion of the family member within the home. It is argued that the concept of nervios, and the family emotions that surround this folk label, may mediate the course and outcome of schizophrenic disorder.

  17. Indian Psychiatric Society multicentric study on assessment of health-care needs of patients with severe mental illnesses as perceived by their family caregivers and health-care providers

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Sandeep; Avasthi, Ajit; Shah, Sandip; Lakdawala, Bhavesh; Chakraborty, Kaustav; Nebhinani, Naresh; Kallivayalil, Roy A; Dalal, Pranob K.; Sinha, Vishal; Khairkar, Praveen; Mukerjee, Divya G.; Thara, R.; Behere, Prakash; Chauhan, Nidhi; Thirunavukarasu, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the health-care needs of the patients with severe mental disorders as perceived by their family caregivers and the treating psychiatrists. Materials and Methods: Caregivers of patients with severe mental disorders and their treating psychiatrists were assessed using Camberwell Assessment of Need-Research Version (CAN-R) scale and indigenously designed Supplementary Assessment of Needs Scale (SNAS). Results: The study included 1494 patients recruited from 15 centers. The mean nee...

  18. Si dios quiere: Hispanic families' experiences of caring for a seriously mentally ill family member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnaccia, P J; Parra, P; Deschamps, A; Milstein, G; Argiles, N

    1992-06-01

    Among Hispanics, the family is viewed as the primary care giver for seriously mentally ill family members. This paper reports on a study of minority families' conceptions of serious mental illness, of their interaction with mental health resources, and on the burdens experienced by families in caring for a seriously mentally ill family member. The focus of this paper is on Hispanic families in New Jersey, with some comparative data from other ethnic group families. Families' conceptions of serious mental illness are explored and analyzed to demonstrate the importance of concepts of nervios and fallo mental in shaping families' responses to their ill family member. Social support systems for families are also explored with particular attention to the role of religious institutions and religious healing as a major source of solace.

  19. Perceived Stress in Family Caregivers of Individuals With Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masa'Deh, Rami

    2017-06-01

    The current study aimed to measure the stress levels of family caregivers of individuals with mental illness and compare their stress levels according to the diagnosis and other sociodemographic characteristics. The sample comprised 310 family caregivers of individuals with mental illness in Jordan. Family caregivers completed a demographic checklist and the Arabic version of the Perceived Stress Scale 10-Item (PSS-10) questionnaire. A significant difference was found in PSS-10 levels among family caregivers according to gender, diagnosis of their family member, and time since diagnosis. Female caregivers reported significantly higher stress levels than male caregivers. Family members of individuals with schizophrenia reported the highest stress levels (p family caregivers and time since diagnosis. Investigating stress levels in family members of individuals with mental illness may be helpful when designing interventions to reduce such stress. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(6), 30-35.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. The Organization of the Psychiatric Service and Criminality Committed by the Mentally Ill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramp, Peter; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Over the past 40 years, a marked deinstitutionalisation in favour of social and community psychiatry has taken place in many countries. During this same period of time, there has been an increase in the number of mentally ill criminals. The purpose of this study is to analyse...... the correlations between the reorganization of the psychiatric treatment system, the growing number of forensic patients and the increase in serious crime, homicide, arson and violence associated with the mentally ill. Materials and methods: Using registers and other data sources, we estimated the annual positive......: The study is based on historical data, but the results are still valid. We have used two sets of data firstly the number of forensic patients and, secondly the reported number of crimes associated with the mentally ill. The uniformity of the results leads us to consider them for certain: That the decreasing...

  1. Children in families with a severely mentally ill member. Prevalence and needs for support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Margareta; Hansson, Lars

    2002-05-01

    The prevalence of minor children in families with a severely mentally ill member, these children's needs for support and the situation of the spouses were investigated as part of a multi-centre study of the quality of the mental health services in Sweden performed in 1986, 1991 and 1997. The sample was drawn from relatives of compulsorily and voluntarily admitted inpatients to acute psychiatric wards. The instrument used was a semi-structured questionnaire, interviewing relatives about the burden of relatives, their needs for support and participation in care and items concerning the situation of the under-aged children in these families. The results over the years investigated showed the same proportion of patients admitted to hospital who were also parents to minor children and a decreasing proportion of patients who had the custody of their children. Female patients were more often a parent and also more often had the custody of the children. The majority of the children had needs for support caused by their parent's illness and these needs were met in half of the cases. The healthy spouses in families with minor children more often had to give up their own occupation and to a higher extent experienced own needs for care and support from psychiatric services compared to spouses without minor children. The study supports that there is an urgent need for the psychiatric services to initiate parental issues in programmes for treatment and rehabilitation to ensure that the specific needs of minor children are met.

  2. Enabling healthy living: Experiences of people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Marjut; Sandgren, Anna; Carlsson, Ing-Marie; Jormfeldt, Henrika

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that people with severe mental illness have a reduced life expectancy and a greater risk of being affected by preventable physical illnesses such as metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. There are still, however, only a few published studies focusing on what enables healthy living for this group. This study thus aimed to describe what enables healthy living among people with severe mental illness in psychiatric outpatient services. The data were collected in qualitative interviews (n = 16) and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The interviews resulted in an overall theme "Being regarded as a whole human being by self and others", which showed the multidimensional nature of health and the issues that enable healthy living among people with severe mental illness. Three categories emerged: (i) everyday structure (ii), motivating life events and (iii) support from significant others. The results indicate that a person with severe mental illness needs to be encountered as a whole person if healthy living is to be enabled. Attaining healthy living requires collaboration between the providers of care, help and support. Health care organizations need to work together to develop and provide interventions to enable healthy living and to reduce poor physical health among people with severe mental illness. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Attitudes of Brazilian Medical Students Towards Psychiatric Patients and Mental Illness: A Quantitative Study Before and After Completing the Psychiatric Clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha Neto, Helio Gomes; Rosenheck, Robert A; Stefanovics, Elina A; Cavalcanti, Maria Tavares

    2017-06-01

    The authors evaluated whether a psychiatric clerkship reduces stigmatized attitudes towards people with mental illness among medical students. A 56-item questionnaire was used to assess the attitudes of medical students towards patients with mental illness and their beliefs about its causes before and after their participation in their psychiatric clerkship at a major medical school in Rio de Janeiro. Exploratory factor analysis identified four factors, reflecting "social acceptance of people with mental illness," "normalizing roles for people with mental illness in society," "non-belief in supernatural causes for mental illness," and "belief in bio-psychosocial causes for mental illness." Analysis of variance was used to evaluate changes in these factors before and after the clerkship. One significant difference was identified with a higher score on the factor representing social acceptance after as compared to before the clerkship (p = 0.0074). No significant differences were observed on the other factors. Participation in a psychiatric clerkship was associated with greater social acceptance but not with improvement on other attitudinal factors. This may reflect ceiling effects in responses before the clerkship concerning supernatural and bio-psychosocial beliefs about causes of mental illness that left little room for change.

  4. Validation of the Mental Illness Sexual Stigma Questionnaire (MISS-Q in a sample of Brazilian adults in psychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Wainberg

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective We evaluated the psychometric properties of a new instrument “Mental Illness Sexual Stigma Questionnaire” (MISS-Q. Methods We interviewed 641 sexually active adults (ages 18-80 attending public outpatient psychiatric clinics in Rio de Janeiro about their stigma experiences. Results Nine factors were extracted through exploratory factor analysis (EFA and labeled: ‘individual discrimination by others’; ‘staff willingness to talk about sexuality’; ‘staff and family prohibitions’; ‘sexual devaluation of self’; ‘perceived attractiveness’; ‘mental illness concealment’; ‘perceived sexual role competence’; ‘withdrawal’; and ‘locus of social-sexual control’. ‘Withdrawal’ and ‘locus of social-sexual control’ showed poor psychometric properties and were excluded from further analysis. The remaining seven factors had high factorial loadings (.39 to .86, varying from sufficient to optimal reliability (Ordinal α ranged from .57 to .88, and good convergent and discriminant validity. Conclusions The resulting MISS-Q is the first instrument assessing mental illness sexual stigma with demonstrated psychometric properties. It may prove useful in reducing stigma, protecting sexual health, and promoting recovery.

  5. Stress in adolescents with a chronically ill parent: inspiration from Rolland's Family Systems-Illness model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieh, D.S.; Dikkers, A.L.C.; Visser-Meily, J.M.A.; Meijer, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    This article was inspired by Rolland’s Family Systems-Illness (FSI) model, aiming to predict adolescent stress as a function of parental illness type. Ninety-nine parents with a chronic medical condition, 82 partners, and 158 adolescent children (51 % girls; mean age = 15.1 years) participated in

  6. Strengths of families to limit relapse in mentally ill family members

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tlhalefi T. Tlhowe

    The purpose of this research was to explore and describe the strengths of .... In this review family strengths refer to qualities of families with a mentally ill .... they thought that their mentally ill family members were just acting out when ..... techniques, creative communication and praise as strengths. .... International Journal of.

  7. Investigating the relationship between neighborhood experiences and psychiatric distress for individuals with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloos, Bret; Townley, Greg

    2011-03-01

    The present study examined the relationships between how research participants experienced their neighborhood, their neighborhood social climate, and psychological well-being. Participants (n = 525) were residents of supported housing programs who used mental health services at one of 17 community mental health centers in South Carolina. Hierarchical regression and mediation analyses were employed to answer research questions. Results suggest that neighbor relations, perceptions of neighborhood safety, and neighborhood satisfaction were significantly associated with perceptions of neighborhood social climate; and neighborhood social climate accounted for a significant amount of the variance in psychiatric distress. Of particular interest, perceptions of neighborhood social climate fully mediated the relationship between the specific reported neighborhood experiences and psychiatric distress. These findings have implications for interventions and policy aimed at promoting integration of individuals with serious mental illness into community settings.

  8. The effect of psychiatric illness and labour market status on suicide; at healthy worker effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben

    2005-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To describe the association between labour market status and death by suicide with focus on admission with a psychiatric disorder. DESIGN: Nested case-control study. Data from routine registers. SETTING: Entire Danish population. PARTICIPANTS: 9011 people aged 25-60 years who com....... The associations seen suggest the need to consider healthy worker selection effects when studying the causal pathway from unemployment and psychiatric illness to suicide........08), and 0.86 (0.53 to 1.41), respectively. Although a similar risk decrease is found in women, men, people younger than 30 years, people older than 45 years, and in people who become unemployed, the reversed effect attenuates with time since admission, and little association is seen when a marginal...

  9. Differences between youth with a single suicide attempt and repeaters regarding their and their parents history of psychiatric illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ida Skytte; Christiansen, Erik; Juul Larsen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    , psychiatric diagnoses, and psychopharmacological medications prescribed to youth before and after the index attempt were risk factors for repeated suicide attempts. Parental diagnoses and drug prescriptions following a child's first suicide attempt moderated the risk of repeated attempts. Psychiatric illness......The objective of this study was to determine predictors of repeated suicide attempts in young people, focusing on psychiatric illness. A longitudinal population-based register study of all adolescents born in Denmark between 1984 and 2006 was conducted. Greater numbers of hospitalizations...... is a strong predictor of repeated suicide attempts in young people, and those with co-morbid diagnoses are at increased risk of repeated suicide attempts. Treatment of psychiatric illness in the parents after their child's first suicide attempt is a potential protective factor....

  10. Age onset of offending and serious mental illness among forensic psychiatric patients: A latent profile analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Stephanie R; Prosser, Aaron; Simpson, Alexander I F

    2018-01-16

    Developmental typologies regarding age of onset of violence and offending have not routinely taken account of the role of serious mental illness (SMI), and whether age of onset of offending in relation to onset of illness impacts on the manifestation of offending over the life course. To test whether forensic psychiatric patients can be classified according to age of onset of SMI and offending, and, if so, whether subtypes differ by sex. Details of all 511 patients enrolled into a large forensic mental health service in Ontario, Canada, in 2011 or 2012 were collected from records. A latent profile analysis supported a 2-class solution in both men and women. External validation of the classes demonstrated that those with a younger age onset of serious mental illness and offending were characterised by higher levels of static risk factors and criminogenic need than those whose involvement in both mental health and criminal justice systems was delayed to later life. Our findings present a new perspective on life course trajectories of offenders with SMI. While analyses identified just two distinct age-of-onset groups, in both the illness preceded the offending. The fact that our sample was entirely drawn from those hospitalised may have introduced a selection bias for those whose illness precedes offending, but findings underscore the complexity and level of need among those with a younger age of onset. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A reforma psiquiátrica no Brasil: contextualização e reflexos sobre o cuidado com o doente mental na família La reforma psiquiátrica en Brasil: contexto y reflejos sobre el cuidado con el enfermo mental en la familia Psychiatric reform in Brazil: contextualization and consequences regarding the care for the mentally ill in their family environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alda Martins Gonçalves

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho analisa as conseqüências da reforma psiquiátrica brasileira sobre o cuidado do doente mental na família. Trata-se de um estudo descritivo-exploratório de abordagem qualitativa, cuja fundamentação teórico-metodológica foi orientada pelo materialismo histórico-dialético. Os sujeitos da pesquisa foram onze mulheres que cuidam de doente mental em família. A análise de seus discursos revelou singularidades do cuidar de um doente mental na família e as dificuldades decorrentes deste processo acentuadas pela desinstitucionalização do doente mental. Concluiu-se que a mulher, cuidadora do doente mental, cumpre um papel social importante e indispensável na consolidação da reforma psiquiátrica no país.El presente trabajo analiza las consecuencias de la reforma psiquátrica basileña sobre el cuidado del enfermo mental en la familia. Se trata de un estudio descriptivo-exploratorio de abordaje cualitativo, cuya fundamentación teórico-metodológica fue orientada por el materialismo histórico-dialéctico. Los sujetos de la investigación fueron once mujeres cuidadoras de enfermos mentales. El análisis de sus discursos reveló las singularidades del cuidar de un enfermo mental. Se concluye que la mujer cuidadora del enfermo mental cumple un papel social importante e indispensable en la consolidación de la reforma psiquiátrica en el país.This work analyzes the consequences of the Brazilian psychiatric reform to the care provided to the mentally ill in their family environment. It is a descriptive and exploratory study based on a qualitative approach, using the historical-dialectic materialism as its theoretical and methodological framework. The subjects of the research were 11 women that provided care to mentally ill persons. The analysis of their discourses revealed unique aspects related to caring for the mentally ill in their family environment and the difficulties resulting from the process of

  12. The dappled nature of causes of psychiatric illness: replacing the organic-functional/hardware-software dichotomy with empirically based pluralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S

    2012-04-01

    Our tendency to see the world of psychiatric illness in dichotomous and opposing terms has three major sources: the philosophy of Descartes, the state of neuropathology in late nineteenth century Europe (when disorders were divided into those with and without demonstrable pathology and labeled, respectively, organic and functional), and the influential concept of computer functionalism wherein the computer is viewed as a model for the human mind-brain system (brain=hardware, mind=software). These mutually re-enforcing dichotomies, which have had a pernicious influence on our field, make a clear prediction about how 'difference-makers' (aka causal risk factors) for psychiatric disorders should be distributed in nature. In particular, are psychiatric disorders like our laptops, which when they dysfunction, can be cleanly divided into those with software versus hardware problems? I propose 11 categories of difference-makers for psychiatric illness from molecular genetics through culture and review their distribution in schizophrenia, major depression and alcohol dependence. In no case do these distributions resemble that predicted by the organic-functional/hardware-software dichotomy. Instead, the causes of psychiatric illness are dappled, distributed widely across multiple categories. We should abandon Cartesian and computer-functionalism-based dichotomies as scientifically inadequate and an impediment to our ability to integrate the diverse information about psychiatric illness our research has produced. Empirically based pluralism provides a rigorous but dappled view of the etiology of psychiatric illness. Critically, it is based not on how we wish the world to be but how the difference-makers for psychiatric illness are in fact distributed.

  13. Newly identified psychiatric illness in one general practice: 12-month outcome and the influence of patients' personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A F; Anderson, A J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Relatively little is known about the natural history and outcome of psychological problems in patients who present to general practitioners. Only a small proportion of such patients are seen by specialists. Clinical experience suggests that patient personality is one of the factors influencing outcome in patients diagnosed as having psychiatric illness. AIM. This study set out to examine prospectively the progress and 12-month outcome of patients with newly identified psychiatric illness, and the association of patients' personality with outcome. METHOD. One hundred and seventy one patients with clinically significant psychiatric illness attending one practice in a Scottish new town were followed up prospectively (96 presented with psychological symptoms and 75 with somatic symptoms), and were compared with a group of 127 patients with chronic physical illness. Patients were assessed in terms of psychiatric state, social problems and personality using both computer-based and pencil and paper tests in addition to clinical assessments at each consultation during the follow-up year and structured interview one year after recruitment. RESULTS. Most of the improvement in psychiatric state scores on the 28-item general health questionnaire occurred in the first six months of the illness. Of the 171 patients with psychiatric illness 34% improved quickly and remained well, 54% had an intermittent course but had improved at 12-month follow up while 12% pursued a chronic course without improvement. The mean number of consultations in the follow-up year was 8.4 for patients presenting with psychological symptoms, 7.2 for those presenting with somatic symptoms and 6.6 for patients with chronic physical illness. The Eysenck N score proved a strong predictor of the outcome of new psychiatric illness. CONCLUSION. Only one in three patients with newly identified psychiatric illness improved quickly and and remained well, reflecting the importance of continuing care of

  14. Age of onset of bipolar disorder: Combined effect of childhood adversity and familial loading of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert M; Altshuler, Lori L; Kupka, Ralph; McElroy, Susan L; Frye, Mark A; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Keck, Paul E; Leverich, Gabriele S; Nolen, Willem A

    2016-10-01

    Family history and adversity in childhood are two replicated risk factors for early onset bipolar disorder. However, their combined impact has not been adequately studied. Based on questionnaire data from 968 outpatients with bipolar disorder who gave informed consent, the relationship and interaction of: 1) parental and grandparental total burden of psychiatric illness; and 2) the degree of adversity the patient experienced in childhood on their age of onset of bipolar disorder was examined with multiple regression and illustrated with a heat map. The familial loading and child adversity vulnerability factors were significantly related to age of onset of bipolar and their combined effect was even larger. A heat map showed that at the extremes (none of each factor vs high amounts of both) the average age of onset differed by almost 20 years (mean = 25.8 vs 5.9 years of age). The data were not based on interviews of family members and came from unverified answers on a patient questionnaire. Family loading for psychiatric illness and adversity in childhood combine to have a very large influence on age of onset of bipolar disorder. These variables should be considered in assessment of risk for illness onset in different populations, the need for early intervention, and in the design of studies of primary and secondary prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mental Illness in the Family. Families Today: A Research Sampler on Families and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfman, Eunice, Ed.

    Science Monographs, published by the National Institute of Mental Health, are book-length, integrative state-of-the-art reviews, critical evaluations of findings, or program assessments of current research on topics related to the NIMH mandate. This set of articles concentrate on mental illness in the family. "Depression and Low-Income,…

  16. Families of Children with Chronic Illness and the Relational Family Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Pate

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Families of children with chronic illness experience persistent stress. Facing the diagnosis and learning how to cope with it is a stressful experience not only for the child but also for the parents and for the whole family. The illness, with its unpredictability and treatment, disturbs their daily routine and threatens the whole family system. Parental involvement in the child’s disease management and their emotional support are crucial for effective coping and adaptation to the child’s chronic illness. The aim of this article is to present the importance of the parental role in these families through theoretical findings of the relational family model.

  17. Mental illness and parenthood: being a parent in secure psychiatric care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parrott, F.R.; Macinnes, D.I.; Parrott, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research into parenting and mental illness seldom includes forensic mental health service users, despite its relevance to therapeutic, family work and risk management. Aims: This study aimed to understand the experiences of parents and the variety of parenting roles maintained during

  18. Role of maternal childhood trauma on parenting among depressed mothers of psychiatrically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Maureen; Cyranowski, Jill M; Cheng, Yu; Swartz, Holly A

    2013-09-01

    Independently, maternal depression and maternal history of childhood abuse confer risk for impaired parenting. These associations may be compounded when depressed mothers with histories of childhood abuse are faced with the challenge of parenting offspring who themselves struggle with mental health problems. This study examined the relationships among maternal history of childhood abuse, maternal depression, and parenting style in the context of parenting a psychiatrically ill child, with an emphasis on examining maternal emotional abuse and neglect. We hypothesized that maternal childhood emotional abuse would be associated with maladaptive parenting strategies (lower levels of maternal acceptance and higher levels of psychological control), independent of maternal depression severity and other psychosocial risk factors. Ninety-five mother-child dyads (children ages 7-18) were recruited from child mental health centers where children were receiving treatment for at least one internalizing disorder. Participating mothers met DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder. Mothers reported on their own childhood abuse histories and children reported on their mothers' parenting. Regression analyses demonstrated that maternal childhood emotional abuse was associated with child reports of lower maternal acceptance and greater psychological control, controlling for maternal depression severity, and other psychosocial risk factors. When treating psychiatrically ill children, it is important for a child's clinician to consider mothers' childhood abuse histories in addition to their history of depression. These mothers appear to have additional barriers to effective parenting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Childhood- versus adolescent-onset antisocial youth with conduct disorder: psychiatric illness, neuropsychological and psychosocial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Vicki A; Kemp, Andrew H; Heard, Robert; Lennings, Christopher J; Hickie, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates whether youths with childhood-onset antisocial behavior have higher rates of psychiatric illness, neuropsychological and psychosocial dysfunction than youths who engage in antisocial behavior for the first time in adolescence. Prior studies have generally focused on single domains of function in heterogeneous samples. The present study also examined the extent to which adolescent-onset antisocial behavior can be considered normative, an assumption of Moffitt's dual taxonomy model. Forty-three subjects (34 males, 9 females, mean age = 15.31, age range 12-21) with a diagnosis of conduct disorder (CD) were recruited through Headspace Services and the Juvenile Justice Community Centre. We compared childhood-onset antisocial youths (n = 23) with adolescent-onset antisocial youths (n = 20) with a conduct disorder, across a battery of psychiatric, neuropsychological and psychosocial measures. Neuropsychological function of both groups was also compared with normative scores from control samples. The childhood-onset group displayed deficits in verbal learning and memory, higher rates of psychosis, childhood maltreatment and more serious violent behavior, all effects associated with a large effect size. Both groups had impaired executive function, falling within the extremely low range (severely impaired). Childhood-onset CD displayed greater cognitive impairment, more psychiatric symptoms and committed more serious violent offences. The finding of severe executive impairment in both childhood- and adolescent-onset groupings challenges the assumption that adolescent-onset antisocial behavior is a normative process.

  20. Childhood- versus adolescent-onset antisocial youth with conduct disorder: psychiatric illness, neuropsychological and psychosocial function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicki A Johnson

    Full Text Available The present study investigates whether youths with childhood-onset antisocial behavior have higher rates of psychiatric illness, neuropsychological and psychosocial dysfunction than youths who engage in antisocial behavior for the first time in adolescence. Prior studies have generally focused on single domains of function in heterogeneous samples. The present study also examined the extent to which adolescent-onset antisocial behavior can be considered normative, an assumption of Moffitt's dual taxonomy model.Forty-three subjects (34 males, 9 females, mean age = 15.31, age range 12-21 with a diagnosis of conduct disorder (CD were recruited through Headspace Services and the Juvenile Justice Community Centre. We compared childhood-onset antisocial youths (n = 23 with adolescent-onset antisocial youths (n = 20 with a conduct disorder, across a battery of psychiatric, neuropsychological and psychosocial measures. Neuropsychological function of both groups was also compared with normative scores from control samples.The childhood-onset group displayed deficits in verbal learning and memory, higher rates of psychosis, childhood maltreatment and more serious violent behavior, all effects associated with a large effect size. Both groups had impaired executive function, falling within the extremely low range (severely impaired.Childhood-onset CD displayed greater cognitive impairment, more psychiatric symptoms and committed more serious violent offences. The finding of severe executive impairment in both childhood- and adolescent-onset groupings challenges the assumption that adolescent-onset antisocial behavior is a normative process.

  1. Patient-provider communication over social media: perspectives of adolescents with psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Samuel H; Klingensmith, Katherine; McLaughlin, Paige; Qayyum, Zheala; van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I

    2016-02-01

    Social media is an increasingly dominant platform for communication, especially among adolescents. Statements from professional bodies and a growing body of empirical evidence support a role for social media in improving provider-patient interactions. In psychiatry, particular concerns exist about the suitability of this style of communication. Very limited data are available exploring how patients would like to incorporate social media into their communication with their psychiatric providers. We conducted a qualitative study with 20 adolescents attending the Yale Psychiatric Hospital Intensive Outpatient Programme. Interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Participants highlighted how social media could allow for constant access to a mental health provider, provide a less anxiety-provoking mode of communication, and allow for them to be monitored in a more on-going fashion. However, participants also identified many potential risks associated with these applications, including the potential for anxiety if a provider was not able to respond immediately, and a sense that online interactions would be less rich overall. Our findings suggest that adolescents are open to the idea of communicating with mental health providers over social media and are able to describe a number of instances where this could be of value. The risks participants described, as well as concerns raised by existing literature, indicate the need for further work and protocol development in order for social media to be a feasible tool for communication between providers and adolescents with psychiatric illness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Assessment of Family Functionality Among the Elderly With Chronic Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Balula Chaves

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The family APGAR scale was developed by Smilkstein, Ashworth, and Montano (1982. The satisfaction assessment of the elderly with chronic illness regarding family is essential. This study aims to describe the socio-demographic and clinical profile of elderly people with chronic illness and correlate with perceived family support. This is a cross-sectional, analytical study of 294 elderly people (51.4% female, patients at the Health Centre in the district of Viseu - Portugal, diagnosed with chronic illness (77.9% cardiovascular; Mean age was 72.22 ± 6.13, 70.7% were married and 52% had 4 years of schooling; Data was gathered using a questionnaire and the Family APGAR (Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection and Resolve. In relation to family functionality, 18.7% perceive families as highly functional, 26.9% mildly dysfunctional and 54.4% severely dysfunction. There is a statistically significant relationship between the family APGAR and the presence of chronic illness (p < 0.001. We found no statistical significance between the family APGAR and gender (p = 0.26, age (p = 0.26, marital status (p = 0.32 and educational level (p = 0.28. Economic, political and social changes in our society has an impact on the family and the support they provide which is manifested among vulnerable groups, as is the case of an elderly person with chronic illness. Thus, we propose specialised psychological support for this age group which is more vulnerable and without the needed support from within the family.

  3. A behavioral weight-loss intervention for persons with serious mental illness in psychiatric rehabilitation centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumit, G L; Dalcin, A T; Jerome, G J; Young, D R; Charleston, J; Crum, R M; Anthony, C; Hayes, J H; McCarron, P B; Khaykin, E; Appel, L J

    2011-08-01

    Overweight and obesity are epidemic in populations with serious mental illnesses. We developed and pilot-tested a behavioral weight-loss intervention appropriately tailored for persons with serious mental disorders. We conducted a single-arm pilot study in two psychiatric rehabilitation day programs in Maryland, and enrolled 63 overweight or obese adults. The 6-month intervention provided group and individual weight management and group physical activity classes. The primary outcome was weight change from baseline to 6 months. A total of 64% of those potentially eligible enrolled at the centers. The mean age was 43.7 years; 56% were women; 49% were white; and over half had schizophrenia or a schizoaffective disorder. One-third had hypertension and one-fifth had diabetes. In total, 52 (82%) completed the study; others were discharged from psychiatric centers before completion of the study. Average attendance across all weight management sessions was 70% (87% on days participants attended the center) and 59% for physical activity classes (74% on days participants attended the center). From a baseline mean of 210.9 lbs (s.d. 43.9), average weight loss for 52 participants was 4.5 lb (s.d. 12.8) (P<0.014). On average, participants lost 1.9% of body weight. Mean waist circumference change was 3.1 cm (s.d. 5.6). Participants on average increased the distance on the 6-minute walk test by 8%. This pilot study documents the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a behavioral weight-loss intervention in adults with serious mental illness who were attendees at psychiatric rehabilitation centers. The results may have implications for developing weight-loss interventions in other institutional settings such as schools or nursing homes.

  4. Psychiatric illness, socioeconomic status, and marital status in people committing suicide: a matched case-sibling-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben; Qin, Ping; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2006-01-01

    of these factors. DESIGN: Nested case-control study. Information on causes of death, psychiatric admission, marital status, children, and socioeconomic factors was obtained from routine registers. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 985 suicide cases, 1104 sex-age (+/-3 years) matched siblings, and 16 619 controls......STUDY OBJECTIVE: Suicides cluster in both families and persons with psychiatric disorders and socioeconomic disadvantages. This study compares these factors between suicide cases, their siblings, and population based controls in an attempt to evaluate both the familial and the individual element...... and controls in exposure to hospitalised psychiatric disorders and socioeconomic disadvantages, although these factors contribute to the familial aggregation of suicides....

  5. Pathological gambling: comorbid psychiatric diagnoses in patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannon, Pinhas N; Lowengrub, Katherine; Aizer, Anat; Kotler, Moshe

    2006-01-01

    Pathological gambling is a highly prevalent and disabling impulse control disorder. Recent studies have consistently demonstrated that pathological gamblers respond well to treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mood stabilizers and opioid antagonists. These findings have supported the observation that pathological gambling is associated with anxiety and mood spectrum disorders as well as addictive disorders. Fifty-two male pathological gamblers and their first-degree relatives (n=93) completed a semi-structured DSM-IV-based diagnostic interview as well as a series of data collection instruments including the South Oaks Gambling Scale, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, and the Young Mania Rating Scale. The study subjects and their first-degree relative were compared to demographically matched normal controls (n=96). We found higher prevalence of alcohol, substance abuse, problematic gambling, depression, and anxiety disorders in the pathological gamblers and their first-degree relatives than in the control group. In particular, the scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, and the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale were higher in the study group than in the control group. Our finding of a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in pathological gamblers and their families raises the question of the proper classification of pathological gambling in the DSM-IV. Furthermore, the pattern of psychiatric disorders seen in the first-degree relatives can lead to new insights about the etiopathology of pathological gambling.

  6. The family’s experience of having a mentally ill family member

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Ngqoboka

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was firstly to explore and describe the experience of families with a mentally ill family member and secondly to describe guidelines (based on the results obtained for the advanced psychiatric nurse practitioner to assist families in mobilising their resources to facilitate the promotion, maintenance and restoration of their mental health as an integral part of health. Opsomming Die doel van hierdie studie was eerstens om die belewenis van gesinne wat 'n geestesongestelde gesinslid het, te verken en beskryfen in die tweede piek om riglyne te beskryfvir die gevorderde psigiatriese verpleegpraktisyn om hierdie gesinne the help in die mobilise ring van hulpbronne om hul geestes gesondheid as integrate deel van gesondheid te bevorder, te handhaaf en te herstel. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  7. The Effects of Group Psychoeducational Programme on Attitude toward Mental Illness in Families of Patients with Schizophrenia, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Rahmani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family members often play a vital role as caregivers in the lives of individuals with schizophrenia. Results of the studies showed that family invironment is the most important determinint of patients outcomes like as quality of life, relapse, adherence. This study aimed to determine the effect of group psychoeducational programme on attitude towards mental illness in families of patients with schizophrenia. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 74 families who have schizophrenic patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards during sampling were selected by convenience sampling method. Then the sample was randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The families of experimental group received 8 continuous 90-minute 3 times a week psychoeducational sessions. Family attitude towards mental illness was measured using the questionnaire of Opinion about Mental Illnesses (OMI before and after intervention. Data analysis was conducted using 2 test, independent t-test, and paired t-test on SPSS software version 13. Results: The results showed that majority of the families had negative attitude towards mental illness (88.90%. In addition, the results showed that there was significant difference between different dimensions of attitude towards mental illness before and after psychoeducation in the experimental group. The mean score of families' post-test in the experimental group increased compared to control group 108.86 (14.9, vs. 88.86 (7.5. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that psychoeducation improves family attitude towards mental illness. Training methods like group psych education for the families of mental patients can be effective on their attitudes towards mental illness.

  8. Psychological status and coping styles of caregivers of individuals with intellectual disability and psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicker, Anuja S; Ramesh, Sonali

    2018-06-27

    The psychological status of caregivers of individuals with intellectual disability and psychiatric illness (PI) is important for effective management. The aim of this study was to examine the psychological status and its relationship with coping styles among these caregivers. Caregivers (N = 80) of individuals with intellectual disability (n = 40) and PI (n = 40) were administered a socio-demographic questionnaire, depression, anxiety and stress scale and COPE Inventory. Caregivers experienced depression, anxiety and stress symptoms. These symptoms were found to be significantly higher among caregivers of individuals with intellectual disability than those with PI. The most common coping style used was religious coping. Use of positive reinterpretation and growth was associated with lower levels of depression and stress symptoms. Caregivers' mental health plays an important role in the quality of care delivery and outcome. Use of appropriate coping styles can reduce the impact of these symptoms. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Ketamine sedation for patients with acute agitation and psychiatric illness requiring aeromedical retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cong, Minh; Gynther, Bruce; Hunter, Ernest; Schuller, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Aeromedical retrieval services face the difficult problem of appropriate levels of sedation for transport of acutely agitated patients to definitive care. This paper describes a technique using ketamine, which is titratable and avoids problems associated with airway management. A 3-year review of a new technique of ketamine sedation by aeromedical retrieval teams from the Cairns base of the Queensland section of the Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia. Clinical records were systematically reviewed for ketamine administration and signs of adverse events during transport and in the subsequent 72 h. 18 patients were sedated during retrieval with intravenous ketamine. Effective sedation was achieved in all cases, with no significant adverse events noted during retrieval or 72 h afterwards. Ketamine sedation is effective and safe in agitated patients with a psychiatric illness in the aeromedical setting and does not lead to worsening agitation in the subsequent 72-h period.

  10. Substance use comorbidity among veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder and other psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, Ismene L; Rosenheck, Robert; Desai, Rani

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable concern about the emergence of significant substance abuse among younger veterans of war in the Middle East, especially among those with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), but little information exists on the magnitude of this problem. Using national administrative data from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) (n = 1,001,996), we examined rates of diagnosed substance use disorders in Veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan diagnosed with PTSD compared to other psychiatric disorders; and compared rates among veterans of other service eras. Of VA patients with a selected mental disorder, 21.0% had a comorbid substance diagnosis. Veterans who served in the post-Vietnam era (VET) (1973-1991) had the highest rates of comorbidity. Logistic regression models indicated that veterans with each selected psychiatric diagnosis were significantly more likely to be dually diagnosed in comparison to veterans with PTSD; post-Vietnam veterans were significantly more likely to be dually diagnosed than veterans from other eras. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are most strongly associated with dual diagnosis in OEF/OIF (Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom) veterans. There are high rates of substance use disorders among veterans with mental illness. The highest rates of comorbidity occur among those with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia; and in post-VET veterans.  © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  11. Psychotherapeutic work with Families with Life-threatening Maternal Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Chinoy, Freni

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory research study describes a child and adolescent psychotherapeutic clinical service offered to children/adolescents and their families with mothers with a life-threatening illness. The clinical service itself was also exploratory in nature. The research objectives of the study were (i) to explore whether this form of clinical work could be beneficial for such families in relieving distress and supporting their development; (ii) to discover the factors at play within and betwee...

  12. Frequency and correlates of comorbid psychiatric illness in patients with heroin use disorder admitted to Stikland Opioid Detoxification Unit, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Dannatt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is a lack of studies addressing the frequency and correlates of comorbidities among heroin users admitted for treatment in South Africa (SA. Objective. To assess the frequency and correlates of psychiatric comorbidity among patients with heroin use disorder admitted to the Opioid Detoxification Unit at Stikland Hospital in the Western Cape, SA. Method. Participants (N=141 were assessed for psychiatric illness (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, comorbid substance use disorders (World Health Organization’s Alcohol Smoking Substance Involvement Screening Tool, and legal and social problems (Maudsley Addiction Profile. Demographic, personal, psychiatric and substance-use history, in addition to mental state examination on admission, were collected from the case notes. Results. The largest group of patients (n=56, 40% had not been abstinent from heroin use since drug debut, and most had been arrested for drug-related activities (n=117, 83% and had family conflicts related to use (n=135, 96%. Nicotine was the most common comorbid substance of dependence (n=137, 97% and methamphetamine was the most common comorbid substance abused (n=73, 52%. The most common comorbid psychiatric illness was previous substance-induced psychosis (n=42, 30% and current major depressive disorder (n=37, 26%. Current major depressive disorder was significantly associated with females (p=0.03, intravenous drug use (p=0.03, alcohol use (p=0.02, and a higher number of previous rehabilitation attempts (p=0.008. Conclusion. Patients with heroin use disorders present with high rates of psychiatric comorbidities, which underscores the need for substance treatment services with the capacity to diagnose and manage these comorbidities.

  13. The Effect of Violence on the Diagnoses and the Course of Illness Among Female Psychiatric Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    TEMİZ, Meltem; BEŞTEPE, Emrem; YILDIZ, Özlem; KÜÇÜKGÖNCÜ, Suat; YAZICI, Ayla; ÇALIKUŞU, Celal; ERKOÇ, Şahap

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to determine the rate of exposure to domestic violence among female inpatients at any period of their lives; to investigate the effect of different forms of violence on the diagnoses and the course of the illness. Method The study was conducted on 102 female inpatients treated at Bakirkoy Research and Training Hospital for Psychiatry, Neurology and Neurosurgery. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) was administered and socio-demographic and clinical data was collected. A form designed for the assessment of violence was used to evaluate domestic violence. Results Ninety patients reported that they had been subjected to some kind of violence at some period of their lives. The parents or husbands were the most frequently reported persecutors. Seventy-three patients reported that they had been subjected to violence before the onset of their illness. Seventy-one had been subjected to physical, 79 to verbal, 42 to sexual, 52 to economic violence, and 49 to constraints on social relationship formation. Comorbid diagnosis of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was related to all types of violence. The rate of suicide attempt was found to be significantly related to verbal-emotional violence. Only 12 patients had previously reported being subjected to domestic violence to their psychiatrist. Conclusion Domestic violence, an often overlooked phenomenon, is prevalent among women with psychiatric disorders. Subjection to domestic violence is found to be correlated with PTSD and suicidal attempt. PMID:28360588

  14. Coping with stigma by association and family burden among family members of people with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sanden, Remko L M; Stutterheim, Sarah E; Pryor, John B; Kok, Gerjo; Bos, Arjan E R

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we explored stigma by association, family burden, and their impact on the family members of people with mental illness. We also studied the ways in which family members coped with these phenomena. We conducted semistructured interviews with 23 immediate family members of people with mental illness. Participants reported various experiences of stigma by association and family burden. Social exclusion, being blamed, not being taken seriously, time-consuming caregiving activities, and exhaustion appeared to be the predominant forms of stigma by association and family burden experienced by the participants. The participants used problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies, separately or simultaneously, to cope with the negative impact of stigma by association and family burden. The results suggest that family members should have access to services to address these problems. Social, instrumental, and emotional support should be given to family members by community members and mental health professionals.

  15. Reintegrating Family Therapy Training in Psychiatric Residency Programs: Making the Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Douglas; Glick, Ira

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Given the marginalization of couples and family therapy in psychiatric residency programs over the past two decades, the authors propose a rationale for the reintegration of these important psychosocial treatments into the mainstream of general psychiatric residency education. Methods: After reviewing recent trends in the field that…

  16. Family interaction and a supportive social network as salutogenic factors in childhood atopic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Per A; Kjellman, N-I Max; Björkstén, Bengt

    2002-02-01

    The role of psycho-social factors in the development of allergy was studied prospectively in 82 infants with a family history of atopy. The family participated in a standardized family test when the children were 18 months old. The ability to adjust to demands of the situation ('adaptability'), and the balance between emotional closeness and distance ('cohesion'), were assessed from videotapes by independent raters. Families rated as functional in both of these aspects were classified as 'functional', otherwise as 'dysfunctional'. The social network, life events, atopic symptoms (based on postal inquiries regarding symptoms answered by the parents, and on physical examinations), psychiatric symptoms, and socio-economic circumstances of the families were evaluated when the children were 18 months and 3 years of age. The children were classified as atopic (asthmatic symptoms or eczema) or as non-atopic. All but two children with atopic disease at 3 years of age had atopic disease before 18 months of age, while 32 of 60 children with atopic disease at 18 months of age had no problems by 3 years of age. An unbalanced family interplay at 18 months was associated with a relative risk (RR) of 1.99 for continuing atopic illness at 3 years of age (1.18 eczema on three or more localizations (RR reduced by 4.5%), and the amount of cat allergen in household dust (RR reduced by 3%). Recovery from atopic illness between 18 months and 3 years of age was four times as probable in families with functional interaction and a good social supportive network when children were 18 months of age, than in dysfunctional families with a poor social network (74% versus 20% p emotional distress than did healthy children (p = 0.02). Dysfunctional family interaction patterns were more commonly observed in families of children who at 3 years of age still had atopic symptoms, than in children who had recovered. The patterns included expression of emotion and reaction to the needs of others

  17. Associations between Familial Rates of Psychiatric Disorders and De Novo Genetic Mutations in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyleen Luhrs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the confluence of genetic and familial risk factors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD with distinct de novo genetic events. We hypothesized that gene-disrupting mutations would be associated with reduced rates of familial psychiatric disorders relative to structural mutations. Participants included families of children with ASD in four groups: de novo duplication copy number variations (DUP, n=62, de novo deletion copy number variations (DEL, n=74, de novo likely gene-disrupting mutations (LGDM, n=267, and children without a known genetic etiology (NON, n=2111. Familial rates of psychiatric disorders were calculated from semistructured interviews. Results indicated overall increased rates of psychiatric disorders in DUP families compared to DEL and LGDM families, specific to paternal psychiatric histories, and particularly evident for depressive disorders. Higher rates of depressive disorders in maternal psychiatric histories were observed overall compared to paternal histories and higher rates of anxiety disorders were observed in paternal histories for LGDM families compared to DUP families. These findings support the notion of an additive contribution of genetic etiology and familial factors are associated with ASD risk and highlight critical need for continued work targeting these relationships.

  18. Emotional and informational support for families during their child's illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarajärvi, A; Haapamäki, M L; Paavilainen, E

    2006-09-01

    To describe and compare the support provided by nursing staff to families during their child's illness from the viewpoint of families and nurses. A survey method was used. Data were collected by questionnaires planned for families and staff separately. The study population consisted of families who visited paediatric outpatient clinics, families with hospitalized children (n = 344) and the paediatric nursing staff (n = 60). Almost half of the families had received adequate emotional and informational support from the nursing staff for their physical and psychological reactions. One-fifth of the families reported that they had not been supported at all during the child's hospitalization. According to families and nurses, the support was provided in the forms of discussion, listening and giving time. Families' and nurses' suggestions for development of support were related to the time resources of the staff, to the flow of information, to more client-centred attitudes, to being appreciated and listened to and to home care guidance. However, the pervasiveness of this problem in the international literature suggests that deeper consideration of possible underlying reasons for this phenomenon is called for.

  19. Trends in suicide risk associated with hospitalized psychiatric illness: a case-control study based on danish longitudinal registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ping; Nordentoft, Merete; Hansen Høyer, Eyd

    2006-01-01

    longitudinal registers. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: This study shows that the reduction in suicide rate is generally faster among individuals with a history of psychiatric admission than among individuals without such a history. However, this substantial reduction...... at the time of suicide or the index date, the reduction in suicide rate is relatively slower. Such trends hold for all diagnostic groups. Further analyses stratified by age indicate that the faster reduction in suicide rate associated with history of hospitalized psychiatric illness is more pronounced among...

  20. Quality of life and competitive work among adults with severe mental illness: moderating effects of family contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Paul B

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Competitive employment may improve life quality for adults with severe mental illness, but it is not known for whom or under what circumstances. On the basis of previous research demonstrating benefits of family contact for African-American adults with severe mental illness, it was hypothesized that frequent family contact would moderate (enhance) a positive association between competitive employment and global quality of life for a rural sample of predominantly African-American adults. METHODS In a secondary analysis of data collected from a randomized trial of supported employment, a series of nested random regression analyses was conducted to test the hypothesized moderating effect of face-to-face family contact on the association between competitive employment and global quality of life, controlling for severity of psychiatric symptoms and satisfaction with family relations. RESULTS Most of the 143 study participants spent time with a family member at least once a month (80%)-and most at least weekly (60%). Participants who held a competitive job and had face-to-face contact with family members at least weekly reported higher global quality of life than all other study participants. CONCLUSIONS In this rural sample of African-American adults with severe mental illness, competitive work was associated with higher global quality of life only for those who frequently spent time with family members. Research is needed to test the generalizability of this finding to other geographic settings and cultures, as well as the feasibility and effectiveness of formal inclusion of family members in psychosocial rehabilitation interventions.

  1. What helps or undermines adolescents' anticipated capacity to cope with mental illness stigma following psychiatric hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tally

    2015-05-01

    Better understanding of the individual and environmental factors that promote adolescents' use of more or less adaptive coping strategies with mental illness stigma would inform interventions designed to bolster youth resilience. This cross-sectional study draws on data from research on adolescents' well-being after discharge from a first psychiatric hospitalization to explore the relationships between anticipated coping in reaction to a hypothetical social stigma scenario, and various factors conceptualized as 'coping resource' and 'coping vulnerability' factors. Focusing on coping strategies also identified in the companion article, we hypothesize that primary and secondary control engagement coping would relate to more coping resource and less coping vulnerability factors, and the opposite would be true for disengagement, aggression/confrontation and efforts to disconfirm stereotypes. Data were elicited from interviews with 102 adolescents within 7 days of discharge. Hypothesized coping resource factors included social resources, optimistic illness perceptions, better hospital experiences and higher self-esteem. Vulnerability factors included more previous stigma experiences, desire for concealment of treatment, more contingent self-worth, higher symptom levels and higher anticipated stress. Multivariate ordinary least squares (OLS) regression was used to analyze associations between coping strategy endorsement and correlates. Although some coping correlates 'behaved' contrary to expectations, for the most part, our hypotheses were confirmed. As expected, youth anticipating reacting to the stigmatizing situation with greater disengagement, aggression/confrontation or efforts to disconfirm stenotypes rated significantly lower on 'coping resources' such as self-esteem and higher on vulnerability factors such as symptom severity. The opposite was true for youth who anticipated exercising more primary and secondary control engagement coping. This study begins to

  2. Evaluation Of The Overload Of Care In Families Of Psychiatric Patients In Psychosocial Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayron Morais Almeida

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The burden of care in family refers to the weight caused by the primary caregiver role to psychiatric patients and the difficulties encountered in performing this function in daily life. Objectives: Assessing the objective and subjective overload of family members who live with the reality of psychiatric disorder in a child day-care psychosocial care center. Methods: Cross-sectional study, descriptive-exploratory, of quantitative approach, with non-probabilistic samples of accidental type with 80 families of psychiatric patients held in a Psychosocial Care Center. For overload evaluation, the subscales "B" and "D" of the Family Overload Rating Scale (FBIS-BR were used. Results: The study was conducted with 80 families of psychiatric patients. The average age of female caregivers was 39,6 years old, and 40,7 years old for male caregivers, with female predominance (87,5% compared to men (12,5%, with low education for both genres. Family caregivers presented high objective burden due to excessive demand attention (p<0,001, heteroaggressiveness (p<0,001 and perplexing behavior of psychiatric patients regarding the supervision of problematic behaviors (p<0,001. The items on the impact on the family's daily routine have not helped to generate objective overload for the family members. On subjective overload, it was clear to observe familiar members with high degree of disturbance in all the dimensions assessed (p < 0,001. Conclusion: The high degree of care overload observed in family members indicates the need to develop contacts with the family of the psychiatric patient to answer questions, offer support and assistance to the family caregiver. Keywords: Caregivers. Patients. Mental Health Services.

  3. Computational modeling of psychiatric illnesses via well-defined neurophysiological and neurocognitive biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekmeier, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    A good deal of recent research has centered on the identification of biomarkers and endophenotypic measures of psychiatric illnesses using in vivo and in vitro studies. This is understandable, as these measures-as opposed to complex clinical phenotypes-may be more closely related to neurobiological and genetic vulnerabilities. However, instantiation of such biomarkers using computational models-in silico studies-has received less attention. This approach could become increasingly important, given the wealth of detailed information produced by recent basic neuroscience research, and increasing availability of high capacity computing platforms. The purpose of this review is to survey the current state of the art of research in this area. We discuss computational approaches to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer's disease, fragile X syndrome and autism, and argue that it represents a promising and underappreciated research modality. In conclusion, we outline specific avenues for future research; also, potential uses of in silico models to conduct "virtual experiments" and to generate novel hypotheses, and as an aid in neuropsychiatric drug development are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Unfinished Business in Families of Terminally Ill With Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Ryoko; Arao, Harue; Takao, Ayumi; Masutani, Eiko; Morita, Tatsuya; Shima, Yasuo; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Aoyama, Maho; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-12-01

    Unfinished business often causes psychological issues after bereavement. Providing care for families of terminally ill patients with cancer to prevent unfinished business is important. To clarify the prevalence and types of unfinished business in families of end-of-life patients with cancer admitted to palliative care units (PCUs), explore depression and grief associated with unfinished business, and explore the factors affecting unfinished business. We conducted a cross-sectional, anonymous, self-report questionnaire survey with 967 bereaved families of patients with cancer admitted to PCUs. The questionnaire assessed the presence or the absence of unfinished business, content of unfinished business, depression, grief, process of preparedness, condition of the family and patient, and the degree of involvement of health care professionals. Questionnaires were sent to 967 families, and 73.0% responded. In total, 26.0% of families had some unfinished business, with improvement of the patient-family relationship being a common type of unfinished business. Families with unfinished business had significantly higher depression and grief scores after bereavement compared with those without. Factors that influenced the presence or the absence of unfinished business were preparedness for the patient's death (P = 0.001), discussion between the patient and family about the disease trajectory and way to spend daily life (P business. Health care professionals should coordinate the appropriate timing for what the family wishes to do, with consideration of family dynamics, including the family's preparedness, communication pattern, and relationships. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Family Intervention for Co-occurring Substance Use and Severe Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Kim T.; Glynn, Shirley M.; Cather, Corrine; Xie, Haiyi; Zarate, Roberto; Smith, Lindy Fox; Clark, Robin E.; Gottlieb, Jennifer D.; Wolfe, Rosemarie; Feldman, James

    2013-01-01

    Substance use disorders have a profound impact on the course of severe mental illnesses and on the family, but little research has evaluated the impact of family intervention for this population. To address this question, a randomized controlled trial was conducted comparing a brief (2–3 mo) Family Education (ED) program with a longer-term (9–18 mo) program that combined education with teaching communication and problem-solving skills, Family Intervention for Dual Disorders (FIDD). A total of 108 clients (77% schizophrenia-spectrum) and a key relative were randomized to either ED or FIDD and assessed at baseline and every 6 months for 3 years. Rates of retention of families in both programs were moderate. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that clients in both programs improved in psychiatric, substance abuse, and functional outcomes, as did key relatives in knowledge of co-occurring disorders, burden, and mental health functioning. Clients in FIDD had significantly less severe overall psychiatric symptoms and psychotic symptoms and tended to improve more in functioning. Relatives in FIDD improved more in mental health functioning and knowledge of co-occurring disorders. There were no consistent differences between the programs in substance abuse severity or family burden. The findings support the utility of family intervention for co-occurring disorders, and the added benefits of communication and problem-solving training, but also suggest the need to modify these programs to retain more families in treatment in order to provide them with the information and skills they need to overcome the effects of these disorders. PMID:22282453

  6. Discourses of culture and illness in South African mental health care and indigenous healing, Part I: Western psychiatric power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Jeffery; Wilbraham, Lindy

    2003-12-01

    This discourse analytic study explores constructions of culture and illness in the talk of psychiatrists, psychologists and indigenous healers as they discuss possibilities for collaboration in South African mental health care. Versions of 'culture', and disputes over what constitutes 'disorder', are an important site for the negotiation of power relations between mental health practitioners and indigenous healers. The results of this study are presented in two parts. Part I explores discourses about western psychiatric/psychological professionalism, tensions in diagnosis between cultural relativism and psychiatric universalism, and how assertion of 'cultural differences' may be used to resist psychiatric power. Part II explores how discursive constructions of 'African culture' and 'African madness' work to marginalize indigenous healing in South African mental health care, despite repeated calls for collaboration.

  7. Family Trauma and Dysfunction in Sexually Abused Female Adolescent Psychiatric Control Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherry, Jeffrey N.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Differences in family trauma, stressors, and dysfunction among adolescent psychiatric inpatients grouped by sexual abuse self-reports were investigated. Family trauma/dysfunction was determined from a composite score derived from the Traumatic Antecedents Scale. The results indicated that sexually abused adolescents reported more family…

  8. Mental illness and parenthood: being a parent in secure psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Fiona R; Macinnes, Douglas L; Parrott, Janet

    2015-12-10

    Research into parenting and mental illness seldom includes forensic mental health service users, despite its relevance to therapeutic, family work and risk management. This study aimed to understand the experiences of parents and the variety of parenting roles maintained during admission to a secure forensic hospital. Narrative interviews with 18 parents (eight mothers and 10 fathers) at an English medium security hospital were analysed thematically, using the framework approach. The proportion of patients who are parents and their contact patterns with their children were estimated from records. About a quarter of men and 38% of women were parents. Parenthood was of central importance to their emotional life, spanning experiences of loss, shame and failed expectations, joy, responsibility and hope. Fewer fathers maintained contact with their children than mothers yet fatherhood remained a vital aspect of men's identities, with impact on their self-esteem. Parenting during lengthy admissions--while constrained and dependent on professional support and surveillance--ranged from sending gifts and money to visits and phone calls. Offending was seen as a particularly shameful aspect of admission, contributing to distancing from the children and difficulty explaining detention to them. Such complex experiences call for multidisciplinary knowledge and skills. Provision of focused therapy, as well as appropriate visiting spaces, creative approaches to contact time and support for patients in explaining their mental illness and detention to their children are recommended. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The Treatment of School Avoidance in Children and Adolescents With Psychiatric Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissner, Volker; Jost, Diana; Krahn, Ulrike; Knollmann, Martin; Weschenfelder, Ann-Kathrin; Neumann, Anja; Wasem, Jürgen; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2015-09-25

    5-10% of schoolchildren in Germany are absent from school without an excuse more than five times per year. We investigate the effectiveness of manual-based, multimodal cognitive behavioral therapy focusing on school-avoidant behavior and on the underlying mental disorders. 112 school avoiders were recruited from an outpatient child and adolescent psychiatric clinic and adaptively randomized into two treatment groups. The first group received manual-based multimodal treatment (MT), the second group treatment as usual (TAU) in the child and adolescent mental health care system. The primary outcome of the study was the percentage of classes attended in the five days prior to first measurement (before the intervention), as well as 6 and 12 months afterward. In each of these periods, school attendance was characterized as regular, partial, or none. Secondary outcomes were the severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and quality of family life. In both treatment arms, the percentage of regular school attenders rose to about 60% in 6 months, regardless of the intervention (MT 60.6%, TAU 58.3%; odds ratio [OR] for changes over baseline 6.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.98-12.12, preintegration in school and on the differential indicators for outpatient versus inpatient treatment.

  10. Hope as determinant for psychiatric morbidity in family caregivers of advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpold, T; Schur, S; Amering, M; Ebert-Vogel, A; Kirchheiner, K; Masel, E; Watzke, H; Schrank, B

    2017-05-01

    Home care of advanced cancer patients often has adverse effects on physical and mental health of family caregivers. Little is known about the long-term effects of continuous caregiving on mental health as compared with the effects of bereavement. The objectives of this study were to describe the course of psychiatric morbidity in family caregivers over time, to identify the impact of the patients' death on caregivers, and to explore possible predictor variables for psychiatric morbidity. This multi-institutional, prospective study included 80 family caregivers of 80 advanced cancer patients for baseline and 9 months follow-up assessment. Possible psychiatric disorders (ie, depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and alcohol abuse/dependence) as well as potentially predictive factors (ie, sociodemographic factors, burden, hope, and coping mechanisms) were assessed. Follow-up assessment was conducted on average 9.2 months (±2.9) after baseline assessment. Prevalence rates of anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder decreased significantly over time, whereas depression and alcoholism remained stable. Bereavement was experienced by 53% of caregivers in the follow-up period. The patients' death had no influence on psychiatric morbidity at follow-up. Predictors for the development of a psychiatric disorder varied according to condition, with hope and emotion-oriented coping identified as important influences, especially for anxiety and depression. Family caregivers with certain psychiatric disorders might need targeted psychosocial support to ensure their mental well-being and prevent long-term disability. Supporting hope and functional coping strategies early after the patient's diagnosis might limit development and extent of psychiatric morbidity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Substantial skin disorders in psychiatric illness coincide with diabetes and addiction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mookhoek, E. J.; van de Kerkhof, P. C. M.; Hovens, J. E. J. M.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.; Loonen, A. J. M.

    Background Dermatological diseases in psychiatric patients are common; however, epidemiological data on this subject are scarce and to our knowledge integral studies of dermatological disease in psychiatric inpatients are not available yet. Aim The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of

  12. Kleptomania: comorbid psychiatric diagnosis in patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannon, Pinhas N; Lowengrub, Katherine M; Iancu, Iulian; Kotler, Moshe

    2004-01-01

    Kleptomania, defined by DSM-IV as the inability to resist the impulse to steal objects which are not needed for personal use or for their monetary value, may reflect a form of obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder and/or affective spectrum disorder. Twenty-one kleptomanic patients and 57 first-degree relatives completed a semistructured DSM-IV-based interview and questionnaires. Questionnaires are: the HDRS-17 (the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression), the HARS (Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety), the Y-BOCS (Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale), the YMRS (Young Mania Rating Scale). The two groups were compared to demographically matched normal controls (n = 64). We found a high prevalence of affective and anxiety disorders in our sample of kleptomanic patients and their first-degree relatives. In addition, the scores on the HDRS, HARS, and Y-BOCS were significantly higher in the study group than in the control group. Our finding of a high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in kleptomanic patients could lead to the development of new treatment strategies for this disorder. Furthermore, the pattern of psychiatric disorders seen in the first-degree relatives can lead to new insights about the nosology and etiopathology of kleptomania. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Multigenerational Positive Family History of Psychiatric Disorders Is Associated With a Poor Prognosis in Bipolar Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Altshuler, Lori; Kupka, Ralph; McElroy, Susan L.; Frye, Mark A.; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Keck, Paul E.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Nolen, Willem A.

    2015-01-01

    The authors assessed how family history loading affected the course of illness in patients from the United States. A total of 676 outpatients with bipolar disorder from the United States rated their illness and provided a parental and grandparental history of mood disorder, substance abuse, and

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study Reveals Greater Polygenic Loading for Schizophrenia in Cases With a Family History of Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigdeli, Tim B.; Ripke, Stephan; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Lee, Sang Hong; Wray, Naomi R.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Rietschel, Marcella; Cichon, Sven; St Clair, David; Corvin, Aiden; Kirov, George; McQuillin, Andrew; Gurling, Hugh; Rujescu, Dan; Andreassen, Ole A.; Werge, Thomas; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Malhotra, Anil K.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Fanous, Ayman H.

    2018-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia have yielded more than 100 common susceptibility variants, and strongly support a substantial polygenic contribution of a large number of small allelic effects. It has been hypothesized that familial schizophrenia is largely a consequence of inherited rather than environmental factors. We investigated the extent to which familiality of schizophrenia is associated with enrichment for common risk variants detectable in a large GWAS. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for cases reporting a family history of psychotic illness (N = 978), cases reporting no such family history (N = 4,503), and unscreened controls (N = 8,285) from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC1) study of schizophrenia. We used a multinomial logistic regression approach with model-fitting to detect allelic effects specific to either family history subgroup. We also considered a polygenic model, in which we tested whether family history positive subjects carried more schizophrenia risk alleles than family history negative subjects, on average. Several individual SNPs attained suggestive but not genome-wide significant association with either family history subgroup. Comparison of genome-wide polygenic risk scores based on GWAS summary statistics indicated a significant enrichment for SNP effects among family history positive compared to family history negative cases (Nagelkerke’s R2 = 0.0021; P = 0.00331; P-value threshold history positive compared to family history negative cases (0.32 and 0.22, respectively; P = 0.031).We found suggestive evidence of allelic effects detectable in large GWAS of schizophrenia that might be specific to particular family history subgroups. However, consideration of a polygenic risk score indicated a significant enrichment among family history positive cases for common allelic effects. Familial illness might, therefore, represent a more heritable form of schizophrenia, as suggested by

  15. [Family dynamics and chronic illness: children with diabetes in the context of their families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirlach-Bartosik, S; Schubert, M T; Freilinger, M; Schober, E

    2005-01-01

    The present study is based on the assumption of an interaction between family functioning and chronic illness. Using a systemic approach, the intra-familial situation of families with a diabetes-affected child is examined. 44 families were evaluated using a family diagnostic instrument ("Familienbögen") and compared with 31 control families with a healthy child. Furthermore, the study looked at the influence of the level of family functioning on glycemic control, as measured by HbA1c values, and vice versa. Families with a child affected by diabetes showed significantly more dysfunctional domains and higher discrepancies of the ratings in the family diagnostic instrument (p familial dynamics, it may, at the same time, offer opportunities for an improvement of family relationships. However, if physiological parameters deteriorate in the child (poor glycemic control), family problems seem to become less important. Success in the treatment of diabetes patients should therefore not only be measured by the quality of glycemic control, but also by considering psychological factors and aspects of family dynamics.

  16. Novel psychoactive substances (NPS) use in severe mental illness (SMI) patients: Potential changes in the phenomenology of psychiatric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Giuseppe; Prevete, Elisabeth

    2017-05-01

    Literature is quite poor about the clinical effects of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) and the long-term consequences of NPS use in psychiatric patients. Consequently, it is of the greatest interest to examine which effects NPS can exert in patients with previous severe mental illness (SMI), such as psychotic patients. The aim of this work was a comprehensive review about NPS use in patients with SMI. We searched Medline or PubMed for relevant English-language citations and reviews describing relationships between NPS use and mental disorders, as well as for the main groups of substances and associated psychiatric manifestations. All studies reporting single case or case series of patients were selected. The NPS use in patients with SMI is probably underestimated. The one existing systematic review considers only 14 studies, 12 of which are case reports. Most clinical results report acute symptom exacerbation of preexisting psychosis. Paranoid, mood, and aggression symptoms occur more frequently. NPS use could modify clinical features of SMI, but these conclusions cannot be generalizable. More evidence is needed to establish the causal and effective connection between NPS use and course of illness, type of psychiatric symptoms, and outcome of treatment in terms of adherence or response. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Family caregivers' narratives of mental health treatment usage processes by their Latino adult relatives with serious and persistent mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Jorge A; Ramírez García, Jorge I

    2013-06-01

    Family caregivers' views and experiences related to treatment usage processes by their adult relatives with serious and persistent mental illness (SPMI) were empirically examined in a sample of Latino caregivers (n = 17) who were users of services at the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) in a predominantly Latino- (80%) and Mexican-descent large city in the Southwest United States. We conducted a stability check of qualitative findings with a second sample of Latino caregivers with no exposure to NAMI (n = 15). Overall, the combined sample (N = 32) compared similarly with larger samples of Latino adults and caregivers in quantitative measures of acculturation, familism, caregiver stigma, and depression symptoms. Together, caregivers' stigma and cultural beliefs, such as vergüenza (shame), use of folk healers, and lack of insurance, were major reported barriers to service usage. Family support (and lack of) for treatment also weighed heavily as a facilitator (and a barrier) of service usage, thus highlighting the complexity of family relationship contexts. Substantial portions of caregivers reported that treatment initiation was prompted by psychiatric hospitalization (50%), and that positive experiences with service providers were influential in treatment retention (72%). Given the high levels of family involvement reported among Latino caregivers, the findings underscore the potential role of family caregivers in treatment engagement and retention. Future research is needed that examines family caregivers' role in treatment with models that consider the interplay between cultural background, family level relationships, and service system contexts. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Parents' mental health and psychiatric expertise in child welfare family rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimäki, Kirsi

    2015-02-01

    Parents' mental health disorders are not well known within child welfare services. First, to assess the mental health disorders and treatment needs of parents participating in the child welfare-centred family rehabilitation; Second, to evaluate the work of psychiatric nurses and the effectiveness of consultations by psychiatrists in such cases. During 2010, a total of 141 parents participated in child welfare-centred family rehabilitation. The primary psychiatric disorders of parents not currently receiving psychiatric care were assessed, as was the appropriate treatment for them. The majority of parents in child welfare-centred family rehabilitation suffered from severe mental health disorders, often unrecognized and untreated. As much as 93% of parents were referred to mental health or substance abuse treatment, almost half of them to secondary care. The work of psychiatric nurses and consultations by psychiatrists were found to be useful. Most parents suffered from severe unrecognized and untreated mental health disorders. There is a high demand for adult-psychiatric expertise in child welfare.

  19. Effects of preventive family service coordination for parents with mental illnesses and their children, a RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansink, Henny J; Janssens, Jan M A M; Hoencamp, Erik; Middelkoop, Barend J C; Hosman, Clemens M H

    2015-06-01

    Children of parents with a mental illness (COPMI) are at increased risk for developing psychiatric disorders, especially when parenting is compromised by multiple risk factors. Due to fragmented services, these families often do not get the support they need. Can coordination between services, as developed in the Preventive Basic Care Management (PBCM) program, improve parenting and prevent child behavioral problems? This randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) compared the effectiveness of PBCM with a control condition. Ninety-nine outpatients of a community mental health center were randomized to intervention or control. Primary outcomes included parenting quality (assessed by the HOME instrument), parenting skills (parenting skills subscale of FFQ), and parenting stress (PDH). Secondary outcomes are child behavioral problems (SDQ). Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 9 and 18 months. Effects were analyzed by Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance. Most families were single-parent families belonging to ethnic minorities. The results of the first RCT on effects of PBCM suggest that this intervention is feasible and has a positive effect on parenting skills. There was no evidence for effects on the quality of parenting and parenting stress, nor preventive effects on child behavioral problems. Replication studies in other sites, with more power, including monitoring of the implementation quality and studying a broader palette of child outcomes are needed to confirm the positive effects of PBCM. Long-term prospective studies are needed to investigate if improved parenting skills lead to positive effects in the children in the long run. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Systematic chromosome examination of two families with schizophrenia and two families with manic depressive illness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, U.; Mors, O.; Ewald, H. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)

    1996-02-16

    Systematic and detailed chromosome analysis, combined with a semistructured interview, was performed in 2 families with schizophrenia and in 2 families with manic depressive illness. Prometaphase technique did not reveal any subtle structural chromosome abnormalities. However, in standard techniques, gain and loss of sex chromosomes were observed. This occurred in patients at a younger age than in unaffected persons. This gives rise to the suspicion that sex chromosome aneuploidy may somehow be related to the development of psychosis. But since the data set is small, especially with respect to schizophrenia, further studies are needed to elucidate this observation. In one family, cosegregation of the disease locus with a marker on chromosome 21 was seen. Therefore, further research should determine if chromosome 21 contains a gene for manic depressive illness. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Characteristics associated with family money management for persons with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrum, Travis

    2018-05-11

    Persons with psychiatric disorders (PD) commonly have their money officially or unofficially managed by others, with money managers most commonly being family members. (i) Identify characteristics of persons with PD, adult family members, and interactions with each other significantly associated with family money management (FMM). (ii) Identify significant differences in aforementioned characteristics between official versus unofficial FMM. Five hundred and seventy-three adults residing in USA with an adult relative with PD completed a survey. Among persons with PD, FMM was positively associated with lower income, diagnosis of schizophrenia/schizoaffective or bipolar disorder, psychiatric hospitalization, and arrest history. FMM was negatively associated with family members having a mental health diagnosis. FMM was positively associated with interaction characteristics of co-residence, financial assistance, caregiving, and use of limit-setting practices. Compared to official FMM, when unofficial FMM was present, persons with PD were less likely to have been psychiatrically hospitalized or to have regularly attended mental health treatment. When unofficial FMM was present, adult family members were less likely to be a parent of the person with PD. Practitioners should assess the level of burden experienced by family money managers and assess and address with family money managers the use of limit-setting practices.

  2. Family members' involvement in psychiatric care: experiences of the healthcare professionals' approach and feeling of alienation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertzon, M; Lützén, K; Svensson, E; Andershed, B

    2010-06-01

    The involvement of family members in psychiatric care is important for the recovery of persons with psychotic disorders and subsequently reduces the burden on the family. Earlier qualitative studies suggest that the participation of family members can be limited by how they experience the professionals' approach, which suggests a connection to the concept of alienation. Thus, the aim of this study was in a national sample investigate family members' experiences of the psychiatric health care professionals' approach. Data were collected by the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire. The median level and quartiles were used to describe the distributions and data were analysed with non-parametric statistical methods. Seventy family members of persons receiving psychiatric care participated in the study. The results indicate that a majority of the participants respond that they have experiencing a negative approach from the professionals, indicating lack of confirmation and cooperation. The results also indicate that a majority of the participants felt powerlessness and social isolation in the care being provided, indicating feelings of alienation. A significant but weak association was found between the family members' experiences of the professionals' approach and their feelings of alienation.

  3. Family matters: infants, toddlers and preschoolers of parents affected by mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kowalenko, N.M.; Mares, S.P.; Newman, L.K.; Williams, A.E.S.; Powrie, R.M.; Doesum, K.T.M. van

    2012-01-01

    One in five young people in Australia, including infants, toddlers and preschoolers, lives in a family with a parent with a mental illness.1 Families affected by mental illness are more likely than other families to experience poverty and social isolation,2 and are more likely to have children taken

  4. Life after the Shock! The Impact on Families of Caring for Young Children with Chronic Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Jean

    2004-01-01

    The stresses experienced by most families include limitations on time, conditions of employment, financial burdens and sibling rivalry. For the families of a child with a chronic illness, these stresses are often compounded, making family functioning problematic. Chronic illness is marked by permanency and the need for ongoing vigilance with…

  5. Psychiatric disorders and family functioning in children and adolescents with functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Moaiedy, Farah; Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Askani, Hamid; Haghighat, Mahmood; Dehbozorgi, Gholamreza; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen

    2008-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder. There is a heightened risk when conducting potentially dangerous and unnecessary medical investigations and procedures in children with FAPS. The aim of this study was to survey the rate of the psychiatric disorders and family functioning in children and adolescents with FAPS. The subjects were a consecutive new sample of 45 children and adolescents with FAPS, 45 with an organic abdominal pain, and 45 pain-free comparison subjects aged 5-18 years that were interviewed using the Farsi version of K-SADS. Family functioning and the severity of pain were also studied. About 51.1% of patients with FAPS suffered from at least one psychiatric disorder. Psychiatric disorders in the FAPS patients studied included general anxiety disorder (8.9%), obsessive-compulsive disorder (11.1%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (15.6%), separation anxiety disorder (24.4%), and major depressive disorder (15.6%). Except for generalized anxiety disorder and tic disorder, the other disorders were significantly more common in the FAPS group than in the two other control groups. Family functioning scores were not significantly different between groups. There is a high rate of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents with FAPS in Iran, but our study found fewer incidences of disorders than previous reports have indicated. Family dysfunction difficulties in FAPS children are not more common than those in the control groups.

  6. Quality of life, treatment adherence, and locus of control: multiple family groups for chronic medical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larrosa, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The Multiple Family Groups (MFGs) approach for patients with a chronic medical illness and their families is a structured psychoeducational program that unfolds in six weekly 90-minute sessions. In the MFGs, patients and family members explore new ways to balance illness and nonillness priorities in family life (Steinglass, 1998; Steinglass, 2000 Cuadernos de Terapia Familiar, 44-45, 11; Steinglass, Ostroff, & Steinglass, 2011 Family Process, 50, 393). © FPI, Inc.

  7. Getting to know the person behind the illness - the significance of interacting with patients hospitalised in forensic psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; Rydlo, Cecilia; Wiklund Gustin, Lena

    2016-05-01

    To describe what nurses want to accomplish in relationships with patients who are hospitalised in forensic psychiatric settings. Relationships between staff and patients in forensic psychiatric settings should be grounded in trust and confidence, and the patients need opportunities for emotional reconciliation. However, relationships can be challenging for nurses, who sometimes distance themselves from patients' expressions of suffering. The role of forensic mental health nurses is nebulous, as are the prescriptives and the implementation of nursing practices. Qualitative descriptive design. In-depth interviews with five nurses who all work in forensic psychiatric settings. We present a descriptive analysis of what nurses want to accomplish in relationships with patients who are hospitalised in forensic psychiatric settings. The results are presented in two main categories: (1) getting to know the person behind the illness and (2) making a difference. Care in forensic psychiatry needs to shift towards a more long-term view of the role of nursing, focusing less on the traditional and stereotypical identity of the productive nurse and more on the care given when nurses slow down and take the time to see the patients as individuals. Establishing trusting relationships with patients in forensic psychiatric settings is viewed as a less oppressive way to control patients and guide them in directions that are preferable for the nurses and for the society. Nurses may use simple strategies in their daily practice such as sitting on the sofa with patients to establish trust. We stress that nurses should abandon policing roles and custodial activities in favour of guiding principles that promote individual recovery, treatment and health-promoting care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Stigma: a Unique Source of Distress for Family Members of Individuals with Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Anjana; Lucksted, Alicia; Medoff, Deborah; Fang, Li Juan; Dixon, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    To distinguish the impact of mental illness stigma from that of other negative caregiving experiences, this study examined the unique relationships between stigma and caregiver/family functioning. Adult relatives (n = 437) of individuals with mental illness completed questionnaires regarding caregiving experiences, distress, empowerment, and family functioning, as part of a larger study. Regression analyses examined the relationship between stigma and caregiver/family variables, while controlling for other negative caregiving experiences. Stigma was uniquely associated with caregiver distress, empowerment, and family functioning. Mental illness stigma is a potent source of distress for families and an important target of family services.

  9. Engaging with Families Is a Challenge: Beliefs among Healthcare Professionals in Forensic Psychiatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörberg, Ulrica; Erlingsson, Christen; Syrén, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Being healthcare professionals in the complex field of forensic psychiatry care (FPC) seems particularly challenging. Historically, families have almost been invisible in FPC. The aim of this study was to uncover beliefs among healthcare professionals concerning families of patients admitted for FPC. Using a hermeneutical approach inspired by Gadamer's philosophy, group interviews with healthcare professionals in four Swedish forensic psychiatric clinics were analyzed. Analysis resulted in seven key beliefs. There were three beliefs about families: family belongingness is a resource for the patient; most families are broken and not possible to trust; and most families get in the way of the patient's care. Four beliefs concerned encounters with families: it is important to achieve a balance and control over the family; it is essential to set aside one's own values and morals; family-oriented work is an impossible mission; and family oriented work requires welcoming the families. Despite ethical dilemmas of working with families in FPC, healthcare professionals showed a willingness and desire to work in a more family-oriented manner. More knowledge, understanding, and caring tools are needed in order to meet the needs of the family as well as support the family's resources. PMID:26448874

  10. Does /sup 3/H-imipramine binding asymmetry indicate psychiatric illness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demeter, E.; Somogyi, E.; Tekes, K.; Majorossy, K.; Arato, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have accepted that serotonin is essentially an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human brain, so we propose that it is precisely this inhibiting effect that has weakened in psychiatric cases. We have investigated the asymmetry of tritiated imipramine binding sites (Bmax) in the frontal cortices of homicide victims (n = 6) and controls (n = 6) who died of natural causes. Of these homicide victimes examined in our experiment, five proved to have been psychiatric cases and one case had no psychiatric record. The two groups were comparable in age, gender and postmortem delay. The number of imipramine binding sites (Bmax) in the frontal cortices of controls was significantly higher in the right hemisphere than in the left hemisphere. But the homicide victims who were psychiatric cases had significantly higher (Bmax) values in the left hemisphere. While we only found higher Bmax values in the left hemisphere of homicide victims with mental diseases, our data may serve to prove the direct role of the serotonergic mechanism in the development of psychiatric cases. 15 refs.

  11. Experimental psychiatric illness and drug abuse models: from human to animal, an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott; Koob, George F

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical animal models have supported much of the recent rapid expansion of neuroscience research and have facilitated critical discoveries that undoubtedly benefit patients suffering from psychiatric disorders. This overview serves as an introduction for the following chapters describing both in vivo and in vitro preclinical models of psychiatric disease components and briefly describes models related to drug dependence and affective disorders. Although there are no perfect animal models of any psychiatric disorder, models do exist for many elements of each disease state or stage. In many cases, the development of certain models is essentially restricted to the human clinical laboratory domain for the purpose of maximizing validity, whereas the use of in vitro models may best represent an adjunctive, well-controlled means to model specific signaling mechanisms associated with psychiatric disease states. The data generated by preclinical models are only as valid as the model itself, and the development and refinement of animal models for human psychiatric disorders continues to be an important challenge. Collaborative relationships between basic neuroscience and clinical modeling could greatly benefit the development of new and better models, in addition to facilitating medications development.

  12. [Influenza-like illness. Therapeutic experience in family medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Cortés, Gerardo; García-Zavala, Guadalupe Ulises; Estrada-Andrade, María Elena

    2013-01-01

    influenza is a highly contagious respiratory disease. Surveillance in Mexico is based on the detection of Influenza-Like Illness (ILI) and antiviral treatment should begin within 48 hours to avoid the main complication, pneumonia. The aim was to describe the experience of treatment of ILI in a family medicine unit. a descriptive study included patients presented to the emergency room with ILI (38°C fever, headache and cough accompanied by other symptoms). We reviewed the reporting formats of Influenza. To follow up, we contacted them by telephone. Data are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. there were 537 patients attended with diagnosis of upper airway infection, 1.3 % met criteria for ILI. 85.7 % were men. The mean age was 18 ± 24.21 years. The patients were seen in a mean time of 19.14 hours after the symptoms have started; 100 % of the patients received treatment with oseltamivir and zanamivir; 14.3 % developed pneumonia. All the patients recovered without concomitant disease or complications. The use of a protocol in patients with influenza in a family medicine unit led an early diagnosis and treatment that favored the patients' health restoration.

  13. Psychiatric and family functioning in children with leukemia and their parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodarzi A

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports data from a cross-sectional investigation of the psychiatric and psychosocial functioning of 55 children diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia and their families at three points in time: diagnosis (newly diagnosed, 1 year postdiagnosis, and 1 year after the completion of chemotherapy (offtherapy. Results reveal minimal psychopathology in these children and their parents based on self-and informantreports and structured diagnostic interviews. These families appear to be functioning adequately and report more family cohesiveness and marital satisfaction after chemotherapy was completed. Coping strategies commonly used by children and their parents include problem solving, a positive outlook, and good communication. Implications for psychiatric consultation are presented.

  14. Engaging with Families Is a Challenge: Beliefs among Healthcare Professionals in Forensic Psychiatric Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrica Hörberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Being healthcare professionals in the complex field of forensic psychiatry care (FPC seems particularly challenging. Historically, families have almost been invisible in FPC. The aim of this study was to uncover beliefs among healthcare professionals concerning families of patients admitted for FPC. Using a hermeneutical approach inspired by Gadamer’s philosophy, group interviews with healthcare professionals in four Swedish forensic psychiatric clinics were analyzed. Analysis resulted in seven key beliefs. There were three beliefs about families: family belongingness is a resource for the patient; most families are broken and not possible to trust; and most families get in the way of the patient’s care. Four beliefs concerned encounters with families: it is important to achieve a balance and control over the family; it is essential to set aside one’s own values and morals; family-oriented work is an impossible mission; and family oriented work requires welcoming the families. Despite ethical dilemmas of working with families in FPC, healthcare professionals showed a willingness and desire to work in a more family-oriented manner. More knowledge, understanding, and caring tools are needed in order to meet the needs of the family as well as support the family’s resources.

  15. A mixed methods exploration of family involvement in medical care for older adults with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Pepin, Renee; Mueser, Kim T; Naslund, John A; Rolin, Stephanie A; Faber, Marjan J; Bartels, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Many older persons with serious mental illness (SMI) suffer from high rates of comorbid medical conditions. Although families play a critical role in psychiatric illness management among adults with SMI, their contributions to improving health outcomes in this population has received little attention. This study explored family involvement in medical care for older adults with SMI. This mixed methods study involved analysis of quantitative data collected from older adults with SMI and cardiovascular risk (n = 28) participating in a pilot study of an intervention designed to improve patient-centered primary care augmented by qualitative interviews with their relatives (n = 13) to explore family involvement in medical care. Approximately 89% of older adults with SMI reported family involvement in at least one aspect of their medical care (e.g., medication reminders, medical decision making). However, many family members reported that they were rarely involved in their relative's medical visits, and most did not perceive a need to be involved during routine care. Family members identified obesity as their relative's primary health concern and many wanted guidance from providers on effective strategies for supporting weight loss. Although many family members did not perceive a need to be involved in their relative's routine medical visits, they expressed interest in talking with providers about how to help their relative change unhealthy behaviors. Educating patients, families, and providers about the potential benefits of family involvement in medical care, including routine medical visits for persons with SMI and cardiovascular health risk may promote patient- and family-centered collaboration in this high-risk population.

  16. Coping with information style and family burden: Possible roles of self-stigma and hope among parents of children in a psychiatric inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson-Ohayon, I; Pijnenborg, G H M; Ben-Pazi, A; Taitel, S; Goldzweig, G

    2017-05-01

    Parents of children who are hospitalized in inpatient psychiatric units must cope with significant challenges. One of these challenges relates to the way in which they cope with illness-related information. The current study examined the relationship between two such coping styles - monitoring and blunting - and family burden among parents of children in a psychiatric inpatient unit. Moreover, the possible moderating roles played by hope and self-stigma in these associations were also examined. Questionnaires regarding coping with information style, self-stigma, hope and family burden were administered to 70 parents. A main positive effect of hope and a main negative effect of self-stigma were uncovered. An interaction between self-stigma and monitoring was also revealed, suggesting that for parents with high self-stigma, compared to those with low self-stigma, more monitoring was related to more burden. Tailoring family interventions according to coping style and self-stigma is highly recommended as a mean to reduce the family burden of parents whose child is hospitalized in a psychiatric inpatient unit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Work-family conflict and employee psychiatric disorders: the National Comorbidity Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frone, M R

    2000-12-01

    This study examined the relation between work-family conflict and several types of psychiatric disorders: mood, anxiety, substance dependence, and substance abuse. Survey data were obtained from a representative national sample of 2,700 employed adults who were either married or the parent of a child 18 years old or younger. Hierarchical logistic regression analyses revealed that both work-to-family and family-to-work conflict were positively related to having a mood, anxiety, and substance dependence disorder. Depending on the type of work-family conflict and type of disorder, employees who reported experiencing work-family conflict often were 1.99-29.66 times more likely than were employees who reported no work-family conflict to experience a clinically significant mental health problem. No support was found for gender differences.

  18. Psychiatric effects of military deployment on children and families: the use of play therapy for assessment and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Trenton; Countryman, Jacqueline

    2012-02-01

    Deployments in the United States military have increased greatly in the past 10 years. Families and children are psychiatrically affected by these deployments, and recent studies are clarifying these effects. This article focuses on the psychiatric effects of deployment on children and uses a composite case example to review the use of play therapy to treat children who are having psychiatric issues related to the deployment of one or both parents.

  19. "It's not that straightforward": when family support is challenging for mothers living with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Dinali N; Short, Liz; Fernbacher, Sabin

    2014-09-01

    Mental health service providers often have limited or problematic understanding of parents' support needs or experiences and family relationships. Moreover, the impact of family life and relationships for mothers with mental illness, and whether these relationships are experienced as positive or negative, have been largely underinvestigated. This article aims to increase understanding about the complexity of family relationships and support for mothers. Findings may be useful for services when considering family involvement, and for how to better meet the needs of mothers with mental illness and support their recovery. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 8 mothers with mental illness and 11 mental health service providers. This article presents a grounded theory analysis of the complexity of family relationships and support for mothers with mental illness. Family relationships of mothers with mental illness can be complex, potentially difficult, and challenging. Problems in relationships with partners and families, and experiences of abuse, can have harmful consequences on parenting, on mothers' and children's well-being, and on the support mothers receive. This project highlights a need to recognize and work with positive aspects and difficulties in family relationships as part of mental health service provision. Policies can be reviewed to increase the likelihood that mental health care will combine family-sensitive practice with practice that acknowledges difficult family relationships and experiences of family violence in order to maximize support to mothers with mental illness and their children. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Effects of psychotropic drugs and psychiatric illness on vocational aptitude and interest assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmes, E; Fekken, G C

    1986-07-01

    This study examined the vocational aptitude and interest scores of 326 inpatients at a large urban psychiatric hospital. The inpatient group performed significantly below the adult normative mean on eight of nine General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB) aptitude measures; the single exception was Verbal Aptitude. Further, GATB aptitude scores (adjusted for age and education) were significantly lower for patients who were receiving (N = 210) psychotropic medication than for patients who were not receiving (N = 114) psychotropic medication, again with the exception of Verbal Aptitude. Differentiation of patients into subsamples who were receiving particular drugs or drug combinations indicated that phenothiazines in combination with Anti-Parkinsonians were associated with the poorest GATB performances. Interestingly, self-reported vocational interests were not related in any systematic fashion to receiving medication. A variety of explanations that may account for these findings, including drug side-effects and severity or type of psychiatric disorder, were investigated. Implications for vocational counselors were discussed.

  1. Function assertive community treatment (FACT) and psychiatric service use in patients diagnosed with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drukker, M; van Os, J; Sytema, S; Driessen, G; Visser, E; Delespaul, P

    2011-09-01

    Previous work suggests that the Dutch variant of assertive community treatment (ACT), known as Function ACT (FACT), may be effective in increasing symptomatic remission rates when replacing a system of hospital-based care and separate community-based facilities. FACT guidelines propose a different pattern of psychiatric service consumption compared to traditional services, which should result in different costing parameters than care as usual (CAU). South-Limburg FACT patients, identified through the local psychiatric case register, were matched with patients from a non-FACT control region in the North of the Netherlands (NN). Matching was accomplished using propensity scoring including, among others, total and outpatient care consumption. Assessment, as an important ingredient of FACT, was the point of departure of the present analysis. FACT patients, compared to CAU, had five more outpatient contacts after the index date. Cost-effectiveness was difficult to assess. Implementation of FACT results in measurable changes in mental health care use.

  2. Family caregivers: Competence in the care of the chronically ill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Marina Vega Angarita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Because of the high demand and costs of care, chronic diseases have shown an increasing number of caregivers who develop their role without the required training and skill. Objective: To describe the capacity for home care of caregivers of patients with chronic illness in a service provider institution of San José de Cúcuta. Materials and methods: Descriptive quantitative cross-sectional study, developed in the fi rst half of 2017. The sample was composed by 360 caregivers of patients with chronic disease. We used the instruments developed by the Chronic Patient Care Group of the Faculty of Nursing of the National University of Colombia called: GCPC-UN-C © - technical characterization chart for family caregivers of patients with chronic non-transferable disease and the instrument “Caring” - short version to measure the competence of care at home. Results: In the study, low and medium levels of competence of the caregivers were reported in the exercise of their role, and the categories Knowledge and Enjoyment (Welfare were more affected. It is important to note that caregivers with a high level of competence were not reported. Conclusion: The results show that the need for nursing intervention in strengthening the competence of caregivers remains an important constant of professional performance.

  3. Impact of psychiatric and social characteristics on HIV sexual risk behavior in Puerto Rican women with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Emily Lenore Goldman; Loue, Sana; Sajatovic, Martha; Tisch, Daniel J

    2010-11-01

    Latinos in the United States have been identified as a high-risk group for depression, anxiety, and substance abuse. HIV/AIDS has disproportionately impacted Latinos. Review findings suggest that HIV-risk behaviors among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are influenced by a multitude of factors including psychiatric illness, cognitive-behavioral factors, substance use, childhood abuse, and social relationships. To examine the impact of psychiatric and social correlates of HIV sexual risk behavior in Puerto Rican women with SMI. Data collected longitudinally (from 2002 to 2005) in semi-structured interviews and from non-continuous participant observation was analyzed using a cross-sectional design. Bivariate associations between predictor variables and sexual risk behaviors were examined using binary and ordinal logistic regression. Linear regression was used to examine the association between significant predictor variables and the total number of risk behaviors the women engaged in during the 6 months prior to baseline. Just over one-third (35.9%) of the study population (N = 53) was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and GAF scores ranged from 30 to 80 with a median score of 60. Participants ranged in age from 18 to 50 years (M = 32.6 ± 8.7), three-fourths reported a history of either sexual or physical abuse or of both in childhood, and one-fourth had abused substances in their lifetimes. Bivariate analyses indicated that psychiatric and social factors were differentially associated with sexual risk behaviors. Multivariate linear regression models showed that suffering from increased severity of psychiatric symptoms and factors and living below the poverty line are predictive of engagement in a greater number of HIV sexual risk behaviors. Puerto Rican women with SMI are at high risk for HIV infection and are in need of targeted sexual risk reduction interventions that simultaneously address substance abuse prevention and treatment, childhood abuse, and the

  4. Discrimination attributed to mental illness or race-ethnicity by users of community psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbidon, Jheanell; Farrelly, Simone; Hatch, Stephani L; Henderson, Claire; Williams, Paul; Bhugra, Dinesh; Dockery, Lisa; Lassman, Francesca; Thornicroft, Graham; Clement, Sarah

    2014-11-01

    This study assessed participants' experienced discrimination and their causal attributions, particularly to mental illness or race-ethnicity. In a cross-sectional study, 202 service users with severe mental illnesses were interviewed to assess their reported experiences of discrimination. The Major Experiences of Discrimination Scale assessed major experiences of discrimination and their recency and frequency across 12 life domains and perceived reasons (attributions). The Everyday Experiences of Discrimination Scale assessed ten types of everyday discrimination and attributions for these experiences. Most participants (88%) reported discrimination in at least one life domain, and 94% reported ever experiencing everyday discrimination. The most common areas of major discrimination were mental health care (44%), neighbors (42%), police (33%), employment (31%), and general medical care (31%). The most common attributions for major discrimination were mental illness (57%), race-ethnicity (24%), education or income (20%), or appearance (19%). Almost half (47%) attributed experiences of major discrimination to two or more causes. No differences were found between racial-ethnic groups in overall experienced discrimination or in main attributions to mental illness. However, compared with the mixed and white groups, participants in the black group were most likely to endorse race-ethnicity as a main attribution (pethnic groups, and discrimination based on race-ethnicity was prevalent for the mixed and black groups. There is a need for antidiscrimination strategies that combine efforts to reduce the experience of discrimination attributed to mental illness and to race-ethnicity for racial-ethnic minority groups.

  5. Medical students' attitudes to mental illnesses and to psychiatry before and after the psychiatric clerkship: Training in a specialty and a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, Marina; Kontoangelos, Kontantinos; Peppou, Lily Evangelia; Arvaniti, Aikaterini; Samakouri, Maria; Douzenis, Athanasios; Papadimitriou, George N

    2017-12-01

    Medical students' attitudes to mental illnesses and psychiatry may be reshaped during the psychiatric training, with important implications in their future practice of the profession. Therefore, the present study set out to explore the impact of the psychiatric clerkship in students' attitudes, while taking into consideration the site of their practical training. To this end, a total of 678 final-year medical students were recruited. Students completed a self-reported questionnaire entailing the Attitudes to Psychiatry scale, the Attitudes to Mental Illness scale and the Greek Social Distance scale before and after their placement. Findings indicate that the psychiatric clerkship had a positive effect in reducing stigma towards both psychiatry and mental illnesses, with the effect being more pronounced in the general hospital with respect to the former, while in the specialty hospital was more marked regarding the latter. A further exploration of the determinants of change revealed that the improvement discerned in the general hospital was only among those without professional experience of mental illnesses. Therefore, the psychiatric clerkship may exert a substantial influence on shaping favourable attitudes towards mental illnesses and psychiatry; however, other elements should also be taken into consideration, if the clerkship is to tackle stigma in healthcare. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Perception and coping with stigma of mental illness: Arab families' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalky, Heyam F

    2012-07-01

    Family stigma is well documented in the research literature; however, it has only been recently that efforts have been undertaken to discuss the perception of stigma as reported by Arab families of relatives with mental illness. This clinical paper aims to identify families' perception of stigma related to mental illness, and to compare Arab families' approaches with various aspects of caring from different countries. Further, this paper discusses, in-depth, specific areas related to families' perceptions of stigma: What impacts does stigma perception have on those families and on their relatives' care outcomes and what are coping strategies are used to handle stigma and its impacts in such countries? This paper emphasizes that chronic mental illness contributes the most to families' perception of stigma. In this study, Arab families perceived the experience of caring for a family member with a mental illness with fear, loss, embarrassment, and disgrace of family reputations. Further, secrecy, isolation, despair, and helplessness were reported the most among different family groups in Jordan and Morocco. This paper reminds us that cultural norms and beliefs shape family members' perception of coping and their ability to manage caring for relatives with mental illnesses. Thus, more studies are needed concerning coping and management strategies that are culturally relevant. This could eventually guide the establishment of stigma reduction initiatives and expand understanding of stigma from different cultural perspectives.

  7. Epidemiology of Serious Mental Illness in Malta - Consequences for developing a new psychiatric hospital and community psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Anton

    2016-09-01

    Mental Health Services in Malta are presently at crossroads, because they are in the stage of increasing and strengthening the community services and considering closing the main psychiatric inpatient facility and replacing it with a new hospital. For proper planning of such changes, and ideal approach is that of basing these plans on results of population based epidemiological findings on rate of mental illness and required care. Such studies are strongly recommended, and this approach has already been used in Malta a couple of years ago prior to establishing inpatient care for Eating Disorders. In absence of such studies, this paper proposes ways how to use findings from available research and data to use as basis for such proper service plans.

  8. Anxiety, stress and depression in family caregivers of the mentally ill

    OpenAIRE

    Lídia Cabral; João Duarte; Manuela Ferreira; Carlos dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Background: The current policy guidelines on mental health aim to keep the mentally ill within the community, with the development of social support, including families, hence the emergence of the role of the family caregiver. Objectives: To identify socio-demographic variables influencing anxiety, depression and stress for the informal caregivers of the mentally ill; to determine the influence of family background variables on caregiver anxiety, depression and stress; to analyse the relat...

  9. The relationship between family expressed emotion, perceived criticism and criticism sensitivity and psychiatric outcomes following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alway, Yvette; Ponsford, Jennie; McKay, Adam

    2016-12-30

    Family expressed emotion (EE) is a strong predictor of outcome in a range of psychiatric and medical conditions. This study aimed to examine the relationship between family EE-criticism, patient perceived criticism and criticism sensitivity and psychiatric disorders following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were 60 patients with TBI and their family members. Patients were assessed for psychiatric disorders using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I) and completed the Perceived Criticism Measure (PCM) to determine levels of perceived criticism and criticism sensitivity. Family members completed the Family Questionnaire (FQ) to assess patient directed EE-criticism. Patients were reassessed approximately 12-months post-baseline. After controlling for diagnostic status at baseline, high criticism sensitivity at baseline was associated with greater probability of psychiatric diagnosis at follow-up (odds ratio=3.99, 95% CI=1.15-13.71). Family EE-criticism and perceived criticism were not predictive of patient diagnostic status at follow-up, but patients with high EE-family members were more likely to have a concurrent psychiatric diagnosis at baseline. Findings suggest that sensitivity to interpersonal criticism may have a role in the development and course of psychiatric disorders following TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Creativity and psychiatric illness: the search for a missing link--an historical context for current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, E; Sabbe, B; De Hert, M

    2013-01-01

    Creativity is an important human quality upon which many achievements of humankind are based. Defined as the ability to produce something that is novel and useful or meaningful, it is difficult to operationalize for research. This text provides an overview of the historical and cultural context of this research. The assumption that creativity is related to psychiatric vulnerability dates back to antiquity. The modern interest in the subject stems from the romantic era and gained a scientific aura in the 19th century. In the 20th century, a further entanglement of creativity and psychopathology came about through the influence of patient artists on regular art. Psychometric, psychodiagnostic and genetic research supports a connection between creativity and psychiatric illness within the bipolar-psychotic continuum, with schizotypy/thymotypy as prototypes of creativity-related disorders. Evolutionary hypotheses link the schizophrenia paradox to a survival advantage through enhanced creative ability. The relevance of scientific research in this complex and heterogeneous area can be increased if creativity and psychopathology are further operationalized and if underlying art concepts are made explicit and placed in a broader cultural context. There is a continuing need for meaningful definitions and measures, as well as a multidisciplinary collaboration. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes: Impact on Weight, Quality of Life, and Psychiatric Symptoms in Veterans With Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Jillian M; Erickson, Zachary D; Meyer, Hilary B; Baker, Matthew R; Gelberg, Hollie A; Arnold, Irina Y; Kwan, Crystal; Chamberlin, Valery; Rosen, Jennifer A; Shah, Chandresh; Hellemann, Gerhard; Lewis, Melissa M; Nguyen, Charles; Sachinvala, Neena; Amrami, Binyamin; Pierre, Joseph M; Ames, Donna

    2017-09-01

    Veterans with mental illness tend to have shorter life spans and suboptimal physical health because of a variety of factors. These factors include poor nutrition, being overweight, and smoking cigarettes. Nonphysical contributors that may affect quality of life are the stigma associated with mental illness, social difficulties, and spiritual crises. Current mental health treatment focuses primarily on the delivery of medication and evidence-based psychotherapies, which may not affect all the above areas of a Veteran's life as they focus primarily on improving psychological symptoms. Clinicians may find greater success using integrative, comprehensive, multifaceted programs to treat these problems spanning the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual domains. These pilot studies test an adjunctive, holistic, behavioral approach to treat mental illness. This pilot work explores the hypotheses that engagement in a greater number of therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) leads to improvement in quality of life, reduction of psychiatric symptoms, and weight loss. Institutional Review Boards for human subjects at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Greater Los Angeles and Long Beach Healthcare Systems approved pilot study activities at their sites. Pilot Study 1 was a prospective survey study of Veterans with mental illness, who gained weight on an atypical antipsychotic medication regimen, participating in a weight management study. At each session of the 1-year study, researchers asked a convenience sample of 55 Veterans in the treatment arm whether they engaged in each of the eight TLCs: exercise, nutrition/diet, stress management and relaxation, time in nature, relationships, service to others, religious or spiritual involvement, and recreation. Pilot Study 2 applied the TLC behavioral intervention and examined 19 Veterans with mental illness, who attended four classes about TLCs, received individual counseling over 9 weeks, and maintained journals to track TLC practice

  12. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts for Families Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation No. 52; Updated October 2017 Evaluation ... with serious emotional and behavioral problems need a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation. Comprehensive psychiatric evaluations usually require a ...

  13. The Relationship Between the Perceived Risk of Harm by a Family Member with Mental Illness and the Family Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Judith; Medoff, Deborah; Fang, Li Juan; Dixon, Lisa B

    2015-10-01

    Family members of people with serious mental illness (SMI) at times report that they act to stop their ill relative from self harm or harming others. This study examines the relationship between the perception of risk of harm and family distress, burden, empowerment, coping, physical and mental health, appraisal of the caregiving experience, family communication, and family functioning. The study is a secondary analysis of baseline data collected for a randomized study of the family-to-family peer driven education program (FTF). Four hundred thirty-four enrolled individuals who were seeking to participate in FTF completed survey items that asked if they had tried to stop or prevent their ill family member from harming themselves or others in the last 30 days. Participants who perceived a recent risk of harm by their ill relative reported more negative appraisals of caregiving, greater psychological distress, poorer mental health and greater objective burden compared with those who did not perceive a recent risk of harm. The results suggest that families of persons with SMI should be asked about perceived risk of harm to self and others, and the presence of perceived risk of harm should serve as a red flag indicating the need for further evaluation of the family experience and additional support for the family.

  14. [Shared decision-making and individualized goal setting - a pilot trial using PRISM (Pictorial Representation of Illness and Self Measure) in psychiatric inpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchi, S; Straub, S; Schwager, U

    2010-12-01

    Although there is much talk about shared decision making and individualized goal setting, there is a lack of knowledge and knowhow in their realization in daily clinical practice. There is a lack in tools for easy applicable tools to ameliorate person-centred individualized goal setting processes. In three selected psychiatric inpatients the semistructured, theory driven use of PRISM (Pictorial Representation of Illness and Self Measure) in patients with complex psychiatric problems is presented and discussed. PRISM sustains a person-centred individualized process of goal setting and treatment and reinforces the active participation of patients. The process of visualisation and synchronous documentation is validated positively by patients and clinicians. The visual goal setting requires 30 to 45 minutes. In patients with complex psychiatric illness PRISM was used successfully to ameliorate individual goal setting. Specific effects of PRISM-visualisation are actually evaluated in a randomized controlled trial.

  15. Phenomenology, psychiatric comorbidity and family history in referred preschool children with obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coskun Murat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The study aimed to investigate phenomenology, psychiatric comorbidity, and family history of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD in a clinical sample of normally developing preschool children with OCD. Method Subjects in this study were recruited from a clinical sample of preschool children (under 72 months of age who were referred to a university clinic. Subjects with a normal developmental history and significant impairment related to OCD symptoms were included in the study. Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale was used to assess OCD symptoms. Each subject was assessed for comorbid DSM-IV psychiatric disorders using a semi-structured interview. Parents were evaluated for lifetime history of OCD in individual sessions. Results Fifteen boys and ten girls (age range: 28 to 69 months; 54.12±9.08 months were included. Mean age of onset of OCD was 35.64±13.42 months. All subjects received at least one comorbid diagnosis. The most frequent comorbid disorders were non-OCD anxiety disorders (n=17; 68.0%, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD (n=15; 60.0%, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD (n=12; 48.0%, and tic disorders (n=6; 24.0%. Mean number of comorbid disorders was 3.65 and 2.35 for boys and girls, respectively. At least one parent received lifetime OCD diagnosis in 68 percent of the subjects. Conclusions The results indicated that OCD in referred preschool children is more common in males, highly comorbid with other psychiatric disorders, and associated with high rates of family history of OCD. Given the high rates of comorbidity and family history, OCD should be considered in referred preschool children with disruptive behavior disorders and/or with family history of OCD.

  16. Psychiatric morbidity in perimenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit L Jagtap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women in the perimenopausal period are reported to be vulnerable to psychiatric disorders. Aim: To assess the psychiatric morbidity in perimenopausal women aged 45–55 years. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, observational, hospital-based study was conducted at the Department of Psychiatry in a tertiary care hospital attached to a medical college. The study sample consisted of consecutive women in perimenopause as diagnosed by a gynecologist and written informed consent for inclusion in the study. Women with a previous history of psychiatric illnesses, with a major medical illness, or who had undergone surgical menopause were excluded from the study. All women were evaluated with a brief questionnaire for collecting demographic and clinical information and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for assessing psychiatric disorders. Results: Of the 108 women in perimenopause included in the study, 31% had depressive disorder, 7% had anxiety, while 5% had depressive disorder with anxiety features. Psychiatric morbidity was significantly more in women having lesser education, from rural background, with a history of psychiatric illness in the family, a later age of menarche, and in the late stage of perimenopause. Conclusions: Women in the perimenopause affected by psychiatric morbidity were most commonly diagnosed with depression. As perimenopause is a time of vulnerability in women, attention to signs and symptoms of depression may be required so that they may lead a more productive life.

  17. Associations among comorbid anxiety, psychiatric symptomatology, and diabetic control in a population with serious mental illness and diabetes: Findings from an interventional randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftab, Awais; Bhat, Chetan; Gunzler, Douglas; Cassidy, Kristin; Thomas, Charles; McCormick, Richard; Dawson, Neal V; Sajatovic, Martha

    2018-05-01

    Objective Serious mental illness and type II diabetes mellitus have a high comorbidity, and both have a higher prevalence of anxiety disorders compared to the general population. Targeted Training in Illness Management is a group-based self-management training approach which targets serious mental illness and type II diabetes mellitus concurrently. This analysis examines data from a randomized controlled trial of Targeted Training in Illness Management intervention to examine the impact of comorbid anxiety on baseline psychiatric symptomatology and diabetic control, and on longitudinal treatment outcomes. Methods We conducted secondary analyses on data from a prospective, 60-week, randomized controlled trial testing Targeted Training in Illness Management versus treatment as usual in 200 individuals with serious mental illness and diabetes. Primary outcomes included measures related to serious mental illness symptoms, functional status, general health status, and diabetes control. Measures were compared between those participants with anxiety disorders versus those without anxiety at baseline as well as over time using linear mixed effects analyses. Results Forty seven percent of the participants had one or more anxiety disorders. At baseline, those with an anxiety diagnosis had higher illness severity, depressive, and other psychiatric symptomatology and disability. Diabetic control (HbA1c) was not significantly different at baseline. In the longitudinal analyses, no significant mean slope differences over time (group-by-time interaction effect) between those with anxiety diagnoses and those without in treatment as usual group were found for primary outcomes. Within the Targeted Training in Illness Management arm, those with anxiety disorders had significantly greater improvement in mental health functioning. Those with anxiety comorbidity in the Targeted Training in Illness Management group demonstrated significantly lower HbA1c levels compared to no anxiety

  18. Family Burden and Social Support in Mental Illness: A Comparative Study in Schizophrenia and Mood Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    JOSY KADAVIL THOMAS

    2018-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to assess and compare the global functioning of individuals affected with two major mental illnesses i.e. schizophrenia and mood disorders , social support perceived by them, and family burden and social support perceived by their caregivers. The individuals affected with schizophrenia were found to be more severely ill with a longer duration of illness, and perceived less social support as compared to those with mood disorders. The caregivers’ perceived socia...

  19. Family function and its relationship to injury severity and psychiatric outcome in children with acquired brain injury: a systematized review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax Pericall, Maria Teresa; Taylor, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The psychological and psychiatric outcome of children with acquired brain injury is influenced by many variables. A review was undertaken to clarify the contribution of family function, how it relates to injury severity, and what particular aspects of family function influence psychological outcome in this group. A systematized review of the literature of studies published between 1970 and 2012 from OvidMedline, PsychoInfo, PsycARTICLES, and Cochrane was undertaken focusing on family function, injury severity, and psychiatric outcome. Thirty-six papers met the inclusion criteria. Injury severity was linked to the development of organic personality change. Family function before injury, measured by the Family Assessment Device or the Clinical Rating Scale, had a statistically significant effect on general psychological functioning in six out of eight studies. Family function had a significant effect for oppositional defiant disorder and secondary attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder. The effects of family function may differ depending on the age of the child and the severity of the injury. Some styles of parenting moderated recovery. After injury, family function was related to the child's contemporaneous psychiatric symptoms. The level of evidence for these papers was 3 or 4 (Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine criteria). Screening for some aspects of family functioning before injury and family function during the rehabilitation phase may identify children at risk of psychiatric disorders. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  20. Hospice Counsellor Facing the Grief of the Terminally Ill Child and Its Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Godawa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The child’s illness, suffering and death provoke many emotions in the family. The ill child and its family both experience grief which is an emotional reaction to the danger of losing health or life. Support offered by home hospices for children aims at overcoming the destructive influence of illness. A hospice counsellor’s task is to improve the ill child and its family’s quality of life. He is helping the family overcome grief and prepare for the child’s death. The hospice team supports the family members who experience anticipatory and later, actual mourning. Preventing pathological effects of grief is a basic challenge for people who offer help.

  1. Adolescents with Functional Somatic Symptoms: The influence of family therapy on empowerment and illness beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgaard, Ditte Roth; Rask, Charlotte; Dehlholm-Lambertsen, Birgitte

    psychological treatment and the significance of illness beliefs and empowerment in children and adolescents with severe FSS is scarce. Aims: To conduct a qualitative study which aims to examine how specific illness beliefs and a sense of empowerment evolve and change during specialized family-based treatment......Background: Young patients with Functional Somatic Symptoms (FSS) are common and may present in all clinical settings. Psychological treatment targeting dysfunctional illness beliefs and poor sense of empowerment has been shown effective for FSS in adults. In comparison current knowledge about...... (IPA). Results: Preliminary data from a pilotstudy with 2 families, from interviews conducted prior to family therapy, indicate that illness beliefs and sense of empowerment may be diverging for children and their parents, and are influenced by many factors, such as health professionals, family history...

  2. Prevalence of mental illness within families in a regional child-focussed mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Michael F A; Maybery, Darryl J; Goodyear, Melinda

    2018-04-01

    Nearly 50% of all mental illnesses begin in childhood before the age of 14 years, and over 20% of parents have a mental illness. Few studies have examined the co-occurrence of mental illnesses in parents and children. In the present study, we examined the extent of mental illness within families of 152 clients attending an Australian regional child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS). A cross-sectional study design was employed involving a case record review and clinician-completed questionnaire of the children and youth attending a CAMHS. It was found that 79% of these children were living with a parent with mental illness. The predominant diagnosis of both child and parent was an anxiety or mood disorder, and many families had co-occurring risk factors of domestic violence and limited social supports. The findings in this Australian cohort are similar to those of other international research. While novel in nature, the present study has highlighted the extent of both mental illness and scarce supports for both children and parents in the same family. The findings indicate the need for a coordinated multiservice delivery of appropriate and consistent family-focussed interventions, responding to both mental illness and social supports for children and parents. Further research should examine specific components of family need and support, as seen through the eyes of the child and their parent. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Walking a mile in their shoes... Symbolic interactionism for families living with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, J

    1997-06-01

    1. With deinstitutionalization and changes in legal rights of patients, care of patients with severe mental illness has shifted from a hospital-based to a community-centered system. 2. Families often serve as an extension of the mental health system, providing important case management functions such as assessment, monitoring, crisis management, and advocacy. 3. Symbolic interactionism provides a framework for understanding the role of meaning in individual and family responses to the disruption of life that results from severe mental illness.

  4. Oregon's Gun Relief Program for Adjudicated Mentally Ill Persons: The Psychiatric Security Review Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Juliet; Bloom, Joseph D

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the State of Oregon's implementation of two programs designed to comply with federal gun laws regarding reporting individuals who have received mental health adjudications in criminal and civil courts. One mandate requires that states submit names of adjudicated individuals to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) while the second requires that the state establish a qualifying gun restoration program for those disqualified from gun ownership. In 2009, Oregon's Legislature developed an administrative approach to gun restoration and assigned the responsibility for conducting these hearing to the Oregon Psychiatric Security Review Board (PSRB). The PSRB is a state administrative board that has existed since 1977 and has been primarily focused on the supervision and treatment of adult and juvenile insanity acquittees. The gun restoration program began in 2010, but to date has only received three completed petitions requesting restoration of firearm rights. The article concludes with a discussion that surmises why very few of the Oregonians who are listed in NICS have submitted petitions for relief. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Children in Beardslee's family intervention: relieved by understanding of parental mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihkala, Heljä; Sandlund, Mikael; Cederström, Anita

    2012-11-01

    Beardslee's family intervention (FI), which is a family-based preventive method for children of mentally ill parents, has been implemented on a national level in Sweden. Fourteen children and parents from nine families were interviewed about how the FI was for the children. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. A central finding was children's sense of relief and release from worry because of more knowledge and openness about the parent's illness in the family. The results indicating relief for the children are encouraging.

  6. The stigma of mental illness in Arab families: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardas, L A; Simmons, L A

    2015-11-01

    The stigma of mental illness varies significantly from culture to culture and from person to person. To date, little is known about how mental illness stigma manifests within the Arab community. This study aimed at bringing clarity to the concept of 'mental illness stigma' as it applies to Arab families. Nursing's holistic and patient-centered approach is integral to helping Arab patients and their families appropriately incorporate individual values, beliefs, and cultural perspectives into treatment plans. This study establishes a scientific alert for professionals at all levels to avoid making false generalizations about a specific culture that are not based on specific research findings from that culture. Accessing mental health services is a critical step towards reducing the burden of mental illness. The stigma of mental illness is one of the most common reasons for not seeking mental health care leading to negative health consequences and undue suffering for many individuals and their families. Stigma is embedded in its social context. What may be considered acceptable in one society may be considered unacceptable and open to stigmatization in other societies. Arabs have a shared set of values, beliefs, and traditions that are substantially different from those of Westerners. Further, in most Arab countries, formal mental health resources are scarce and people with mental illness experience the compounded disadvantages of poverty and illness stigma. To date, little is known about how mental illness stigma manifests within the Arab community making it difficult to design and test interventions that support Arab individuals with mental illness and their families in treatment seeking and adherence. Using Rodger's concept analysis method, we examined how 'mental illness stigma' operates within an Arab context as a first step towards elucidating culturally competent approaches to treatment. This analysis provides a foundation for future work in the areas of mental

  7. Excess mortality in people with mental illness: findings from a Northern Italy psychiatric case register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starace, Fabrizio; Mungai, Francesco; Baccari, Flavia; Galeazzi, Gian Maria

    2018-03-01

    People with mental disorders show mortality rates up to 22.2 times higher than that of the general population. In spite of progressive increase in life expectancy observed in the general population, the mortality gap of people suffering from mental health problems has gradually widened. The aim of this paper was to study mortality rates in people suffering from mental illness in a cohort of people (16,981 subjects) in the local mental health register of the province of Modena during the decade 2006-2015. Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) were calculated to compare the mortality of people with mental disorders to the mortality of people living in the province of Modena and the excess of mortality was studied in relation to the following variables: gender, age group, diagnosis and causes of death. In addition, Poisson regression analysis was performed to study the association between patient characteristics and mortality. An overall excess mortality of 80% was found in subjects under the care of mental health services as compared to the reference population (SMR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.7-1.9). Subjects in the 15-44 year group presented the highest SMR (9.2, 95% CI 6.9-11.4). The most prevalent cause of death was cancer (28.1% of deaths). At the Poisson regression, the diagnosis "Substance abuse and dependence" showed the highest relative risk (RR) (4.00). Moreover, being male, single, unemployed and with a lower qualification was associated with higher RRs. Our study confirms that subjects with mental illness have higher SMR. Noteworthy, the overall higher risk of mortality was observed in the younger age group.

  8. The role of culture and family in mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschke, V; Doi, T

    1989-03-01

    A case is presented of a 25-year-old Oriental man who shocked his family by revealing his homosexuality, choosing atheism over his family's traditional Christian religion, and attempting suicide. The discussant examines the cultural implications of the family's reactions to the patient's clinical picture.

  9. The characteristics of family functioning with mentally ill children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Jelkić Milica; Mandić-Gajić Gordana; Stojanović Zvezdana; Đokić Milan; Eror Aleksandar; Kolundžija Ksenija

    2018-01-01

    Background/Aim. The family functioning and characteristics are the major risk factors in the genesis and persistence of mental disorders in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of functioning of family with mentally ill children and adolescents. Methods. This study explored 47 families with a child/adolescent suffering from mental disorders and 47 families of age matched healthy children/adolescents. The socio-demographic questionnaire, Social Adaptation Self-ev...

  10. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in United States military spouses: The Millennium Cohort Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Maria M; Corry, Nida H; Qian, Meng; Li, Meng; McMaster, Hope Seib; Fairbank, John A; Stander, Valerie A; Hollahan, Laura; Marmar, Charles R

    2018-05-10

    Approximately half of US service members are married, equating to 1.1 million military spouses, yet the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among military spouses remains understudied. We assessed the prevalence and correlates of eight mental health conditions in spouses of service members with 2-5 years of service. We employed baseline data from the Millennium Cohort Family Study, a 21-year longitudinal survey following 9,872 military-affiliated married couples representing all US service branches and active duty, Reserve, and National Guard components. Couples were surveyed between 2011 and 2013, a period of high military operational activity associated with Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. Primary outcomes included depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic, alcohol misuse, insomnia, somatization, and binge eating, all assessed with validated self-report questionnaires. A total of 35.90% of military spouses met criteria for at least one psychiatric condition. The most commonly endorsed conditions were moderate-to-severe somatization symptoms (17.63%) and moderate-to-severe insomnia (15.65%). PTSD, anxiety, depression, panic, alcohol misuse, and binge eating were endorsed by 9.20%, 6.65%, 6.05%, 7.07%, 8.16%, and 5.23% of spouses, respectively. Having a partner who deployed with combat resulted in higher prevalence of anxiety, insomnia, and somatization. Spouses had lower prevalence of PTSD, alcohol misuse, and insomnia but higher rates of panic and binge eating than service members. Both members of a couple rarely endorsed having the same psychiatric problem. One third of junior military spouses screened positive for one or more psychiatric conditions, underscoring the need for high-quality prevention and treatment services. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The association between intelligence scores and family history of psychiatric disorder in schizophrenia patients, their siblings and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Kim H. W.; Derks, Eske M.; Kahn, René S.; Linszen, Don; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2013-01-01

    The degree of intellectual impairment in schizophrenia patients and their relatives has been suggested to be associated with the degree of familial loading for schizophrenia. Since other psychiatric disorders are also more present in relatives of schizophrenia patients, the definition of family

  12. [Children of mentally ill parents: the impact of parental psychiatric diagnosis, comorbidity, severity and chronicity on the well-being of children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand-Grefe, S; Geers, P; Petermann, F; Plass, A

    2011-01-01

    Children of mentally ill parents are known as a high-risk population for the development of psychological disturbances. In this study, the psychiatric diagnoses, the severity and chronicity and the comorbidity of a parental mental illness as well as the non-specific parameters were examined in terms of their influence on the children's mental health. n = 62 children of psychiatric inpatients were examined regarding their psychic symptomatology, assessed with the CBCL-Parent Report Form. The psychiatric ICD-10 diagnoses and comorbidities as well as the severity (CGI) of the mentally ill parents were collected from psychiatric assessment forms. Children of parents with personality disorders (PD) are evaluated as highly affected by their parents, regardless of whether the PD is the primary or the comorbid diagnosis. Children of parents suffering from addictive disorders are seen as the least affected by their parents. Overall, children of parents with multiple diagnoses tend to be rated as more affected. Severity of illness and chronicity do not have a considerable impact on the children's development of mental health problems. Strikingly, children with a high length of exposure to a parental illness are psychologically less affected than children with shorter times of exposure. Thus, children possibly acquire effective coping mechanisms with increasing time of exposure. The results reveal the necessity of preventive programmes, especially in case of personality disorders. In addition the necessity for external assessment of the children becomes clear, especially in those cases where the parents exhibit a poor acceptance of their disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Human trafficking and severe mental illness: an economic analysis of survivors' use of psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Maria; Oram, Siân; Howard, Louise M; Trevillion, Kylee; Byford, Sarah

    2016-07-19

    Previous studies have found a high prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among survivors of human trafficking. European countries are required to assist trafficked people in their psychological recovery, but there are no rigorous data on the costs of doing so. The objectives of this study were to quantify the use of secondary mental health services by survivors of human trafficking; to estimate the cost of survivors' use of secondary mental health services provided by the UK National Health Service (NHS); and to identify factors that predict higher costs of mental health service provision. Historical cohort study of psychiatric patients who had experienced human trafficking. The South London and Maudsley NHS Trust (SLaM) Biomedical Research Centre Case Register Interactive Search (CRIS) database was used to identify anonymised full patient records of patients who had experienced human trafficking and who had accessed SLaM mental health services between 2007 and 2012. Data were extracted on socio-demographic and trafficking characteristics and contacts with mental health services. Total costs were calculated by multiplying each resource use item by an appropriate unit cost. Factors that predicted high mental health service costs were analysed using regression models. One hundred nineteen patients were included in the analysis. Mean total mental health service costs per patient were £27,293 (sd 80,985) and mean duration of contact with services was 1490 (sd 757) days (approximately 4 years). Regression analysis showed that higher costs were associated with diagnosis of psychotic disorder (p trafficking violence (p = 0.06). Patients diagnosed with psychotic disorders cost approximately £32,635 more than patients with non-psychotic disorders/psychological distress but no formal diagnosis and patients whose clinical notes documented pre-trafficking violence cost £88,633 more than patients for whom pre-trafficking violence was not

  14. Family functioning in families of first-episode psychosis patients as compared to chronic mentally ill patients and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutra, Katerina; Triliva, Sofia; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Stefanakis, Zacharias; Basta, Maria; Lionis, Christos; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2014-11-30

    The present study aimed to investigate possible differences in family environment among patients experiencing their First Episode of Psychosis (FEP), chronic patients and controls. Family cohesion and flexibility (FACES-IV) and psychological distress (GHQ-28) were evaluated in families of 50 FEP and 50 chronic patients, as well as 50 controls, whereas expressed emotion (FQ) and family burden (FBS) were assessed in families of FEP and chronic patients. Multivariable linear regression analysis, adjusted for confounders, indicated impaired cohesion and flexibility for families of FEP patients compared to controls, and lower scores for families of chronic patients compared to those of FEP patients. Caregivers of chronic patients scored significantly higher in criticism, and reported higher burden and psychological distress than those of FEP patients. Our findings suggest that unbalanced levels of cohesion and flexibility, high criticism and burden appeared to be the outcome of psychosis and not risk factors triggering the onset of the illness. Furthermore, emotional over-involvement both in terms of positive (i.e. concern) and negative behaviors (i.e. overprotection) is prevalent in Greek families. Psychoeducational interventions from the early stages of the illness should be considered to promote caregivers' awareness regarding the patients' illness, which in turn, may ameliorate dysfunctional family interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Emancipation of the works of artists with psychiatric illness - Artistic reflections from the twentieth century and the Art Brut].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesznivy, Edit

    2015-01-01

    The study presents the emancipation of the artworks of psychiatric patients through the review of four centuries, focusing on some of the most important medical cultural and art historical stages of the period between the 18th and the 21st century, which is a particularly relevant era in this regard. It touches on the collections linked to psychiatrists and hospitals that were formed primarily on the basis of the researches that were analyzing the connection between creativity and mental illness. After that, the study discusses the ever-changing attitudes and preferences of artists' and major artistic movements towards psychosis and the pictorial world of the psychotic. With great care, it analyses the aesthetic category of the art brut, which is connected to the French painter Jean Dubuffet and was born in the middle of the 1940s, and the relationship between contemporary art and art brut. In connection with some of the most significant art brut collections and exhibitions, the works of a few classical and contemporary art brut artists are also discussed (Adolf Wolfli, Louis Soutter, Aloise Corbaz, August Walla ).

  16. Refocusing on physical health: Community psychiatric nurses' perceptions of using enhanced health checks for people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressington, Daniel; Mui, Jolene; Wells, Harvey; Chien, Wai Tong; Lam, Claire; White, Jacquie; Gray, Richard

    2016-06-01

    In the present qualitative, descriptive study, we explored Hong Kong community psychiatric nurses' (CPN) perceptions of using comprehensive physical health checks for service users diagnosed with severe mental illness (SMI). Research interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 11 CPN in order to explore their perceptions about the use of the Health Improvement Profile (HIP) over a 1-year period. Interview data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The analysis revealed that the majority of CPN appreciated the comprehensive focus on the physical health of their clients and reported positive changes in their clinical practice. Many of them observed an increase in the motivation of their clients to improve their physical health, and also noted observable benefits in service users' well-being. The use of the HIP also helped the CPN identify implementation barriers, and highlighted areas of the tool that required modifications to suit the local cultural and clinical context. To our knowledge, this is the first study conducted in an Asian mental health service that explores nurses' views about using comprehensive health checks for people with SMI. The findings suggest that such approaches are viewed as being acceptable, feasible, and potentially beneficial in the community mental health setting. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Follow-Up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness (FUH) Quality Measure Data – by Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  18. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Follow-Up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness (FUH) Quality Measure Data – by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  19. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Follow-Up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness (FUH) Quality Measure Data – National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  20. The conceptualization of family care during critical illness in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J. de Beer

    the objective of this study was to explore the meaning of family care within a South African context. Methodology: This .... Additionally, the diverse societal contexts within which family care is ..... of palliative and end of life care in hospitals, hospices or homes (Abiven .... representations of community and their implications for.

  1. Stigma by association and family burden among family members of people with mental illness: the mediating role of coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sanden, Remko L M; Pryor, John B; Stutterheim, Sarah E; Kok, Gerjo; Bos, Arjan E R

    2016-09-01

    When someone has a mental illness, family members may share the experience of stigma. Past research has established that family members' experiences of stigma by association predict psychological distress and lower quality-of-life. The present study, conducted with 503 family members of people with mental illness examined the prevalence of 14 different coping strategies. Of greater importance, we examined the role of these coping strategies as mediators of the relationships between stigma by association and family burden, on the one hand, and outcomes, such as psychological distress and quality-of-life, on the other. The results showed that both perceived stigma by association and family burden are associated with greater psychological distress and lower quality-of-life, and that most coping strategies mediate these relationships. Adaptive coping strategies were related to reduced negative outcomes, while most maladaptive coping strategies were related to enhanced negative outcomes. Implications for intervention development are discussed.

  2. Caring for families of the terminally ill in Malaysia from palliative care nurses' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Pathma; Lee, Susan; O'Connor, Margaret; Barnett, Tony

    2014-01-01

    To describe the process that nurses experienced in engaging with families in Malaysian palliative care settings and the challenges they faced. In palliative care settings, nurses and the terminally ill person's family members interact very closely with each other. It is important for nurses to work with families to ensure that the care of the terminally ill person is optimised. A qualitative design using grounded theory methods was used to describe how nurses engaged with families and the challenges they faced. Twenty-two nurses from home care and inpatient palliative care settings across Malaysia participated in this study. Data were collected through seven interviews and eight focus group discussions conducted between 2007-2009. The main problem identified by nurses was the different expectations to patient care with families. The participants used the core process of Engaging with families to resolve these differences and implemented strategies described as Preparing families for palliative care, Modifying care and Staying engaged to promote greater consistency and quality of care. When participants were able to resolve their different expectations with families, these resulted in positive outcomes, described as Harmony. However, negative outcomes of participants not being able to resolve their different expectations with families were Disharmony. This study highlights the importance of engaging and supporting families of the terminally ill as well as providing a guide that may be used by nurses and carers to better respond to families' needs and concerns. The study draws attention to the need for formal palliative care education, inclusive of family care, to enable nurses to provide the terminally ill person and their family effective and appropriate care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The influence of family adaptability and cohesion on anxiety and depression of terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Yoon; Jeong, Young-Jin; Lee, Junyong; Moon, Nayun; Bang, Inho; Kim, Hyunju; Yun, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Yong-I; Jeon, Tae-Hee

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of family members on terminally ill cancer patients by measuring the relationship of the presence of the family caregivers, visiting time by family and friends, and family adaptability and cohesion with patient's anxiety and depression. From June, 2016 to March, 2017, 100 terminally ill cancer patients who were admitted to a palliative care unit in Seoul, South Korea, were surveyed, and their medical records were reviewed. The Korean version of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales III and Hospital Anxiety-Depression Scale was used. Chi-square and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. The results of the chi-square analysis showed that the presence of family caregivers and family visit times did not have statistically significant effects on anxiety and depression in terminally ill cancer patients. In multiple logistic regression, when adjusted for age, sex, ECOG PS, and the monthly average income, the odds ratios (ORs) of the low family adaptability to anxiety and depression were 2.4 (1.03-5.83) and 5.4 (1.10-26.87), respectively. The OR of low family cohesion for depression was 5.4 (1.10-27.20) when adjusted for age, sex, ECOG PS, and monthly average household income. A higher family adaptability resulted in a lower degree of anxiety and depression in terminally ill cancer patients. The higher the family cohesion, the lower the degree of depression in the patient. The presence of the family caregiver and the visiting time by family and friends did not affect the patient's anxiety and depression.

  4. Health Education Audiovisual Media on Mental Illness for Family

    OpenAIRE

    Wahyuningsih, Dyah; Wiyati, Ruti; Subagyo, Widyo

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to produce health education media in form of Video Compact Disk (VCD). The first disk consist of method how to take care of patient with social isolation and the second disk consist of method how to take care of patient with violence behaviour. The implementation of audiovisual media is giving for family in Psyciatric Ward Banyumas hospital. The family divided in two groups, the first group was given health education about social isolation and the second group was given healt...

  5. [National socialist violent measures against psychiatric patients: ways of coping by family members].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delius, P

    1991-03-01

    In the cause of an historical study dealing with the closing of an ancient psychiatric hospital in Luebeck during the 2nd world war the infrafamilial structures of the deported patients were explored. Among 136 clinical reports 42 cases were found in which families succeeded to get into contact with deported patients, in three cases their efforts to have them discharged were successful. Stress was laid on the exploration of 12 relatives of deported or murdered psychiatric patients. The interviews were structured following the "oral history" concept and psychological interpretation was added. Focussing on infrafamiliar coping processes which were developed facing the NS-propaganda it was found that working-class people tended to see the victim in an idealized role. They showed a strong projective defence remembering Psychiatry as an integral part of nazi-system. Others saw their relatives as victims of war in general. Some of the relatives tried to repress the existence of surviving patients for a long time, a smaller group clinged to the idea of Euthanasia. Remarkable were the deep effects of eugenic nazi-propaganda on the following generation. The national socialistic violence concerning their fathers or mothers was often a total "tabu" and they nowadays still fear to get into contact with Psychiatry being aware of "suffering" from the same "bad blood" as their murdered relatives. Dealing with patients' resistance to therapeutic efforts in gerontopsychiatric wards their heritage of the nazi ear should be taken into account.

  6. Family Life and Social Medicine: Discourses and Discontents Surrounding Puebla's Psychiatric Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Kathryn Law

    2017-12-01

    Drawing on clinical data from 15 months of on-site participant observation in the only public psychiatric hospital in the state of Puebla, Mexico, this article advances our understanding of globalization in relation to psychiatry. I challenge the construction of psychiatry as only treating the individual patient and provide grounded doctor-patient-family member interaction in a Mexican psychiatric clinic in order to review what happens when doctors cannot interact with patients as atomized individuals even though in theory they are trained to think of patients that way. Challenged by severe structural constraints and bolstered by lessons from other nations' efforts at deinstitutionalization, psychiatrists in Puebla push to keep patients out of the inpatient wards and in their respective communities. To this end, psychiatrists call upon co-present kin who are identified both as the customer and part of the caretaking system outside the clinic. This modification to the visit structure changes the dynamic and content of clinical visits while doctors seamlessly respond to unspoken beliefs and values that are central to local life, ultimately showing that efforts to define a "global psychiatry" informed by global policy will fail because it cannot exist in a uniform way-interpersonal interaction and personal experience matters.

  7. How are the Experiences and Needs of Families of Individuals with Mental Illness Reflected in Medical Education Guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebschleger, Joanne; Scheid, Jeanette; Luz, Clare; Mickus, Maureen; Liszewski, Christine; Eaton, Monaca

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This descriptive study explored the extent that medical education curriculum guidelines contained content about the experiences and needs of family members of people with serious mental illness. Methods: Key family-focused-literature themes about the experiences and needs of families of individuals with mental illness were drawn from a…

  8. Electronic cigarettes and mental illness: Reviewing the evidence for help and harm among those with psychiatric and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Kathryn; Valentine, Gerald; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2017-06-01

    Adults with mental illness (MI) use combustible tobacco at increased rates and have greater difficulty quitting smoking. Given the increasing popularity of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), their use by those with MI has important health implications. While preliminary evidence suggests potential benefits of e-cigarette use for those with MI, well-controlled, systematic research examining appeal, correlates, and consequences of e-cigarette use in this vulnerable population is lacking. This review evaluated current knowledge of e-cigarette use and potential for help and/or harm among adults with MI. The search strategy resulted in k = 88 reports, of which k = 9 were deemed relevant. E-cigarette use is prevalent among those with MI, as is concurrent use of e-cigarettes and combustibles. E-cigarettes appeal to those with MI as a viable alternative to combustible tobacco, and their use does not appear to exacerbate nicotine addiction or psychiatric symptoms. However, the long-term impact of e-cigarette use on combustible tobacco use and other health indices is largely unknown. Rigorous research and improved knowledge regarding risks and benefits of e-cigarette use within this vulnerable population are needed to inform whether special consideration is warranted towards those with MI in developing tobacco control policies and health communications. Recommendations for future e-cigarette research include improved assessment of the following: 1) psychodiagnostic variability, 2) flavor preferences, 3) the longitudinal impact on combustible tobacco use, and 4) impact of tobacco product communications. As with combustible cigarettes, individuals with MI may display unique e-cigarette use patterns from that of the general population. (Am J Addict 2017;26:306-315). Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Impact of family support on psychiatric disorders and seizure control in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalakshmi, Sita; Padmaja, Gaddamanugu; Vooturi, Sudhindra; Bogaraju, Anand; Surath, Mohandas

    2014-08-01

    Psychiatric disorders (PDs) are frequently observed in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). In this study, we aimed to assess factors associated with PDs in patients with JME. Retrospective analysis of data of 90 consecutive patients with JME was performed. Assessment of DSM-IV Axis I clinical disorders was done using Structured Clinical Interview for Axis I. Diagnosis of PDs is made when the score exceeds the threshold provided by the DSM-IV. We also applied the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale which is part of the multiaxial evaluation of the DSM-IV (Axis-V). Using seizure frequency score at presentation, we classified subjects into controlled and uncontrolled groups. In the current cohort, 29 (32.2%) patients were diagnosed with PDs. Fewer patients with PDs had family support (48.3% vs. 83.6%; p=0.001). Lifetime prevalence of PDs was higher among patients with current PDs (96.6% vs. 18.0%; pseizure control (7.8% vs. 73.1%; pseizure control. Patients with lack of family support had poor seizure control (0% vs. 36.9%; pseizure control and higher incidence of PDs in patients with JME. Lack of family support increases neither the odds of PDs nor seizure control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. In our own voice-family companion: reducing self-stigma of family members of persons with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlick, Deborah A; Nelson, Ann H; Mattias, Kate; Selzer, James; Kalvin, Carla; Wilber, Charles H; Huntington, Brittney; Holman, Caroline S; Corrigan, Patrick W

    2011-12-01

    This article reports preliminary findings from a novel, family peer-based intervention designed to reduce self-stigma among family members of people with serious mental illness. A total of 158 primary caregivers of patients with schizophrenia were recruited from a large urban mental health facility (93 caregivers) or from a family and consumer advocacy organization (65 caregivers). Caregivers (N=122) who reported they perceived at least a moderate level of mental illness-related stigma were evaluated on measures of self-stigma, withdrawal, secrecy, anxiety, and social comparison and randomly assigned to receive one of two, one-session group interventions: a peer-led intervention (In Our Own Voice-Family Companion [IOOV-FC]) designed to stimulate group discussion or a clinician-led family education session, which delivered information about mental illness in a structured, didactic format. IOOV-FC consisted of playing a videotape of family members who describe their experiences coping with stigma, which was followed by a discussion led by two family peers who modeled sharing their own experiences and facilitated group sharing. Of 24 family members and ten consumers, 96% rated the videotape above a predetermined acceptability threshold on a 19-item scale assessing cultural sensitivity, respect for different stakeholders, relevance of content, and technical quality (α=.92). Caregivers receiving IOOV-FC with low to moderate pretreatment anxiety reported a substantial reduction in self-stigma (effect size=.50) relative to those receiving clinician-led family education (p=.017) as well as significant reductions in secrecy (p=.031). Peer-led group interventions may be more effective in reducing family self-stigma than clinician-led education, at least for persons reporting experiencing low to moderate anxiety levels on a standard questionnaire

  11. Understanding Response Rates to Surveys About Family Members' Psychological Symptoms After Patients' Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ann C; Downey, Lois; Engelberg, Ruth A; Nielsen, Elizabeth; Ciechanowski, Paul; Curtis, J Randall

    2017-07-01

    Achieving adequate response rates from family members of critically ill patients can be challenging, especially when assessing psychological symptoms. To identify factors associated with completion of surveys about psychological symptoms among family members of critically ill patients. Using data from a randomized trial of an intervention to improve communication between clinicians and families of critically ill patients, we examined patient-level and family-level predictors of the return of usable surveys at baseline, three months, and six months (n = 181, 171, and 155, respectively). Family-level predictors included baseline symptoms of psychological distress, decisional independence preference, and attachment style. We hypothesized that family with fewer symptoms of psychological distress, a preference for less decisional independence, and secure attachment style would be more likely to return questionnaires. We identified several predictors of the return of usable questionnaires. Better self-assessed family member health status was associated with a higher likelihood and stronger agreement with a support-seeking attachment style with a lower likelihood, of obtaining usable baseline surveys. At three months, family-level predictors of return of usable surveys included having usable baseline surveys, status as the patient's legal next of kin, and stronger agreement with a secure attachment style. The only predictor of receipt of surveys at six months was the presence of usable surveys at three months. We identified several predictors of the receipt of surveys assessing psychological symptoms in family of critically ill patients, including family member health status and attachment style. Using these characteristics to inform follow-up mailings and reminders may enhance response rates. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The characteristics of family functioning with mentally ill children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelkić Milica

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The family functioning and characteristics are the major risk factors in the genesis and persistence of mental disorders in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of functioning of family with mentally ill children and adolescents. Methods. This study explored 47 families with a child/adolescent suffering from mental disorders and 47 families of age matched healthy children/adolescents. The socio-demographic questionnaire, Social Adaptation Self-evaluation scale (SASS and Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale (FACES III (Olson, 1983 were completed by parents. Results. For all three FACES III dimensions multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA showed significant differences between groups ( Wilks λ = .887; F = 3.839; df = 3; p = 0.012. Univariate analysis results showed significant differences for cohesiveness F = 6.99 p = 0.001 and adaptability F = 10.07 p = 0 .001. The analysis of the social adaption (SASS assessment showed that the mean score for clinical vs. non-clinical group was 39.66 ± 6.82 vs. 38.06 ± 8.44 without significant difference between groups (p = 0.32. The families of mentally ill children showed frequently lower socioeconomic status and education level, higher number of children per family, and broken home. Conclusion. The results suggested that cohesiveness and adaptability were significantly more prominent among families with mentaly ill children, but adaptation was similar to families with healthy children. It would be useful to evaluate adaptability, cohesiveness and adaptation of primary families when planning prevention and rehabillitation of mentally ill children and adolescent.

  13. Evaluation of childhood trauma with respect to criminal behavior, dissociative experiences, adverse family experiences and psychiatric backgrounds among prison inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Merih; Bilici, Mustafa

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate childhood trauma in relation to criminal behavior, dissociative experiences, adverse family experiences during childhood and psychiatric backgrounds among prison inmates. In total, 200 prison inmates were included in this questionnaire-based study. Data on demographic characteristics, adverse family experiences during childhood and psychiatric backgrounds were collected via face-to-face interviews, and a psychometric evaluation was conducted using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ-28) and Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). Several historical items were more common in females than in males including family history of psychiatric disease (23.0% vs. 13.0%, p = 0.048), a personal history of psychiatric disease (51.0% vs. 29.0%, p first crime (24.9 ± 8.9 years vs. 30.3 ± 9.2 years, p first offense (β = 0.772, p first offense. In conclusion, our findings revealed a high prevalence of and significant associations among childhood trauma, dissociative experiences, adverse family experiences and psychiatric problems in a cohort of incarcerated females and males. A psychiatric background, childhood trauma characterized by sexual abuse and violent crimes were found to be predominant in female prison inmates, whereas a criminal background with a younger age at first offense and frequent previous convictions, substance use and sexual crimes were more prevalent among male prison inmates. Our findings indicate a potential link between childhood traumatization and criminal behavior in terms of subsequent offending but not in terms of severity of the subsequent offense. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The association between intelligence scores and family history of psychiatric disorder in schizophrenia patients, their siblings and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, K.; Derks, E.M.; Bruggeman, R.; Cahn, W.; de Haan, L.; Kahn, R.; Krabbendam, L.; Linzen, D.; Myin-Germeys, I.; van Os, J.; Wiersma, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background:The degree of intellectual impairment in schizophrenia patients and their relatives has been suggested to be associated with the degree of familial loading for schizophrenia. Since other psychiatric disorders are also more present in relatives of schizophrenia patients, the definition of

  15. A study of reasons of non-compliance of psychiatric treatment and patients' attitudes towards illness and treatment in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Dafeeah, Elnour E; Salem, Mohamad O

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the extent of psychiatric patients' compliance and non-compliance with treatment and examine the factors that affect compliance. Patients were recruited who were between 16 and 60 years of age and who were hospitalized with a psychiatric disorder and treated in the outpatient clinics of the psychiatry department. A total of 689 patients were approached and 564 patients agreed to participate in the study, a response rate of 81.8%. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire that asked about socio-demographic characteristics (e.g., age, gender, nationality, level of education, occupation, marital status, and life style habits); medication(s) prescribed and the participant's response; the degree of social supervision (rated subjectively by the patient as "poor," "good," or "very good"); data also were obtained from clinical records. Data analyses explored significant associations between compliance and non-compliance and a group of relevant variables. Of the 564 patients studied, 328 (58.2%) were compliant with treatment and 236 (41.8%) were non-compliant. There was no significant difference between compliance and non-compliance in terms of gender (p = 0.471). Patients between 21-30 years of age were significantly more compliant with drug treatment than not. Non-compliance was more common among patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (28.4%), followed by depression (14.4%), and bipolar affective disorder (12.7%) (p = 0.001). Only 25% of compliant patients and 26.3% of non-compliant patients used non-psychotropic medication. Social supervision (40%) was very poor in non-compliant patients whereas 49.4% of compliant patients had very good family support. Notable reasons for non-compliance were irregular attendance to clinic (55.5%), ignorance about side effects of medication (61%), free medicine (45.8%), and a lack of education about medication (58.1%). This study revealed that non-compliance rates among psychiatry patients

  16. Family demands, social support and caregiver burden in Taiwanese family caregivers living with mental illness: the role of family caregiver gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess gender effects on family demands, social support and caregiver burden as well as to examine contributing factors of caregiver burden in caring for family members with mental illness. Providing continued care and support for people with mental illness is demanding and challenging. Findings of earlier caregiving studies on the role of caregiver gender in response to caregiver burden and caregiving-related factors have been inconsistent. Little research has been undertaken to examine gender effect on family demands, social support and caregiver burden in Taiwanese family caregivers of individuals with mental illness. Cross-sectional, descriptive correlation design. Data from 43 families, including at least one male and female family caregiver in each family, were analysed using descriptive statistics, principal component analysis and mixed linear modelling. Demographic data, Perceived Stress Scale, Perceived Social Support and Caregiver Burden Scale-Brief were used to collect data. Female family caregivers perceived less social support and experienced higher degrees of caregiver burden compared with male family caregivers. In contrast, no significant gender effect was associated with family demands. Family caregivers with greater family demands and less social support experienced higher degrees of caregiver burden. The results reinforced those of previously published studies that caregiver burden is highly prevalent among female family caregivers. Caregiver gender appears to be highly valuable for explaining family demands, social support and caregiver burden. Health care professionals should continue to collaborate with family caregivers to assess potential gender effects on available support and design gender-specific interventions to alleviate caregiver burden. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Modifiable factors associated with caregiver burden among family caregivers of terminally ill Korean cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seok-Joon; Kim, Jong-Sung; Jung, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Samyong

    2014-05-01

    Higher caregiver burden is associated with poor quality of life among family caregivers. However, in Korea, very few studies have examined factors associated with caregiver burden. The present study investigated factors associated with caregiver burden among family caregivers of terminally ill Korean cancer patients, particularly modifiable factors as a potential target of intervention strategies. A cross-sectional study using self-administered questionnaires was performed. Sixty-four family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients who were admitted to the hospice-palliative care unit of a university hospital in South Korea were included. To identify caregiver burden, the Caregiver Reaction Assessment scale (CRA) was used in this study. Time spent in providing care per day, number of visits per week from other family members, family functioning, and a positive subscale, self-esteem, of the CRA were deemed as modifiable factors. Other sociodemographic, caregiving characteristics of the subjects were non-modifiable factors. Longer time spent providing care per day, fewer weekly visits from other family members, poor family functioning, and low self-esteem were considered as modifiable factors associated with caregiver burden. Low monthly income and the spouse being the family caregiver were non-modifiable factors. Our study has practical significance in that it identifies modifiable factors that can be used to devise intervention strategies. Developing and applying such intervention strategies for alleviating the factors associated with high caregiver burden could be important for improving the quality of life of both patients and their families.

  18. Familial risk for psychiatric disorders in military veterans who have post-traumatic stress disorder with psychosis: a retrospective electronic record review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ÓConghaile, Aengus; Smedberg, Diane L; Shin, Ah L; DeLisi, Lynn E

    2018-04-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a leading cause of morbidity among military veterans, with up to one-in-five individuals with PTSD also having psychotic symptoms. The current study was designed to determine the association between a known family history of psychiatric illness and risk of developing psychosis in patients with PTSD. Retrospective medical record review was performed on a cohort study of 414 consecutive individuals admitted to the Veteran Administration in 2014 with a diagnosis of military-related PTSD, but without a prior diagnosis of a psychotic disorder. PTSD with psychotic features was defined as the presence of hallucinations, paranoia, other delusions, thought insertion, withdrawal, broadcasting, and/or dissociative episodes. Overall, 22.9% of individuals with PTSD had psychotic symptoms. Having a first-degree relative with bipolar affective and with anxiety disorders was associated with an increased risk of PTSD with psychosis (odds ratio=2.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.01-4.45 and odds ratio=2.72, 95% confidence interval: 1.16-6.41, respectively). A family history of schizophrenia or depression was not associated with risk of developing psychotic features in patients with PTSD. In veterans with military-related PTSD, a familial vulnerability for bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders was associated with an increased risk of developing PTSD with psychotic features. These are preliminary data, given the limitations of a retrospective record review design. These results await replication in future prospective direct family interview studies.

  19. Perceived barriers on mental health services by the family of patients with mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rr Dian Tristiana

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Families whose members suffered from mental illness still experienced barriers in relation to mental health services even with universal health coverage. Improved mental health services are related to the health insurance coverage, affordability, availability of mental health services and stigma reduction in the health professionals and wide community.

  20. The Relation Between Parental Mental Illness and Adolescent Mental Health: The Role of Family Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.M.A. van; Ven, M.O.M. van de; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Witteman, C.L.M.; Hosman, C.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Children of parents with a mental illness are often found to be at high risk of developing psychological problems themselves. Little is known about the role of family factors in the relation between parental and adolescent mental health. The current study focused on parent-child interaction and

  1. The Family Challenge of Caring for the Chronically Mentally Ill: A Phenomenological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsaei, Farshid; Cheraghi, Fatemeh; Esmaeilli, Ravanbakhsh

    2015-09-01

    Family caregiving for patients with chronic mental illness is influenced by various factors such as political, socioeconomic, and cultural contexts as well as related policies and health services. The purpose of this study was to explore the challenges with which the family caregivers of patients with chronic mental illness have to contend. The research design was qualitative with a phenomenological approach. The research population consisted of 16 long-term carers expressing interest in participating in the project. The carers were the family members of mentally ill relatives who collected their monthly medications at Farshchian Psychiatry Hospital in Hamadan in 2012. Purposive sampling was used to draw the sample. Data were collected by individual in-depth semi-structured interviews, which were tape-recorded and analyzed via Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Rigor was assessed regarding credibility, dependability, conformability, and transferability. Our findings highlighted 4 main themes, namely stress and emotional distress, need for education and information, socioeconomic effects and support, and physical strain. Families experience frustrations when providing support and care to their mentally ill relatives. They, therefore, need appropriate support and intervention by mental health services.

  2. Markers of DNA/RNA damage from oxidation as predictors of a registry-based diagnosis of psychiatric illness in type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Anders; Siersma, Volkert; Davidsen, Annette S.

    2018-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a potential biological mediator of the higher rates of psychiatric illness (PI) observed after the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We investigated validated urinary markers of systemic DNA/RNA damage from oxidation (8-oxodG/8-oxoGuo respectively) as predictors of incident PI......, this association was most predominant in minor PIs (unipolar depression and anxiety) compared to major PIs such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These observations indicate that higher levels of systemic oxidative stress are not associated with a higher risk of PI after T2DM onset. Only PI patients treated...... in a cohort of 1381 newly diagnosed T2DM patients, who were followed prospectively for a total of 19 years after diagnosis. Psychiatric diagnoses were from Danish national registries. Patients were examined at the time of diagnosis and at a 6-year follow-up. At baseline, 8-oxodG was slightly lower in PI vs...

  3. Social support in chat sessions for adolescents and young adults living with a family member with mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Louisa M; van der Krieke, Lian; Iedema-den Boer, Zamira; Sytema, Sjoerd; Schippers, Gerard M

    Children from families with a mental illness are at risk of developing negative health outcomes. Online interventions are a new way to offer support to these children. The present study utilized a website that had been developed to support Dutch youth who had a family member with a mental illness.

  4. Social support in chat sessions for adolescents and young adults living with a family member with mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Louisa M.; van der Krieke, Lian; Iedema-den Boer, Zamira; Sytema, Sjoerd; Schippers, Gerard M.

    2017-01-01

    Children from families with a mental illness are at risk of developing negative health outcomes. Online interventions are a new way to offer support to these children. The present study utilized a website that had been developed to support Dutch youth who had a family member with a mental illness.

  5. Getting to know the person behind the illness - the significance of interacting with patients hospitalised in forensic psychiatric settings

    OpenAIRE

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; Rydlo, Cecilia; Wiklund Gustin, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Source: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jocn.13252/epdf AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe what nurses want to accomplish in relationships with patients who are hospitalised in forensic psychiatric settings. BACKGROUND: Relationships between staff and patients in forensic psychiatric settings should be grounded in trust and confidence, and the patients need opportunities for emotional reconciliation. However, relationships can be challenging for nurses, who sometimes dist...

  6. A SHOCKING REQUIREMENT IN THE LAW ON NEGLIGENCE LIABILITY FOR PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS: LIVERPOOL WOMEN'S HOSPITAL NHS FOUNDATION TRUST V RONAYNE [2015] EWCA CIV 588.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Andrew S; Burrows, John H

    2016-01-01

    The Ronayne case concerned a husband who suffered a psychiatric illness, described as an adjustment disorder, in seeing the condition of his wife who was the primary victim of admitted medical negligence. His claim for compensation, as a 'secondary victim', failed because he could not satisfy the legal requirement that there must be a sudden shocking event. This commentary criticises that requirement which appears to make no medical sense. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Strengths of families to limit relapse in mentally ill family members ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Relapse prevention in mental health care is important. Utilising the strengths of families can be a valuable approach in relapse prevention. Studies on family strengths have been conducted but little has been done on the strengths of family members to help limit relapse in mental health care users. The purpose ...

  8. Stress and coping of Hong Kong Chinese family members during a critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Winter Y-Y; Chan, Sally W-C

    2007-02-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the stress and coping strategies of Hong Kong Chinese families during a critical illness and to examine the relationships between stress and coping. Admissions to intensive care unit are usually an unanticipated event, which imposes stress on the family. Family's wellness is one of the significant factors affecting patient's well-beings. Much work has been conducted in Western societies. Stress and coping in Chinese families of critically ill patients have rarely been discussed. Structured face-to-face interviews were conducted, using the Impact of Events Scale and the Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scales. A convenience sample of 133 participants was recruited from a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Many were patients' children with age between 30 and 49. A total of 39.1% (n = 52) of the participants were males and 60.9% (n = 81) were females. The participants experienced high level of stress (mean = 25.1, SD = 8.3). Higher level of stress were experienced by female (t = -4.6; d.f. = 1, 131; P = 0.00), those with lower educational attainment (F = 3.0; d.f. = 2, 130; P = 0.05) and those whose relatives were admitted to the intensive care unit unexpectedly (t = -2.2; d.f. = 1; P = 0.03). Patients' length of stay in the unit was significantly correlated with levels of stress (r = 0.5, P stress had significant correlation with coping strategies utilization (r = 0.5, P stress-coping pattern 'fatalistic voluntarism'. This study contributes to the understanding of Hong Kong Chinese families' stress and coping during a critical illness. Comprehensive assessments of family members' psychosocial needs are important to plan appropriate interventions to alleviate their stress and strengthen their coping skills. The findings will serve as guidance for nurses in delivering culturally sensitive and competent interventions.

  9. Social worker involvement in identifying problems and needs of families with mentally ill members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalčíková N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was to explore the impact of schizophrenia on the life of the patient and his family, in particular, which problems people with schizophrenia and their families face. We applied a qualitative research strategy and method of semi-structured interview. Qualitative analysis of the data demonstrated barriers in the working and financial areas of life of people with schizophrenia. In addition, schizophrenia negatively affects social interactions of patients which lead to their social isolation which is also derived from barriers at work. Families with this kind of patient suffer mainly in the economic sphere of life with the necessity to leave the job and take care of an ill member. These families also suffer from isolation, restriction of social contacts, reduction of free-time activities, and many other problems included within the barriers in social interactions. Family members suffer psychological stress and they badly cope with the situation if the ill member is hospitalized. In addition, the family meets with the structural discrimination in the form of lack of information about the disease, lack of day care centres network and similar barriers in communication with physicians and the other professionals.

  10. Perception of family caregivers about barriers of leisure in care of individuals with chronic psychiatric disorders: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandani, Batool; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Noori, Ashraf Karbalaie; Ardakani, Mohammad Reza Khodaie

    2018-01-01

    Background Family caregivers of individuals with chronic psychiatric disorders play an important role in the management of the patient’s conditions, which interferes with other activities of daily living, work, social and leisure activities. Objective This study was conducted in an Iranian context to explore the perception of family caregivers about barriers of leisure in care of individuals with chronic psychiatric disorders. Methods The current qualitative study was conducted on the basis of conventional content analysis. Participants were 15 family caregivers of individuals with chronic psychiatric disorders who were selected by Purposeful sampling method between July 2016 and March 2017 in Tehran, Iran. The data was collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews. The interviews were tape recorded, written and transcribed. Then, data were analyzed by inductive content analysis method. Results Data analysis led to extraction of 3 main categories and 10 sub categories. Obstacles to leisure-time of family caregivers have been placed in three main categories which are patient-related factors (Resentment from psychological problems, Resentment from behavioral problems, Need for continuous monitoring and access), caregiver-related factors (Physical harm, Psychosocial harm, Temporal stress, Accumulation of responsibilities, Concerns), and community-related factors (Feeling of sympathy and rejection, Social stigma). Conclusion Understanding the barriers of leisure in this group of family caregivers has contributed to understanding the family caregivers’ perception in this area and regarding their leisure, it can provide a broader perspective to mental health therapists, rehabilitation managers and policy makers for understanding the needs, addressing the challenges and barriers of this group of family caregivers. PMID:29765577

  11. Perceived importance of caring behaviors to Swedish psychiatric inpatients and staff, with comparisons to somatically-ill samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Essen, L; Sjödén, P O

    1993-08-01

    The present study identified psychiatric inpatient (N = 61) and staff (N = 63) perceptions of most and least important nurse caring behaviors using a modified Swedish version of the CARE-Q instrument (Larson, 1981) and compared the results with data from somatic care (von Essen & Sjödén, 1991a, 1991b). The results demonstrated 13 significant mean between-group differences in the rating of 50 specific CARE-Q behaviors. Two significant mean value differences out of six subscales combining individual items were demonstrated between groups. Psychiatric inpatients considered the cognitive aspect, and somatic inpatients the task-oriented aspect of caring as the most important. Staff, in psychiatric as well as somatic care, considered the emotional aspect of caring as the most important. The results suggest that staff has a relatively invariant, human-oriented perception of caring, irrespective of subdisciplines, while patients' perceptions of caring vary more over specialties.

  12. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttger, Pernille; Pedersen, Simon Glerup; Gesslein, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments...... sex hormone cycle and the glutamate system and a link to co-morbid psychiatric manifestations of FHM2....

  13. Randomized Clinical Trial of the Effectiveness of a Home-Based Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nurse Intervention: Outcomes for Individuals with Serious Mental Illness and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Nancy P.; Wu, Evan; Kelly, Deena; Aiken, Linda H.; Blank, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with serious mental illness have greater risk for contracting HIV, multiple morbidities, and die 25 years younger than the general population. This high need and high cost subgroup face unique barriers to accessing required health care in the current health care system. The effectiveness of an advanced practice nurse model of care management was assessed in a four-year random controlled trial. Results are reported in this paper. In a four-year random controlled trial, a total of 238 community-dwelling individuals with HIV and serious mental illness (SMI) were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n=128) or to a control group (n=110). Over 12 months, the intervention group received care management from advanced practice psychiatric nurse, and the control group received usual care. The intervention group showed significant improvement in depression (P=.012) and the physical component of health-related quality of life (P=.03) from baseline to 12 months. The advanced practice psychiatric nurse intervention is a model of care that holds promise for a higher quality of care and outcomes for this vulnerable population. PMID:21935499

  14. Psychiatric care or social defense? The origins of a controversy over the responsibility of the mentally ill in French forensic psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protais, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    While some countries like Belgium chose a penal system clearly inspired by social-defense theories for mentally disturbed criminals, the French law hasn't been consistent and varies from the enlightened classical law and social-defense law. Indeed paragraph 1 of article 122-1 states that people whose discernment or control is abolished by a psychiatric disorder are non-responsible respecting the classical logic of law. On the other hand, Paragraph 2 of Article 122-1 allows the mentally ill to be judged responsible whereas no institution exists to take care about them. Then the system of psychiatric care in prisons present as a solution for professionals wishing to promote a system where people are punished and socially rehabilitated. Thus these forensic psychiatrists don't refer to paragraph 1 of article 122-1 and even people presenting serious mental disorders are considered responsible. Moreover, if a controversy has always existed between psychiatrists who argue a large conception of mental irresponsibility and professionals who defend the right to punish and to conclude that responsibility even for mentally disturbed criminals, the controversy becomes more important in French forensic psychiatry after the Second World War. If until the 1970s the practice of imposing responsibility for mentally ill individuals shows itself as a humanism, it occurs more within a security perspective today. © 2013.

  15. Family structure and health, how companionship acts as a buffer against ill health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kizuki Masashi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health and well-being are the result of synergistic interactions among a variety of determinants. Family structure and composition are social determinants that may also affect health behaviours and outcomes. This study was performed to examine the associations between family structure and health and to determine the protective effects of support mechanisms to improve quality of health outcome. Methods Six hundred people, selected by multistage sampling to obtain a representative population of men and women aged 20–60 living in communities in Japan, were included in this study. Data regarding subjective views of one's own health, family structure, lifestyle and social support were collected through structured face-to-face interviews on home visits. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures, height and weight were measured by trained examiners. The associations between family structure and health after controlling for demographics, lifestyle and social support were examined using logistic and linear regression analyses. Results Subjects living alone were significantly more likely to be in ill health, as determined using the General Health Questionnaire, in comparison to those in extended families (OR = 3.14. Subjects living alone or as couples were significantly more likely to suffer from severe hypertension in comparison to those living in extended families (OR = 8.25, OR = 4.90. These associations remained after controlling for the influence of lifestyle. Subjects living only with spouse or in nuclear family had higher probabilities of mental ill health in the absence than in the presence of people showing concern for their well-being. Conclusion The results of this study infers that a support mechanism consisting of companionship and the presence of family or other people concerned for one's well being acts as a buffer against deleterious influence of living in small family that will lead to improved quality of health outcome.

  16. Impact of psychiatric education and training on attitude of medical students towards mentally ill: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of studies from the western world have explored the negative beliefs held by individuals towards people with mental illness. The knowledge of attitude and awareness of undergraduate medical students towards psychiatry, mental health and mental disorders is of utmost importance. Objective: The current study aims at assessment of attitudes of medical students towards mental illness and mentally ill. Materials and Methods: The study used a cross-sectional survey design. The instruments used included Beliefs toward Mental Illness (BMI scale, Attitudes to Mental Illness Questionnaire (AMIQ. ANOVA was carried out to compare the in between group differences for the four study groups. Additionally Bonferroni correction was used to conduct the post hoc analysis. Results: The interns were significantly more likely to agree with the statement that the mental disorders are recurrent; less likely to be of thought that the behavior of people with mental disorders is unpredictable; more likely to disagree with the fact that diagnosis of depression as described in the case vignette was going to damage the career of the individual; more likely to agree with the option of inviting a depressed person to a party; more likely to believe in fact that mentally ill individuals are more likely to be criminals as compared to medical students in different professional years. Conclusions: Adequate modifications to existing medical curriculum would help improve attitude of medical students towards mentally ill.

  17. Comparing Affiliate Stigma Between Family Caregivers of People With Different Severe Mental Illness in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Cheng; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Jang, Fong-Lin; Su, Jian-An; Lin, Chung-Ying

    2017-07-01

    The family caregivers of people with mental illness may internalize the public stereotypes into the affiliate stigma (i.e., the self-stigma of family members). This study aimed to compare the affiliate stigma across schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder, and to investigate potential factors associated with affiliate stigma. Each caregiver of family members with schizophrenia (n = 215), bipolar disorder (n = 85), and major depressive disorder (n = 159) completed the Affiliate Stigma Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Caregiver Burden Inventory, Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire, and Beck Anxiety Inventory. After controlling for potential confounders, the hierarchical regression models showed that caregivers of a family member with schizophrenia had a higher level of affiliate stigma than those of bipolar disorder (β = -0.109; p stigma. The affiliate stigma of caregivers is associated with their self-esteem, caregiver burden, and by the diagnosis.

  18. Acute psychological trauma in the critically ill: Patient and family perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadzko, Volha; Dziadzko, Mikhail A; Johnson, Margaret M; Gajic, Ognjen; Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V

    2017-07-01

    Post-intensive care syndrome (PICS), which encompasses profound psychological morbidity, affects many survivors of critical illness. We hypothesize that acute psychological stress during the intensive care unit (ICU) confinement likely contributes to PICS. In order to develop strategies that mitigate PICS associated psychological morbidity, it is paramount to first characterize acute ICU psychological stress and begin to understand its causative and protective factors. A structured interview study was administered to adult critical illness survivors who received ≥48h of mechanical ventilation in medical and surgical ICUs of a tertiary care center, and their families. Fifty patients and 44 family members were interviewed following ICU discharge. Patients reported a high level of psychological distress. The families' perception of patient's stress level correlated with the patient's self-estimated stress level both in daily life (rho=0.59; ptherapy/walking (14%) were perceived to be important mitigating factors. Clinicians' actions that were perceived to be very constructive included reassurance (54%), explanations (32%) and physical touch (8%). Fear, hallucinations, and the inability to communicate, are identified as central contributors to psychological stress during an ICU stay; the presence of family, and physician's attention are categorized as important mitigating factors. Patients and families identified several practical recommendations which may help assuage the psychological burden of the ICU stay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Empathy toward Patients with Mental Illness among Baccalaureate Nursing Students: Impact of a Psychiatric Nursing and Mental Health Educational Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Marwa Abd El-Gawad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is an ability and skill that can be learned and developed through appropriate education and practice. While the importance of nurses' empathy is widely acknowledged, little is known about the impact of passing through the psychiatric nursing and mental health educational experience at the Faculty of Nursing, Alexandria University on…

  20. Anxiety, stress and depression in family caregivers of the mentally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Lídia; Duarte, João; Ferreira, Manuela; dos Santos, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    The current policy guidelines on mental health aim to keep the mentally ill within the community, with the development of social support, including families, hence the emergence of the role of the family caregiver. To identify socio-demographic variables influencing anxiety, depression and stress for the informal caregivers of the mentally ill; to determine the influence of family background variables on caregiver anxiety, depression and stress; to analyse the relationship between social support and caregiver overload with caregiver anxiety, depression and stress. Cross-sectional, descriptive and correlational study with 104 caregivers, mostly female (62.5%), aged between 22 and 77 years with a mean age of 52.03 years. The following were used as instruments: the Family Apgar Scale; the Satisfaction with Social Support Scale (ESSS); the Caregiver Overload Scale (ESC); the Anxiety, Depression and Stress Scales (EADS-21). We found that females have higher rates (Panxiety, depression and stress; participants with less education have more anxiety than those with higher and secondary education (P=.001); caregivers living in rural areas have higher levels of depression (P=.044) and stress (P=.041); those who perceive belonging to families with marked dysfunctions have higher levels of depression (P=.0.001) and stress (P=.000); the higher the overload, the higher the levels of anxiety (P=.002), depression and stress (P=.000). I tis necessary to develop strategies for local and community intervention to promote mental health and prevent mental illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Fathers' experience of starting family life with an infant born prematurely due to mothers' severe illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Værland, Inger Emilie; Vevatne, Kari; Brinchmann, Berit Støre

    2017-10-01

    To describe fathers' experiences of starting family life with an infant delivered prematurely out of necessity of saving the mother's and infant's lives due to the mother's severe preeclampsia. A descriptive, qualitative design was used. Six fathers were interviewed twice: from 6 to 24 days and from 4 to 22 weeks after delivery. Data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using a reflective lifeworld research approach. The essence of the fathers' experiences of establishing a family with a seriously ill mother and a premature infant can be described as a process of becoming a family through reflection on life and death in a context of separation. The essence specifically comprised the following constituents: (1) starting fatherhood facing existential issues, (2) connecting the family, (3) becoming familiar with your infant, and (4) becoming a father in a public area. The fathers were able to develop their relationship to their infants; this emphasizes the importance of the fathers being able to spend their time in the NICU. The privacy of the fathers were more or less challenged, health professionals should be aware of individualize their approach to the fathers. The study reveals that family life started with separation. Health professionals should try to ensure that the family should be together. Mutual guidelines between the wards that treats mother and child should be implemented. When new mother and child-centers are planned a family friendly environment should be prioritized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mental illness and legal fitness (competence) to stand trial in New York State: expert opinion and criminal defendants' psychiatric symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eugene; Rosner, Richard; Harmon, Ronnie

    2014-07-01

    Fitness to Stand Trial is a critical concept in the adjudication of justice-involved persons. A retrospective study was conducted to examine criminal defendants' specific psychiatric symptoms and those symptoms' associations with expert opinions on Competence to Stand Trial. One hundred charts were reviewed: 50 Cases (opined as Not Fit) were compared against 50 Controls (opined as Fit) with respect to ratings on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). A significance level of 0.001 was selected a priori. Statistically significant differences were found in seven of the eighteen BPRS symptom constructs (with the highest differences in Conceptual Disorganization and Unusual Thought Content) and two of the four BPRS higher-order syndrome factors (Thinking Disorder and Hostile-Suspiciousness). Consistent with previous reports, psychotic symptoms are found in this study to be inversely associated with Fitness. Validity, reliability, and limitations of this study, as well as directions for future research, are discussed herein. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. Health-promoting conversations-A novel approach to families experiencing critical illness in the ICU environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla; Wåhlin, Ingrid; Orvelius, Lotti; Ågren, Susanna

    2018-02-01

    To identify and describe the outcomes of a nurse-led intervention, "Health-promoting conversations with families," regarding family functioning and well-being in families with a member who was critically ill. Families who have a critically ill family member in an intensive care unit face a demanding situation, threatening the normal functioning of the family. Yet, there is a knowledge gap regarding family members' well-being during and after critical illness. The study used a qualitative inductive-descriptive design. Eight families participated in health-promoting conversations aimed to create a context for change related to the families' identified problems and resources. Fifteen qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 adults who participated in health-promoting conversations about a critical illness in the family. Eight participants were patients (six men, two women) and 10 were family members (two male partners, five female partners, one mother, one daughter, one female grandchild). The interviews were analysed by conventional content analysis. Family members experienced strengthened togetherness, a caring attitude and confirmation through health-promoting conversations. The caring and calming conversations were appreciated despite the reappearance of exhausting feelings. Working through the experience and being confirmed promoted family well-being. Health-promoting conversations were considered to be healing, as the family members take part in sharing each other's feelings, thoughts and experiences with the critical illness. Health-promoting conversations could be a simple and effective nursing intervention for former intensive care patients and their families in any cultural context. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. 29 CFR Appendix H to Part 825 - Certification for Serious Injury or Illness of Covered Servicemenber for Military Family Leave...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification for Serious Injury or Illness of Covered Servicemenber for Military Family Leave (Form WH-385) H Appendix H to Part 825 Labor Regulations Relating to... ACT OF 1993 Pt. 825, App. H Appendix H to Part 825—Certification for Serious Injury or Illness of...

  5. The influences of chronic illness and ego development on self-esteem in diabetic and psychiatric adolescent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, A M; Hauser, S T; Powers, S; Noam, G

    1984-12-01

    Self-esteem as measured by the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory [Coopersmith, S. (1967),The Antecedents of Self-Esteem, Freeman, San Francisco] and ego development as measured by the Washington University Sentence Completion Test [Loevinger, J., and Wessler, R. (1970),Measuring Ego Development, Vol. I, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco] were evaluated in three groups of early adolescents: diabetic patients, nonpsychotic psychiatric patients, and a nonpatient group of high-school students. We found that low levels of ego development were associated with low levels of global and domain-specific self-esteem in all three subject groups. Levels of self-esteem among diabetic patients were not significantly different from those of nonpatients. While psychiatric patients had significantly lower self-esteem levels than the other groups, this difference was accounted for by preconformists, i.e., those at the lowest stages of ego development. Psychiatric patients reaching higher ego levels showed self-esteem levels indistinguishable from those of the diabetics and nonpatients.

  6. Psychiatric and physical sequelae of childhood physical and sexual abuse and forced sexual trauma among individuals with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subica, Andrew M

    2013-10-01

    Trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) frequently co-occur with serious mental illness, yet the unique mental and physical health influences of childhood physical abuse (CPA), childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and forced sexual trauma on individuals with serious mental illness remain unevaluated. The present study of 172 individuals with serious mental illness investigated the adverse effects of CPA, CSA, and forced sexual trauma on severity of PTSD and depression, and overall mental and physical health functioning. Data analysis consisted of chi-square tests, independent t tests, bivariate odds ratios, and linear regressions. Prevalence of CPA (44.8%), CSA (29.1%), and forced sexual trauma (33.1%) were elevated, and nearly one third of participants (31.4%) reported clinical PTSD. Participants exposed to CSA or forced sexual trauma evidenced bivariate ORs ranging from 4.13 to 7.02 for PTSD, 2.44 to 2.50 for major depression, and 2.14 to 2.31 for serious physical illness/disability. Sexual trauma exposure associated with heightened PTSD and depression, and reduced mental and physical health functioning, with CSA uniquely predicting PTSD, depression, and physical health difficulties. CPA less significantly affected these clinical domains. Sexual traumas have profound negative effects on mental and physical health outcomes among individuals with serious mental illness; increased screening and treatment of sexual traumas is needed. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  7. Impact of critical illness news on the family: hermeneutic phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Anabela Pereira

    2018-01-01

    Understand the impact of critical-illness news on the experience of family members at an Intensive Care Unit. Phenomenological approach according to Van Manen's method. Open interviews were held with 21 family members. From analysis and interpretation of the data, three essential themes were identified: the unexpected; the pronouncement of death; and the impact on self-caring within the family. The study complied with the ethical principles inherent to research involving humans. The unexpected news and death of the sick person influence the well-being and self-care of family members, affecting their ability for analysis and decision making. It was observed that the family experiences the news with suffering, mainly due to the anticipation arising from the events. The humanity of nurses was revealed in response to the needs of the family. In view of the requirements for information, it was verified that the information transmitted allowed them to become aware of themselves, to become empowered in their daily lives and to alleviate the emotional burden experienced.

  8. Impact of critical illness news on the family: hermeneutic phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Pereira Mendes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Understand the impact of critical-illness news on the experience of family members at an Intensive Care Unit. Method: Phenomenological approach according to Van Manen's method. Open interviews were held with 21 family members. From analysis and interpretation of the data, three essential themes were identified: the unexpected; the pronouncement of death; and the impact on self-caring within the family. The study complied with the ethical principles inherent to research involving humans. Results: The unexpected news and death of the sick person influence the well-being and self-care of family members, affecting their ability for analysis and decision making. It was observed that the family experiences the news with suffering, mainly due to the anticipation arising from the events. Final considerations: The humanity of nurses was revealed in response to the needs of the family. In view of the requirements for information, it was verified that the information transmitted allowed them to become aware of themselves, to become empowered in their daily lives and to alleviate the emotional burden experienced.

  9. Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein (MBD) Family: Epigenomic Read-Outs Functions and Roles in Tumorigenesis and Psychiatric Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Smith, Marilia Arruda Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics is the study of the heritable changes on gene expression that are responsible for the regulation of development and that have an impact on several diseases. However, it is of equal importance to understand how epigenetic machinery works. DNA methylation is the most studied epigenetic mark and is generally associated with the regulation of gene expression through the repression of promoter activity and by affecting genome stability. Therefore, the ability of the cell to interpret correct methylation marks and/or the correct interpretation of methylation plays a role in many diseases. The major family of proteins that bind methylated DNA is the methyl-CpG binding domain proteins, or the MBDs. Here, we discuss the structure that makes these proteins a family, the main functions and interactions of all protein family members and their role in human disease such as psychiatric disorders and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Parenting and psychiatric rehabilitation: Can parents with severe mental illness benefit from a new approach? : 1-3 October

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joanne Nicholson; dr. P.C. van der Ende; Jaap van Weeghel; Dr. Lies Korevaar; Jooske T. van Busschbach

    2015-01-01

    Can parents with severe mental illness benefit from a new approach? XIthENMESH International Conference in Málaga (Spain). 1-3 October, 2015. With these results at hand we developed a new program and evaluated it . In this presentation we will reflect on the merits of this program but also share

  11. Validation of the Portuguese version of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being scale (FACIT-Sp 12) among Brazilian psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Lucchetti, Alessandra Lamas Granero; de Bernardin Gonçalves, Juliane Piasseschi; Vallada, Homero P

    2015-02-01

    Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual Well-Being scale (FACIT-Sp 12) is one of the most used and most validated instruments for assessing spiritual well-being in the world. Some Brazilian studies have used this instrument without, however, assessing its psychometric properties. The present study aims to validate the Portuguese version of the FACIT-Sp 12 among Brazilian psychiatric inpatients. A self-administered questionnaire, covering spiritual well-being (FACIT-Sp 12), depression, anxiety, religiosity, quality of life, and optimism, was administered. Of those who met the inclusion criteria, 579 patients were invited to participate and 493 (85.1 %) were able to fill out the FACIT-Sp 12 twice (test and retest). Subsequently, the validation analysis was carried out. Estimation of test-retest reliability, discriminant, and convergent validity was determined by the Spearman's correlation test, and the internal consistency was examined by the Cronbach's alpha. The sample was predominantly male (63.9 %) with a mean age of 35.9 years, and the most common psychiatric condition was bipolar disorder (25.7 %) followed by schizophrenia (20.4 %), drug use (20.0 %), and depression (17.6 %) according to ICD-10. The total FACIT-Sp 12 scale as well as the subscales demonstrated high internal consistency (coefficient alphas ranging from 0.893 for the total scale to 0.655 for the Meaning subscale), good convergent and divergent validity, and satisfactory test-retest reliability (rho = 0.699). The Portuguese version of FACIT-Sp 12 is a valid and reliable measure to use in Brazilian psychiatric inpatients. The availability of a brief and broad measure of spiritual well-being can help the study of spirituality and its influence on health by researchers from countries that speak the Portuguese language.

  12. Cortical and sub-cortical effects in primate models of cocaine use: implications for addiction and the increased risk of psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradberry, Charles W

    2011-02-01

    Drug abuse is a serious risk factor for the incidence and severity of multiple psychiatric illnesses. Understanding the neurobiological consequences of repeated exposure to abused drugs can help to inform how those risks are manifested in terms of specific neurochemical mechanisms and brain networks. This review examines selective studies in non-human primates that employed a cocaine self-administration model. Neurochemical consequences of chronic exposure appear to differ from observations in rodent studies. Whereas chronic intermittent exposure in the rodent is usually associated with a dose-dependent increase in dopaminergic response to a cocaine challenge, in the rhesus monkey, high cumulative exposure was not observed to cause a sensitized dopamine response. These non-human primate observations are concordant with clinical findings in human users. The results of cue exposure studies on dopaminergic transmission are also reviewed. Direct microdialysis measurements indicate that there is not a sustained increase in dopamine associated with cocaine-linked cues. As an alternative to striatal dopaminergic mechanisms mediating cue effects, single unit studies in prefrontal cortex during self-administration in monkeys suggests the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex are strongly engaged by cocaine cues. Based on the strong clinical imaging literature on cortical and cognitive dysfunction associated with addiction, it is proposed that the strong engagement of cortical systems during repeated cocaine reinforcement results in maladaptive changes that contribute to the risks of drug use for exacerbation of other psychiatric disorders.

  13. Astronomy for Extremely ill or Traumatically Injured Children and Their Families - IAU OAD Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald

    2015-08-01

    This grant funded a program for extremely ill or traumatically injured children, their siblings, and family members rlated to the children’s surgery and medical treatments at nearby hospitals. This grant provided an educational family-learning experience and out-of-this world diversion from the stress of being sick or of having a sick family member hospitalized. The families stayed at the four Ronald McDonald Houses (RMHs) of Chicago. The RMHs provide free or low-cost housing in a comfortable, supportive alternative atmosphere where family members sleep, eat, relax and find support from other families in similar situations. Families are kept united when mutual support is as critical as the medical treatment itself. The ill children and their families may stay for a few days or months because of chemotherapy, dialysis, or rehabilitative therapy. Children from 50 states and 50 countries stay the Chicago RMHs and there are 260 RMHs in the US and 65 worldwide.The RMH staff and volunteers were trained to: use optical and solar telescopes; use the Stellarium program to show the night sky, identify objects, and plan observing sessions; use Sky and Telescope or Astronomy Magazine to selected the best nights for observing; conduct simple family oriented demonstrations; demonstrate citizen science/Zooniverse activities; and provide information about science museums and astronomy clubs near their home. The Chicago Astronomical Society (amateur astronomy club) provides ongoing support.I created an Activity Book with demonstrations and participatory hands-on activities including a toilet plunger sundial, making a sundial, creating a scale model of the Solar System (football field or toilet paper), phases and craters of the Moon (Oreo cookie phases, flour/ cocoa crater formation), eclipses, make constellations from chocolate chips in chocolate-chip cookies, crate your own constellation patterns, stellar temperature (images, demonstrations, candy), order images of the stages of

  14. Giving patients responsibility or fostering mutual response-ability: family physicians' constructions of effective chronic illness management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thille, Patricia H; Russell, Grant M

    2010-10-01

    Current visions of family medicine and models of chronic illness management integrate evidence-based medicine with collaborative, patient-centered care, despite critiques that these constructs conflict with each other. With this potential conflict in mind, we applied a critical discursive psychology methodology to present discursive patterns articulated by 13 family physicians in Ontario, Canada, regarding care of patients living with multiple chronic illnesses. Physicians constructed competing versions of the terms "effective chronic illness management" and "patient involvement." One construction integrated individual responsibility for health with primacy of "evidence," resulting in a conceptualization consistent with paternalistic care. The second constructed effective care as involving active partnership of physician and patient, implying a need to foster the ability of both practitioners and patients to respond to complex challenges as they arose. The former pattern is inconsistent with visions of family medicine and chronic illness management, whereas the latter embodies it.

  15. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients from seven families with autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonietta; Caccavale, Carmela; Santulli, Lia; Balestrini, Simona; Cagnetti, Claudia; Licchetta, Laura; Esposito, Marcello; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo; Provinciali, Leandro; Minetti, Carlo; Zara, Federico; Striano, Pasquale; Striano, Salvatore

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this report was to assess the psychiatric comorbidity in a group of patients affected by autosomal dominant cortical tremor, myoclonus, and epilepsy (ADCME). Reliable and validated psychodiagnostic scales including the BDI (Beck Depression Inventory), STAI-Y1 and 2 (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - Y; 1 and 2), MMPI-2 (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - 2), and QoLIE-31 (Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory - 31) were administered to 20 patients with ADCME, 20 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), and 20 healthy controls. There was a higher prevalence of mood disorders in patients with ADCME compared to patients with JME and healthy controls, particularly depression (p=0.035 and p=0.017, respectively) and state anxiety (p=0.024 and p=0.019, respectively). Trait anxiety was not different from JME (p=0.102) but higher than healthy controls (p=0.017). The myoclonus score positively correlated with both state (rho: 0.58, p=0.042) and trait anxiety (rho: 0.65, p=0.011). These psychiatric features were also often associated with pathological traits of personality: paranoid (OR: 25.7, p=0.003), psychasthenia (OR: 7.0, p=0.023), schizophrenia (OR: 8.5, p=0.011), and hypomania (OR: 5.5, p=0.022). Finally, in patients with ADCME, decreased quality of life correlated with these psychiatric symptoms. Patients with ADCME show a significant psychiatric burden that impairs their quality of life. A comprehensive psychiatric evaluation should be offered at the time of diagnosis to detect these comorbidities and to treat them. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Employment, family roles, and mental ill health in young married women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, N F

    1985-01-01

    Women are entering the labor force at unprecedented rates, many combining employment with their roles as wives and mothers. The purpose of this study was to determine if the complement of women's roles was associated with negative mental health effects. It was hypothesized that multiple roles would have negative effects on mental health only in the presence of a social context that itself was associated with symptoms of mental ill health. The contextual variables included influence of sex role norms, task-sharing support from the spouse, and support from a confidant. A sample of 140 married women randomly selected from registrants at a family health clinic were interviewed about their roles and mental health. The complement of the women's roles was not associated with mental ill health, nor was there a clear relationship between employment or parenting on mental health. Each of the contextual variables had a moderate influence on symptoms of mental ill health. Women who had traditional sex role norms, little task-sharing support from a spouse, and little support from a confidant had poorer mental health than their counterparts. Thus, in this sample, the context for role performance had a stronger influence on mental health than did the actual roles women performed. In addition, the importance of the social contextual variables was contingent on the woman's complement of roles. For women who were both spouse and parent, confiding support was most important.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Family carers: A role in addressing chronic disease risk behaviours for people with a mental illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jacqueline M; Wye, Paula M; Wiggers, John H; Bartlem, Kate M; Bowman, Jennifer A

    2017-09-01

    People with a mental illness experience greater chronic disease morbidity and mortality compared to those without mental illness. Family carers have the potential to promote the health behaviours of those they care for however factors which may influence the extent to which they do so have not been reported. An exploratory study was conducted to investigate carers': 1) promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, quitting smoking, and reducing alcohol consumption; 2) perceptions of their role and ability to promote such behaviours; 3) and the association between carer perceptions and the promotion of such behaviours. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with mental health carers ( N  = 144, 37.6% response rate) in New South Wales, Australia in 2013. Associations between current promotion of health behaviours and carer perceptions were explored through multivariate regression analysis in 2016. A majority of respondents promoted fruit and vegetable consumption (63.8%), physical activity (60.3%), quitting smoking (56.3%), and reducing alcohol consumption (56.2%) to the person they cared for. A perception that it was 'very important' to have a positive influence on these behaviours was positively related with promotion of each of the four behaviours, with those holding such a view being more likely to promote such behaviours, than those who did not (odds ratio: 9.47-24.13, p  mental illness.

  18. [Religious/spiritual well-being in mentally ill persons II: the development of a short scale and comparison scores for clinical psychiatric groups and healthy controls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterrainer, Human-Friedrich; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Multidimensional Inventory for Religious/Spiritual Well-Being (MI-RSWB) was successfully applied in several clinical as well as non-clinical studies. However, the original version of the scale often showed to be as too comprehensive especially for clinical surroundings. There for the aim of this study is to develop a short version of the scale comprising 12 items. Based on a sample representative of the Austrian general population (N = 1,500), a first MI-RSWB short version is developed by means of factor- and reliability analysis. Furthermore the new short version of the scale is initially validated through several indicators of mental illness. The MI-RSWB short version shows convincing psychometric properties. The total scale as well as the sub scales exhibit at least a sufficient internal consistency. A significant negative association with several indicators of psychiatric illness is also confirmed for the short version of the scale. The MI-RWSB 12 scale is especially recommended for further research focusing on the clinical relevance of religiosity and spirituality.

  19. Disentangling depression and anxiety in relation to neuroticism, extraversion, suicide, and self-harm among adult psychiatric inpatients with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subica, Andrew M; Allen, Jon G; Frueh, B Christopher; Elhai, Jon D; Fowler, J Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Little is known about depression-anxiety comorbidity and its association with personality traits and suicide/self-harm in adult psychiatric inpatients with serious mental illness (SMI), impacting clinical assessment and treatment. This study sought to determine the symptom structure of depression-anxiety comorbidity and its relation to neuroticism, extraversion, and suicide/self-harm behaviour in this high-risk population. Nine hundred and sixty-two adults receiving inpatient care at a private psychiatric hospital completed questionnaires at admission. Confirmatory factor analyses compared a bifactor solution specifying a general distress factor and two specific depression and anxiety factors against unidimensional and correlated factors solutions. The bifactor solutions' factors were subsequently correlated with neuroticism and extraversion subscales and pre-hospitalization suicide/self-harm behaviours. The bifactor model rendered superior fit to sample data and a robust general factor - accounting for 77.61% of common item variance - providing the first evidence for a tripartite structure of depression and anxiety among adult inpatients. The bifactor solution-outputted independent general distress, depression, and anxiety factors positively correlated with neuroticism, the personality dimension corresponding to trait negative affectivity. The general distress and depression factors associated with recent self-harm, but factors showed no associations with prior suicidal behaviour. In adult psychiatric inpatients, general distress substantially underlies comorbid depression and anxiety symptom variation and may contribute to recent incidence of self-harm. Transdiagnostic assessments and interventions targeting general distress may temper depression, anxiety, and self-harm in adult inpatients. Clinical implications Depression-anxiety comorbidity symptomology in adult psychiatric inpatients is primarily composed of general distress. General distress and specific

  20. Family Caregiver Knowledge, Patient Illness Characteristics, and Unplanned Hospital Admissions in Older Adults With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddie, Patricia I; Wochna Loerzel, Victoria; Norris, Anne E

    2016-07-01

    To explore factors related to unplanned hospital admissions and determine if one or more factors are predictive of unplanned hospital admissions for older adults with cancer.
. A prospective longitudinal design and a retrospective chart review.
. Adult oncology outpatient infusion centers and inpatient units at Orlando Regional Medical Center in Florida.
. A convenience sample of 129 dyads of older adults with cancer and their family caregivers. 
. Family caregiver demographic and side effect knowledge data were collected prospectively during interviews with family caregivers using a newly developed tool, the Nurse Assessment of Family Caregiver Knowledge and Action Tool. Patient demographic and clinical data were obtained through a retrospective chart review. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate data and examine relationships among variables.
. Patient illness characteristics; impaired function; side effects, such as infection, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea; family caregiver knowledge; and unplanned hospital admissions.
. Unplanned hospital admissions were more likely to occur when older adults had impaired function and side effects, such as infection, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. Impaired function and family caregiver knowledge did not moderate the effects of these side effects on unplanned hospital admissions. 
. Findings suggest that the presence of impaired function and side effects, such as infection, fever, vomiting, and diarrhea, predict unplanned hospital admissions in older adults with cancer during the active treatment phase. Side effects may or may not be related to chemotherapy and may be related to preexisting comorbidities. 
. Nurses can conduct targeted assessments to identify older adults and their family caregivers who will need additional follow-up and support during the cancer treatment trajectory. Information gained from these assessments will assist nurses to provide practical and

  1. Developing Family Psychoeducational Treatments for Patients with Bipolar and Other Severe Psychiatric Disorders: A Pathway from Basic Research to Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklowitz, David J.; Hooley, Jill M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development pathway of family treatments for patients with severe and persistent psychiatric disorders in a population for whom family attributes have prognostic importance. The methodological complexities of psychosocial treatment studies are many. Moreover, the results of these studies often reflect interactions between treatment,…

  2. Family characteristics oF NigeriaN womeN with severe meNtal illNess

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 88 No. 6 June ... mental illnesses like schizophrenia impair ability or potential to ... from relatives, in which case institutional caregivers ... overload; physical and emotional burnouts may make.

  3. Illness cognitions and family adjustment: psychometric properties of the Illness Cognition Questionnaire for parents of a child with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sint Nicolaas, Simone M; Schepers, Sasja A; van den Bergh, Esther M M; Evers, Andrea W M; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Verhaak, Christianne M

    2016-02-01

    Illness cognitions are an important mediator between disease and psychological adjustment. This study assessed the psychometric properties of the Illness Cognition Questionnaire (ICQ), adjusted for the parents of an ill child. Participants were recruited from two multicenter studies: sample 1 included 128 parents of a child diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (response rate 82 %) and sample 2 included 114 parents of a child diagnosed with cancer (response rate 74 %). Parents completed an adapted version of the ICQ (Illness Cognition Questionnaire-Parent version (ICQ-P)), together with the Profile of Mood States (POMS; sample 1) or the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS; sample 2). The factor structure of the ICQ-P was examined by means of principal component analysis. Cronbach's alpha for each subscale and correlations between the ICQ-P scales and the HADS and POMS were calculated. The illness cognitions of parents with and without psychological distress were compared. Factor analysis confirmed the hypothesized structure of the ICQ-P in our sample (n = 242). The three scales Helplessness, Acceptance, and Perceived Benefits explained 9.8, 31.4, and 17.9 % of the variance, respectively. Cronbach's alpha showed adequate internal consistency (.80-.88). Concurrent and criterion-related validity were appropriate. The results confirm that the ICQ-P reliably assesses the illness cognitions of the parents of a child with cancer. Psychologically distressed parents showed less acceptance and more helplessness. The availability of a short and valid illness cognition questionnaire will help clinicians gain insight into parental cognitions regarding the illness of their child, information that might be helpful for targeting interventions.

  4. Adult Outcome of ADHD: An Overview of Results From the MGH Longitudinal Family Studies of Pediatrically and Psychiatrically Referred Youth With and Without ADHD of Both Sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Mai; Spencer, Thomas J; Faraone, Stephen V; Biederman, Joseph

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to provide an overview of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Longitudinal Studies of ADHD. We evaluated and followed samples of boys and girls with and without ADHD ascertained from psychiatric and pediatric sources and their families. These studies documented that ADHD in both sexes is associated with high levels of persistence into adulthood, high levels of familiality with ADHD and other psychiatric disorders, a wide range of comorbid psychiatric and cognitive disorders including mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders, learning disabilities, executive function deficits, emotional dysregulation, and autistic traits as well as functional impairments. The MGH studies suggested that stimulant treatment decreased risks of developing comorbid psychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and functional outcomes. The MGH studies documented the neural basis of persistence of ADHD using neuroimaging. The MGH studies provided various insights on symptoms, course, functions, comorbidities, and neuroscience of ADHD.

  5. [The hemodialysed patient and his/her family caregiver. Comparison of perceptions of the chronic illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, S; Ajmone, C; Margola, D; Busnach, G; Summa, I; Brunati, C; Cabibbe, M; Dal Col, A; De Ferrari, M E; Macaluso, M

    2006-01-01

    According to health psychology, the family caregiver (fc), i.e. the person who takes care of a hemodialysed patient, plays a pivotal role in coping with dialysis. This study explored and compared the lifestyle and the main needs of a cohort of hemodialysis patients, with reduced personal autonomy, to their fc, evaluating some psychological functional parameters, such as the perception of familial and social support, the psychological quality of life, the disability due to chronic illness, and the communication style. An anonymous multiple versions questionnaire, administered according to the caregiver's family relationship, was given for self assessment to 54 couples of patients and related fc (spouse, son/daughter and brother/sister), mean age 66 and 60, respectively; mean dialytic patients' age: 8 years and 6 months. The questionnaire consisted of three different sections, demographics, renal disease and psychological evaluation, with 4 standard scales (Social Support Satisfaction, Marital Communication, Psychological General Well-Being Index and Evaluation of Needs). A multivariate variance analysis (MANOVA) was subsequently performed. Women have a higher perception of their lifestyle change after dialysis, and, in general, patients communicate more easily with their fc than vice versa. Communication problems are more common in patients with a recent diagnosis. Patients and fc mostly need a better dialogue with their nephrologists and urge some psychological help. The quality of the relationship between physicians, patients and their families is a key element in the process of healing.

  6. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders and functional impairment after loss of a family member: a longitudinal study after the 2004 Tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Pål; Weisaeth, Lars; Hussain, Ajmal; Heir, Trond

    2015-01-01

    Bereavement following disasters is a devastating experience for family members. The aim of this study was to examine the long-term mental health effects of losing a loved one in a natural disaster. Ninety-four Norwegians aged 18-80 years who lost close family members in the 2004 Southeast Asian tsunami were evaluated 2 and 6 years after the disaster. The participants were either staying in an affected area at the time of the disaster (i.e., directly exposed) or not (i.e., not directly exposed). The prevalence of psychiatric disorders was assessed by the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I). Prolonged grief disorder (PGD) was self-reported using the Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG), and functional impairment was self-reported using the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS). We did not identify a significant decrease in the prevalence of PGD, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), or major depressive disorder (MDD) from 2 to 6 years. Approximately, one-third of the bereaved (36%) had a psychiatric disorder 6 years after the tsunami. The most common disorder was PGD (12%) followed by general anxiety disorder (GAD, 11%), agoraphobia (11%), and MDD (10%). The prevalence of PTSD and MDD was higher among family members who were directly exposed to the disaster compared to those who were not (21 vs. 0%, and 25 vs. 3%). PGD was associated with functional impairment independent of other disorders. Loss of a close family member in a natural disaster can have a substantial adverse long-term effect on mental health and everyday functioning. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Employment, family leave, and parents of newborns or seriously ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Paul J; Lui, Camillia K; Cowgill, Burton O; Hoffman, Geoffrey; Elijah, Jacinta; Schuster, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Parents of newborns and children with special health care needs (CSHCN) often experience conflict between employment and family responsibilities. Family leave benefits such as the federal Family and Medical Leave Act and California's Paid Family Leave Insurance program help employed parents miss work to bond with a newborn or care for an ill child. The use of these benefits, however, is rare among mothers of CSHCN and fathers in general and limited even among mothers of newborns. We explored barriers to and experiences with leave-taking among parents of newborns and CSHCN. We conducted semistructured qualitative interviews in 2008 with 10 mothers and 10 fathers of newborns and 10 mothers and 10 fathers of CSHCN in Los Angeles to explore their need for and experiences with family leave. Qualitative analytical techniques were used to identify themes in the transcripts. All parents reported difficulties in accessing and using benefits, including lack of knowledge by employers, complexity of rules and processes, and inadequacy of the benefits themselves. Parents of CSHCN also described being too overwhelmed to rapidly seek and process information in the setting of urgent and often unexpected health crises. Most parents expressed a clear desire for expert guidance and saw hospitals and clinics as potentially important providers. Even when parents are aware of family leave options, substantial barriers prevent many, especially parents of CSHCN, from learning about or applying for benefits. Clinics and hospitals might be opportune settings to reach vulnerable parents at times of need. Copyright © 2012 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Palliative care services for Indian migrants in Australia: Experiences of the family of terminally Ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Shanmugasundaram

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The way that health care systems in developing countries like India care for dying patients, has an impact on the expectations of such care for those who migrate to other countries faces. At the end of life, cultural issues may impact on the quality of life remaining and for that reason, it is important that particular cultural practices are understood. This paper describes a study that investigated the cultural issues of access to palliative care services for Indian migrants in Australia. Purpose of the Study: To investigate the experiences of the family members of terminally ill Indian migrants in Victoria, Australia. Objective of the Study: To explore the issues related to accessing palliative care services for Indian migrants; to identify the effectiveness of palliative care in supporting the patient and family and to recommend strategies for improving this care. Materials and Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was utilized. Up to 6 family members were selected for in-depth interviews in understanding cultural issues related to the palliative care services for a family member. Results: Analysis of the interviews revealed that families of Indian patients experience difficulties whilst receiving palliative care services, which fell into three main categories: Indian support systems, cultural issues, and caring experiences. Although each of these issues had a direct influence on the experience of terminal care that their family member received, cultural issues and support systems also influenced the caring experiences. Conclusion: Despite the successful implementation of palliative care services across Australia, there are still problems in accessing and receiving the services among minority and disadvantaged groups like various cultural groups.

  9. The impact of familial expressed emotion on clinical and personal recovery among patients with psychiatric disorders: The mediating roles of self-stigma content and process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin Ka Shing; Lam, Chun Bun

    2018-05-24

    The present study examined the associations of familial expressed emotion (EE) with clinical and personal recovery among patients with psychiatric disorders, as well as the potential mechanisms underlying these associations. Guided by the content-process theory of self-stigma, we hypothesized that EE would be negatively associated with clinical and personal recovery and that these associations would be mediated by self-stigma content and process. A total of 311 patients with psychiatric disorders completed questionnaires on their perceptions of EE, self-stigma, and recovery. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that EE was positively associated with self-stigma content and process, which were in turn negatively associated with clinical and personal recovery. The indirect effects of EE on clinical and personal recovery, via self-stigma content and process, were also significant. Multigroup analyses further demonstrated that the impact of EE on self-stigma and recovery was generalizable across patients with psychotic and nonpsychotic disorders. Theoretically, our findings revealed the potential pathways through which EE may adversely affect psychiatric recovery. Practically, our findings highlighted the importance of designing multipronged intervention programs to reduce familial EE and its potential harmful impact on psychiatric patients. In addition to helping family members improve their knowledge about psychiatric disorders and adjust their communication styles, practitioners should help psychiatric patients develop resilience against EE, mitigate self-stigma, and achieve recovery. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Development of the Family Stigma Stress Scale (FSSS) for Detecting Stigma Stress in Caregivers of People With Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Cheng; Su, Jian-An; Chang, Kun-Chia; Lin, Chung-Ying; Koschorke, Mirja; Rüsch, Nicolas; Thornicroft, Graham

    2017-01-01

    People with mental illness and their family caregivers often perceive public stigma, which may lead to stigma-related stress (or stigma stress). However, no instruments have been developed to measure this stress for family caregivers of people with mental illness. We modified an instrument that measures the stigma stress of people with mental illness (i.e., the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor) and examined the psychometric properties of the scores of the newly developed instrument: the Family Stigma Stress Scale (FSSS). Primary family caregivers of people with mental illness in Southern Taiwan ( n = 300; mean age = 53.08 ± 13.80; 136 males) completed the FSSS. An exploratory factor analysis showed that the FSSS score had two factors; both factor scores had excellent internal consistency (α = .913 and .814) and adequate test-retest reliability ( r = .627 and .533; n = 197). Significant correlations between FSSS factor scores and other instruments supported its concurrent validity and the ability of the FSSS to differentiate between clinical characteristics, for example, having been previously hospitalized or not. The FSSS is a brief and effective measure of the stigma stress of family caregivers of people with mental illness.

  11. Awareness and Use of California's Paid Family Leave Insurance Among Parents of Chronically Ill Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Mark A.; Chung, Paul J.; Elliott, Marc N.; Garfield, Craig F.; Vestal, Katherine D.; Klein, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Context In 2004, California's Paid Family Leave Insurance Program (PFLI) became the first state program to provide paid leave to care for an ill family member. Objective To assess awareness and use of the program by employed parents of children with special health care needs, a population likely to need leave. Design, Setting, and Participants Telephone interviews with successive cohorts of employed parents before (November 21, 2003-January 31, 2004; n=754) and after (November 18, 2005-January 31, 2006; n=766) PFLI began, randomly sampled from 2 children's hospitals, one in California (with PFLI) and the other in Illinois (without PFLI). Response rates were 82% before and 81% after (California), and 80% before and 74% after (Illinois). Main Outcome Measures Taking leave, length of leave, unmet need for leave, and awareness and use of PFLI. Results Similar percentages of parents at the California site reported taking at least 1 day of leave to care for their ill child before (295 [81%]) and after (327 [79%]) PFLI, taking at least 4 weeks before (64 [21%]) and after (74 [19%]) PFLI, and at least once in the past year not missing work despite believing their child's illness necessitated it before (152 [41%]) and after (156 [41%]) PFLI. Relative to Illinois, parents at the California site reported no change from before to after PFLI in taking at least 1 day of leave (difference of differences, −3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], −13% to 7%); taking at least 4 weeks of leave (1%; 95% CI, −9% to 10%); or not missing work, despite believing their child's illness necessitated it (−1%; 95% CI, −13% to 10%). Only 77 parents (18%) had heard of PFLI approximately 18 months after the program began, and only 20 (5%) had used it. Even among parents without other access to paid leave, awareness and use of PFLI were minimal. Conclusions Parents of children with special health care needs receiving care at a California hospital were generally unaware of PFLI and rarely used

  12. Awareness and use of California's Paid Family Leave Insurance among parents of chronically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Mark A; Chung, Paul J; Elliott, Marc N; Garfield, Craig F; Vestal, Katherine D; Klein, David J

    2008-09-03

    In 2004, California's Paid Family Leave Insurance Program (PFLI) became the first state program to provide paid leave to care for an ill family member. To assess awareness and use of the program by employed parents of children with special health care needs, a population likely to need leave. Telephone interviews with successive cohorts of employed parents before (November 21, 2003-January 31, 2004; n = 754) and after (November 18, 2005-January 31, 2006; n = 766) PFLI began, randomly sampled from 2 children's hospitals, one in California (with PFLI) and the other in Illinois (without PFLI). Response rates were 82% before and 81% after (California), and 80% before and 74% after (Illinois). Taking leave, length of leave, unmet need for leave, and awareness and use of PFLI. Similar percentages of parents at the California site reported taking at least 1 day of leave to care for their ill child before (295 [81%]) and after (327 [79%]) PFLI, taking at least 4 weeks before (64 [21%]) and after (74 [19%]) PFLI, and at least once in the past year not missing work despite believing their child's illness necessitated it before (152 [41%]) and after (156 [41%]) PFLI. Relative to Illinois, parents at the California site reported no change from before to after PFLI in taking at least 1 day of leave (difference of differences, -3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -13% to 7%); taking at least 4 weeks of leave (1%; 95% CI, -9% to 10%); or not missing work, despite believing their child's illness necessitated it (-1%; 95% CI, -13% to 10%). Only 77 parents (18%) had heard of PFLI approximately 18 months after the program began, and only 20 (5%) had used it. Even among parents without other access to paid leave, awareness and use of PFLI were minimal. Parents of children with special health care needs receiving care at a California hospital were generally unaware of PFLI and rarely used it. Among parents of children with special health care needs, taking leave in California did not

  13. Novel, Family-Centered Intervention to Improve Nutrition in Patients Recovering From Critical Illness: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Andrea P; Lemieux, Margot; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Seyler, Hilda; MacEachern, Kristen N; Heyland, Daren K

    2017-06-01

    Critically ill patients are at increased risk of developing malnutrition-related complications because of physiological changes, suboptimal delivery, and reduced intake. Strategies to improve nutrition during critical illness recovery are required to prevent iatrogenic underfeeding and risk of malnutrition. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a novel family-centered intervention to improve nutrition in critically ill patients. A 3-phase, prospective cohort feasibility study was conducted in 4 intensive care units (ICUs) across 2 countries. Intervention feasibility was determined by patient eligibility, recruitment, and retention rates. The acceptability of the intervention was assessed by participant perspectives collected through surveys. Participants included family members of the critically ill patients and ICU and ward healthcare professionals (HCPs). A total of 75 patients and family members, as well as 56 HCPs, were enrolled. The consent rate was 66.4%, and 63 of 75 (84%) of family participants completed the study. Most family members (53/55; 98.1%) would recommend the nutrition education program to others and reported improved ability to ask questions about nutrition (16/20; 80.0%). Family members viewed nutrition care more positively in the ICU. HCPs agreed that families should partner with HCPs to achieve optimal nutrition in the ICU and the wards. Health literacy was identified as a potential barrier to family participation. The intervention was feasible and acceptable to families of critically ill patients and HCPs. Further research to evaluate intervention impact on nutrition intake and patient-centered outcomes is required.

  14. Influence of caregiver personality on the burden of family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Hyun; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Sung-Wan; Shin, Il-Seon; Shim, Hyun-Jeong; Hwang, Jun-Eul; Chung, Ik-Joo; Yoon, Jin-Sang

    2016-02-01

    To determine the influence of caregiver personality and other factors on the burden of family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients. We investigated a wide range of factors related to the patient-family caregiver dyad in a palliative care setting using a cross-sectional design. Caregiver burden was assessed using the seven-item short version of the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI-7). Caregiver personality was assessed using the 10-item short version of the Big Five Inventory (BFI-10), which measures the following five personality dimensions: extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness. Patient- and caregiver-related sociodemographic and psychological factors were included in the analysis because of their potential association with caregiver burden. Clinical patient data were obtained from medical charts or by using other measures. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to identify the independent factors associated with caregiver burden. We analyzed 227 patient-family caregiver dyads. The multivariate analysis revealed that caregiver extroversion was protective against caregiver burden, whereas depressive symptoms in caregivers were related to increased burden. Neuroticism was positively correlated with caregiver burden, but this relationship was nonsignificant following adjustment for depressive symptoms. Patient-related factors were not significantly associated with caregiver burden. Evaluating caregiver personality traits could facilitate identification of individuals at greater risk of high burden. Furthermore, depression screening and treatment programs for caregivers in palliative care settings are required to decrease caregiver burden.

  15. Family assessment conversations as a tool to support families affected by parental mental illness: a retrospective review of electronic patient journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Camilla; Kolmannskog, Anne Berit; Iversen, Anette Christine

    2018-01-01

    Previous research has shown a link between parental mental illness and adverse development in their offspring. In Norway, it is mandatory for health professionals to identify if patients in adult mental health services have children, and subsequently to provide support for the children. An important tool to detect if families are affected by parental mental illness and to assess if there is a need for further intervention is the Family Assessment Conversation. Family Assessment Conversations is potentially a powerful tool for communication with families affected by parental mental illness because it facilitates early identification of children at risk of various adversities due to the family situation. Additionally the tool may initiate processes that enable children and parents to cope with the situation when a parent becomes seriously ill. Little is however known about how the mental health practitioners use the family assessment form in conversations, and to what extent they record relevant information in the electronic patient journals. The main aim of the study was to provide information about the existing practice within mental health services for adults in terms of parental mental illness and family assessment conversations. The project is a retrospective journal review. The data base consists of relevant journal data from 734 patients aged 20-60 years admitted. In total, 159 recordings of family assessment conversations were discovered. The main result in this study was that many of the questions in the family assessment form lacked documented responses and assessments from the healthcare professionals. Only 17% of the participants had been assessed with the total family assessment form. Additionally, there was a lack of documentation about whether or not the children had been informed in a large proportion of the assessment forms (31%). A total of 55% say that the child has not been informed. This implies that there is still a long way to go in order to

  16. Cultural aspects within caregiver interactions of ultra-orthodox Jewish women and their family members with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Penina; Shor, Ron; Hadas-Lidor, Naomi

    2013-10-01

    The role of cultural dynamics and norms within families of persons with mental illness has been an underexplored subject, although the familial context has been recognized as influential. This subject was studied with 24 ultra-Orthodox Jewish mothers of persons with mental illness who live in a relatively closed religious community. While participating in the Keshet educational program designed for family caregivers in mental health, they wrote Meaningful Interactional Life Episodes that involved a dialogue exchange in their lives. Qualitative analysis of 50 episodes illuminates the significant role that religious and cultural norms have in the perceptions of what are considered stressors and the dynamics in these families surrounding these stressors. The necessity and value of incorporating cultural competence into family educational programs and interventions is emphasized, as this may contribute to the potential use and success of mental health service models within a population that essentially underutilizes these services. © 2013 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  17. Altered DNA methylation associated with a translocation linked to major mental illness

    OpenAIRE

    McCartney, Daniel L; Walker, Rosie M; Morris, Stewart W; Anderson, Susan M; Duff, Barbara J; Marioni, Riccardo E; Millar, J Kirsty; McCarthy, Shane E; Ryan, Niamh M; Lawrie, Stephen M; Watson, Andrew R; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Thomson, Pippa A; McIntosh, Andrew M; McCombie, W Richard

    2018-01-01

    Recent work has highlighted a possible role for altered epigenetic modifications, including differential DNA methylation, in susceptibility to psychiatric illness. Here, we investigate blood-based DNA methylation in a large family where a balanced translocation between chromosomes 1 and 11 shows genome-wide significant linkage to psychiatric illness. Genome-wide DNA methylation was profiled in whole-blood-derived DNA from 41 individuals using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (Illumin...

  18. eHealth interventions for family carers of people with long term illness: A promising approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Jacqueline; Henderson, Claire; Spain, Debbie; Cornelius, Victoria; Chen, Tao; Gillard, Steve

    2018-03-01

    Family carers of people who have long term illness often experience physical and mental health morbidities, and burden. While there is good evidence to suggest that carers benefit from psychosocial interventions, these have primarily been delivered via face-to-face individual or group-formats. eHealth interventions offer a novel, accessible and self-paced approach to care delivery. Whether these are effective for carers' wellbeing has been little explored. This paper reports the first comprehensive systematic review in this area. A total of 78 studies, describing 62 discrete interventions, were identified. Interventions commonly aimed to promote carers' knowledge, self-efficacy, caregiving appraisal, and reduce global health morbidities. Interventions were offered to carers of people with a wide range of long term illness; dementia has been the most researched area, as reported in 40% of studies. Clinical and methodological heterogeneity in interventions precluded meta-analyses, and so data were analysed narratively. The most popular approach has comprised psychoeducational interventions delivered via an enriched online environment with supplementary modes of communication, such as network support with professionals and peers. Overall, carers appreciate the flexibility and self-paced nature of eHealth interventions, with high rates of satisfaction and acceptability. More studies using robust designs are needed to extend the evidence base. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Cost Analysis of a High Support Housing Initiative for Persons with Severe Mental Illness and Long-Term Psychiatric Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudoler, David; de Oliveira, Claire; Jacob, Binu; Hopkins, Melonie; Kurdyak, Paul

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this article was to conduct a cost analysis comparing the costs of a supportive housing intervention to inpatient care for clients with severe mental illness who were designated alternative-level care while inpatient at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto. The intervention, called the High Support Housing Initiative, was implemented in 2013 through a collaboration between 15 agencies in the Toronto area. The perspective of this cost analysis was that of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. We compared the cost of inpatient mental health care to high-support housing. Cost data were derived from a variety of sources, including health administrative data, expenditures reported by housing providers, and document analysis. The High Support Housing Initiative was cost saving relative to inpatient care. The average cost savings per diem were between $140 and $160. This amounts to an annual cost savings of approximately $51,000 to $58,000. When tested through sensitivity analysis, the intervention remained cost saving in most scenarios; however, the result was highly sensitive to health system costs for clients of the High Support Housing Initiative program. This study suggests the High Support Housing Initiative is potentially cost saving relative to inpatient hospitalization at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

  20. Effects on resilience of women family caregivers of adults with serious mental illness: the role of positive cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Bekhet, Abir K; Suresky, M Jane

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effects of risk and protective factors on resilience in 60 women family members of adults with serious mental illness. Both the risk factors constituting caregiver burden (strain, stigma, client dependence, and family disruption) and protective factors, including eight positive cognitions were found to predict two indicators of resilience: resourcefulness and sense of coherence. The effects of caregiver burden on resourcefulness and sense of coherence were mediated by positive cognitions, lending support to resilience theory and suggesting the need to develop interventions to encourage positive thinking among women caregivers of adults with mental illness.

  1. ["Nicht von schlechten Eltern - NischE": A Family Orientated Collaborative Care Approach to Support Children in Families with Mentally Ill Parents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabnitz, Pascal; Kronmüller, Klaus-Thomas; Wieskus-Friedemann, Erwin; Kliem, Sabine; Hoppmann, Johannes; Burek, Monika; Löhr, Michael; Kemper, Ulrich; Nienaber, André

    2016-11-01

    "Nicht von schlechten Eltern - NischE": A Family Orientated Collaborative Care Approach to Support Children in Families with Mentally Ill Parents The present work describes the setting- and multi-professional offer "NischE" in Gütersloh, a systemic approach for the care of children and their mentally ill parents. Children of mentally ill parents are a special risk group for developing their own mental illness. The aim of the collaborative care model between child and adolescent psychiatry, youth services and adult psychiatry is to enable affected families in terms of family-focused practice a low threshold access to different services. For this purpose, two positions have been created to advise the affected families and support access to the help system in the sense of a systemic case management in a project. The article describes the background and the need for the development of the offer, the current scientific knowledge base on the subject and illustrates the procedure using a case study from practice.

  2. A 4q35.2 subtelomeric deletion identified in a screen of patients with co-morbid psychiatric illness and mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Ben S; Hollox, Edward J; Malloy, M Pat; Porteous, David J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Armour, John A L; Muir, Walter J

    2004-08-13

    Cryptic structural abnormalities within the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes have been the focus of much recent research because of their discovery in a percentage of people with mental retardation (UK terminology: learning disability). These studies focused on subjects (largely children) with various severities of intellectual impairment with or without additional physical clinical features such as dysmorphisms. However it is well established that prevalence of schizophrenia is around three times greater in those with mild mental retardation. The rates of bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder have also been reported as increased in people with mental retardation. We describe here a screen for telomeric abnormalities in a cohort of 69 patients in which mental retardation co-exists with severe psychiatric illness. We have applied two techniques, subtelomeric fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and multiplex amplifiable probe hybridisation (MAPH) to detect abnormalities in the patient group. A subtelomeric deletion was discovered involving loss of 4q in a patient with co-morbid schizoaffective disorder and mental retardation. The precise region of loss has been defined allowing us to identify genes that may contribute to the clinical phenotype through hemizygosity. Interestingly, the region of 4q loss exactly matches that linked to bipolar affective disorder in a large multiply affected Australian kindred.

  3. A 4q35.2 subtelomeric deletion identified in a screen of patients with co-morbid psychiatric illness and mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackwood Douglas HR

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptic structural abnormalities within the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes have been the focus of much recent research because of their discovery in a percentage of people with mental retardation (UK terminology: learning disability. These studies focused on subjects (largely children with various severities of intellectual impairment with or without additional physical clinical features such as dysmorphisms. However it is well established that prevalence of schizophrenia is around three times greater in those with mild mental retardation. The rates of bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder have also been reported as increased in people with mental retardation. We describe here a screen for telomeric abnormalities in a cohort of 69 patients in which mental retardation co-exists with severe psychiatric illness. Methods We have applied two techniques, subtelomeric fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH and multiplex amplifiable probe hybridisation (MAPH to detect abnormalities in the patient group. Results A subtelomeric deletion was discovered involving loss of 4q in a patient with co-morbid schizoaffective disorder and mental retardation. Conclusion The precise region of loss has been defined allowing us to identify genes that may contribute to the clinical phenotype through hemizygosity. Interestingly, the region of 4q loss exactly matches that linked to bipolar affective disorder in a large multiply affected Australian kindred.

  4. Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy: A Family Affair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, Albert L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The article reports on a case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy in which chronic illicit insulin was administered to a one-year-old child by her mother. Factitious illnesses continued despite psychiatric intervention. Retrospective review of medical records suggested 30 previous episodes of factitious illness within the family. (DB)

  5. More illness in offspring of bipolar patients from the US compared to Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Kupka, Ralph; McElroy, Susan L.; Frye, Mark A.; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Keck, Paul E.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Nolen, Willem A.

    Background: Evidence suggests that patients with bipolar disorder from the United States have an earlier age of onset and a more difficult course of illness than those from Germany and the Netherlands. These characteristics were related to a greater family burden of psychiatric illness and the

  6. [Subjective Needs of Support in Families with a Mentally Ill Parent – A Literature Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Patricia; Bruland, Dirk; Bauer, Ulrich; Lenz, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Mentally ill parents are often sceptical about professional help for their children although these children face an increased risk to develop a mental disease themselves. To get a better understanding of needs and help-seeking behaviour in those families a systematic literature review was conducted. Four databases (FIS, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX, PubPsych) were scanned for international and national research literature. Out of 18,057 articles 56 were included which report quantitative or qualitative studies taking the children's and parents' perspectives into account. A thematic synthesis was done to categorize the needs. Results concerning the help-seeking behaviour and the influence of demographic variables were extracted and summarized. Our results were limited by the aspect that no evaluation of study quality had been made and influences on the categorizing process by the authors' subjective perceptions are likely. There were a lot of hints regarding the needs of the families, but little report was found about help-seeking behaviour and demographic variables. The "health literacy" concept was discussed as a basis for further research in this area.

  7. Living with Mentally Ill Parent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye Buldukoglu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review seeks to identify and analyze qualitative studies that examined experiences of children whose parents have a mental illness. This study reported that children whose parents have a mental illness had some common experiences. These experiences may have negative effects on children’s coping skills, resilience to tough living conditions and ability to maintain their mental health. In spite of these negative conditions, some of these children have much more self-confidence, resilience and independence because of inner development and early maturation. Some effective intervention programs are needed to promote information to children and other family members about mental illness, coping behaviors. Availability of such psychiatric services and nation-wide programs with professionals to deal with these problems should be organized properly to increase quality of life of these children. Furthermore, qualitative researches that explore the experiences of children whose parents with mental illness should also be conducted in our country.

  8. The experience of Chinese immigrant women in caring for a terminally ill family member in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Mary T; Koo, Fung Kuen; White, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese community, a heterogeneous, highly visible non-English speaking ethnic group in Australia, remains mostly hidden and underrepresented in palliative care service delivery along with participation in health research despite being the fastest growing such group in the country. There is a lack of Australian research information concerning the impact of migration on the caregiving experience of women carers within the Chinese cultural framework and the Australian palliative care context. This paper aims to explore the influence of Chinese cultural norms and immigration on the experience of immigrant women of Chinese ancestry caring for a terminally ill family member at home in Sydney. This study also seeks to identify factors that may present access barriers to palliative care support services. A qualitative approach was used in this study. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with five home-based Chinese women carers and were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings identified that the participants found being a carer is a lonely and isolating experience. Sources of isolation and loneliness included social isolation experienced as a solitary carer without meaningful family and social relationships; loss of familiar cultural understandings and family values; and emotional isolators expressed in response to the physical and emotional role commitment and other constraints. The study results suggest the need for palliative care educational programmes designed to help nurses to understand the impact of cultural background within the palliative care context. Results also indicate that health care professionals should provide culturally appropriate and competent palliative care services, sensitive to the diverse socio-cultural influences and individual needs of Chinese migrants.

  9. Needs, expectations and consequences for children growing up in a family where the parent has a mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Izabela; Zabłocka-Żytka, Lidia; Ryan, Peter; Poma, Stefano Zanone; Joronen, Katja; Viganò, Giovanni; Simpson, Wendy; Paavilainen, Eija; Scherbaum, Norbert; Smith, Martin; Dawson, Ian

    2016-08-01

    The lack of pan-European guidelines for empowering children of parents with mental illness led to the EU project CAMILLE - Empowerment of Children and Adolescents of Mentally Ill Parents through Training of Professionals working with children and adolescents. The aim of this initial task in the project was to analyse needs, expectations and consequences for children with respect to living with a parent with mental illness from the perspective of professionals and family members. This qualitative research was conducted in England, Finland, Germany, Italy, Norway, Poland and Scotland with 96 professionals, parents with mental illness, adult children and partners of parents with mental illness. A framework analysis method was used. Results of the study highlighted that the main consequences described for children of parental mental illness were role reversal; emotional and behavioural problems; lack of parent's attention and stigma. The main needs of these children were described as emotional support, security and multidisciplinary help. Implications for practice are that professionals working with parents with mental illness should be aware of the specific consequences for the children and encourage parents in their parental role; multi-agency collaboration is necessary; schools should provide counselling and prevent stigma. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. Filial piety and parental responsibility: an interpretive phenomenological study of family caregiving for a person with mental illness among Korean immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Mijung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the strong influence of culture on family involvement in disease management, few studies have examined how immigrant families care for persons with mental illness. The purpose of this study was to examine how immigrant families organize their world to care for a mentally ill person in the United States. The current analysis focused on how Confucian notions of filial piety and parental obligation shape caregiving in Korean immigrant families. Methods Participants in this interpretive phenomenological study were comprised of six Korean immigrant women caring for a family member with mental illness. Participants provided narratives that illustrate challenges and opportunities in caring for their mentally ill family member. Results Three family caregiving patterns were discerned. Insulating from the outside world describes a family’s effort to accept a member's illness and to manage it within the family. Prioritizing education over well-being concerns parental commitment to the Confucian priority of educating one’s children. Reciprocating the sacrifice describes how a family adapts and enacts filial piety. Conclusion The findings of this study warrant further study to examine the influence of Confucianism among Korean American families. The three patterns of caregiving are strongly aligned with Confucian notion of family and family engagement. These patterns may help health providers to anticipate the needs of and provide individualized, culturally appropriate mental health care for patients with mental illness and their families of Korean origin.

  11. Patterns of Psychopathology in the Families of Children with Conduct Problems, Depression, and Both Psychiatric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Lisa M.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.

    2007-01-01

    Comorbid conduct problems (CPs) and depression are observed far more often than expected by chance, which is perplexing given minimal symptom overlap. In this study, relations between parental psychopathology and children's diagnostic status were evaluated to test competing theories of comorbidity. Participants included 180 families with an…

  12. Cannabis use and family history in adolescent first episode ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To investigate the clinical correlates of cannabis use in adolescents with first episode psychosis (FEP). Methods: Inpatient psychiatric records provided demographic, lifetime cannabis use, family history of mental illness, and clinical data on 45 FEP adolescents, aged 12–18 years, admitted to a psychiatric unit in ...

  13. Sociodemographic profile and psychiatric diagnosis of patients referred to consultation-liaison psychiatric services of general hospital psychiatric unit at a Tertiary Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shri Gopal Goyal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Previous studies have reported high psychiatric comorbidity with physical illness. However, referral rate to consultation-liaison (C-L psychiatry from other departments is very low. There is a paucity of literature from India in this subspecialty of psychiatry. Aims: This study was conducted to assess the sociodemographic profile and psychiatric diagnosis of patients referred to C-L psychiatric services at a tertiary care center. Settings and Design: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary care multispecialty teaching institution. Patients and Methods: The study population comprised all the patients who were referred for psychiatric consultation from other departments to C-L services of psychiatry department for 2 months. Information was collected using semi-structured pro forma, and diagnosis was made based on the International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria. Results: A total of 160 patients were referred for C-L psychiatric services. Majority of the patients were in the age group of 31–45 years, married, educated matriculation or beyond, belonged to Hindu religion, nuclear family, and residing in urban area. The maximum referrals were from internal medicine department (17.5 followed by nephrology (15.0% and neurology (10.6%. The most common psychiatric diagnosis was depression (12% followed by delirium (8%. The most common reason for seeking psychiatric consultation was psychiatric clearance of prospective kidney donor and bone marrow transplant/stem cell transplant recipient. Conclusions: Psychiatric comorbidity may present with chronic physical illness. The C-L psychiatry would play a major role in the management of psychiatric comorbidity.

  14. Empowering families with the experience of mental illness. A presentation of the Polish version of CAMILLE training package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Izabela; Zabłocka-Żytka, Lidia; Czabała, Jan C

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the CAMILLE training package prepared in the EU program Empowerment of Children and Adolescents of Mentally Ill Parents through Training of Professionals working with children and adolescents. The training is designed for psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, teachers and others working with children and adolescents where a parent experiences mental disorders. The project was realized on 4 stages: (1) pre-analyses (quality and quantity) with professionals, family members and people experiencing mental disorders, in regards to the needs, experiences and expectations in education of professionals working with families of parents with mental illness; (2) development of a new pan-European training program for specialists working with these families; (3) pre-pilot implementation and evaluation of the training; (4) preparing of the final version of the training and pilot implementation in 7 countries participating in the project, also in Poland. The training program consists of 9 subjects, divided into 3 main groups: the basic knowledge (mental disorders, child development, attachment), experiences and needs of the families (experiences of parents, children, stigma), methods of family support (talking with children, resilience, successful services). The pilot implementation of the program showed great professionals' interest in the subject and training methods. The evaluation showed significant positive effects of the training in terms of the raise of awareness of influence of the parent's illness on needs of the child, parental abilities and ability of building the child resilience. The CAMILLE training is a valuable program that can be implemented in Poland.

  15. Incommunicado detention and torture in Spain, Part IV: Psychological and psychiatric consequences of ill-treatment and torture: trauma and human worldviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Lashaya, Miguel Angel; Pérez-Sales, Pau; Lopez Neyr, Gabriela; Martínez, Maitane Arnoso; Morentin, Benito

    2016-01-01

    Most literature on psychological consequences of torture is related to prolonged detention. Psychological consequences of intensive physical and psychological torture in brief detention have not been investigated. The aim of this study is to analyse the psychological impact of torture in short-term incommunicado detention. A sample of 45 Basque people who had allegedly been subjected to ill-treatment or torture whilst held in incommunicado detention between two and 11 days in Spain in the period 1980-2012 was analysed. The period between detention and evaluation ranged between two and 12 years. Each case was evaluated by several psychiatrists and psychologists. Clinical interviews which followed the Istanbul Protocol were assessed, as were psychometric tests (Post-traumatic Checklist-Civilian version (PCL-C), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Vital Impact Assessment Questionnaire (VIVO)) and external documentary evidence. A cumulative prevalence of psychiatric diagnosis (ICD-10) from the period of detention was established. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was the most frequent diagnosis (53%). Enduring personality change after a catastrophic experience was detected in 11% of subjects. Other diagnoses were depressive disorders (16%) and anxiety disorders (9%). Psychometric evaluation at the time of the study showed symptoms of PTSD in 52% of the subjects (with a tendency for these symptoms to diminish over time) and depressive symptoms in 56%. The VIVO questionnaire discerned two subgroups of survivors: "affected" survivors (36%); and "resilient" survivors (64%). The data demonstrated two important issues: the undervalued damaging effect of intensive torture in short-term detention and the long lasting psychological damage of the same over time.

  16. Family caregiver burden in mental illnesses: The case of affective disorders and schizophrenia - a qualitative exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kardorff, Ernst; Soltaninejad, Ali; Kamali, Mohammad; Eslami Shahrbabaki, Mahin

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers of people with mental illnesses often experience a wide range of burdens. Although many studies have confirmed burdens among family caregivers of mentally ill relatives in general, specific knowledge regarding the concrete everyday hassle and existential sorrows from the caregiverś subjective reasoning perspective is lacking. Furthermore, there is little evidence on the possible different effects of affective disorders and schizophrenia on the quality of burden; this is also true with regard to the role of cultural traditions and lay beliefs. The aim of this study was to explore the specific burdens experienced by caregivers of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders. A qualitative study was conducted by semi-structured interviews with 45 caregivers of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders. Data were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Eleven encumbering themes resulted from the interviews including incertitude, unawareness, emotional burden, stigma and blame, financial burden, physical burden, restriction in routine, disruption in routine, dissatisfaction with family, relatives, and acquaintances, troubles with patients' adherence to medication, and problems with health services and governmental support. Caring for a person with mental illness affects caregivers emotionally, financially, physically, and it elicits some restrictions in their routine (daily hassles). Finally, it causes conflicts in family relationships. Despite some differences regarding perceived burden among caregivers of schizophrenia and affective disorders, a common pattern of burden could be identified. Thus, authorities should provide adequate financial, educational, and psychosocial supports for caregivers of mental illnesses.

  17. Perspectives of family members participating in cultural assessment of psychiatric disorders: findings from the DSM-5 International Field Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Ladson; Aggarwal, Neil; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Weiss, Mitchell; Paralikar, Vasudeo; Deshpande, Smita; Jadhav, Sushrut; Ndetei, David; Nicasio, Andel; Boiler, Marit; Lam, Peter; Avelar, Yesi; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Despite the important roles families play in the lives of many individuals with mental illness across cultures, there is a dearth of data worldwide on how family members perceive the process of cultural assessment as well as to how to best include them. This study addresses this gap in our knowledge through analysis of data collected across six countries as part of a DSM-5 Field Trial of the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI). At clinician discretion, individuals who accompanied patients to the clinic visit (i.e. patient companions) at the time the CFI was conducted were invited to participate in the cultural assessment and answer questions about their experience. The specific aims of this paper are (1) to describe patterns of participation of patient companions in the CFI across the six countries, and (2) to examine the comparative feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility of the CFI from companion perspectives through analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data. Among the 321 patient interviews, only 86 (at four of 12 sites) included companions, all of whom were family members or other relatives. The utility, feasibility and acceptability of the CFI were rated favourably by relatives, supported by qualitative analyses of debriefing interviews. Cross-site differences in frequency of accompaniment merit further study.

  18. Polygenic Risk Score, Parental Socioeconomic Status, Family History of Psychiatric Disorders, and the Risk for Schizophrenia: A Danish Population-Based Study and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerbo, Esben; Sullivan, Patrick F; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Pedersen, Carsten B; Mors, Ole; Børglum, Anders D; Hougaard, David M; Hollegaard, Mads V; Meier, Sandra; Mattheisen, Manuel; Ripke, Stephan; Wray, Naomi R; Mortensen, Preben B

    2015-07-01

    Schizophrenia has a complex etiology influenced both by genetic and nongenetic factors but disentangling these factors is difficult. To estimate (1) how strongly the risk for schizophrenia relates to the mutual effect of the polygenic risk score, parental socioeconomic status, and family history of psychiatric disorders; (2) the fraction of cases that could be prevented if no one was exposed to these factors; (3) whether family background interacts with an individual's genetic liability so that specific subgroups are particularly risk prone; and (4) to what extent a proband's genetic makeup mediates the risk associated with familial background. We conducted a nested case-control study based on Danish population-based registers. The study consisted of 866 patients diagnosed as having schizophrenia between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2006, and 871 matched control individuals. Genome-wide data and family psychiatric and socioeconomic background information were obtained from neonatal biobanks and national registers. Results from a separate meta-analysis (34,600 cases and 45,968 control individuals) were applied to calculate polygenic risk scores. Polygenic risk scores, parental socioeconomic status, and family psychiatric history. Odds ratios (ORs), attributable risks, liability R2 values, and proportions mediated. Schizophrenia was associated with the polygenic risk score (OR, 8.01; 95% CI, 4.53-14.16 for highest vs lowest decile), socioeconomic status (OR, 8.10; 95% CI, 3.24-20.3 for 6 vs no exposures), and a history of schizophrenia/psychoses (OR, 4.18; 95% CI, 2.57-6.79). The R2 values were 3.4% (95% CI, 2.1-4.6) for the polygenic risk score, 3.1% (95% CI, 1.9-4.3) for parental socioeconomic status, and 3.4% (95% CI, 2.1-4.6) for family history. Socioeconomic status and psychiatric history accounted for 45.8% (95% CI, 36.1-55.5) and 25.8% (95% CI, 21.2-30.5) of cases, respectively. There was an interaction between the polygenic risk score and family history

  19. Adaptation and evaluation of the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertzon, Mats; Alvariza, Anette; Winnberg, Elisabeth; Leksell, Janeth; Andershed, Birgitta; Goliath, Ida; Momeni, Pardis; Kneck, Åsa; Skott, Maria; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2018-03-31

    To adapt the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (FIAQ) for use in the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care and to evaluate its validity and reliability. Involvement in the professional care has proven to be important for family members. However, they have described feelings of alienation in relation to how they experienced the professionals' approach. To explore this issue, a broad instrument that can be used in different care contexts is needed. A psychometric evaluation study, with a cross-sectional design. The content validity of the FIAQ was evaluated during 2014 by cognitive interviews with 15 family members to adults in different care contexts. Psychometric evaluation was then conducted (2015-2016). A sample of 325 family members participated, 103 of whom in a test-retest evaluation. Both parametric and non-parametric methods were used. The content validity revealed that the questionnaire was generally understood and considered to be relevant and retrievable by family members in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care. Furthermore, the FIAQ (Revised), demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties in terms of data quality, homogeneity, unidimensionality (factor structure), internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The study provides evidence that the FIAQ (Revised) is reliable and valid for use in further research and in quality assessment in the contexts of the care of older people, psychiatric care, palliative care and diabetes care. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. "Her illness is a project we can work on together": developing a collaborative family-centered intervention model for newly diagnosed multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintell, David; Melito, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a model for intervening with families that are addressing a new diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in one member. The model is collaborative, integrative, and family-centered. It involves both working with the family collaboratively and providing strategies to promote greater collaboration within the family. The model integrates elements of crisis intervention theory, psycho-education, and family-centered approaches. The model was developed with families addressing MS, and was piloted with three families. The intervention was found to improve family members' ability to collaborate with each other. Such increased collaboration may enhance the family's ability to manage long-term illness more effectively, help the family address the impact of the illness on all family members, and generally improve the family's quality of life.

  1. Research and organizational issues for the implementation of family work in community psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adrian; Scannell, Tony

    2002-04-01

    The need for evidence-based practice (EBP) to guide and develop mental health services remains fundamental for modern services. Aim. To discuss issues that impact upon implementation of EBP and practice development using family work (FW) as an example. A selection of the FW literature was reviewed drawing on sources including the Cochrane Library, Cinahl and Medline. Keywords used were FW, community mental health team and research design. Centralized policy initiatives and guidelines that are themselves guided by evidence of randomized controlled trials predominantly risk alienating practitioners and clients/carers. Family work has some demonstrable clinical benefits although models differ and the active therapeutic agent remains unclear. Its adoption into routine care is also hindered by a productivity management outlook that seeks to maximize stretched resources and whose values are likely to be internalized by practitioners. The dichotomous position of previous research and practice development make implementation of EBP difficult and highlights the need for strategic planning that embraces both factors. The current drive to increase EBP requires a bi-directional process of influence that allows individual practitioners and clients/carers to become producers of evidence and not simply recipients. The authors support wider adoption of case study research designs to reflect the unpredictable nature of mental health care. Adoption of assertive community treatment models within community services is most likely to promote the excellence management model and accommodate EBP such as FW.

  2. Genome-wide association study reveals greater polygenic loading for schizophrenia in cases with a family history of illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigdeli, Tim B.; Ripke, Stephan; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia have yielded more than 100 common susceptibility variants, and strongly support a substantial polygenic contribution of a large number of small allelic effects. It has been hypothesized that familial schizophrenia is largely a consequence...... of inherited rather than environmental factors. We investigated the extent to which familiality of schizophrenia is associated with enrichment for common risk variants detectable in a large GWAS. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for cases reporting a family history of psychotic illness (N...... history subgroup. Comparison of genome-wide polygenic risk scores based on GWAS summary statistics indicated a significant enrichment for SNP effects among family history positive compared to family history negative cases (Nagelkerke's R2=0.0021; P=0.00331; P-value threshold

  3. Family members' views on the benefits of harp music vigils for terminally-ill or dying loved ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzini, Linda; Rakoski, Alexa; Cohn, Sharilyn; Mularski, Richard A

    2015-02-01

    Music-thanatology is a palliative modality that uses harp and voice to provide bedside vigils, particularly for terminally ill or actively dying. We sought to determine the benefits of music vigils for terminally ill patients. Survey of 55 family members, whose terminally ill loved one experienced a music vigil during hospitalization, regarding effects on the patient's breathing, relaxation, comfort, pain and ability to sleep. Written comments on negative and positive results of the vigils were coded using content analysis. Family members perceived that the vigils resulted in modest improvement in the patients' breathing, relaxation, comfort, and ability to sleep, with fewer positive effects on pain, and almost no negative effects. Open ended comments focused on the positive benefit in increasing calm, relaxation, comfort. Comments on the positive effects for the family were almost as common as comments on the positive results for the patient. The use of music-vigils in palliative care should be investigated more extensively as our study supports that this intervention has benefits, almost no risk, minimal cost, and may improve patient-family experience of the dying process.

  4. Self-stigma, insight, and family burden among Israeli mothers of people with serious mental illness: Ethno-national considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisman-Ilani, Yaara; Hasson-Ohayon, Ilanit; Levy-Frank, Itamar; Tuval-Mashiach, Rivka; Roe, David

    2017-06-01

    The current cross-sectional study investigated and compared the associations between insight, self-stigma, and family burden among Jewish and Arab mothers of an adult son or daughter with serious mental illness (SMI) in Israel. A total of 162 Israeli mothers of a person with SMI participated in the study; 95 were Jewish (58.6%), and 67 were Arab (41.4%). Insight, self-stigma, and family burden scales were administered. Jewish mothers reported higher levels of insight into their son's or daughter's illness and reported greater family burden compared to Arab mothers. No significant differences in self-stigma scores were found between Jewish and Arab mothers. The pattern of associations between insight, self-stigma, and burden differed between Jewish and Arab mothers. Self-stigma was found to mediate the relationship between insight and burden among Jewish mothers but not among Arab mothers. Ethno-national affiliation should be taken into consideration regarding how family members conceptualize and experience mental illness, as this might affect care.

  5. Suicide and mental illness in parents and risk of suicide in offspring: a birth cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L; Wang, August G

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A family history of completed suicide and psychiatric illness has been identified as risk factors for suicide. AIMS: To examine the risk of offspring suicide in relation to parental history of suicide and other parental risk factors. METHOD: The study population consisted of 7,177 adult...... the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. RESULTS: Forty-eight cohort members, 77 mothers and 133 fathers had committed suicide during the follow-up. Independent of parental psychiatric illness and social status, parental suicide significantly increased suicide risk in offspring (hazard ratio 4...

  6. Suicide and mental illness in parents and risk of suicide in offspring : A birth cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Wang, August

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A family history of completed suicide and psychiatric illness has been identified as risk factors for suicide. AIMS: To examine the risk of offspring suicide in relation to parental history of suicide and other parental risk factors. METHOD: The study population consisted of 7,177 adult...... the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. RESULTS: Forty-eight cohort members, 77 mothers and 133 fathers had committed suicide during the follow-up. Independent of parental psychiatric illness and social status, parental suicide significantly increased suicide risk in offspring (hazard ratio 4...

  7. The NDE1 genomic locus can affect treatment of psychiatric illness through gene expression changes related to microRNA-484.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Nicholas J; Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Pankakoski, Maiju; Zheutlin, Amanda B; Ortega-Alonso, Alfredo; Torniainen-Holm, Minna; Sinha, Vishal; Therman, Sebastian; Paunio, Tiina; Suvisaari, Jaana; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Cannon, Tyrone D; Haukka, Jari; Hennah, William

    2017-11-01

    Genetic studies of familial schizophrenia in Finland have observed significant associations with a group of biologically related genes, DISC1 , NDE1 , NDEL1 , PDE4B and PDE4D , the 'DISC1 network'. Here, we use gene expression and psychoactive medication use data to study their biological consequences and potential treatment implications. Gene expression levels were determined in 64 individuals from 18 families, while prescription medication information has been collected over a 10-year period for 931 affected individuals. We demonstrate that the NDE1 SNP rs2242549 associates with significant changes in gene expression for 2908 probes (2542 genes), of which 794 probes (719 genes) were replicable. A significant number of the genes altered were predicted targets of microRNA-484 ( p = 3.0 × 10 -8 ), located on a non-coding exon of NDE1 Variants within the NDE1 locus also displayed significant genotype by gender interaction to early cessation of psychoactive medications metabolized by CYP2C19. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-484 can affect the expression of CYP2C19 in a cell culture system. Thus, variation at the NDE1 locus may alter risk of mental illness, in part through modification of miR-484, and such modification alters treatment response to specific psychoactive medications, leading to the potential for use of this locus in targeting treatment. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Beyond symptom management: Family relations, unmet needs of persons living with severe mental illnesses, and potential implications for social work in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Andrew; Burns, Jonathan K; King, Howard; Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Davis, Glen P; Mtshemla, Sisanda; Nene, Siphumelele; Susser, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the quality of family relationships and its associations with the severity of unmet needs of individuals admitted to a tertiary psychiatric hospital in South Africa. The quality of family relations and perceived unmet needs were assessed using the Lehman Quality of Life Interview and Camberwell Assessment of Needs, respectively. The results show that higher total unmet needs were associated with lower quality of family relations. The main areas of serious unmet needs included accessing government benefits and information, and establishing social relations. The results have implications for hospital-based social workers beyond managing psychiatric symptoms in South Africa.

  9. Brain science and illness beliefs: an unexpected explanation of the healing power of therapeutic conversations and the family interventions that matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Lorraine M

    2015-05-01

    Paradigm families and paradigm practice moments have shown me that therapeutic conversations between nurses and families can profoundly and positively change illness beliefs in family members and nurses and contribute to healing from serious illness. The integration of brain science into nursing practice offers further understanding of the importance of illness beliefs and the role they may play in helping individual and family healing. Brain science offers explanations that connect how certain family nursing interventions that soften suffering and challenge constraining illness beliefs may result in changes in brain structure and functioning. New illness beliefs may result in new neural pathways in the brain, and therefore, possibilities for a new way of being in relationship with illness and in relationship with others can also develop. Newly acquired practice skills and interventions that have emerged from an understanding of brain science plus the reemphasis of other interventions utilized in the Illness Beliefs Model are offered to enhance our care of families suffering with illness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Concurrent Medical and Psychiatric Disorders among Schizophrenic and Neurotic Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Bruno R.; Pai, Shaila

    Although the occurrence of medical illnesses in psychiatric patients is quite high, medical illnesses manifested by psychiatric symptoms are often overlooked. The higher mortality rates among psychiatric patients when compared to the general population may be a reflection of neglect or inadequate treatment of the psychiatric patients' medical…

  11. European Federation of Associations of Families of People with Mental Illness initiatives on person-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Sigrid

    2011-04-01

    European Federation of Associations of Families of People with Mental Illness is working towards the goal of shifting the emphasis of care for people with metal illness from the treatment of the symptoms to a more holistic approach of treating the whole person - in other words 'person-centred care'. It is also working with the Geneva conference on person-centred medicine and various interested groupings and organizations to ensure that the role of the family is fully recognized and supported. By engaging primarily with the medical community in bringing to fruition certain initiatives which European Federation of Associations of Families of People with Mental Illness considers as important to the success of person-centred care. To date, no formal reviews have taken place and feedback from the initiatives has been informal and anecdotal. Early reports from the various initiatives are positive. But they also indicate that there is still much work to be done in order for the concept to become a reality across the majority of European countries. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Impact of a family-oriented rehabilitation programme on behavioural and emotional problems in healthy siblings of chronically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besier, T; Hölling, H; Schlack, R; West, C; Goldbeck, L

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of a family-oriented inpatient rehabilitation programme on behavioural and emotional problems in healthy siblings of chronically ill children and to assess the association between these problems and quality of life. A total of 259 healthy children (4-16 years, M = 8.6 years, SD = 3.3) with a chronically ill sibling were enrolled in the study. Parents filled in the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, while the children answered a self-report quality of life instrument (LQ-KID) at the time of admission and discharge from the clinic and at a 6-month follow-up. Comparisons were performed with a matched control group from the German general population (n= 777). Significant behavioural or emotional symptoms were found in 30.5% of the healthy siblings, the relative risk of having elevated scores being 2.2 compared with the control group. Symptoms were inversely correlated with quality of life (r=-0.42). During the inpatient rehabilitation, symptoms decreased significantly to a normal level. Similarly, quality of life significantly improved, except in the dimension family relations. Family-oriented inpatient rehabilitation is a promising approach to improve the mental health of children with a chronically ill sibling.

  13. Communication Challenges and Strategies of U.S. Health Professionals Caring for Seriously Ill South Asian Patients and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Nidhi; Washington, Karla T; Shaunfield, Sara; Aslakson, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    While effective communication is important in the care of seriously ill patients, little is known about communication challenges faced by healthcare providers serving U.S. patients of South Asian origin, one of the fastest growing demographic groups in the United States. Researchers sought to examine communication challenges faced by healthcare providers serving seriously ill South Asian patients and their families and present strategies recommended by providers for effective communication. Researchers conducted a thematic analysis of qualitative data obtained through focus groups and individual interviews with 57 healthcare providers, including physicians, social workers, nurses, chaplains, and others drawn from different healthcare settings in one Midwestern city. While acknowledging the considerable diversity within the U.S. South Asian community, participants discussed three types of communication challenges they often encounter when serving this population: ensuring effective interpretation, identifying a spokesperson, and challenges posed by different cultural norms. Participants shared strategies to address these challenges such as proactively inquiring about patients' and families' preferences and encouraging early appointment of a spokesperson. While providers should avoid stereotyping patients, an awareness of common challenges and adoption of recommended strategies to address these challenges may enhance the provision of culturally responsive person-centered services for seriously ill South Asian patients and their families receiving care in the United States.

  14. Psychiatric Co-Morbidities in Pregnant Women with Opioid Use Disorders: Prevalence, Impact, and Implications for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaudo, Camila L; Andraka-Christou, Barbara; Allgood, Kacy

    2017-01-01

    This review seeks to investigate three questions: What is the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric diagnoses among pregnant women with opioid use disorder (OUD)? How do comorbid psychiatric illnesses impact pregnant women with OUD? And how do comorbid psychiatric illnesses affect the ability of pregnant women with OUD to adhere to and complete OUD treatment? Based on this literature review, 25-33% of pregnant women with OUD have a psychiatric comorbidity, with depression and anxiety being especially common. However, of the 17 studies reviewed only 5 have prevalence rates of dual diagnosis in pregnant women with OUD as their primary outcome measures, their N's were typically small, methods for determining psychiatric diagnosis were variable, and many of the studies were undertaken with women presenting for treatment which carries with its implicit selection bias. Of the women enrolled in treatment programs for SUD, those with psychiatric comorbidity were more likely to have impaired psychological and family/social functioning than those without psychiatric comorbidity. Greater severity of comorbid psychiatric illness appears to predict poorer adherence to treatment, but more research is needed to clarify this relationship with the psychiatric illness is less severe. While cooccurrence of psychiatric disorders in pregnant women with opioid use disorder appears to be common, large population-based studies with validated diagnostic tools and longitudinal assessments are needed to obtain definitive rates and characteristics of cooccurring illnesses. Integrated prenatal, addiction, and psychiatric treatment in a setting that provides social support to pregnant patients with OUD is most effective in maintaining women in treatment. More research is still needed to identify optimal treatment settings, therapy modalities, and medication management for dually diagnosed pregnant women with OUD.

  15. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among cancer patients – hospital-based, cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Roy Gopalan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the prevalence of Psychiatric disorders in cancer patients and to find out the factors associated with Psychiatric disorders in Cancer Patients. Settings and Design: Department of Radiotherapy, Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, cross sectional survey design was used. Methods and Material: Adult patients (18 years of age and above, having a diagnosis of carcinoma were selected by consecutive sampling method.A questionnaire which included back ground data, socio economic variables, treatment variables like type of malignancy, exposure to radiation & chemotherapy prior to the evaluation and current treatment, co occurring medical illness & treatment and past & family history of psychiatric illness was used to collect data. Delirium rating scale and MINI International neuropsychiatric interview were used to assess Psychiatric disorders and delirium. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi square and logistics regression tests were used for analysis. Results: Of the 384 assessed, 160(41.7% had psychiatric disorders. Adjustment disorders were seen in 22.6%. 10.9% of subjects had major depressive disorder. Thus a total of 33.5% of patients had a diagnosis of either anxiety or depressive disorder. Proportion of patients having delirium was 6.5%. Hypomania was seen in small (1.6% of patients. Multivariate analysis for various parameters for psychiatric disorders showed that age, past history of chemotherapy, past history of radiotherapy, & surgical treatment of carcinomas are significant predictors of psychiatric disorders. Conclusions: Psychiatric disorders are seen in a significant proportion of Psychiatric patients.

  16. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity among cancer patients – hospital-based, cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Mohan Roy; Karunakaran, Vidhukumar; Prabhakaran, Anil; Jayakumar, Krishnannair Lalithamma

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the prevalence of Psychiatric disorders in cancer patients and to find out the factors associated with Psychiatric disorders in Cancer Patients. Settings and Design: Department of Radiotherapy, Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, cross sectional survey design was used. Methods and Material: Adult patients (18 years of age and above), having a diagnosis of carcinoma were selected by consecutive sampling method.A questionnaire which included back ground data, socio economic variables, treatment variables like type of malignancy, exposure to radiation & chemotherapy prior to the evaluation and current treatment, co occurring medical illness & treatment and past & family history of psychiatric illness was used to collect data. Delirium rating scale and MINI International neuropsychiatric interview were used to assess Psychiatric disorders and delirium. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi square and logistics regression tests were used for analysis. Results: Of the 384 assessed, 160(41.7%) had psychiatric disorders. Adjustment disorders were seen in 22.6%. 10.9% of subjects had major depressive disorder. Thus a total of 33.5% of patients had a diagnosis of either anxiety or depressive disorder. Proportion of patients having delirium was 6.5%. Hypomania was seen in small (1.6%) of patients. Multivariate analysis for various parameters for psychiatric disorders showed that age, past history of chemotherapy, past history of radiotherapy, & surgical treatment of carcinomas are significant predictors of psychiatric disorders. Conclusions: Psychiatric disorders are seen in a significant proportion of Psychiatric patients. PMID:28066004

  17. Cardiovascular disease and diabetes in people with severe mental illness position statement from the European Psychiatric Association (EPA), supported by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hert, M; Dekker, J M; Wood, D; Kahl, K G; Holt, R I G; Möller, H-J

    2009-09-01

    People with severe mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia, depression or bipolar disorder, have worse physical health and reduced life expectancy compared to the general population. The excess cardiovascular mortality associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is attributed in part to an increased risk of the modifiable coronary heart disease risk factors; obesity, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. Antipsychotic medication and possibly other psychotropic medication like antidepressants can induce weight gain or worsen other metabolic cardiovascular risk factors. Patients may have limited access to general healthcare with less opportunity for cardiovascular risk screening and prevention than would be expected in a non-psychiatric population. The European Psychiatric Association (EPA), supported by the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) published this statement with the aim of improving the care of patients suffering from severe mental illness. The intention is to initiate cooperation and shared care between the different healthcare professionals and to increase the awareness of psychiatrists and primary care physicians caring for patients with severe mental illness to screen and treat cardiovascular risk factors and diabetes.

  18. Individual and parental psychiatric history and risk for suicide among adolescents and young adults in Denmark : A population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Kirstina; Qin, Ping

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both individual and familial histories of mental illness are substantial risk factors for suicide in young people. AIM: To explore suicide risk among adolescents and young adults according to detailed aspects of individual and parental psychiatric admission history. METHODS: A nested...... case-control study was undertaken using data from Danish population registers to include 4,142 suicide cases and 82,840 matched controls aged 9-35 years. Data were analyzed with conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: A history of hospitalized psychiatric illness was a strong risk factor for suicide......, affective disorders or substance abuse disorders. At the same time, a parental psychiatric history constituted a substantial risk factor for suicide in young people, in particular, if having a mother admitted for psychiatric illness. The elevated risk associated with parental psychiatric history was greater...

  19. Beyond symptom management: Family relations, unmet needs of persons living with severe mental illnesses, and potential implications for social work in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Tomita, Andrew; Burns, Jonathan K.; King, Howard; Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Davis, Glen P.; Mtshemla, Sisanda; Nene, Siphumelele; Susser, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the quality of family relationships and its associations with the severity of unmet needs of individuals admitted to a tertiary psychiatric hospital in South Africa. The quality of family relations and perceived unmet needs were assessed using the Lehman Quality of Life Interview and Camberwell Assessment of Needs, respectively. The results show that higher total unmet needs were associated with lower quality of family relations. The main areas of serious unmet needs inclu...

  20. [Historic evolution of psychiatric care paradigms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, Pablo M; Fernández Bruno, Mónica

    2017-09-01

    The rehabilitation of severely mentally-ill patients and their return to the community are related to historical progress. Their potential of achieving these goals is higher or lower depending on the presence of more or less stigma attached to their condition. Watts and Bennett have divided psychiatric rehabilitation into three phases: Phase 1: Very little was done because there was not much to be done. Patients were rejected and received mistreatment. Phase 2: Their vulnerability was admitted and protection was given to the disabled; services were provided by charity and voluntary religious institutions; there was no clear distinction between illness and poverty. Phase 3: Modern psychiatric rehabilitation began after the two World Wars in the 20th century, with attempts to modify and to oppose disability with the development of other skills. Psychiatric rehabilitation programs help these patients to resume life in the community and prevent their social isolation. By ensuring continuity of their treatment, rehabilitation programs reduce relapses and hospitalizations, thereby contributing to preserve family life and social inclusion. This reduces treatment costs to both families and communities, while promoting patients' reinsertion and recovery in the community according to their individual needs.

  1. Treating the untreated: applying a community-based, culturally sensitive psychiatric intervention to confined and physically restrained mentally ill individuals in Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani, Luh Ketut; Lesmana, Cokorda Bagus Jaya; Tiliopoulos, Niko

    2011-11-01

    This study identified, mapped and treated the clinical features of mentally ill people, who had been isolated and restrained by family and community members as a result of a functional failure of the traditional medical, hospital-based mental health model currently practiced in Indonesia. A 10-month epidemiological population survey was carried out in Karangasem regency of Bali, Indonesia. A total of 404,591 individuals were clinically interviewed, of which 895 individuals with mental health problems were identified, with 23 satisfying criteria of physical restraint and confinement. Of the latter, twenty were males; age range was 19-69 years, all diagnosed by the researchers with schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (ICD-10 diagnostic criteria). Duration of restraint ranged from 3 months to 30 years (mean = 8.1 years, SD = 8.3 years). Through the application of a holistic intervention model, all patients exhibited a remarkable recovery within 19 months of treatment. We conclude that the development of a community-based, culturally sensitive and respectful mental health model can serve as an optimum promoter of positive mental health outcomes.

  2. Who's boarding in the psychiatric emergency service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott A; Joesch, Jutta M; West, Imara I; Pasic, Jagoda

    2014-09-01

    When a psychiatric patient in the emergency department requires inpatient admission, but no bed is available, they may become a "boarder." The psychiatric emergency service (PES) has been suggested as one means to reduce psychiatric boarding, but the frequency and characteristics of adult PES boarders have not been described. We electronically extracted electronic medical records for adult patients presenting to the PES in an urban county safety-net hospital over 12 months. Correlative analyses included Student's t-tests and multivariate regression. 521 of 5363 patient encounters (9.7%) resulted in boarding. Compared to non-boarding encounters, boarding patient encounters were associated with diagnoses of a primary psychotic, anxiety, or personality disorder, or a bipolar manic/mixed episode. Boarders were also more likely to be referred by family, friends or providers than self-referred; arrive in restraints; experience restraint/seclusion in the PES; or be referred for involuntary hospitalization. Boarders were more likely to present to the PES on the weekend. Substance use was common, but only tobacco use was more likely associated with boarding status in multivariate analysis. Boarding is common in the PES, and boarders have substantial psychiatric morbidity requiring treatment during extended PES stays. We question the appropriateness of PES boarding for seriously ill psychiatric patients.

  3. Public stigma against family members of people with mental illness: findings from the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center (GGFRC), Southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Eshetu; Möller-Leimkühler, Anne Maria; Müller, Norbert; Dehning, Sandra; Froeschl, Guenter; Tesfaye, Markos

    2014-02-21

    Public stigma against family members of people with mental illness is a negative attitude by the public which blame family members for the mental illness of their relatives. Family stigma can result in self social restrictions, delay in treatment seeking and poor quality of life. This study aimed at investigating the degree and correlates of family stigma. A quantitative cross-sectional house to house survey was conducted among 845 randomly selected urban and rural community members in the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center, Southwest Ethiopia. An interviewer administered and pre-tested questionnaire adapted from other studies was used to measure the degree of family stigma and to determine its correlates. Data entry was done by using EPI-DATA and the analysis was performed using STATA software. Unadjusted and adjusted linear regression analysis was done to identify the correlates of family stigma. Among the total 845 respondents, 81.18% were female. On a range of 1 to 5 score, the mean family stigma score was 2.16 (± 0.49). In a multivariate analysis, rural residents had significantly higher stigma scores (std. β = 0.43, P mental illness increased, the stigma scores decreased significantly. High supernatural explanation of mental illness was significantly correlated with lower stigma among individuals with lower level of exposure to people with mental illness (PWMI). On the other hand, high exposure to PWMI was significantly associated with lower stigma among respondents who had high education. Stigma scores increased with increasing income among respondents who had lower educational status. Our findings revealed moderate level of family stigma. Place of residence, perceived signs and explanations of mental illness were independent correlates of public stigma against family members of people with mental illness. Therefore, mental health communication programs to inform explanations and signs of mental illness need to be implemented.

  4. Comparison of individuals opting for BRCA1/2 or HNPCC genetic susceptibility testing with regard to coping, illness perceptions, illness experiences, family system characteristics and hereditary cancer distress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Iris; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Brocker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Gool, Arthur R.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Tibben, Aad

    Objective: To study differences between individuals opting for genetic cancer susceptibility testing of a known familial BRCA1/2 and HNPCC related germline mutation. Methods: Coping, illness perceptions, experiences with cancer in relatives and family system characteristics were assessed in 271

  5. Proposed changes to the American Psychiatric Association diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder: implications for young children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Roy; Nozyce, Molly

    2013-05-01

    The American Psychiatric Association has revised the diagnostic criteria for their DSM-5 manual. Important changes have been made to the diagnosis of the current (DSM-IV) category of Pervasive Developmental Disorders. This category includes Autistic Disorder (autism), Asperger's Disorder, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). The DSM-5 deletes Asperger's Disorder and PDD-NOS as diagnostic entities. This change may have unintended consequences, including the possibility that the new diagnostic framework will adversely affect access to developmental interventions under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) programs, Early Intervention (for birth to 2 years olds) and preschool special education (for 3 and 4 years olds). Changing the current diagnosis of PDD-NOS to a "Social Communication Disorder" focused on language pragmatics in the DSM-5 may restrict eligibility for IDEA programs and limit the scope of services for affected children. Young children who meet current criteria for PDD-NOS require more intensive and multi-disciplinary services than would be available with a communication domain diagnosis and possible service authorization limited to speech-language therapy. Intensive behavioral interventions, inclusive group setting placements, and family support services are typically more available for children with an autism spectrum disorder than with diagnoses reflecting speech-language delay. The diagnostic distinction reflective of the higher language and social functioning between Asperger's Disorder and autism is also undermined by eliminating the former as a categorical diagnosis and subsuming it under autism. This change may adversely affect treatment planning and misinform parents about prognosis for children who meet current criteria for Asperger's Disorder.

  6. Religious care required for Japanese terminally ill patients with cancer from the perspective of bereaved family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takuya; Ando, Michiyo; Morita, Tatsuya; Hirai, Kei; Kawamura, Ryo; Mitsunori, Miyashita; Sato, Kazuki; Shima, Yasuo

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the most suitable religious care for Japanese terminally ill patients with cancer based on the opinions of bereaved family members. A multicenter questionnaire survey on palliative care service was sent to 592 bereaved family members of patients with cancer who were admitted to palliative care units in Japan, and 430 responded by mail. In the section of the questionnaire about religious care, 382 responses were used for quantitative analysis, and 71 responses about religious care for qualitative analysis. In the current study, the 71 responses were grouped into families with and without a religion and were analyzed qualitatively. Families with a religion (N = 28) chose answers such as ''Instrumental care'' such as music or a religious event, ''Freedom of choice of kinds for religious care,'' ''Staff involvement of religious care,'' ''Meeting with a pastoral care workers,'' and ''Burden of offering a different kind of personal religion.'' In contrast, families without a religion (N = 44) chose answers such as ''Instrumental care,'' ''Freedom of choice whether patients receive religious care or not,'' ''Spiritual care,'' ''Not being able to accept religious care,'' and ''Burden of thinking about a religion and nuisance.'' These findings suggest that Japanese bereaved families with a religion generally regard religious care positively and prefer care through their own religion, whereas some families without a religion require religious care but some do not prefer it.

  7. Prevalence of psychiatric and physical morbidity in an urban geriatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seby, K; Chaudhury, Suprakash; Chakraborty, Rudraprosad

    2011-04-01

    With a rapidly increasing population of older aged people, epidemiological data regarding the prevalence of mental and physical illnesses are urgently required for proper health planning. However, there is a scarcity of such data from India. To study the frequency and pattern of psychiatric morbidity present and the association of physical illness with psychiatric morbidity in an elderly urban population. Cross-sectional, epidemiological study. All the consenting elderly persons in a municipal ward division (n=202) were enrolled after surveying a total adult population of 7239 people. A door to door survey was undertaken where the participants were interviewed and physically examined. General Health Questionnaire-12, Mini Mental State Examination, CAGE Questionnaire and Geriatric Depression Scale were used in the interview apart from consulting the available documents. Other family members were also interviewed to verify the information. Chi-square test with Yates correction. Psychiatric illnesses were detected in 26.7% while physical illnesses were present in 69.8% of the population surveyed. Predominant psychiatric diagnoses were depressive disorders, dementia, generalized anxiety disorder, alcohol dependence and bipolar disorder. The most common physical illness was visual impairment, followed by cardiovascular disease, rheumatic illnesses, pulmonary illnesses, hearing impairment, genitourinary diseases and neurological disorders. Presence of dementia was associated with increased age, single/widowed/separated status, nuclear family, economic dependence, low education, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatic disorders and neurological disorders. Depression was associated with female sex, single/widowed/separated status, staying in nuclear families, economic dependence on others and co-morbid physical illnesses, specifically cardiovascular disorders and visual impairment. This study presented a higher rate of dementia and old age depression. The interesting

  8. Organisational systems and services for children of parents with mental illness and their families: processes of change and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Susanne

    2010-09-01

    Adult mental illness in the community including depression and anxiety has achieved greater public awareness and visibility in recent years and this has also resulted in increased recognition about the widespread impact on dependent children. During the past decade in Australia, policies and specific programs for infants, children and youth in terms of prevention, early intervention and promotion in relation to children of parents with a mental illness ('copmi') have been devised. However, these have generally been disconnected projects, essentially supported only by non-recurrent funding. In more recent years, systematic and interconnected responses involving a wider range of government, non-government and consumer and carer organisations to build sustainability have become the focus. However, little research about change processes affecting the organisational systems serving children of parents with mental illness and their families has been undertaken. This aim of the current study is to describe the enablers and barriers that contribute to change in systems and government and non-government organisations in relation to children of parents with a mental illness in Australia over the past decade, within the context of sustainability. The study involved interviews, focus groups and website and literature searches regarding systems change across Australian states and territories and nationally in relation to the enablers, barriers and future directions. Strategic and intentional processes within organisations, more evolutionary ongoing cross-agency processes and links to sustained changes are key systems change findings. Relevance for change in other health services is highlighted.

  9. Coping strategies and styles of family carers of persons with enduring mental illness: a mixed methods analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kartalova-O'Doherty, Yulia

    2008-03-01

    A qualitative exploratory study investigated the experiences and needs of family carers of persons with enduring mental illness in Ireland. The current mixed-methods secondary study used content analysis and statistical procedures to identify and explore the coping strategies emerging from the original interviews. The majority of family carers reported use of active behavioural coping strategies, sometimes combined with active cognitive or avoidance strategies. The percentage of cares reporting use of active cognitive strategies was the lowest among those whose ill relative lived in their home, and the highest among those whose relative lived independently. Participants with identified active cognitive strategies often reported that their relative was employed or in training. Participants who reported use of avoidance strategies were significantly younger than participants who did not report use of such strategies. The lowest percentage of avoidance strategies was among participants whose ill relative lived independently, whereas the highest was among carers whose relative lived in their home. The findings of this study highlight the importance of a contextual approach to studying coping styles and processes. Further research questions and methodological implications are discussed.

  10. Public stigma against family members of people with mental illness: findings from the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center (GGFRC), Southwest Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Public stigma against family members of people with mental illness is a negative attitude by the public which blame family members for the mental illness of their relatives. Family stigma can result in self social restrictions, delay in treatment seeking and poor quality of life. This study aimed at investigating the degree and correlates of family stigma. Methods A quantitative cross-sectional house to house survey was conducted among 845 randomly selected urban and rural community members in the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center, Southwest Ethiopia. An interviewer administered and pre-tested questionnaire adapted from other studies was used to measure the degree of family stigma and to determine its correlates. Data entry was done by using EPI-DATA and the analysis was performed using STATA software. Unadjusted and adjusted linear regression analysis was done to identify the correlates of family stigma. Results Among the total 845 respondents, 81.18% were female. On a range of 1 to 5 score, the mean family stigma score was 2.16 (±0.49). In a multivariate analysis, rural residents had significantly higher stigma scores (std. β = 0.43, P supernatural (std. β = -0.12, P supernatural explanation of mental illness was significantly correlated with lower stigma among individuals with lower level of exposure to people with mental illness (PWMI). On the other hand, high exposure to PWMI was significantly associated with lower stigma among respondents who had high education. Stigma scores increased with increasing income among respondents who had lower educational status. Conclusions Our findings revealed moderate level of family stigma. Place of residence, perceived signs and explanations of mental illness were independent correlates of public stigma against family members of people with mental illness. Therefore, mental health communication programs to inform explanations and signs of mental illness need to be implemented. PMID:24555444

  11. Cadherin-related Family Member 3 Genetics and Rhinovirus C Respiratory Illnesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Coleman, Amaziah T; Evans, Michael D

    2018-01-01

    Background Experimental evidence suggests that CDHR3 is a receptor for rhinovirus-C (RV-C), and a missense variant in this gene (rs6967330) is associated with childhood asthma with severe exacerbations. Objective To determine whether rs6967330 influences RV-C infections and illnesses in early...... childhood. Methods We studied associations between rs6967330 and respiratory infections and illnesses in the COPSAC2010 and COAST birth cohorts, where respiratory infections were monitored prospectively for the first 3 years of life. Nasal samples were collected during acute infections in both cohorts...

  12. Do Parent Mental Illness and Family Living Arrangement Moderate the Effects of the Aussie Optimism Program on Depression and Anxiety in Children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryanne Cheng

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Parent mental illness and family living arrangement are associated with depression and anxiety in children, and may influence the effects of programs that aim to prevent these disorders. This study investigated whether these family context factors moderated the intervention effects of the enhanced Aussie Optimism Positive Thinking Skills program on depression and anxiety in primary school children. The intervention was a universal, cognitive-behavioral program, with a one hour session each week for 10 weeks, delivered by trained teachers. The participants were 502 children from 13 private schools, aged 9–11, with 347 in the intervention group and 155 in the control group. There were 267 females and 235 males. Data from 502 parents was also included. A cluster randomized controlled trial design was used, including eight intervention schools and five control schools. Depression and anxiety were assessed at pre-test, post-test, and 6-months follow-up. Information on parent mental illness and family living arrangement was collected through a parent questionnaire. The data was analyzed using covariance analysis with Generalized Linear Mixed Methods. At baseline, depressive and anxiety symptoms did not differ significantly based on parent mental illness. Symptoms of depression at baseline were significantly higher for children from a higher-risk family living arrangement, but anxiety symptoms were not. Parent mental illness and family living arrangement did not moderate the effects of the program on depression and anxiety at post-test or 6-months follow-up. Parent mental illness moderated the intervention effects on negative self-esteem, an aspect of depression, at post-test, with improvements seen only for children who did not have a parent with a mental illness. The findings indicate an association between family living arrangement and depressive symptoms in children. The findings suggest that the program is effective for children regardless of

  13. Effectiveness of a family-oriented rehabilitation program on the quality of life of parents of chronically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C A; Besier, T; Borth-Bruhns, T; Goldbeck, L

    2009-01-01

    Parents of chronically ill children face numerous burdens in daily life, which can impair their quality of life (QoL) significantly. Therefore in family-oriented rehabilitation, not only the children themselves, but also their parents receive interventions. These aim at stabilizing parents both mentally and physically to enable them to support their children in the best possible way. This study investigates the effects of an inpatient family-oriented rehabilitation program on the QoL of parents of chronically ill children. A consecutive sample of 231 mothers and 155 fathers of children suffering from cancer, cardiac diseases or cystic fibrosis participated in the study. In a prospective longitudinal study, parental QoL was repeatedly assessed using the Ulm Quality of Life Inventory for Parents (ULQIE) at three different time points: admission to the rehabilitation clinic, discharge after four weeks of inpatient treatment, and at a six-month follow-up. Parental QoL increased markedly during rehabilitation treatment (mothers eta (2)=.326, fathers eta (2)=.249). Moreover, six months after the intervention, parental quality of life was still markedly improved compared to baseline assessment (mothers eta (2)=.259, fathers eta (2)=.069). The child's diagnosis had no effect on the level and course of parental QoL. Taking part in family-oriented rehabilitation can improve the QoL of parents of children suffering from cancer, cardiac diseases or cystic fibrosis. Such programs could be expected to affect the way chronically ill children cope with their condition and this should be examined in future studies.

  14. In search of attachment: a qualitative study of chronically ill women transitioning between family physicians in rural Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Ellen; Crooks, Valorie A; Goldsmith, Laurie J

    2012-12-23

    Most Canadians receive basic health services from a family physician and these physicians are particularly critical in the management of chronic disease. Canada, however, has an endemic shortage of family physicians. Physician shortages and turnover are particularly acute in rural regions, leaving their residents at risk of needing to transition between family physicians. The knowledge base about how patients manage transitioning in a climate of scarcity remains nascent. The purpose of this study is to explore the experience of transitioning for chronically ill, rurally situated Canadian women to provide insight into if and how the system supports transitioning patients and to identify opportunities for enhancing that support. Chronically ill women managing rheumatic diseases residing in two rural counties in the province of Ontario were recruited to participate in face-to-face, semi-structured interviews. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically to identify emergent themes associated with the transitioning experience. Seventeen women participated in this study. Ten had experienced transitioning and four with long-standing family physicians anticipated doing so soon. The remaining three expressed concerns about transitioning. Thematic analysis revealed the presence of a transitioning trajectory with three phases. The detachment phase focused on activities related to the termination of a physician-patient relationship, including haphazard notification tactics and the absence of referrals to replacement physicians. For those unable to immediately find a new doctor, there was a phase of unattachment during which patients had to improvise ways to receive care from alternative providers or walk-in clinics. The final phase, attachment, was characterized by acceptance into the practice of a new family physician. Participants often found transitioning challenging, largely due to perceived gaps in support from the health care system. Barriers to a smooth transition

  15. Chronically ill Canadians' experiences of being unattached to a family doctor: a qualitative study of marginalized patients in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Valorie A; Agarwal, Gina; Harrison, Angela

    2012-07-16

    Unattached patients do not have a regular primary care provider. Initiatives are being developed to increase attachment rates across Canada. Most existing attention paid to patient unattachment has focused on quantifying the problem and health system costs. Our purpose is to qualitatively identify the implications of chronically ill patients' experiences of unattachment for health policy and planning to provide policy-relevant insights for Canadian attachment initiatives. Three focus groups were conducted with marginalized chronically ill individuals residing in a mid-sized city in British Columbia who are unattached to a family doctor. We use the term marginalized as a descriptor to acknowledge that by virtue of their low socio-economic status and lack of attachment the participants are marginalized in Canada's health care system Focus groups were structured as an open conversation organized around a series of probing questions. They were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was employed. Twenty-six individuals participated in the focus groups. The most common chronic illnesses reported were active drug addiction or recovery (and their associated symptoms), depression, arthritis, and hepatitis C. Participants identified life transitions as being the root cause for not having a family doctor. There was a strong sense that unsuccessful attempts to get a family doctor reflected that they were undesirable patients. Participants wanted to experience having a trusting relationship with a regular family doctor as they believed it would encourage greater honesty and transparency. One of the main health concerns regarding lack of access to a regular family doctor is that participants lacked access to preventative care. Participants were also concerned about having a discontinuous medical record due to unattachment. Participants perceived that there are many benefits to be had by having attachment to a regular family doctor and that experiencing

  16. Chronically ill Canadians’ experiences of being unattached to a family doctor: a qualitative study of marginalized patients in British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooks Valorie A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unattached patients do not have a regular primary care provider. Initiatives are being developed to increase attachment rates across Canada. Most existing attention paid to patient unattachment has focused on quantifying the problem and health system costs. Our purpose is to qualitatively identify the implications of chronically ill patients’ experiences of unattachment for health policy and planning to provide policy-relevant insights for Canadian attachment initiatives. Methods Three focus groups were conducted with marginalized chronically ill individuals residing in a mid-sized city in British Columbia who are unattached to a family doctor. We use the term marginalized as a descriptor to acknowledge that by virtue of their low socio-economic status and lack of attachment the participants are marginalized in Canada’s health care system Focus groups were structured as an open conversation organized around a series of probing questions. They were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was employed. Results Twenty-six individuals participated in the focus groups. The most common chronic illnesses reported were active drug addiction or recovery (and their associated symptoms, depression, arthritis, and hepatitis C. Participants identified life transitions as being the root cause for not having a family doctor. There was a strong sense that unsuccessful attempts to get a family doctor reflected that they were undesirable patients. Participants wanted to experience having a trusting relationship with a regular family doctor as they believed it would encourage greater honesty and transparency. One of the main health concerns regarding lack of access to a regular family doctor is that participants lacked access to preventative care. Participants were also concerned about having a discontinuous medical record due to unattachment. Conclusions Participants perceived that there are many benefits to be had

  17. The diurnal salivary cortisol pattern of adolescents from families with single, ill and healthy parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieh, D.S.; Visser-Meily, J.M.A.; Oort, F.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Adolescents of single and/or chronically ill parents (target groups) reportedly have elevated psychological stress. However, their salivary cortisol pattern as part of the physiological stress system has not been compared to controls. The aim of this study is to examine differential

  18. The diurnal salivary cortisol pattern of adolescents from families with single, ill and healthy parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieh, Dominik S.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A.; Oort, Frans J.; Meijer, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents of single and/or chronically ill parents (target groups) reportedly have elevated psychological stress. However, their salivary cortisol pattern as part of the physiological stress system has not been compared to controls. The aim of this study is to examine differential outcomes in the

  19. Hospice Comics: Representations of Patient and Family Experience of Illness and Death in Graphic Novels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwiec, M K; Huang, Michelle N

    2017-06-01

    Non-fiction graphic novels about illness and death created by patients and their loved ones have much to teach all readers. However, the bond of empathy made possible in the comic form may have special lessons for healthcare providers who read these texts and are open to the insights they provide.

  20. Predictors of posttraumatic stress and quality of life in family members of chronically critically ill patients after intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermann, Gloria-Beatrice; Weidner, Kerstin; Strauß, Bernhard; Rosendahl, Jenny; Petrowski, Katja

    2016-12-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation for acute medical conditions increases the risk of chronic critical illness (CCI). Close family members are confronted with the life-threatening condition of the CCI patients and are prone to develop posttraumatic stress disorder affecting their health-related quality of life (HRQL). Main aim of the present study was to investigate patient- and family-related risk factors for posttraumatic stress and decreased HRQL in family members of CCI patients. In a cross-sectional design nested within a prospective longitudinal cohort study, posttraumatic stress symptoms and quality of life were assessed in family members of CCI patients (n = 83, aged between 18 and 72 years) up to 6 months after transfer from ICU at acute care hospital to post-acute rehabilitation. Patients admitted a large rehabilitation hospital for ventilator weaning. The Posttraumatic Stress Scale-10 and the Euro-Quality of life-5D-3L were applied in both patients and their family members via telephone interview. A significant proportion of CCI patients and their family members (14.5 and 15.7 %, respectively) showed clinically relevant scores of posttraumatic stress. Both CCI patients and family members reported poorer HRQL than a normative sample. Factors independently associated with posttraumatic stress in family members were the time following ICU discharge (β = .256, 95 % confidence interval .053-.470) and the patients' diagnosis of PTSD (β = .264, 95 % confidence interval .045-.453). Perceived satisfaction with the relationship turned out to be a protective factor for posttraumatic stress in family members of CCI patients (β = -.231, 95 % confidence interval -.423 to -.015). Regarding HRQL in family members, patients' acute posttraumatic stress at ICU (β = -.290, 95 % confidence interval -.360 to -.088) and their own posttraumatic stress 3 to 6 months post-transfer (β = -.622, 95 % confidence interval -.640 to -.358) turned out to be

  1. [The family of a patient with borderline personality disorder: burden of illness and interventions for caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Francesca; Lia, Loredana; Bortolotti, Biancamaria; Menchetti, Marco; Monari, Marco; Ridolfi, Maria Elena; Sanza, Michele; Sasdelli, Anna; Berardi, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The scientific literature focused on factors involved in the onset of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has given a central role to the families of these patients. The role of the family in understanding the disorder has gradually changed thanks to research that investigated the interaction of several factors in the development of this psychopathology. Recently, scientific literature on DBP has allowed to consider parents as no longer "responsible" for the development of the disorder, but as directly involved in interpersonal problems of patients and therefore a potential "ally" in the management of crisis. The aim of this study is to describe and quantify the family burden of BPD patients and browse specific interventions for the family of these patients. PubMed and PsycINFO have been used for review with the following keywords: "borderline personality disorder", "family", "psychopathology", "burden", "psychoeducation", "caregiver", "caretaker". Studies on family burden of BPD patients are still few. Research shows that the family burden of BPD patients is comparable with that of families of patients with schizophrenia. Clinical trials of interventions for caregivers of patients with BPD show that specific strategies can reduce the family burden and improve their self-efficacy. Scientific literature highlights the relevance of problems of families with a BPD member and the importance of involving them in the treatment of these patients.

  2. A Study Of The Effects Of Illness Experienced By Families Of Oral And Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyalaxmi A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Research question : What are the various areas and burden a family experiences due to presence of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patient. Objectives: 1. To identify the family burden like financial burden, disruption of routine activities and family leisure etc. 2. To study the severity of family burden experienced by the families of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients. Study design: Case- control. Setting: Gujarat Cancer and Research Institute (G.C.R.I, Ahmedabad. Participants: 100 cases belonging to the diagnostic categories no. 140-46 of ICD â€"9 and 100 controls belonging to the diagnostic categories other than no. 140-46 of ICD-9 Statistical analysis: Proportions, Chi-square test and Z test. Results: Financial burden was observed in 36% of cases and 43% of controls had burden on the family. Out of 43% respondents reporting any burden, 36(83.72% were identified with severe burden.

  3. The mental health effects of multiple work and family demands. A prospective study of psychiatric sickness absence in the French GAZEL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Maria; Berkman, Lisa F; Niedhammer, Isabelle; Zins, Marie; Goldberg, Marcel

    2007-07-01

    Individuals who experience work stress or heavy family demands are at elevated risk of poor mental health. Yet, the cumulative effects of multiple work and family demands are not well known, particularly in men. We studied the association between multiple work and family demands and sickness absence due to non-psychotic psychiatric disorders in a longitudinal study conducted among members of the French GAZEL cohort study (8,869 men, 2,671 women) over a period of 9 years (1995-2003). Work stress and family demands were measured by questionnaire. Medically certified psychiatric sickness absence data were obtained directly from the employer. Rate ratios (RRs) of sickness absence were calculated using Poisson regression models, adjusting for age, marital status, social support, stressful life events, alcohol consumption, body mass and depressive symptoms at baseline. Participants simultaneously exposed to high levels of work and family demands (> or =2 work stress factors and > or =4 dependents) had significantly higher rates of sickness absence due to non-psychotic psychiatric disorders than participants with lower levels of demands (compared to participants exposed to 0-1 work stress factors and with 1-3 dependents, age-adjusted rate ratios were 2.37 (95% CI 1.02-5.52) in men and 6.36 (95% CI 3.38-11.94) in women. After adjusting for baseline socio-demographic, behavioral and health characteristics, these RRs were respectively reduced to 1.82 (95% CI 0.86-3.87) in men, 5.04 (95% CI 2.84-8.90) in women. The effect of multiple work and family demands was strongest for sickness absence due to depression: age-adjusted RRs among participants with the highest level of work and family demands were 4.70 (1.96-11.24) in men, 8.57 (4.26-17.22) in women; fully adjusted RRs: 3.55 (95% CI 1.62-7.77) in men, 6.58 (95%CI 3.46-12.50) in women. Men and women simultaneously exposed to high levels of work stress and family demands are at high risk of experiencing mental health problems

  4. The impact of chronic physical illness, maternal depressive symptoms, family functioning, and self-esteem on symptoms of anxiety and depression in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Mark A; Boyle, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends earlier research identifying an increased risk of anxiety among children with chronic physical illness (CwCPI) by examining a more complete model that explains how physical illness leads to increased symptoms of anxiety and depression. We tested a stress-generation model linking chronic physical illness to symptoms of anxiety and depression in a population-based sample of children aged 10 to 15 years. We hypothesized that having a chronic physical illness would be associated with more symptoms of anxiety and depression, increased levels of maternal depressive symptoms, more family dysfunction, and lower self-esteem; and, that maternal depressive symptoms, family dysfunction, and child self-esteem would mediate the influence of chronic physical illness on symptoms of anxiety and depression. Data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (N = 10,646). Mediating processes were analyzed using latent growth curve modeling. Childhood chronic physical illness was associated with increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression, β = 0.20, p self-esteem, and in turn, increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression. CwCPI are at-risk for symptoms of anxiety and depression. Some of this elevated risk appears to work through family processes and child self-esteem. This study supports the use of family-centered care approaches among CwCPI to minimize burden on families and promote healthy psychological development for children.

  5. [Working with a family systems therapy approach as part of the routine treatment on acute psychiatric wards: sustained effects on team members' workload].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Markus W; Kordy, Henrike; Ochs, Matthias; Schweitzer, Jochen; Zwack, Julika

    2012-11-01

    Assessing long-term effects of a family systems therapy approach (systems therapy methods in acute psychiatry, SYMPA) on occupational stress and interdisciplinary cooperation of team members in three German psychiatric hospitals. Pre-post-follow-up survey using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and Team Climate Inventory (TCI) questionnaires complemented by semi-structured in-depth interviews (N = 56). Three years after implementing a family systems therapy approach, experienced work load and staff burnout remain significantly lower than before. Interdisciplinary cooperation was intensified and nursing staff status increased. Following systemic case conceptualisations and interventions the therapeutic alliance moved towards a need-adapted treatment approach. Seven years after implementation, the family systems therapy approach still included significantly lower workload burden, an intensified interdisciplinary cooperation, and a need-adapted treatment orientation that strengthens the alliance between staff and client system. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Being a family. The experience of raising a child with a disability or chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, J

    1992-01-01

    This chapter examined the experiences of families of children with a variety of specialized needs, families who, as pioneers in family-centered, community-based care, are defining the future of services. It also looked at the services that are supposed to support the families in their efforts. On one hand, we have exposed the reader to the tension between traditional approaches to services for children with special needs and the expressed needs of families for coherence and empowerment. On the other hand, the data testify to the development of a new definition of the parent-professional relationship as individual professionals and select service systems around the country strive to work out what it means to support families. When the testimony of these families is carefully read, we are left with an impression of a schizophrenic system of public and private supports for home care for children with severe disabilities and specialized health care needs. The official rhetoric affirms the primacy of the family, and yet the experience of these families is otherwise. Again and again, the families told of benefits managers, case managers, discharge planners, social workers, program administrators, special educators, and the like who implied that parents were out to "milk the system." This attitude was conveyed even in dealing with entitlements and plans to which the parents had long contributed. Families were treated as beneficiaries of benevolent charity for which they should be grateful. Families, already struggling to come to terms with their child's impairment and the care demands associated with it, find themselves stigmatized, impoverished, and degraded. In a society of rugged individualists they are forced to ask for help. That in itself is more than some of the parents can deal with. It should be clear that these parents are not asking for charity. No one here is out to "milk the system." They are simply seeking support to meet some of the extraordinary demands

  7. A survey of an organization for families of patients with serious mental illness in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schene, A. H.; van Wijngaarden, B.

    1995-01-01

    Members of Ypsilon, a Dutch family organization for relatives of patients with schizophrenia or chronic psychosis, were surveyed to determine whether patients whose families were involved in the organization were representative of all patients with schizophrenia in the Netherlands and whether

  8. Pattern of depression among patients in a Nigerian family practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a positive family history of psychiatric illness, and these two subjects had mild to moderate ... factors that contribute to the genesis of depressive disorders are ... More than 90% of persons with depression are treated in family .... symptoms that were inquired about included feelings of crawling .... psychological symptoms.

  9. Impact of a visual aid on discordance between physicians and family members about prognosis of critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burelli, Gabrielle; Berthelier, Chloé; Vanacker, Hélène; Descaillot, Léonard; Philippon-Jouve, Bénédicte; Fabre, Xavier; Kaaki, Mahmoud; Chakarian, Jean-Charles; Domine, Alexandre; Beuret, Pascal

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a visual aid on the discordance about prognosis between physicians and family members. The study was performed in a general intensive care department with two 6-bed units. In the unit A, family members could consult a visual aid depicting day by day the evolution of global, hemodynamic, respiratory, renal and neurological conditions of the patient on a 10-point scale. In the unit B, they only received oral medical information. On day 7 of the ICU stay, the physician and family members estimated the prognosis of the patient among four proposals (life threatened; steady state but may worsen; steady state, should heal; will heal). Then we compared the rate of discordance about prognosis between physicians and family members in the two units. Seventy-nine consecutive patients admitted in the intensive care department and still present at day 7, their family members and physicians, were enrolled. Patients in the two units were comparable in age, sex ratio, reason for admission, SAPS II at admission and SOFA score at day 7. In the unit A, physician-family members discordance about prognosis occurred for 12 out of 39 patients (31%) vs. 22 out of 40 patients (55%) in the unit B (P=0.04). In our study, adding a visual aid depicting the evolution of the condition of critically ill patients day by day to classic oral information allowed the family to have an estimate of the prognosis less discordant with the estimate of the physician. Copyright © 2018 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Primary Care Physician Involvement in Shared Decision Making for Critically Ill Patients and Family Satisfaction with Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kevin B; Weber, Urs; Johnson, Jennifer; Anderson, Nathanial; Knies, Andrea K; Nhundu, Belinda; Bautista, Cynthia; Poskus, Kelly; Sheth, Kevin N; Hwang, David Y

    2018-01-01

    An intensive care unit (ICU) patient's primary care physician (PCP) may be able to assist family with certain ICU shared medical decisions. We explored whether families of patients in nonopen ICUs who nevertheless report involvement of a patient's PCP in medical decision making are more satisfied with ICU shared decision making than families who do not. Between March 2013 and December 2015, we administered the Family Satisfaction in the ICU 24 survey to family members of adult neuroscience ICU patients. We compared the mean score for the survey subsection regarding shared decision making (graded on a 100-point scale), as well as individual survey items, between those who reported the patient's PCP involvement in any medical decision making versus those who did not. Among 263 respondents, there was no difference in mean overall decision-making satisfaction scores for those who reported involvement (81.1; SD = 15.2) versus those who did not (80.1; SD = 12.8; P = .16). However, a higher proportion reporting involvement felt completely satisfied with their 1) inclusion in the ICU decision making process (75.9% vs 61.4%; P = .055), and 2) control over the care of the patient (73.6% vs 55.6%; P = .02), with no difference regarding consistency of clinical information provided by the medical team (64.8% vs 63.5%; P = 1.00). Families who report involvement of a patient's PCP in medical decision making for critically ill patients may be more satisfied than those who do not with regard to specific aspects of ICU decision making. Further research would help understand how best to engage PCPs in shared decisions. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  11. Past trauma and present functioning of patients attending a women's psychiatric clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borins, E F; Forsythe, P J

    1985-04-01

    A women's psychiatric clinic, incorporated within a university teaching general hospital and staffed entirely by women, was opened in March of 1980. The authors studied a sample of 100 women who came to the clinic and characterized them by demographic variables, psychiatric diagnoses, health problems, chronic illness, death in the family, and traumatic incidents. Death in the family before she was 18 was found to predict a woman's subsequent request for or completion of sterilization. Physical or sexual abuse was significantly related to abortion, and abortion and trauma were significantly correlated.

  12. Perceived Social Support among Mentally Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandana Pokharel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social support is the perception that one is cared for, has assistance available from significant others and its benefit is by buffering stress by influencing the ability to adjust and live with illness. Social support can uplift the quality and subjective wellbeing of people. The objective of this study was to examine the perceived social support and factors influencing it among mentally ill patients. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out. Ninety cases aged more than 18 years visiting outpatient of psychiatric department and diagnosed as a case of mental illness for at least a year were included. Instruments used were self-developed proforma and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Interview technique was used to collect the data. Results: Majority (60% of the patients perceive social support from family, 28% of the patients perceive social support from significant others. Regression analysis showed that the perceived social support is influenced by employment status, type of family one lives in and physical illness. It is not influenced by gender, subjective financial status and frequency of hospitalization. Conclusion: Perceived social support is influenced by employment status, type of family one lives in and physical illness. Majority (60% of the patients perceive social support from family.

  13. Health Shocks and Social Drift: Examining the Relationship Between Acute Illness and Family Wealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Thompson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the extent to which health shocks play a role in black-white wealth inequality. Deploying data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, we implement a first-differences identification strategy in estimating the effects of acute health events on changes in wealth for couples across waves of data from 1999 to 2011. We find that although such shocks affect both white and black families, they make black families more vulnerable financially as family heads near retirement. In comparison with their white counterparts, black families that experience an acute health shock are more likely to rely on social safety nets, such as food stamps and Social Security Disability Insurance. Findings hold implications across multiple policy arenas, including health-care and labor law.

  14. Perception of attachment security in families with children affected by neurological illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langher Viviana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes inter-family relationships of families with children with neurological problems using Bowlby’s attachment theory as model of reference. The research was conducted in two hospitals in Serbia specialized in neurological diseases: cerebral palsy and epilepsy. It is hypothesized that neurological problems could be associated to a discrepancy of inter-family attachment perceptions. Two groups were selected, a clinical one composed of 25 nuclear families: mother, father and child with a certified diagnosis of either cerebral palsy or epilepsy; and a control group of 25 nuclear families: mother, father and child with no pathology. Kerns, Klepac and Cole’s Security Scale (1996 was used for the investigation, with the addition of two modified version for administration to the parents. Data analysis demonstrated that the clinical group is substantively higher (p=.076 with respect to the discrepancy of attachment perceived by the children and the attribution of meaning that parents give to their child’s attachment perception towards them. Further analyses carried out on parent-child relationships demonstrated a significant difference (p =.017 between the clinical and control groups, with respect to the perception of father-child attachment. We conclude that in the clinical group, there is a discrepancy of attachment perceptions that particularly affects the father-child relationship. It appears that hospitalization and the consequent separation of the nuclear families may influence the formation of secure attachment relationships, in particular between father and child.

  15. Exploring the stigma related experiences of family members of persons with mental illness in a selected community in the iLembe district, KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celenkosini T. Nxumalo

    2017-10-01

    Purpose: To explore the stigma related experiences of family members of persons with mental illness in a selected community in the iLembe district of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN, in order to develop recommendations to help families cope with such stigma. Methods: This was a descriptive qualitative study; data was collected from a purposive sample of six family members, which resulted in data saturation. Semi-structured interview questions were used during data collection and content analysis using Creswell's (2009 method was done to analyse the data; resulting in the formation of themes and sub-themes which were supported by the participants' responses and existing literature. Results: Participants reported experiencing stigma from the community in the form of isolation, blame and exploitation, community neglect, as well as labelling and stereotyping. The majority of the participants reported using emotion-focused coping mechanisms to deal with the stigma they faced. Participants suggested that education of communities regarding the myths and facts about mental illness may help to curb the stigma faced by the family members of persons with mental illness. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it was recommended that a combination of coping strategies, together with the integration of public and private sector support, be used to holistically deal with family related stigma. It was found that ground level education and support to families is the key to curbing family related stigma of mental illness, local NGO's and the clinics would be instrumental in this area.

  16. An illness in the family: Dr. Maude Abbott and her sister, Alice Abbott.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores Maude Abbott's internationally significant career in medicine and her parallel commitment to caring for her sister, Alice Abbott. An examination of Abbott's life reveals the difficulties faced by an ambitious Canadian woman in medicine from the 1890s to the 1920s; difficulties compounded by caring for a sister with a mental illness. The Abbott archive suggests that it was far more difficult for a woman doctor to make the kind of sharp distinction between public and private life that might be expected of professional men.

  17. The cost-effectiveness of psychotherapy for the major psychiatric diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Susan G

    2014-09-01

    Psychotherapy is an effective and often highly cost-effective medical intervention for many serious psychiatric conditions. Psychotherapy can also lead to savings in other medical and societal costs. It is at times the firstline and most important treatment and at other times augments the efficacy of psychotropic medication. Many patients are in need of more prolonged and intensive psychotherapy, including those with personality disorders and those with chronic complex psychiatric conditions often with severe anxiety and depression. Many patients with serious and complex psychiatric illness have experienced severe early life trauma in an atmosphere in which family members or caretakers themselves have serious psychiatric disorders. Children and adolescents with learning disabilities and those with severe psychiatric disorders can also require more than brief treatment. Other diagnostic groups for whom psychotherapy is effective and cost-effective include patients with schizophrenia, anxiety disorders (including posttraumatic stress disorder), depression, and substance abuse. In addition, psychotherapy for the medically ill with concomitant psychiatric illness often lowers medical costs, improves recovery from medical illness, and at times even prolongs life compared to similar patients not given psychotherapy. While "cost-effective" treatments can yield savings in healthcare costs, disability claims, and other societal costs, "cost-effective" by no means translates to "cheap" but instead describes treatments that are clinically effective and provided at a cost that is considered reasonable given the benefit they provide, even if the treatments increase direct expenses. In the current insurance climate in which Mental Health Parity is the law, insurers nonetheless often use their own non-research and non-clinically based medical necessity guidelines to subvert it and limit access to appropriate psychotherapeutic treatments. Many patients, especially those who need

  18. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-01-01

    People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time...... trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during...... is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment...

  19. Mental illness sexual stigma: Implications for health and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainberg, Milton L; Cournos, Francine; Wall, Melanie M; Norcini Pala, Andrea; Mann, Claudio Gruber; Pinto, Diana; Pinho, Veronica; McKinnon, Karen

    2016-06-01

    The majority of people in psychiatric care worldwide are sexually active, and studies have revealed sharply elevated rates of HIV infection in that group compared with the general population. Recovery-oriented treatment does not routinely address sexuality. We examined the relationship between gender, severe mental illness diagnosis, and stigma experiences related to sexuality among people in psychiatric outpatient care. Sexually active adults attending 8 public outpatient psychiatric clinics in Rio de Janeiro (N = 641) were interviewed for psychiatric diagnosis and stigma experiences. Stigma mechanisms well-established in the literature but not previously examined in relation to sexuality were measured with the Mental Illness Sex Stigma Questionnaire, a 27-item interview about stigma in sexual situations and activities. Experiences of stigma were reported by a majority of participants for 48% of questionnaire items. Most people reported supportive attitudes toward their sexuality from providers and family members. Those with severe mental illness diagnoses showed greater stigma on individual discrimination and structural stigma mechanisms than did those with nonsevere mental illness diagnoses, whereas there was no difference on the social psychological processes (internalized stigma) mechanism. Regardless of diagnosis or gender, a majority of participants devalued themselves as sexual partners. Adults in psychiatric outpatient care frequently reported stigma experiences related to aspects of their sexual lives. From the perspectives of both HIV prevention and recovery from mental illness, examinations of the consequences of stigma in the sexual lives of people in psychiatric care and improving their measurement would have wide applicability. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Psychiatric rehabilitation education for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, Abraham; Eastwood, Diane

    2013-06-01

    As part of a rapidly spreading reform toward recovery-oriented services, mental health care systems are adopting Psychiatric/Psychosocial Rehabilitation (PSR). Accordingly, PSR education and training programs are now available and accessible. Although psychiatrists and sometimes other physicians (such as family physicians) provide important services to people with serious mental illnesses and may, therefore, need knowledge and skill in PSR, it seems that the medical profession has been slow to participate in PSR education. Based on our experience working in Canada as academic psychiatrists who are also Certified Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practitioners (CPRPs), we offer descriptions of several Canadian initiatives that involve physicians in PSR education. Multiple frameworks guide PSR education for physicians. First, guidance is provided by published PSR principles, such as the importance of self-determination (www.psrrpscanada.ca). Second, guidance is provided by adult education (andragogy) principles, emphasizing the importance of addressing attitudes in addition to knowledge and skills (Knowles, Holton, & Swanson, 2011). Third, guidance in Canada is provided by Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) principles, which delineate the multiple roles of physicians beyond that of medical expert (Frank, 2005) and have recently been adopted in Australia (Boyce, Spratt, Davies, & McEvoy, 2011). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. ['NischE - Nicht von schlechten Eltern' - Evaluation of a Multidisciplinary Teamwork Approach to Support Children in Families with Mentally Ill Parents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienaber, A; Wieskus-Friedemann, E; Kliem, S; Hoppmann, J; Kemper, U; Löhr, M; Kronmüller, K-T; Wabnitz, P

    2017-02-01

    Objective: Evaluation of a project offering low-threshold anonymous counseling services jointly by mental health services and child and youth services to support children in families with mentally ill parents Methods: Evaluating performance data and completed questionnaires returned by parents included in the project. Results: Between 2011-2014, 150 families received up to 10 sessions of family-oriented counseling. The survey results indicate a high level of satisfaction with the services of the cooperation project. The vast majority of respondents said that they would recommend this service to others or would themselves take advantage of the services again. Conclusion: A collaboration of service providers from psychiatry and child and youth welfare department resulting in continuous availability of counseling with a common family medical perspective represents a forward-looking model for families with a mentally ill parent. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. [Simulation-based intervention to improve anesthesiology residents communication with families of critically ill patients--preliminary prospective evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkenstadt, Haim; Perlson, Daria; Shalomson, Orit; Tuval, Atalia; Haviv-Yadid, Yael; Ziv, Amitai

    2013-08-01

    Although effective communication with families of critically ill patients is a vital component of quality care, training in this field is neglected. The article aims to validate communication skills training program for anesthesiology residents in the intensive care set up. Ten anesthesia residents, following 3 months of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) rotation, had 4 hours of lectures and one day simulation-based communication skills training with families of critically ill patients. Participants completed an attitude questionnaire over 3 time periods--before training [t1], immediately following training (t2) and three months following training (t3). The participants' communication skills were assessed by two blinded independent observers using the SEGUE framework while performing a simulation-based scenario at t1 and t3. Seven participants finished the study protocol. Participants ndicated communication importance as 3.68 +/- 0.58 (t1), 4.05 +/- 0.59 (t2), 4.13 +/- 0.64 (t3); their communication ability as 3.09 +/- 0.90 (t1), 3.70 +/- 0.80 (t2), 3.57 +/- 0.64 (t3); the contribution of lecture to communication 3.04 +/- 0.43 (t1), 3.83 +/- 0.39 (t2), 3.87 +/- 0.51 (t3), and contribution of simulation training to communication 3.00 +/- 0.71 (t1), 4.04 +/- 0.52 (t2), 3.84 +/- 0.31 (t3). The differences did not reach statistical significance. Objective assessment of the communication skills using the SEGUE framework indicated that 6/7 participants improved their communication skills, with communication ability before training at 2.66 +/- 0.83 and 1 month following training it was 3.38 +/- 0.78 (p = 0.09). This preliminary study demonstrates the value of communication skills training in the intensive care environment.

  3. The children of mentally ill parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattejat, Fritz; Remschmidt, Helmut

    2008-06-01

    The children of mentally ill parents have a higher risk of developing mental illnesses themselves over the course of their lives. This known risk must be taken into account in the practical provision of health care. Selective literature review. The increased psychiatric risk for children of mentally ill parents is due partly to genetic influences and partly to an impairment of the parent-child interaction because of the parent's illness. Furthermore, adverse factors are more frequent in these families, as well as a higher risk for child abuse. Genetic and psychosocial factors interact with one another. For example, genetic factors moderate environmental effects; that is, the effect of adverse environmental factors depends on the genetic substrate. Preventive measures for children of mentally ill parents urgently need improvement. In this article, positively evaluated programs of preventive measures are discussed. Essential prerequisites for success include appropriate, specialized treatment of the parental illness, psychoeducative measures, and special support (e.g. self-help groups) as indicated by the family's particular needs.

  4. Community Based Survey on Psychiatric Morbidity in Eastern Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Mohan Shyangwa

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Community prevalence rate of some common psychiatric disorders is high which calls for special attention to address depressive and alcohol related disorder from all quarters of society particularly from government. Keywords: community survey; mental illness; psychiatric morbidity.

  5. Individual and parental psychiatric history and risk for suicide among adolescents and young adults in Denmark: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenager, Kirstina; Qin, Ping

    2008-11-01

    Both individual and familial histories of mental illness are substantial risk factors for suicide in young people. To explore suicide risk among adolescents and young adults according to detailed aspects of individual and parental psychiatric admission history. A nested case-control study was undertaken using data from Danish population registers to include 4,142 suicide cases and 82,840 matched controls aged 9-35 years. Data were analyzed with conditional logistic regression. A history of hospitalized psychiatric illness was a strong risk factor for suicide in adolescents and young adults, and the effect of such a history was greater in females than males. The elevated risk peaked in the two periods immediately after admission and discharge for both sexes, and exceeded in females who had multiple admissions and in males who were diagnosed with schizophrenia, affective disorders or substance abuse disorders. At the same time, a parental psychiatric history constituted a substantial risk factor for suicide in young people, in particular, if having a mother admitted for psychiatric illness. The elevated risk associated with parental psychiatric history was greater in females than in males, and tended to be more prominent during the first few years after admission of a parent. Prevention strategies should aim at improving treatment and care to young people with psychiatric problems and at providing social support and psychological consultation to children with parental psychiatric illness.

  6. [Psychiatric patients and relatives instruct German police officers - an anti-stigma project of "BASTA - the alliance for mentally ill people"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wundsam, Kerstin; Pitschel-Walz, Gabi; Leucht, Stefan; Kissling, Werner

    2007-05-01

    Contact with police officers due to schizophrenia and resort to violence in such interactions is a common occurrence and represents a source for stigmatisation of mentally ill people. Aim of this project was to establish a program for police officers to reduce that stigma. The seminar was developed by a German anti-stigma organisation in cooperation with sociology teachers of the Bavarian police academy. Evaluations focussed on the police officers "social distance" and "negative stereotypes" towards mentally ill people. The personal contact between officers and the referees (patients, relatives, professionals) was the core of the seminar. Results of a debriefing after the pilot-project was overall positive. Evaluations in the renewal years showed significant improvement within the scale "social distance" (p stigma interventions.

  7. [Prevention groups for school-age children of mentally ill parents ("Auryn Groups")].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierks, H

    2001-09-01

    Children of psychiatrically ill parents have a high risk themselves to develop a psychiatric illness in adulthood. Prevention aims at strengthening the resilience of these children and reducing psychosocial risk factors. This article found and describes a theoretical concept of prevention groups for children in schoolage (7-16 years) whose parents are psychiatrically ill. First practical experiences are depicted. The Hamburgian model of prevention works with closed and temporary limited groups of children as well as with the parents. It is based on supporting the children's existing coping strategies and the children are encouraged to exchange their individual experiences of the relationships within their families. One conclusion was, that the main thematic emphasis varied considerably depending on the age of the children.

  8. Barriers in the treatment of psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric illnesses are very common in prevalence. But not everyone who has a mental illness gets a psychiatric consultation. The causes are many. First, many time people don’t recognise and accept mental illnesses in them as a result of lack of insight and awareness. Secondly, even if they know they have a mental illness, they don’t feel comfortable in disclosing it. Third, after knowing that they have some problems which require help from a doctor, they don’t know whom to consult, where to consult, and how to consult. Fourth, in spite of all possible awareness, there may not be psychiatric facilities nearby. Thus, it becomes utmost necessary to discuss those factors which stop people with psychiatric illnesses to get adequate help so that remedial steps could be taken.

  9. Valuing psychiatric patients' stories: belief in and use of the supernatural in the Jamaican psychiatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Caryl C A B; Carpenter, Karen A; Peltzer, Karl; Weaver, Steve

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine illness presentation and understand how psychiatric patients make meaning of the causes of their mental illnesses. Six Jamaican psychiatric patients were interviewed using the McGill Illness Narrative Interview Schedule. Of the 6, 3 representative case studies were chosen. The hermeneutic phenomenological approach and the common sense model were used in the formulation of patients' explanatory models. Results indicate that psychiatric patients actively conceptualized the causes and resultant treatment of their mental illnesses. Patients' satisfaction and compliance with treatment were dependent on the extent to which practitioners' conceptualization matched their own, as well as practitioners' acknowledgement of patients' concerns about causation, prognosis, and treatment.

  10. Communication and support from health-care professionals to families, with dependent children, following the diagnosis of parental life-limiting illness: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Rachel; Boland, Jason W

    2017-03-01

    Communication between parents and their children about parental life-limiting illness is stressful. Parents want support from health-care professionals; however, the extent of this support is not known. Awareness of family's needs would help ensure appropriate support. To find the current literature exploring (1) how parents with a life-limiting illness, who have dependent children, perceive health-care professionals' communication with them about the illness, diagnosis and treatments, including how social, practical and emotional support is offered to them and (2) how this contributes to the parents' feelings of supporting their children. A systematic literature review and narrative synthesis. Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and ASSIA ProQuest were searched in November 2015 for studies assessing communication between health-care professionals and parents about how to talk with their children about the parent's illness. There were 1342 records identified, five qualitative studies met the inclusion criteria (55 ill parents, 11 spouses/carers, 26 children and 16 health-care professionals). Parents wanted information from health-care professionals about how to talk to their children about the illness; this was not routinely offered. Children also want to talk with a health-care professional about their parents' illness. Health-care professionals are concerned that conversations with parents and their children will be too difficult and time-consuming. Parents with a life-limiting illness want support from their health-care professionals about how to communicate with their children about the illness. Their children look to health-care professionals for information about their parent's illness. Health-care professionals, have an important role but appear reluctant to address these concerns because of fears of insufficient time and expertise.

  11. Mental illness disclosure in Chinese immigrant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang-Pei; Lai, Grace Ying-Chi; Yang, Lawrence

    2013-07-01

    Support from social networks is imperative to mental health recovery of persons with mental illness. However, disclosing mental illness may damage a person's participation in networks due to mental illness stigma, especially in Chinese immigrant communities where social networks (the guanxi network) have specific social-cultural significance. This study focused on mental illness disclosure in Chinese immigrant communities in New York City. Fifty-three Chinese psychiatric patients were recruited consecutively from 2 Chinese bilingual psychiatric inpatient units from 2006 to 2010. Two bilingual psychologists interviewed each participant once in a semistructured interview, including 6 questions on mental illness disclosure. Conventional content analysis was applied to conceptualize the phenomenon. Results showed that participants voluntarily disclosed to a circle of people composed primarily of family and relatives. The decisions and strategies to disclose depended on participants' consideration of 3 critical elements of social relationships. Ganqing, affection associated with relationship building, ultimately determined who had the privilege to know. Renqing, the moral code of reciprocal kindness, further influenced disclosure decisions and what participants anticipated as responses to disclosure. Lastly, concerns over preserving face (lian), a construct representing personal and familial dignity, oftentimes prohibited disclosure. Additionally, in this tight-knit network, involuntary disclosure could happen without participants' permission or knowledge. Participants commonly suffered from stigma after disclosure. However, half of our participants reported situations in which they experienced little discriminatory treatment, and some experienced support and care as a result of cultural dynamics. Recommendations for culturally sensitive practice to facilitate mental illness disclosure among Chinese immigrants were discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all

  12. Familial cosegregation of manic-depressive illness and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piqueras, J.F.; Santos, J.; Puertollano, R. [Universidad Autonoma, Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1995-06-19

    We report on a Spanish family with co-occurrence of manic-depression and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia. All affected individuals in the second generation showed cerebellar ataxia and manic-depression simultaneously. Since anticipation has been described in both disorders and the pattern of segregation may be autosomal as well as X-linked, we have searched for a possible involvement of two candidate genes which are located either on an autosome (SCA1) or on the X-chromosome (GABRA3). We concluded that expansion of trinucleotide repeats at SCA1 gene cannot be considered as a disease-causing mutation, and this gene should be initially discarded. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Psychiatric aspects of induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, Nada L

    2011-08-01

    Approximately one third of the women in the United States have an abortion during their lives. In the year 2008, 1.21 million abortions were performed in the United States (Jones and Koolstra, Perspect Sex Reprod Health 43:41-50, 2011). The psychiatric outcomes of abortion are scientifically well established (Adler et al., Science 248:41-43, 1990). Despite assertions to the contrary, there is no evidence that abortion causes psychiatric problems (Dagg, Am J Psychiatry 148:578-585, 1991). Those studies that report psychiatric sequelae suffer from severe methodological defects (Lagakos, N Engl J Med 354:1667-1669, 2006). Methodologically sound studies have demonstrated that there is a very low incidence of frank psychiatric illness after an abortion; women experience a wide variety of feelings over time, including, for some, transient sadness and grieving. However, the circumstances that lead a woman to terminate a pregnancy, including previous and/or ongoing psychiatric illness, are independently stressful and increase the likelihood of psychiatric illness over the already high baseline incidence and prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders among women of childbearing age. For optimal psychological outcomes, women, including adolescents, need to make autonomous and supported decisions about problem pregnancies. Clinicians can help patients facing these decisions and those who are working through feelings about having had abortions in the past.

  14. [Nurturance of children during inpatient psychiatric treatment of their parents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölch, Michael; Schmid, Marc

    2008-01-01

    About a third of all inpatients in psychiatric hospitals are parents of children aged below 18 years. The mental illness of a parent and especially the need of inpatient treatment burdens families. This study was contributed to assess parental stress, behavioural and emotional problems of the children and the needs of psychiatric inpatients for support. Barriers and hindrances as well as positive experience with support for their children were assessed. All psychiatric hospitals in a county with about 1.5 million inhabitants in South-West Germany participated in this study. From 643 inpatients after drop-out 83 (54 female, 29 male) patients with non full aged children were questioned with inventories as the SDQ, the PSS and further assessments. Diagnoses and biographic data were assessed by the documentation of the German Association of psychiatry and psychotherapy. Parents reported about an increased level of stress by parenthood (PSS mean 41.9, SD 9.4). Psychopathology of the children influenced the stress of the mentally ill parents. 40% of the patients are dissatisfied with the care of their children during their inpatient treatment, but 51% have strong resentments against the youth welfare custodies and do not ask for support. Our results prove the high negative attitude of mentally ill parents against youth welfare service which must be reduced by active information policy and offers in collaboration with the treating psychiatrist of the parents.

  15. ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY AMONG ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS- A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshimi Borgohain

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT among adolescent psychiatric patient is rarely used and studies in this regard are also rare, while its need is of great importance. Aim of this study was to study the prevalence of ECT in common psychiatric illnesses among adolescent age group, where it is indicated and outcome of ECT in those psychiatric patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS All data were collected retrospectively from the chart review for those adolescents aged between 12 to 18 years who received ECT during the period of 2008 - 2012. During the study period a total of 554 patients received ECT, among whom 104 were adolescents. RESULTS Adolescent patients were 18.77% in the whole ECT sample; the average age of the adolescents was 16.33 years and number of patients were more with older age. Among all the patients, 48.08% had positive family history of mental illness and 81.73% were from lower Socioeconomic Class. The use of ECT was more with schizophrenia (n= 63, 60.57% and acute and transient psychotic disorder (n= 30, 28.85%. The most common indication was agitation and aggression (n= 29, 27.88% followed by poor medication response (n= 19, 18.27%. Good response is found in most of the cases (n= 88, 84.62%, only a few percentage of cases showed minor and transient adverse event. CONCLUSION The result of our study suggests that prevalence of ECT among adolescent psychiatric patients is quite high and ECT is a safe and effective method of treatment in the adolescent psychiatric patients, especially those patients who are severely ill and poorly responding to medication.

  16. Family Violence and Other Potentially Traumatic Interpersonal Events Among 9- to 17-Year-Old Children Attending an Outpatient Psychiatric Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultmann, Ole; Broberg, Anders G

    2016-11-01

    Among children visiting child and adolescent mental health care (CAM), the prevalence of exposure to family violence (FV) is reported to exceed prevalence in community samples, as are potentially traumatic interpersonal events (IPE) outside the family. The aim of the study was to relate CAM patients' self-reported experiences of violence exposure to their current psychiatric symptoms and to compare patients exposed to violence with patients who reported no exposure. We asked 305 consecutive 9- to 17-year-old patients in CAM about their current and previous exposure to violence in and outside of the family. Prevalence of exposure to any kind of violence was 67%. Reported exposures were 19% to IPE, 21% to FV, and 27% to both. Children exposed to both FV and IPE were more negatively affected by the events than children exposed to FV or IPE only. Children in the FV + IPE group reported more mental health symptoms than those in the no violence (33%) group. In general, IPE was related to the outcome measures only in combination with FV. Degree of violence exposure seemed to have a dose-response relationship with the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Midlife suicide risk, partner's psychiatric illness, spouse and child bereavement by suicide or other modes of death: a gender specific study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben

    2005-01-01

    status, children, and socioeconomic factors was obtained from routine registers. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 9011 people aged 25-60 years who committed suicide; 180 220 age-gender matched controls; 111 172 marital partners; 174 672 children. MAIN RESULTS: The suicide risk in women whose partner had...... been first admitted with a psychiatric disorder after 31 December two years earlier was 6.9 (95% CI 3.6 to 13.0), whereas their male counterpart experienced a risk of 3.9 (2.7 to 5.6); p value gender difference = 0.39. Men who had lost their partner by suicide or other causes of death experienced...... a parent was protective in women. Except for widows (1.6, 1.2 to 2.0) and widowers (3.0, 2.3 to 3.9) the suicide risk associated with being separated (2.0, 1.8 to 2.3), divorced (1.8, 1.7 to 2.0), never married (1.4, 1.3 to 1.6), cohabitant (1.2, 1.1 to 1.3) was virtually the same in the two sexes...

  18. Psychiatric morbidity in prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Daria, Usha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prisoners are having high percentage of psychiatric disorders. Majority of studies done so far on prisoners are from Western countries and very limited studies from India. Aim: Study socio-demographic profile of prisoners of a central jail and to find out current prevalence of psychiatric disorders in them. Materials and Methods: 118 prisoners were selected by random sampling and interviewed to obtain socio-demographic data and assessed on Indian Psychiatric Interview Schedule (IPIS) with additional required questions to diagnose psychiatric disorders in prisoners. Results: Mean age of prisoners was 33.7 years with 97.5% males, 57.6% from rural areas and 65.3% were married. Average education in studied years was 6.6 years and 50.8% were unskilled workers. 47.4% were murderers while 20.3% of drugs related crimes. 47.5% were convicted and history of criminal behavior in family was in 32.2% prisoners. Current prevalence of psychiatric disorders was 33%. Psychotic, depressive, and anxiety disorders were seen in 6.7%, 16.1%, and 8.5% prisoners respectively. 58.8% had history of drug abuse/dependence prior to imprisonment. Conclusion: One prison of Hadoti region of Rajasthan is full of people with mental-health problems who collectively generate significant levels of unmet psychiatric treatment need. Prisons are detrimental to mental-health. Beginning of reforms is the immediate need. PMID:24459308

  19. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  20. Psychiatric stigma and discrimination in South Africa: perspectives from key stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbe, Catherine O; Brooke-Sumner, Carrie; Kathree, Tasneem; Selohilwe, One; Thornicroft, Graham; Petersen, Inge

    2014-07-04

    Stigma and discrimination against people with mental illness remain barriers to help seeking and full recovery for people in need of mental health services. Yet there is scarce research investigating the experiences of psychiatric stigma on mental health service users in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The aim of this study was therefore to explore the experiences of psychiatric stigma by service users in order to inform interventions to reduce such stigma and discrimination in one LMIC, namely South Africa. Participants comprised a total of 77 adults aged above 18 years, made up of service providers including professional nurses (10), lay counsellors (20), auxiliary social workers (2); and service users (45). Psychiatric stigma was found to be perpetuated by family members, friends, employers, community members and health care providers. Causes of psychiatric stigma identified included misconceptions about mental illness often leading to delays in help-seeking. Experiencing psychiatric stigma was reported to worsen the health of service users and impede their capacity to lead and recover a normal life. Media campaigns and interventions to reduce stigma should be designed to address specific stigmatizing behaviours among specific segments of the population. Counselling of families, caregivers and service users should include how to deal with experienced and internalized stigma.

  1. Who’s Boarding in the Psychiatric Emergency Service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott A.; Joesch, Jutta M.; West, Imara I.; Pasic, Jagoda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction When a psychiatric patient in the emergency department requires inpatient admission, but no bed is available, they may become a “boarder.” The psychiatric emergency service (PES) has been suggested as one means to reduce psychiatric boarding, but the frequency and characteristics of adult PES boarders have not been described. Methods We electronically extracted electronic medical records for adult patients presenting to the PES in an urban county safety-net hospital over 12 months. Correlative analyses included Student’s t-tests and multivariate regression. Results 521 of 5363 patient encounters (9.7%) resulted in boarding. Compared to non-boarding encounters, boarding patient encounters were associated with diagnoses of a primary psychotic, anxiety, or personality disorder, or a bipolar manic/mixed episode. Boarders were also more likely to be referred by family, friends or providers than self-referred; arrive in restraints; experience restraint/seclusion in the PES; or be referred for involuntary hospitalization. Boarders were more likely to present to the PES on the weekend. Substance use was common, but only tobacco use was more likely associated with boarding status in multivariate analysis. Conclusion Boarding is common in the PES, and boarders have substantial psychiatric morbidity requiring treatment during extended PES stays. We question the appropriateness of PES boarding for seriously ill psychiatric patients. PMID:25247041

  2. Who’s Boarding in the Psychiatric Emergency Service?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Simpson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: When a psychiatric patient in the emergency department requires inpatient admission, but no bed is available, they may become a “boarder.” The psychiatric emergency service (PES has been suggested as one means to reduce psychiatric boarding, but the frequency and characteristics of adult PES boarders have not been described. Methods: We electronically extracted electronic medical records for adult patients presenting to the PES in an urban county safety-net hospital over 12 months. Correlative analyses included Student’s t-tests and multivariate regression. Results: 521 of 5363 patient encounters (9.7% resulted in boarding. Compared to non-boarding encounters, boarding patient encounters were associated with diagnoses of a primary psychotic, anxiety, or personality disorder, or a bipolar manic/mixed episode. Boarders were also more likely to be referred by family, friends or providers than self-referred; arrive in restraints; experience restraint/ seclusion in the PES; or be referred for involuntary hospitalization. Boarders were more likely to present to the PES on the weekend. Substance use was common, but only tobacco use was more likely associated with boarding status in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Boarding is common in the PES, and boarders have substantial psychiatric morbidity requiring treatment during extended PES stays. We question the appropriateness of PES boarding for seriously ill psychiatric patients. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:669-674

  3. Caring Situation, Health, Self-efficacy, and Stress in Young Informal Carers of Family and Friends with Mental Illness in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Lilas; Krevers, Barbro; Skärsäter, Ingela

    2015-06-01

    This study compared the caring situation, health, self-efficacy, and stress of young (16-25) informal carers (YICs) supporting a family member with mental illness with that of YICs supporting a friend. A sample of 225 carers, assigned to a family group (n = 97) or a friend group (n = 128) completed the questionnaire. It was found that the family group experiences a lower level of support and friends experienced a lower positive value of caring. No other differences in health, general self-efficacy and stress were found. YICs endure different social situations, which is why further study of the needs of YICs, especially those supporting friends, is urgently needed.

  4. Adverse life events increase risk for postpartum psychiatric episodes: A population-based epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer-Brody, S; Larsen, J T; Petersen, L; Guintivano, J; Florio, A Di; Miller, W C; Sullivan, P F; Munk-Olsen, T

    2018-02-01

    Trauma histories may increase risk of perinatal psychiatric episodes. We designed an epidemiological population-based cohort study to explore if adverse childhood experiences (ACE) in girls increases risk of later postpartum psychiatric episodes. Using Danish registers, we identified women born in Denmark between January 1980 and December 1998 (129,439 childbirths). Exposure variables were ACE between ages 0 and 15 including: (1) family disruption, (2) parental somatic illness, (3) parental labor market exclusion, (4) parental criminality, (5) parental death, (6) placement in out-of-home care, (7) parental psychopathology excluding substance use, and (8) parental substance use disorder. Primary outcome was first occurrence of in- or outpatient contact 0-6 months postpartum at a psychiatric treatment facility with any psychiatric diagnoses, ICD-10, F00-F99 (N = 651). We conducted survival analyses using Cox proportional hazard regressions of postpartum psychiatric episodes. Approximately 52% of the sample experienced ACE, significantly increasing risk of any postpartum psychiatric diagnosis. Highest risks were observed among women who experienced out-of-home placement, hazard ratio (HR) 2.57 (95% CI: 1.90-3.48). Women experiencing two adverse life events had higher risks of postpartum psychiatric diagnosis HR: 1.88 (95% CI: 1.51-2.36), compared to those with one ACE, HR: 1.24 (95% CI: 1.03-49) and no ACE, HR: 1.00 (reference group). ACE primarily due to parental psychopathology and disability contributes to increased risk of postpartum psychiatric episodes; and greater numbers of ACE increases risk for postpartum psychiatric illness with an observed dose-response effect. Future work should explore genetic and environmental factors that increase risk and/or confer resilience. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Effect of Clinical Psychiatric Training on Medical Students' Belief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    femi oloka

    ... +2348072243922. Medical. Students,. Psychiatric training,. Attitude,. Stigma,. Mental illness. ... ill lead to strained social interaction, low self-esteem, loss of employment and ... seeking help and result in compromised care. The importance of ...

  6. Increases in multiple psychiatric disorders in parents and grandparents of patients with bipolar disorder from the USA compared with The Netherlands and Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Kupka, Ralph; Keck, Paul E.; McElroy, Susan L.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Frye, Mark A.; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Nolen, Willem A.

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveWe previously found that compared with Europe more parents of the USA patients were positive for a mood disorder, and that this was associated with early onset bipolar disorder. Here we examine family history of psychiatric illness in more detail across several generations.MethodsA total of

  7. Increases in multiple psychiatric disorders in parents and grandparents of patients with bipolar disorder from the USA compared with The Netherlands and Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, R.M.; Leverich, G.S.; Kupka, R.W.; Keck, P.E.; McElroy, S.L.; Altshuler, L.L.; Frye, M.A.; Rowe, M.; Grunze, H.; Suppes, T.; Nolen, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We previously found that compared with Europe more parents of the USA patients were positive for a mood disorder, and that this was associated with early onset bipolar disorder. Here we examine family history of psychiatric illness in more detail across several generations. Methods A total

  8. Do the parent-child relationship and parenting behaviors differ between families with a child with and without chronic illness? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinquart, Martin

    2013-08-01

    The present meta-analysis compared the quality of the parent-child relationship as well as parenting behaviors and styles of families with a child with chronic physical illness with families of healthy children or test norms. Empirical studies were identified with the help of electronic databases and cross-referencing. Based on 325 included studies, random-effects meta-analysis was performed. Although most effect sizes were small or very small, the parent-child relationship tended to be less positive if a child had a chronic physical illness (g = -.16 standard deviation units). In addition, lower levels of parental responsiveness (emotional warmth; g = -.22) as well as higher levels of demandingness (control, monitoring; g = .18) and overprotection (g = .39) were observed in these families. However, effect sizes were heterogeneous and only significant for a limited number of diseases. There was also some evidence for higher levels of authoritarian (g = .24) and neglectful parenting (g = .51) as well as lower levels of authoritative parenting compared with families with healthy children (g = -.13). Effect sizes varied, in part, by length of illness, child age, rater, assessment method, and target of comparison. We conclude that most families with a child with chronic physical illness adapt well with regard to the parent-child relationship and parenting behaviors/styles. Nonetheless, some families of children with specific diseases-such as epilepsy, hearing impairment, and asthma-may have difficulties finding appropriate levels of protective behaviors, control, and parental warmth and building positive mutual relationships between parents and children.

  9. A study of family carers of people with a life-threatening illness. 2: Implications of the needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, G

    2001-07-01

    This is the second of two articles that consider the findings of a Carers' Assessment of Difficulties Index (CADI) (Nolan et al, 1998) delivered in a palliative care context. It analyses the implications of these findings for practitioners concerned with the delivery of palliative care to such carers and their families. The development of support strategies and services addressing their needs are also presented against a backdrop of transactional stress theory. For people new to caring, recommendations for the local service include early intervention through informational support and validation of their emotional responses to caring; for longer-term carers they include assistance with cognitive reappraisal of the stressfulness of caring and regular 'respite' and socializing opportunities. These are taking place in a political climate that finally recognizes the contribution and value of carers (Department of Health, 1999). The research behind these carer identity and recognition initiatives aims to apply the spirit of public recognition and practical wisdom of palliative care expertise by responding sensitively to the specific needs of carers of people with a life-threatening illness.

  10. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttger, Pernille; Pedersen, Simon Glerup; Gesslein, Bodil

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments...

  11. Age of onset of bipolar disorder : Combined effect of childhood adversity and familial loading of psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Kupka, Ralph; McElroy, Susan L.; Frye, Mark A.; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Keck, Paul E.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Nolen, Willem A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Family history and adversity in childhood are two replicated risk factors for early onset bipolar disorder. However, their combined impact has not been adequately studied. Methods: Based on questionnaire data from 968 outpatients with bipolar disorder who gave informed consent, the

  12. A familial risk enriched cohort as a platform for testing early interventions to prevent severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Rudolf; Cumby, Jill; MacKenzie, Lynn E; Morash-Conway, Jessica; Glover, Jacqueline M; Aylott, Alice; Propper, Lukas; Abidi, Sabina; Bagnell, Alexa; Pavlova, Barbara; Hajek, Tomas; Lovas, David; Pajer, Kathleen; Gardner, William; Levy, Adrian; Alda, Martin

    2014-12-02

    Severe mental illness (SMI), including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and severe depression, is responsible for a substantial proportion of disability in the population. This article describes the aims and design of a research study that takes a novel approach to targeted prevention of SMI. It is based on the rationale that early developmental antecedents to SMI are likely to be more malleable than fully developed mood or psychotic disorders and that low-risk interventions targeting antecedents may reduce the risk of SMI. Families Overcoming Risks and Building Opportunities for Well-being (FORBOW) is an accelerated cohort study that includes a large proportion of offspring of parents with SMI and embeds intervention trials in a cohort multiple randomized controlled trial (cmRCT) design. Antecedents are conditions of the individual that are distressing but not severely impairing, predict SMI with moderate-to-large effect sizes and precede the onset of SMI by at least several years. FORBOW focuses on the following antecedents: affective lability, anxiety, psychotic-like experiences, basic symptoms, sleep problems, somatic symptoms, cannabis use and cognitive delay. Enrolment of offspring over a broad age range (0 to 21 years) will allow researchers to draw conclusions on a longer developmental period from a study of shorter duration. Annual assessments cover a full range of psychopathology, cognitive abilities, eligibility criteria for interventions and outcomes. Pre-emptive early interventions (PEI) will include skill training for parents of younger children and courses in emotional well-being skills based on cognitive behavioural therapy for older children and youth. A sample enriched for familial risk of SMI will enhance statistical power for testing the efficacy of PEI. FORBOW offers a platform for efficient and unbiased testing of interventions selected according to best available evidence. Since few differences exist between familial and 'sporadic' SMI, the

  13. Balanced translocation linked to psychiatric disorder, glutamate, and cortical structure/function

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Pippa A; Duff, Barbara; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Romaniuk, Liana; Watson, Andrew; Whalley, Heather C; Li, Xiang; Dauvermann, Maria R; Moorhead, T William J; Bois, Catherine; Ryan, Niamh M; Redpath, Holly; Hall, Lynsey; Morris, Stewart W; van Beek, Edwin J R

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic variants of large effect can help elucidate the pathophysiology of brain disorders. Here we expand the clinical and genetic analyses of a family with a (1;11)(q42;q14.3) translocation multiply affected by major psychiatric illness and test the effect of the translocation on the structure and function of prefrontal, and temporal brain regions. The translocation showed significant linkage (LOD score 6.1) with a clinical phenotype that included schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorde...

  14. Supporting change in chronic disease risk behaviours for people with a mental illness: a qualitative study of the experiences of family carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jacqueline M; Hansen, Vibeke; Wye, Paula M; Wiggers, John H; Bartlem, Kate M; Bowman, Jennifer A

    2018-03-27

    People with a mental illness experience greater chronic disease morbidity and mortality, and associated reduced life expectancy, compared to those without such an illness. A higher prevalence of chronic disease risk behaviours (inadequate nutrition, inadequate physical activity, tobacco smoking, and harmful alcohol consumption) is experienced by this population. Family carers have the potential to support change in such behaviours among those they care for with a mental illness. This study aimed to explore family carers': 1) experiences in addressing the chronic disease risk behaviours of their family members; 2) existing barriers to addressing such behaviours; and 3) perceptions of potential strategies to assist them to provide risk behaviour change support. A qualitative study of four focus groups (n = 31), using a semi-structured interview schedule, was conducted with carers of people with a mental illness in New South Wales, Australia from January 2015 to February 2016. An inductive thematic analysis was employed to explore the experience of carers in addressing the chronic disease risk behaviours. Two main themes were identified in family carers' report of their experiences: firstly, that health behaviours were salient concerns for carers and that they were engaged in providing support, and secondly that they perceived a bidirectional relationship between health behaviours and mental well-being. Key barriers to addressing behaviours were: a need to attend to carers' own well-being; defensiveness on behalf of the family member; and not residing with their family member; with other behaviour-specific barriers also identified. Discussion around strategies which would assist carers in providing support for health risk behaviours identified a need for improved communication and collaboration between carers and health services accessed by their family members. Additional support from general and mental health services accessed by family members is desired to

  15. Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescence and Maudsley Family-Based Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Kim; Read, Shelly; Wallis, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder that usually occurs in adolescence. The course of the illness can be protracted. Current empirical evidence suggests that the Maudsley Family-Based Treatment (MFBT) is efficacious for adolescents. MFBT empowers parents as a crucial treatment resource to assist in their child's recovery. The…

  16. Perceptions and types of support coming from families caring for patients suffering from advanced illness in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofandjola, Jacques Masumbuku; Sumaili, Ernest Kiswaya; Mairiaux, Philippe; Petermans, Jean

    2017-08-01

    Perceptions of families who take care of patients suffering from advanced illness are rarely considered in Kinshasa medical practices; nevertheless, these families are the main actors involved in such care. The objective of this present study was to illustrate, in a Congolese context, the perceptions of families on the care of patients suffering from advanced illness, and to identify the possible aids provided by healthcare facilities. A qualitative study was performed among focus groups in six hospitals in Kinshasa. Each group included eight members. We gathered factors that could negatively influence the care of a patient suffering from advanced disease. Such factors included: scarcity of and inaccessibility to painkillers, economic resilience, poor quality treatment, lack of psychological counselling, seeking alternative solutions and poor communication between caregivers and patients. In contrast, the study also showed that relatives caring for these patients often receive support from the wider family and from cult members. This study focuses on the miscommunication between healthcare workers and patients, poor management in advanced illness as well as a lack of psychological support from caregivers. The findings can serve as basis for further research in palliative care.

  17. Needs, expectations and consequences for the child growing up in a family with a parent with mental illness

    OpenAIRE

    Tabak, Izabella; Zabłocka-Żytka, Lidia; Ryan, Peter; Zanone Poma, Stefano; Joronen, Katja; Viganò, Giovanni; Simpson, Wendy; Paavilainen, Eija; Scherbaum, Norbert; Smith, Martin; Dawson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Parental mental illness is considered one of the strongest risk-factors for development of offspring psychopathology. The lack of pan-European guidelines for empowering children of parents with mental illness led to EU project CAMILLE - Empowerment of Children and Adolescents of Mentally Ill Parents through Training of Professionals working with children and adolescents. The first task in this project, was to analyse needs, expectations and consequences for children, with respect to living wi...

  18. Prevention of involuntary admission through Family Group Conferencing: a qualitative case study in community mental health nursing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, G.; Schout, G.; Abma, T.

    2014-01-01

    To understand whether and how Family Group Conferencing might contribute to the social embedding of clients with mental illness. Background: Ensuring the social integration of psychiatric clients is a key aspect of community mental health nursing. Family Group Conferencing has potency to create

  19. Why do psychiatric patients stop antipsychotic medication? A systematic review of reasons for nonadherence to medication in patients with serious mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velligan DI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dawn I Velligan,1 Martha Sajatovic,2 Ainslie Hatch,3 Pavel Kramata,4 John P Docherty3 1Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, 2Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, 3Medical Affairs, ODH, Inc., Princeton, NJ, 4C4 MedSolutions LLC, Yardley, PA, USA Background: Antipsychotic medication reduces the severity of serious mental illness (SMI and improves patient outcomes only when medicines were taken as prescribed. Nonadherence to the treatment of SMI increases the risk of relapse and hospitalization and reduces the quality of life. It is necessary to understand the factors influencing nonadherence to medication in order to identify appropriate interventions. This systematic review assessed the published evidence on modifiable reasons for nonadherence to antipsychotic medication in patients with SMI. Methods: Articles published between January 1, 2005, and September 10, 2015, were searched on MEDLINE through PubMed. Abstracts were independently screened by 2 randomly assigned authors for inclusion, and disagreement was resolved by another author. Selected full-text articles were divided among all authors for review. Results: A qualitative analysis of data from 36 articles identified 11 categories of reasons for nonadherence. Poor insight was identified as a reason for nonadherence in 55.6% (20/36 of studies, followed by substance abuse (36.1%, 13/36, a negative attitude toward medication (30.5%, 11/36, medication side effects (27.8%, 10/36, and cognitive impairments (13.4%, 7/36. A key reason directly associated with intentional nonadherence was a negative attitude toward medication, a mediator of effects of insight and therapeutic alliance. Substance abuse was the only reason consistently associated with unintentional nonadherence, regardless of type and stage of SMI. Discussion: Although adherence research is inherently biased

  20. Public Stigma Toward Mental Illness in Jordan: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Family Members of Individuals With Schizophrenia, Depression, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Abd Al-Hadi; Musleh, Mahmoud

    2017-06-01

    Stigma affects family members of individuals with mental illness. A survey of 640 family members of individuals with mental illness was conducted. Three factors were found to influence stigma regarding schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety: (a) preconceived stereotypes, (b) a sense of personal responsibility or blame for the condition, and (c) perceptions of the patient's inability to recover from the condition. A stronger association between negative stereotypes and inability to recover was found with schizophrenia than depression or anxiety. Conversely, depression and anxiety were found to be correlated with personal responsibility or blame for the condition. The public perception of mental health conditions (e.g., depression, anxiety, schizophrenia) has a crucial role in deriving programs for reducing stigma and raising awareness. Personalized and efficacious treatment regimens may be facilitated by understanding these perceptions and the underlying explanations for why they exist. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(6), 36-43.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. The impact of awareness of terminal illness on quality of death and care decision making: a prospective nationwide survey of bereaved family members of advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eunmi; Shin, Dong Wook; Choi, Jin Young; Kang, Jina; Kim, Dae Kyun; Kim, Hyesuk; Lee, Eunil; Hwang, Kwan Ok; Oh, Bumjo; Cho, BeLong

    2013-12-01

    We aimed to assess whether awareness of a terminal illness can affect care decision making processes and the achievement of a good death in advanced cancer patients receiving palliative care services. Awareness of terminal illness at the time of palliative care service admission was assessed by the health care professionals during the routine initial comprehensive assessment process and was recorded in the national terminal cancer patient registry. A follow-up nationwide bereavement survey was conducted, which contained questions regarding decision making processes and the Korean version of the Good Death Inventory. Among the 345 patients included in the final analysis, the majority (68.4%) of the patients were aware of the terminal illness. Awareness of the terminal illness tended to reduce discordances in care decision making (adjusted odds ratio = 0.55; 95% CI: 0.29-1.07), and increased the patients' own decision making when there were discordances between patients and their families (adjusted odds ratio = 3.79; 95% CI: 1.31-10.94). The Good Death Inventory score was significantly higher among patients who were aware of their terminal illnesses compared with those who were not (5.04 vs. 4.80; p = 0.013) and especially in the domains of 'control over the future' (5.18 vs. 4.04; p Awareness of the terminal illness had beneficial effect on the harmonious decision making, patient autonomy, and patient's quality of death. Disclosure of terminal illness should be encouraged. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mental Illness within Family Context: Visual Dialogues in Joshua Lutz's Photographic Essay "Hesitating Beauty"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sile, Agnese

    2018-01-01

    The status of photography within medical arts or humanities is still insecure. Despite a growing number of published photographic essays that disclose illness experience of an individual and how illness affects close relatives, these works have received relatively little scholarly attention. Through analysis of Joshua Lutz's "Hesitating…

  3. Perceived illness intrusion among patients on hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bapat, Usha; Kedlaya, Prashanth G; Gokulnath

    2009-01-01

    Dialysis therapy is extremely stressful as it interferes with all spheres of daily activities of the patients. This study is aimed at understanding the perceived illness intrusion among patients on hemodialysis (HD) and to find the association between illness intrusion and patient demo-graphics as well as duration of dialysis. A cross sectional study involving 90 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage V, on HD was performed during the period from 2005 to 2006. The subjects included were above 18 years of age, willing, stable and on dialysis for at least two months. Patients with psychiatric co-morbidity were excluded. A semi-structured interview schedule covering sociodemographics and a 13 item illness intrusion checklist covering the various aspects of life was carried out. The study patients were asked to rate the illness intrusion and the extent. The data were analyzed statistically. The mean age of the subjects was 50.28 + - 13.69 years, males were predominant (85%), 73% were married, 50% belonged to Hindu religion, 25% had pre-degree education, 25% were employed and 22% were housewives. About 40% and 38% of the study patients belonged to middle and upper socio-economic strata respectively; 86% had urban background and lived in nuclear families. The mean duration on dialysis was 24 + - 29.6 months. All the subjects reported illness intrusion to a lesser or greater extent in various areas including: health (44%), work (70%) finance (55%), diet (50%) sexual life (38%) and psychological status (25%). Illness had not intruded in areas of relationship with spouse (67%), friends (76%), family (79%), social (40%) and religious functions (72%). Statistically significant association was noted between illness intrusion and occupation (P= 0.02). (author)

  4. Perceived illness intrusion among patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapat Usha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dialysis therapy is extremely stressful as it interferes with all spheres of daily acti-vities of the patients. This study is aimed at understanding the perceived illness intrusion among pa-tients on hemodialysis (HD and to find the association between illness intrusion and patient demo-graphics as well as duration of dialysis. A cross sectional study involving 90 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD stage V, on HD was performed during the period from 2005 to 2006. The subjects included were above 18 years of age, willing, stable and on dialysis for at least two months. Patients with psychiatric co-morbidity were excluded. A semi-structured interview schedule covering socio-demographics and a 13 item illness intrusion checklist covering the various aspects of life was ca-rried out. The study patients were asked to rate the illness intrusion and the extent. The data were ana-lyzed statistically. The mean age of the subjects was 50.28 ± 13.69 years, males were predominant (85%, 73% were married, 50% belonged to Hindu religion, 25% had pre-degree education, 25% were employed and 22% were housewives. About 40% and 38% of the study patients belonged to middle and upper socio-economic strata respectively; 86% had urban background and lived in nuclear fami-lies. The mean duration on dialysis was 24 ± 29.6 months. All the subjects reported illness intrusion to a lesser or greater extent in various areas including: health (44%, work (70% finance (55%, diet (50% sexual life (38% and psychological status (25%. Illness had not intruded in areas of rela-tionship with spouse (67%, friends (76%, family (79%, social (40% and religious functions (72%. Statistically significant association was noted between illness intrusion and occupation (P= 0.02.

  5. Warning Signs of Mental Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families Become an APA Member Learn More Explore APA Psychiatrists Residents & Medical Students Patients & Families About APA ... Psychiatric News Message from President APA Blogs Join APA General Members Residents and Fellows Medical Students International ...

  6. Psychiatric features in perpetrators of homicide-unsuccessful ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... The high rate of psychiatric disorders diagnosed is in keeping with court referrals occurring ... was collected if available, and included gender, age, employment history, marital ... psychiatric symptoms and of psychiatric illness and treatment, as reported by the ... The identity of alleged perpetrators was kept ...

  7. Mental health/psychiatric issues in elder abuse and neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Claudia; Livingston, Gill

    2014-11-01

    Elder abuse may be defined as a violation of a vulnerable older person's human and civil rights. Psychiatric illness is an important cause of vulnerability to abuse, especially when it is comorbid with other risk factors, such as physical frailty, sensory impairment, social isolation, and physical dependency. Health care providers are likely to encounter elder abuse regularly, and therefore have an important role in its detection and management, and in the treatment of subsequent psychiatric illness. This article reviews the relationships between psychiatric illnesses and elder abuse and neglect, examines the psychiatric consequences, and discusses how these may be treated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [KIPKEL--an interdisciplinary ambulatory prevention project for children with mentally ill parents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staets, S; Hipp, M

    2001-09-01

    Children of psychiatrically ill parents up to now have hardly been perceived as a risk group. In order to prevent these children form becoming psychiatrically ill the practice for art-therapy and psychotherapy and the social psychiatric service of the city of Hilden have developed a programme for parents having children under 18 years of age in which at least one parent suffers from endogenous psychosis or severe personality disorder. The two initiators of the KIPKEL project describe the experiences they had during the preparatory phase and while securing the financial basis and building up solid structures of cooperation. The conceptual basis of the project and problems of practical realization are presented. Finally an example of a family who participated in the programme is given. It illustrates the complex arrangement of interpersonal relationship and the course of the carework.

  9. Telemedicine as a tool to provide family conferences and palliative care consultations in critically ill patients at rural health care institutions: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Prema R; Stapleton, Renee D; McVeigh, Ursula; Rabinowitz, Terry

    2015-06-01

    Many critically ill patients who transfer from rural hospitals to tertiary care centers (TCCs) have poor prognoses, and family members are unable to discuss patient prognosis and goals of care with TCC providers until after transfer. Our TCC conducted teleconferences prior to transfer to facilitate early family discussions. We conducted a retrospective review of these telemedicine family conferences among critically ill patients requested for transfer which occurred from December 2008 to December 2009 at our TCC. Outcomes for each patient and detailed descriptions of the conference content were obtained. We also assessed limitations and attitudes and satisfaction with this intervention among clinicians. During the 12-month period, 12 telemedicine consultations were performed. Of these patients, 10 (83%) died in the 30 days following the request for transfer. After the telemedicine consultation, 8 (67%) patients were transferred to our TCC from their respective hospitals, while 4 (33%) patients continued care at their regional hospital and did not transfer. Of the patients who transferred to TCC, 7 (88% of those transferred) returned to their community after a stay at the TCC. This study demonstrates that palliative care consultations can be provided via telemedicine for critically ill patients and that adequate preparation and technical expertise are essential. Although this study is limited by the nature of the retrospective review, it is evident that more research is needed to further assess its applicability, utility, and acceptability. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Foodborne Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    contaminate different dietary constituents. These toxins may be of biologic origin (microbial. plant, or animal toxins) or they may be inorganic or...food mine if similar illness has occurred concomitantly poisoning for planning specific therapy, for esti- in companions or family members. Seek to...gin 4 to 8 hours after ingestion of the toxin and speciated botulinum immunoglobulin of equine include severe retching, vomiting, diarrhea, and

  11. Epidemiology and Heritability of Major Depressive Disorder, Stratified by Age of Onset, Sex, and Illness Course in Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Fernandez-Pujals

    Full Text Available The heritability of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD has been estimated at 37% based largely on twin studies that rely on contested assumptions. More recently, the heritability of MDD has been estimated on large populations from registries such as the Swedish, Finnish, and Chinese cohorts. Family-based designs utilise a number of different relationships and provide an alternative means of estimating heritability. Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS is a large (n = 20,198, family-based population study designed to identify the genetic determinants of common diseases, including Major Depressive Disorder. Two thousand seven hundred and six individuals were SCID diagnosed with MDD, 13.5% of the cohort, from which we inferred a population prevalence of 12.2% (95% credible interval: 11.4% to 13.1%. Increased risk of MDD was associated with being female, unemployed due to a disability, current smokers, former drinkers, and living in areas of greater social deprivation. The heritability of MDD in GS:SFHS was between 28% and 44%, estimated from a pedigree model. The genetic correlation of MDD between sexes, age of onset, and illness course were examined and showed strong genetic correlations. The genetic correlation between males and females with MDD was 0.75 (0.43 to 0.99; between earlier (≤ age 40 and later (> age 40 onset was 0.85 (0.66 to 0.98; and between single and recurrent episodic illness course was 0.87 (0.72 to 0.98. We found that the heritability of recurrent MDD illness course was significantly greater than the heritability of single MDD illness course. The study confirms a moderate genetic contribution to depression, with a small contribution of the common family environment (variance proportion = 0.07, CI: 0.01 to 0.15, and supports the relationship of MDD with previously identified risk factors. This study did not find robust support for genetic differences in MDD due to sex, age of onset, or illness course. However

  12. Epidemiology and Heritability of Major Depressive Disorder, Stratified by Age of Onset, Sex, and Illness Course in Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Pujals, Ana Maria; Adams, Mark James; Thomson, Pippa; McKechanie, Andrew G; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Smith, Blair H; Dominiczak, Anna F; Morris, Andrew D; Matthews, Keith; Campbell, Archie; Linksted, Pamela; Haley, Chris S; Deary, Ian J; Porteous, David J; MacIntyre, Donald J; McIntosh, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The heritability of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been estimated at 37% based largely on twin studies that rely on contested assumptions. More recently, the heritability of MDD has been estimated on large populations from registries such as the Swedish, Finnish, and Chinese cohorts. Family-based designs utilise a number of different relationships and provide an alternative means of estimating heritability. Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) is a large (n = 20,198), family-based population study designed to identify the genetic determinants of common diseases, including Major Depressive Disorder. Two thousand seven hundred and six individuals were SCID diagnosed with MDD, 13.5% of the cohort, from which we inferred a population prevalence of 12.2% (95% credible interval: 11.4% to 13.1%). Increased risk of MDD was associated with being female, unemployed due to a disability, current smokers, former drinkers, and living in areas of greater social deprivation. The heritability of MDD in GS:SFHS was between 28% and 44%, estimated from a pedigree model. The genetic correlation of MDD between sexes, age of onset, and illness course were examined and showed strong genetic correlations. The genetic correlation between males and females with MDD was 0.75 (0.43 to 0.99); between earlier (≤ age 40) and later (> age 40) onset was 0.85 (0.66 to 0.98); and between single and recurrent episodic illness course was 0.87 (0.72 to 0.98). We found that the heritability of recurrent MDD illness course was significantly greater than the heritability of single MDD illness course. The study confirms a moderate genetic contribution to depression, with a small contribution of the common family environment (variance proportion = 0.07, CI: 0.01 to 0.15), and supports the relationship of MDD with previously identified risk factors. This study did not find robust support for genetic differences in MDD due to sex, age of onset, or illness course. However, we found

  13. [Incidence and risk factors for mental abnormalities in children of psychiatric inpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzig-Schöler, Renate; Hasselbring, Laura; Yazdi, Kurosch; Thun-Hohenstein, Leonhard; Stuppäck, Christoph; Aichhorn, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Children of mentally ill parents are exposed to a variety of stress- and harmful life events. To which extent the mental illness of one or both parents affects their children's mental development is barely studied. Therefore, over a period of 6 months 142 patients with children below the age of 18 (n=237 children), who were admitted to the Dept. for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy 1 of the Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, were questioned for abnormalities in their children's mental development. Additionally all these patients were assessed for their family situation, demographic data and psychiatric disorder. 38.4% (n=91) of the children showed mental abnormalities. The most common one were emotional (n=41), social (n=41) and learning (n=34) disabilities. Parental duration of the illness (p=0.001), age of the children (p=0.044), illness of both parents (p=0.008), longlasting family conflicts (p=0.003) and living with only one parent (p=0.012) were correlated significantly with mental abnormalities in children. The results confirm an increase risk for mental abnormalities in children of psychiatric patients. This risk varies with existing risk and protective factors, which can be partially influenced. Therefore children of mentally ill parents with problems in their mental development should be detected early. Even if genetic risk factors cannot be changed reducing known psychosocial risk factors and promotion protective factors can significantly influence a healthy development of these vulnerable children.

  14. [History of psychiatric legislation in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Ester; Dario, Claudia; Piazzi, Gioia; Fiori Nastro, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The different models of mental illness which have followed one another in Italian psychiatry have been linked to the history of psychiatric legislation and its various attempts at reform. The first law of the newly United State which unified legislations and former procedures, whose prevalent psychiatric theories were those that referred to degeneration, was the law 36/1904 that set up the asylums. Accordingly psychiatric praxis was focused on social protection and custody, given that the mentally ill was seen as incurable; Fascism added the inmate's obligation to be enrolled in the judicial register. Afterwards numerous attempts to reform the psychiatric legislation were made that eventually gave rise to law 431/1968 which paved the way to territorial psychiatry. Law 180/1978 changed the organization of Italian psychiatry abolishing asylums and the concept of dangerousness, including psychiatry in the National Health Service but adopting an idea of mental illness as simply social unease.

  15. Routine pre-admission screening for a medical illness in aggressive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-03

    Oct 3, 2009 ... can be a symptom of a psychiatric illness or a medical illness.2,3. Psychiatric .... reported a 27.2% prevalence of physical illness in psychiatric inpatients in Nigeria, Janse ..... Results in a state mental health system. Arch Gen ...

  16. Comparative effectiveness trial of family-supported smoking cessation intervention versus standard telephone counseling for chronically ill veterans using proactive recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian LA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lori A Bastian,1–3 Laura J Fish,4 Jennifer, M Gierisch,3,5 Lesley D Rohrer,3 Karen M Stechuchak,3 Steven C Grambow3,61Veterans Affairs Connecticut, West Haven, CT, USA; 2Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA; 3Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 4Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, 5Department of Medicine, 6Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAObjectives: Smoking cessation among patients with chronic medical illnesses substantially decreases morbidity and mortality. Chronically ill veteran smokers may benefit from interventions that assist them in harnessing social support from family and friends.Methods: We proactively recruited veteran smokers who had cancer, cardiovascular disease, or other chronic illnesses (diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension and randomized them to either standard telephone counseling or family-supported telephone counseling focused on increasing support for smoking cessation from family and friends. Participants each received a letter from a Veterans Affairs physician encouraging them to quit smoking, a self-help cessation kit, five telephone counseling sessions, and nicotine replacement therapy, if not contraindicated. The main outcome was 7-day point prevalent abstinence at 5 months.Results: We enrolled 471 participants with mean age of 59.2 (standard deviation [SD] = 7.9 years. 53.0% were white, 8.5% were female, and 55.4% were married/living as married. Overall, 42.9% had cardiovascular disease, 34.2% had cancer, and 22.9% had other chronic illnesses. At baseline, participants were moderately dependent on cigarettes as measured by the Heaviness of Smoking Index (mean = 2.8, SD = 1.6, expressed significant depressive symptoms as measured by the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (54.8% > 10, and

  17. Effect of Perceived Stigmatisation on the Quality of Life among Ageing Female Family Carers: A Comparison of Carers of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Carers of Adults with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Y. C.; Pu, C. Y.; Lee, Y. C.; Lin, L. C.; Kroger, T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little account has been taken of quality of life (QoL) among family carers of adults with an intellectual disability (ID) and family carers of adults with a mental illness (MI), particularly the female ageing carers' perceived stigma. We explore whether there are differences in the significant predictors of female ageing family carers'…

  18. Interviews with psychiatric inpatients about professional intervention with regard to their children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A R; Goldschmidt, V V

    1996-01-01

    A description of mentally ill parents' experience and points of view concerning professional intervention in relation to their young children is presented in this paper. The results are from an interview survey designed with the purpose of improving the basis for cooperation between mentally ill......% of the children. In most cases their views were in accordance with those of the mentally ill parents. Clinical implications concerning planning of intervention in regard to children of mentally ill parents are discussed....... patients and professionals, when intervention in relation to these patients' children is needed. Fifty consecutively admitted psychiatric inpatients with children 0-10 years old were interviewed by child psychiatrists and their information constitutes the study material. Data concerning the family...

  19. Local suffering and the global discourse of mental health and human rights: An ethnographic study of responses to mental illness in rural Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Ursula M; Adiibokah, Edward; Nyame, Solomon

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The Global Movement for Mental Health has brought renewed attention to the neglect of people with mental illness within health policy worldwide. The maltreatment of the mentally ill in many low-income countries is widely reported within psychiatric hospitals, informal healing centres, and family homes. International agencies have called for the development of legislation and policy to address these abuses. However such initiatives exemplify a top-down approach to promoting...

  20. Psychiatric sequelae of induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, M

    1984-03-01

    An attempt is made to identify and document the problems of comparative evaluation of the more recent studies of psychiatric morbidity after abortion and to determine the current consensus so that when the results of the joint RCGP/RCOG study of the sequelae of induced abortion become available they can be viewed in a more informed context. The legalization of abortion has provided more opportunities for studies of subsequent morbidity. New laws have contributed to the changing attitudes of society, and the increasing acceptability of the operation has probably influenced the occurrence of psychiatric sequelae. The complexity of measuring psychiatric sequelae is evident from the many terms used to describe symptomatology and behavioral patterns and from the number of assessment techniques involved. Numerous techniques have been used to quantify psychiatric sequelae. Several authors conclude that few psychiatric problems follow an induced abortion, but many studies were deficient in methodology, material, or length of follow-up. A British study in 1975 reported a favorable outcome for a "representative sample" of 50 National Health Service patients: 68% of these patients had an absence of or only mild feelings of guilt, loss, or self reproach and considered abortion as the best solution to their problem. The 32% who had an adverse outcome reported moderate to severe feelings of guilt, regret, loss, and self reproach, and there was evidence of mental illness. In most of these cases the adverse outcome was related to the patient's environment since the abortion. A follow-up study of 126 women, which compared the overall reaction to therapeutic abortion between women with a history of previous mild psychiatric illness and those without reported that a significantly different emotional reaction could not be demonstrated between the 2 groups. In a survey among women seeking an abortion 271 who were referred for a psychiatric opinion regarding terminations of pregnancy

  1. Predicting Self-Management Behaviors in Familial Hypercholesterolemia Using an Integrated Theoretical Model: the Impact of Beliefs About Illnesses and Beliefs About Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagger, Martin S; Hardcastle, Sarah J; Hingley, Catherine; Strickland, Ella; Pang, Jing; Watts, Gerald F

    2016-06-01

    Patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) are at markedly increased risk of coronary artery disease. Regular participation in three self-management behaviors, physical activity, healthy eating, and adherence to medication, can significantly reduce this risk in FH patients. We aimed to predict intentions to engage in these self-management behaviors in FH patients using a multi-theory, integrated model that makes the distinction between beliefs about illness and beliefs about self-management behaviors. Using a cross-sectional, correlational design, patients (N = 110) diagnosed with FH from a clinic in Perth, Western Australia, self-completed a questionnaire that measured constructs from three health behavior theories: the common sense model of illness representations (serious consequences, timeline, personal control, treatment control, illness coherence, emotional representations); theory of planned behavior (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control); and social cognitive theory (self-efficacy). Structural equation models for each self-management behavior revealed consistent and statistically significant effects of attitudes on intentions across the three behaviors. Subjective norms predicted intentions for health eating only and self-efficacy predicted intentions for physical activity only. There were no effects for the perceived behavioral control and common sense model constructs in any model. Attitudes feature prominently in determining intentions to engage in self-management behaviors in FH patients. The prominence of these attitudinal beliefs about self-management behaviors, as opposed to illness beliefs, suggest that addressing these beliefs may be a priority in the management of FH.

  2. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 APA*

  3. Psychiatric genetic research at the National Institute of Mental Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, K.; Mullican, C.; Maestri, N. [NIMH/NIH, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-15

    For some time it has been known through the results of family, twin, and adoption studies that hereditary appears to play a significant casual role in many mental disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other mood disorders, Alzheimer`s Disease, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism, dyslexia, and Tourette`s syndrome. The precise patterns of inheritance of these complex disorders have not been determined, nor have the relevant genes been localized or cloned. Because the genetics are complex and because there is also clearly an environmental contribution to behavior, we expect the analysis of the genetics of mental illness to be arduous and not quickly resolved. There are several compelling reasons to continue to focus our attention on uncovering the genetic factors for severe mental illness. Prominent among these are the implications for better treatment of mental disorders. The National Institute of Mental Health supports a wide range of studies on psychiatric genetic research. 16 refs.

  4. Psychiatric outcomes after pediatric sports-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley J; Koltek, Mark; Hosain, Shahid; Cordingley, Dean; Chu, Stephanie; Selci, Erin; Leiter, Jeff; Russell, Kelly

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were twofold: (1) to examine the prevalence of emotional symptoms among children and adolescents with a sports-related concussion (SRC) who were referred to a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program and (2) to examine the prevalence, clinical features, risk factors, and management of postinjury psychiatric outcomes among those in this clinical population. The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with SRC referred to a multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program between September 2013 and October 2014. Clinical assessments carried out by a single neurosurgeon included clinical history, physical examination, and Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS) scoring. Postinjury psychiatric outcomes were defined as a subjective worsening of symptoms of a preinjury psychiatric disorder or new and isolated suicidal ideation or diagnosis of a novel psychiatric disorder (NPD). An NPD was defined as a newly diagnosed psychiatric disorder that occurred in a patient with or without a lifetime preinjury psychiatric disorder after a concussion. Clinical resources, therapeutic interventions, and clinical and return-to-play outcomes are summarized. One hundred seventy-four patients (mean age 14.2 years, 61.5% male) were included in the study. At least 1 emotional symptom was reported in 49.4% of the patients, and the median emotional PCSS subscore was 4 (interquartile range 1-8) among those who reported at least 1 emotional symptom. Overall, 20 (11.5%) of the patients met the study criteria for a postinjury psychiatric outcome, including 14 patients with an NPD, 2 patients with isolated suicidal ideation, and 4 patients with worsening symptoms of a preinjury psychiatric disorder. Female sex, a higher initial PCSS score, a higher emotional PCSS subscore, presence of a preinjury psychiatric history, and presence of a family history of psychiatric illness were significantly associated with postinjury psychiatric outcomes

  5. BIRTH ORDER, FAMILY SIZE, NEUROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMAD JALILI

    1984-05-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to investigate the relationship of birth rank and family size with the incidence of neurosis in an Iranian culture, case notes of 1029 schizophrenic patients as (497 males and 532 females referred to psychiatric clinic for insured workers were studied. The incidence of neurasis appeared to be significantly more frequent among the first-half position of birth  rders in The families of 5 children and over; this bei-ng more marked-in males than in females; and the first second births comprising the lighest incidence of the illness.

  6. Social support, health, and illness: a complicated relationship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, R

    2011-01-01

    .... A useful resource for clinical practitioners and researchers, Social Support, Health, and Illness addresses the effects of intimate support on a wide variety of medical and psychiatric conditions...

  7. EDITORIAL PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS AMONG JUVENILES AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-06-01

    Jun 1, 2003 ... Children with delinquent behaviour and history of substance use should be ...... remaining were supervisors, feeders and line setters respectively. ..... assemble at pre selected central points on selected dates. The mothers were ...... guided percutaneous pericardiocentesis, closed catheter drainage as well ...

  8. EDITORIAL PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESS AMONG JUVENILES AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-06-01

    Jun 1, 2003 ... Bickel, R. and Campbell, A. Mental health of adolescents in custody: ... aged 8 to 18 years classified as criminal offenders, group I (60), and those for protection ... with poor socio-economic support (15). ..... Chief Residents' Office, The Miriam Hospital, 164 Summit Ave., Main Bldg, Room 344 Providence, RI.

  9. Qualitative systematic review: the unique experiences of the nurse-family member when a loved one is admitted with a critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Tracey M; Hall, Karen L

    2014-07-01

    To interpret and synthesize nurse-family member experiences when a critically ill loved one is admitted to hospital. Having a family member hospitalized in a critical condition is an important stressor. When the family member is also a nurse, the provision of care is more complex, yet little research exists on this issue. Systematic review using Thomas and Harden's approach to thematic synthesis of qualitative research. Primary studies were located by searching CINAHL, Proquest, Journals@Ovid, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar. No date restrictions were applied due to a lack of relevant literature. All studies that met inclusion criteria were retrieved (n = 1717) and seven met the review aim. Following critical appraisal, seven studies from 1999-2011 describing the nurse-family member's experience were reviewed and synthesized. Six characteristics of the nurse-family member experience were identified: specialized knowledge; dual-role conflicts; competing expectations; building relationships; being 'let in'; and healthcare setting. Nurse-family members experience important stressors that can negatively affect their psychological health and experience as a healthcare consumer. Nurse-family members want a different type of care than other healthcare consumers. Acknowledging nurse-family members' specialized knowledge and dual role, keeping them fully informed and allowing them to be with the patient and feel in control can reduce their fear and anxiety. Further research is needed to develop a deeper understanding of the unique experiences, challenges and needs of nurse-family members to provide them with an enhanced level of care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. An historical framework for psychiatric nosology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S

    2009-12-01

    This essay, which seeks to provide an historical framework for our efforts to develop a scientific psychiatric nosology, begins by reviewing the classificatory approaches that arose in the early history of biological taxonomy. Initial attempts at species definition used top-down approaches advocated by experts and based on a few essential features of the organism chosen a priori. This approach was subsequently rejected on both conceptual and practical grounds and replaced by bottom-up approaches making use of a much wider array of features. Multiple parallels exist between the beginnings of biological taxonomy and psychiatric nosology. Like biological taxonomy, psychiatric nosology largely began with 'expert' classifications, typically influenced by a few essential features, articulated by one or more great 19th-century diagnosticians. Like biology, psychiatry is struggling toward more soundly based bottom-up approaches using diverse illness characteristics. The underemphasized historically contingent nature of our current psychiatric classification is illustrated by recounting the history of how 'Schneiderian' symptoms of schizophrenia entered into DSM-III. Given these historical contingencies, it is vital that our psychiatric nosologic enterprise be cumulative. This can be best achieved through a process of epistemic iteration. If we can develop a stable consensus in our theoretical orientation toward psychiatric illness, we can apply this approach, which has one crucial virtue. Regardless of the starting point, if each iteration (or revision) improves the performance of the nosology, the eventual success of the nosologic process, to optimally reflect the complex reality of psychiatric illness, is assured.

  11. Current and Potential Support for Chronic Disease Management in the United States: The Perspective of Family and Friends of Chronically Ill Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosland, Ann-Marie; Heisler, Michele; Janevic, Mary; Connell, Cathleen; Langa, Kenneth M.; Kerr, Eve A.; Piette, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Family members and friends can be an important source of self-management support for older adults with chronic diseases. We characterized the U.S. population of potential and current “disease management supporters” for people with chronic illness who are ADL-independent, the help that supporters could provide, and barriers to increasing support. Methods Nationally-representative survey of U.S. adults (N=1,722). Results 44% of respondents (representing 100 million US adults) help a family member or friend with chronic disease management; another 9% (representing 21 million US adults) are willing to start. Most are willing to assist with key tasks such as medication use and communicating with providers, although they feel constrained by privacy concerns and a lack of patient health information. Discussion The majority of U.S. adults already help or would be willing to help one of their family members or friends with chronic illness care. Supporters' specific concerns could be addressed through innovative programs. PMID:23795624

  12. [A cooperative project in the district of Mettmann: preventive assistance for mentally ill parents and their children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Michael; Schatte, Dirk; Altrogge, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    Mentally ill parents are impaired in their ability to care for their children. To support the affected families from the perspective of the parents and the children alike a close cooperation between the institutions of psychiatry and child-welfare is of utmost importance. In the district of Mettmann a cooperation agreement was concluded to realize a cross-system concept to care for the families with mentally ill parents. To prevent children from developing psychiatric disorders the taboo of the psychiatric diseases has to be overcome, an early diagnostic clarification to be reached, and multiinstitutional help to be implemented. In the article the experience in dealing with the affected families in a multidisciplinary context is described.

  13. Some observations of a psychiatric consultant to a hospice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanfield, S B

    1983-01-01

    The experience of a psychiatric consultant to the inpatient and bereavement components of a hospice is reported. The bulk of the consultation is to the hospice staff. Activities of the consultant include attendance at a weekly patient care meeting and patient and staff groups, consultation with the bereavement team and the administrative leadership, and the evaluation of patients. Clarification of the inevitable psychologic problems that arise in dealing with the mostly elderly very ill patients with end-stage cancer as well as with their families is a major function. Many of the problems special to the hospice relate to loss, mourning, and death. Psychiatric diagnostic input has been helpful in the treatment of organic and functional psychiatric disorders including the treatment of the emotional components of pain and disordered grief which is manifest as depression. Consultation is provided to individuals at risk of problems in the bereavement period. The psychiatric consultant to a hospice is helpful in establishing and maintaining a sensitive therapeutic system of care for the patient and family. He provides an important presence and a forum for the discussion of psychologic issues for the staff. In addition, he has an important role in clarifying the psychodynamic issues involved with death, loss, and mourning for the patient, family, and staff. He provides input around the treatment of functional and organic psychiatric problems seen in the patient and family. Such activities require the continuing membership and leadership of a psychiatrist on the hospice team. The hospice is a laboratory for the understanding of death, loss, and mourning. Although they have been the subject of much inquiry, these issues can be studied fruitfully at the hospice because of the accessibility to dying patients and the bereaved, both before and after the death of their loved one (Kubler-Ross, 1970; Parkes, 1972; Schoenberg, Carr, Kutscher, Peretz, and Goldberg, 1974; Jacobs and

  14. Factors of caregiver burden and family functioning among Taiwanese family caregivers living with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2015-06-01

    To assess the degree of caregiver burden and family functioning among Taiwanese primary family caregivers of people with schizophrenia and to test its association with demographic characteristics, family demands, sense of coherence and family hardiness. Family caregiving is a great concern in mental illness. Yet, the correlates of caregiver burden and family functioning in primary family caregivers of individuals with schizophrenia still remain unclear. A cross-sectional descriptive study. A convenience sample of 137 primary family caregivers was recruited from two psychiatric outpatient clinics in Taiwan. Measures included a demographic information sheet and the Chinese versions of the Family Stressors Index, Family Strains Index, 13-item Sense of Coherence Scale, 18-item Caregiver Burden Scale, Family Hardiness Index and Family Adaptability, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve Index. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients, t-test, one-way analysis of variance and a stepwise multiple linear regression. Female caregivers, additional dependent relatives, increased family demands and decreased sense of coherence significantly increased caregiver burden, whereas siblings as caregivers reported lower degrees of burden than parental caregivers. Family caregivers with lower family demands, increased family hardiness and higher educational level had significantly enhanced family functioning. Sense of coherence was significantly correlated with family hardiness. Our findings highlighted the importance of sense of coherence and family hardiness in individual and family adaptation. Special attention needs to focus on therapeutic interventions that enhance sense of coherence and family hardiness, thereby improving the perception of burden of care and family functioning. Given the nature of family caregiving in schizophrenia, understanding of correlates of caregiver burden and family functioning would help

  15. Factors that may Facilitate or Hinder a Family-Focus in the Treatment of Parents with a Mental Illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauritzen, C.; Reedtz, C.; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Martinussen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with mentally ill parents are at risk of developing mental health problems themselves. To enhance early support for these children may prevent mental health problems from being transmitted from one generation to the next. The sample (N = 219) included health professionals in a large

  16. Family functioning and illness perception of parents of children with atopic dermatitis, living without skin symptoms, but with psychosomatic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Orozco, Alain R; Kanán-Cedeño, E G; Guillén Martínez, E; Campos Garibay, M J

    2011-03-01

    Emotional factors and a recurrent psychosomatic environment, have been implicated in the evolution of atopic dermatitis. These, in turn, affect the disease. This study was under taken to evaluate the functioning of families with a child that has atopic dermatitis without skin symptoms and the parents' perceptions of their child's disease.Semi-quantitative and cross-sectional study in which questionnaires were applied: one to study family functioning (Espejel et al. scale) and the second to determine aspects of parental perception of their child's atopic dermatitis. Pearson's correlation was used to analyze the correlation between the categories of the Family Function Scale.The most affected categories of family functioning were authority, handling of disruptive conduct, communication, and negative affect. The most significant positive correlations between the categories of family functioning were: authority and support, r=0.867, pparents, 66.4% thought that the pharmacotherapy used for their child's atopic dermatitis was not effective, and 33.3% of parents stated that the disease had affected their child's daily activities.In families of children with atopic dermatitis, various family environment factors facilitate the recurrence of symptoms even when no cutaneous lesions have been found on the child. The identification and use of family resources to face this disease are aspects that should be taken into consideration during the psychotherapeutic management of these families, putting emphasis on the most affected functional categories of these families in a strategy that should be implanted in a multi-disciplinary context.

  17. Psychiatric disorders of patients seeking obesity treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hung-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obese and overweight people have a higher risk of both chronic physical illness and mental illness. Obesity is reported to be positively associated with psychiatric disorders, especially in people who seek obesity treatment. At the same time, obesity treatment may be influenced by psychological factors or personality characteristics. This study aimed to understand the prevalence of mental disorders among ethnic Chinese who sought obesity treatment. Methods Subjects were retrospectively recruited from an obesity treatment center in Taiwan. The obesity treatments included bariatric surgery and non-surgery treatment. All subjects underwent a standardized clinical evaluation with two questionnaires and a psychiatric referral when needed. The psychiatric diagnosis was made thorough psychiatric clinic interviews using the SCID. A total of 841 patients were recruited. We compared the difference in psychiatric disorder prevalence between patients with surgical and non-surgical treatment. Results Of the 841 patients, 42% had at least one psychiatric disorder. Mood disorders, anxiety disorders and eating disorders were the most prevalent categories of psychiatric disorders. Females had more mood disorders and eating disorders than males. The surgical group had more binge-eating disorder, adjustment disorder, and sleep disorders than the non-surgical group. Conclusion A high prevalence of psychiatric disorders was found among ethnic Chinese seeking obesity treatment. This is consistent with study results in the US and Europe.

  18. Structural brain network analysis in families multiply affected with bipolar I disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forde, Natalie J.; O'Donoghue, Stefani; Scanlon, Cathy; Emsell, Louise; Chaddock, Chris; Leemans, Alexander; Jeurissen, Ben; Barker, Gareth J.; Cannon, Dara M.; Murray, Robin M.; McDonald, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted structural connectivity is associated with psychiatric illnesses including bipolar disorder (BP). Here we use structural brain network analysis to investigate connectivity abnormalities in multiply affected BP type I families, to assess the utility of dysconnectivity as a biomarker and its

  19. Perspectives of family members on planning end-of-life care for terminally ill and frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eechoud, Ineke J; Piers, Ruth D; Van Camp, Sigrid; Grypdonck, Mieke; Van Den Noortgate, Nele J; Deveugele, Myriam; Verbeke, Natacha C; Verhaeghe, Sofie

    2014-05-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is the process by which patients, together with their physician and loved ones, establish preferences for future care. Because previous research has shown that relatives play a considerable role in end-of-life care decisions, it is important to understand how family members are involved in this process. To gain understanding of the involvement of family members in ACP for older people near the end of life by exploring their views and experiences concerning this process. This was a qualitative research study, done with semistructured interviews. Twenty-one family members were recruited from three geriatric settings in Flanders, Belgium. The data were analyzed using the constant comparative method as proposed by the grounded theory. Family members took different positions in the ACP process depending on how much responsibility the family member wanted to take and to what extent the family member felt the patient expected him/her to play a part. The position of family members on these two dimensions was influenced by several factors, namely acknowledgment of the imminent death, experiences with death and dying, opinion about the benefits of ACP, burden of initiating conversations about death and dying, and trust in health care providers. Furthermore, the role of family members in ACP was embedded in the existing relationship patterns. This study provides insight into the different positions of family members in the end-of-life care planning of older patients with a short life expectancy. It is important for health care providers to understand the position of a family member in the ACP of the patient, take into account that family members may experience an active role in ACP as burdensome, and consider existing relationship patterns. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of race and diagnostic label on older adults' emotions, illness beliefs, and willingness to help a family member with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingo, Chivon A; McIlvane, Jessica M; Haley, William E; Luong, My-Linh N

    2015-04-01

    To examine how race and the diagnostic label of Osteoarthritis (OA) affects older adults' emotions, illness beliefs, and willingness to help a family member. African American and White older adults were randomly assigned to read vignettes describing a sister suffering from chronic pain and disability, either with or without the OA label. Race × diagnostic label ANOVAs were conducted. Compared to Whites, African Americans were more optimistic that OA could improve with health care, and showed greater willingness to help their sister. The OA label had little impact on emotions, beliefs, or willingness to help. African Americans rated the sister as having more control of their problem than Whites without the OA label, but providing the diagnosis eliminated this difference. The diagnostic label of OA had little effect on these older adults, but racial differences indicate that cultural values regarding family caregiving are important in arthritis care. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Further Evidence of a Cohort Effect in Bipolar Disorder : More Early Onsets and Family History of Psychiatric Illness in More Recent Epochs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Robert M.; Kupka, Ralph; Keck, Paul E.; McElroy, Susan L.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Frye, Mark A.; Rowe, Michael; Grunze, Heinz; Suppes, Trisha; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Nolen, Willem A.

    Objective: Given that a cohort effect is rarely mentioned as one of the possible contributors to the increased incidence of childhood-onset bipolar disorder in the United States, we reexamined evidence for the phenomenon within our outpatient Bipolar Collaborative Network. Methods: 968 outpatients

  2. Health-seeking behaviour of mentally ill patients in Enugu, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-03-01

    Mar 1, 2009 ... Awareness of mental illness as a significant cause of morbidity is increasing ... of disability throughout the world, 5 are psychiatric illnesses.2 ... war of 1967 - 1970. ... illness, and the treatment that they first employed, with their.

  3. Shelter-based palliative care for the homeless terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podymow, Tiina; Turnbull, Jeffrey; Coyle, Doug

    2006-03-01

    The homeless have high rates of mortality, but live in environments not conducive to terminal care. Traditional palliative care hospitals may be reluctant to accept such patients, due to behavior or lifestyle concerns. The Ottawa Inner City Health Project (OICHP) is a pilot study to improve health care delivery to homeless adults. This is a retrospective analysis of a cohort of terminally ill homeless individuals and the effectiveness of shelter-based palliative care. As proof of principle, a cost comparison was performed. 28 consecutive homeless terminally ill patients were admitted and died at a shelter-based palliative care hospice. Demographics, diagnoses at admission and course were recorded. Burden of illness was assessed by medical and psychiatric diagnoses, addictions, Karnofsky scale and symptom management. An expert panel was convened to identify alternate care locations. Using standard costing scales, direct versus alternate care costs were compared. 28 patients had a mean age 49 years; average length of stay 120 days. DIAGNOSES: liver disease 43%, HIV/AIDS 25%, malignancy 25% and other 8%. Addiction to drugs or alcohol and mental illness in 82% of patients. Karnofsky performance score mean 40 +/- 16.8. Pain management with continuous opiates in 71%. The majority reunited with family. Compared to alternate care locations, the hospice projected 1.39 million dollars savings for the patients described. The homeless terminally ill have a heavy burden of disease including physical illness, psychiatric conditions and addictions. Shelter-based palliative care can provide effective end-of-life care to terminally ill homeless individuals at potentially substantial cost savings.

  4. Palliative Care for Children: Support for the Whole Family When Your Child Is Living with a Serious Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for your whole family. It can ease the stress on all of your children, your spouse, and you during a hard time. 1 Palliative care surrounds your family with a team of experts who work together to support all of you. It is ...

  5. The nature of psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-02-01

    A foundational question for the discipline of psychiatry is the nature of psychiatric disorders. What kinds of things are they? In this paper, I review and critique three major relevant theories: realism, pragmatism and constructivism. Realism assumes that the content of science is real and independent of human activities. I distinguish two "flavors" of realism: chemistry-based, for which the paradigmatic example is elements of the periodic table, and biology-based, for which the paradigm is species. The latter is a much better fit for psychiatry. Pragmatism articulates a sensible approach to psychiatric disorders just seeking categories that perform well in the world. But it makes no claim about the reality of those disorders. This is problematic, because we have a duty to advocate for our profession and our patients against other physicians who never doubt the reality of the disorders they treat. Constructivism has been associated with anti-psychiatry activists, but we should admit that social forces play a role in the creation of our diagnoses, as they do in many sciences. However, truly socially constructed psychiatric disorders are rare. I then describe powerful arguments against a realist theory of psychiatric disorders. Because so many prior psychiatric diagnoses have been proposed and then abandoned, can we really claim that our current nosologies have it right? Much of our current nosology arose from a series of historical figures and events which could have gone differently. If we re-run the tape of history over and over again, the DSM and ICD would not likely have the same categories on every iteration. Therefore, we should argue more confidently for the reality of broader constructs of psychiatric illness rather than our current diagnostic categories, which remain tentative. Finally, instead of thinking that our disorders are true because they correspond to clear entities in the world, we should consider a coherence theory of truth by which disorders

  6. Factors that may Facilitate or Hinder a Family-Focus in the Treatment of Parents with a Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Camilla; Reedtz, Charlotte; Van Doesum, Karin; Martinussen, Monica

    Children with mentally ill parents are at risk of developing mental health problems themselves. To enhance early support for these children may prevent mental health problems from being transmitted from one generation to the next. The sample ( N  = 219) included health professionals in a large university hospital, who responded to a web-based survey on the routines of the mental health services, attitudes within the workforce capacity, worker's knowledge on the impact of parental mental illness on children, knowledge on legislation concerning children of patients, experience, expectations for possible outcomes of change in current clinical practice and demographic variables. A total of 56 % reported that they did not identify whether or not patients had children. There were no significant differences between the groups (identifiers and non-identifiers) except for the two scales measuring aspects of knowledge, i.e., Knowledge Children and Knowledge Legislation where workers who identified children had higher scores. The results also showed that younger workers with a medium level of education scored higher on Positive Attitudes. Furthermore, workers who reported to have more knowledge about children and the impact of mental illness on the parenting role were less concerned about a child-focussed approach interfering with the patient-therapist relation.

  7. Caregivers and Serious Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... toll on you. You may experience distress, anxiety, depression, exhaustion, and worsening of your own physical and emotional well-being. As a result of these types of stress, your health can suffer. FAMILIES AND SERIOUS ILLNESS You are ...

  8. Heat-Related Illnesses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ICE” in Your Cell Phone Prepare for Disasters Communication With Your Family And Your Doctor About Your ... Dr. Glenn Mitchell , Emergency physician at Mercy Health System in Chesterfield, Missouri Heat-related illness can be ...

  9. Psychiatric characterization of children with genetic causes of hyperandrogenism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sven C; Ng, Pamela; Sinaii, Ninet; Leschek, Ellen W; Green-Golan, Liza; VanRyzin, Carol; Ernst, Monique; Merke, Deborah P

    2010-11-01

    Very little is known about the mental health status in children with genetic causes of hyperandrogenism. This study sought to characterize psychiatric morbidity in this group. Children (8-18 years) with the diagnosis of classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) or familial male precocious puberty (FMPP) underwent a semi-structured psychiatric interview, the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime Version. According to sex and the literature, incidence of identified psychopathology was compared between the two endocrinological groups. We evaluated 72 patients: 54 CAH (21 females) and 18 FMPP. Twenty-four (44.4%) CAH patients and 10 (55.6%) FMPP patients met the criteria for at least one lifetime psychiatric diagnosis. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was present in 18.2% of CAH males, 44.4% of FMPP males, and one case (4.8%) in CAH females. A high rate of anxiety disorders was also found in all the three groups (17-21%). Relative to females with CAH, the FMPP patients exhibited higher rates of ADHD. Age at diagnosis and the treatment modalities were not associated with psychopathology. Rates of psychiatric disorder, specifically ADHD and anxiety disorders, were higher than in the general population. Although anxiety disorders may occur at an increased rate in children with chronic illness, androgens may contribute to higher risk for psychopathology in pediatric patients with genetic cause of excess androgen. Early diagnosis and treatment of childhood hyperandrogenism is essential for optimal development. The results suggest that assessment for psychiatric disorders should be part of the routine evaluation of these patients.

  10. Anxiety in Medically Ill Children/Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Pao, Maryland; Bosk, Abigail

    2010-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are thought to be one of the most common psychiatric diagnoses in children/adolescents. Chronic medical illness is a significant risk factor for the development of an anxiety disorder and the prevalence rate of anxiety disorders among youths with chronic medical illnesses is higher compared to their healthy counterparts. Anxiety disorders may develop secondary to predisposing biological mechanisms related to a child’s specific medical illness, as a response to being ill or i...

  11. Psychiatric emergencies (part II): psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Dain, S

    2013-02-01

    In this Part II psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases are discussed. "Comorbidity phenomenon" defines the not univocal interrelation between medical illnesses and psychiatric disorders, each other negatively influencing morbidity and mortality. Most severe psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, show increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease, related to poverty, use of psychotropic medication, and higher rate of preventable risk factors such as smoking, addiction, poor diet and lack of exercise. Moreover, psychiatric and organic disorders can develop together in different conditions of toxic substance and prescription drug use or abuse, especially in the emergency setting population. Different combinations with mutual interaction of psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders are defined by the so called "dual diagnosis". The hypotheses that attempt to explain the psychiatric disorders and substance abuse relationship are examined: (1) common risk factors; (2) psychiatric disorders precipitated by substance use; (3) psychiatric disorders precipitating substance use (self-medication hypothesis); and (4) synergistic interaction. Diagnostic and therapeutic difficulty concerning the problem of dual diagnosis, and legal implications, are also discussed. Substance induced psychiatric and organic symptoms can occur both in the intoxication and withdrawal state. Since ancient history, humans selected indigene psychotropic plants for recreational, medicinal, doping or spiritual purpose. After the isolation of active principles or their chemical synthesis, higher blood concentrations reached predispose to substance use, abuse and dependence. Abuse substances have specific molecular targets and very different acute mechanisms of action, mainly involving dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems, but finally converging on the brain's reward pathways, increasing dopamine in nucleus accumbens. The most common

  12. Care systematization in psychiatric nursing within the psychiatric reform context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirdes, A; Kantorski, L P

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to approach care systematization in psychiatric nursing in two psychiatric disorder patients who attended 'Nossa Casa', São Lourenço do Sul, RS, Brazil. Nossa Casa services psychiatric patients in the community, focussing on: (i) permanence in their environment, allowing patients to remain close to their families and social spheres; (ii) integral attendance to meet individual needs; (iii) respecting individual differences; (iv) rehabilitation practices; and (v) social reinsertion. Concepts and assumptions of the psychiatric reform and the Irving's nursing process were used as theoretical-methodological references to elaborate this systematization. A therapeutic project for the psychiatric patient was elaborated, in accordance with the interdisciplinary proposal accepted by Nossa Casa. Interdisciplinary team intervention, guided by a previously discussed common orientation and defined through an individualized therapeutic project, allowed for an effective process of psychosocial rehabilitation. The authors concluded that a therapeutic project based on the mentioned premises leads to consistent, comprehensive, dialectical and ethical assistance in mental health, thereby reinstating the citizenship of psychiatric patients.

  13. Technological Advances in Psychiatric Nursing: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, Andrea C

    2016-06-01

    Understanding and treating mental illness has improved in many ways as a result of the fast pace of technological advances. The technologies that have the greatest potential impact are those that (1) increase the knowledge of how the brain functions and changes based on interventions, (2) have the potential to personalize interventions based on understanding genetic factors of drug metabolism and pharmacodynamics, and (3) use information technology to provide treatment in the absence of an adequate mental health workforce. Technologies are explored for psychiatric nurses to consider. Psychiatric nurses are encouraged to consider the experiences of psychiatric patients, including poor health, stigmatization, and suffering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of Current Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonnel, François; David, Michel; Norton, Joanna; Bourrel, Gérard; Boulenger, Jean-Philippe; Capdevielle, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Describe and analyse the experience of family physicians in managing current psychiatric disorders to obtain a better understanding of the underlying reasons of under-detection and inadequate prescribing identified in studies. Methods: A qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Sample of 15 practicing family physicians, recruited by telephone from a precedent cohort (Sesame1) with a maximum variation: sex, age, single or group practice, urban or rural. Qualitative method is inspired by the completed grounded theory of a verbatim semiopragmatic analysis from 2 experts in this approach. Results: Family physicians found that current psychiatric disorders were related to psychological symptoms in reaction to life events. Their role was to make patients aware of a psychiatric symptom rather than establish a diagnosis. Their management responsibility was considered in contrasting ways: it was claimed or endured. They defined their position as facilitating compliance to psychiatrist consultations, while assuring a complementary psychotherapeutic approach. Prescribing medication was not a priority for them. Conclusions: The identified under-detection is essentially due to inherent frontline conditions and complexity of clinical forms. The family physician role, facilitating compliance to psychiatrist consultations while assuring a support psychotherapy is the main result of this study. More studies should be conducted to define more accurately the clinical reality, management and course of current psychiatric disorders in primary care.

  15. The study protocol for a randomized controlled trial of a family-centred tobacco control program about environmental tobacco smoke (ETS to reduce respiratory illness in Indigenous infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segan Catherine

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory illness (ARI is the most common cause of acute presentations and hospitalisations of young Indigenous children in Australia and New Zealand (NZ. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS from household smoking is a significant and preventable contributor to childhood ARI. This paper describes the protocol for a study which aims to test the efficacy of a family-centred tobacco control program about ETS to improve the respiratory health of Indigenous infants in Australia and New Zealand. For the purpose of this paper 'Indigenous' refers to Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples when referring to Australian Indigenous populations. In New Zealand, the term 'Indigenous' refers to Māori. Methods/Design This study will be a parallel, randomized, controlled trial. Participants will be Indigenous women and their infants, half of whom will be randomly allocated to an 'intervention' group, who will receive the tobacco control program over three home visits in the first three months of the infant's life and half to a control group receiving 'usual care' (i.e. they will not receive the tobacco control program. Indigenous health workers will deliver the intervention, the goal of which is to reduce or eliminate infant exposure to ETS. Data collection will occur at baseline (shortly after birth and when the infant is four months and one year of age. The primary outcome is a doctor-diagnosed, documented case of respiratory illness in participating infants. Discussion Interventions aimed at reducing exposure of Indigenous children to ETS have the potential for significant benefits for Indigenous communities. There is currently a dearth of evidence for the effect of tobacco control interventions to reduce children's exposure to ETS among Indigenous populations. This study will provide high-quality evidence of the efficacy of a family-centred tobacco control program on ETS to reduce respiratory illness. Outcomes of

  16. Interviews with children of persons with a severe mental illness: investigating their everyday situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Research on children of persons with a severe mental illness focuses predominantly on parents' and others' perceptions. Children of mentally ill parents form a vulnerable group that has not been adequately paid attention to in psychiatric care institutions. Comparatively little is known about the children's recognition of their parents and the everyday situation of these families. The aim of the study was to investigate experiences of their life situation in children 10-18 years of age in a family with a parent with a severe mental illness. Eight children were interviewed concerning their everyday life situation. The interviews were analysed inspired from using thematic analysis. From the analysis of the material emerged aspects concerning the following themes: need for conversation, love for their family, maturity, experience of fear and blame, feelings of loneliness, responsibility and associated stigma. This study highlights the situation experienced by children of severely mentally ill persons who also are parents. The study may be found to be a basis for inspiring structured interventions and treatments programmes including children of the adult patients seeking psychiatric treatment.

  17. Parents in adult psychiatric care and their children: a call for more interagency collaboration with social services and child and adolescent psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzelius, Maria; Östman, Margareta; Råstam, Maria; Priebe, Gisela

    2018-01-01

    A parental mental illness affects all family members and should warrant a need for support. To investigate the extent to which psychiatric patients with underage children are the recipients of child-focused interventions and involved in interagency collaboration. Data were retrieved from a psychiatric services medical record database consisting of data regarding 29,972 individuals in southern Sweden and indicating the patients' main diagnoses, comorbidity, children below the age of 18, and child-focused interventions. Among the patients surveyed, 12.9% had registered underage children. One-fourth of the patients received child-focused interventions from adult psychiatry, and out of these 30.7% were involved in interagency collaboration as compared to 7.7% without child-focused interventions. Overall, collaboration with child and adolescent psychiatric services was low for all main diagnoses. If a patient received child-focused interventions from psychiatric services, the likelihood of being involved in interagency collaboration was five times greater as compared to patients receiving no child-focused intervention when controlled for gender, main diagnosis, and inpatient care. Psychiatric services play a significant role in identifying the need for and initiating child-focused interventions in families with a parental mental illness, and need to develop and support strategies to enhance interagency collaboration with other welfare services.

  18. [Refusal of food and fluids of a psychiatric patient in order to hasten death: obstacles for patient, family and care-team].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Dekkers, W.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this case-report we present a patient with a psychiatric history of a chronic depressive disorder. After a period of several years of ambivalence, he decided to refuse nutrition and hydration because he--in the words of the Royal Dutch Medical Association--was "suffering from life". There was no

  19. Hospital Related Stress Among Patients Admitted to a Psychiatric In-patient Unit in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha KS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric patient’s attitudes towards hospitalization have found an association between patient perceptions of the ward atmosphere and dissatisfaction. The aim of the study was to determine the aspects of stress related to hospitalization in inpatients admitted to a psychiatric facility. Fifty in-patients of both sexes admitted consecutively to a psychiatric unit in a General Hospital were asked to rate the importance of, and their satisfaction with, 38 different aspects of in-patient care and treatment. Results showed that the major sources of stress were related to having a violent patient near to his/her bed; being away from family; having to stay in closed wards; having to eat cold and tasteless food; losing income or job due to illness, being hospitalized away from home; not able to understand the jargons used by the clinical staff and not getting medication for sleep. A well-differentiated assessment of stress and satisfaction has implications for the evaluation of the quality of psychiatric care and for the improvement of in-patient psychiatric care.

  20. Enhancing psychosocial and spiritual palliative care: Four-year results of the program of comprehensive care for people with advanced illnesses and their families in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Batiste, Xavier; Mateo-Ortega, Dolors; Lasmarías, Cristina; Novellas, Anna; Espinosa, Jose; Beas, Elba; Ela, Sara; Barbero, Javier

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to describe the overall quantitative and qualitative results of a "La Caixa" Foundation and World Health Organization Collaborating Center Program entitled "Comprehensive Care for Patients with Advanced Illnesses and their Families" after four years of experience. Qualitative and quantitative methods were employed to assess the program. Quasiexperimental, prospective, multicenter, single-group, and pretest/posttest methods were utilized to assess the quantitative data. The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions was assessed at baseline (visit 1) and after four follow-up visits. The following dimensions were assessed: mood state, discomfort, anxiety, degree of adjustment or adaptation to disease, and suffering. We also assessed the four dimensions of the spiritual pain scale: faith or spiritual beliefs, valuable faith or spiritual beliefs, meaning in life, and peace of mind/forgiveness. Qualitative analyses were performed via surveys to evaluate stakeholder satisfaction. We built 29 psychosocial support teams involving 133 professionals-mainly psychologists and social workers. During the study period, 8,964 patients and 11,810 family members attended. Significant improvements were observed in the psychosocial and spiritual dimensions assessed. Patients, family members, and stakeholders all showed high levels of satisfaction. This model of psychosocial care could serve as an example for other countries that wish to improve psychosocial and spiritual support. Our results confirm that specific psychosocial interventions delivered by well-trained experts can help to ease suffering and discomfort in end-of-life and palliative care patients, particularly those with high levels of pain or emotional distress.

  1. Psychiatric morbidity in two urban communities in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-08-08

    Aug 8, 2008 ... psychiatric illness significantly differentiates cases from non-cases on all measures of morbidity. Conclusion:the ..... with the onerous task of sifting out several variables .... strategy in providing services targeted to high-risk.

  2. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in older patients admitted to psychiatric hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongen, S.; Kramers, C.; O'Mahony, D.; Feuth, T.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Ahmed, A.I.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing including potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and potential prescription omissions (PPOs) and to assess related risk factors in older people with major psychiatric illness.

  3. Consensus on guidelines for stereotactic neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuttin, Bart; Wu, Hemmings; Mayberg, Helen; Hariz, Marwan; Gabriëls, Loes; Galert, Thorsten; Merkel, Reinhard; Kubu, Cynthia; Vilela-Filho, Osvaldo; Matthews, Keith; Taira, Takaomi; Lozano, Andres M.; Schechtmann, Gastón; Doshi, Paresh; Broggi, Giovanni; Régis, Jean; Alkhani, Ahmed; Sun, Bomin; Eljamel, Sam; Schulder, Michael; Kaplitt, Michael; Eskandar, Emad; Rezai, Ali; Krauss, Joachim K.; Hilven, Paulien; Schuurman, Rick; Ruiz, Pedro; Chang, Jin Woo; Cosyns, Paul; Lipsman, Nir; Voges, Juergen; Cosgrove, Rees; Li, Yongjie; Schlaepfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background For patients with psychiatric illnesses remaining refractory to 'tandard' therapies, neurosurgical procedures may be considered. Guidelines for safe and ethical conduct of such procedures have previously and independently been proposed by various local and regional expert groups. Methods

  4. Oral hygiene and oral flora evaluation in psychiatric patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Key words: Bacteria types, oral and dental illnesses, psychiatric patients. Date of Acceptance: .... patients, and difficulties such as insufficient sedation.[7]. This study .... Despite the general notion that stress triggers bruxism ...

  5. Parental psychiatric hospitalisation and offspring schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L; Reinisch, June M

    2009-01-01

    The risk of schizophrenia has been linked with a family history of schizophrenia and less strongly with other psychiatric disorders in family members. Using data from the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort and from the Danish Psychiatric Case Register, we studied the relationship between offspring risk...... of schizophrenia and a range of psychotic and non-psychotic psychiatric diagnoses in parents. Psychiatric admission data after 1969 were available for 7047 cohort members born between 1959 and 1961, and for 7006 mothers and 6993 fathers. Univariate analysis showed that neurosis, alcohol and substance dependence...... in both parents were associated with elevated risk of offspring schizophrenia; in addition, maternal schizophrenia, affective disorder and personality disorder were associated with elevated risk. Controlling for parental age, parental social status, and parental psychiatric co-diagnosis, offspring risk...

  6. Headache complaints associated with psychiatric comorbidity in a population-based sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benseñor I.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency at which people complain of any type of headache, and its relationship with sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in São Paulo, Brazil. A three-step cluster sampling method was used to select 1,464 subjects aged 18 years or older. They were mainly from families of middle and upper socioeconomic levels living in the catchment area of Instituto de Psiquiatria. However, this area also contains some slums and shantytowns. The subjects were interviewed using the Brazilian version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 1.1. (CIDI 1.1 by a lay trained interviewer. Answers to CIDI 1.1 questions allowed us to classify people according to their psychiatric condition and their headaches based on their own ideas about the nature of their illness. The lifetime prevalence of "a lot of problems with" headache was 37.4% (76.2% of which were attributed to use of medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, and 23.8% attributed to nervousness, tension or mental illness. The odds ratio (OR for headache among participants with "nervousness, tension or mental illness" was elevated for depressive episodes (OR, 2.1; 95%CI, 1.4-3.4, dysthymia (OR, 3.4; 95%CI, 1.6-7.4 and generalized anxiety disorder (OR, 4.3; 95%CI, 2.1-8.6, when compared with patients without headache. For "a lot of problems with" headaches attributed to medicines, drugs/alcohol, physical illness or trauma, the risk was also increased for dysthymia but not for generalized anxiety disorder. These data show a high association between headache and chronic psychiatric disorders in this Brazilian population sample.

  7. A família e o doente mental usuário do hospital-dia: estudo de um caso La familia y el enfermo mental usuário del hospital/día: estudo de un caso The family and the mentally-ill user of day-hospitals: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ruth Macêdo Monteiro

    2000-12-01

    este estudio son bastante significativas para la construcción de nuevas posibilidades en la atención a la familia del enfermo mental.The day-hospital, as a modality of psychiatric care, provides families with the possibility to experience greater contact with their mentally-ill relative during treatment and leads them to searching, together with such relative, for ways to facilitate the adaptation process of interaction in the family. This study aims at understanding how families and the users of day-hospitals interact out of their homes and at describing the experience narrated by a family. The family in this study was selected from one of the users of a day-hospital who had a previous history of hospital admissions for psychiatric treatment. Five members of the family under study were interviewed. Based on the experiences described by the subjects, two great thematic categories emerged: the family experiencing the day-hospital with its family member and the family-user relationships. The experiences narrated by the subjects in this study are rather significant for the construction of new possibilities in caring for the mentally-ill person's family.

  8. Psychiatric Psychosocial Rebilibation in Nigeria; What Needs to be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerians who suffer from severe mental illness also need psychiatric psychosocial rehabilitation. Despite the availability of a wide range of mental health services in Nigeria, majority of Nigerians with mental health relatively have their needs unmet. To fill this unmet gap, Nigerian psychiatrists should also make psychiatric ...

  9. The Role of a Psychiatric Pharmacist in College Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caley, Charles F.; Webber, Donna; Kurland, Michael; Holmes, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Published evidence indicates there is a growing prevalence of psychiatric illnesses on college campuses, and that approximately one quarter of students may be taking psychotropic medications. But attracting and retaining experienced mental health care professionals to college health settings is a challenging task. The psychiatric pharmacist is one…

  10. Exploring Peer Support Needs of Caregivers for Youth with Mental Illness or Addictions Concerns in Family Navigation Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoulakis, R; Turner, M; Wicik, K; Weingust, S; Dobbin, K; Levitt, A

    2017-11-16

    Roles for peer support workers are increasingly recognized as a valuable component of mental health and addictions (MHA) services. In youth MHA care, caregivers are often closely involved in finding and accessing services and may also require support for themselves, yet caregiver peer support is not readily available in existing service delivery models. In order to understand the potential role and value of a caregiver peer support worker in a Family Navigation service, a descriptive qualitative study was conducted to explore the needs and potential value of a peer worker from caregiver client perspectives. Study findings indicate that a caregiver peer support worker can provide support for engaging in the caregiving role, utilize lived experience as a skill, and complement navigation support through lived experience. The discussion highlights implications for the implementation of a caregiver peer role at a family-focused service as well as implications for peer work within the MHA system.

  11. Illness perspectives of Thais diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanseeha, Ladda; Chontawan, Ratanawadee; Sethabouppha, Hunsa; Disayavanish, Chamlong; Turale, Sue

    2009-09-01

    This study explored the perceptions of 18 people diagnosed with schizophrenia from 1-10 years to uncover how they perceived themselves and their illness. It also involved 12 family members who added their perceptions. The data were collected using in-depth interviews, reflective journaling, and observations. The data were analyzed through the lens of Heidegger's hermeneutic phenomenology. Four themes emerged: perceptions of mental illness, perceptions of the causes of illness, perceptions of discrimination, and attempting to live with schizophrenia. The findings included strong underlying cultural and spiritual beliefs, and attitudes unique to the Thai participants, including the causation of schizophrenia by supernatural powers, black magic, and bad karma stemming from past deeds. Understanding the perceptions of the participants might help health-care providers to be more sensitive to those living with schizophrenia in Thailand and elsewhere. In particular, the findings could be useful in informing psychiatric careproviders about developing better caring systems for clients diagnosed with schizophrenia. This should help the sufferers of schizophrenia to live their lives to their own satisfaction and as normally as possible.

  12. Adolescent Onset Psychosis: A 2-year retrospective study of adolescents admitted to a general psychiatric unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Paruk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background:KwaZulu-Natal had no dedicated in-patient adolescent psychiatric service during the study period and adolescents were admitted to general psychiatric wards. Aim of Study: This is a descriptive review of adolescents admitted with psychotic symptoms to a psychiatric hospital. It aims to describe their demographic profile, associated risk factors, clinical profile and management strategies utilized. Method: The files of all adolescent patients with psychotic symptoms, aged twelve to eighteen years old, admitted to a psychiatric hospital from July 2005 to June 2007 were reviewed. Results: 70 adolescents with psychosis were admitted to adult psychiatric wards over the 2 year period. The age range was 13 to 18 years old. 80% of the adolescent patients were male, 37% reported a positive family history of mental illness, 50% smoked nicotine and 61.4% reported cannabis use. The most common diagnoses were schizophrenia (30% and schizophreniform disorder (27.1%. 85.5%(60 of adolescent patients had a trial on a first generation antipsychotic and 10 patients were initiated on a second generation antipsychotic de- novo. The average length of stay in hospital was 27.8 days. 40% defaulted follow up post discharge. Conclusion: Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis. There were high rates of cannabis use. The adolescents were managed in psychiatric wards for significant periods and the majority of patients were initiated on first-generation antipsychotics. There is a need to develop specialized inpatient adolescent psychiatric facilities and services, as well as to address the issues of co-morbid substance use and non-adherence to treatment.

  13. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Lorenzo R

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosaria Di Lorenzo,1 Nina Cimino,2 Elena Di Pietro,3 Gabriella Pollutri,4 Vittoria Neviani,5 Paola Ferri2 1Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment, Department of Mental Health, AUSL Modena, Modena, 2School of Nursing, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 3School of Neuro-Psychiatry, 4School of Psychiatry, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 5 “The Medlar”, Villa Igea Hospital, Modena, Italy Background: Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods: This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT, and in the residential facility for adole