WorldWideScience

Sample records for psychiatric health care

  1. Transformations of Professional Work in Psychiatric Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybbroe, Betina

    In psychiatry in Denmark health and social care is being replaced by diagnostic categorisations and a more consumerized relation between the health professionals and patients as self- responsible citizens. Increasing medicalization and New Public Management reforms and standardization for cost......- effectiveness intertwine with a neo-liberal health policy of a “user- focus and user involvement”,that transforms psychiatric practice. Through the micro-sociological study of professionals working with patients in psychiatry, it is illuminated how patients/clients are objectified and left to care...... for themselves, and how professionalism is transformed into manualisation of practice, and test technologies replace meeting “significant others”....

  2. Psychiatric nursing as 'different' care: experience of Iranian mental health nurses in inpatient psychiatric wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, K; Nikbakht-Nasrabadi, A; Abbaszadeh, A; Mohammadpour, A

    2013-03-01

    Patients with mental illness require unique and specific care. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of nurses, who provide such care for mentally ill people, within the context of Iranian culture. This hermeneutic phenomenological study was carried out in a university-affiliated hospital in an urban area of Iran. We interviewed 10 mental health nurses to capture in detail their experiences in psychiatric units, and the approach developed by Diekelmann et al. was employed to analyse the data. Four themes and five sub-themes were identified: 'being engaged with patients' (sub-themes: 'struggle for monitor/control', 'safety/security concerns', 'supporting physiological and emotional needs'), 'being competent', 'altruistic care' and 'facing difficulties and challenges' (sub-themes: 'socio-cultural' and 'organizational challenges'). The results provide valuable insights and greater understanding of the professional experiences of psychiatric nurses in Iran, and indicate the need for a stable and responsible organizational structure for those nurses who are expected to manage patient care in psychiatric wards. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  3. Exploring associations between psychiatric disorder, psychological distress, and health care utilization in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compen, F R; Adang, E M M; Bisseling, E M; Van der Lee, M L; Speckens, A E M

    2017-12-04

    The mental burden of cancer might elicit additional health care utilization. However, it is unclear how psychiatric disorder and psychological distress relate to health care utilization. Therefore, this study explores associations between psychiatric disorder, psychological distress, and health care utilization. It was hypothesized that presence of psychiatric disorder and psychological distress was associated with increased health care utilization and costs. The current study consisted of secondary analyses of baseline data of a larger randomized controlled trial. Two hundred forty-five mixed-cancer patients with at least mild symptoms of psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-T ≥ 11) were mainly recruited via online media, participating centers and patient associations. Patients were assessed with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders (SCID-I) for depressive, anxiety, and/or adjustment disorder. Psychological distress was measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Retrospective self-reported health care utilization in the past 3 months was collected. Associations between predictors and health care utilization in terms of incidence rate ratios (IRR) and costs per category (mental, primary, somatic, and complementary) were assessed by negative binomial, logistic, and gamma regression. Eighty-nine (36.3%) patients suffered from psychiatric disorder, which was associated with mental health care utilization (IRR = 1.63) and costs (OR = 3.11). We observed a nonsignificant trend of somatic health care utilization in patients with psychiatric disorder. Psychological distress was associated with mental health care utilization (IRR = 1.09) and costs (OR = 1.09). Psychological distress was also associated with complementary health care utilization (IRR = 1.03). Psychiatric disorder and psychological distress were associated with mental health care use and costs. Psychological distress was associated

  4. Does Primary Care Mental Health Resourcing Affect the Use and Costs of Secondary Psychiatric Services?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Sadeniemi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative care models for treatment of depression and anxiety disorders in primary care have been shown to be effective. The aim of this study was to investigate at the municipal level to what extent investment in mental health personnel at primary care health centres in the study area is reflected in the costs and use of secondary psychiatric services. Furthermore, we analysed whether the service provision and use of secondary psychiatric care correlates with the socioeconomic indicators of need. We found significant variation in the amount of mental health personnel provided at the health centres, uncorrelated with the indicators of need nor with the costs of secondary psychiatric care. The amount of mental health nurses at the health centres correlated inversely with the number of secondary psychiatric outpatient visits, whereas its relation to inpatient days and admission was positive. The costs of secondary psychiatric care correlated with level of psychiatric morbidity and socioeconomic indicators of need. The results suggest that when aiming at equal access of care and cost-efficiency, the primary and secondary care should be organized and planned with integrative collaboration.

  5. Challenges to HIV prevention in psychiatric settings: Perceptions of South African mental health care providers

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Pamela Y.

    2006-01-01

    Mental health services in South Africa increasingly feel the brunt of the AIDS epidemic. Despite the high prevalence of infection in the psychiatric setting, HIV risk reduction interventions targeting South Africans with psychiatric illness remain few and far between. The attitudes of mental health care providers about sexual relations and HIV among people with mental illness continue to influence the extent to which these issues are addressed in care settings. This study examines these attit...

  6. A model to facilitate collaboration between institutions of higher education and psychiatric health care services to promote psychiatric clinical nursing education

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    D.Cur. The purpose of this research study was to describe a model to facilitate collaboration between the institutions of higher education and psychiatric health care services in order to promote psychiatric clinical nursing education, with guidelines to operationalise the model. In spite of the calls by statutory bodies and contemporary legislation for collaboration between institutions of higher education and psychiatric health care services, there are few instances where formalised coll...

  7. Challenges and possibilities for understanding men's health in twenty-first century forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpula, Esa; Ekstrand, Per

    2014-08-01

    Forensic psychiatric care in Sweden constitutes a specific institutional environment in health care in terms of gender and power relationships. This context emphasizes safety and protection in an environment where men constitute a majority of the patients and staff. It involves relationships among men's health, constructions of masculinities, and issues regarding equality between women's and men's caring work. The aim of this theoretical article is to problematize men's health in relation to constructions of masculinities. Our analysis shows how the perception of health is involved in the construction of masculinities and how this plays out in daily interactions between caregivers and patients.

  8. Psychiatric Cultures Compared : Psychiatry and Mental Health Care in the Twentieth Century: Comparisons and Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijswijt-Hofstra, Marijke; Oosterhuis, Harry; Vijselaar, Joost; Freeman, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    The history of mental health care in the twentieth century is a relatively uncharted territory. Exemplifying a new emphasis on the comparative approach, this volume offers overviews of various national psychiatric cultures and explores new research subjects. By confronting Dutch psychiatry with

  9. Development of the ITHACA Toolkit for monitoring human rights and general health care in psychiatric and social care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, J; Thornicroft, G; Burti, L; Katschnig, H; Lewis, O; Russo, J; Shaw, T; Wahlbeck, K; Rose, D

    2013-09-01

    Background. Human rights violations are commonly experienced by people in psychiatric and social care institutions. States and private organizations providing such health and social services must comply with international human rights law. Monitoring of such compliance is increasingly recognized as a vital component in ensuring that rights are respected and violations are brought out in the open, remedied and prevented. Aims. The Institutional Treatment, Human Rights and Care Assessment (ITHACA) project produced a method to document violations and good practice with the aim of preventing human rights violations and improving general health care practice in psychiatric and social care institutions (www.ithacastudy.eu). Methods. A methodological and implementation study conducted across 15 European countries developed and assessed the ITHACA Toolkit in monitoring visits to 87 mental health organizations. Results. The toolkit is available in 13 European languages and has demonstrated applicability in a range of contexts and conditions. The information gathered through monitoring visits can document both good practice and areas for improvement. Conclusions. The ITHACA Toolkit is an acceptable and feasible method for the systematic monitoring of human rights and general health care in psychiatric and social care institutions that explicitly calls for the participation of service users in the monitoring of human rights violations and general health care practice.

  10. Focusing on psychiatric patients′ strengths: A new vision on mental health care in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Zargham-Boroujeni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying and using the strengths of patients, in practice, is a new territory. Today, the need to educate nurses and psychiatric patients about positive psychology in practice and the importance of understanding and focusing on strengths is clear. However, little is known about the strengths the psychiatric patients use and experience. Thus, this study has been designed and conducted in order to understand how people with psychiatric disorders demonstrate their strengths. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 13 semi-structured, qualitative interviews with patients and 2 focus groups with nurses were carried out. In addition, a qualitative content analysis was used to identify significant strengths. Results: Based on the results, the four main strengths consisted of: Finding a meaning in daily living, work as enduring strength, entertaining activities, and positive relationship. Patients also reported that health care providers rarely focused on patients′ strengths, and experts confirmed these findings. Our findings indicate that patients′ own strengths are a pivotal factor in getting through their illness from their perspective. Conclusions: Despite the enduring legacy of pessimism regarding psychiatric patients, these people have a repertoire of strengths. Nurses should, therefore, have a greater focus on eliciting and nourishing psychiatric patients′ strengths in their care. It is suggested that the theoretical and practical aspects of patients′ strengths be incorporated in nursing school curricula.

  11. Safety in psychiatric inpatient care: The impact of risk management culture on mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemon, Allie; Jenkins, Emily; Bungay, Vicky

    2017-10-01

    The discourse of safety has informed the care of individuals with mental illness through institutionalization and into modern psychiatric nursing practices. Confinement arose from safety: out of both societal stigma and fear for public safety, as well as benevolently paternalistic aims to protect individuals from self-harm. In this paper, we argue that within current psychiatric inpatient environments, safety is maintained as the predominant value, and risk management is the cornerstone of nursing care. Practices that accord with this value are legitimized and perpetuated through the safety discourse, despite evidence refuting their efficacy, and patient perspectives demonstrating harm. To illustrate this growing concern in mental health nursing care, we provide four exemplars of risk management strategies utilized in psychiatric inpatient settings: close observations, seclusion, door locking and defensive nursing practice. The use of these strategies demonstrates the necessity to shift perspectives on safety and risk in nursing care. We suggest that to re-centre meaningful support and treatment of clients, nurses should provide individualized, flexible care that incorporates safety measures while also fundamentally re-evaluating the risk management culture that gives rise to and legitimizes harmful practices. © 2017 The Authors Nursing Inquiry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A challenge for community psychiatric nursing: is there a future in primary health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannigan, B

    1997-10-01

    The growing debate surrounding the role of the community psychiatric nurse (CPN) in the United Kingdom is reviewed. Issues which have attracted significant interest and which form the focus of this paper are the prioritization of CPN services, CPN attachment to primary health care (PHC), and the effectiveness of clinical interventions. The requirement for CPNs is now to concentrate services on people experiencing severe and enduring mental health problems. Innovative and effective clinical and social interventions for this client group are beginning to disseminate into everyday CPN practice. Problem-solving family interventions, cognitive therapies and case management are three such examples. The past, present and possible future role for CPNs working in primary health care settings with people experiencing nonpsychotic mental health problems is a particular focus in this paper. Drawing on the relevant literature, central issues addressed are the process and outcome of CPN work with nonpsychotic service users, reasons for the growth of CPN involvement in PHC, and the overall expansion of interest in mental health interventions within the primary health care environment. The literature suggests that this expansion has been strategically unplanned, but that mental health need amongst primary health care service users is significant. The concluding contention of this paper is that a future role for CPNs in primary care does exist.

  13. [Closing forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy: a new deal for mental health care?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casacchia, Massimo; Malavolta, Maurizio; Bianchini, Valeria; Giusti, Laura; Di Michele, Vittorio; Giosuè, Patricia; Ruggeri, Mirella; Biondi, Massimo; Roncone, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The date of March 31, 2015, following the Law 81/2014, has marked a historical transition with the final closure of the six forensic psychiatric hospitals in Italy. This law identifies a new pathway of care that involves small-scale high therapeutic profile facilities (Residenze per la Esecuzione della Misura di Sicurezza, REMS) instead of the old forensic psychiatric hospitals. The Law promotes a new recovery-oriented rehabilitation approach for the persons with mental disorders who committed a criminal offence, but lack criminal responsibility and deemed as socially dangerous. After a brief description of what happens abroad, this article highlights the positive aspects of the law that, as a whole, has to be considered innovative and unavoidable. The main debated problems are also reviewed, including the lack of changes to the Criminal Code; the improper equation between insanity and mental illness and social dangerousness; the evaluation of "socially dangerousness", based solely on "subjective qualities" of the person, assessed out of his/her context, without paying attention to family and social conditions suitable for discharge; the expensive implementation of the REMS, mainly based on security policies and less on care and rehabilitation, the delay in their construction, and the search for residential alternatives structures; the uncertain boundaries of professional responsibility. Finally, several actions are suggested that can support the implementation of the law: information programs addressed to the general population; training activities for mental health professionals; systematic monitoring and evaluation of the outcomes of the care provided to the forensic psychiatric population; implementation of Agreement Protocols and a better cooperation with the judiciary. Scientific societies dealing with psychosocial rehabilitation need to be involved in such issues relating to the identification of the best care and rehabilitation pathways, which should be

  14. Psychiatric nurse practitioners’ experiences of working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kgalabi J. Ngako

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric nurse practitioners (PNPs working with mental health care users presenting with acute symptoms work in a complex environment. This environment is characterised by mental health care users who may present with a history of violence, sexual assault and substance misuse.The objectives of this study were twofold: firstly, to explore and describe the experiences of PNPs working with mental health care users (MHCUs presenting with acute symptoms; and secondly, to make recommendations for the advanced PNPs to facilitate promotion of the mental health of PNPs with reference to nursing practice, research and education.A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. The target population was PNPs working with MHCUs presenting with acute symptoms in a public mental health care institution in Gauteng. Data were collected by means of four focus group interviews involving 21 PNPs. The researcher made use of drawings, naïve sketches and field notes for the purpose of data triangulation. Data were analysed in accordance with Tesch’s method of open coding.The three themes that emerged were: PNPs experienced working with these MHCUs as entering an unsafe world where care became a burden; they experienced negative emotional reactions and attitudes towards these MHCUs that compromised quality nursing care; and they made a plea for a nurturing environment that would enhance quality nursing care.The PNPs suggest skills and competency development, organisational support, and a need for external resources. Creation of a positive environment and mobilisation of resources as well as the identification and bridging of obstacles are essential in the promotion of the overall wellbeing and mental health of PNPs. 

  15. Outsourcing mental health care services? The practice and potential of community-based farms in psychiatric rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Sorana C; Zweekhorst, Marjolein B M; Veltman, Dick J; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Bunders, Joske F G

    2015-02-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation supports individuals with mental disorders to acquire the skills needed for independent lives in communities. This article assesses the potential of outsourcing psychiatric rehabilitation by analysing care farm services in the Netherlands. Service characteristics were analysed across 214 care farms retrieved from a national database. Qualitative insights were provided by five case descriptions, selected from 34 interviews. Institutional care farms were significantly larger and older than private care farms (comprising 88.8% of all care farms). Private, independent care farms provide real-life work conditions to users who are relatively less impaired. Private, contracted care farms tailor the work activities to their capacities and employ professional supervisors. Institutional care farms accommodate for the most vulnerable users. We conclude that collaborations with independent, contracted and institutional care farms would provide mental health care organizations with a diversity in services, enhanced community integration and a better match with users' rehabilitation needs.

  16. Health care professionals implementing a smoke-free policy at inpatient psychiatric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Lyle G; Oliffe, John L; Johnson, Joy L; Bottorff, Joan L

    2014-12-01

    Smoke-free grounds policies (SFGPs) were introduced to inpatient psychiatric hospital settings to improve health among patients, staff, and visitors. We conducted an ethnographic study in Northern British Columbia, Canada, to describe how the implementation of SFGPs is affected by institutional cultures. Data reported here included participant observation, document review, informal discussions (n = 11), and interviews with health care professionals (HCPs; n = 19) and staff (n = 2) at two hospitals. We used iterative and inductive processes to derive thematic findings. Findings related to HCPs illustrate how local contexts and cultural factors affect SFGP implementation. These factors included individual beliefs and attitudes, the influence of group norms, leadership and consensus building, and locale-specific norms. Strong, consultative leadership, in which leaders solicited input from and long-term support of people most directly responsible for policy implementation, was key to success. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Caring Science and the Development of Forensic Psychiatric Caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörberg, Ulrica

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to discuss how caring science can contribute and provide a theoretical foundation for the development of caring within forensic psychiatric care. It is not only a challenge but also a great opportunity to use caring science theory within forensic psychiatric care when caring for the patients and supporting their health processes. There is a need for more knowledge about, understanding of, and willingness to care for patients within forensic psychiatric settings in a "true caring" way. In order to achieve this, a caring culture is required, one that supports carers and provides them with opportunities to further develop a caring attitude. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Psychiatric History, Deployments, and Impacts of Seeking Mental Health Care in a Combat Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Rates of mental health in service members deployed to Afghanistan continue to rise, with service members with 3+ deployments displaying highest rates of psychological problems and use of psychiatric medications.

  19. Confirming mental health care in acute psychiatric wards, as narrated by persons experiencing psychotic illness: an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebergsen, Karina; Norberg, Astrid; Talseth, Anne-Grethe

    2016-01-01

    It is important that mental health nurses meet the safety, security and care needs of persons suffering from psychotic illness to enhance these persons' likelihood of feeling better during their time in acute psychiatric wards. Certain persons in care describe nurses' mental health care as positive, whereas others report negative experiences and express a desire for improvements. There is limited research on how persons with psychotic illness experience nurses' mental health care acts and how such acts help these persons feel better. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore, describe and understand how the mental health nurses in acute psychiatric wards provide care that helps persons who experienced psychotic illness to feel better, as narrated by these persons. This study had a qualitative design; 12 persons participated in qualitative interviews. The interviews were transcribed, content analysed and interpreted using Martin Buber's concept of confirmation. The results of this study show three categories of confirming mental health care that describe what helped the participants to feel better step-by-step: first, being confirmed as a person experiencing psychotic illness in need of endurance; second, being confirmed as a person experiencing psychotic illness in need of decreased psychotic symptoms; and third, being confirmed as a person experiencing psychotic illness in need of support in daily life. The underlying meaning of the categories and of subcategories were interpreted and formulated as the theme; confirming mental health care to persons experiencing psychotic illness. Confirming mental health care acts seem to help persons to feel better in a step-wise manner during psychotic illness. Nurses' openness and sensitivity to the changing care needs of persons who suffer from psychotic illness create moments of confirmation within caring acts that concretely help the persons to feel better and that may enhance their health. The results show the

  20. The Attitude of Psychiatric and Non-psychiatric Health-care Workers Toward Suicide in Malaysian Hospitals and Its Implications for Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, Ching Sin; Wee, Lei-Hum; Yacob, Sapini; Yeoh, Seen Heng; Binti Adnan, Tassha Hilda; Haniff, Jamaiyah; Perialathan, Komathi; Mahdi, Aziman; Rahman, Abu Bakar; Eu, Choon Leng; Binti Wahab, Suzaily

    2017-08-01

    This research is aimed to examine the attitude of health-care workers toward suicidal patients in Malaysian hospitals, comparing responses from psychiatric and non-psychiatric workers, and to identify specific needs in suicide prevention and management training. This is a multi-site cross-sectional study. The authors conducted a survey based on a translated self-administered questionnaire to participants from seven core hospital departments. While most health-care workers regardless of department and specialty took their duty to prevent suicide seriously, a large majority of them expressed negative attitudes such as finding suicidal behavior irritating, and more than half believed suicidal attempts were a way of making others sorry. However, psychiatric workers were less likely to have judgmental attitudes that included believing suicide attempters as being selfish or trying to get sympathy from others. As there were more similarities than differences in health-care workers' attitudes toward suicide, recommendations on basic and continuous suicide prevention and management training among hospital workers were made. The interventions focused on improving knowledge, affective, and skill-based areas that were aimed to correct the wrongful understanding of and to minimize the negative attitudes toward suicidal individuals indicated by the study results.

  1. Psychiatric care in the German prison system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the nature of medical care within the German penal system. German prison services provide health care for all inmates, including psychiatric care. The reached level of equivalence of care and ethical problems and resource limitations are discussed and the way of legislation in this field since 2006 reform on federal law is described. The article summarizes basic data on German prison health care for mentally ill inmates. The legislation process and factors of influence are pointed out. A description of how psychiatric care is organized in German prisons follows. It focuses on the actual legal situation including European standards of prison health care and prevention of torture, psychiatric care in German prisons themselves, self harm and addiction. Associated problems such as blood born diseases and tuberculosis are included. The interactions between prison staff and health care personal and ethic aspects are discussed. The legislation process is still going on and there is still a chance to improve psychiatric care. Mental health problems are the major challenge for prison health care. Factors such as special problems of migrants, shortage of professionals and pure statistic data are considered. The paper provides a general overview on psychiatric services in prison and names weak points and strengths of the system.

  2. Eradicating Barriers to Mental Health Care Through Integrated Service Models: Contemporary Perspectives for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Horace; Alexander, Vinette

    2016-06-01

    There has been renewed, global interest in developing new and transformative models of facilitating access to high-quality, cost-effective, and individually-centered health care for severe mentally-ill (SMI) persons of diverse racial/ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. However, in our present-day health-service delivery systems, scholars have identified layers of barriers to widespread dispersal of well-needed mental health care both nationally and internationally. It is crucial that contemporary models directed at eradicating barriers to mental health services are interdisciplinary in context, design, scope, sequence, and best-practice standards. Contextually, nurses are well-positioned to influence the incorporation and integration of new concepts into operationally interdisciplinary, evidence-based care models with measurable outcomes. The aim of this concept paper is to use the available evidence to contextually explicate how the blended roles of psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing can be influential in eradicating barriers to care and services for SMI persons through the integrated principles of collaboration, integration and service expansion across health, socioeconomic, and community systems. A large body of literature proposes that any best-practice standards aimed at eliminating barriers to the health care needs of SMI persons require systematic, well-coordinated interdisciplinary partnerships through evidence-based, high-quality, person-centered, and outcome-driven processes. Transforming the conceptual models of collaboration, integration and service expansion could be revolutionary in how care and services are coordinated and dispersed to populations across disadvantaged communities. Building on their longstanding commitment to individual and community care approaches, and their pivotal roles in research, education, leadership, practice, and legislative processes; PMH nurses are well-positioned to be both influential and instrumental in

  3. Resilience of the health team in caring for people with mental disorders in a psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolese, Débora Felippe; Lessa, Greice; Santos, José Luís Guedes Dos; Mendes, Jucimara da Silva; Cunha, Kamylla Santos da; Rodrigues, Jeferson

    2017-08-17

    Evaluating and understanding the resilience process of the health team in caring for people with mental disorders in a psychiatric hospital. A mixed-method study with concomitant triangulation of data from a cross-sectional study, with health professionals, and Grounded Theory in the data. Quantitative data were collected using the Resilience Scale and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were obtained from interviews and analyzed using initial and focused coding. 40 health professionals participated in the study. Mean responses of the participants in the resilience scale were 99.80 ± 12.86 points, with a minimum of 35 and a maximum of 114 points. From the qualitative data, we can highlight the professionals' commitment in developing competencies in caring for people with mental disorders; valorization of teamwork and positive impact on work for the re-signification of the meaning of life. Understanding this process of resilience enables developing strategies to improve the quality of life of workers in psychiatric hospitals. Avaliar e compreender o processo de resiliência da equipe de saúde no cuidado a pessoas com transtornos mentais em um hospital psiquiátrico. Estudo de método misto com triangulação concomitante de dados de um estudo transversal, com profissionais de saúde, e uma Teoria Fundamentada nos Dados. Os dados quantitativos foram coletados a partir da Escala de Resiliência e analisados por meio de estatística descritiva e inferencial. Os dados qualitativos foram obtidos a partir de entrevistas e analisados mediante codificação inicial e focalizada. Participaram da pesquisa 40 profissionais de saúde. Na escala de resiliência, a média das respostas dos participantes foi 99,80±12,86 pontos, o mínimo foi de 35 e o máximo de 114 pontos. Nos dados qualitativos, destacaram-se o empenho dos profissionais para o desenvolvimento de competências para o cuidado de pessoas com transtornos mentais, a valoriza

  4. Hospital staff nurse perceptions of competency to care for patients with psychiatric or behavioral health concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Dana N; Wickman, Mary E; Cacciata, Marysol; Winokur, Elizabeth J; Loucks, Jeannine; Drake, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Disruptive behaviors are common among hospitalized patients with psychiatric and substance abuse behaviors. Nurses working on nonpsychiatric units, however, may lack competencies to care for patients with such behaviors. A survey was developed and administered to 844 nurses across three hospital settings that revealed a lack of nurse confidence to intervene in situations that require de-escalation techniques and crisis communication. This study provides direction for further research and interventions in hospital settings with similar professional development needs.

  5. Health Protective Effects of Attachment Among African American Girls in Psychiatric Care

    OpenAIRE

    Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri R.; Wilson, Helen W.

    2011-01-01

    African American (AA) girls in psychiatric care are at increased risk for HIV and STI infection through sexual risk taking. Adolescent sexual behavior often reflects peer norms and behavior. Secure attachment patterns with mothers and peers might lessen the effects of negative peer influences and reduce sexual risk taking among AA girls. This study examined the relationships among mother-daughter and peer attachment, peer norms, and sexual risk behaviors in African American girls seeking outp...

  6. Health-protective effects of attachment among African American girls in psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri R; Wilson, Helen W

    2012-02-01

    African American girls in psychiatric care are at increased risk for HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) through sexual risk taking. Adolescent sexual behavior often reflects peer norms and behavior. Secure attachment patterns with mothers and peers might lessen the effects of negative peer influences and reduce sexual risk taking among African American girls. This study examined the relationships among mother-daughter and peer attachment, peer norms, and sexual-risk behaviors in African American girls seeking outpatient psychiatric care. A group of 12-16-year-old African American girls (N = 262; M age = 14.45 years) reported on their attachment to their mothers and peers, peer risk-taking and dating behaviors, peer pressure, and sexual-risk behaviors (e.g., number of partners, high-risk partners, and condom use). Structural equation modeling examined whether peer attachment and peer norms mediated the relationship between mother attachment and sexual risk. Findings supported peer norms, but not peer attachment, as a mediator of mother attachment and girls' sexual-risk behaviors. Findings revealed important family and peer factors for African American girls in psychiatric care. HIV prevention programs may be strengthened by improving mother-daughter relationships, addressing the importance of peer relationships, and emphasizing how secure mother-daughter relationships can temper the impact of peer norms.

  7. Gender-specific mental health care needs of women veterans treated for psychiatric disorders in a Veterans Administration Women's Health Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura J; Ghadiali, Nafisa Y

    2015-04-01

    This pilot study aims to ascertain the prevalence of self-reported premenstrual, perinatal, and perimenopausal influences on mental health, and of gynecologic conditions that could interact with psychiatric conditions, among women veterans receiving psychiatric care within a Veterans Administration (VA) Women's Health Clinic (WHC). Participants included all women veterans (N=68) who received psychiatric evaluations within a VA WHC over a 5-month period. This setting encompasses colocated and coordinated primary care, gynecologic and mental health services. Evaluations included a Women's Mental Health Questionnaire, a psychiatric interview, and medical record review. Deidentified data were extracted from a clinical data repository for this descriptive study. High proportions of study participants reported that their emotional problems intensified premenstrually (42.6%), during pregnancy (33.3%), in the postpartum period (33.3%), or during perimenopause (18.2%). Unintended pregnancy (70.0% of pregnancies) and pregnancy loss (63.5% of women who had been pregnant) were prominent sex-linked stressors. Dyspareunia (22.1% of participants) and pelvic pain (17.6% of participants) were frequent comorbidities. Among women veterans receiving psychiatric care within a VA WHC, there are high rates of self-reported premenstrual, perinatal, and perimenopausal influences on mental health. This population also has substantial comorbidity of psychiatric disorders with dyspareunia and pelvic pain. This underscores the importance of recognizing and addressing women veterans' sex-specific care needs, including interactions among reproductive cycle phases, gynecologic pain, and psychiatric symptoms. The findings support the need for greater awareness of the sex-specific mental health needs of women veterans, and for more definitive studies to further characterize these needs.

  8. [Social psychiatric service as a cornerstone of psychiatric community care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, P; Tiggemann, H G

    1991-12-01

    Psychiatric care has gradually been shifting in Germany from its original inpatient basis to outpatient and complementary treatment. This shift of emphasis resulted in a transfer of psychiatry-political responsibility to communal bodies and hence also to communal public health services. Sociopsychiatric service ranks high in communal psychiatric care setups, since it promotes cooperation and helps to coordinate efforts in individual cases in respect of focal points on which such care is centered. For the future, an expert commission has suggested that the various institutions actively engaged in community psychiatric care should team up in each region. This applies in particular to mobile services visiting the patients in their homes, and to the offices providing contracts to sociopsychiatric services of public health offices. Despite positive outlooks there are also quite a few negative aspects of present-day practice. One of them is poor definition of tasks and functions of communal sociopsychiatric services, whereas another one are the unsatisfactory quantitative and qualitative means at their disposal. It is also too often overlooked that psychiatric patients and disabled persons are entitled to compensation insurance payments to promote their rehabilitation, as provided for by individual legislation in the various German laender. To tap these sources sufficiently well, sociopsychiatric services must be better equipped in every respect. The professional competence of social workers and physicians, as well as of the relevant staff, must be safeguarded by continuing education and specialist training measures.

  9. Psychiatric Correlates of Medical Care Costs among Veterans Receiving Mental Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Tracy L.; Moore, Sally A.; Luterek, Jane; Varra, Alethea A.; Hyerle, Lynne; Bush, Kristen; Mariano, Mary Jean; Liu, Chaun-Fen; Kivlahan, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Research on increased medical care costs associated with posttraumatic sequelae has focused on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the provisional diagnosis of Disorders of Extreme Stress Not Otherwise Specified (DESNOS) encompasses broader trauma-related difficulties and may be uniquely related to medical costs. We investigated whether…

  10. [Promoting "successful aging" in community psychiatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimura, Hidehito; Nemoto, Takahiro; Sakuma, Kei; Mizuno, Masafumi

    2011-01-01

    Recently, patients with schizophrenia have been progressively aging in a way similar to that of the general population. In Japan, community mental health care has become more active in the context of the policy of promoting the discharge of patients from psychiatric hospitals. Patients with chronic schizophrenia who have been discharged are already approaching old age. "Successful aging" may be a key concept in their community-based psychiatric care. Successful aging does not emphasize a loss of youth, but focuses on gains and growth achieved with aging. In the Sasagawa Project, 78 patients with schizophrenia were gradually transferred from a psychiatric hospital to a community dwelling. Eight years have passed since the project began. Elder patients (>60 years old) showed stable psychiatric symptoms and were rarely readmitted to the psychiatric ward. They were, however, more often readmitted to hospital due to physical disease (for example, lifestyle-related disease or fracture) than were middle -aged patients (aging, but they are not sufficiently prepared for old age. In the mental health care of aging psychiatric patients, it is necessary to not only control psychiatric symptoms, but also promote and improve their quality of life by maintaining their ability to continue living in the community (for example, by supporting their preparations for old age).

  11. [Is "mental health" part of the common good? The sociopolitical framework of psychiatric ethics and the responsibility of health-care elites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlken, Eike

    2014-07-01

    Psychiatric work can only be that ethical as the framework of a health-care system allows. Thus, the responsibility of the health-care elites to establish a sociopolitical framework that suits psychiatric ethics is discussed on the basis of a theory of the common good and of a philosophical and normative elite theory. "Mental health" is demonstrated to be part of a basic sphere of the common good which cannot be denied to any member of a society. The final section discusses which specific duties can be derived for health-care elites on the ground of the aforementioned conception of "mental health" as a part of the common good. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. [Scientific bases of the organization of psychiatric care: development of a conceptual framework of modern mental health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastrebov, V S; Mitikhin, V G; Solokhina, T A; Mitikhina, I A

    Analysis and development of conceptual models of mental health organization allowing to determine the perspective directions of its further development. The work was based on the collection of scientific publications on the problems of psychiatric care organization as well as the results of own research carried out by the authors over the last 25 years. System analysis was used for the development and analysis of the major conceptual models of mental health care. The system analysis of the major conceptual models of mental health care - from the matrix model to models of the DSM-5 and RDoC, was carried out. Priorities and main AIM: of the research were specified. It has been shown that the Analytic Hierarchy Process should be used, along with traditional methods, to solve the addressed problems.

  13. Disability and Psychiatric Symptoms in Men Referred for Treatment with Work-Related Problems to Primary Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S Kathleen; Mushquash, Christopher J; Haggarty, John M

    2017-03-24

    The relationship between male sex and employment as barriers to accessing mental health care is unclear. The aim of this research was to examine (1) whether the clinical features of men referred to a shared mental health care (SMHC) service through primary care differed when symptoms were affecting them in the work domain; and (2) empirically re-evaluate the effectiveness of a SMHC model for work-related disability using a pre-post chart review of N = 3960 referrals to SMHC. ANOVA and logistic regression were performed to examine symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ) and disability (World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule, WHODAS 2) at entry and discharge. Men were RR (relative risk) = 1.8 (95% C.I.: 1.60-2.05) times more likely to be referred to SMHC with work problems than women. Having greater disability and more severe somatic symptoms increased the likelihood of a work-related referral. There were no significant differences after treatment. Problems in the work domain may play an important role in men's treatment seeking and clinicians' recognition of a mental health care need. This study is relevant because men are underrepresented in mental health (MH) treatment and primary care is the main gateway to accessing MH care. Asking men about functioning in the work domain may increase access to helpful psychiatric services.

  14. The prevalence and burden of psychiatric disorders in primary health care visits in Qatar: Too little time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric disorders including anxiety, depression, somatization, obsessive compulsive, and bipolar disorders are recognized as causing the biggest burden of disease worldwide. Aim: In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence and burden of common mental disorders at Primary Health Care Centers (PHCC using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WHO-CIDI in the Qatari population, aged 18-65 who attended Primary Health Care (PHC settings. Design: A prospective cross-sectional study conducted during November 2011 to October 2012. Setting: Primary Health Care Centers of the Supreme Council of Health, Qatar. Subjects: A total of 2,000 Qatari subjects aged 18-65 years were approached; 1475 (73.3% agreed to participate. Methods: Prevalence and severity of International Classification of Disease-10 disorders were assessed with the WHO-CIDI (Version 3.0. Results: Of the 1475 participants, 830 (56.3% were females and 645 (43.7% was males. One-third were aged 35-49 years 558 (37.8%. The three most common disorders were major depression disorders (18.31%, any anxiety disorders (17.3%, any mood disorders (16.95%, followed by separation anxiety disorders (15.25%, personality disorder (14.1%. In the present study, prevalence in women was significantly higher than men for the most common psychiatric disorders, specifically generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, specific phobias, obsessive compulsive disorders, posttraumatic disorder, somatization, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, dysthymia, and oppositional defiant disorder. Of the total 20% had only one psychiatric diagnosis and 12% had two disorders, 9.7% respondents with three diagnoses, and finally 4.3% of respondents had four or more diagnoses. Conclusion: One-fifth of all adults who attended the PHCC (20% had at least one psychiatric diagnosis. The CIDI is a useful instrument for psychiatric diagnosis in community

  15. Widening the Psychiatric gaze: reflections on PsychoDoctor, depression, and recent transitions in japanese mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, Ken

    2010-07-01

    Japan has one of the world's highest rates of psychiatric institutionalization, and popular images of mental health care and public attitudes toward mental illness there have been stigmatized for decades. However, there are transitions underway that are reshaping the mental health care landscape as well as affecting public representations of mental illness. Those transitions include attempts to promote community-based care, move away from long-term hospitalization, reduce stigma, increase utilization of services, and bring clinical psychological services under the national health insurance umbrella. This article discusses one cultural representation in which those transitions are brought into relief: a 2002 television series entitled PsychoDoctor that portrayed the clinical practice of a psychiatrist. The article analyzes the messages inherent in the series about the nature of mental illness, the everyday-ness of sufferers, and the expanded repertoire of treatments now available. In so doing, the article suggests that the efforts of progressive clinicians, pharmaceutical companies, and mental health activists to put forth new images of mental illness and mental health care are now having a degree of success in the arena of popular culture.

  16. Mental Health Nurses' Experiences of Caring for Suicidal Patients in Psychiatric Wards: An Emotional Endeavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Julia; Knizek, Birthe Loa; Hjelmeland, Heidi

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate mental health nurses' experiences of recognizing and responding to suicidal behavior/self-harm and dealing with the emotional challenges in the care of potentially suicidal inpatients. Interview data of eight mental health nurses were analyzed by systematic text condensation. The participants reported alertness to patients' suicidal cues, relieving psychological pain and inspiring hope. Various emotions are evoked by suicidal behavior. Mental health nurses seem to regulate their emotions and emotional expressions, and balance involvement and distance to provide good care of patients and themselves. Mental health nurses have an important role and should receive sufficient formal support. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment received, satisfaction with health care services, and psychiatric symptoms 3 months after hospitalization for self-poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimholt Tine K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients who self-poison have high repetition and high mortality rates. Therefore, appropriate follow-up is important. The aims of the present work were to study treatment received, satisfaction with health care services, and psychiatric symptoms after hospitalization for self-poisoning. Methods A cohort of patients who self-poisoned (n = 867 over a period of 1 year received a questionnaire 3 months after discharge. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS, and Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE were used. The participation rate was 28% (n = 242; mean age, 41 years; 66% females. Results Although only 14% of patients were registered without follow-up referrals at discharge, 41% reported no such measures. Overall, satisfaction with treatment was fairly good, although 29% of patients waited more than 3 weeks for their first appointment. A total of 22% reported repeated self-poisoning and 17% cutting. The mean BDI and BHS scores were 23.3 and 10.1, respectively (both moderate to severe. The GSE score was 25.2. BDI score was 25.6 among patients with suicide attempts, 24.9 for appeals, and 20.1 for substance-use-related poisonings. Conclusions Despite plans for follow-up, many patients reported that they did not receive any. The reported frequency of psychiatric symptoms and self-harm behavior indicate that a more active follow-up is needed.

  18. Morbidity of "DSM-IV" Axis I Disorders in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain: Psychiatric Morbidity Linked with Increased Pain and Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kamila S.; Raffa, Susan D.; Jakle, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.; Covino, Nicholas A.; Ullman, Edward; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined current and lifetime psychiatric morbidity, chest pain, and health care utilization in 229 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), angina-like pain in the absence of cardiac etiology. Diagnostic interview findings based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV"; American…

  19. Managing psychiatric emergencies in persons with mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing psychiatric emergencies in persons with mental health issues at a primary care clinic. Rabi Ilemona Ekore. Abstract. Background: Psychiatric emergencies are commonly encountered by the emergency room team where non-mental health specialists are often the first care providers. Materials and Methods: The ...

  20. Toward the integration of comprehensive mental health services in HIV care: an assessment of psychiatric morbidity among HIV-positive individuals in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olagunju, Andrew T; Ogundipe, Olasimbo A; Erinfolami, Adebayo R; Akinbode, Abiola A; Adeyemi, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    Existing evidence from research supports the desirability of integration of mental health services into HIV care in order to mitigate the grave consequences of unattended mental health morbidity among People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). This study aims to find out the burden and pattern of psychiatric disorders that is prevalent among HIV-positive individuals attending a Nigerian-based HIV clinic. The study participants, consisting of 295 HIV-positive adults were recruited using systematic random sampling method. The participants were subjected to questionnaire to elicit demographic profile and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) to screen for probable psychiatric disorders. This was followed by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Non patient (SCID-NP) to diagnose the presence of psychiatric morbidity in any of the participant with a GHQ-28 score ≥5 and 10% of those with GHQ-28 score mental disorder detected as 44 (14.9%) met the DSM-IV Axis 1 diagnosis of major depressive disorders. Anxiety disorders, concurrent Nicotine with Alcohol dependence and cannabis abuse were elicited in 24 (8.1%), 4 (1.3%), and 2 (0.7%) participants, respectively. This study finds a higher burden of psychiatric disorders in PLWHA in comparison to what is obtainable in the general population based on previous research works in similar context. Thus further underscores the need for integration of comprehensive psychiatric services into HIV care. We advocate the support and commitment of key stakeholders in HIV care to the translation of this research-based evidence into practice among PLWHA.

  1. The Role of a Psychiatric Pharmacist in College Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caley, Charles F.; Webber, Donna; Kurland, Michael; Holmes, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Published evidence indicates there is a growing prevalence of psychiatric illnesses on college campuses, and that approximately one quarter of students may be taking psychotropic medications. But attracting and retaining experienced mental health care professionals to college health settings is a challenging task. The psychiatric pharmacist is one…

  2. Language Barriers and Access to Psychiatric Care: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Ai; Suzuki, Takefumi; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to synthesize the available evidence regarding the impact of patients' language proficiency on access to psychiatric care. A systematic literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, and PsycINFO was performed to identify studies published between January 1950 and July 2014 that examined the impact of language proficiency on access to and utilization of psychiatric services in the general population or among patients with psychiatric disorders. The keywords were psychiatry, language, utilization, access, and mental health care. Only articles in English were included. Cross-referencing of the identified articles was also performed. Eighteen articles from four countries were identified, including 13 from the United States, two from Australia, two from Canada, and one from the Netherlands. These reports were generally consistent in showing a clear association between insufficient language proficiency and underutilization of psychiatric services; 15 studies reported that limited language proficiency was significantly associated with less frequent mental health care visits. Only one article showed an inverse relationship between limited language proficiency and use of mental health services, and two articles reported no association. No published data were found on the effects of linguistic interventions on access to mental health care among people with limited language proficiency. It is plausible that limited language proficiency is closely associated with underutilization of psychiatric services. Still, the lack of prospective interventional data clearly highlights the need for further investigations of the impact of language barriers on access to psychiatric care.

  3. Prevalence of sleep disorders and severity of insomnia in psychiatric outpatients attending a tertiary level mental health care facility in Punjab, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Gargi; Bajaj, Vikrant; Goyal, B L; Mukherjee, Nirmalya

    2018-02-01

    Sleep disorders are frequently associated with psychiatric disorders and can be both cause and effect of the same. To study the prevalence of sleep disorders and the severity of insomnia in psychiatric outpatients. 500 patients were randomly selected using purposive sampling from patients attending a tertiary level mental health care facility were evaluated for the presence of any sleep disorder along with their sleep quality. In patients having insomnia, severity of the same was determined. 83.4% of the population had some type of sleep disorder. Symptoms of insomnia were reported by 78.2% of the population and 29.2% had moderate to severe insomnia. 78.4% of the population had poor sleep quality. Significant difference was noted among the different psychiatric groups when insomnia severity index (ISI) was compared. In multinomial logistic regression, chance of severe insomnia is more if the diagnosis is depression, but less if mania or ocd, compared to psychosis. This study was the first in India to assess the prevalence of sleep disorders in psychiatric outpatients. Our study underscores the importance of careful evaluation of sleep problems for proper management of the patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Mental Health and Political Violence. Care of Psychiatric Patient or Acknowledge of the Micropolitics of the Subject].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias López, Beatriz Elena

    2013-09-01

    Political violence is a global phenomenon, especially in low- to middle-income countries. This phenomenon increasingly involves civilians. This situation is a priority in collective health, as it produces multiple and complex effects on physical and mental health, and human and social ecosystems. The objective of this article is to present the main tendencies that coexist in research and practice on the understanding of the effects of political violence on mental health. The biomedical approach of psychiatric trauma and the wider perspective of social sciences, which incorporate the collective dimension of these effects, are also taken into account. Review of research determines the relationship with political violence / collective violence and mental health in international databases and national documentation centers, academics and NGOs within the last decade of the twentieth century, and the first of this century under the headings of trauma, war, armed conflict and political violence. The limitations of general explanations of psychiatric trauma in understanding the complex effects of political violence on mental health are shown. The constructs that incorporate social and collective dimensions increase this comprehension of these effects and knowledge of mental health, both conceptually as methodologically. In a political violence context it urgent to change attitudes about mental health. It is a way to overcome the biomedical, individualistic, and short term epidemiology, and to remove medication from mental health. This means acknowledging that people who experience the effects of political violence effects are not sick. They are powerful people who can transform and produce the life they dream of. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. A modern history of psychiatric-mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Laura C; Scharer, Kathleen M

    2015-02-01

    This paper discusses the progression of developments in psychiatric-mental health nursing from the 1960s to the present. The 1960s were a time of shortage of psychiatric APRNs, with legislation expanding the availability of mental health services. We find ourselves in a similar time with 7 million new health insurance enrollees, because of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The expansion of health insurance coverage comes at a time when some colleges of nursing are closing master's programs in psychiatric-mental health, in lieu of the DNP mandate from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Is history repeating itself? Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychiatric Nurses' Views on Caring: Patients and Canine Companions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Camille

    2017-03-01

    Psychiatric nurses are expert care providers for individuals with mental health needs. The art of caring spans across multiple species, is important to understand, and is universal whether intentions are toward individuals or animals. Pets are often cared for and viewed as family members. The current research examined psychiatric nurses' views on the similarities and differences of caring for patients and their pet dogs. Twenty-five nurses were interviewed. Similarities of caring for patients and canines included trusting relationships, companionship, daily basic needs, and improved communication through monitored body language. Differences in caring included personal expectations, unconditional love, and professional boundaries. Understanding the concepts of caring for patients and pet dogs will provide the opportunity for insight into familial versus professional relationships, improve communication with others, and strengthen the human-animal bond. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(3), 46-52.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Profile of children placed in residential psychiatric program: Association with delinquency, involuntary mental health commitment, and reentry into care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yampolskaya, Svetlana; Mowery, Debra; Dollard, Norín

    2014-05-01

    This study examined characteristics and profiles of youth receiving services in 1 of Florida's Medicaid-funded residential mental health treatment programs--State Inpatient Psychiatric Program (SIPP)--between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2008 (N=1,432). Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to classify youth, and 3 classes were identified: Children With Multiple Needs, Children With No Caregivers, and Abused Children With Substantial Maltreatment History. The results of LCA showed that Children With Multiple Needs experienced the greatest risk for adverse outcomes. Compared with youth in the other 2 classes, these children were more likely to get readmitted to SIPP, more likely to become involved with the juvenile justice system, and more likely to experience involuntary mental health assessments. Implications of the findings are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  8. Burden of psychiatric morbidity among attendees of a secondary level hospital in Northern India: Implications for integration of mental health care at subdistrict level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Partha; Sagar, Rajesh; Malhotra, Sumit; Kant, Shashi

    2017-01-01

    There is little information available on the type, pattern, trend, and demographic differentials of psychiatric cases attending a subdistrict level facility in India. Our objectives were to describe the sociodemographic profile of the patients availing the psychiatric outpatient department services and document the diagnosis. This study is based on a retrospective analysis of routinely recorded administrative data collected during psychiatry consultations that took place between January 2010 and June 2014, at the subdistrict level hospital, Ballabgarh, Faridabad district, Haryana, Northern India. The data were abstracted in Microsoft Excel, scrutinized for duplicates, and cleaned in terms of the International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision coding. Descriptive analysis was done for dependent variables and continuous variables were compared using independent t-test. A total of 2806 people (new registrations) were provided psychiatric consultations between January 2010 and June 2014. The mean age of males was 33.7 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 32.9, 34.5) and of females was 35.6 years (95% CI, 34.9, 36.3). Neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders (F40-F48) comprised the major category of diagnoses with 661 cases (24%), followed by unspecified mental disorders (F99) with 528 cases (19%), mood (affective) disorders (F30-F39) with 448 cases (16%), and episodic and paroxysmal disorders (G40-G47) with 334 cases (12%). We reported an increase in level and trend in the monthly attendance of patients who required psychiatric at a secondary care hospital in Northern India. We suggest that setting up of mental health units only at district hospital might not be a sufficient health system's approach as has been envisaged under the District Mental Health Program.

  9. Stigma experienced by persons under psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struch, Naomi; Levav, Itzhak; Shereshevsky, Yechiel; Baidani-Auerbach, Alona; Lachman, Max; Daniel, Noga; Zehavi, Tali

    2008-01-01

    Mental health-related stigma causes suffering and interferes with care and social inclusion. This study explored stigma as experienced by mental health service users. Particular attention is given to their use of coping mechanisms. Interviews were held with 167 adults undergoing outpatient psychiatric treatment; two-thirds of them had previously been hospitalized. Examples of frequency of stigma-related situations included the following: Over half of service users expect people to refuse to have a person with a mental disorder as a co-worker or neighbor, or to engage in other types of social contact. A sizeable group acknowledged that they feared or had experienced rejection. A third of respondents reported they feared or had experienced inappropriate treatment by their doctor. Service users utilize several coping mechanisms to deal with stigma, among them: education, withdrawal, secrecy, and positive distinctiveness. Although we studied a convenience sample of service users, our findings provide sufficient basis to suggest different types of intervention, i.e., to address stigma in the course of treatment in the specialist settings, to promote the establishment of mutual support groups, and to raise family physicians' awareness with regard to the stigma that may be present when caring for persons with mental disorders.

  10. Onconeural Antibodies in Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæther, Sverre Georg; Schou, Morten; Stoecker, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorders associated with onconeural antibodies often appear with neuropsychiatric symptoms. To study the prevalence of onconeural antibodies in patients admitted to acute psychiatric inpatient care, the serum of 585 such patients was tested for antibodies targeting MOG......, GLRA1B, DPPX, GRM1, GRM5, DNER, Yo, ZIC4, GAD67, amphiphysin, CV2, Hu, Ri, Ma2, and recoverin. Only one sample was positive (antirecoverin IgG). The present findings suggest that serum onconeural antibody positivity is rare among patients acutely admitted for inpatient psychiatric care. The clinical...

  11. Psychiatric disorders and treatment among newly homeless young adults with histories of foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ronald G; Hasin, Deborah

    2012-09-01

    Although foster care placement is often preceded by stressful events such as child abuse, foster care itself often exposes children to additional severe stressors. A history of foster care, as well as the childhood abuse that often precedes it, is common among homeless young adults. This study examined whether a history of foster care was associated with psychiatric disorders, prior psychiatric counseling, prescription of psychiatric medications, and prior psychiatric hospitalization among newly homeless young adults. A consecutive sample of 423 adults aged 18 to 21 years who sought emergency shelter for the first time between October 1, 2007, and February 29, 2008, were assessed at intake. Logistic regression analyses determined the associations between foster care and any psychiatric disorder (affective, anxiety, personality, and psychotic) and psychiatric treatment. The analyses adjusted for demographic characteristics, childhood abuse, substance use, prior arrest, unemployment, lack of high school diploma, and histories of psychiatric disorders and drug abuse among biological relatives. Homeless young adults with histories of foster care were 70% more likely than those without such histories to report any psychiatric disorder. They were more than twice as likely to have received mental health counseling for a psychiatric disorder, to have been prescribed psychiatric medication, and to have been hospitalized for psychiatric problems. Histories of foster care among homeless young adults should trigger screening for psychiatric disorders to aid in the provision of treatment (counseling, medication, and hospitalization) tailored to the psychiatric needs of this highly vulnerable population.

  12. A critical view of transgender health care in Germany: Psychopathologizing gender identity - Symptom of 'disordered' psychiatric/psychological diagnostics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güldenring, Annette

    2015-01-01

    After explaining the essential trans* terminology, I offer a short historical overview of the way health care has dealt with the subject of gender, trans* and health in different times. In the third section, I compare the world's most important diagnostic manuals, namely the International statistical classification of diseases and related health problems (ICD) and the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM), i.e. their criteria for 'gender identity disorders' (ICD-10) and 'gender dysphoria' (DSM-5). The fourth section branch out the factors which influence every diagnostic conception - of no matter whom - in the health care system. The last section discusses the implications resulting from this diagnostic dilemma for the health situation of gender nonconforming people.

  13. [Quality of the psychiatric care in social welfare houses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopińiska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the research is a diagnosis of the level of the psychiatric help in social welfare houses. The research was conducted in the form of a questionnaire. The questionnaire was sent at random to 60 houses of social welfare for people with psychic disorders on the whole territory of Poland. 37 responses were received. All the houses in question provide their inhabitants with regular contact with a psychiatrist, 86% inside the social welfare house. 92% of inhabitants have no problems with obtaining referral to psychiatric hospital, however, 70% inhabitants of the social welfare houses have problems with being admitted to hospital. Half of the houses in question use direct compulsion. All the places studied possess therapeutic-caring teams, in 97% of the houses treatment is based on the individual plan. 14% of the houses do not allow the patients to have access to the medical documentation concerning them. In every house integrated pharmacotherapy is used together with various forms of therapy, 76% of the houses involve the family of the patient into the therapeutic process. 78% of those studied note the existence of different factors reducing the quality of the psychiatric care offered. The level of psychiatric care in the social welfare houses is adjusted to the health needs of the patients in the majority of the houses studied. However, the inhabitants have to face the difficulties connected with being admitted to psychiatric hospitals and can have problems with gaining access to medical documentation concerning them. Treatment and rehabilitation of psychic disorders is based on individualized and multi-directional therapeutic interaction. Preparation of the staff providing psychiatric care, especially therapeutic-caring ones, is diversified in individual houses (half of the therapeutic teams do not have a psychiatrist, whose presence seems to be indispensable). The most essential factors reducing the quality of psychiatric care include insufficient financial

  14. Religion and spirituality in psychiatric care: looking back, looking ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnlein, James K

    2006-12-01

    Cultural psychiatry has been an important contributor to the enhanced dialogue between psychiatry and religion in the past couple of decades. During this time, religion and spirituality have become more prominent in mainstream psychiatry in a number of areas of study and clinical care, including refugee and immigrant health, trauma and loss, psychotherapy, collaboration with clergy, bioethics, and psychiatric research. In looking towards the future, there is a great deal of promise for future enhancement of the study of religion and spirituality in psychiatric education, research, and clinical care.

  15. Conceptions of mobile emergency service health professionals concerning psychiatric emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Bonfada

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Under the Brazilian Psychiatric Reformation, assistance to psychological seizures represents a challenge for the emergency services. Therefore, the objective of this paper is the analysis of the conceptions of health professionals who work at the Mobile Emergency Service in Natal on psychiatric emergency care. This paper is, then, a qualitative study that used interviews as tools for collecting information. By using thematic analysis, the speeches were grouped into three categories: the stigma on patients and the professionals' fear of services interventions in psychiatric emergencies; having psychiatric emergencies regarded as harmful to patients and others' security; psychiatric emergencies being taken as patients' aggressiveness or severe depression. The data collected indicate that the interviewed professionals' ideas are supported by elements associated with the ideology that insanity implies social segregation and dangerousness. Thus, the survey prompted reflection on relevant issues to the process of psychiatric reformation implementation.

  16. Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment for non-psychotic chronic patients and nurses in outpatient mental health care : A controlled pilotstudy on feasibility and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Schene; A. Smit; A. Kaasenbrood; B. van Meijel; G. Hutschemaekers; Bauke van Koekkoek

    2012-01-01

    In psychiatric care professionals perceive some patients as ‘difficult’, especially patients with long-term non-psychotic disorders. For these patients few evidence-based treatments exist. An intervention program, Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment (ICPT), was developed by the authors. It

  17. Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment for non-psychotic chronic patients and nurses in outpatient mental health care: A controlled pilot study on feasibility and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Smit; A. Schene; A. Kaasenbrood; G. Hutschemaekers; prof Berno van Meijel; B. Koekkoek

    2011-01-01

    In psychiatric care professionals perceive some patients as 'difficult', especially patients with long-term non-psychotic disorders. For these patients few evidence-based treatments exist. An intervention program, Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment (ICPT), was developed by the authors. It

  18. Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment for non-psychotic chronic patients and nurses in outpatient mental health care: A controlled pilot study on feasibility and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koekkoek, B.W.; Meijel, B.K.G. van; Schene, A.H.; Smit, A.; Kaasenbrood, A.J.A.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In psychiatric care professionals perceive some patients as 'difficult', especially patients with long-term non-psychotic disorders. For these patients few evidence-based treatments exist. An intervention program, Interpersonal Community Psychiatric Treatment (ICPT), was developed by the

  19. Burden of Misconception in Sexual Health Care Setting: A Cross-Sectional Investigation among the Patients Attending a Psychiatric Sex Clinic of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Yasir Arafat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bangladesh is a country in South Asia with about 160 million people and achieved health related Millennium Development Goals (MDG significantly. But sexual health is still an untapped issue with predominant myths and misconception. Objective. We aimed to look into the proportions of patients attending sexual health care services due to misconceptions. Methods. The descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted among 110 patients attending Psychiatric Sex Clinic (PSC of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University. Respondents were included in the study with convenient sampling from November 2016 to March 2017. Data were collected through face-to-face interview with semistructured preformed, pretested questionnaire and analyzed by SPSS software 16.0 version. Results. Most of the patients (93% were male, 60% were married, 62% were urban habitant, 42% were under grade 10, and 33% were service holder. Total 55% of the patients had misconceptions and 29% visited only for misconception; 14% had Premature Ejaculation; and 12% had desire disorder. 32% of the patients had psychiatric disorders and among them depression was most common, 13%. Conclusion. Positive openness in sexual health and appropriate strategy should be taken to improve the quality of sexual life as well as reduce the misconception in the people of Bangladesh.

  20. Relationship between national mental health expenditure and quality of care in longer-term psychiatric and social care facilities in Europe: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Tatiana Taylor; Killaspy, Helen; King, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Background It is not known whether increased mental health expenditure is associated with better outcomes. Aims To estimate the association between national mental health expenditure and (a) quality of longer-term mental healthcare, (b) service users' ratings of that care in eight European countries. Method National mental health expenditure (per cent of health budget spent on mental health) was calculated from international sources. Multilevel models were developed to assess associations with quality of care and service user experiences of care using ratings of 171 facility managers and 1429 service users. Results Significant positive associations were found between mental health spend and (a) six of seven quality of care domains; and (b) service user autonomy and experiences of care. Conclusions Greater national mental health expenditure was associated with higher quality of care and better service user experience. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  1. Quality of Publicly-Funded Outpatient Specialty Mental Health Care for Common Childhood Psychiatric Disorders in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zima, Bonnie T.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Knapp, Penny; Ladd, Heather; Tang, Lingqi; Duan, Naihua; Wallace, Peggy; Rosenblatt, Abram; Landsverk, John; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To describe the documented adherence to quality indicators for the outpatient care of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, and major depression for children in public mental health clinics and to explore how adherence varies by child and clinic characteristics. Method: A statewide, longitudinal cohort study of 813…

  2. eHealth provides a novel opportunity to exploit the advantages of the Nordic countries in psychiatric genetic research, building on the public health care system, biobanks, and registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Ole A

    2017-07-07

    Nordic countries have played an important role in the recent progress in psychiatric genetics, both with large well-characterized samples and expertise. The Nordic countries have research advantages due to the organization of their societies, including system of personal identifiers, national health registries with information about diseases, treatment and prescriptions, and a public health system with geographical catchment areas. For psychiatric genetic research, the large biobanks and population surveys are a unique added value. Further, the population is motivated to participate in research, and there is a trust in the institutions of the society. These factors have been important for Nordic contributions to biomedical research, and particularly psychiatric genetics. In the era of eHealth, the situation seems even more advantageous for Nordic countries. The system with public health care makes it easy to implement national measures, and most of the Nordic health care sector is already based on electronic information. The potential advantages regarding informed consent, large scale recruitment and follow-up, and longitudinal cohort studies are tremendous. New precision medicine approaches can be tested within the health care system, with an integrated approach, using large hospitals or regions of the country as a test beds. However, data protection and legal framework have to be clarified. In order to succeed, it is important to keep the people's trust, and maintain the high ethical standards and systems for secure data management. Then the full potential of the Nordic countries can be leveraged in the new era of precision medicine including psychiatric genetics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The importance of relationships in mental health care: A qualitative study of service users' experiences of psychiatric hospital admission in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slade Mike

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a number of studies have looked at life on service users' experiences of life on psychiatric wards, no research exists that have approached these experiences from the user perspective since the introduction of community care. Methods This user-led study uses a participatory approach to develop an understanding of the processes and themes which define the user experience of hospitalisation. Nineteen service users who had all had inpatient stays in psychiatric hospitals in London were interviewed in the community. Results Relationships formed the core of service users' experiences. Three further codes, treatment, freedom and environment defined the role of hospital and its physical aspects. Themes of communication, safety, trust, coercion, and cultural competency contributed to the concept of relationships. Conclusion Relationships with an individual which comprised effective communication, cultural sensitivity, and the absence of coercion resulted in that person being attributed with a sense of trust. This resulted in the patient experiencing the hospital as a place of safety in terms of risk from other patients and staff. Barriers to positive relationships included ineffective and negative communication, a lack of trust, a lack of safety in terms of staff as ineffective in preventing violence, and as perpetrators themselves, and the use of coercion by staff. This unique perspective both acts as a source of triangulation with previous studies and highlights the importance of the therapeutic relationship in providing a safe and therapeutic milieu for the treatment of people with acute mental health problems.

  4. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Correspondence between Mental Health Clinician Report and Structured Parent Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnick, Nicole; Chlebowski, Colby; Baker-Ericzén, Mary; Dyson, Margaret; Garland, Ann; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Publicly funded mental health services are critical in caring for children with autism spectrum disorder. Accurate identification of psychiatric comorbidity is necessary for effective mental health treatment. Little is known about psychiatric diagnosis for this population in routine mental health care. This study (1) examined correspondence…

  5. Psychiatric Nursing Care for Adult Survivors of Child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thóra van der Hafsteinsdóttir; Cokky van der Venne; Yvonne van der Zalm; Nienke Kool; Willem Nugteren; prof Berno van Meijel

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to

  6. [Kinshicho Model for Community Care by Multifunctional Vertical Integration of Psychiatric Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The future of psychiatric community care in Japan requires a medical team for outpatient care to offer support and take responsibility for a region; respecting human rights and supporting high risk patients who have concluded a long-period of hospitalized or repeated involuntary commitment, and for people who suffer from social withdraws over a long period of time. There are over 3,000 private psychiatric outpatient clinics in Japan. Over 400 of them are multifunctional psychiatric outpatient clinics that provide daycare services and outreach activities. In the future, if systematized those clinics entrusted by an administrative organ with performing as a "community mental health center". Multifunctional vertical integration of psychiatric care is possible in Japan to create a catchment area with 24 hours phone service and continued free access.

  7. Nursing diagnoses related to psychiatric adult inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauenfelder, Fritz; van Achterberg, Theo; Müller Staub, Maria

    2018-02-01

    To detect the prevalence of NANDA-I diagnoses and possible relationships between those and patient characteristics such as gender, age, medical diagnoses and psychiatric specialty/setting. There is a lack on studies about psychiatric inpatient characteristics and possible relationships among these characteristics with nursing diagnoses. A quantitative-descriptive, cross-sectional, completed data sampling study was performed. The data were collected from the electronic patient record system. Frequencies for the social-demographic data, the prevalence of the NANDA-I diagnoses and the explanatory variables were calculated. In total, 410 nursing phenomena were found representing 85 different NANDA-I diagnoses in 312 patients. The NANDA-I diagnosis "Ineffective Coping" was the most frequently stated diagnosis followed by "Ineffective Health Maintenance," "Hopelessness" and "Risk for Other-Directed Violence". Men were more frequently affected by the diagnoses "Ineffective Coping," "Hopelessness," "Risk for Self-Directed Violence," "Defensive Coping" and "Risk for Suicide," whereas the diagnoses "Insomnia," "Chronic Confusion," "Chronic Low Self-Esteem" and "Anxiety" were more common in women. Patients under the age of 45 years were more frequently affected by "Chronic Low Self-Esteem" and "Anxiety" than older patients. "Ineffective Coping" was the most prevalent diagnosis by patients with mental disorders due to psychoactive substance use. Patients with schizophrenia were primarily affected by the diagnoses "Ineffective Coping," "Impaired Social Interaction" and "Chronic Low Self-Esteem." This study demonstrates the complexity and diversity of nursing care in inpatient psychiatric settings. Patients' gender, age and psychiatric diagnoses and settings are a key factor for specific nursing diagnosis. There are tendencies for relationships between certain nursing diagnosis and patient characteristics in psychiatric adult inpatients. This enhances the specific, extended

  8. Improving the physical health in long-term psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Peter; Davidsen, A.S.; Killian, R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with psychiatric illness have increased somatic morbidity and increased mortality. Knowledge of how to integrate the prevention and care of somatic illness into the treatment of psychiatric patients is required. The aims of this study were to investigate whether an intervention...... programme to improve physical health is effective. METHODS: An extension of the European Network for Promoting the Health of Residents in Psychiatric and Social Care Institutions (HELPS) project further developed as a 12-month controlled cluster-randomized intervention study in the Danish centre. Waist...... circumference was a proxy of unhealthy body fat in view of the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: Waist circumference was 108 cm for men and 108 cm for women. Controlled for cluster randomization, sex, age, and body fat, the intervention group showed a small...

  9. [Compulsory referral to institutionalised psychiatric care and its organizational structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollmer, E

    1998-11-01

    Nation-wide German Counseling Review regarding psychiatry in 1975 yielded a reasonable reform of psychiatric care in Germany. Especially outpatient and complementary caring concepts promoted the integration of psychiatric patients in their communities. However, this development was paralled by an increase of involuntary hospitalisations in Northrine-Westphalia. Within ten years involuntary hospitalisations doubled in some communities. These findings contrast with recent concepts of a complex community psychiatry with improved caring according to humanitarian principles and those of non-violence. These specific settings must be taken into consideration in developing community psychiatry. The report presents the activity of the working group concerning community psychiatry in Northrine-Westphalia. During its annual meetings a standardised and valid documentation concerning hospitalisation procedures in the communities as a means of quality control was discussed repeatedly. Taking into consideration the data of this survey the complex mechanisms leading to an increase of involuntary hospitalisations becomes understandable. Health reporting on a community level on the topic of involuntary hospitalisations is an important tool for discussion of its complex psychosocial and administrative mechanisms. Discussion about standard procedures in psychiatric emergency care service will thus be enabled.

  10. Psychiatric Genomics and Mental Health Treatment: Setting the Ethical Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Camillia; Dunn, Michael; Parker, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Realizing the benefits of translating psychiatric genomics research into mental health care is not straightforward. The translation process gives rise to ethical challenges that are distinctive from challenges posed within psychiatric genomics research itself, or that form part of the delivery of clinical psychiatric genetics services. This article outlines and considers three distinct ethical concerns posed by the process of translating genomic research into frontline psychiatric practice and policy making. First, the genetic essentialism that is commonly associated with the genomics revolution in health care might inadvertently exacerbate stigma towards people with mental disorders. Secondly, the promises of genomic medicine advance a narrative of individual empowerment. This narrative could promote a fatalism towards patients' biology in ways that function in practice to undermine patients' agency and autonomy, or, alternatively, a heightened sense of subjective genetic responsibility could become embedded within mental health services that leads to psychosocial therapeutic approaches and the clinician-patient therapeutic alliance being undermined. Finally, adopting a genomics-focused approach to public mental health risks shifting attention away from the complex causal relationships between inequitable socio-economic, political, and cultural structures and negative mental health outcomes. The article concludes by outlining a number of potential pathways for future ethics research that emphasizes the importance of examining appropriate translation mechanisms, the complementarity between genetic and psychosocial models of mental disorder, the implications of genomic information for the clinician-patient relationship, and funding priorities and resource allocation decision making in mental health.

  11. [Psychiatric and Psychotherapeutic Care of Refugees by Reference of a Large Psychiatric Care Hospital in Western Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffrath, Jonas; Schmitz-Buhl, Mario; Gün, Ali Kemal; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2017-04-01

    Medical and psychological care of refugees is among the most important current challenges in German health politics. Work with patients from this heterogeneous group who have often faced severe stress before, during and after their migration is currently based on a thin data foundation. Based on introductory information on current knowledge concerning psychiatric morbidity of refugees this article presents the psychiatric care of refugees at LVR Clinics Cologne - a psychiatric specialty hospital situated in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. A sample of 239 cases of refugee patients who were referred to in- and outpatient departments of the LVR Clinics Cologne between April 2015 and March 2016 are evaluated in respect of diagnoses, admission modalities and socio-demographic variables. The majority of principal diagnoses (40.2%) belong to the group of stress-related and somatoform disorders (F4 in ICD-10). Mood disorders (F3 in ICD-10) represented 31.0%, followed by mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (F1 in ICD-10) with 15.1%. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was the most prevalent diagnose (13.0%). Among the 29 countries of the patients' origin Afghanistan (10,0%), Serbia (9.6%) and Kosovo (8.8%) were the most abundant. The diagnoses and the high rate of acute psychiatric events reflect the massive psychological pressure of the patients. The important role of interpreters and mediators specialized in language and integration in the treatment process is emphasized. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Caring conversations - psychiatric patients' narratives about suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, Lennart; Lindström, Unni A

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to increase and deepen the understanding of how psychiatric patients in conversations with nurses narrate their experience of suffering. Data were obtained in the years 2001-2002 by audio recording of 20 individual caring conversations between eight patients and three psychiatric nurses at a psychiatric outpatient unit in Sweden. Before the data were gathered the study was approved by a local research ethics committee. The methodology is inspired by the hermeneutics of Paul Ricoeur. The data is given a naïve reading which is followed by two structural analyses which explain the text. Finally, the structural analyses and the pre-understanding are confronted in a critical reflection. In the patients' narratives, suffering was at first concealed under a façade that helps the patient to cope with suffering and with shame. As they moved along to a turning point, something happened that made them able to risk everything, i.e. their very selves, but also gave them the possibility of regaining vital parts of themselves that where lost when the façade was constructed. As they took the suffering upon themselves, they grew to be fully visible as human beings and healing was possible as a re-establishment of the interpersonal bridge. This not only meant that the sufferer became open for relationships with others or an abstract other, but also that an opening in the relationship with themselves occurred. If psychiatric patients are allowed to narrate freely they develop different plot structures, which can either hide or reveal suffering. Patients who could establish an answer to the why-question of suffering could also interpret their suffering in a way that enabled growth and reconciliation. In order to do so, they had to abandon the shelter of the façade and confront suffering and shame. This turning point opened them up to life-sustaining relationships with themselves as well as with abstract and concrete others.

  13. Care zoning in a psychiatric intensive care unit: strengthening ongoing clinical risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Antony; Drinkwater, Vincent; Lewin, Terry J

    2014-03-01

    To implement and evaluate the care zoning model in an eight-bed psychiatric intensive care unit and, specifically, to examine the model's ability to improve the documentation and communication of clinical risk assessment and management. Care zoning guides nurses in assessing clinical risk and planning care within a mental health context. Concerns about the varying quality of clinical risk assessment prompted a trial of the care zoning model in a psychiatric intensive care unit within a regional mental health facility. The care zoning model assigns patients to one of 3 'zones' according to their clinical risk, encouraging nurses to document and implement targeted interventions required to manage those risks. An implementation trial framework was used for this research to refine, implement and evaluate the impact of the model on nurses' clinical practice within the psychiatric intensive care unit, predominantly as a quality improvement initiative. The model was trialled for three months using a pre- and postimplementation staff survey, a pretrial file audit and a weekly file audit. Informal staff feedback was also sought via surveys and regular staff meetings. This trial demonstrated improvement in the quality of mental state documentation, and clinical risk information was identified more accurately. There was limited improvement in the quality of care planning and the documentation of clinical interventions. Nurses' initial concerns over the introduction of the model shifted into overall acceptance and recognition of the benefits. The results of this trial demonstrate that the care zoning model was able to improve the consistency and quality of risk assessment information documented. Care planning and evaluation of associated outcomes showed less improvement. Care zoning remains a highly applicable model for the psychiatric intensive care unit environment and is a useful tool in guiding nurses to carry out routine patient risk assessments. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons

  14. Characteristics of Foster Care History as Risk Factors for Psychiatric Disorders Among Youth in Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpych, Nathanael J; Courtney, Mark E

    2017-03-02

    This study evaluates foster care history characteristics as risk factors for psychopathology. We examine characteristics of youths' foster care histories separately and as a gestalt (i.e., identification of latent classes). Six mental health disorders and lifetime suicide attempt were assessed via in-person interviews with a representative sample of older adolescents in California foster care (n = 706). Information on respondents' foster care histories were obtained from state administrative data. Half of the sample (47.3%) screened positive for a psychiatric disorder and 1/4 (25.2%) had attempted suicide. When assessed individually, placement instability predicted posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), alcohol and substance use problems, and suicide attempt. Primary placement type and maltreatment type were also associated with 1 or more psychiatric disorders. When foster care characteristics were considered in concert, 6 latent classes were identified: veterans, returners, treated stayers, midrangers, late stayers, and disquieted drifters. Three latent classes (returners, late stayers, and disquieted drifters) were at increased risk of psychiatric problems relative to 1 or more of the other latent classes. Both separate foster care characteristics and the gestalt of youths' foster care histories identified risks of psychiatric problems. Results from these analyses can inform the development of risk assessment tools. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Abusive experiences and psychiatric morbidity in women primary care attenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coid, Jeremy; Petruckevitch, Ann; Chung, Wai-Shan; Richardson, Jo; Moorey, Stirling; Feder, Gene

    2003-10-01

    Abusive experiences in childhood and adulthood increase risks of psychiatric morbidity in women and independently increase risks of further abuse over the lifetime. It is unclear which experiences are most damaging. To measure lifetime prevalence of abusive experiences and psychiatric morbidity, and to analyse associations in women primary care attenders. A cross-sectional, self-report survey of 1207 women attending 13 surgeries in the London borough of Hackney, UK. Independent associations between demographic measures, abusive experiences and psychiatric outcome were established using logistic regression. Childhood sexual abuse had few associations with adult mental health measures, in contrast to physical abuse. Sexual assault in adulthood was associated with substance misuse; rape with anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder but not substance misuse. Domestic violence showed strongest associations with most mental health measures, increased for experiences in the past year. Abuse in childhood and adulthood have differential effects on mental health; effects are increased by recency and severity. Women should be routinely questioned about ongoing and recent experiences as well as childhood.

  16. Psychiatric classification, stigma, and mental health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afr J Psychiatry 2013;16:227-229. African Journal of Psychiatry • July 2013. 227. Work on DSM-5 and ICD-11, and the simultaneous development of alternative approaches to psychiatric classification such as the Research Domain Criteria of the. National Institute of Mental Health1, has led to renewed interest of colleagues ...

  17. Possibilities and limits of multiprofessional attention in the care of psychiatric emergencies: analytical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Lima de Paula

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Goal: to analyze the possibilities and limits of multiprofessional care in the attention to psychiatric emergencies. Method: it is an analytical study of the type integrative review of the comprehensive literature. Searches were conducted in the Latin American and Caribbean Literature (LILACS and Nursing Database (BDENF databases and in the ScieLo Virtual Library, with the use of Descriptors in Health Sciences (DECs: “Emergency Services, Psychiatric”, “Forensic Psychiatry”, “Psychiatric Rehabilitation”, in the period from 2007 to 2017. Results: after data analysis, two thematic categories emerged: “Possibilities and limits in multiprofessional care for patients in crisis” and “The continuity of care to the patient in crisis by the multiprofessional team”. The studies point out fragility in the management of the multiprofessional team of care to the patients in psychiatric crisis. Therefore, in the substitutive services to the psychiatric hospital, it is necessary to strengthen the care and bonding tools for continuity of treatment after the cases of psychiatric emergency of these patients. Conclusion: this research provided a deepening of the knowledge regarding the challenges of the multiprofessional team in the care of analytical psychiatric emergencies and in relation to the patient in crisis, considering the main multiprofessional actions, understanding how this approach is done and patient follow-up. Descriptors: Emergency Services, Psychiatric. Forensic Psychiatry. Psychiatric Rehabilitation.

  18. The Rise of Mental Health Nursing : A History of Psychiatric Care in Dutch Asylums, 1890-1920

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, Geertje

    2003-01-01

    The Rise of Mental Health Nursing onderzoekt de tegenstrijdigheden in de op het ziekenhuis georiënteerde inrichtingszorg, die rond 1900 opkwam. Bovendien illustreert het boek de sociale complexiteit van de psychiatrische zorg. Op basis van archiefmateriaal uit vier Nederlandse psychiatrische

  19. [Psychiatric care in South Tyrol -- an example of coordination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pycha, Roger; Conca, Andreas

    2006-02-01

    The Tyrol's division after the two World Wars cut the South Tyrol off from every relevant aspect of psychiatric care. First attempts towards a community psychiatric system weren't sufficiently sustained by politicians. Only in the 90 ty's was the association of relatives of mentally ill people able to sensitize public and politicians to the need for an adequate psychiatric care system. Since 1996 an excellent psychiatric plan has been in existence, 80 % of which has to date been able to be put into practice. Since 1997 mentally ill people have founded their own self-help-organization and influenced the planning process.

  20. [Towards a history of the family care of psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Inserting adults with psychic problems into families has recently been practiced in various European countries and also in Italy, where some mental health departments support such families. Beyond the well known story of Gheel, the etero and omofamily care of psychiatric patients has a forgotten history. On the basis of unexplored and exceptionally rich sources from the archives of the asylums in Florence, as well as of the Province di Florence, which funded assistance to the mentally ill--this research focuses on the subsidized "domestic custody" of hundreds of psychiatric patients, who had already been institutionalized. Beginning in 1866, outboarding was supported by the provincial administration in Florence with the collaboration of the asylum medical direction. In the late 19th C. and in the early 20th C. prestigious psychiatrists sought alternatives to the institutionalisation. These alternatives involved varied participants in a community (the patients and their families, the administrators and the medical specialists, the neighborhood and the police). The families played a special role that historians of the psychiatry exclusively dedicated to the insane asylums have not really seen. The role of the families in the interaction with the psychiatric staff is not, even on a historiographical level, simply an additional and marginal chapter of the practices and of the culture of the mental health. These archival evidence contradicts some common places on the past of the Italian psychiatry before 1978, and provokes new reflections of possible relevance to the present.

  1. Nurses' caring and empathy in Jordanian psychiatric hospitals: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadidi, Majdi M B; Abdalrahim, Maysoon S; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    Nurses working in psychiatric hospitals need to acquire the skills of therapeutic communication and empathy, and have higher levels of caring. The present study aims to investigate the level of caring and empathy among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was utilized to collect data from 205 nurses recruited from three psychiatric hospitals in Jordan. The Background Information Questionnaire, Modified Caring Dimensions Inventory, and Toronto Empathy Questionnaire were administered to the recruited participants. The findings revealed that the sampled nurses had a high level of caring and empathy. Significant correlations were found between caring and having a specialized training in mental health nursing, and having organizational and managerial support. However, no significant correlations were found between empathy and participants' characteristics. Specialized training in mental health nursing, having organizational and managerial support, and empathy were found predictors for caring. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. Psychiatric Mental Health Leadership at the Tipping Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Delaney, Kathleen

    2015-05-01

    Currently the United States health care system is responding to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and the vision it contains for health care transformation. Along with sweeping changes in service delivery and payment structures, health care reform has championed concepts such as patient-centered care, integrated care, and wellness. Although these are not new ideas, their adaptation, in both ideology and service design has been accelerated in the context for reform. Indeed they are reaching a tipping point; the point where ideas gain wide acceptance and become influential trends. Although psychiatric mental health (PMH) nurses have been active in wellness, patient-centered care, and integrated care, at the current time they seem to be situated peripheral to these national trends. Increased presence of PMH nurses will facilitate their contribution to the development of these concepts within service structures and interventions. To increase knowledge and appreciation of PMH nurses' practice and unique perspective on these issues, leaders are needed who will connect and effectively communicate PMH nursing efforts to the broader health care arena. This article outlines the events that created a context for these three concepts (patient-centered care, wellness, and integrated care), and I suggest why they have reached a tipping point and discuss the need for greater PMH nursing presence in the American national dialog and the role of nursing leaders in facilitating these connections.

  3. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    , developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups....... For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2014, 11 9740 individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were...... of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field...

  4. Shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care: The experiences and expectations of General Practitioners in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Agyapong, Vincent Israel Opoku

    2012-04-17

    Objective. The study aims to explore the views of General Practitioners in Ireland on shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care. Method. A self-administered questionnaire was designed and posted to 400 randomly selected General Practitioners working in Ireland. Results. Of the respondents, 189 (94%) reported that they would support a general policy on shared care between primary care and specialised psychiatric services for patients who are stable on their treatment. However, 124 (61.4%) reported that they foresaw difficulties for patients in implementing such a policy including: a concern that primary care is not adequately resourced with allied health professionals to support provision of psychiatric care (113, 53.2%); a concern this would result in increased financial burden on some patients (89, 48.8%); a lack of adequate cooperation between primary care and specialised mental health services (84, 41.8%); a concern that some patients may lack confidence in GP care (55, 27.4%); and that primary care providers are not adequately trained to provide psychiatric care (29, 14.4% ). Conclusion. The majority of GPs in Ireland would support a policy of shared care of psychiatric patients; however they raise significant concerns regarding practical implications of such a policy in Ireland.

  5. Shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care: the experiences and expectations of General Practitioners in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyapong, Vincent Israel Opoku; Jabbar, Faiza; Conway, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Objective. The study aims to explore the views of General Practitioners in Ireland on shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care. Method. A self-administered questionnaire was designed and posted to 400 randomly selected General Practitioners working in Ireland. Results. Of the respondents, 189 (94%) reported that they would support a general policy on shared care between primary care and specialised psychiatric services for patients who are stable on their treatment. However, 124 (61.4%) reported that they foresaw difficulties for patients in implementing such a policy including: a concern that primary care is not adequately resourced with allied health professionals to support provision of psychiatric care (113, 53.2%); a concern this would result in increased financial burden on some patients (89, 48.8%); a lack of adequate cooperation between primary care and specialised mental health services (84, 41.8%); a concern that some patients may lack confidence in GP care (55, 27.4%); and that primary care providers are not adequately trained to provide psychiatric care (29, 14.4% ). Conclusion. The majority of GPs in Ireland would support a policy of shared care of psychiatric patients; however they raise significant concerns regarding practical implications of such a policy in Ireland.

  6. DOD Health Care: Cost Impact of Health Care Reform and the Extension of Dependent Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    care reform legislation—the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (HCERA...Estimated Costs for Compliance Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (HCERA...including inpatient hospitals, home health agencies, nursing homes, hospice providers, psychiatric hospitals, long-term care hospitals, inpatient

  7. 78 FR 38718 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care... geographic areas, population groups, and facilities designated as primary medical care, mental health, and... (primary medical care, dental, psychiatric, vision care, podiatric, pharmacy, and veterinary care). The...

  8. Progress monitoring and feedback in psychiatric care reduces depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, Elizabeth A; Hooke, Geoff R; Page, Andrew C

    2010-12-01

    To date, the monitoring of patient progress using standardized assessments has been neglected in hospital-based psychiatric care. Findings in outpatient psychotherapy have demonstrated clinically significant benefits for providing feedback to the sizeable minority of patients who were otherwise unlikely to experience positive outcome (Lambert, 2007). However, a similar system for presenting feedback on patient progress has not yet been assessed for group therapy within psychiatric inpatient settings. The current study aimed to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a feedback system suitable for use in psychiatric services. In a nonrandomized trial, 1308 consecutive inpatients and day patients, whose diagnoses were primarily depressive and anxiety disorders, completed the World Health Organization's Wellbeing Index (WHO-5) routinely during a ten-day cognitive behavioral therapy group. The first cohort (n=461) received treatment as usual. The second cohort (n=439) completed monitoring measures without feedback, and for patients in the third cohort (n=408), feedback on progress was provided to both clinicians and patients midway through the treatment period. Feedback was effective in reducing depressive symptoms (F(1,649)=6.29, p.05). The current findings may be generalized to patient samples that exhibit largely depressive disorders, however rigorous follow-up is warranted. Similar to outpatient settings, feedback appears to be beneficial for improving symptom outcomes but further time may be required for wellbeing to be affected. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Access to somatic care for patients undergoing psychiatric treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabaret, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    In France, there is no across-the-board formal connection between psychiatric and somatic treatment and the somatic care of patients undergoing psychiatric treatment remains very heterogeneous and inadequate. Despite some attempts at providing structure, it is the place of the physician which must be examined and optimised.

  10. Shared care between specialized psychiatric services and primary care: the experiences and expectations of consultant psychiatrists in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyapong, Vincent I O; Conway, Catherine; Guerandel, Allys

    2011-01-01

    Internationally, there has been a growing interest in the pursuit of collaborative forms of care for patients with enduring mental health difficulties. The study aims to explore the views of consultant psychiatrists in Ireland on shared care between specialized psychiatric services and primary care for patients with mental health difficulties. A self-administered questionnaire was designed and posted to 470 consultant psychiatrists who are members of the College of Psychiatry of Ireland. Stamped self-addressed envelopes were included for the return of completed questionnaires. Overall, 213 questionnaires were returned, giving a response rate of 45%. Of the respondents, 194 (91%) reported that they would support a general policy on shared care between primary care and specialized psychiatric services for patients who are stable on their treatment. However, 181 (85%) reported that they foresaw difficulties for patients in implementing such a policy including: increased financial burden on some patients (141, 66%); some patients may lack confidence in GP care (100, 47%); primary care is not adequately resourced with allied health professionals to support provision of psychiatric care (128, 60%); primary care providers are not adequately trained to provide psychiatric care (111, 52%); and lack of adequate cooperation between primary care and specialized mental health services (96, 45%). The Irish government and the Colleges of General Practitioners and Psychiatrists in Ireland need to work together to remove the bottlenecks that hinder the active involvement of primary care in the management of patients with enduring mental health difficulties. Also, the health care systems need to be organized along a shared care model to facilitate effective collaboration between primary and specialized psychiatric services.

  11. Rights in psychiatric care : implementation of Shtukaturov v Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Lycette; Bartenev, Dmitri

    2011-01-01

    In this article Lycette Nelson and Dmitri Bartenev, both of the Mental Disability Advocacy Center (Budapest), discuss the follow-up to the 2008 Shtukaturov judgment against Russia, concerning the rights of people held in psychiatric care.

  12. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care: Perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning after 12 months of preventive monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eLay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate effects of a preventive monitoring program targeted to reduce compulsory re-hospitalization and perceived coercion in patients with severe mental disorder. We analyze patient outcomes in terms of perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning at 12 months. Methods: The program consists of individualized psycho-education, crisis cards and, after discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a 24-month preventive monitoring. In total, 238 psychiatric inpatients who had had compulsory admission(s during the past 24 months were included in the trial. T1-assessment 12 months after baseline was achieved for 182 patients. Results: Study participants reported lower levels of perceived coercion, negative pressures and process exclusion, a higher level of optimism, and a lesser degree of distress due to symptoms, interpersonal relations and social role functioning (significant time effects. However, improvements were not confined to the intervention group, but seen also in the TAU group (no significant group or interaction effects. Altered perceptions were linked to older age, shorter illness duration, female sex, non-psychotic disorder, and compulsory hospitalization not due to risk of harm to others. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that changes in the subjective perspective were fuelled primarily by participation in this study, rather than by having received the specific intervention. The study contributes to a better understanding of the interaction between 'objective' measures (compulsory readmissions and patients’ perceptions and highlights the need for treatment approaches promoting empowerment in individuals with a history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations.

  13. Preventing Compulsory Admission to Psychiatric Inpatient Care: Perceived Coercion, Empowerment, and Self-Reported Mental Health Functioning after 12 Months of Preventive Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Barbara; Drack, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a preventive monitoring program targeted to reduce compulsory rehospitalization and perceived coercion in patients with severe mental disorder. We analyze patient outcomes in terms of perceived coercion, empowerment, and self-reported mental health functioning at 12 months. The program consists of individualized psychoeducation, crisis cards and, after discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a 24-month preventive monitoring. In total, 238 psychiatric inpatients who had had compulsory admission(s) during the past 24 months were included in the trial. T1-assessment 12 months after baseline was achieved for 182 patients. Study participants reported lower levels of perceived coercion, negative pressures, and process exclusion, a higher level of optimism, and a lesser degree of distress due to symptoms, interpersonal relations, and social role functioning (significant time effects). However, improvements were not confined to the intervention group, but seen also in the treatment-as-usual group (no significant group or interaction effects). Altered perceptions were linked to older age, shorter illness duration, female sex, non-psychotic disorder, and compulsory hospitalization not due to risk of harm to others. Our findings suggest that changes in the subjective perspective were fueled primarily by participation in this study rather than by having received the specific intervention. The study contributes to a better understanding of the interaction between "objective" measures (compulsory readmissions) and patients' perceptions and highlights the need for treatment approaches promoting empowerment in individuals with a history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations.

  14. A Professional Containment Method in Acute Psychiatric Care: Nursing Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Sabancigullari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Observation is a method that is used in place of other control methods such as chemical and physical detention, isolation. Observation is used especially as an interference method to ensure the safety of the patients with suicidal and aggressive behaviors in acute psychiatric care in many countries. Especially in acute psychiatric wards using observations of nursing as a professional control method is an important issue. This article aims to draw attention to the importance of the subject in our country about using nursing observations as a control method in acute psychiatric care from the view of the literature. In this article several studies related to risk assessment, decision making, the levels of observation, the application of observation and the ethical aspects of observation on acute psychiatric care have been discussed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(1.000: 79-91

  15. Career Choice and Longevity in U.S. Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Robbi K; Diefenbeck, Cynthia A; Brown, Carlton G

    2015-06-01

    The demand for mental health services in the United States taxes the existing care continuum and is projected to increase as federal initiatives such as the Affordable Care Act and mental health parity improve access to, and coverage for, mental health services. Quality health care providers, such as psychiatric-mental health nurses, are needed to bolster the mental health system. Prior research has focused on the unpopularity of psychiatric nursing as a career choice for nursing students. The purpose of this study is to understand how seasoned psychiatric nurses came to choose and remain in the specialty; descriptive phenomenology is used. In a face-to-face interview, eight registered nurses described their experiences with psychiatric nursing as a student, their entry into psychiatric nursing, and factors related to their longevity in the specialty. Giorgi's Existential Phenomenological Research Method was employed to analyze the interview data. Three themes emerged related to career choice: Interest Developed Prior to or While in Nursing School, Personal Relevance, and Validation of Potential. Three themes emerged related to retention: Overcoming Stereotypes to Develop Career Pride, Positive Team Dynamics, and Remaining Hopeful. Nurse educators play an important role in identifying talent, validating capability, enhancing interest, and increasing students' confidence to pursue a psychiatric nursing career, while nursing administrators and clinical specialists play a key role in retention. Findings also stimulate pertinent questions surrounding the long-term viability of the psychiatric-mental health nursing specialty.

  16. Collaborative Care for Psychiatric Disorders in Older Adults: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dham, Pallavi; Colman, Sarah; Saperson, Karen; McAiney, Carrie; Lourenco, Lillian; Kates, Nick; Rajji, Tarek K

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the mode of implementation, clinical outcomes, cost-effectiveness, and the factors influencing uptake and sustainability of collaborative care for psychiatric disorders in older adults. Systematic review. Primary care, home health care, seniors' residence, medical inpatient and outpatient. Studies with a mean sample age of 60 years and older. Collaborative care for psychiatric disorders. PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched up until October 2016. Individual randomized controlled trials and cohort, case-control, and health service evaluation studies were selected, and relevant data were extracted for qualitative synthesis. Of the 552 records identified, 53 records (from 29 studies) were included. Very few studies evaluated psychiatric disorders other than depression. The mode of implementation differed based on the setting, with beneficial use of telemedicine. Clinical outcomes for depression were significantly better compared with usual care across settings. In depression, there is some evidence for cost-effectiveness. There is limited evidence for improved dementia care and outcomes using collaborative care. There is a lack of evidence for benefit in disorders other than depression or in settings such as home health care and general acute inpatients. Attitudes and skill of primary care staff, availability of resources, and organizational support are some of the factors influencing uptake and implementation. Collaborative care for depressive disorders is feasible and beneficial among older adults in diverse settings. There is a paucity of studies on collaborative care in conditions other than depression or in settings other than primary care, indicating the need for further evaluation.

  17. Bidirectional Linkages between Psychological Symptoms and Sexual Activities among African American Adolescent Girls in Psychiatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Lisa R.; Donenberg, Geri R.; Emerson, Erin

    2012-01-01

    The current study examines longitudinal associations between light and heavy sexual experiences and psychiatric symptoms in African American adolescent girls receiving mental health care. Research supports bidirectional associations between adolescent romantic and sexual behaviors and depression and other mental health problems, but this finding…

  18. Views of practitioners of alternative medicine toward psychiatric illness and psychiatric care: a study from Solapur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holikatti, Prabhakar C; Kar, Nilamadhab

    2015-01-01

    It is common knowledge that patients seek treatment for psychiatric illnesses from various sources including the alternative medicine. Views and attitudes of clinicians often influence the provision of appropriate mental health care for these patients. In this context, it was intended to study the views of the practitioners of alternative medicine toward psychiatric disorders, patients and interventions. The study was conducted as a questionnaire-based survey among a sample of practitioners of alternative medicine specifically Ayurveda and Homeopathy, who were practicing in Solapur and adjoining areas of Maharashtra and Karnataka states in India. A semi-structured Attitudinal Inventory for Psychiatry questionnaire was used. Demographic and professional data were collected. Out of 62 practitioners approached, 50 responded (80.6%). There were no significant differences in the views of practitioners toward psychiatry and psychiatrists based on respondents' gender, place of residence, location of practice, type of alternative medicine, exposure to psychiatric patients, or if they knew someone with psychiatric illness. Attitudes were generally positive, but variable. Among negative observations were that approximately 60% of respondents felt that a patient can be disadvantaged by being given a psychiatric label and 58% believed that emotions are difficult to handle. A considerable proportion (40%) of the respondents felt doctors other than psychiatrists were unable to identify psychiatric disorders. This study's findings suggest that practitioners of alternative medicine have mixed views about mental illness, patients and treatment. Some of their negative views and perceived inability to identify psychiatric disorders may be addressed through further training, information sharing and collaborative work.

  19. Sensory rooms in psychiatric inpatient care: Staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkdahl, Anna; Perseius, Kent-Inge; Samuelsson, Mats; Lindberg, Mathilde Hedlund

    2016-10-01

    There is an increased interest in exploring the use of sensory rooms in psychiatric inpatient care. Sensory rooms can provide stimulation via sight, smell, hearing, touch and taste in a demand-free environment that is controlled by the patient. The rooms may reduce patients' distress and agitation, as well as rates of seclusion and restraint. Successful implementation of sensory rooms is influenced by the attitudes and approach of staff. This paper presents a study of the experiences of 126 staff members who worked with sensory rooms in a Swedish inpatient psychiatry setting. A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used. Data were collected by a web based self-report 12-item questionnaire that included both open- and closed-ended questions. Our findings strengthen the results of previous research in this area in many ways. Content analyses revealed three main categories: hopes and concerns, focusing on patients' self-care, and the room as a sanctuary. Although staff initially described both negative and positive expectations of sensory rooms, after working with the rooms, there was a strong emphasis on more positive experiences, such as letting go of control and observing an increase in patients' self-confidence, emotional self-care and well-being. Our findings support the important principals of person-centred nursing and recovery-oriented mental health and the ability of staff to implement these principles by working with sensory rooms. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Gender differences in the effects of community violence on mental health outcomes in a sample of low-income youth receiving psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javdani, Shabnam; Abdul-Adil, Jaleel; Suarez, Liza; Nichols, Sara R; Farmer, A David

    2014-06-01

    Previous research suggests that community violence impacts mental health outcomes, but much of this research has not (a) distinguished between different types of community violence, (b) examined gender differences, and (c) focused on youth living in urban poverty. The current study addresses these questions. Participants were 306 youth (23 % girls) and one parent/guardian receiving outpatient psychiatric services for disruptive behavior disorders in a large urban city. Youth and parents reported on youth's experience of different types of community violence (being a direct victim, hearing reports, and witnessing violence), and whether violence was directed toward a stranger or familiar. Outcomes included youth externalizing, internalizing, and posttraumatic stress symptoms assessed via parent and youth reports. Being a direct victim of violence accords risk for all mental health outcomes similarly for both boys and girls. However, gender differences emerged with respect to indirect violence, such that girls who hear reports of violence against people they know are at increased risk for all assessed mental health outcomes, and girls who witness violence against familiars are at increased risk for externalizing mental health symptoms in particular. There are gender differences in violence-related mental health etiology, with implications for intervention assessment and design.

  1. Ideology of nursing care in child psychiatric inpatient treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellilä, Heikki; Välimäki, Maritta; Warne, Tony; Sourander, Andre

    2007-09-01

    Research on nursing ideology and the ethics of child and adolescent psychiatric nursing care is limited. The aim of this study was to describe and explore the ideological approaches guiding psychiatric nursing in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient wards in Finland, and discuss the ethical, theoretical and practical concerns related to nursing ideologies. Data were collected by means of a national questionnaire survey, which included one open-ended question seeking managers' opinions on the nursing ideology used in their area of practice. Questionnaires were sent to all child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient wards (n = 69) in Finland; 61 ward managers responded. Data were analysed by qualitative and quantitative content analysis. Six categories -- family centred care, individual care, milieu centred care, integrated care, educational care and psychodynamic care -- were formed to specify ideological approaches used in inpatient nursing. The majority of the wards were guided by two or more approaches. Nursing models, theories and codes of ethics were almost totally ignored in the ward managers' ideological descriptions.

  2. The identification of psychiatric illness by primary care physicians: the effect of patient gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, P D; Burns, B J; Nycz, G R

    1990-01-01

    This study tested several hypotheses about why women are more likely than men to have psychiatric disorders noted by their primary care physicians. Patients were screened for mental disorders using the General Health Questionnaire. A stratified sample was assessed using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia. Information on utilization and identification of mental health problems was abstracted from the medical records. The study was conducted at a multispecialty group practice in a semirural area of Wisconsin. Study participants consisted of a stratified probability sample of 247 patients seeking primary care. Patients with a psychiatric illness who were relatively frequent users of the clinic were most likely to be identified by a physician as having a mental health problem. When psychiatric illness and utilization rates were statistically controlled, men and women had comparable identification rates.

  3. Comparative psychiatric morbidity among three groups of health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative psychiatric morbidity among three groups of health professionals in a Nigerian tertiary health institution. ... Background Because health professionals have different job schedules and commitments, they may be differentially ... Conclusion The author therefore advocates establishment of a comprehensive stress

  4. Co-occurrence of psychiatric and medical morbidity in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, L G; Tessler, R C; Nycz, G R

    1983-02-01

    This study examines the co-occurrence of psychiatric and medical morbidity in primary care patients utilizing a health care clinic in Marshfield, Wisconsin. Previous research has shown that individuals with psychiatric disorders have higher rates of medical illness than people without psychiatric illness, but most prior studies have tended to confound the measures of psychiatric and medical morbidity. In addition, appropriate controls for bias resulting from different medical utilization patterns have sometimes been absent. The present study reports the medical diagnoses of persons who had been assessed for psychiatric disorder with a standardized psychiatric interview using research diagnostic criteria independent of their medical assessment. Psychiatric diagnoses are analyzed in relation to medical diagnoses at the time of the interview and for a one-year period--six months before and six months after that date. The results indicate that persons with mental disorder diagnoses have significantly more morbidity for the one-year study period. Although considerable congruence exists in the physical diagnoses recorded for both groups, those with mental disorders are more likely to have diagnoses of the digestive and genitourinary systems. Some sex differences are also explored.

  5. Terminal delirium misdiagnosed as major psychiatric disorder: Palliative care in a psychiatric inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aligeti, Sabitha; Baig, Muhammad R; Barrera, Fernando F

    2016-06-01

    Delirium is a neuropsychiatric condition characterized by acute change in cognition and disturbance of consciousness. A similar state during the final days of life is termed "terminal delirium." We present three cases with end-stage chronic medical problems without any significant psychiatric history who were admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit or a locked dementia unit for management of "depression," "dementia," or "psychosis." Early diagnosis of terminal delirium helps prevent patients, family members, and staff from undergoing severe emotional distress and facilitates appropriate end-of-life care.

  6. Genetic Counselling for Psychiatric Disorders: Accounts of Psychiatric Health Professionals in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Sian; Arribas-Ayllon, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Genetic counselling is not routinely offered for psychiatric disorders in the United Kingdom through NHS regional clinical genetics departments. However, recent genomic advances, confirming a genetic contribution to mental illness, are anticipated to increase demand for psychiatric genetic counselling. This is the first study of its kind to employ qualitative methods of research to explore accounts of psychiatric health professionals regarding the prospects for genetic counselling services within clinical psychiatry in the UK. Data were collected from 32 questionnaire participants, and 9 subsequent interviewees. Data analysis revealed that although participants had not encountered patients explicitly demanding psychiatric genetic counselling, psychiatric health professionals believe that such a service would be useful and desirable. Genomic advances may have significant implications for genetic counselling in clinical psychiatry even if these discoveries do not lead to genetic testing. Psychiatric health professionals describe clinical genetics as a skilled profession capable of combining complex risk communication with much needed psychosocial support. However, participants noted barriers to the implementation of psychiatric genetic counselling services including, but not limited to, the complexities of uncertainty in psychiatric diagnoses, patient engagement and ethical concerns regarding limited capacity.

  7. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L. Gabriels

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and/or intellectual disabilities (ID are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children’s hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33% and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days. Available data from a subset of patients (=43 in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes.

  8. Evaluation of self-care skills training and solution-focused counselling for health professionals in psychiatric medicine: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mache, Stefanie; Bernburg, Monika; Baresi, Lisa; Groneberg, David A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to implement and to evaluate a self-care skills training with solution-focused counselling to support psychiatrists in handling their daily work challenges. A total of 72 psychiatrists working in a psychiatric clinic were randomised in a single-blind trial to either an intervention group or a control group. Outcomes were measured at baseline and at the end of the training (follow-up 1: after 3 months; follow-up 2: after 6 months). A validated questionnaire including the Perceived Stress Questionnaire, the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, Brief Resilient Coping Scale, Self-Efficacy Scale and the Quality of Relationship Inventory was used. Psychiatrists in the intervention group reached a significant reduction in perceived job stress (p = 0.01, d = 0.05), improvements in job satisfaction (p = 0.02, d = 0.04), resilience (p = 0.02, d = 0.04) and self-efficacy (p = 0.04, d = 0.02) from baseline to all follow-ups with no comparable results seen in the control group. Psychiatrists stated an improved quality of physician-patient relationship (e.g. support, conflict management; p stress, job satisfaction, individual protective skills and quality of relationship to patients. This training is suitable to implement as a group training program for psychiatrists.

  9. Community psychiatric nurses and the care co-ordinator role: squeezed to provide 'limited nursing'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Alan

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports a study illuminating the factors that either facilitate or constrain the ability of community psychiatric nurses, in their role as care co-ordinators, to meet service users' and carers' needs. The Care Programme Approach is the key policy underpinning community-focused mental health services in England, but has been unevenly implemented and is associated with increased inpatient bed use. The care co-ordinator role is central to the Care Programme Approach and is most often held by community psychiatric nurses, but there has been little research into how this role is performed or how it affects the work of community psychiatric nurses and their ability to meet the needs of service users. A multiple case study of seven sectorised community mental health teams was employed over 2 years using predominantly qualitative methods including participant observation, semi-structured interviews and document review. The data were collected in one National Health Service trust in south England between 1999 and 2001. Additional duties and responsibilities specifically associated with the care co-ordinator role and multidisciplinary working, combined with heavy workloads, produced 'limited nursing', whereby community psychiatric nurses were unable to provide evidence-based psychosocial interventions that are recognized to reduce relapse amongst people with severe mental illness. The role of the Care Programme Approach care co-ordinator was not designed to support the provision of psychosocial interventions. Consequently, community psychiatric nurses in the co-ordinator role are faced with competing demands and are unable to provide the range of structured, evidence-based interventions required. This may partially account for the increased inpatient bed use associated with the Care Programme Approach.

  10. Nursing interventions in crisis-oriented and long-term psychiatric home care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, J.; Dassen, T.WN; Dingemans, T.; van den Heuvel, W.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses in The Netherlands are moving out of residential mental health institutions and are pioneering home care for the acutely and chronically mentally ill. The purpose of this study was to identify the interventions nurses currently use and to describe the differences between

  11. Child psychiatric disorders in a primary care Arab population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Al-Sabosy, Moza; Saeed, Mohammed; Sabri, Sufyan

    2004-01-01

    Physical and psychiatric comorbidity is relatively common in general practice but there have been few systematic studies using clinical interviews of children attending the primary care services in the Arab population, and none from the Gulf countries. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and nature of child psychiatric morbidity in primary care in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Systematic psychiatric evaluations were carried out on consecutive children aged 6 to 18 years visiting their primary care doctors in Al Ain. The sample consisted of 141 (50.7%) boys and 137 (49.3%) girls. Forty-three percent of the 278 children received a DSM-IV diagnosis. Of these, 46 (38%) were males and 74 (62%) were females. However, only 1.1% (3/120) of the patients consulted general practitioners for a primary psychiatric symptom. The most common diagnosis was anxiety disorder followed by depression. Obsessive compulsive disorder was present in 11%, conduct disorder in 7%, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in 3% of those with a diagnosis. A statistically significant association was found between DSM-IV caseness and female gender, higher number of children in the household, relationship problems in the family, physical illness and family history of psychiatric disorder. Other factors that did not show any significant association were age, nationality, socioeconomic status, parental education or occupation, scholastic performance or developmental delay in the child, or parental consanguinity. Our findings suggest that psychiatric disorders are common among young people of Arab origin attending primary care facilities, and that doctors need to be vigilant about this possibility.

  12. 'Doing things together': male caregivers' experiences of giving care to patients in forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpula, E; Ekstrand, P

    2013-02-01

    Studies into work carried out by male caregivers in a care environment in which male patients and male caregivers constitute a majority are lacking. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the experiences of male caregivers in providing care for patients in forensic psychiatric care. The study has a qualitative design and data were constituted by interviews with six male caregivers at a clinic of forensic psychiatry in a town in central Sweden. The method of analysis chosen was latent content analysis. The results consist of four themes: Activities as a component of care, Social training as the basis of care, Feelings of powerlessness and Seeing the complete person. The experience that comes out most distinctly in the descriptions given by caregivers involves performing activities together with the patients. The activities had different significances and these contribute to creating a more secure care relationship, in which the boundaries between personnel and patients become less clear. Physical activities contribute to recreating the patient's health. Social training appears as a component of the care in which the significance of rules and routines in the operations was integrated. Feelings of powerlessness arise when the caregivers do not experience that the care given on the ward contributes to recreating health for the patients. Seeing the complete person behind the crime constitutes the themes that can be said to summarize the meaning of the work carried out by male caregivers. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  13. The Impact of Culture and Religion on Psychiatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Ezra E.H.

    1982-01-01

    Culture and religion have a strong impact on clinical relationships, and attention to these issues has been shown to improve psychiatric care. Current issues in psychiatry and religion are explored, in order to demonstrate the clinical relevance of new findings in this area. PMID:7154101

  14. Case-based reimbursement for psychiatric hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederer, L I; Eisen, S V; Dill, D; Grob, M C; Gougeon, M L; Mirin, S M

    1992-11-01

    A fixed-prepayment system (case-based reimbursement) for patients initially requiring hospital-level care was evaluated for one year through an arrangement between a private nonprofit psychiatric hospital and a self-insured company desiring to provide psychiatric services to its employees. This clinical and financial experiment offered a means of containing costs while monitoring quality of care. A two-group, case-control study was undertaken of treatment outcomes at discharge, patient satisfaction with hospital care, and service use and costs during the program's first year. Compared with costs for patients in the control group, costs for those in the program were lower per patient and per admission; cumulative costs for patients requiring rehospitalization were also lower. However, costs for outpatient services for patients in the program were not calculated. Treatment outcomes and patients' satisfaction with hospital care were comparable for the two groups.

  15. [Knowledge about previous psychiatric care: is it a guaranty for therapeutic investment or a curse in psychiatric emergencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, M; Hoyois, P

    1990-04-01

    A sample of 755 psychiatric emergencies taken in charge in the emergency service of the St-Luc Hospital, Brussels, was divided into two groups: patients without psychiatric background (498) and patients having received previous psychiatric care (238). A background of psychiatric follow-up strongly influence the taking on and therapeutic decisions to be made by psychiatrists: its absence protects the patient and is seen as the guaranty of a good investment from the therapist while the existence of previous psychiatric treatment rather leads to hospital in lieu of crisis intervention, even when the crisis mechanisms are not significantly different in both samples.

  16. [Pharmaco- and psychotherapy in psychiatric ambulatory care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burner, M

    1983-01-01

    Our report describes the evolution of the outpatients' psychiatry in Lausanne. Here is mentioned the constant increase of consultations for new and former cases, and it is statistically shown that this augmentation is not only the result of the increasing population in the "Vaud District" (Canton de Vaud) but rather the consequence of the increasing number of patients with deeper investigations and treatments. It is true that the psychotherapeutic training was the most important in our outpatients' department, but the coming of psychotropic drugs has changed the treatment in certain cases and has developed mixed treatments. The creation of the Psycho-Social Center in the Psychiatric outpatients' department was the beginning of the social action in the institution, with the creation of an emergency department, consultations at the patients' home and treatment made by a team including doctors-outpatients' nurses-social assistants. We have checked that for many outpatients, very often in hard or psycho-reactive situations, there was no opposition between pharmaco-therapy or psychotherapy. So pharmaco-therapy and psychotherapy are often used separately or together in the outpatients' department through individual analytic psychotherapies, group or brief psychotherapies, relaxation, emergency treatments with perfusion of psychotropic and neuroleptic drugs.

  17. The prevalence of personality disorders in psychiatric outpatients with borderline intellectual functioning: Comparison with outpatients from regular mental health care and outpatients with mild intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Jannelien; Van Den Brink, Annemarie; Zitman, Frans G

    2015-01-01

    There is little research on the subject of personality disorder (PD) in individuals with borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Unlike in most countries, in the Netherlands, patients with BIF are eligible for specialized mental health care. This offers the unique possibility of examining the rates of PDs in patients, who in other countries are treated relatively invisibly in regular mental health care. To compare, in a naturalistic setting, the frequency of PD diagnoses in outpatients with BIF with outpatients from regular mental health care and outpatients with mild ID. We compared the rates of all DSM-IV-TR axis II PDs in outpatients with BIF (BIF group; n = 235) with rates of the same disorders in outpatients from regular mental health care (RMHC group; n = 1026) and outpatients with mild intellectual disability (ID) (mild ID group; n = 152) in a naturalistic cross-sectional anonymized medical chart review. Over half of the patients with BIF (52.8%) were diagnosed with a PD, compared with one in five in the RMHC group (19.3%) and one in three of the mild ID group (33.6%). All PD diagnoses, except for cluster A PDs and histrionic PDs, were most frequently diagnosed in the BIF group. PD NOS and borderline PD were the most frequently diagnosed PDs in BIF. The majority of PD patients had one or more comorbid axis I disorder. There is a high frequency of PD diagnoses in BIF outpatients in daily clinical practice. In anticipation of further scientific research, results suggest that PDs should not be overlooked in patients with BIF.

  18. Approaching the vulnerability of refugees: evaluation of cross-cultural psychiatric training of staff in mental health care and refugee reception in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäärnhielm, Sofie; Edlund, Ann-Sofie; Ioannou, Michael; Dahlin, Marie

    2014-09-27

    This study evaluates the outcomes of cross-cultural mental health training given to professionals in health care and refugee reception in Stockholm, Sweden. A mixed method approach, with quantitative data from questionnaires (n = 232) and ten qualitative focus group interviews, was used. After training, the participants reported that the hindering effect of lack of knowledge on their work decreased significantly from 2.81 (SD1.22) before, to 2.29 (SD1.00) (p refugees with mental ill-health. Training resulted in an increased experienced capacity among participants to understand the social vulnerability of newly-arrived refugees with mental distress. However, the lack of collaboration and the structural barriers between the different organisations were not affected.

  19. Medical students' attitudes to psychiatric illness in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Robert P; Roberts, Lesley M; Lawrie, Stephen; Jones, Lisa A; Humphreys, Martin S

    2008-11-01

    Previous research has shown that general practitioners (GPs) hold negative attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia, which do not simply reflect the nature or chronic aspects of the illness. This study aimed to describe the attitudes and predicted behaviour of medical students towards patients with mental illness in a primary care setting and to investigate whether these were affected by the students' level of training. A sample of 1239 students from the University of Birmingham Medical School were each given one of four case vignettes, all of which were identical except that the patient involved was described as having a previous diagnosis of, respectively, schizophrenia, depression, diabetes or no illness. Students rated their level of agreement with 12 attitudinal statements relating to the vignette. A total of 1081 (88%) students responded to the questionnaire. Students were generally less favourable in their responses to patients with either schizophrenia or depression. They would not be as happy to have them on their list, believed they would consume more time and considered they would be less likely to comply with advice and treatment. They expressed more concern about the risk of violence, the potential welfare of children and the possibility of illegal drug and excessive alcohol use. General clinical and psychiatric training had little effect on these reactions. Patients with mental illness provoke less favourable responses in medical students, which are not altered by furthering education. Undergraduate primary care-based mental health education should be re-evaluated to ensure that students develop an empathetic and positive approach to mental health patients and their treatment.

  20. [Nursing perspective on psychiatric care in Ivory Coast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Dan

    2017-05-01

    Michaël Bilson is a nurse at the psychiatric hospital of Bingerville, in Ivory Coast. Here, he describes his mission supporting the National Health Worker Training Institute. It is the only nurse training school in Ivory Coast. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Demonstrating the impact and model of care of a Statewide psychiatric intensive care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart; Hollander, Yitzchak; Scarff, Lisa; Dube, Ryan; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Stafrace, Simon

    2013-10-01

    To characterise patients and their outcomes following referral to a Statewide psychiatric intensive care service. This study conducted a medical audit for patients referred to the Statewide service during the first four years of operation (2007-2011). Demographics and the presence of alcohol and other drug and forensic comorbidities were documented along with the treatment received prior to and during admission. In the first four years of operation, 58 referrals were received, 41 resulting in admission and seven in secondary consultation delivered to the referring inpatient psychiatry service. Admitted patients were most commonly experiencing a psychotic illness, had high levels of substance comorbidities and antisocial personality traits, required lengthy admissions (mean days = 41.5), and were in most cases successfully discharged back to the referring inpatient psychiatry service or the community. Significant reductions in clinician-rated difficulties measured via the Health of the Nations Outcome Scale were found at discharge, and despite the significant presenting aggression risk, few attempted or actual assaults occurred. Improved outcomes were achieved with patients deemed unsafe for psychiatric care in high dependency units in other Victorian acute mental health services through management by an acute service that has developed special expertise in this area.

  2. Development and piloting of a treatment foster care program for older youth with psychiatric problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, J Curtis; Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Robinson, Debra; Havlicek, Judy; Fedoravicius, Nicole; Bertram, Julie; McNelly, David

    2015-01-01

    Older youth in out-of-home care often live in restrictive settings and face psychiatric issues without sufficient family support. This paper reports on the development and piloting of a manualized treatment foster care program designed to step down older youth with high psychiatric needs from residential programs to treatment foster care homes. A team of researchers and agency partners set out to develop a treatment foster care model for older youth based on Multi-dimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC). After matching youth by mental health condition and determining for whom randomization would be allowed, 14 youth were randomized to treatment as usual or a treatment foster home intervention. Stakeholders were interviewed qualitatively at multiple time points. Quantitative measures assessed mental health symptoms, days in locked facilities, employment and educational outcomes. Development efforts led to substantial variations from the MTFC model and a new model, Treatment Foster Care for Older Youth was piloted. Feasibility monitoring suggested that it was difficult, but possible to recruit and randomize youth from and out of residential homes and that foster parents could be recruited to serve them. Qualitative data pointed to some qualified clinical successes. Stakeholders viewed two team roles - that of psychiatric nurse and skills coaches - very highly. However, results also suggested that foster parents and some staff did not tolerate the intervention well and struggled to address the emotion dysregulation issues of the young people they served. Quantitative data demonstrated that the intervention was not keeping youth out of locked facilities. The intervention needed further refinement prior to a broader trial. Intervention development work continued until components were developed to help address emotion regulation problems among fostered youth. Psychiatric nurses and skills coaches who work with youth in community settings hold promise as important

  3. Psychiatric emergencies, a primary care perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    bly reve rsed for completed suicides. Tri g g e rs for attempting suicide dif- fer for different ages. In teenagers the trigger is often relationships or the lack thereof, problems at school or parental expectat i o n s. In middle- age the concerns are divorce and. s e p a r at i o n .The elderly are more likely to gi ve financial or health-.

  4. Psychiatric symptomatology and personality in a population of primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Biała

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available introduction and objective. Psychiatric disorders (and their high rates of prevalence in primary care have been widely analyzed, but the problem of underdiagnosis remains unresolved. This becomes increasingly more important in rural health centres in the face of lack of epidemiological data from these centres. The aim of this study is focused on the relationship between general health, psychiatric symptomatology and personality characteristics in the context of an adequate diagnosis. materials and methods. 518 primary care patients in 6 Polish urban clinical centres were studied using (in order of administration: a sociodemographic questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R. results. The investigated sample was representative for urban primary care patients. The findings confirmed a significant association between neuroticism and general health. The strongest relation with current functioning and mental distress of the patients (GHQ general score was observed in case of symptoms of anxiety and insomnia. The symptoms of depression may be the most difficult to identify (psychiatric symptoms assessed using GHQ sub-scales. conclusions. According to the GHQ assumptions and confirmed by the presented study, sub-threshold psychiatric symptomatology affects the functioning of primary care patients and their general health. This correlates with personality factors. Improving adequacy of diagnosis becomes extremely important, as it may often be the only chance for appropriate therapy of mental problems for people living in rural areas due to lower availability of specialistic mental services. Further epidemiological studies concerning rural primary care and prevalence of the spectrum of mental disorders need to be conducted.

  5. Recovery in involuntary psychiatric care: is there a gender difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Ulla-Karin

    2013-10-01

    Research on recovery from mental illness and the influence of compulsory psychiatric institutional care has revealed the complexity of this concept. There is also limited knowledge regarding the impact of gender-role expectations in these contexts, and how such expectations may influence both the care and individuals' recovery processes. To explore women's and men's perceptions of the impact of compulsory inpatient care on recovery from severe mental illness. Grounded theory was used to analyse 30 first-person accounts of recovery from mental illness, elicited via interviews with individuals who had been compulsorily treated in hospital and diagnosed with a severe mental illness. Inpatient care at an early stage was crucial for the informants' recovery. However, there was ambivalence in their perceptions of the impact of compulsory inpatient care. The narratives confirmed gender differences as well as gender stereotypes. The results have implications for recovery research, in that they emphasise the importance of understanding recovery as a gender-influenced process.

  6. 76 FR 68198 - Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... Administration Lists of Designated Primary Medical Care, Mental Health, and Dental Health Professional Shortage... designated as primary medical care, mental health, and dental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as... seven health professional types (primary medical care, dental, psychiatric, vision care, podiatric...

  7. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    mania) and anxiety disorders (General anxiety, agoraphobia, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post traumatic stress disorder). Conclusion: Findings suggest that there is need to consider mental and psychological care of clients with HIV/AIDS to minimise the prevalence of psychiatric disorder among HIV ...

  8. Psychiatric nursing care for adult survivors of child maltreatment: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zalm, Y.C.; Nugteren, W.A.; Hafsteinsdottir, T.B.; van der Venne, C.G.J.M.; Kool, N.; van Meijel, B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. Conclusions: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to ask

  9. Alcohol Use and Abuse in a University Psychiatric Health Service: Prevalence and Patterns of Comorbidity with Other Psychiatric Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Helen E.; Tisdall, Gordon W.

    1994-01-01

    Examined use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs in university psychiatric health service and patterns of comorbidity with other psychiatric problems. Psychiatric service students (n=110) tended to drink less than did undergraduate comparison group and to report similar frequencies of adverse consequences. Alcohol disorders were significantly…

  10. Niveles de dependencia y utilización de servicios en los hospitales psiquiátricos de Aragón Dependency levels and health care services' utilization in psychiatric hospitals in Aragon (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos de Miguel

    2004-06-01

    assess their dependency levels, and to analyze health care services' utilization by these patients. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study between July 1 and November 31. The questionnaire used was the Resident Assessment Instrument- Mental Health (RAI-MH. The sample consisted of 437 patients living in public psychiatric hospitals in Aragon. These hospitals provide care to chronically mentally ill patients and to patients undergoing rehabilitation. The Resource Utilization Group (RUG-I system was used to classify patients by their dependency levels for activities of daily life (ADL.Results: Of the 437 patients, 259 (59.3% were men with a mean age of 62.2 years. A total of 82.1% of the patients were classified as RUG-I group 1. Patients in groups 1 and 2 required more formal health care services. At least one visit by a psychiatrist was required by 25.3% of patients in group 1 and by 15.2% of those in group 2 compared with no visits by the other groups. Nursing interventions were more frequently required by patients in the more dependent groups. All of the of patients in groups 2 to 8 needed daily physical assistance for ADL vs. 26.3% of those in group 1. In the multivariate analysis, predictive variables were the hospital and type of unit. Conclusions: There is wide variation in health care services' utilization by patients living in psychiatric hospitals, which is related to dependency levels. Many psychiatric patients do not need formal psychiatric care. Health care professionals should assess the real needs of patients to provide each of them with appropriate care.

  11. Psychiatric patients' perspectives of student involvement in their care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öster, Caisa; Bäckström, Susan; Lantz, Ingrid; Ramklint, Mia

    2015-04-03

    In the education of professionals in psychiatry, one challenge is to provide clinical placements with opportunities for students to interact and have direct contact with patients. The aim of this study was to explore Swedish psychiatric patients' perspectives on student participation in their care. In a cross-sectional survey design, 655 adult psychiatric patients at a university hospital completed questionnaires. These questionnaires included statements about student involvement, student gender, attitudes towards student participation as well as two open-ended questions. Data were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The majority of the patients were comfortable with student participation. There were no differences between patients in wards compared to outpatients but patients who previously had students involved in their care reported higher comfort levels and a more positive attitude. Female patients were less comfortable with male students and very young students. Patients stressed the importance of being informed about the opportunity to refuse student participation. More detailed information given before the consultation as well as the importance of the student showing a professional attitude was conditions that could enable more patients to endorse student participation. The psychiatric patients' overall positive attitudes are in line with previous findings from other specialties and countries. The results support both altruistic motives and experience of personal gains by student involvement. More detailed information given beforehand would enable more patients to consider student participation.

  12. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient's at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient's symptoms and improve the individual's quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Literature review was done by using the keywords "home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing" from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015.

  13. Bibliotherapy for mental health service users Part 2: a survey of psychiatric libraries in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanner, Deborah; Urqhuart, Christine

    2009-06-01

    UK health policy advocates a patient-centred approach to patient care. Library services could serve the rehabilitation needs of mental health service users through bibliotherapy (the use of written, audio or e-learning materials to provide therapeutic support). Part 2 of this two-part paper assesses the views of psychiatric libraries in the UK on providing access to service users and possible services provided. An e-mail questionnaire survey of psychiatric library members of the psychiatric lending co-operative scheme (n = 100) obtained a response rate of 55%, mostly from libraries based in hospitals. At present, libraries funded by the health service provide minimal facilities for service users. Librarians are uncertain about the benefits and practicalities of providing access to service users. In order to implement change, information providers across the National Health Service (NHS) will need to work collaboratively to overcome attitudinal and institutional barriers, including the key issue of funding.

  14. Locum tenens and telepsychiatry: trends in psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Jonathan S; Doarn, Charles R; Shore, Jay H

    2015-06-01

    There is a national shortage of psychiatrists, and according to nationally available data, it is projected to get worse. Locum tenens psychiatry and telepsychiatry are two ways to fill the shortages of psychiatric providers that exist in many areas in the United States. Employment and salary data in these areas can be used to illuminate current trends and anticipate future solutions to the problem of increasing demand for, and decreasing supply of, psychiatrists in the United States. A search was conducted of the literature and relevant Web sites, including PubMed, Google Scholar, and www.google.com , as well as information obtained from locum tenens and telepsychiatry organizations. There is a dearth of data on the use of locum tenens in the field of psychiatry, with little available prior to 2000 and few published studies since then. The majority of the data available are survey data from commercial entities. These data show trends toward increasing demand for psychiatry along with increasing salaries and indicate the utilization of telepsychiatry and locum tenens telepsychiatry is increasing. The published academic data that are available show that although locum tenens psychiatry is slightly inferior to routine psychiatric care, telepsychiatry is generally equivalent to face-to-face care. One can anticipate that as the national shortage of psychiatrists is expected to accelerate, use of both locum tenens and telepsychiatry may also continue to increase. Telepsychiatry offers several possible advantages, including lower cost, longer-term services, quality of care, and models that can extend psychiatric services. If current trends continue, systems that demand face-to-face psychiatry may find themselves paying higher fees for locum tenens psychiatrists, whereas others may employ psychiatrists more efficiently with telepsychiatry.

  15. Psychiatric morbidity among adult patients in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Khairani

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Screening for psychiatric disorders in primary care can improve the detection rate and helps in preventing grave consequences of unrecognised and untreated psychiatric morbidity. This is relevant to the Malaysian setting where mental health care is now also being provided at primary care level. The aim of this paper is to report the prevalence of psychiatric illness in a semi-urban primary care setting in Malaysia using the screening tool Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ. Methods This is a cross-sectional study carried out in a semi-urban primary healthcare centre located south of Kuala Lumpur. Systematic random sampling was carried out and a total of 267 subjects completed the PHQ during the study period. Results The proportion of respondents who had at least one PHQ positive diagnosis was 24.7% and some respondents had more than one diagnosis. Diagnoses included depressive illness (n = 38, 14.4%, somatoform disorder (n = 32, 12.2%, panic and anxiety disorders (n = 17, 6.5%, binge eating disorder (n = 9, 3.4% and alcohol abuse (n = 6, 2.3%. Younger age (18 to 29 years and having a history of stressors in the previous four weeks were found to be significantly associated (p = 0.036 and p = 0.044 respectively with PHQ positive scores. Conclusion These findings are broadly similar to the findings of studies done in other countries and are a useful guide to the probable prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in primary care in other similar settings in Malaysia.

  16. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vaccine for their children. journal of. COMMUNITY HEALTH. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26(2) 46-58. Correspondence to: Ijadunola M.Y. Department of Community Health, Faculty of Clinical Sciences,. College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University,.

  17. Caffeine, mental health, and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Diogo R

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine intake is so common that its pharmacological effects on the mind are undervalued. Since it is so readily available, individuals can adjust their own dose, time of administration and dose intervals of caffeine, according to the perceived benefits and side effects of each dose. This review focuses on human studies of caffeine in subjects with and without psychiatric disorders. Besides the possibility of mild drug dependence, caffeine may bring benefits that contribute to its widespread use. These benefits seem to be related to adaptation of mental energy to the context by increasing alertness, attention, and cognitive function (more evident in longer or more difficult tasks or situations of low arousal) and by elevating mood. Accordingly, moderate caffeine intake (caffeine can induce psychotic and manic symptoms, and more commonly, anxiety. Patients with panic disorder and performance social anxiety disorder seem to be particularly sensitive to the anxiogenic effects of caffeine, whereas preliminary data suggests that it may be effective for some patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). The threshold for the anxiogenic effect of caffeine is influenced by a polymorphism of the A2A receptor. In summary, caffeine can be regarded as a pharmacological tool to increase energy and effortful behavior in daily activities. More populational (cross-sectional and prospective) and experimental studies are necessary to establish the role of caffeine intake in psychiatric disorders, especially its putative efficacy on depressive mood and cognitive/attentional disorders.

  18. Mental health service use types among Asian Americans with a psychiatric disorder: considerations of culture and need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy; Bornheimer, Lindsay A

    2014-10-01

    Despite levels of need that are comparable with other groups, relatively few Asian Americans receive mental health care. While studies have described the tendency for Asian Americans to delay care until mental health symptoms are severe, relatively little research has examined how the severity of symptoms impact mental health service use. This study uses publicly available data from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS) and focuses solely on Asian American respondents with a psychiatric disorder (n = 230). Unexpectedly, few Asian Americans with a psychiatric disorder received care in a medical setting. The perception of mental health needs increased the likelihood of using mental health specialist care. Social and systemic barriers together hinder mental health service use. Implications for addressing Asian American mental health service use within a changing health care environment are discussed.

  19. Family members' involvement in psychiatric care: experiences of the healthcare professionals' approach and feeling of alienation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertzon, M; Lützén, K; Svensson, E; Andershed, B

    2010-06-01

    The involvement of family members in psychiatric care is important for the recovery of persons with psychotic disorders and subsequently reduces the burden on the family. Earlier qualitative studies suggest that the participation of family members can be limited by how they experience the professionals' approach, which suggests a connection to the concept of alienation. Thus, the aim of this study was in a national sample investigate family members' experiences of the psychiatric health care professionals' approach. Data were collected by the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire. The median level and quartiles were used to describe the distributions and data were analysed with non-parametric statistical methods. Seventy family members of persons receiving psychiatric care participated in the study. The results indicate that a majority of the participants respond that they have experiencing a negative approach from the professionals, indicating lack of confirmation and cooperation. The results also indicate that a majority of the participants felt powerlessness and social isolation in the care being provided, indicating feelings of alienation. A significant but weak association was found between the family members' experiences of the professionals' approach and their feelings of alienation.

  20. Suicide Risk Is High for Psychiatric Patients Long After Discharge from Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166107.html Suicide Risk Is High for Psychiatric Patients Long After ... that psychiatric patients are at high risk for suicide immediately after being discharged from a mental health ...

  1. Psychiatric and somatic health in relation to experience of parental divorce in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angarne-Lindberg, Teresia; Wadsby, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of studies about the experience of parental divorce and its effects on mental and physical health differs, a result possibly caused by the use of different questionnaires and instruments, varying length of time since the divorce and divergent drop-out of participants. To study the presence of psychiatric records and number of diagnosed somatic and mental healthcare visits in a group of young adults with childhood experience of parental divorce in comparison to a group without this experience. The presence of records at public psychiatric clinics and 10 years of administrative healthcare data (somatic and mental) were checked for both groups. Significantly more persons from the divorce group appeared in child and adolescent psychiatric care; this was most pronounced in females. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in the number of persons seeking adult psychiatry or in the number of psychiatric consultations. Experience of parental divorce was not found to be an indicator of larger somatic health problems. Experience of parental divorce in childhood is not an indicator of adult psychiatric or somatic need of care.

  2. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Barbara; Salize, Hans Joachim; Dressing, Harald; Rüsch, Nicolas; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bühlmann, Monika; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Korinth, Lena; Rössler, Wulf

    2012-09-05

    The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates) has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients' perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be compared with standard care procedures (control group

  3. Abused women's vulnerability in daily life and in contact with psychiatric care: In the light of a caring science perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örmon, Karin; Hörberg, Ulrica

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study is to deepen the understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with health care professionals affect life. A further aim is to highlight abused women's vulnerability with a caring science perspective. Experience of abuse has consequences for the mental health of women and girls. Abused women may experience health care as unsupportive, and as a result, often chose not to disclose their experiences of abuse. The results of two qualitative empirical studies were analysed along with a phenomenological meaning analysis in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. Living one's life with experiences of abuse implies vulnerability, which can prevent abused women from achieving good health. This vulnerability results from insecurity regarding identity, along with the sense that one could have been a different individual if it were not for the abuse and thereby have a more fair chance in life. Being cared for within general psychiatric care could further increase this vulnerability. The healthcare professional's ability to care for the women who have experienced abuse leads to either an encounter of trust or else further suffering for the women. A lifeworld-oriented caring science perspective as a foundation for care can contribute to care for abused women which reaches the existential dimensions of their vulnerability and vulnerable life situation. It is evident that healthcare professionals should deepen their understanding of how abused women live, within a general psychiatric context. This study enables a deeper understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with healthcare professionals affect life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COMMUNITY HEALTH. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. KEYWORDS ABSTRACT. Correspondence to: Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (2) 1-6. Facility User's Preference between the Free and the Bamako. Initiative (Drug Revolving Fund-Based) Health Services in Iwajowa Local Government, Oyo ...

  5. Health care operations management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, M.W.; Hans, Elias W.; Kolisch, R.

    2012-01-01

    Health care operations management has become a major topic for health care service providers and society. Operations research already has and further will make considerable contributions for the effective and efficient delivery of health care services. This special issue collects seven carefully

  6. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Workforce Agenda: Optimizing Capabilities and Capacity to Address Workforce Demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Kathleen R

    2016-01-01

    The mental health service delivery transformation has created models of care that generate demand for a workforce with particular competencies. This article develops a psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing workforce agenda in light of demand generated by new models of care and the capacity/capabilities of the PMH RN and advanced practice nurse (APN) workforce. Examine the current capacity of the PMH nursing workforce and how health care reform and related service delivery models create demand for a particular set of behavioral health workforce competencies. PMH RNs and APNs have an educational background that facilitates development of competencies in screening, care coordination, leveling care, and wellness education. PMH RNs are a large workforce but the size of the PMH APN group is inadequate to meet demand. The specialty must strategize on how to build requisite PMH RN and APN competencies for the evolving service landscape. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Developing the concept of family involvement and the alienation questionnaire in the context of psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertzon, Mats; Lützén, Kim; Svensson, Elisabeth; Andershed, Birgitta

    2008-12-01

    Research shows that family members of people with a mental illness often experience a lack of involvement in the psychiatric care of their relative. An interpretation of the findings of these studies raises the question of whether the family members' experience of not being involved can be conceptualized in terms of alienation towards mental health services from their encounter with psychiatric care. In order to explore this possibility, the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire (FIAQ) was constructed, guided by relevant theoretical frameworks and empirical research. The content validity of the questionnaire was evaluated by two groups of experienced researchers who had sound knowledge of the theoretical frameworks used. Validity based on the response process was evaluated by the parents of people with mental illness. The reliability of the questionnaire was evaluated by a test-retest design with a group of 15 family members. The data were analyzed by a non-parametric statistical method. The results of the validity and reliability evaluations showed that of the 46 original items in the questionnaire, 28 would be useful in exploring the concept of family involvement and alienation in the context of psychiatric care. Further, minor modifications could make the FIAQ useful in exploring these concepts in other settings.

  8. [Nursing care for psychiatric patients defined by NANDA-NIC-NOC terminology: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalada Hernández, Paula; Muñoz Hermoso, Paula; Marro Larrañaga, Itxaso

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to provide a synthesis of the most relevant studies describing nursing work in mental health by means of NNN taxonomy. Literature from 1990 to September 2011 was reviewed using the "scoping review" methodology. Three independent reviewers examined the articles which were found and selected those fulfilling the inclusion criteria for subsequent analysis. From the 220 articles obtained, 14 studies were finally included and divided into two groups. The aim of the first ten papers was examining the most frequent NANDA nursing diagnosis or/and NIC nursing interventions in different mental health care settings. The remaining four articles describe health care plans for psychiatric patients developed with NNN taxonomy. Combining results from both groups, the most prevalent diagnostic labels are: disturbed thought processes and impaired social interaction. This review has illustrated the lack of evidence in relation to NNN taxonomy in the field of mental health and the need of further research in this area.

  9. Estimating the number of children exposed to parental psychiatric disorders through a national health survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padoin Cintia V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Children whose parents have psychiatric disorders experience an increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders, and have higher rates of developmental problems and mortality. Assessing the size of this population is important for planning of preventive strategies which target these children. Methods National survey data (CCHS 1.2 was used to estimate the number of children exposed to parental psychiatric disorders. Disorders were diagnosed using the World Psychiatric Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI (12 month prevalence. Data on the number of children below 12 years of age in the home, and the relationship of the respondents with the children, was used to estimate exposure. Parent-child relations were identified, as was single parenthood. Using a design-based analysis, the number of children exposed to parental psychiatric disorders was calculated. Results Almost 570,000 children under 12 live in households where the survey respondent met criteria for one or more mood, anxiety or substance use disorders in the previous 12 months, corresponding to 12.1% of Canadian children under the age of 12. Almost 3/4 of these children have parents that report receiving no mental health care in the 12 months preceding the survey. For 17% of all Canadian children under age 12, the individual experiencing a psychiatric disorder is the only parent in the household. Conclusion The high number of children exposed causes major concern and has important implications. Although these children will not necessarily experience adversities, they possess an elevated risk of accidents, mortality, and of developing psychiatric disorders. We expect these estimates will promote further research and stimulate discussion at both health policy and planning tables.

  10. Relatives of psychiatric inpatients--do physical violence and suicide attempts of patients influence family burden and participation in care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellin, Lars; Ostman, Margareta

    2005-01-01

    A common concern of psychiatric patients' relatives is that patients might be a danger to themselves or others. The aim of this study was to investigate family burden and relatives' participation in care in relation to physical violence towards others and suicide attempts by psychiatric inpatients before admission. Information concerning violence and suicide attempts by the patients prior to admission was collected from the medical records of 155 acutely voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric inpatients. Relatives were interviewed a month after admission, using a semi-structured questionnaire. Violence towards other persons and suicide attempts were recorded in 16% and 17% of the cases, respectively. There were no differences between relatives of patients who had been violent and other relatives regarding burden and participation in care. Relatives of patients with suicide attempts more often stated they had been prevented from having own company, worried about suicide attempts by the patient, had mental health problems of their own, and had own need for care and support. It was concluded that violence of acutely admitted psychiatric patients, targeted at other people, was not associated with burden of family, but the results corroborate the need for psychiatric services to involve and support relatives of psychiatric patients with suicidal behaviour.

  11. Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability? Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; L Tz N, Kim; Ivarsson, Ann-Britt; Eriksson, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.

  12. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    healthcare providers in south-east Nigerian. Malaria. National population commission and ORC Macro. Journal.2009;8:22. 6. Amaghionyeodiwe LA. Determinants of the. 15. World Health Organisation. The African choice of health care provider in Nigeria. Health malaria report 2003. Available at. Care Management Science.

  13. Reducing the Use of Seclusion and Restraint in Psychiatric Emergency and Adult Inpatient Services— Improving Patient-Centered Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wale, Joyce B; Belkin, Gary S; Moon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of seclusion and restraint (S/R) use has been given national priority by the US government, The Joint Commission, and patient advocacy groups. It is associated with high rates of patient and staff injuries and is a coercive and potentially traumatizing intervention. The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) is the largest municipal health care system in the country, with 11 HHC facilities operating psychiatric emergency services and inpatient psychiatric services. HHC operates 1117 adult inpatient psychiatric beds with an average length of stay of 22.2 days that generated over 19,000 discharges in 2009. In 2009, there were over 36,000 psychiatric emergency services visits. HHC's Office of Behavioral Health provides strategic leadership, planning, and support for the operations and quality objectives of these services. In January 2007, the corporate office initiated the Seclusion and Restraint Reduction Initiative, with a sequenced, intensive series of interventions and strategies to help focus the behavioral health leadership and staff on the need for continued culture change toward a more patient-centered and safe system of psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient care. From 2007 to 2009, there was a substantial decline in HHC's overall rate of S/R incidents in inpatient units. The more substantial impact was in the reduced overall time spent in S/R; the reduced frequency of use of S/R; and the reduced likelihood of patient injury from S/R use. PMID:21841927

  14. Reducing the use of seclusion and restraint in psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient services- improving patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wale, Joyce B; Belkin, Gary S; Moon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of seclusion and restraint (S/R) use has been given national priority by the US government, The Joint Commission, and patient advocacy groups. It is associated with high rates of patient and staff injuries and is a coercive and potentially traumatizing intervention. The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) is the largest municipal health care system in the country, with 11 HHC facilities operating psychiatric emergency services and inpatient psychiatric services. HHC operates 1117 adult inpatient psychiatric beds with an average length of stay of 22.2 days that generated over 19,000 discharges in 2009. In 2009, there were over 36,000 psychiatric emergency services visits. HHC's Office of Behavioral Health provides strategic leadership, planning, and support for the operations and quality objectives of these services. In January 2007, the corporate office initiated the Seclusion and Restraint Reduction Initiative, with a sequenced, intensive series of interventions and strategies to help focus the behavioral health leadership and staff on the need for continued culture change toward a more patient-centered and safe system of psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient care. From 2007 to 2009, there was a substantial decline in HHC's overall rate of S/R incidents in inpatient units. The more substantial impact was in the reduced overall time spent in S/R; the reduced frequency of use of S/R; and the reduced likelihood of patient injury from S/R use.

  15. The outpatient care of psychiatric patients in a rural area: Mhala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lisorders (4%) and no anxiety disorders. A number of drug. ;ombinations and usages for the ... psychiatric care provided by the PS in the Mhala district of. Northern Transvaal. The PS in Mhala. Mhala district is ... nurse (CPN) being responsible for the continuing care of all patients discharged from the hospital's psychiatric ...

  16. Oral health status and treatment needs of psychiatric inpatients in Ranchi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvan Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral health has an impact on general health, self-esteem and quality of life, but it often has a low priority in the context of mental health and in some phases of illness, the priority may be nonexistent Patients with psychiatric illness have poor oral hygiene than general population. Very few studies have been reported regarding the oral health among Indian psychiatric inpatients. Aim: To assess the oral health status of long-term psychiatric inpatients in a psychiatric institute and to evaluate the treatment requirements of psychiatric inpatients for maintaining the oral hygiene. Materials and methods: Psychiatric inpatients were examined and data was collected using the WHO standardized dental evaluation form in the psychiatric institute. Results: One hundred and forty-one patents (53% female: mean age: 36.56 ± 13.28 years: 47% male: mean age: 37.36 ± 12.49 years: length of illness: More than 5 years, 35.5%: less than 5 years, 84.5% were included in the study. 73% being schizophrenics. Dental canes was found in 55.3% patients. Calculus was present in 94.3% patients. Missing teeth was found in 22.7% patients. Mucosal lesions and oral ulcers were seen in 5.7 and 1 4% of total examined patients respectively. Percentages of patient requiring extractions were 34.8%. oral prophylaxis 98.6%. conservative treatment 31.9% and prosthesis 20.6%. Age was significantly correlated with number of decayed (r = 0.294, p < 0.01 and missing teeth (r = 0.436, p < 0.01. Length of illness was significantly correlated with number of decayed (r = 0.258. p < 0.01 and missing teeth (r = 0.229. p < 0.0 1 Conclusion: Oral health is an important and integral part of health care. Members of multidisciplinary team should be encouraged to assist psychiatric patients in maintaining their oral health with good oral hygiene and access to dental treatment taking into account their special needs.

  17. Vacation health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Vacation health care URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001937.htm Vacation health care To use the ...

  18. National Health Care Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  19. Do primary care medical homes facilitate care transitions after psychiatric discharge for patients with multiple chronic conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa E; Jackson, Carlos; Beadles, Christopher A; Lichstein, Jesse C; Ellis, Alan R; Farley, Joel F; Morrissey, Joseph P; DuBard, C Annette

    2016-01-01

    Primary-care-based medical homes may facilitate care transitions for persons with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) including serious mental illness. The purpose of this manuscript is to assess outpatient follow-up rates with primary care and mental health providers following psychiatric discharge by medical home enrollment and medical complexity. Using a quasi-experimental design, we examined data from North Carolina Medicaid-enrolled adults with MCC hospitalized with an inpatient diagnosis of depression or schizophrenia during 2008-2010. We used inverse-probability-of-treatment weighting and assessed associations between medical home enrollment and outpatient follow-up within 7 and 30 days postdischarge. Medical home enrollees (n=16,137) were substantially more likely than controls (n= 11,304) to receive follow-up care with any provider 30 days post discharge. Increasing patient complexity was associated with a greater probability of primary care follow-up. Medical complexity and medical home enrollment were not associated with follow-up with a mental health provider. Hospitalized persons with MCC including serious mental illness enrolled in a medical home were more likely to receive timely outpatient follow-up with a primary care provider but not with a mental health specialist. These findings suggest that the medical home model may be more adept at linking patients to providers in primary care rather than to specialty mental health providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Development and piloting of a treatment foster care program for older youth with psychiatric problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMillen, J Curtis; Narendorf, Sarah Carter; Robinson, Debra; Havlicek, Judy; Fedoravicius, Nicole; Bertram, Julie; McNelly, David

    2015-01-01

    .... This paper reports on the development and piloting of a manualized treatment foster care program designed to step down older youth with high psychiatric needs from residential programs to treatment foster care homes...

  1. Creonization of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulger, R J

    1990-01-01

    As prefigured in the Greek tragedy Antigone, one of the primary conflicts in contemporary health care is that between humane concern for the individual and concern for society at large and administrative rules. The computerization of the health care system and development of large data bases will create new forms of this conflict that will challenge the self-definition of health care and health care professionals.

  2. Communication and Mental Health: Psychiatric Forerunners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Deems M.

    The connections between human communication and mental health were first noted 50 to 60 years ago by such early psychiatrists as Alfred Adler, Harry Stack Sullivan, and Karen Horney. They were concerned with understanding those communication processes and skills that make for effective, fully functioning human beings. Adler emphasized faulty…

  3. Non-psychiatric inpatient care preceding admission for self-harm in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idenfors, Hans; Strömsten, Lotta M J; Renberg, Ellinor Salander

    2016-09-01

    Many young people contact health services before they harm themselves intentionally. However, they often seek care for non-suicidal or non-psychiatric causes despite having suicidal thoughts. We investigated the non-psychiatric hospital diagnoses received by young people during the year before their first admission to hospital for self-harm. From a national register, we selected people who were hospitalised for an episode of self-harm during the period 1999-2009, at which time they were aged 16 to 24. We compared them with matched controls regarding the probability for having been admitted with different diagnoses during the year preceding the self-harm admission. The study included 48,705 young people (16,235 cases and 32,470 controls). Those admitted for self-harm were more likely than controls to have been hospitalised for non-psychiatric reasons, which included symptomatic diagnoses such as abdominal pain, syncope/collapse, unspecified convulsions, and chest pain. Certain chronic somatic illnesses were also overrepresented, such as epilepsy, diabetes mellitus type 1, and asthma. Symptomatic diagnoses were more common in those who had been admitted for self-harm. It is possible that psychiatric problems could have been the cause of the symptoms in some of these admissions where no underlying illness could be found, and if this was not uncovered it might lead to a delay in suicide risk assessment. For several chronic illnesses, when admitted to hospital, a psychiatric evaluation might be indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Methods for selecting foster families for psychiatric family care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Michel, P O; Konrad, M; Krüger, M

    1989-11-01

    Psychiatric foster family care of no more than two patients living in the foster family can be seen as a therapeutic setting, where longterm chronic patients can improve in their social functioning. Recent studies found the family characteristics as decisive for potential therapeutic effects. So the question arises how to select adequate foster family applicants. In an empirical study with 105 applicant-families we have tried to uncover the selection-procedures and mechanism of the foster care team that finally lead to adequate/non-adequate distinction. The results of the study show that the differences between the two applicant groups (selected vs non selected) are not identical with the intended selection criteria of the team members. Some major differences were found in areas that were totally independent from the team-criteria: the selected-as-adequate-families had a more intensive exchange with the outside world, educated more children and were therefore assumed to be socially more competent than the not selected applicant group. So selecting foster families comes up as a complicated decision making process that goes beyond checking up some criteria.

  5. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    debut (20.8%), 40.8% had multiple sexual partners, 23.3% had sex under the influence of alcohol while. 34.2% didn't use ... PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26(2) 97-106. KEYWORDS. Risky sexual behaviour, young people, ..... 2010;15(1): Art. #505[cited consistent with ...

  6. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Up to 11 (7.2%) respondents in the non-BI LGA were not satisfied with the drug services in the health centers, compared ... improvement in primary health care services,. 8 ..... Naves J O, Silver LD. Evaluation of pharmaceutical assistance in public primary care in Brasilia, Brazil. Rev. Saude Publica. 2005; 39(2): 223-30. 21.

  7. Psychiatric disorders and sleep issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Eliza L

    2014-09-01

    Sleep issues are common in people with psychiatric disorders, and the interaction is complex. Sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, can precede and predispose to psychiatric disorders, can be comorbid with and exacerbate psychiatric disorders, and can occur as part of psychiatric disorders. Sleep disorders can mimic psychiatric disorders or result from medication given for psychiatric disorders. Impairment of sleep and of mental health may be different manifestations of the same underlying neurobiological processes. For the primary care physician, key tools include recognition of potential sleep effects of psychiatric medications and familiarity with treatment approaches for insomnia in depression and anxiety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The bulldozer and the ballet dancer: aspects of nurses' caring approaches in acute psychiatric intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkdahl, A; Palmstierna, T; Hansebo, G

    2010-08-01

    Demanding conditions in acute psychiatric wards inhibit provision of safe, therapeutic care and leave nurses torn between humanistic ideals and the harsh reality of their daily work. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' caring approaches within this context. Data were collected from interviews with nurses working in acute psychiatric intensive care. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis, based on interpretive description. Results revealed a caring-approach continuum on which two approaches formed the main themes: the bulldozer and the ballet dancer. The bulldozer approach functioned as a shield of power that protected the ward from chaos. The ballet dancer approach functioned as a means of initiating relationships with patients. When examining the data from a theoretical perspective of caring and uncaring encounters in nursing, the ballet dancer approach was consistent with a caring approach, while the bulldozer approach was more complex and somewhat aligned with uncaring approaches. Conclusions drawn from the study are that although the bulldozer approach involves a risk for uncaring and harming actions, it also brings a potential for caring. This potential needs to be further explored and nurses should be encouraged to reflect on how they integrate paternalistic nursing styles with person-centred care.

  9. Health Care in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    China has recently emerged as an important global partner. However, like other developing nations, China has experienced dramatic demographic and epidemiologic changes in the past few decades. Population discontent with the health care system has led to major reforms. China's distinctive health care system, including its unique history, vast infrastructure, the speed of health reform, and economic capacity to make important advances in health care, nonetheless, has incomplete insurance coverage for urban and rural dwellers, uneven access, mixed quality of health care, increasing costs, and risk of catastrophic health expenditures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Health Care in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    Although a stated right for all Indians, equal access to health care in India is impeded by socioeconomic barriers. With its 3-tier system of public health care centers in villages, district hospitals, and tertiary care hospitals, government expenditure in India is inordinately low, with a disproportionate emphasis on private health spending. Accordingly, the poorest receive a minority of the available subsidies, whereas the richest obtain more than a third, fostering a divide in health care infrastructure across the rich and poor in urban and rural settings. This paradigm has implications for domestic Indian public health and global public health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The detrimental impact of maladaptive personality on public mental health: a challenge for psychiatric practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pascal Hengartner

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Experts in personality psychology and personality disorders have long emphasised the pervasive and persistent detrimental impact of maladaptive personality traits on mental health and functioning. However, in routine psychiatric practice maladaptive personality is readily ignored and personality traits are seldom incorporated into clinical guidelines. The aim of this narrative review is to outline how pervasively personality influences public mental health and how personality thereby challenges common psychiatric practice. A comprehensive search and synthesis of the scientific literature demonstrates that maladaptive personality traits and personality disorders, in particular high neuroticism and negative affectivity, first, are risk factors for divorce, unemployment and disability pensioning; second, relate to the prevalence, incidence and co-occurrence of common mental disorders; third, impair functioning, symptom remission and recovery in co-occurring common mental disorders; and fourth, predispose to treatment resistance, non-response and poor treatment outcome. In conclusion, maladaptive personality is not only involved in the development and course of mental disorders, but also predisposes to chronicity and re-occurrence of psychopathology and reduces the efficacy of psychiatric treatments. The pernicious impact of maladaptive personality on mental health and functioning demands that careful assessment and thorough consideration of personality should be compulsory in psychiatric practice.

  12. The Detrimental Impact of Maladaptive Personality on Public Mental Health: A Challenge for Psychiatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengartner, Michael Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Experts in personality psychology and personality disorders have long emphasized the pervasive and persistent detrimental impact of maladaptive personality traits on mental health and functioning. However, in routine psychiatric practice, maladaptive personality is readily ignored and personality traits are seldom incorporated into clinical guidelines. The aim of this narrative review is to outline how pervasively personality influences public mental health and how personality thereby challenges common psychiatric practice. A comprehensive search and synthesis of the scientific literature demonstrates that maladaptive personality traits and personality disorders, in particular high neuroticism and negative affectivity, first, are risk factors for divorce, unemployment, and disability pensioning; second, relate to the prevalence, incidence, and co-occurrence of common mental disorders; third, impair functioning, symptom remission, and recovery in co-occurring common mental disorders; and fourth, predispose to treatment resistance, non-response and poor treatment outcome. In conclusion, maladaptive personality is not only involved in the development and course of mental disorders but also predisposes to chronicity and re-occurrence of psychopathology and reduces the efficacy of psychiatric treatments. The pernicious impact of maladaptive personality on mental health and functioning demands that careful assessment and thorough consideration of personality should be compulsory in psychiatric practice. PMID:26106335

  13. [Psychiatric concept of health--its dialectic and reflective determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, M

    1983-01-01

    The subjectivity of the subject of psychiatry calls for a specific method, which cannot be developed in analogy to objectifying methodologies. Taking the current discussion of normative methods as an example, it is suggested to integrate the method of Hegel's logic into psychiatric thinking. In the following study, this suggestion is explained with reference to the problem of the scientific approach and to the dialectical constitution of illness and health.

  14. Managing Cancer Care - Finding Health Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Questions to Ask about Advanced Cancer Research Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Costs & Medical ... Feelings Planning for Advanced Cancer Advanced Cancer & Caregivers Managing Cancer Care Finding Health Care Services Managing Costs ...

  15. Psychiatric/Mental health nursing education in Victoria, Australia: barriers to specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda

    2006-04-01

    The introduction of undergraduate comprehensive nursing education in Victoria, Australia, during the 1990s has resulted in significant changes in undergraduate preparation for psychiatric/mental health nursing. Comprehensive programs became charged with the responsibility of preparing graduates to provide care for people experiencing a mental illness across a broad range of health-care settings, as well as providing a pathway for graduates with an interest in specialist practice in this field. The aim of this article is to clearly articulate the issues associated with psychiatric/mental health nursing education at the undergraduate level, including prevalence of mental illness, the inadequacy of psychiatric/mental health nursing theory and practice at undergraduate level, the negative attitudes of students toward this field of practice, and the subsequent failure of nursing education and practice initiatives to provide a clear mechanism for specialization in this important area of nursing practice. Throughout the article, the distinction between generalist and specialist preparation is argued and accompanied by a call for nursing education to recognize and address the issues associated with both domains.

  16. Psychiatric Assessment and Screening for the Elderly in Primary Care: Design, Implementation, and Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C. Abrams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We describe the design and implementation of a psychiatric collaborative care model in a university-based geriatric primary care practice. Initial results of screening for anxiety and depression are reported. Methods and Materials. Screens for anxiety and depression were administered to practice patients. A mental health team, consisting of a psychiatrist, mental health nurse practitioner, and social worker, identified patients who on review of screening and chart data warranted evaluation or treatment. Referrals for mental health interventions were directed to members of the mental health team, primary care physicians at the practice, or community providers. Results. Subjects (N=1505 comprised 38.2% of the 3940 unique patients seen at the practice during the 4-year study period. 37.1% (N=555 screened positive for depression, 26.9% (N=405 for anxiety, and 322 (21.4% screened positive for both. Any positive score was associated with age (P<0.033, female gender (P<0.006, and a nonsignificant trend toward living alone (P<0.095. 8.87% had suicidal thoughts. Conclusions. Screening captured the most affectively symptomatic patients, including those with suicidal ideation, for intervention. The partnering of mental health professionals and primary care physicians offers a workable model for addressing the scarcity of expertise in geriatric psychiatry.

  17. The culture of care within psychiatric services: tackling inequalities and improving clinical and organisational capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cultural Consultation is a clinical process that emerged from anthropological critiques of mental healthcare. It includes attention to therapeutic communication, research observations and research methods that capture cultural practices and narratives in mental healthcare. This essay describes the work of a Cultural Consultation Service (ToCCS) that improves service user outcomes by offering cultural consultation to mental health practitioners. The setting is a psychiatric service with complex and challenging work located in an ethnically diverse inner city urban area. Following a period of 18 months of cultural consultation, we gather the dominant narratives that emerged during our evaluation of our service. Results These narratives highlight how culture is conceptualized and acted upon in the day-to-day practices of individual health and social care professionals, specialist psychiatric teams and in care systems. The findings reveal common narratives and themes about culture, ethnicity, race and their perceived place and meaningfulness in clinical care. These narratives express underlying assumptions and covert rules for managing, and sometimes negating, dilemmas and difficulties when considering “culture” in the presentation and expression of mental distress. The narratives reveal an overall “culture of understanding cultural issues” and specific “cultures of care”. These emerged as necessary foci of intervention to improve service user outcomes. Conclusion Understanding the cultures of care showed that clinical and managerial over-structuring of care prioritises organisational proficiency, but it leads to inflexibility. Consequently, the care provided is less personalised and less accommodating of cultural issues, therefore, professionals are unable to see or consider cultural influences in recovery. PMID:23020856

  18. Motivational Factors that Help in Coping with Barriers to Provision of Psychiatric Nursing Care: Perspective of Psychiatric Nurses in a Hospital Setting in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimba, Solomon Musa; Duma, Sinegugu

    2015-07-01

    This qualitative case study explored barriers to provision of psychiatric nursing care in a hospital in Plateau State, Nigeria, and revealed motivational factors that helped the nurses to cope with these barriers. Data collection methods included grand tour and in-depth interviews and participant observation. Motivational factors were related to the psychiatric nurse's individual intrinsic belief system, as well as to their intrinsic belief system as influenced by the environment. These motivational factors highlight how psychiatric nurses continue to cope with the barriers they face in provision of care. The findings indicate the need for hospital management to create and sustain an environment to complement the existing intrinsic motivation of psychiatric nurses to provide psychiatric nursing care, and to provide prompt and appropriate emotional and psychological support to psychiatric nurses worldwide.

  19. The Health Care Costs of Violence Against Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Sørensen, Jan; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the health care costs of violence against women. For the study, we used a register-based approach where we identified victims of violence and assessed their actual health care costs at individual level in a bottom-up analysis. Furthermore, we identified...... care sector and costs of prescription pharmaceuticals. We estimated the attributable health care costs of violence against women in Denmark, using a generalized linear model where health care costs were modeled as a function of age, childbirth, and exposure to violence. In addition we tested whether...... socioeconomic status, multiple episodes of violence, and psychiatric contacts had any impact on health care costs. We found that the health care costs were about €1,800 higher for victims of violence than for nonvictims per year, driven mostly by higher psychiatric costs and multiple episodes of violence....

  20. Psychopathology of the General Population Referred by Primary Care Physicians for Urgent Assessment in Psychiatric Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith McLenan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the type, severity and progression of psychiatric pathologies in a sample of 372 outpatients (age range 18–65 years referred by their primary general practitioners (GPs to an Urgent Referral Team (URT based in a psychiatric hospital in Aberdeen, Scotland. This team offers immediate appointments (1- to 7-day delays for rapid assessments and early interventions to the outpatients referred by their primary family doctors.Method: One-sample t-test and z statistic were used for data analysis. From the total population, a convenience sample of 40 people was selected and assessed to evaluate whether follow-up appointments after the first visit could reduce the severity of suicidal ideation, depression and anxiety in the outpatients seen by the URT. A two-sample t-test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess the variations in the scores during the follow-up visits.Results: We found a statistically significant prevalence of depressive disorders, comorbid with anxiety at first presentation in people who were females, white, never married, living with a partner, not studying and not in paid employment. The common presentation of borderline personality disorder and dysthymia in this population underscores its vulnerability to major socioeconomic challenges.Conclusion: The data confirmed the impact that primary care cooperation with psychiatric hospitals can have on the psychiatric system, and as a reflection, on the population’s mental health and well-being. In fact, active cooperation and early diagnosis and intervention will help detect cases at risk in the general population and reduce admissions into hospitals.

  1. Preventive health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines or supplements that you are taking WHY PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE IS IMPORTANT Even if you feel ... want to schedule a visit . Another part of preventive health is learning to recognize changes in your ...

  2. Transforming Health Care Through Interprofessional Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Lora Humphrey; Roman, Marian; Raynor, Hollie; Thompson, Dixie; Ray, Shaunta

    2018-01-01

    We provide an overview of the Recovery-based Interprofessional Distance Education (RIDE) rotation for graduate students in psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing, pharmacy, nutrition, and exercise physiology, with faculty from the four professions represented. Interprofessional education can enhance team concepts in these professions and is viewed positively by students and faculty. Interprofessional learning opportunities prepare graduates to contribute to team-based care. We urge colleagues to join us in providing meaningful IPE experiences to students at all levels, with the goal of optimizing health care for all persons with mental health treatment needs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Efficacy of integrated interventions combining psychiatric care and nursing home care for nursing home residents: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Janine; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Verhey, Frans R J; Schols, Jos M G A

    2010-01-01

    Nursing home residents needing both psychiatric care and nursing home care for either somatic illness or dementia combined with psychiatric disorders or severe behavioural problems are referred to as Double Care Demanding patients, or DCD patients. Integrated models of care seem to be necessary in order to improve the well-being of these residents. Two research questions were addressed. First, which integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are described in the research literature? And second, which outcomes of integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care in DCD nursing home residents are reported in the literature? A critical review of studies was done that involved integrated interventions combining both psychiatric care and nursing home care on psychiatric disorders and severe behavioural problems in nursing home patients. A systematic literature search was performed in a number of international databases. Eight intervention trials, including four RCTs (2b level of evidence), were identified as relevant studies for the purpose of this review. Seven studies, three of which were RCTs, showed beneficial effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach combining medical, psychiatric and nursing interventions on severe behavioural problems in DCD nursing home patients. Important elements of a successful treatment strategy for DCD nursing home patients include a thorough assessment of psychiatric, medical and environmental causes as well as programmes for teaching behavioural management skills to nurses. DCD nursing home patients were found to benefit from short-term mental hospital admission.This review underlines the need for more rigorously designed studies to assess the effects of a comprehensive, integrated multidisciplinary approach towards DCD nursing home residents. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Examining patients' perceptions of care to identify opportunities for quality improvement in psychiatric inpatient hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Glorimar

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to examine patients' perceptions with psychiatric care to prioritize action for quality improvement (QI), and to explore differences in care experiences across domains of care by sample subgroups in psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Analysis of frequency, central tendency, and variation examined the distribution of 11,778 Inpatient Consumer Surveys (ICS), from 67 psychiatric inpatient hospitals, by domain of care and Likert scale. The percentage of patients responding positively to each domain of care was evaluated. A performance-importance matrix was constructed to identify key drivers and prioritize action for QI. Chi-squared, t test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) analyses evaluated the experiences of care by sample subgroups. Overall, patients tended to be satisfied with the care received. However, patients perceived their care differently across hospitals. Hospitals scored lower in the rights domain, mainly attributed to problems with communication between patients and hospital staff. Patients' care experiences varied among sample subgroups; however, four sample characteristics were common to all domains of care. Patients who were Latinos, aged 65 years and older, who completed the survey at discharge, before leaving the hospital, had a higher perception of care across all domains of care. Either an examination of the individual items on the ICS or the aggregation of them by domain of care, the ICS could be a significant tool for hospitals that continuously strive to improve the quality of care provided to psychiatric patients in a time driven by the needs and expectations of consumers.

  5. Psychiatric inpatient care at a county hospital before and after the inception of a university-affiliated psychiatry residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Benjamin K P; Ma, Albert Y

    2007-09-01

    The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), along with Kern Medical Center (KMC) and Kern County Mental Health (KCMH), established a new psychiatry residency program in 2004. In this study, we compared psychiatric care at a county psychiatric facility serving a population of 760,000 inhabitants before and after the initiation of this psychiatry residency program. Medical charts for all patients admitted to the psychiatric inpatient service during the year before the inception of the psychiatry residency program (2003-2004) and during the first year in which there was full implementation of residents after inception of the psychiatry residency program (2005-2006) were reviewed. Baseline characteristics, demographics, and various outcomes of the two groups were compared. After the residency program was established, the mean length of stay increased from 8.8 to 9.8 days (p psychiatric inpatient setting. More research is needed to identify strategies, such as guidelines to eliminate over-utilization of resources and methods to improve residents' competency, that may successfully enhance the quality of care provided by residents to psychiatric inpatients.

  6. [The long road for psychiatric care in prisons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencin, Gérard

    2016-01-01

    From the 19th century to the present day, the history of psychiatry in prisons has evolved considerably. In parallel with successive laws, codes and articles, psychiatry has gained in structure. From the "medical prison", mental health consultations in every detention centre, the regional medico-psychological services, to today's specially equipped hospital units (UHSA), prisoners receive both preventive care as well as curative treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. [THE CLINICAL ORGANIZATIONAL SUBSTANTIATION OF NEW TECHNOLOGY OF HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRIC CARE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsevatkin, V G; Blinov, D S; Podsevatkin, D V; Podsevatkina, S V; Smirnova, O A

    2015-01-01

    The new technology of hospital psychiatric care, developed and implemented in the Mordovia republican clinical hospital, permits resolving problems of hospitalism, lethality, pharmaceutical resistance and others. The essence of this technology is in staging of hospital care under condition of intensification and standardization of curative diagnostic process, implementation of complex approach to treatment of psychiatric disorders. The patient sequentially passes through three stages: intensive diagnostics and intensive treatment (intensive care department, intensive therapy department), supportive therapy (general psychiatric department); rehabilitation measures (curative rehabilitative department). The concentration of resources at the first stage, application of intensive therapy techniques permit in the shortest period to arrest acute psychotic symptomatic. The described new technology of hospital psychiatric care permits enhancing effectiveness of treatment, significantly shorten period of hospitalization (37.5 days), to obtain lasting and qualitative remission, to rehabilitate most fully social working status of patient and to significantly decrease lethality.

  8. Through the depths and heights of darkness; mothers as patients in psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, Nina Elisabeth; Eriksson, Katie; Bondas, Terese

    2014-12-01

    This study attempts to contribute to the knowledge of caring science and mental health care by means of a profound understanding of the patients' existential world when being a mother in receipt of psychiatric care, with focus on inner processes such as health and suffering. Mothers struggle to cope with the demands of the illness and the responsibility for their children. They see themselves through their children and regard the child as an important part of themselves. Mothers experience guilt and shame related to motherhood, and when they have to relinquish their responsibility as a mother, they consider themselves a failure. Despite a range of practical and emotional difficulties, motherhood involved extremely positive experiences, which provide a purpose as well as fulfilment and meaning in life. This study is rooted in philosophical hermeneutics inspired by Gadamer with an inductive-deductive-abductive approach. Interpretation of the data was made on different levels of abstraction described as rational, contextual, existential and ontological. The point of departure was the caring science theory about health and suffering and the hermeneutic philosophy of understanding. The interpretation revealed the mothers' experiences of health and suffering as a struggle between the darkness of suffering and their inner source of strength. In the light of the theory of caring, the conscience became visible as the bearer of the human being's inner ethos of love and compassion. Experiences of health and suffering were interpreted as a struggle between guilt and responsibility, where conscience emerged as the road from ontological guilt to responsibility that leads the human being to what is true, beautiful and good in life. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  9. Psychiatric wards with locked doors--advantages and disadvantages according to nurses and mental health nurse assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, K; von Knorring, L; von Essen, L

    2006-04-01

    To describe nurses' and mental health nurse assistants' perceptions of advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door. Psychiatric staff sometimes needs to protect patients from harming themselves or others. To keep the entrance door locked may help staff to achieve this goal. How locked entrance doors at psychiatric wards are experienced by staff, working on these wards, has been investigated to a very limited extent. The study was explorative and descriptive. Audio taped, semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions about advantages and disadvantages about working on a psychiatric ward with a locked entrance door, were conducted with 20 nurses and 20 mental health nurse assistants. Data were analyzed with content analysis. A content analysis revealed eight categories of advantages and 18 categories of disadvantages. Most advantages mentioned by nurses and mental health nurse assistants were categorized as providing staff with control over patients, providing patients with a secure and efficient care and protecting patients and staff against 'the outside'. Most disadvantages mentioned by nurses were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, making patients feel dependent and creating a non-caring environment. Most disadvantages mentioned by mental health nurse assistants were categorized as causing extra work for staff, making patients feel confined, causing emotional problems for patients, making staff's power obvious and forcing patients to adapt to other patients' needs. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants mentioned more disadvantages than advantages and nurses mentioned more disadvantages than mental health nurse assistants. Nurses and mental health nurse assistants perceive a number of advantages and disadvantages for themselves, patients and significant others with a locked door at a psychiatric ward. Most of these concern patients' experiences. It is important for

  10. Standards for the mental health care of people with severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Part one describes conceptual issues underlying the development of South African standards for people with severe psychiatric disorders. Mental health care standards seek to describe what is an acceptable and adequate quality of mental health care for service users. A focus on service quality is especially crucial in ...

  11. The outcome of Mental Health Care Users admitted under Section ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The outcome of Mental Health Care Users admitted under Section 40 of the South African Mental Health Care Act (No 17 of 2002) ... i) being male, ii) being less than 35 years of age, iii) being unemployed, iv) having a lower level of education, v) having a past history of substance abuse and/or vi) a past psychiatric illness.

  12. [Perception of ethical aspects in psychiatric patient care: a pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenschlag, Franziska; Steinauer, Regine; Heimann, Regine; Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2014-10-01

    Research on staff perception of ethical aspects of psychiatric patient care are scarce; little is known about systematic supplies of ethics support in psychiatric institutions. The goal of this pilot study is to inform the implementation of Clinical Ethics Support Services in psychiatric institutions by assessing which topics of psychiatric practice are considered ethically challenging by the staff. Explorative survey as pilot study by questionnaire with clinical staff, quantitative (descriptive) and qualitative (coding) data-analysis. Involuntary treatment, the relationship between healthcare professionals and patients, staff shortage and the collaboration between the professions as well as dealing with patient relatives came up as ethical challenges. Clinical Ethics Support in psychiatric patient care should not only cover aspects that are specific for psychiatry, but also structural topics such as short resources, interprofessional collaboration and communication with relatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Psychiatric treatment and research unit for adolescent intensive care: the first adolescent forensic psychiatric service in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahila, K; Kilkku, N; Kaltiala-Heino, R

    2004-04-01

    Finland does not have a history of providing forensic adolescent psychiatric units although the need for this kind of service has been established. According to legislation patients who are minors have to be treated separately from adults, however, this has not been possible in practice. Also, adolescent psychiatric wards have not always been able to admit the most severely ill patients, those with impulsive and aggressive behaviours, because of lack of staff resources, problems associated with protecting other vulnerable patients and a shortage of secure environments. A previous report demonstrated the significant increase in adolescent's involuntary treatment within adult psychiatric wards. Data from this report were acknowledged as an important starting point in the planning process for the psychiatric treatment and research unit for adolescent intensive care. This paper describes the background, development process, plan of action, tailor-made education programme and supporting evidence for the first Finnish adolescent forensic service opened in April 2003 in the Department of Psychiatry, Tampere University Hospital. The tool used for planning the unit's activities and staff education programme was the Balanced Score Card approach, the structure and development of which is also outlined within the paper.

  14. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Early detection and treatment of these morbidities could prevent deterioration. The aim of the survey was to determine and compare the prevalence of ..... interventions. Increasing the detection rate of mental morbidity in the community is fundamental. The inclusion of mental health care as a component of primary health ...

  15. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    large extent can reduce financial barriers to options; including government budgetary health care access ..... managers and demand-side factors, such as. International Health Conference. New adverse selection in ... patients in the scheme, and patient demand for. Information Centre. 1995. insured services. Many previous ...

  16. The duality of suffering and trust: abused women's experiences of general psychiatric care--an interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örmon, Karin; Torstensson-Levander, Marie; Sunnqvist, Charlotta; Bahtsevani, Christel

    2014-08-01

    To elucidate how women subjected to physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse experience the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after the disclosure of abuse. Violence against women is a major global public health issue, which has an impact on women's lives and mental health as well as generating frequent hospital admission. Qualitative design with an inductive approach. Interviews with nine women who were recipients of general psychiatric care and had disclosed experiences of abuse to a member of staff were conducted. Qualitative inductive content analysis was used. The overall theme emerging from the narratives, 'dependency as a reality containing a duality of suffering and trust,' links the categories together. Each subcategory is presented in relation to the categories 'being belittled,' 'being misinterpreted' and 'being cared for.' Experiences of care as caring and noncaring were found in the narratives. Caring could include situations experienced as the women being acknowledged and listened to, situations where staff approached and supported the women in a sensitive way. Experiences of noncaring were when the abuse was disregarded, and when the women were not believed in, were left with burdens of guilt and were offended. A noncaring environment focused primarily on the diagnosis, and the experienced abuse was seen as secondary. Abused women are subjected to psychiatric environments where staff are divided into groups of those who believed in and supported the abused women and those who regarded experiences of abuse as a secondary issue and focused on the mental disorder. This study provides knowledge of how abused women experience the care provided at a general psychiatric clinic after the disclosure of abuse. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Detection of psychiatric morbidity in the primary medical care setting in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Mari,Jair de Jesus; Iacoponi,Eduardo; Williams,Paul; Simões,Oziris; Silva,João Batista Teodoro

    1987-01-01

    The aims of this study were a) to assess the ability of primary care doctors to make accurate ratings of psychiatric disturbance and b) to evaluate the use of a case-finding questionnaire in the detection of psychiatric morbidity. The estudy took place in three primary care clinics in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, during a six-month survey. A time sample of consecutive adult attenders were asked to complete a case-finding questionnaire for psychiatric disorders (the Self Report Questionnaire...

  18. Psychiatric consultation in the collaborative care model: The "bipolar sieve" effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, James R; James, James

    2017-08-01

    Around the world, psychiatrists are in exceptionally short supply. The majority of mental health treatment is delivered in primary care. In the United States, the Collaborative Care Model (CCM) addresses the shortfall of psychiatrists by providing indirect consultation in primary care. A Cochrane meta-analysis affirms the efficacy this model for depression and anxiety. However, our experience with the CCM suggests that most patients referred for consultation have problems far more complex than simple depression and anxiety. Based on preliminary data, we offer five linked hypotheses: (1) in an efficient collaborative care process, the majority of mental illnesses can be handled by providers who are less expensive and more plentiful than psychiatrists. (2) A majority of the remaining cases will be bipolar disorder variations. Differentiating these from PTSD, the most common alternative or comorbid diagnosis, is challenging and often requires a psychiatrist's input. (3) Psychiatric consultants can teach their primary care colleagues that bipolar diagnoses are estimations based on rigorously assessed probabilities, and that cases fall on a spectrum from unipolar to bipolar. (4) All providers must recognize that when bipolarity is missed, antidepressant prescription often follows. Antidepressants can induce bipolar mixed states, with extreme anxiety and potentially dangerous impulsivity and suicidality. (5) Psychiatrists can help develop clinical approaches in primary care that identify bipolarity and differentiate it from (or establish comorbidity with) PTSD; and psychiatrists can facilitate appropriate treatment, including bipolar-specific psychotherapies as well as use of mood stabilizers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mental Health: Knowledge, Attitudes and Training of Professionals on Dual Diagnosis of Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, S.; Stawski, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dual diagnosis (DD) refers to the coexistence of intellectual disability and psychiatric disorder. In order to provide individuals with DD with adequate care, it is essential for mental health workers to have adequate knowledge and positive attitudes. These may be achieved through proper training. Aims: To summarise the available…

  20. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... map [a-z] More VA More VA Health Health Care Information A-Z Health Topic Finder My Health ... General QUICK LIST Apply for Benefits Apply for Health Care Prescriptions My Health e Vet eBenefits Life Insurance ...

  1. Psychiatric services in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmebarek, Zoubir

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the current provision of psychiatric services in Algeria - in particular, in-patient and out-patient facilities, child psychiatry and human resources. Education, training, associations and research in the field of mental health are also briefly presented. The challenges that must dealt with to improve psychiatric care and to comply with international standards are listed, by way of conclusion.

  2. Impact of patient language proficiency and interpreter service use on the quality of psychiatric care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy M; Alegría, Margarita

    2010-08-01

    This literature review examined the effects of patients' limited English proficiency and use of professional and ad hoc interpreters on the quality of psychiatric care. PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) were systematically searched for English-language publications from inception of each database to April 2009. Reference lists were reviewed, and expert sources were consulted. Among the 321 articles identified, 26 met inclusion criteria: peer-reviewed articles reporting primary data on clinical care for psychiatric disorders among patients with limited proficiency in English or in the provider's language. Evaluation in a patient's nonprimary language can lead to incomplete or distorted mental status assessment. Although both untrained and trained interpreters may make errors, untrained interpreters' errors may have greater clinical impact, compromising diagnostic accuracy and clinicians' detection of disordered thought or delusional content. Use of professional interpreters may improve disclosure in patient-provider communications, referral to specialty care, and patient satisfaction. Little systematic research has addressed the impact of language proficiency or interpreter use on the quality of psychiatric care in contemporary U.S. settings. Findings are insufficient to inform evidence-based guidelines for improving quality of care among patients with limited English proficiency. Clinicians should be aware of the ways in which quality of care can be compromised when they evaluate patients in a nonprimary language or use an interpreter. Given U.S. demographic trends, future research should help guide practice and policy by addressing deficits in the evidence base.

  3. Community-based mental health care in Africa: mental health workers’ views

    OpenAIRE

    Alem, Atalay; JACOBSSON, LARS; Hanlon, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has for long proposed the development of community-based mental health services worldwide. However, the progress toward community mental health care in most African countries is still hampered by a lack of resources, with specialist psychiatric care essentially based in large, centrally located mental hospitals. It is again time to reconsider the direction of mental health care in Africa. Based on a small inquiry to a number of experienced mental health pro...

  4. Mental Health Issues in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, W David; Jones, V Faye

    2016-10-01

    Children in foster care have exceptional needs due to their histories of abuse, neglect, and increased exposure to violence. The rates of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and reactive attachment disorder, are much higher in children in foster care; furthermore, the rate of these children receiving psychotropic medications is 3 times that of children who are not in foster care. Pediatricians, in their role of providing a medical home, play a central role in safeguarding the physical and mental health of these children. By taking a trauma-informed approach to understanding the unique needs and gaps in their health care, pediatricians can improve the mental health and maximize outcome for children in foster care. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(10):e342-e348.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. [Statutory duties of German psychiatric outpatient clinics and their real care conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Stauber, Juan; Kilian, Reinhold

    2013-04-01

    This study examines whether psychiatric outpatient clinics fulfill their statutory role of providing psychiatric services for patients with severe mental disorders. A retrospective cross-sectional study on 1,672 patients of a psychiatric outpatient clinic for the year 2010, based on 30 variables. Associations between variables were explored by means of robust multivariate regression models and polynomial regression plots. The patients' average CGI value was found to be 5.98, the mean GAF-score 47.3, and the mean duration of illness 13.8 years. A third of the sample attempted suicide in the past. Metabolic comorbidity was found in 23.1 % of the sample. Results of regression analyses reveal positive effects of the disease severity and functional impairment on the use of psychiatric care. Patients with affective and schizophrenic disorders received more units of care and caused more costs. Patients living in nursing homes received less in- and outpatient care but caused more medication costs. Study results support the assumption that German psychiatric outpatient clinics fulfill their statutory duties by treating severely chronically mentally ill patients. The patients' use of care is positively related to the disease severity and their functional impairment. However, results of the regression analyses suggest that patients living in nursing homes received less psychiatric care than patients who live more independently. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care were...... assessed: Compliance with current guidelines on initiation of 1) combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), 2) chemoprophylaxis, 3) frequency of laboratory monitoring, and 4) virological response to cART (proportion of patients with HIV-RNA 90% of time on cART). RESULTS: 7097 Euro...... to North, patients from other regions had significantly lower odds of virological response; the difference was most pronounced for East and Argentina (adjusted OR 0.16[95%CI 0.11-0.23, p HIV health care utilization...

  7. Mental Health Services Use Across the Life Course in Adults with Psychiatric Disorders and Prior Suicidal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Amy L.; Lai, Amy X.; Arean, Patricia; Nelson, Craig; Yaffe, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Little is known about mental health services use by adults with prior suicidal behavior and current (12-month) psychiatric disorders. This study determined nationally representative prevalence estimates of current mental health services use by these adults, examining racial/ethnic, age, and gender differences. Methods Services use was examined across the life course using 1139 adults with history of suicidal behavior and current mood or anxiety disorders in the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES, 2001–2003). Results Overall services use was 47.3%. Across the life course, African Americans showed greater use that increasingly paralleled that by white non-Hispanics and Hispanics/Others, whose use decreased in the latter half of the life course (p interaction=.01). Conclusions Adults with prior suicidal behavior and current psychiatric disorders have low mental health services use. Findings of racial/ethnic disparities in use can help identify those in need of care. PMID:26766753

  8. Health-Care Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    The Broad Acres clinic is one of 1,500 school-based health centers nationwide that bring a wide range of medical, nutritional, and mental-health care to millions of students and their families. The centers provide an important safety net for children and adolescents--particularly the more than 10 million today who lack health insurance, according…

  9. Organizing Rural Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    The liberalization of health care in the course of three decades of ‘reform and opening up’ has given people in rural China access to a diverse range of treatment options, but the health care system has also been marred by accusations of price hikes, fake pharmaceuticals, and medical malpractice...... roads to healing. The recent introduction of new rural cooperative medicine in the township represents an attempt to bring the state back in and address popular concern with the cost and quality of health care. While superficially reminiscent of the traditional socialist system, this new state attempt...

  10. Mental health and psychiatric pharmacy instruction in US colleges and schools of pharmacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cates, Marshall E; Monk-Tutor, Mary R; Drummond, Stephanie Ogle

    2007-01-01

    To describe the extent of psychiatric pharmacy instruction in US pharmacy curricula, including course and faculty characteristics and mental health topics taught in clinical therapeutics-based courses...

  11. Quality of psychiatric referrals to secondary-level care | Struwig ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. This study examined the quality of referrals to secondary-level outpatient psychiatric services rendered by the. Department of Psychiatry, University of the Free State. Referral letters were evaluated according to specific quality criteria. Aspects that would enable secondary-level doctors to make informed decisions ...

  12. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Primary Health Care Department, Ikpoba Okha Local Government Area, Benin City, Nigeria. 1. 2. Adam V.Y , Iseh A.E. ABSTRACT. Introduction. The level of accurate knowledge adolescents have about HIV/AIDS, is important to enhance effective preventive actions, which ultimately result in a decrease in the incidence of ...

  13. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterobacter spp. 1. 0.6. Table V: Proportion of Respondent that enter the Ward with Handheld Device. Table VI: Proportion of Respondent that Disinfect Phones and what they Disinfect with. Table VII: Hand Hygiene Practices. JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL. 27, NO 1, MARCH ...

  14. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    globally, (Ischaemic heart diseases, Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), which. 5 cerebrovascular diseases, lower ... tract infections, chronic obstructive than 86% of the world's population. Tobacco pulmonary diseases ... and delivery of smoking cessation services among health care workers in Abuja. A cross sectional ...

  15. Stories of change: the text analysis of handovers in an Italian psychiatric residential care home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordini, M; Saita, E; Irtelli, F; Buratti, M; Savuto, G

    2017-05-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: There is a growing emphasis on communication as a result of the move towards the more inclusive approach associated with the community-based rehabilitation model. Therefore, more importance is attached to handovers. Besides ensuring transfer of information, handovers enhance group cohesion, socialize staff members to the practices of the service and capture its organizational culture. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: While handovers are mainly used for information transfer and to manage the services' daily routine, this paper offers an insight on how handovers can be conceived as valuable instruments to document cultural and organizational change. Only a limited amount of studies has focused on handovers in mental healthcare settings, and most of them only consider the perspectives of psychiatric nurses, while embracing a broader perspective, this paper provides valuable insights into the perspectives of various service providers. The overcoming of the dichotomy deficit-based vs. recovery-oriented model is possible if professionals use handovers to reflect upon their practice and the ways in which their cultural models are affected by the environmental context. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Handovers are valuable instruments to document organizational change. It would be important for psychiatric and rehabilitation facilities to keep track of the handover records over time as they may provide insightful information about cultural change and the transformations in the core values and beliefs held by professionals. Handovers assure a timely and correct information transfer while socializing workers to the service's culture; however, no study describes them as instruments to document organizational change and only a few have focused on psychiatric settings. Aim To investigate the change in the culture of an Italian psychiatric residential care home as perceived by its mental health workers (MHWs) over the course of

  16. Resilient health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, E.; Braithwaite, J.; Wears, R. L.

    Health care is everywhere under tremendous pressure with regard to efficiency, safety, and economic viability - to say nothing of having to meet various political agendas - and has responded by eagerly adopting techniques that have been useful in other industries, such as quality management, lean...... production, and high reliability. This has on the whole been met with limited success because health care as a non-trivial and multifaceted system differs significantly from most traditional industries. In order to allow health care systems to perform as expected and required, it is necessary to have...... engineering's unique approach emphasises the usefulness of performance variability, and that successes and failures have the same aetiology. This book contains contributions from acknowledged international experts in health care, organisational studies and patient safety, as well as resilience engineering...

  17. Health care engineering management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzembski, W B

    1980-01-01

    Today, health care engineering management is merely a concept of dreamers, with most engineering decisions in health care being made by nonengineers. It is the purpose of this paper to present a rationale for an integrated hospital engineering group, and to acquaint the clinical engineer with some of the salient features of management concepts. Included are general management concepts, organization, personnel management, and hospital engineering systems.

  18. Coercion in psychiatric care: can paternalism justify coercion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mi Kyung; Kim, Seung Hyun; Rhee, MinKyu

    2013-05-01

    It has long been debated whether coercion can be justified as paternalism in the field of mental health and it is still a continuing issue of controversy today. This study analyses whether coercive intervention in mental health can be justified by the basic assumptions of paternalists: the assumption of incompetence, the assumption of dangerousness and the assumption of impairment. This study involved 248 patients: 158 (63.7%) were diagnosed with schizophrenia and 90 (36.3%) were diagnosed with mood disorder. In this study, experiences of coercion were divided into legal status, subjective (perceived coercion) and objective experiences (experienced coercion). The assumption of incompetence was justified in all three categories of coercion whereas the assumption of dangerousness was not justified in any. The assumption of impairment was not justified in legal status and perceived coercion, but provided a partial explanation to serve as a basis for justifying experienced coercive measures. It can be noted that mental health experts who support paternalism without question must reconsider their previous methods. Above all, the reason why the assumption of dangerousness was not justified in any of the categories of coercion was because coercive intervention used to prevent harm to oneself and others must be very carefully carried out.

  19. Predictors of shared decision making and level of agreement between consumers and providers in psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Sadaaki; Salyers, Michelle P; Matthias, Marianne S; Collins, Linda; Thompson, John; Coffman, Melinda; Torrey, William C

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively examine elements of shared decision making (SDM), and to establish empirical evidence for factors correlated with SDM and the level of agreement between consumer and provider in psychiatric care. Transcripts containing 128 audio-recorded medication check-up visits with eight providers at three community mental health centers were rated using the Shared Decision Making scale, adapted from Braddock's Informed Decision Making Scale (Braddock et al. 1997, 1999, 2008). Multilevel regression analyses revealed that greater consumer activity in the session and greater decision complexity significantly predicted the SDM score. The best predictor of agreement between consumer and provider was "exploration of consumer preference," with a four-fold increase in full agreement when consumer preferences were discussed more completely. Enhancing active consumer participation, particularly by incorporating consumer preferences in the decision making process appears to be an important factor in SDM.

  20. An approach to measure compliance to clinical guidelines in psychiatric care

    OpenAIRE

    Forsner, Tord; Wistedt, Anna Åberg; Brommels, Mats; Forsell, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to measure six months compliance to Swedish clinical guidelines in psychiatric care after an active supported implementation process, using structured measures derived from the guidelines. Methods In this observational study four psychiatric clinics each participated in active implementation of the clinical guidelines for the assessment and treatment of depression and guidelines for assessment and treatment of patients with suicidal behaviours dev...

  1. [Humanization in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Beatriz Rosana Gonçalves de; Collet, Neusa; Viera, Cláudia Silveira

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to reflect on humanization in health care, recovering the history of understanding about mankind, the human and humanity, until humanization in humanity and health. We discuss the national humanization program in hospital care and reflect on this proposal and on the issue of humanization in Brazilian health care nowadays. Communication is indispensable to establish humanization, as well as technical and material conditions. Both users and health professionals need to be heard, building a network of dialogues to think and promote singular humanization actions. For this process to take effect, there is a need to involve the whole that makes up the health service. This group involves different professionals, such as managers, public policy makers, professional councils and education institutions.

  2. The Concept of Patient Participation in Forensic Psychiatric Care: The Patient Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Mikael; Almqvist, Kjerstin; Kjellin, Lars; Schröder, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    The importance of patient participation is advocated in medical treatment and nursing care and has been linked to increased quality of care, increased patient satisfaction, and treatment adherence. Still, patients in forensic psychiatric care often report being unhappy with their experienced level of participation. The concept of patient participation is complex and has several definitions, thus it is important to investigate it from different perspectives in different contexts. The aim of this study was to describe patients' perceptions of the concept of patient participation in forensic psychiatric care. A qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach was used, and interviews with 19 participants in a Swedish setting were completed. The participants described the concept of patient participation in forensic psychiatric care as follows: influence, to have good communication and to be involved; confidence, to have mutual trust and to trust the care; and own responsibility, to participate in activities and to take the initiative. On the basis of the results of this study, improved patient participation in forensic psychiatric care may be achieved with active communication, by building up and maintaining trust for professional competence and by encouraging patients' own responsibility. It is important that knowledge about patients' views of the concept of patient participation is included in the planning and improvement of forensic care.

  3. The use of humor in the care of psychiatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chrysodimitra Galatou; Evangelia Kotrotsiou; Angeliki Statharou

    2012-01-01

    Humor is defined as a state of good spirit, exhibited with a smile or laughter, as a response to external stimuli. It constitutes a special form of human communication as well as a form of social conduct. The word «humor» appears for the first time in Hippocrates' writings. Psychology considers humor as one of the most powerful weapons against depression and disappointment. In psychiatric therapeutics humor serves many purposes, thereby acting as a supplement, not a substitute to treatment re...

  4. [From the psychiatric sector to the mental health territory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiron, Anne-Sophie; Deloro, Cyrille

    2013-01-01

    There is currently a noticeable change in public health policy, as well as a paradigm shift with the policy of a mental health territory. From a humanist sector policy, centred on the patient, we are moving towards a policy of a mental health territory, which, although taking into account the changing needs of a group of people, no longer considers the specific needs of the individual. The notion of a geographic breakdown of the organisation of care is becoming predominant.

  5. Health habits, attitudes and behavior towards oral health of psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. People with psychiatric disorders are at high risk of oral diseases due to the impact of their primary psychiatric condition and the side-effects of antipsychotic medications. Objective. The aim of this study was to identify habits, attitudes and behavior towards oral health of hospitalized psychiatric patients with psychotic disorders, including mood disorders with psychotic characteristics, as well as to identify factors that could influence those habits, attitudes and behavior. Methods. The experimental group consisted of 186 hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders (87 males and 99 females, aged from 18 to 59 years (mean age 46.0±8.0 years. The control group consisted of 186 healthy persons matched for age and gender. Data were obtained by using specially designed questionnaires with questions about the subjects' social, economic and demographic characteristics, as well as their habits, attitudes and behaviour concerning their oral health, in a form of a standardized interview. Other medical data were collected from medical documentation of disease history. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t-test, Chi-square test, ANOVA, Logistic Regression and simultaneous multiple regression. Results. Psychiatric patients have worse habits, attitudes and behavior concerning their oral health in comparison with healthy persons (p<0.001: they wash their teeth more rarely and in a shorter time, have less knowledge of oral diseases and their effect on general health, and visit their dentist more rarely. The obtained results depend on social, economic and demographic characteristics and on the underlying illness of patients. Conclusion. Health educational work concerning oral health of patients should be included in psychiatric treatment, as a part of an existing therapy with the aim of improving the general quality of their life.

  6. [The Development of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing in Taiwan: Reflection From the Perspective of Recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Biau; Tsai, Sing-Ling

    2017-06-01

    Evidence-based nursing science has identified psychological recovery, partnership, and medication adherence as factors that have influenced the development of mental health care. This article discusses the process by which mental health care has developed from a medical / rehabilitation-focused model to a model that focuses on patient empowerment. The current model aims to assist patients to achieve self-awareness and to develop coping skills that enhance their motivation to transform. Medical advances have improved the control of psychiatric symptoms. Following the introduction of 2nd generation antipsychotics, patients were invited to establish decisions related to these prescription medications. Under the principles of patient-centered service, Taiwanese mental health professionals have changed their relationship with patients from a therapeutic model to a mutual-partnership model. Furthermore, investigations of the therapeutic care of patients with mental illness have used the needs of patients as their starting point and emphasized various aspects of patient and caregiver needs. Taiwanese mental health professionals are searching for a model of mental health care that is superior to the traditional operative framework of medical authority.

  7. Psychiatric genetic research at the National Institute of Mental Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, K.; Mullican, C.; Maestri, N. [NIMH/NIH, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-15

    For some time it has been known through the results of family, twin, and adoption studies that hereditary appears to play a significant casual role in many mental disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other mood disorders, Alzheimer`s Disease, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism, dyslexia, and Tourette`s syndrome. The precise patterns of inheritance of these complex disorders have not been determined, nor have the relevant genes been localized or cloned. Because the genetics are complex and because there is also clearly an environmental contribution to behavior, we expect the analysis of the genetics of mental illness to be arduous and not quickly resolved. There are several compelling reasons to continue to focus our attention on uncovering the genetic factors for severe mental illness. Prominent among these are the implications for better treatment of mental disorders. The National Institute of Mental Health supports a wide range of studies on psychiatric genetic research. 16 refs.

  8. Health care technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  9. Clinical Education In psychiatric mental health nursing: Overcoming current challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heeseung; Hwang, Boyoung; Kim, Sungjae; Ko, Heesung; Kim, Sumi; Kim, Chanhee

    2016-04-01

    In response to current challenges in psychiatric mental health nursing education, nursing schools have implemented new strategies in teaching undergraduate nursing students. The objectives of the study were to evaluate learning outcomes of a mental health nursing clinical practicum and to explore students' perceptions of the clinical practicum. This was a mixed-method study. Sixty-three undergraduate nursing students, who were undertaking their first mental health clinical practicum, completed a set of structured questionnaires and answered open-ended questions about the clinical practicum. Answers to open-ended questions were analyzed qualitatively, and learning outcomes (i.e., empathy, mental illness prejudice, simulation-related efficacy, and satisfaction) were measured at three time points: pre-clinical, post-simulation, and post-clinical. Students reported improvement in empathy and simulation-related self-efficacy after the clinical practicum, but no change was found in mental illness prejudice. Students' expectations for and evaluation of the clinical practicum are summarized. The observed improvement in learning outcomes of the clinical practicum may be attributed to the unique contribution of each component of the clinical practicum and the synergic effect of these diverse components. To manage emerging challenges in clinical settings and nursing education, it is critical to develop systematic and comprehensive mental health nursing clinical practicums for undergraduate nursing students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ask me what is in my heart of hearts! The core question of care in relation to parents who are patients in a psychiatric care context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, Nina Elisabeth; Eriksson, Katie; Bondas, Terese

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to understand the experience of being cared for in psychiatric care as a patient and as a parent. Parenthood represents the natural form of human caring, a human directedness regardless of gender. The study has its starting point in this image, as it applies to mothers who receive care as provided in a psychiatric care context. The theoretical perspective is the theory of caritative caring, and the methodological approach is the philosophical hermeneutics outlined by Gadamer. The sample was purposeful: 10 mothers who experienced being a mother while suffering from mental illness and receiving care from professionals in psychiatric specialist health care contexts. The interpretation process is inductive, deductive, and abductive, and includes different levels of rational, contextual, existential, and ontological interpretation supported by the chosen theoretical perspective and the philosophy of ethics outlined by Emmanuel Levinas. The interpretation on the contextual level shows that the patients do not talk about their inner feelings concerning themselves as mothers in the care relationship. The interpretation on the existential level reveals the meaning of the mothers’ experiences of inner struggle between their inner demands and assuming a mask of silence. The patients’ experiences on the ontological level were interpreted as a struggle between the responsibility inherent in human being and the fear of condemnation. At the ontological level, a new hypothesis of the understanding of the meaning of the parents’ experiences was formulated: Being in care as a patient and as a parent means struggling to restore one's responsibility as a human being. This new understanding paves the way for caring of the patient who is a parent. PMID:27342047

  11. Ask me what is in my heart of hearts! The core question of care in relation to parents who are patients in a psychiatric care context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Elisabeth Blegen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to understand the experience of being cared for in psychiatric care as a patient and as a parent. Parenthood represents the natural form of human caring, a human directedness regardless of gender. The study has its starting point in this image, as it applies to mothers who receive care as provided in a psychiatric care context. The theoretical perspective is the theory of caritative caring, and the methodological approach is the philosophical hermeneutics outlined by Gadamer. The sample was purposeful: 10 mothers who experienced being a mother while suffering from mental illness and receiving care from professionals in psychiatric specialist health care contexts. The interpretation process is inductive, deductive, and abductive, and includes different levels of rational, contextual, existential, and ontological interpretation supported by the chosen theoretical perspective and the philosophy of ethics outlined by Emmanuel Levinas. The interpretation on the contextual level shows that the patients do not talk about their inner feelings concerning themselves as mothers in the care relationship. The interpretation on the existential level reveals the meaning of the mothers’ experiences of inner struggle between their inner demands and assuming a mask of silence. The patients’ experiences on the ontological level were interpreted as a struggle between the responsibility inherent in human being and the fear of condemnation. At the ontological level, a new hypothesis of the understanding of the meaning of the parents’ experiences was formulated: Being in care as a patient and as a parent means struggling to restore one's responsibility as a human being. This new understanding paves the way for caring of the patient who is a parent.

  12. Ask me what is in my heart of hearts! The core question of care in relation to parents who are patients in a psychiatric care context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, Nina Elisabeth; Eriksson, Katie; Bondas, Terese

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to understand the experience of being cared for in psychiatric care as a patient and as a parent. Parenthood represents the natural form of human caring, a human directedness regardless of gender. The study has its starting point in this image, as it applies to mothers who receive care as provided in a psychiatric care context. The theoretical perspective is the theory of caritative caring, and the methodological approach is the philosophical hermeneutics outlined by Gadamer. The sample was purposeful: 10 mothers who experienced being a mother while suffering from mental illness and receiving care from professionals in psychiatric specialist health care contexts. The interpretation process is inductive, deductive, and abductive, and includes different levels of rational, contextual, existential, and ontological interpretation supported by the chosen theoretical perspective and the philosophy of ethics outlined by Emmanuel Levinas. The interpretation on the contextual level shows that the patients do not talk about their inner feelings concerning themselves as mothers in the care relationship. The interpretation on the existential level reveals the meaning of the mothers' experiences of inner struggle between their inner demands and assuming a mask of silence. The patients' experiences on the ontological level were interpreted as a struggle between the responsibility inherent in human being and the fear of condemnation. At the ontological level, a new hypothesis of the understanding of the meaning of the parents' experiences was formulated: Being in care as a patient and as a parent means struggling to restore one's responsibility as a human being. This new understanding paves the way for caring of the patient who is a parent.

  13. Palliative care in mental health facilities from the perspective of nurses: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenblij, K; Widdershoven, G A M; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B D; de Kam, H; Pasman, H R W

    2016-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Nurses play an important role in monitoring and supporting patients and their relatives at the end of life. To date, there is a lack of recent empirical research on the experiences of psychiatric nurses in providing palliative care to psychiatric patients who suffer from life-threatening physical co-morbidity. The limited literature available indicates that palliative care for psychiatric patients needs to be improved. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This explorative study is unique in offering an insight into current palliative care practice for psychiatric patients and showed that one in three nurses working in Dutch mental health facilities is involved in palliative care provision. Important elements of palliative care, i.e.: care domains, multidisciplinary approach, early recognition and family care are recognized by nurses. Moreover, in palliative care for psychiatric patients there is more attention for psychosocial and spiritual care compared to palliative care for patients without psychiatric disorders. Patient characteristics and little attention for palliative care within mental health facilities were found to hamper timely and adequate palliative care provision by nurses. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCH AND PRACTICE?: Educating psychiatric nurses about palliative care and close collaboration between physical and mental health care are crucial to address the palliative care needs of this vulnerable patient group. Since mental health care is increasingly provided ambulatory, the development of palliative care for psychiatric patients outside mental health facilities should be closely monitored. Introduction Recent empirical research on palliative care for psychiatric patients is lacking. Aim The aim of this study was to explore nurses' experiences with and identify barriers to providing palliative care to psychiatric patients in Dutch mental health facilities. Methods Mixed-methods; 137 nurses working in

  14. The professional psychiatric/mental health nurse: skills, competencies and supports required to adopt recovery-orientated policy in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, E; Killoury, F; Nugent, L E

    2017-03-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Nationally and internationally there has been a movement away from the traditional medical model towards a more holistic recovery-oriented approach to mental health care delivery. At every level of service provision the emphasis is firmly on recovery and on facilitating active partnership working and involvement of service users, their carers and family members. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This is the first study to identify on a national level specific areas of care that are addressed most or least by psychiatric and mental health nurses in care planning for mental health service users in Ireland. In addition, this is the first study to identify nationally how the recovery approach is being implemented by psychiatric and mental health nurses in relation to current recovery-orientated policy. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Mental healthcare staff require more education on the recovery concept and this needs to be multidisciplinary team wide. Further research is required to establish how best to develop a shared approach to working with service users and their families within the mental healthcare environment. Further investigation is required to help determine how funding could be allocated appropriately for education and training and service development nationally. Introduction The restructuring of national mental health policy to an integrated recovery ethos demands a clarification in the psychiatric/mental health nurse's role, skills and competencies. Aim/Question To explore the psychiatric/mental health nurse's role and identify skills, competencies and supports required to adopt recovery-orientated policy in practice. Method An exploratory mixed methods study in multiple health services in Ireland with N = 1249 psychiatric/mental health nurses. Data collection used a survey, focus groups and written submissions. Data analysis used descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Results The medical

  15. Questioning Care in Mental Health: Professionalization of Home Health Care Based on In Home Therapeutic Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Gouveia Passos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present how to operate home health care practices. It describes  the influence of the experience given by the Italian psychiatric reform in democratic societies, with emphasis on the intervening dimensions and replacement services. The study indicates the guidelines and strategies established for the promotion of health care in individuals under psychological distress in the deinstitutionalization process. It also addresses the professionalization and the performance of caretakers in home services. Based on a review of the literature, this paper poses some questions to guide the ways outlined for the construction and establishment of professional practices by mental health caregivers.

  16. A crisis of credibility: professionals' concerns about the psychiatric care provided to clients of the child welfare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, J Curtis; Fedoravicius, Nicole; Rowe, Jill; Zima, Bonnie T; Ware, Norma

    2007-05-01

    This study examined child welfare and mental health professionals' views of the quality of psychiatric services received by consumers of the child welfare system and explored root causes of perceived quality problems. One hundred and thirty child welfare, mental health and court professionals participated in qualitative interviews individually or in groups. Data analyses identified perceived problems in quality and perceived causes of quality problems. Participants in member checking groups were then asked to comment on and further clarify the results. The participants reported concerns related to overuse of psychotropic medication, overmedicated children, short inpatient stays, and continuity of psychiatric care. Overuse of psychotropic medications and overmedication were perceived to be driven by short evaluations, liability concerns, short inpatient stays and a lack of clinical feedback to psychiatrists from child welfare partners. Medicaid reimbursement policies were at the heart of several quality concerns. These problems contributed to a distrust of psychiatric practices among child welfare professionals. These findings underscore the adverse effects of modern marketplace medicine coupled with low Medicaid reimbursement rates on quality of care for vulnerable groups. Child welfare and mental health professionals and their associated stakeholders may together possess substantial clout to advocate for a reimbursement system and structure that promotes quality service. The findings also point to a crisis of credibility toward psychiatric practice among social service and other non-psychiatrist mental health professionals. Efforts are needed to increase the capacity for psychiatrists and child welfare professionals to communicate effectively with each other and for psychiatrists to receive the information that they need from their child welfare partners to ensure accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.

  17. Perceived mental health related stigma, gender, and depressive symptom severity in a psychiatric facility in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Magdalena; Raguram, R; Rao, Deepa

    2014-06-01

    Few studies exist on the topic of gender associated with depression and mental health-related stigma coming out of non-Western countries such as India. We aimed to add to the literature by assessing these relationships among adults seeking psychiatric services in India. Participants were 60 individuals seeking care at a psychiatric clinic in Bangalore, India. The majority of participants were female with a mean age of 36 years (SD=9.75). Contrary to our prediction, there were no significant differences between men (M=28.96; SD=9.85) and women (M=33.03; SD=12.08) on depression severity, t(58)=1.42, p=.16. Yet, women (M=10.09, SD=8.23) reported significantly more perceived stigma than men (M=5.79, SD=5.86), t(58)=2.30, p=.02. While men and women seeking psychiatric services at the psychiatric clinic in India report similar levels of depression severity, women reported more perceived mental illness stigma. Having experienced regular forms of discrimination associated with female status in India, it may be the case that women are more attuned to other forms of stigma, such as mental health stigma investigated in the present study. Given the detrimental impact of stigma on treatment adherence and engagement in care, additional research is needed support this work, including research on interventions to reduce stigma and improve engagement in care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mental health nurses' perceptions of patient safety culture in psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaideh, S H

    2017-12-01

    Mental health nurses have a crucial role in preventing medical incidents and in promoting safety culture because they provide and coordinate most of patients' care. Therefore, they are able to enhance patients' outcomes and reduce nurses' injuries. The aims of this study were to assess the perception of mental health nurses about patients' safety culture and to detect the factors which may affect patients' safety culture at psychiatric hospitals. A predictive correlational design was employed to collect data about patient safety culture and safety outcomes from 224 mental health nurses working in psychiatric hospitals using Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Positive scores to patients' safety culture dimensions ranged between 13.4% and 81.2%. Two-thirds of mental health nurses perceived safety as excellent/very good, 20.5% perceived it as acceptable and 10.8% perceived it as poor/failing. Overall perception of safety correlated significantly with four dimensions and explained 32.6% of the variance. Frequency of events reported correlated significantly with six dimensions and explained 23.1% of the variance. Of the 12 dimensions of patients' safety culture, only one was strong, six within acceptable range and five were weak and need improvement. Healthcare managers and policy-makers should encourage educational interventions and help to establish a reporting system that focus on improving systems, not on blaming individuals and encourage open communication among mental healthcare workers. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  19. Primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romualdez, A

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a short discussion of essential concepts in primary health care based on the Alma Ata Declaration of 1978 and a brief description of the Philippine Ministry of Health primary health program. The phrase primary health care implies that PHC is a package of goods to be delivered to people, whereas in fact it is an approach to health care which emphasizes community involvement and participation in health development. Community participation is too often taken to mean that communities should participate in programs designed, implemented, and run by health professionals. PHC however requires that health programs be designed, implemented, run by, and belong to the people of the community. External agencies and health professionals must find ways of becoming involved and participating in the community's programs. A thorough reorientation of health professionals, particularly doctors and nurses, away from technology and toward the ideals and wisdom of the people is needed if PHC is to succeed. PHC should provide the bridge between technological knowledge and indigenous wisdom. The national government is embarking on a nationwide PHC program, with structures being organized at national, regional, provincial, municipal, and barangay levels for PHC. The higher organizational levels are intended to ensure access to their available resources to complement resources at the lower levels, especially at the critical barangay level. Because over 70% of the national population lives in rural areas, the national government's effort through the Ministry of Health will stress rural needs and approaches. Different approaches will be needed for poor urban communities, and the Manila Health Department may be able to provide leadership for developing the new ideas needed to tailor health development programs to Filipino urban communities.

  20. Health care in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Schers, H.J.; Timmermans, A.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes Dutch experiences of health care reform--in particular in primary care--with emphasis on lessons for current United States health care reforms. Recent major innovations were the introduction of private insurance based on the principles of primary care-led health care and

  1. Health care utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Serritzlew, Søren

    An important task in governing health services is to control costs. The literatures on both costcontainment and supplier induced demand focus on the effects of economic incentives on health care costs, but insights from these literatures have never been integrated. This paper asks how economic cost...... containment measures affect the utilization of health services, and how these measures interact with the number of patients per provider. Based on very valid register data, this is investigated for 9.556 Danish physiotherapists between 2001 and 2008. We find that higher (relative) fees for a given service...... make health professionals provide more of this service to each patient, but that lower user payment (unexpectedly) does not necessarily mean higher total cost or a stronger association between the number of patients per supplier and the health care utilization. This implies that incentives...

  2. Experiences of self-injury and aggression among women admitted to forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenius, Heidi; Strand, Susanne

    2017-05-01

    Self-injury and institutional violence are well-known characteristics of female forensic psychiatric patients, but research on patients' experiences of these behaviours is limited. The aim of the study was to investigate how female forensic psychiatric patients describe their self-injury and aggression. The authors performed qualitative in-depth interviews with 13 female forensic psychiatric inpatients. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis resulted in three themes describing the process of handling negative thoughts and emotions by using self-injury or aggression towards others and thereby experiencing satisfaction. Both self-injury and aggression were experienced as strategies for emotional regulation. The forensic psychiatric care was perceived as important for the women in developing less harmful strategies for coping with negative thoughts and emotions instead of injuring themselves or others. Self-injury and aggression are often risk-assessed separately, but results from the present study suggest that these behaviours need a more holistic approach.

  3. Utilization of health care services by depressed patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Depression is a common psychiatric disorder in primary health care throughout the world with increasing incidence and prevalence. ... Therefore, it is recommended that general practitioners and other health workers need to be better equipped to deal with the diagnosis and management of depression.

  4. Utilization of health care services by depressed patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... Utilization of health care services by depressed patients in Jos, Nigeria lead to chronicity and deterioration of the depression, psychiatric complications, such as substance abuse, suicide attempts, and decline in physical health and recurrent visit to general practitioners. This leads to enormous utilization.

  5. Health Care Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    and people of all ages with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a kidney transplant). Medicaid is a federal and...living care. “Medicine has been slow to confront the very changes that it has been responsible for – or to apply the knowledge we already have about how...challenge to the nation. Challenges of the Industry As already outlined, a number of challenges confront the U.S. health care industry. Below are six

  6. Health care reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušič, Dorjan; Prevolnik Rupel, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country.

  7. Health care reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marušič Dorjan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country.

  8. Ações de saúde mental no Programa Saúde da Família: confluências e dissonâncias das práticas com os princípios das reformas psiquiátrica e sanitária Mental health care in the Family Health Program: consensus and dissent in practices and principles under the psychiatric reform and health reform in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Nunes

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Em um grande número de Reformas Psiquiátricas que se sedimentam sobre os pressupostos básicos da não-institucionalização dos pacientes psiquiátricos e da consolidação de bases territoriais do cuidado em saúde mental, a ênfase é atribuída a uma rede de cuidados que contemple a rede de atenção primária. No Brasil, a Reforma Psiquiátrica Brasileira nasce no bojo da Reforma Sanitária, guardando em comum princípios que reorientariam o modelo de atenção. Neste artigo, discutiremos as articulações entre esses dois movimentos por intermédio das práticas concretas do cuidado de saúde mental no Programa Saúde da Família (PSF, tomando como base um estudo etnográfico com quatro equipes de saúde da família, em que priorizamos a narrativa dos trabalhadores de saúde. Analisaremos, dessas práticas, discrepâncias entre o proposto normativo e o instituído, fatores dificultadores e conquistas da operacionalização das ações e limites da confrontação e potencialidades da transversalidade de campos epistemológicos particulares como a clínica ampliada da saúde mental e do PSF. Moveremos nossa discussão com base em conceitos como modelo psicossocial do cuidado, integralidade da atenção, participação social, territorialidade, ações coletivas, entre outros.In many psychiatric reforms based on the principles of deinstitutionalization of psychiatric patients and the consolidation of territorial systems for mental health care, the emphasis is on a mental health care system that includes the primary care network. In Brazil, the Psychiatric Reform emerged within the country's overall Health Reform, with which it shares common principles for reorienting the model of care. The current article discusses the links between these two movements through actual mental health care practices within the Family Health Program (FHP, based on an ethnographic study with four family health teams, in which the authors prioritize health workers

  9. A nested case-control study of the risk of suicide attempts after discharge from psychiatric care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Erik; Jensen, Børge

    2008-01-01

    The literature suggests that the risk of suicide is high within the first weeks after discharge from psychiatric care, but practically no studies have estimated the risk of suicide attempt after discharge from psychiatric care. The aim of this study was to examine the risk level for suicide attempt...... after discharge from psychiatric care, and to control for effects from psychiatric diagnoses, number and length of previous admission. An analysis of the role of co-morbid substance use disorder in suicide attempts risk was completed. The study is a Danish register-based nested case-control study; 3037...... cases were identified from Register for Suicide Attempts, and 60,295 individuals, matched by gender and age, were identified for comparison. Retrospective personal data on psychiatric care was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. Risk of suicide attempts was estimated by the use...

  10. Psychiatric services in primary care settings: a survey of general practitioners in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saipanish Ratana

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General Practitioners (GPs in Thailand play an important role in treating psychiatric disorders since there is a shortage of psychiatrists in the country. Our aim was to examine GP's perception of psychiatric problems, drug treatment and service problems encountered in primary care settings. Methods We distributed 1,193 postal questionnaires inquiring about psychiatric practices and service problems to doctors in primary care settings throughout Thailand. Results Four hundred and thirty-four questionnaires (36.4% were returned. Sixty-seven of the respondents (15.4% who had taken further special training in various fields were excluded from the analysis, giving a total of 367 GPs in this study. Fifty-six per cent of respondents were males and they had worked for 4.6 years on average (median = 3 years. 65.6% (SD = 19.3 of the total patients examined had physical problems, 10.7% (SD = 7.9 had psychiatric problems and 23.9% (SD = 16.0 had both problems. The most common psychiatric diagnoses were anxiety disorders (37.5%, alcohol and drugs abuse (28.1%, and depressive disorders (29.2%. Commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs were anxiolytics and antidepressants. The psychotropic drugs most frequently prescribed were diazepam among anti-anxiety drugs, amitriptyline among antidepressant drugs, and haloperidol among antipsychotic drugs. Conclusion Most drugs available through primary care were the same as what existed 3 decades ago. There should be adequate supply of new and appropriate psychotropic drugs in primary care. Case-finding instruments for common mental disorders might be helpful for GPs whose quality of practice was limited by large numbers of patients. However, the service delivery system should be modified in order to maintain successful care for a large number of psychiatric patients.

  11. Paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity: ethical perspectives in encounters with patients in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto-Piri, Veikko; Engström, Karin; Engström, Ingemar

    2013-12-06

    Psychiatric staff members have the power to decide the options that frame encounters with patients. Intentional as well as unintentional framing can have a crucial impact on patients' opportunities to be heard and participate in the process. We identified three dominant ethical perspectives in the normative medical ethics literature concerning how doctors and other staff members should frame interactions in relation to patients; paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse statements describing real work situations and ethical reflections made by staff members in relation to three central perspectives in medical ethics; paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity. All staff members involved with patients in seven adult psychiatric and six child and adolescent psychiatric clinics were given the opportunity to freely describe ethical considerations in their work by keeping an ethical diary over the course of one week and 173 persons handed in their diaries. Qualitative theory-guided content analysis was used to provide a description of staff encounters with patients and in what way these encounters were consistent with, or contrary to, the three perspectives. The majority of the statements could be attributed to the perspective of paternalism and several to autonomy. Only a few statements could be attributed to reciprocity, most of which concerned staff members acting contrary to the perspective. The result is presented as three perspectives containing eight values.•Paternalism; 1) promoting and restoring the health of the patient, 2) providing good care and 3) assuming responsibility.•Autonomy; 1) respecting the patient's right to self-determination and information, 2) respecting the patient's integrity and 3) protecting human rights.•Reciprocity; 1) involving patients in the planning and implementation of their care and 2) building trust between staff and patients. Paternalism clearly appeared to be the dominant

  12. Medication adherence in schizophrenia: The role of insight, therapeutic alliance and perceived trauma associated with psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Arnaud; Boyer, Laurent; Husky, Mathilde; Baylé, Franck; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Misdrahi, David

    2017-11-01

    Medication non adherence in schizophrenia is a major cause of relapse and hospitalization and remains for clinicians an important challenge. This study investigates the associations between insight, therapeutic alliance, perceived trauma related to psychiatric treatment and medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia. In this multicenter study, 72 patients were assessed regarding symptomatology, self-reported adherence with medication, insight, medication side-effects, therapeutic alliance and perceived trauma related to psychiatric treatment. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to test predicted paths among these variables. The data fit a model in which medication adherence was directly predicted by insight, therapeutic alliance and perceived trauma related to psychiatric treatment. Perceived trauma moderates the role of insight on medication adherence. The final model showed good fit, based on four reliable indices. Greater adherence was correlated with higher insight, higher therapeutic alliance and lower perceived trauma. These three variables appear to be important determinants of patient's medication adherence. Medication adherence could be enhanced by reducing perceived trauma and by increasing insight. The need for mental health providers to acknowledge patients' potentially traumatic experience with psychiatric treatment and the need to encourage greater involvement in care are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nursing care community health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Acosta-Salazar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Process Nursing Care (PAE is a systematic tool that facilitates the scientificity of care in community practice nurse, the application of scientific method in community practice, allows nursing to provide care in logical, systematic and comprehensive reassessing interventions to achieve the proposed results. It began with the valuation of Marjory Gordon Functional Patterns and then at the stage of diagnosis and planning North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC is interrelate. It is a descriptive and prospective study. Diagnosis was made by applying the instruments measuring scale of the socio-demographic characteristics, symptom questionnaire for early detection of mental disorders in the community and appreciation for functional patterns. The PAE includes more frequent diagnoses, criteria outcomes, indicators, interventions and activities to manage community issues. alteration was evidenced in patterns: Adaptation and Stress Tolerance, Self-perception-Self-concept-, Role-Relationships, sleep and rest and Perception and Health Management. A standardized NANDA-NIC-NOC can provide inter care holistic care from the perspective of community mental health with a degree of scientific nature that frames the professional work projecting the individual, family and community care.

  14. Workplace violence in the hospital psychiatric setting. An occupational health perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, B

    1996-12-01

    1. Assault directed against psychiatric staff is emerging as a serious occupational health problem. Governmental regulatory agencies, unions, and academic research have identified workplace assault in the psychiatric setting as a serious workplace health issue. 2. Violence directed against psychiatric nursing personnel is increasing. Increases in assault are related to shorter hospitalizations, cutbacks in mental health services, and the increasing number of clients with criminal histories and personality disorders. 3. Reduction in staff assault can best be accomplished using an injury epidemiology occupational health focus. Identifying hazards, energy transfer mechanisms, and other environmental factors contributing to staff injuries can reduce or eliminate the morbidity associated with client assault.

  15. Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing in China: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiuying; Li, Xin-Min; Xu, Dongmei; Wang, Wenqiang

    2017-10-01

    The mental health service model and policy have undergone dramatic changes and are moving toward the establishment of integrated service network-based community mental health services in China. But there are still some issues, such as shortage of resources, a relatively low rate of psychiatric treatment, lack of the knowledge about mental health in the general population, and stigma associated with mental disorders. This paper summarizes the history of psychiatric and mental health nursing in China and analyzes the characteristics of the current situation. There are healthcare challenges for psychiatric and mental health nurses with the mental health services reform by government, and in this paper we discuss future trends and provide suggestions for development of the psychiatric nursing profession, and mental health services reform. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. American Health Care Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program SNF Requirements of Participation SNF Value-Based Purchasing (SNF VBP) Survey and Regulatory Therapy Services Workforce ... out, stay informed and spread. Looking for more information reguarding Prefered Provider Program Quality Care Book Store ... ​ ​​​ ​ Nursing Home Administrator | Benedictine Health System US - MO - St. Louis, Qualifications Required: Bachelor’s degree ...

  17. Home health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Home Care Services Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  18. Accountability in Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrangbæk, Karsten; Byrkjeflot, Haldor

    2016-01-01

    adjustment of such frameworks. In this article we present a framework for analyzing accountability within health care. The paper makes use of the concept of "accountability regime" to signify the combination of different accountability forms, directions and functions at any given point in time. We show...

  19. Mental health related Internet use among psychiatric patients: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalckreuth, Sophie; Trefflich, Friederike; Rummel-Kluge, Christine

    2014-12-24

    The Internet is of great importance in today's health sector, as most Internet users utilize online functions for health related purposes. Concerning the mental health care sector, little data exist about the Internet use of psychiatric patients. It is the scope of this current study to analyze the quantity and pattern of Internet usage among mental health patients. Patients from all services of the Department of Psychiatry at a university hospital were surveyed by completing a 29-item questionnaire. The data analysis included evaluation of frequencies, as well as group comparisons. 337 patients participated in the survey, of whom 79.5% were Internet users. Social media was utilized by less than half of the users: social networks (47.8%), forums (19.4%), chats (18.7%), blogs (12.3%). 70.9% used the Internet for mental health related reasons. The contents accessed by the patients included: information on mental disorders (57.8%), information on medication (43.7%), search for mental health services (38.8%), platforms with other patients (19.8%) and platforms with mental health professionals (17.2%). Differences in the pattern of use between users with low, medium and high frequency of Internet use were statistically significant for all entities of social media (p mental health services (p = 0.017) and usage of platforms with mental health professionals (p = 0. 048). The analysis of differences in Internet use depending on the participants' type of mental disorder revealed no statistically significant differences, with one exception. Regarding the Internet's role in mental health care, the participants showed differing opinions: 36.2% believe that the Internet has or may have helped them in coping with their mental disorder, while 38.4% stated the contrary. Most psychiatric patients are Internet users. Mental health related Internet use is common among patients, mainly for information seeking. The use of social media is generally less frequent. It varies

  20. Hours and Miles: Patient and Health System Implications of Transfer for Psychiatric Bed Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. O’Neil

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An increasing number of behavioral health (BH patients are presenting to the emergency department (ED while BH resources continue to decline. This situation may lead to more external transfers to find care. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients presenting to a tertiary care academic ED from February 1, 2013, through January 31, 2014. Patients were identified through electronic health record documentation of psychiatric consultation during ED evaluation. We reviewed electronic health records for demographic characteristics, diagnoses, payer source, ED length of stay, ED disposition, arrival method, and distance traveled to an external facility for inpatient admission. Univariable and multivariable associations with transfer to an external facility in comparison with patients admitted internally were evaluated with logistic regression models and summarized with odds ratios (OR. Results: We identified 2,585 BH visits, of which 1,083 (41.9% resulted in discharge. A total of 1,502 patient visits required inpatient psychiatric admission, and of these cases, 177 patients (11.8%; 95% CI = [10.2-13.5] required transfer to an external facility. The median ED length of stay for transferred patients was 13.9 hours (interquartile range [IQR], 9.3-20.2 hours; range, 3.0-243.0 hours. The median distance for transport was 83 miles (IQR, 42-111 miles; range, 42-237 miles. In multivariable analysis, patients with suicidal or homicidal ideation had increased risk of transfer (odds ratio [OR] [95% CI], 1.93 [1.22-3.06]; P=0.005. Children younger than 18 years (OR [95% CI], 2.34 [1.60- 3.40]; P<0.001 and adults older than 65 years (OR [95% CI], 3.46 [1.93-6.19]; P<0.001 were more likely to require transfer and travel farther to access care. Conclusion: Patients requiring external transfer for inpatient psychiatric care were found to have prolonged ED lengths of stay. Patients with suicidal and homicidal ideation as well

  1. The outpatient care of psychiatric patients in a rural area: Mhala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reviews the quality of outpatient care provided by the psychiatric service in the Mhala district of Northern Transvaal. A retrospective survey of 488 patient cards was undertaken at the end of 1989. Diagnoses showed a high proportion of epileptic (48%) and schizophrenic (22%) disorders, but few mood disorders ...

  2. Prevalence of burnout among public health nurses in charge of mental health services and emergency care systems in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Hirohisa; Nakao, Hiroyuki; Nakagi, Yoshihiko; Niwata, Satoko; Sugioka, Yoshihiko; Itoh, Toshihiro; Yoshida, Takahiko

    2006-11-01

    The Community Health Act came into effect in 1997 in Japan. This act altered the work system for public health nurses (PHNs) in public health centers (PHCs) nationwide from region-specific to service-specific work. Such major changes to working environment in the new system seem to be exposing PHNs to various types of stress. The present study examined whether prevalence of burnout is higher among PHNs in charge of mental health services (psychiatric PHNs) than among PHNs in charge of other services (non-psychiatric PHNs), and whether attributes of emergency mental health care systems in communities are associated with increased prevalence of burnout. A questionnaire including the Pines burnout scale for measuring burnout was mailed to 525 psychiatric PHNs and 525 non-psychiatric PHNs. The 785 respondents included in the final analysis comprised 396 psychiatric PHNs and 389 non-psychiatric PHNs. Prevalence of burnout was significantly higher for psychiatric PHNs (59.2%) than for non-psychiatric PHNs (51.5%). When prevalence of burnout in each group was analyzed in relation to question responses regarding emergency service and patient referral systems, prevalence of burnout for psychiatric PHNs displayed significant correlations to frequency of cases requiring overtime emergency services, difficulties referring patients, and a feeling of "restriction". Prevalence of burnout is high among psychiatric PHNs, and inadequate emergency mental health service systems contribute to burnout among these nurses. Countermeasures for preventing such burnout should be taken as soon as possible.

  3. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The psychiatric conditions identi ed were mood disorders (depression and mania) and anxiety ... Depression also may be a consequence of HIV – induced. 11 brain injury or antiretroviral treatment. Anxiety can accompany depression or be seen as a disorder by .... This should be of great concern to the government and ...

  4. Ethnic Disparities in School-Based Behavioral Health Service Use for Children with Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Jill; Kang-Yi, Christina D.; Pellecchia, Melanie; Marcus, Steven; Hadley, Trevor; Mandell, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: We examined racial/ethnic disparities in school-based behavioral health service use for children with psychiatric disorders. Methods: Medicaid claims data were used to compare the behavioral healthcare service use of 23,601 children aged 5-17 years by psychiatric disorder (autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD],…

  5. Psychiatric inpatient expenditures and public health insurance programmes: analysis of a national database covering the entire South Korean population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Woojin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical spending on psychiatric hospitalization has been reported to impose a tremendous socio-economic burden on many developed countries with public health insurance programmes. However, there has been no in-depth study of the factors affecting psychiatric inpatient medical expenditures and differentiated these factors across different types of public health insurance programmes. In view of this, this study attempted to explore factors affecting medical expenditures for psychiatric inpatients between two public health insurance programmes covering the entire South Korean population: National Health Insurance (NHI and National Medical Care Aid (AID. Methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study used a nationwide, population-based reimbursement claims dataset consisting of 1,131,346 claims of all 160,465 citizens institutionalized due to psychiatric diagnosis between January 2005 and June 2006 in South Korea. To adjust for possible correlation of patients characteristics within the same medical institution and a non-linearity structure, a Box-Cox transformed, multilevel regression analysis was performed. Results Compared with inpatients 19 years old or younger, the medical expenditures of inpatients between 50 and 64 years old were 10% higher among NHI beneficiaries but 40% higher among AID beneficiaries. Males showed higher medical expenditures than did females. Expenditures on inpatients with schizophrenia as compared to expenditures on those with neurotic disorders were 120% higher among NHI beneficiaries but 83% higher among AID beneficiaries. Expenditures on inpatients of psychiatric hospitals were greater on average than expenditures on inpatients of general hospitals. Among AID beneficiaries, institutions owned by private groups treated inpatients with 32% higher costs than did government institutions. Among NHI beneficiaries, inpatients medical expenditures were positively associated with the proportion of

  6. Juvenile mental health courts for adjudicated youth: role implications for child and adolescent psychiatric mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burriss, F Antoinette; Breland-Noble, Alfiee M; Webster, Joe L; Soto, Jose A

    2011-05-01

    Juvenile mental health courts for adjudicated youth. To describe the role of psychiatric nurses in reducing mental health disparities for adjudicated youth via juvenile mental health courts. ISI Web of Knowledge; Sage Journals Online; HighWire; PubMed; Google Scholar and Wiley Online Library and websites for psychiatric nursing organizations. Years included: 2000-2010. Juvenile mental health courts may provide a positive and effective alternative to incarceration for youth with mental health problems with psychiatric nurses playing a key role in program implementation. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Potential for substitution of mental health care towards family practices: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnée, Tessa; de Beurs, Derek P; Boxem, Richard; de Bakker, Dinny H; Verhaak, Peter F

    2017-01-31

    Substitution is the shift of care from specialized health care to less expensive and more accessible primary health care. It seems promising for restraining rising mental health care costs. The goal of this study was to investigate a potential for substitution of patients with psychological or social problems, but without severe psychiatric disorders, from Dutch specialized mental health care to primary care, especially family practices. We extracted anonymized data from two national databases representing primary and specialized care in 2012. We calculated the number of patients with and without psychiatric disorder per 1,000 citizens in three major settings: family practices, primary care psychologists, and specialized care. Family physicians recorded psychopathology using the International Classification of Primary Care, while psychologists and specialists used the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition. Considerable numbers of patients without a diagnosed DSM-IV psychiatric disorder were treated by primary care psychologists (32.8%) or in specialized care (20.8%). Over half of the patients referred by family physicians to mental health care did not have a psychiatric disorder. A recent reform of Dutch mental health care, including new referral criteria, will likely increase the number of patients with psychological or social problems that family physicians have to treat or support. Enabling and improving diagnostic assessment and treatment in family practices seems essential for substitution of mental health care.

  8. From ideals to resignation - interprofessional teams perspectives on everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Jenny; Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren; Ringnér, Anders; Lindgren, Britt-Marie

    2016-11-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Psychiatric inpatient care has been described by both ward staff and patients as being demanding and disorganized, lacking opportunities for quality interactions in everyday life through joint activities. Qualitative research on interprofessional teams' perspectives on everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care is lacking. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Staff have ideals about care and collaboration, but the obstacles they face in everyday life, such as a poor environment, power asymmetry, lacking structure and the demands of managing chaos, mean that they appear to resign and shift focus from the patients' best interests to self-survival. Different professions in general describe the same obstacles in everyday life on the wards but there are also profession-specific perspectives on distancing and feelings of abandonment. To our knowledge, these findings have not been reported in the international evidence. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Given these findings we suggest interventions such as Protected Engagement Time as well as reflective dialogues within interprofessional teams. This would help staff to resume their caring role in everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care and put their ideals into practice. Introduction Patients and ward staff describe psychiatric inpatient care as demanding, characterized by unpredictable events, yet research on interprofessional teams perspectives of everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care lacks. Aim This study aims to explore everyday life processes in psychiatric inpatient care, as reported by staff in interprofessional teams. Method A grounded theory design was used and 36 participants were interviewed. Results The analysis resulted in a process-oriented core category From ideals to resignation. Related to this core category were three further categories: Knowing where to go, Walking a path of obstacles and Shifting focus from the patient's best

  9. Women's health and behavioral health issues in health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jean Lau; Yee, Barbara W K; Banks, Martha E

    2014-01-01

    As health care reform promises to change the landscape of health care delivery, its potential impact on women's health looms large. Whereas health and mental health systems have historically been fragmented, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates integrated health care as the strategy for reform. Current systems fragment women's health not only in their primary care, mental health, obstetrical, and gynecological needs, but also in their roles as the primary caregivers for parents, spouses, and children. Changes in reimbursement, and in restructuring financing and care coordination systems through accountable care organizations and medical homes, will potentially improve women's health care.

  10. [Primary health care contributes to global health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aabenhus, Mette Morre; Schriver, Michael; Kallestrup, Per

    2012-05-28

    Global health interventions often focus on specific diseases, thus forming vertical programmes. Studies show that vertical programmes perform poorly, which underlines the need for a horizontal basis: universal community-based primary health care, which improves health equity and outcomes. The diagonal approach supports an integrated patient-centered health-care system. The ''15% by 2015''-initiative suggests that vertical programmes invest 15% of their budgets in strengthening integrated primary health care. Strategies depend on local context.

  11. The effectiveness of psychiatric partial hospitalization and day care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schene, A. H.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this article is to review recent literature on partial hospitalization and day care in order to answer the following questions: (1) For what percentage of patients otherwise hospitalized is partial hospitalization a good alternative? (2) What is the (cost)-effectiveness

  12. Processes of In-Hospital Psychiatric Care and Subsequent Criminal Behaviour Among Patients With Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Charlotte Gjørup; Olrik Wallenstein Jensen, Signe; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: It is unknown whether evidence-based, in-hospital processes of care may influence the risk of criminal behaviour among patients with schizophrenia. Our study aimed to examine the association between guideline recommended in-hospital psychiatric care and criminal behaviour among patients...... with schizophrenia. Methods: Danish patients with schizophrenia (18 years or older) discharged from a psychiatric ward between January 2004 and March 2009 were identified using a national population-based schizophrenia registry (n = 10 757). Data for in-hospital care and patient characteristics were linked with data...... on criminal charges obtained from the Danish Crime Registry until November 2010. Results: Twenty per cent (n = 2175) of patients were charged with a crime during follow-up (median = 428 days). Violent crimes accounted for 59% (n = 1282) of the criminal offences. The lowest risk of crime was found among...

  13. Care in psychiatric hospital under the perspective of a nursing team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mara de Melo Tavares

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed at describing the perception of the nursing team concerning the care in a psychiatric hospital. The research used a qualitative approach, exploratory type, using focus group technique, with five participants, in August 2011, in Niteroi, RJ, Brazil. From the data analysis five categories emerged, covering: sensitive listening; personal availability; therapeutic projects; human issues of the team; Traditional Psychiatry vs. Psychosocial Paradigm tension. It was concluded that despite the research, the subjects were still working at the hospital model. It was possible to bring awareness in a human, comprehensive and complete manner. But this perception of care has frailties once it does not bring any evidence of scientific basis of nursing. It is recommended that the professional nursing team invest in their role of caring in the context of the Psychiatric Reform, in the pursuit of an approach centered on the subject and in his way of living.

  14. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    @hotmail.com, A.Ehigiegba@shell.com. KEYWORDS. Volunteer,. Obio Cottage. Hospital,. Participants,. Nigeria journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care.

  15. Types of health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Types of health care providers URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001933.htm Types of health care providers To ...

  16. Understanding your health care costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000878.htm Understanding your health care costs To use the sharing features on this ... This is the payment you make for certain health care provider visits and prescriptions. It is a set ...

  17. [Empathy fatigue and psychiatric care of the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazif-Thomas, Cyril; Thomas, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is one of the qualities which enable caregivers to develop high quality care. The circumstances of professional practice such as pressure and lack of time can see this quality pushed to one side. The risk of burnout is all the greater as empathy alone does not protect caregivers from submitting themselves to their hierarchy. Compassion, on the other hand, enables caregivers to actively take on their responsibilities. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Do electronic health records affect the patient-psychiatrist relationship? A before & after study of psychiatric outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuyler Mark

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of literature shows that patients accept the use of computers in clinical care. Nonetheless, studies have shown that computers unequivocally change both verbal and non-verbal communication style and increase patients' concerns about the privacy of their records. We found no studies which evaluated the use of Electronic Health Records (EHRs specifically on psychiatric patient satisfaction, nor any that took place exclusively in a psychiatric treatment setting. Due to the special reliance on communication for psychiatric diagnosis and evaluation, and the emphasis on confidentiality of psychiatric records, the results of previous studies may not apply equally to psychiatric patients. Method We examined the association between EHR use and changes to the patient-psychiatrist relationship. A patient satisfaction survey was administered to psychiatric patient volunteers prior to and following implementation of an EHR. All subjects were adult outpatients with chronic mental illness. Results Survey responses were grouped into categories of "Overall," "Technical," "Interpersonal," "Communication & Education,," "Time," "Confidentiality," "Anxiety," and "Computer Use." Multiple, unpaired, two-tailed t-tests comparing pre- and post-implementation groups showed no significant differences (at the 0.05 level to any questionnaire category for all subjects combined or when subjects were stratified by primary diagnosis category. Conclusions While many barriers to the adoption of electronic health records do exist, concerns about disruption to the patient-psychiatrist relationship need not be a prominent focus. Attention to communication style, interpersonal manner, and computer proficiency may help maintain the quality of the patient-psychiatrist relationship following EHR implementation.

  19. Mental Health and Psychiatric Pharmacy Instruction in US Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marshall E Cates; Mary R Monk-Tutor; Stephanie Ogle Drummond

    2007-01-01

      To describe the extent of psychiatric pharmacy instruction in US pharmacy curricula, including course and faculty characteristics and mental health topics taught in clinical therapeutics-based courses...

  20. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  1. Standards for the mental health care of people with severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Introduction. In the first part of this two-part series, a number of conceptual issues regarding the development of stan- dards for the mental health care of people with severe psychiatric disorders in South Africa were addressed.1. This part presents the methods that were followed to develop standards, and the results of the ...

  2. The economic burden of personality disorders in mental health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeteman, D.I.; Hakkaart-van Roijen, L.; Verheul, R.; Busschbach, J.J.V.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Some evidence suggests that personality disorders are associated with a high economic burden due to, for example, a high demand on psychiatric, health, and social care services. However, state-of-the-art cost studies for the broad range of personality disorder diagnoses are lacking. The

  3. Integrated Care in College Health: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Cary; Sloan, Sarah K.; Vance, Mary; Brownson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This case study describes 1 international student's treatment experience with an integrated health program on a college campus. This program uses a multidisciplinary, mind-body approach, which incorporates individual counseling, primary care, psychiatric consultation, a mindfulness-based cognitive therapy class, and a meditation group.

  4. Standards for the mental health care of people with severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Standards for the mental health care of people with severe psychiatric disorders in South Africa: Part 1. Conceptual issues. National and provincial departments must publish standards for the level and quality of services they will provide, including the introduction of new services to those who have previously been denied ...

  5. Differences between Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses' family-focused practice in adult mental health services

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grant, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric nurses\\' practice with parents who have mental illness, their children and families is an important issue internationally. This study provides a comparison of Irish and Australian psychiatric nurses\\' family-focused practices in adult mental health services. Three hundred and forty three nurses across Ireland and 155 from Australia completed the Family Focused Mental Health Practice Questionnaire. Cross-country comparisons revealed significant differences, in terms of family-focused skill, knowledge, confidence and practice. Australian psychiatric nurses engaged in higher family-focused practice compared to Irish nurses. The comparative differences between countries may be attributable to differences in training, workplace support and policy.

  6. [Children and adolescents in foster care: health problems and guidelines for their health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliván Gonzalvo, G

    2003-02-01

    In Spain, between 8,000 and 10,000 children and adolescents enter foster or residential care every year. This article aims to provide a review to increase knowledge of the health problems of minors in foster care.Sixty-five percent of the studies consulted were performed in the USA, 25 % in Spain and 10 % in other developed and industrialized countries. These studies report that a high percentage of these minors present complicated and serious physical, mental, and/or developmental problems. However, no appreciable qualitative differences in the most frequent health problems presented by these minors have been observed and there is general consensus that the high-priority health needs are the provision of preventive and/or therapeutic psychopedagogic, psychiatric, dermatologic, dental, nutritional, ophthalmologic, respiratory and immunization services. Failure to identify and provide early treatment of the health needs of these minors not only adversely affects their quality of life and future physical, emotional and intellectual development, but can also increase their difficulties in adaptation while in foster care and their future social adaptation. Their permanent relationship with the biological or adoptive family when foster care stops could also be jeopardized. Therefore, all children and adolescents in foster care should receive initial health screenings, comprehensive assessments and monitoring of their physical, mental health, and developmental status. We provide guidelines for the healthcare of these minors, which should be of use to healthcare professionals taking care of these children and adolescents while they remain in foster care.

  7. A Q fever outbreak in a psychiatric care institution in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, R.P.M.; Schimmer, B.; Rensen, H.; Biesheuvel, M.; Bruin, A. de; Lohuis, A.; Horrevorts, A.; Lunel, F.V.; Delsing, C.E.; Hautvast, J.L.A.

    2011-01-01

    In May 2008 the Nijmegen Municipal Health Service (MHS) was informed about an outbreak of atypical pneumonia in three in-patients of a long-term psychiatric institution. The patients had been hospitalized and had laboratory confirmation of acute Q fever infection. The MHS started active case finding

  8. Championing person-first language: a call to psychiatric mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mary E; Pease, Elizabeth A; Lambert, Kris; Hickman, Diane R; Robinson, Ora; McCoy, Kathleen T; Barut, Jennifer K; Musker, Kathleen M; Olive, Dana; Noll, Connie; Ramirez, Jeffery; Cogliser, Dawn; King, Joan Kenerson

    2013-01-01

    At the heart of recovery-oriented psychiatric mental health care are the dignity and respect of each person and the ways in which helping professionals convey a person's uniqueness, strengths, abilities, and needs. "Person-first language" is a form of linguistic expression relying on words that reflect awareness, a sense of dignity, and positive attitudes about people with disabilities. As such, person-first language places emphasis on the person first rather than the disability (e.g., "person with schizophrenia" rather than "a schizophrenic"). This article champions the use of person-first language as a foundation for recovery-oriented practice and enhanced collaborative treatment environments that foster respect, human dignity, and hope.

  9. Clinical outcomes and satisfaction of patients of clinical nurse specialists in psychiatric-mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradell, J G

    1995-10-01

    Survey research was conducted to examine clinical outcomes and satisfaction of patients of psychiatric mental health clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). Patients who had terminated from outpatient psychotherapy with 6 CNSs in 1993 were mailed a questionnaire (N = 223). Follow-ups by mail yielded a response rate of 45% (n = 100). The questionnaires included the Profile of Mood States-Short Form ([POMS-SF]; McNair, Lorr, & Droppleman, 1992). Quality of Life Function ([QOL]; Lehman, 1991), and Patient Satisfaction Scale (Baradell, 1994). Paired difference t-tests were used to evaluate clinical outcomes. Percentages were used to report satisfaction, and Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationship between clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The mean age for respondents was 37 years; 82% were female. Diagnoses included depression (46%), adjustment disorders (34%), anxiety (10%), and other (10%). Patients reported significant improvement in all clinical symptoms: anxiety, depression, anger, confusion, fatigue and vigor. Patients reported significant improvement in all domains of QOL: family, social, and job. Patients reported a very high level of satisfaction with the care provided. The more clinical improvement the patients reported, the more satisfied they were with the care provided. If nurses are to be included in a reformed health care delivery system in the future, additional research is essential.

  10. Killing the mother of one's child: psychiatric risk factors among male perpetrators and offspring health consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysell, Henrik; Dahlin, Marie; Långström, Niklas; Lichtenstein, Paul; Runeson, Bo

    2016-03-01

    To study possible psychiatric and criminological risk factors of intimate partner femicide (IPF) as well as the bereaved offspring's psychiatric morbidity and premature death. We conducted a nested case-control study, based on Swedish national registries, including all perpetrators of IPF. We computed risk estimates relative to matched population controls, which were compared to those of non-IPF homicide offenders. Exposed children were matched to population controls and followed longitudinally up to 37 years. Offspring outcomes were psychiatric and substance use disorders (according to ICD) self-harm; violent crime; suicide; and premature, all-cause death. We identified 261 male IPF perpetrators and 494 bereaved children from 1973 through 2009. Multivariable logistic regression suggested that major mental disorder (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 5.9; 95% CI, 3.3-10.6) and violent crime convictions (adjusted OR = 4.4; 95% CI, 2.7-7.2) were independent risk factors of IPF, but substance use disorders were not (aOR = 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2-1.0). Children exposed to IPF before age 18 years had elevated risks of major mental disorder (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 5.7; 95% Cl, 3.0-10.6), substance use disorders (adjusted HR = 5.8; 95% CI, 2.8-11.9) and self-harm (adjusted HR = 5.7; 95% CI, 3.0-11.1). Offspring 18 years or older at the IPF had an increased risk of completed suicide (adjusted HR = 4.3; 95% CI, 1.3-14.5). Previous major mental disorder and violent behavior were strong independent risk factors for IPF. Bereavement caused by IPF had significant associations with the offspring's future life, especially for those below 18 years of age at exposure. Our findings demonstrate the need of direct support to the exposed offspring by health care providers and social services. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  11. All this happened, more or less: thoughts on 'truth', the role of fiction and its potential application in mental health and psychiatric nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biley, F C

    2009-12-01

    Fundamental differences in the philosophy of history as an academic discipline are briefly explored, primarily from two perspectives. The traditional psychiatric and mental health nursing historian objectively uses primary sources in order to be able to make 'truth' claims about the past. The post-modern psychiatric nursing historian, on the other hand, constructs truth claims, rather than discovers them, and in the process of doing so creates historical discourses that are different from the past. To the postmodern psychiatric nursing historian, all histories are fictions, created with the use of imagination, and have characteristics that are similar to the literary constructions that are more traditionally identified as fiction. A variety of literature is used in order to explore such claims, and the conclusion is drawn that, with caution and careful attention to the rigorous use of historical method, fiction can be used as a valid source for historical research in psychiatric and mental health nursing.

  12. Comparison of psychiatric disability on the health of nation outcome scales (HoNOS) in resettled traumatized refugee outpatients and Danish inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palic, Sabina; Kappel, Michelle; Nielsen, Monica

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, the mental health issues of traumatized refugees are mainly documented in terms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. Importantly, there are no reports of the level of psychiatric disability in treatment seeking traumatized refugees resettled in the West...... and social domains. The rate of pre- to post-treatment improvement on the HoNOS was smaller for the traumatized refugees than it was for the psychiatric inpatients. CONCLUSIONS: The level, and the versatile profile, of psychiatric disability on the HoNOS point to complex bio-psycho-social problems...... in resettled treatment seeking traumatized refugees. Thus, a broader assessment of symptoms and better cooperation between psychiatric, health care, and social systems is necessary in order to meet the treatment needs of this group....

  13. A measure of South Africa's health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Selincourt, K

    Nurses provide the bulk of health care in South Africa. For example, in 1 of the biggest and poorest townships Khayelitsha, nurses treat malnourished mothers and children and offer primary health care services. Physicians tend to work in township clinics on a part-time basis and supervise nurse-advised treatments over the telephone. Most physicians do not speak the language of the people living in the township which is Xhosa. Thus they often depend on a nurse to serve as interpreter for Xhosa-speaking patients which takes the nurse away from her duties. Some clinics never receive physician supervision or services. Nurses spend much of their time sharing their skills and knowledge with clients. Nutrition workers and other staff back up nurses at the clinics. They sometimes are mothers whose children were at one time malnourished. Since they have the basic skills and knowledge, clinic staff provide treatment for straightforward conditions such as scabies. Nurses working in hospital in Khayelitsha also have many responsibilities. For example, they do the initial psychiatric assessment and decide whether to send a patient immediately to Valkenburg Psychiatric Hospital or to schedule the patient for an appointment with the physician at the satellite psychiatric clinic at Khayelitsha Hospital where psychiatrists come only twice/week. They sometimes make home visits which results in them also providing primary care. Unlike nurses not working in the hospital, the nurses at the hospital have good medical support. Both black and white nurses in South Africa work in the same clinics despite the country's policy of separateness. A shortage of nurses is 1 reason for this integration. Black nurses still encounter discrimination when applying for jobs and, until recently, made less money for the same work than white nurses.

  14. Family dental health care service

    OpenAIRE

    Riana Wardani

    2008-01-01

    The Family Dental Health Care Service is a new approach that includes efforts to serve oral and dental patients that focuses on maintenance, improvement and protection. This oral and dental health approach uses basic dentistry science and technology. The vision of the Family Dental Health Care Service is the family independences in the effort of dental health maintenance and to achieve the highest oral and dental health degree as possible through family dentist care that is efficient, effecti...

  15. Fatores preditores da sobrecarga subjetiva de familiares de pacientes psiquiátricos atendidos na rede pública de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil Predictors of subjective burden for families of psychiatric patients treated in the public health care system in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Martins Barroso

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram investigados os fatores preditores da sobrecarga subjetiva em familiares de pacientes psiquiátricos, sendo entrevistados 150 familiares de pacientes selecionados aleatoriamente em quatro serviços de saúde mental de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Utilizou-se a Escala de Sobrecarga dos Familiares de Pacientes Psiquiátricos (FBIS-BR e um questionário sócio-demográfico para coleta dos dados. As variáveis foram agrupadas em categorias temáticas analisadas separadamente para determinar a importância relativa dos fatores preditores. Os resultados mostraram que a sobrecarga subjetiva associou-se à sobrecarga objetiva e a fatores relacionados às condições clínicas dos pacientes, às condições de vida, estado de saúde e condições financeiras do cuidador e do paciente e às informações sobre o transtorno mental. O grau de sobrecarga subjetiva era menor quando o cuidador tinha lazer, atividades religiosas, admitia cuidar e tinha sentimentos positivos pelo paciente. Constatou-se a necessidade de incluir o acompanhamento aos familiares no modelo comunitário de atendimento psiquiátrico.This study investigated the predictors of subjective burden for families of psychiatric patients. We interviewed 150 relatives of patients randomly selected in four mental health care services in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Subjects were interviewed with the Family Burden Interview Schedule (FBIS-BR and a standardized socio-demographic questionnaire. Variables were grouped into thematic categories and separately analyzed to determine the relative importance of predictive factors. The results showed that subjective burden is influenced by objective burden and by factors related to the patient's clinical condition, the caregiver's and patient's living and health conditions and financial status, and increased demand for information on mental illness. Subjective burden was less when the caregiver practiced leisure and religious

  16. International health care spending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieber, G J; Puollier, J P

    1986-01-01

    Trends in health are reviewed for the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) covering the following: the basic difficulties inherent in international comparative studies; the absolute levels of health expenditures in 1984; the levels and rates of growth of the health share in the gross domestic product (GDP) and the public share of total health expenditures; the elasticities of real health expenditures to real GDP for the 1960-75, 1975-84, and 1960-84 time periods; growth in health expenditures for the largest 7 OECD countries in terms of growth in population, health prices, health care prices in excess of overall prices, and utilization/intensity of services per person. International comparisons are a problem due to differences in defining the boundaries of the health sector, the heterogeneity of data, and methodological problems arising from comparing different economic, demographic, cultural, and institutional structures. The most difficult problem in international comparisons of health expenditures is lack of appropriate measures of health outcome. Exhibit 1 contains per capita health expenditures denominated in US dollars based on GDP purchasing power parities for 21 OECD countries for 1984. Per capita health expenditures ranged from less than $500 in Greece, Portugal, and Spain to over $1400 in Sweden and the US, with an OECD average of $871. After adjusting for price level differences, there still appears to be a greater than 3-fold difference in the "volume" of services consumed across the OECD countries. To determine if per capita health expenditures are related to a country's wealth as measured by its per capita GDP, the relationship between per capita health expenditures and per capita GDP for the 21 countries were examined for 1984. The data points and the "best fitting" trend line indicate a statistically significant relationship in which each $100 difference in per capita GDP is associated with a $10

  17. Child and adolescent experience of and satisfaction with psychiatric care: a critical review of the research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering, P

    2010-02-01

    This review paper contributes to better understanding of child and adolescent perception of quality of psychiatric care and should therefore be of interests for those who are concerned with the development and improvement of psychiatric care. * The review shows that the concept of patient satisfaction in child and adolescent psychiatric care is still underdeveloped and that few valid instruments have been developed to measure the concept. * The review helps to clarify the concept of adolescent satisfaction with psychiatric care by indentifying the universal components of the concept. * The paper concludes that children's perception of quality of care differs from their parents' and that quality assessment of children and adolescents needs to be heeded. Abstract Users' perspectives ought to be a determining factor for assessing the quality of psychiatric care and hence their perspectives need to be thoroughly understood. There is a lack of comprehensive knowledge of how children and adolescents perceive the quality of their psychiatric care. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to critically review and synthesize findings from research on youth experience and satisfaction with psychiatric care. The review finds that knowledge about youth perception of quality of care is scattered and that few researchers consider previous findings. There are few valid instruments to measure child and adolescent patient satisfaction and few studies have considered these users' perceptions. These few studies indicate that adolescents' satisfaction has three universal components: satisfaction with environment and the organization of services; with user-caregiver relationship; and with treatment outcome. However, instruments that only use these factors lack sensitivity, while instruments that measure specific components of services capture differences in satisfaction between user groups. The review shows that parents and children have different mental care needs, and that the

  18. Health care engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Frize, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Part II of Health Care Engineering begins with statistics on the occurrence of medical errors and adverse events, and includes some technological solutions. A chapter on electronic medical records follows. The knowledge management process divided into four steps is described; this includes a discussion on data acquisition, storage, and retrieval. The next two chapters discuss the other three steps of the knowledge management process (knowledge discovery, knowledge translation, knowledge integration and sharing). The last chapter briefly discusses usability studies and clinical trials.This two-

  19. Health care need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Andreas; Hope, Tony; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    2006-01-01

    The argument that scarce health care resources should be distributed so that patients in 'need' are given priority for treatment is rarely contested. In this paper, we argue that if need is to play a significant role in distributive decisions it is crucial that what is meant by need can be precis......, the three interpretations provide a starting-point for further debate of what the concept means in its specific application. We discuss combined interpretations, the meaning of grading needs, and compare needs-based priority setting to social welfare maximisation...

  20. Mental health and psychiatric pharmacy instruction in US colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Marshall E; Monk-Tutor, Mary R; Drummond, Stephanie Ogle

    2007-02-15

    To describe the extent of psychiatric pharmacy instruction in US pharmacy curricula, including course and faculty characteristics and mental health topics taught in clinical therapeutics-based courses. An 11-item survey instrument (54% response) was developed and mailed to 91 colleges and schools of pharmacy. Over 75% of colleges and schools employed a psychiatric pharmacist; however, less than 50% of faculty teaching psychiatric pharmacy content were psychiatric pharmacy specialists as defined in the study. All colleges and schools included psychiatric topics as part of a therapeutics-based course with an average of 9.5% of course content devoted to these topics. About 25% of colleges and schools offered elective didactic courses in psychiatric pharmacy. Only 2 schools required a psychiatric pharmacy advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE), but about 92% offered elective APPEs. The mean number of hours spent on lecture- and case-based instruction across all colleges and schools was highest for depression and lowest for personality disorders. There is a need for colleges and schools of pharmacy to better identify and standardize the minimal acceptable level of didactic instruction in psychiatric pharmacy as well as the minimal level of specialty qualifications for faculty members who teach this subject.

  1. FastStats: Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography Pap ... Centers Hospice Care National Study of Long-Term Care Providers Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Centers for Medicare ...

  2. Shared decision making in psychiatric practice and the primary care setting is unique, as measured using a 9-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De las Cuevas C

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Carlos De las Cuevas,1,2 Wenceslao Peñate,3 Lilisbeth Perestelo-Pérez,2,4 Pedro Serrano-Aguilar2,41Department of Psychiatry, University of La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain; 2Health Services Research Network for Chronic Diseases (REDISSEC, Tenerife, Spain; 3Department of Personality, Assessment and Psychological Treatments, University of La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain; 4Evaluation Unit, Canary Island Health Service, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, SpainBackground: To measure and compare the extent to which shared a decision making (SDM process is implemented both in psychiatric outpatient clinical encounters and in the primary care setting from the patient’s perspective.Methods: A total of 1,477 patients recruited from the Canary Islands Health Service mental health and primary care departments were invited to complete the nine-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9 immediately after their consultation. MANCOVA, Student’s t-test, and Pearson correlations were used to assess the relationship and differences between SDM-Q-9 scores in patient samples.Results: No differences were found in SDM-Q-9 total scores between the two patient samples, but there were relevant differences when item by item analysis was applied; differences were observed according to the different steps of the SDM process. SDM is present to a very limited extent in the routine psychiatric setting compared to primary care. Patients’ age, education, type of appointment, and treatment decision all play a specific role in predicting SDM.Conclusion: The study provides evidence that SDM is a complex process that needs to be analyzed according to its different steps. SDM patterns were different in the primary care and psychiatric outpatient care settings and reflect quite a different perspective of the decision making process.Keywords: primary care patients, psychiatric outpatients, SDM-Q-9, shared decision making

  3. Psychiatric care in Asia: spirituality and religious connotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid

    2008-10-01

    Throughout the history of humanity it has been said that the individual ego, is a very limited form of identity. Spirituality is shaped by larger social circumstances and by the beliefs and values present in the wider culture. In Asia, as compared to other regions, people fall back on spiritualism. Mental health professionals, laymen and patients have great interest in spirituality and religious activities but still it is one of the most neglected fields of life. Spirituality and religion often are used interchangeably and it has also been described as an individual search for meaning. In psychiatry, religion and spirituality play a vital role in an individual's personal and social life. They are part of a very powerful medium to help in the healing process. Spiritual people know the meaning and goal of their life, have strong belief and firm faith in God or themselves, they can easily cope with stress and have the ability to adjust in every situation. They have satisfaction and contentment. They are less anxious and depressed and if they feel so, they try to overcome it through religious activities or rituals. Patients who depend heavily on their religious faith are significantly less depressed than those who don't. Spiritual practices foster an awareness that serves to identify and promote values such as creativity, patience, perseverance, honesty, kindness, compassion, wisdom, equanimity, hope and joy, all of which support good healthcare practice. Spirituality and religion form a bridge of contact between human, a composite of body and soul, and the Creator. Realizing this need, mental health professionals working in this field need to understand the spiritual values of patients and incorporate them in assessment and treatment.

  4. A tale of two veterans: homeless vs domiciled veterans presenting to a psychiatric urgent care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haoyu; Iglewicz, Alana; Golshan, Shah; Zisook, Sidney

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between homelessness among veterans and mental illness and suicidality has not been clearly defined. To further examine this relationship, we compared rates of mental illness and suicidality among homeless and domiciled veterans seeking urgent psychiatric care at a US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facility. Information was collected by survey from 482 consecutive veterans seeking care at the Psychiatric Emergency Clinic (PEC) at the VA San Diego Healthcare System. A total of 73 homeless veterans were designated the homeless group and 73 domiciled veterans were randomly selected as the domiciled group. Suicidality and mental illnesses were assessed by self-assessment questionnaires and chart review of diagnoses. The homeless group had significantly higher rates of past suicide attempts (47% vs 27%) and recent reckless or self-harming behavior (33% vs 18%) compared with the domiciled group but significantly lower rates of depressive disorder (25% vs 44%), as diagnosed by a PEC physician. There were no differences between groups on the questionnaires for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, or alcohol abuse. Nor were there differences in diagnoses of bipolar disorder, PTSD, anxiety disorder, schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder, or alcohol abuse. Veterans seeking help from a VA-based urgent psychiatric care clinic often are burdened by substantial depression, alcohol use disorders, PTSD, and both past and present suicide risk.

  5. [Psychiatric support for children and adolescents in residential care in a German sample].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nützel, Jakob; Schmid, Marc; Goldbeck, Lutz; Fegert, Jörg M

    2005-10-01

    Children and adolescents in residential care represent a high risk population for mental disorders. We examined in an epidemiologic survey the level of professional psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment in relation to the prevalence of mental disorders among this group. The study includes 689 children and adolescents living in 20 residential care institutions in a two-step design. Participants with elevated scores in a screening questionnaire were then assessed by a standardized clinical examination. Data on psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment were obtained and correlated with the prevalence of mental disorders. Wishes for cooperation with psychiatry on the part of the child welfare providers were recorded by a self-constructed questionnaire. 57.1% of the children and adolescents of our sample fulfilled the criteria for one or more ICD-10 F diagnosis. As most frequent disorders we found conduct disorders (CD), ADHD and depressive disorders. Highest levels of psychopharmalogical treatment were found in ADHD (25 to 33.3%), half of the children and adolescents with ICD-10 F diagnosis got psychiatric or psychotherapeutic treatment. Compared to the high prevalence of severe mental disorders in children and adolescents living in residential care the levels of psychopharmacological and psychiatric/psychotherapeutic treatment seem to be low, especially in those with conduct disorders (CD) and ADHD. Cooperation between the child welfare providers and child and adolescent psychiatry services should get intensified. Adequate psychiatric diagnostic and multimodal therapeutic procedures are necessary.

  6. Teaching child psychiatric assessment skills: Using pediatric mental health screening tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, T M; Arthur, M E

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the workshop "Teaching Child Psychiatric Assessment Skills: Using Mental Health Screening Instruments," presented at the 35th Forum for Behavioral Sciences in Family Medicine on 20 September 2014. The goals of the presentation were (1) to teach family medicine behavioral health educators to use both general and problem-specific mental health screening tools (MHSTs) in their work with trainees to help satisfy the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandate for behavioral and mental health experience during family medicine residency, (2) to reflect on how MHSTs might be integrated into the flow of family medicine teaching practices, and (3) to exemplify how evidence-based methods of adult education might be used in teaching such content. One general MHST, the Pediatric Symptom Checklist-17 and one problem-specific MHST for each of the four commonest pediatric mental health issues: for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, the Vanderbilt; for Anxiety, the Screen for Childhood Anxiety-Related Emotional Disorders; for Depression, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 for teens; and for Aggression, the Retrospective-Modified Overt Aggression Scale, were practiced at least twice in the context of a clinical vignette. All of the selected MHSTs are free in the public domain and available for download from the website: www.CAPPCNY.org. Participants were asked to reflect on their own office practice characteristics and consider how MHSTs might be integrated into their systems of care. This workshop could be replicated by others wishing to teach the use of MHSTs in primary care settings or teaching programs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Client Satisfaction with Antenatal Care Services in Primary Health Care. Centres in Sabon Gari Local Government Area, Kaduna State Nigeria. journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. 1. 1. 1. M.B Sufiyan , A.A Umar , A. Shugaba . 1Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, ...

  8. Reforming the health care system: implications for health care marketers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochuk, M A; Javalgi, R G

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform has become the dominant domestic policy issue in the United States. President Clinton, and the Democratic leaders in the House and Senate have all proposed legislation to reform the system. Regardless of the plan which is ultimately enacted, health care delivery will be radically changed. Health care marketers, given their perspective, have a unique opportunity to ensure their own institutions' success. Organizational, managerial, and marketing strategies can be employed to deal with the changes which will occur. Marketers can utilize personal strategies to remain proactive and successful during an era of health care reform. As outlined in this article, responding to the health care reform changes requires strategic urgency and action. However, the strategies proposed are practical regardless of the version of health care reform legislation which is ultimately enacted.

  9. Constructivism applied to psychiatric-mental health nursing: an alternative to supplement traditional clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoux Hampton, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    With the popularity of accelerated pre-licensure nursing programmes and the growth in nursing student enrolments, traditional clinical education continues to be a challenge to deliver. Nursing faculty members are required to develop and implement educational innovations that achieve effective learning outcomes, while using fewer resources. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the effectiveness of a constructivism-based learning project to achieve specific learning outcomes and to supplement approximately 30 clinical hours in a psychiatric-mental health nursing course. Students participated in a 10-week, multistage project that examined life histories, treatment resources, and evidence-based practice, as applied to a single individual with a mental illness. Students reported increased understanding of mental health and illness, developed personal relevance associated with the knowledge gained, and learned to problem solve with regard to nursing care of individuals diagnosed with mental illness. For many students, there also appeared to be a reduction in stigmatized attitudes towards mental illness. Constructivism-based learning is a promising alternative to supplement clinical hours, while effectively achieving learning outcomes. Future research is needed to further validate the use of this method for the learning of course content, as well as the reduction of stigma. © 2011 The Author. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. [Suicide prevention activities of psychiatry-related professional societies: the promotion of suicide prevention in psychiatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kotaro; Kawanishi, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    Suicide prevention is promoted nationally in Japan. In the General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy determined in 2007, the areas in which, psychiatry contributed were shown to be important, for example, psychiatric care, suicide, aftercare program for suicide attempters, mental health promotion, and actual elucidation of the cause of suicide. At a part of these national measures, guidelines on suicide attempters' care are devised by the Japanese Society for Emergency Medicine and the Japanese Association for Emergency Psychiatry, and a training workshop on caring for suicide attempters was held by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The Japanese society for Emergency Medicine devised an educational program of care for patients with mental health problems in emergency care in cooperation with the Japanese Association for Emergency Psychiatry and Japanese Society of General Hospital Psychiatry. On the other hand, suicide prevention and staff care at hospitals are important problems, and the Japan Council for Quality Health Care devised a program and conducted a training workshop. Also, the Japanese Association for Suicide Prevention conducted workshops for both the educational program of cognitive-behavioral therapy and facilitator training program for gatekeeper. The Japanese Society of Mood Disorders conducted a training workshop involving clinical high-risk case discussion. Also, the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology devised clinical guidelines for suicide prevention and distributed them to all society members. In this society, on-site discussion of the guidelines and the holding of workshops are expected in the future. It is hoped that these guidelines will be utilized and training workshops will be held in the future.

  11. Occupational Health for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health care workers are exposed to many job hazards. These can include Infections Needle injuries Back injuries ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ...

  12. Federalism and Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Alan Tarr

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available President Barack Obama proposed a major overhaul of the American healthsystem, and in 2010 the U.S. Congress enacted his proposal, the PatientProtection and Affordable Care Act. Opponents of the Act challenged itsconstitutionality in federal court, claiming that it exceeds the powers grantedto the federal government under the Commerce Clause and the NecessaryProper Clause of the federal Constitution. Some courts have upheldthe law, but others have agreed with the critics, in particular ruling thatthe provision requiring citizens to buy health insurance is unconstitutional.Eventually the U.S. Supreme Court will rule on the issue. This article tracesthe controversy, surveys the interpretation of pertinent constitutional provisionsin past cases, analyzes the constitutional arguments presented byproponents and opponents of the Act, and concludes that the Act is constitutional.

  13. Psychiatric treatment received by primary care patients with panic disorder with and without agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcks, Brook A; Weisberg, Risa B; Keller, Martin B

    2009-06-01

    Although the majority of individuals with panic disorder first present to the primary care setting, little is known about the psychiatric treatment that primary care patients with the disorder typically receive. The purpose of this study was to explore characteristics of treatment received by patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia and by those with panic disorder without agoraphobia, examine demographic and clinical predictors of receiving treatment, and explore treatment barriers. This study used data from the Primary Care Anxiety Project (PCAP), which is a naturalistic, longitudinal study of anxiety disorders among primary care patients. This study presents data for 235 PCAP participants diagnosed at the study intake assessment as having panic disorder with agoraphobia (N=150) or without agoraphobia (N=85). Many patients with panic disorder were not receiving psychiatric treatment at study intake (38%), with those without agoraphobia being less likely to receive treatment. Psychotropic medications were the treatment of choice, with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors being the most commonly received class of medications (34%). Only 38% of those with panic disorder with agoraphobia and 24% of those with panic disorder without agoraphobia were receiving psychotherapy, and the use of empirically supported interventions was rare. The most common treatment barriers were not believing in using medication or therapy for emotional problems and not receiving a treatment recommendation from one's provider. The findings suggest a need for better treatment dissemination, in addition to making interventions more accessible or adapting them to the particular needs of primary care patients.

  14. Primary health care models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Methods Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Main findings Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowledge was generally obtained from practical experiences rather than classroom learning; students could identify both advantages and disadvantages of working within the new PHC models; and although students regarded the new PHC models positively, these models did not influence their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Conclusion Knowledge of the new PHC models varies among fourth-year students, indicating a need for improved education strategies in the years before clinical training. Being able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the PHC models was not enough to influence participants’ choice of specialty. Educators and health care policy makers need to determine the best methods to promote and facilitate knowledge transfer about these PHC models. PMID:22518904

  15. Spiritual Care Education of Health Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Baldacchino

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nurses and health care professionals should have an active role in meeting the spiritual needs of patients in collaboration with the family and the chaplain. Literature criticizes the impaired holistic care because the spiritual dimension is often overlooked by health care professionals. This could be due to feelings of incompetence due to lack of education on spiritual care; lack of inter-professional education (IPE; work overload; lack of time; different cultures; lack of attention to personal spirituality; ethical issues and unwillingness to deliver spiritual care. Literature defines spiritual care as recognizing, respecting, and meeting patients’ spiritual needs; facilitating participation in religious rituals; communicating through listening and talking with clients; being with the patient by caring, supporting, and showing empathy; promoting a sense of well-being by helping them to find meaning and purpose in their illness and overall life; and referring them to other professionals, including the chaplain/pastor. This paper outlines the systematic mode of intra-professional theoretical education on spiritual care and its integration into their clinical practice; supported by role modeling. Examples will be given from the author’s creative and innovative ways of teaching spiritual care to undergraduate and post-graduate students. The essence of spiritual care is being in doing whereby personal spirituality and therapeutic use of self contribute towards effective holistic care. While taking into consideration the factors that may inhibit and enhance the delivery of spiritual care, recommendations are proposed to the education, clinical, and management sectors for further research and personal spirituality to ameliorate patient holistic care.

  16. [Cost-effectiveness of two hospital care schemes for psychiatric disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevárez-Sida, Armando; Valencia-Huarte, Enrique; Escobedo-Islas, Octavio; Constantino-Casas, Patricia; Verduzco-Fragoso, Wázcar; León-González, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    In Mexico, six of every twenty Mexicans suffer psychiatric disorders at some time in their lives. This disease ranks fifth in the country. The objective was to determine and compare the cost-effectiveness of two models for hospital care (partial and traditional) at a psychiatric hospital of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). a multicenter study with a prospective cohort of 374 patients was performed. We made a cost-effectiveness analysis from an institutional viewpoint with a six-month follow-up. Direct medical costs were analyzed, with quality of life gains as outcome measurement. A decision tree and a probabilistic sensitivity analysis were used. patient care in the partial model had a cost 50 % lower than the traditional one, with similar results in quality of life. The cost per successful unit in partial hospitalization was 3359 Mexican pesos while in the traditional it increased to 5470 Mexican pesos. treating patients in the partial hospitalization model is a cost-effective alternative compared with the traditional model. Therefore, the IMSS should promote the infrastructure that delivers the psychiatric services to the patient attending to who requires it.

  17. Randomised controlled trial of a psychiatric consultation model for treatment of common mental disorder in the occupational health setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Jong Fransina J

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common mental disorders are the most prevalent of all mental disorders, with the highest burden in terms of work absenteeism and utilization of health care services. Evidence-based treatments are available, but recognition and treatment could be improved, especially in the occupational health setting. The situation in this setting has recently changed in the Netherlands because of new legislation, which has resulted in reduced sickness absence. Severe mental disorder has now become one of the main causes of work absenteeism. Occupational physicians (OPs are expected to take an active role in diagnosis and treatment, and seem to be in need of support for a new approach to handle cases of more complex mental disorders. Psychiatric consultation can be a collaborative care model to achieve this. Methods/design This is a two-armed cluster-randomized clinical trial, with randomization among OPs. Forty OPs in two big companies providing medical care for multiple companies will be randomized to either the intervention group, i.e. psychiatric consultation embedded in a training programme, or the control group, i.e. only training aimed at recognition and providing Care As Usual. 60 patients will be included who have been absent from work for 6–52 weeks and who, after screening and a MINI interview, are diagnosed with depressive disorder, anxiety disorder or somatoform disorder based on DSM-IV criteria. Baseline measurements and follow up measurements (at 3 months and 6 months will be assessed with questionnaires and an interview. The primary outcome measure is level of general functioning according to the SF-20. Secondary measures are severity of the mental disorder according to the PHQ and the SCL-90, quality of life (EQ-D5, measures of Return To Work and cost-effectiveness of the treatment assessed with the TiC-P. Process measures will be adherence to the treatment plan and assessment of the treatment provided by the Psychiatric

  18. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  19. A study of a culturally focused psychiatric consultation service for Asian American and Latino American primary care patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fava Maurizio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnic minorities with depression are more likely to seek mental health care through primary care providers (PCPs than mental health specialists. However, both provider and patient-specific challenges exist. PCP-specific challenges include unfamiliarity with depressive symptom profiles in diverse patient populations, limited time to address mental health, and limited referral options for mental health care. Patient-specific challenges include stigma around mental health issues and reluctance to seek mental health treatment. To address these issues, we implemented a multi-component intervention for Asian American and Latino American primary care patients with depression at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH. Methods/Design We propose a randomized controlled trial to evaluate a culturally appropriate intervention to improve the diagnosis and treatment of depression in our target population. Our goals are to facilitate a primary care providers' ability to provide appropriate, culturally informed care of depression, and b patients' knowledge of and resources for receiving treatment for depression. Our two-year long intervention targets Asian American and Latino American adult (18 years of age or older primary care patients at MGH screening positive for symptoms of depression. All eligible patients in the intervention arm of the study who screen positive will be offered a culturally focused psychiatric (CFP consultation. Patients will meet with a study clinician and receive toolkits that include psychoeducational booklets, worksheets and community resources. Within two weeks of the initial consultation, patients will attend a follow-up visit with the CFP clinicians. Primary outcomes will determine the feasibility and cost associated with implementation of the service, and evaluate patient and provider satisfaction with the CFP service. Exploratory aims will describe the study population at screening, recruitment, and enrollment

  20. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    2013-09-02

    Port Harcourt. ... Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 25 (2) 53-58. KEYWORDS. Healer shopping,. Discharge Against. Medical Advice,. Non- communicable diseases, epidemiological transition, Port.

  1. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  2. Caring potentials in the shadows of power, correction, and discipline—Forensic psychiatric care in the light of the work of Michel Foucault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrica Hörberg

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to shed light on contemporary forensic psychiatric care through a philosophical examination of the empirical results from two lifeworld phenomenological studies from the perspective of patients and carers, by using the French philosopher Michel Foucault's historical–philosophical work. Both empirical studies were conducted in a forensic psychiatric setting. The essential results of the two empirical studies were reexamined in a phenomenological meaning analysis to form a new general structure in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. This general structure shows how the caring on the forensic psychiatric wards appears to be contradictory, in that it is characterized by an unreflective (non-caring attitude and contributes to an inconsistent and insecure existence. The caring appears to have a corrective approach and thus lacks a clear caring structure, a basic caring approach that patients in forensic psychiatric services have a great need of. To gain a greater understanding of forensic psychiatric caring, the new empirical results were further examined in the light of Foucault's historical–philosophical work. The philosophical examination is presented in terms of the three meaning constituents: Caring as correction and discipline, The existence of power, and Structures and culture in care. The philosophical examination illustrates new meaning nuances of the corrective and disciplinary nature of forensic psychiatric care, its power, and how this is materialized in caring, and what this does to the patients. The examination reveals embedded difficulties in forensic psychiatric care and highlights a need to revisit the aim of such care.

  3. Caring potentials in the shadows of power, correction, and discipline—Forensic psychiatric care in the light of the work of Michel Foucault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on contemporary forensic psychiatric care through a philosophical examination of the empirical results from two lifeworld phenomenological studies from the perspective of patients and carers, by using the French philosopher Michel Foucault's historical–philosophical work. Both empirical studies were conducted in a forensic psychiatric setting. The essential results of the two empirical studies were reexamined in a phenomenological meaning analysis to form a new general structure in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. This general structure shows how the caring on the forensic psychiatric wards appears to be contradictory, in that it is characterized by an unreflective (non-)caring attitude and contributes to an inconsistent and insecure existence. The caring appears to have a corrective approach and thus lacks a clear caring structure, a basic caring approach that patients in forensic psychiatric services have a great need of. To gain a greater understanding of forensic psychiatric caring, the new empirical results were further examined in the light of Foucault's historical–philosophical work. The philosophical examination is presented in terms of the three meaning constituents: Caring as correction and discipline, The existence of power, and Structures and culture in care. The philosophical examination illustrates new meaning nuances of the corrective and disciplinary nature of forensic psychiatric care, its power, and how this is materialized in caring, and what this does to the patients. The examination reveals embedded difficulties in forensic psychiatric care and highlights a need to revisit the aim of such care. PMID:26319100

  4. Caring potentials in the shadows of power, correction, and discipline - Forensic psychiatric care in the light of the work of Michel Foucault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörberg, Ulrica; Dahlberg, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to shed light on contemporary forensic psychiatric care through a philosophical examination of the empirical results from two lifeworld phenomenological studies from the perspective of patients and carers, by using the French philosopher Michel Foucault's historical-philosophical work. Both empirical studies were conducted in a forensic psychiatric setting. The essential results of the two empirical studies were reexamined in a phenomenological meaning analysis to form a new general structure in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research. This general structure shows how the caring on the forensic psychiatric wards appears to be contradictory, in that it is characterized by an unreflective (non-)caring attitude and contributes to an inconsistent and insecure existence. The caring appears to have a corrective approach and thus lacks a clear caring structure, a basic caring approach that patients in forensic psychiatric services have a great need of. To gain a greater understanding of forensic psychiatric caring, the new empirical results were further examined in the light of Foucault's historical-philosophical work. The philosophical examination is presented in terms of the three meaning constituents: Caring as correction and discipline, The existence of power, and Structures and culture in care. The philosophical examination illustrates new meaning nuances of the corrective and disciplinary nature of forensic psychiatric care, its power, and how this is materialized in caring, and what this does to the patients. The examination reveals embedded difficulties in forensic psychiatric care and highlights a need to revisit the aim of such care.

  5. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences,. Obafemi Awolowo ... Younger parents less than 35years, parents with lower educational attainments and low .... staffing, availability of immunization consumables was estimated using the Computer Programme for.

  6. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    financing are critical issues that continue to bother health policy makers. .... Ethical approval. Ethical approval was obtained from the. Health Research Ethics Committee of the Delta. State University Teaching Hospital, Oghara and informed written (and or verbal) ... Teachers/Religious Leaders. Indifferent. 85. 24.3%. 117.

  7. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Background: Quarry industry has become a major means of livelihood in Ebonyi state, but insufficient data exists on their operations and use of control measures like dust mask, with no serious attempt at comprehensive health education. The study sought to assess the effect of health education on the perception and ...

  8. Stress and job satisfaction among social workers, community nurses and community psychiatric nurses: implications for the care management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry-Jones, Beth; Grant, Gordon; McGrath, Morag; Caldock, Kerry; Ramcharan, Paul; Robinson, Catherine A.

    1998-07-01

    The introduction in April 1993 of new arrangements for assessment and care management following the NHS and Community Care Act 1990 (Department of Health 1990a) heralded a period of major transition for front-line workers in the health and social services. Policy expectations for the development of the purchaser/provider split and the 'new managerialism' have posed unprecedented ideological, organizational and professional challenges. Two years after the full implementation of the reforms a postal survey of the experiences of care managers about policy and practice changes was undertaken in Wales. This paper focuses on the stresses and satisfactions of care management practice among three distinct groups of front-line workers: social workers, community nurses and community psychiatric nurses. The results of multiple regression analyses, corroborated by qualitative data, implicate an increased workload in general and administrative work in particular, combined with reduced opportunities for client contact, as the main sources of stress. Being able to control or shape those factors impinging on the experience of stress and job satisfaction appears to lie at the heart of the dilemma. Practice and policy implications are considered.

  9. An Analysis of Canadian Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing through the Junctures of History, Gender, Nursing Education, and Quality of Work Life in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A society that values mental health and helps people live enjoyable and meaningful lives is a clear aspiration echoed throughout our Canadian health care system. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has put forth a framework for a mental health strategy with goals that reflect the virtue of optimal mental health for all Canadians (Mental Health Commission Canada, 2009). Canadian nurses, the largest group of health care workers, have a vital role in achieving these goals. In Canada, two-thirds of those who experience mental health problems do not receive mental health services (Statistics Canada, 2003). Through a gendered, critical, and sociological perspective the goal of this paper is to further understand how the past has shaped the present state of psychiatric mental health nursing (PMHN). This integrative literature review offers a depiction of Canadian PMHN in light of the intersections of history, gender, education, and quality of nursing work life. Fourteen articles were selected, which provide a partial reflection of contemporary Canadian PMHN. Findings include the association between gender and professional status, inconsistencies in psychiatric nursing education, and the limitations for Canadian nurse practitioners to advance the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner. PMID:23710367

  10. An Analysis of Canadian Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing through the Junctures of History, Gender, Nursing Education, and Quality of Work Life in Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary; Khanlou, Nazilla

    2013-01-01

    A society that values mental health and helps people live enjoyable and meaningful lives is a clear aspiration echoed throughout our Canadian health care system. The Mental Health Commission of Canada has put forth a framework for a mental health strategy with goals that reflect the virtue of optimal mental health for all Canadians (Mental Health Commission Canada, 2009). Canadian nurses, the largest group of health care workers, have a vital role in achieving these goals. In Canada, two-thirds of those who experience mental health problems do not receive mental health services (Statistics Canada, 2003). Through a gendered, critical, and sociological perspective the goal of this paper is to further understand how the past has shaped the present state of psychiatric mental health nursing (PMHN). This integrative literature review offers a depiction of Canadian PMHN in light of the intersections of history, gender, education, and quality of nursing work life. Fourteen articles were selected, which provide a partial reflection of contemporary Canadian PMHN. Findings include the association between gender and professional status, inconsistencies in psychiatric nursing education, and the limitations for Canadian nurse practitioners to advance the role of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner.

  11. Psychiatric Disorders and Sexual Risk among Adolescents in Mental Health Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Larry K.; Hadley, Wendy; Stewart, Angela; Lescano, Celia; Whiteley, Laura; Donenberg, Geri; DiClemente, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between psychiatric disorders and sexual behaviors among adolescents receiving mental health treatment. Adolescents in mental health treatment have been found to have higher rates of HIV risk behavior than their peers, but data concerning the relationship between psychopathology and risk are inconsistent and…

  12. Enforcing patient rights or improving care? The interference of two modes of doing good in mental health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pols, Jeannette

    2003-01-01

    New state laws are intended to bring about formal changes. These juridical activities inevitably interfere with the content of care of substantially changing health care practice. The case is argued by means of an analysis of ethnographic material gathered in the long-stay wards of two psychiatric

  13. Correlates of attitudes toward homosexuality and intention to care for homosexual people among psychiatric nurses in southern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shu-Ying; Pan, Shung-Mei; Ko, Nai-Ying; Liu, Hsiu-Chin; Wu, Shu-Jung; Yang, Wen-Chiung; Yang, Hsing-Hu; Shieh, Shiu-Fen; Chuang, Li-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2006-08-01

    This study examined the association between attitudes toward homosexual individuals and intention to provide care and demographic and occupational factors, sexual orientation, knowledge about homosexuality, and experiences of contact with homosexual people among psychiatric nurses in southern Taiwan. In total, 133 psychiatric nurses from a medical center, three regional teaching hospitals, and one psychiatric hospital in southern Taiwan were recruited into this study. Their attitudes toward homosexual people as recorded on the Attitudes Toward Homosexuality Questionnaire, intention to provide care to homosexual individuals, and related factors were examined. The results revealed that psychiatric nurses who had a bachelor's or master's degree, higher level of knowledge about homosexuality, and friends or relatives with a homosexual orientation had a more positive attitude toward homosexuality. These psychiatric nurses, with more positive attitudes, and who worked in the medical center or regional teaching hospitals had a higher intention to care for homosexual people. The factors related to attitudes toward homosexuality and intention to care for homosexual people identified in this study should be taken into consideration when intervening in psychiatric nurses' attitudes toward homosexuality and intention to care for homosexual people.

  14. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology. A cross-sectional survey of patients at the antiretroviral clinic of the Federal Medical Centre,. Makurdi, Nigeria, was conducted between June and August 2008. An adapted version of the RAND. Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire Long Form was used to assess seven dimensions of care: general satisfaction ...

  15. Space age health care delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  16. Pedagogy, power and practice ethics: clinical teaching in psychiatric/mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewashen, Carol; Lane, Annette

    2007-09-01

    Often, baccalaureate nursing students initially approach a psychiatric mental health practicum with uncertainty, and even fear. They may feel unprepared for the myriad complex practice situations encountered. In addition, memories of personal painful life events may be vicariously evoked through learning about and listening to the experiences of those diagnosed with mental disorders. When faced with such challenging situations, nursing students often seek counsel from the clinical and/or classroom faculty. Pedagogic boundaries may begin to blur in the face of student distress. For the nurse educator, several questions arise: Should a nurse educator provide counseling to students? How does one best negotiate the boundaries between 'counselor', and 'caring educator'? What are the limits of a caring and professional pedagogic relation? What different knowledges provide guidance and to what differential consequences for ethical pedagogic relationships? This paper offers a comparative analysis of three philosophical stances to examine differences in key assumptions, pedagogic positioning, relationships of power/knowledge, and consequences for professional ethical pedagogic practices. While definitive answers are difficult, the authors pose several questions for consideration in discerning how best to proceed and under what particular conditions.

  17. Primary health care nurses’ management practices of common mental health conditions in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith N. Dube

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric conditions contribute to 13%of the global burden of diseases and account for one third of years lost because of disability (YLD. Despite the high prevalence of mental health problems, primary health care (PHC services remain ineffective in managing patients with mental health conditions.Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the practices of PHC nurses in the management of psychiatric patients in primary health care clinics in one of the rural districts in South Africa.Method: A survey was conducted amongst nurses working in several PHC clinics in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN in order to determine their practices in the management of psychiatric patients. Mixed methods were used to determine the PHC nurses practices in the management of psychiatric patients.Results: The findings revealed that in five sites (83.3% treatments are not reviewed every six months, there were no local protocols on the administration of psychiatric emergency drugs, and none of the study sites provided psychiatric patients with education on their medication and its possible side effects.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study it is evident that psychiatric patients at PHC clinics in the district where the study was conducted do not receive quality treatment according to institutional mental health guidelines.

  18. Mental health care in general practice in the context of a system reform.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnée, T.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to monitor mental health care in Dutch general practices in recent years. In 2014, a reform of the Dutch mental health care system was introduced. Since this reform, general practitioners (GPs) are expected to only refer patients with a (suspected) psychiatric disorder or

  19. [Survey for management of BPSD in care managers and special psychiatric wards for people with severe dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiyoshi; Ozaki, Tohmi; Kawamata, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The integration of medical care and long-term care services is very important in managing dementia patients. We performed two surveys to explore how dementia patients and their symptoms were managed in care facilities (study 1) and at special psychiatric wards for people with severe dementia (study 2). (Study 1) One hundred and sixty-six care managers were subjects for the survey. The questionnaires were distributed at the meeting and recovered at the same meeting place. (Study 2) The questionnaires were sent by mail to 405 psychiatric hospitals with special psychiatric wards. The questionnaires were recovered from 105 wards (recovery rate: 26.0%). (Study 1) Over 60% of people the care managers take care of have dementia, and 1/3 of them showed severe dementia. The care managers felt that it is very difficult to manage dementia patients with severe BPSD. They were of the opinion that psychiatric care should be administered to those people. (Study 2) The average period of stay on the wards was about 2 years. One third of people stayed on the wards for over 3 years. The reasons why the people have to stay longer on the wards were as follows: severe BPSD, limited number of care facilities for patients to go to after discharge from the wards, and patients' families do not accept them in their homes. Care managers supposed that dementia patients with severe BPSD should be managed by specialists in dementia, psychiatrists, etc., at psychiatric hospitals. Patients on special psychiatric wards stayed for longer because of a limited number of care facilities which can manage them.

  20. Aggression in Psychiatric Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidhjelm, Jacob; Sestoft, Dorte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers are often exposed to violence and aggression in psychiatric settings. Short-term risk assessments, such as the Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC), are strong predictors of such aggression and may enable staff to take preventive measures against aggression. This study evaluated wh...

  1. Health care's service fanatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life.

  2. Anal Health Care Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jason; Mclemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy.The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate.Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area.Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases.In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists.

  3. Family dental health care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riana Wardani

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Family Dental Health Care Service is a new approach that includes efforts to serve oral and dental patients that focuses on maintenance, improvement and protection. This oral and dental health approach uses basic dentistry science and technology. The vision of the Family Dental Health Care Service is the family independences in the effort of dental health maintenance and to achieve the highest oral and dental health degree as possible through family dentist care that is efficient, effective, fair, evenly distributed, safe and has a good quality. To support this effort, the Ministry of Health has issued Health Care Policy and Implementation Guideline as well as the licensing standard for family dentist practice.

  4. Foster Care and Child Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavid, Lolita M

    2015-10-01

    Children in foster care need more from health providers than routine well-child care. The changes in legislation that were designed to prevent children from languishing in foster care also necessitate a plan that works with the child, the biological family, and the foster family in ensuring the best outcome for the child. This approach acknowledges that most foster children will return to the biological family. Recent research on the effect of adverse childhood experiences across all socioeconomic categories points to the need for specifically designed, focused, and coordinated health and mental health services for children in foster care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Health care for nautical tourist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, N

    1992-01-01

    Nautical tourism is one of the developing branches of tourism in Europe. It differs from other forms of tourism. Conditions under which nautical tourists live are similar to those of seamen employed on vessels in costal shipping. The health care for nautical tourists should be organized according to the principles of health care for crews of merchant ships engaged in constal shipping.

  6. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    communicable diseases such as hypertension and transitions currently experienced in Sub-Saharan. 96. JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL. 26, NO 1, MARCH 2014. KEYWORDS journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine ...

  7. Prospects for Health Care Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    This editorial reviews areas of health care reform including managed health care, diagnosis-related groups, and the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale for physician services. Relevance of such reforms to people with developmental disabilities is considered. Much needed insurance reform is not thought to be likely, however. (DB)

  8. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (1) 21-29. KEYWORDS. Household, expenditure,. Treatment, presumptive malaria,. Gimba ... A cross-sectional descriptive study conducted during community diagnosis posting of final year medical students of. Ahmadu Bello University ...

  9. Psychiatric components of a Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santy, Patricia A.

    1987-01-01

    The operational psychiatric requirements for a comprehensive Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on a permanently manned Space Station are examined. Consideration is given to the psychological health maintenance program designed for the diagnosis of mental distress in astronauts during flight and for prevention of mental breakdown. The types of mental disorders that can possibly affect the astronauts in flight are discussed, including various organic, psychotic, and affective mental disorders, as well as anxiety, adjustment, and somatoform/dissociative disorders. Special attention is given to therapeutic considerations for psychiatric operations on Space Station, such as restraints, psychopharmacology, psychotherapy, and psychosocial support.

  10. Self-harm as a risk factor for inpatient aggression among women admitted to forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenius, Heidi; Leppänen Östman, Sari; Strand, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    Inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric patients has been shown to be associated with self-harm, that is considered to be a historical risk factor for violence. Research on associations between previous or current self-harm and different types of inpatient aggression is missing. The aim of this register study was to investigate the prevalence of self-harm and the type of inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric inpatients, and to study whether the patients' self-harm before and/or during forensic psychiatric care is a risk factor for inpatient aggression. Female forensic psychiatric patients (n = 130) from a high security hospital were included. The results showed that 88% of the female patients had self-harmed at least once during their life and 57% had been physically and/or verbally aggressive towards staff or other patients while in care at the hospital. Self-harm before admission to the current forensic psychiatric care or repeated self-harm were not significantly associated with inpatient aggression, whereas self-harm during care was significantly associated with physical and verbal aggression directed at staff. These results pointed towards self-harm being a dynamic risk factor rather than a historical risk factor for inpatient aggression among female forensic psychiatric patients. Whether self-harm is an individual risk factor or a part of the clinical risk factor 'Symptom of major mental illness' within the HCR-20V3 must be further explored among women. Thus, addressing self-harm committed by female patients during forensic psychiatric care seems to be important in risk assessments and the management of violence, especially in reducing violence against staff in high-security forensic psychiatric services.

  11. Culturally responsive integrated health care: Key issues for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Rose Anne C; Grace, Aaron J; Niño, José R; Ring, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Primary care providers are increasingly responsible for providing mental health care in the United States. For those patients who do receive specialty mental health services, the primary care provider functions as the main entry point into the mental health system. Given the persistent racial and ethnic health disparities in the United States, it is not surprising that mental health disparities also present a difficult challenge for both the U.S. health system and for frontline practitioners. Physicians-in-training require tools for rapid psychiatric assessment that will quickly identify pertinent symptom clusters and distinguish between major psychological disorders. It is incumbent on residency faculty to teach resident physicians how to provide culturally responsive mental health assessment and intervention/referral knowledge and skills toward the elimination of these disparities and toward patient-centered care. This article begins with an overview of health disparities and barriers to health and mental health care access, followed by a discussion of culturally responsive care including an example of a culturally responsive educational program in the United States that is directly targeting the problem of access in that geographic region. It concludes with a review of educational strategies for enhancing culturally responsive behavioral and mental health care by physicians in training. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Health Professionals' Knowledge of Women's Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Rebecca M.

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 71 health professionals, benchmarking data from 8 hospitals, continuing education program evaluations, and focus groups with nursing, allied health, and primary care providers indicated a need for professional continuing education on women's health issues. Primary topic needs were identified. The data formed the basis for…

  13. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  14. Can countertransference at the early stage of trauma care predict patient dropout of psychiatric treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira Júnior, Erico de Moura; Polanczyk, Guilherme Vanoni; Hauck, Simone; Eizirik, Cláudio Laks; Ceitlin, Lúcia Helena Freitas

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the association between feelings of countertransference (CT) at the early psychiatric care provided to trauma victims and treatment outcome. The Assessment of Countertransference Scale was used to access CT after the first medical appointment. Fifty psychiatric residents cared for 131 trauma victims of whom 83% were women, aged 15 to 64 years. Patients had been consecutively selected over 4 years. Were evaluated the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients and the correlation with the therapists' CT feelings. Patients were followed-up during treatment to verify the association between initial CT and treatment outcome, defined as discharge and dropout. The median number of appointments was 5 [4; 8], absences 1 [0; 1], and the dropout rate was 34.4%. Both groups, namely the discharge group and the dropout group, shared similar clinical and demographic characteristics. A multivariate analysis identified that patients with a reported history of childhood trauma were 61% less likely to dropout from treatment than patients with no reported history of childhood trauma (OR = 0.39, p = 0.039, CI95% 0.16-0.95). There was no association between initial CT and treatment outcome. In this sample, CT in the initial care of trauma victims was not associated with treatment outcome. Further studies should assess changes in CT during treatment, and how such changes impact treatment outcome.

  15. Next-Generation Psychiatric Assessment: Using Smartphone Sensors to Monitor Behavior and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zeev, Dror; Scherer, Emily A.; Wang, Rui; Xie, Haiyi; Campbell, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Optimal mental health care is dependent upon sensitive and early detection of mental health problems. The current study introduces a state-of-the-art method for remote behavioral monitoring that transports assessment out of the clinic and into the environments in which individuals negotiate their daily lives. The objective of this study was examine whether the information captured with multi-modal smartphone sensors can serve as behavioral markers for one’s mental health. We hypothesized that: a) unobtrusively collected smartphone sensor data would be associated with individuals’ daily levels of stress, and b) sensor data would be associated with changes in depression, stress, and subjective loneliness over time. Methods A total of 47 young adults (age range: 19–30 y.o.) were recruited for the study. Individuals were enrolled as a single cohort and participated in the study over a 10-week period. Participants were provided with smartphones embedded with a range of sensors and software that enabled continuous tracking of their geospatial activity (using GPS and WiFi), kinesthetic activity (using multi-axial accelerometers), sleep duration (modeled using device use data, accelerometer inferences, ambient sound features, and ambient light levels), and time spent proximal to human speech (i.e., speech duration using microphone and speech detection algorithms). Participants completed daily ratings of stress, as well as pre/post measures of depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), stress (Perceived Stress Scale), and loneliness (Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale). Results Mixed-effects linear modeling showed that sensor-derived geospatial activity (pdepression and sensor-derived speech duration (pSmartphones can be harnessed as instruments for unobtrusive monitoring of several behavioral indicators of mental health. Creative leveraging of smartphone sensing will create novel opportunities for close-to-invisible psychiatric assessment at a scale and

  16. Next-generation psychiatric assessment: Using smartphone sensors to monitor behavior and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zeev, Dror; Scherer, Emily A; Wang, Rui; Xie, Haiyi; Campbell, Andrew T

    2015-09-01

    Optimal mental health care is dependent upon sensitive and early detection of mental health problems. We have introduced a state-of-the-art method for the current study for remote behavioral monitoring that transports assessment out of the clinic and into the environments in which individuals negotiate their daily lives. The objective of this study was to examine whether the information captured with multimodal smartphone sensors can serve as behavioral markers for one's mental health. We hypothesized that (a) unobtrusively collected smartphone sensor data would be associated with individuals' daily levels of stress, and (b) sensor data would be associated with changes in depression, stress, and subjective loneliness over time. A total of 47 young adults (age range: 19-30 years) were recruited for the study. Individuals were enrolled as a single cohort and participated in the study over a 10-week period. Participants were provided with smartphones embedded with a range of sensors and software that enabled continuous tracking of their geospatial activity (using the Global Positioning System and wireless fidelity), kinesthetic activity (using multiaxial accelerometers), sleep duration (modeled using device-usage data, accelerometer inferences, ambient sound features, and ambient light levels), and time spent proximal to human speech (i.e., speech duration using microphone and speech detection algorithms). Participants completed daily ratings of stress, as well as pre- and postmeasures of depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9; Spitzer, Kroenke, & Williams, 1999), stress (Perceived Stress Scale; Cohen et al., 1983), and loneliness (Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale; Russell, Peplau, & Cutrona, 1980). Mixed-effects linear modeling showed that sensor-derived geospatial activity (p sensor-derived speech duration (p sensor-derived kinesthetic activity (p health. Creative leveraging of smartphone sensing could provide novel opportunities for close-to-invisible psychiatric

  17. [Decentralized outpatient teams in community-based psychiatric care: comparison of two Bavarian rural catchment areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Stauber, J; Putzhammer, A; Kilian, R

    2014-05-01

    Psychiatric outpatient clinics (PIAs) are an indispensable care service for crisis intervention and multidisciplinary treatment of people suffering from severe and persistent mental disorders. The decentralization of outpatient clinics can be understood as a further step in the deinstitutionalization process. This cross-sectional study (n=1,663) compared the central outpatient clinic with the decentralized teams for the year 2010 by means of analyses of variance, χ(2)-tests and robust multivariate regression models. The longitudinal assessment (descriptively and by means of Prais-Winsten regression models for time series) was based on all hospitalizations for the two decentralized teams (n = 6,693) according to partial catchment areas for the time period 2002-2010 in order to examine trends after their installation in the year 2007. Decentralized teams were found to be similar with respect to the care profile but cared for relatively more patients suffering from dementia, addictive and mood disorders but not for those suffering from schizophrenia and personality disorders. Decentralized teams showed less outpatient care costs as well as psychopharmacological expenses but a lower contact frequency than the central outpatient clinic. Total expenses for psychiatric care were not significantly different and assessed hospitalization variables (e.g. total number of annual admissions, cumulative length of inpatient-stay and annual hospitalizations per patient) changed slightly 3 years after installation of the decentralized teams. The number of admissions of people suffering from schizophrenia decreased whereas those for mood and stress disorders increased. Decentralized outpatient teams seemed to reach patients in rural regions who previously were not reached by the central outpatient clinic. Economic figures indicate advantages for the installation of such teams because care expenses are not higher than for patients treated in centralized outpatient clinics and

  18. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    2012-05-01

    May 1, 2012 ... Results: The findings reveal different modes money was made available for payment for health services. On the whole, about 98% of payment was through out-of pocket spending (user-charges) with most respondents using their own money. Although this financing method shown to be associated with ...

  19. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Department of Community Health, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State. 1. 2. 2. Awunor N.S , Omuemu V.O , Adam V.Y. ABSTRACT. Introduction. A nation's disease control effort is often as good as the surveillance and notification system put in place, which would help to generate the much needed ...

  20. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    living on each square inch of the phone. This study determined the prevalence of micro-organisms on the mobile phones of health workers and their role as a source of hospital acquired infection. The study utilised a cross-sectional design. A total of one hundred and eighty swabs were collected from the mobile phones of ...

  1. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    child deaths among under-fives were due to. Childhood immunization is an effective public. VPDs, this represents 17% of global total. 1 health initiative aimed at reducing the burden mortality in children under five years of age. of vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs) and. To achieve the Millennium Developmental.

  2. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-10-07

    Oct 7, 2011 ... These factors include poor environmental and personal hygiene, poverty, malnutrition, unsafe water supply and ... The environment farmers live in, their standard of living and nutrition are very important to their health. ..... Globalization of food system: JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY ...

  3. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    instruments were pretested self-administered questionnaire and observational checklist. The data generated were analyzed using .... The observational checklist (OBL) was used to. Kwara State was carried from April to ..... supervision of health workers by middle cadre Central Zonal Office). Report on Routine immunization ...

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further studies on this subject are recommended. Employees' Assessment of Leadership in a Tertiary. Hospital in South-South Nigeria. Adeleye O. A, Aduh U. Department of Community Health, .... National Institute of Standards and Technology, (where it is trying to go in the future)”; “my senior were originally designed for ...

  5. [Between therapeutic nihilism and social hygiene: psychiatric care in French positivism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas Garcia-Alejo, R

    1993-01-01

    This work attemps to reflect upon the founding theories of psychiatric care in France during the second half of the 19th. The relationship between the medical somaticism and therapeutical fatalism or positivist alienism has been evaluated using the contributions of the degeneratist psychiatricts as the research documentation. The study also covers the principle means of "reaction" to this alienism: the addressing of a certain form of "social hygiene" and the search for new treatments which would allow the alienist to be returned within the asylum walls.

  6. Teens, technology, and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanza, Francesco; Hauser, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Teens are avid users of new technologies and social media. Nearly 95% of US adolescents are online at least occasionally. Health care professionals and organizations that work with teens should identify online health information that is both accurate and teen friendly. Early studies indicate that some of the new health technology tools are acceptable to teens, particularly texting, computer-based psychosocial screening, and online interventions. Technology is being used to provide sexual health education, medication reminders for contraception, and information on locally available health care services. This article reviews early and emerging studies of technology use to promote teen health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Experience of Psychiatric Care of Adolescents with Anxiety-based School Refusal and of their Parents: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibeoni, Jordan; Orri, Massimiliano; Podlipski, Marc-Antoine; Labey, Mathilde; Campredon, Sophie; Gerardin, Priscille; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety-based school refusal in adolescence is a complex, sometimes difficult to treat disorder that can have serious academic and psychiatric consequences. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore how teens with this problem and their parents experience the psychiatric care received. This qualitative multicenter study took place in France, where we conducted semi-structured interviews with adolescents receiving psychiatric care for anxiety-based school refusal and with their parents. Data collection by purposive sampling continued until we reached theoretical sufficiency. Data analysis was thematic. This study included 20 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years and 21 parents. Two themes emerged from the analysis: (1) the goals of psychiatric care with two sub-themes, " self-transformation " and problem solving ; and, (2) the therapeutic levers identified as effective with two sub-themes: time and space and relationships . Our results show a divergence between parents and teens in their representations of care and especially of its goals. Therapeutic and research implications about the terms of return to school within psychiatric care and also the temporality of care are discussed.

  8. Academic health centers and health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, S H; Lurie, N; Fisher, E S; Haugen, D

    1993-09-01

    There is increasing support for the proposition that academic health centers have a duty to accept broad responsibility for the health of their communities. The Health of the Public program has proposed that centers become directly involved in the social-political process as advocates for reform of the health care system. Such engagement raises important issues about the roles and responsibilities of centers and their faculties. To address these issues, the authors draw upon the available literature and their experiences in recent health care reform efforts in Minnesota and Vermont in which academic health center faculty participated. The authors discuss (1) the problematic balance between academic objectivity and social advocacy that faculty must attempt when they engage in the health care reform process; (2) the management of the sometimes divergent interests of academic health centers, some of their faculty, and society (including giving faculty permission to engage in reform efforts and developing a tacit understanding that distinguishes faculty positions on reform issues from the center's position on such issues); and (3) the challenge for centers to develop infrastructure support for health reform activities. The authors maintain that academic health centers' participation in the process of health care reform helps them fulfill the trust of the public that they are obligated to and ultimately depend on.

  9. Access to oral health care in the Georgia prison system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Kandyce J; Collins, Marie

    2013-10-01

    The Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution establishes the basis for inmates' rights to health care and includes both routine and emergency medical, dental and psychiatric treatment. According to Georgia's Correctional Standards of Health Care, inmates should receive a dental examination within 30 days of incarceration, instructions in oral hygiene and other care by a dentist when medically necessary. The July, August and September 2011 Georgia Department of Corrections' profiles of active inmates in the Georgia prison system reveal a need for both dental and dental hygiene services. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the access to oral health care of inmates in the Georgia prison system. Potential barriers to dental and dental hygiene services are identified and suggestions are offered to improve access to care for inmates.

  10. Personal health care of internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palabindala, Venkataraman; Foster, Paul; Kanduri, Swetha; Doppalapudi, Avanthi; Pamarthy, Amaleswari; Kovvuru, Karthik

    2011-01-01

    drop the call. Half of the residents had concerns that they might be having a psychiatric illness, but only 5% of them received a formal evaluation at their own hospital and 23 (12.4%) at an outside hospital. It is very important to have more studies to emphasize on resident's physical and mental health and encourage them to have a primary care physician. There are several reasons preventing residents from getting a formal evaluation, confidentiality reasons, lack of time - schedule constraints, fear of being labeled, and social repercussions are few of them. Program directors should encourage the residents to not only care of the health of their patients but also be enthusiastic about their personal health issues for upgraded, revised patient care, and ultimately for their overall well-being.

  11. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System—A Study Including Immigrants, Refugees and Ethnic Danes

    OpenAIRE

    Natasja Koitzsch Jensen; Katrine Schepelern Johansen; Marianne Kastrup; Allan Krasnik; Marie Norredam

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refu...

  12. Mental health care technologies for treating crack users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Nasi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify mental health care technologies for treating crack users in a Psychosocial Care Center for Alcohol and other Drugs (CAPsad, as per its acronym in Portuguese. A qualitative, evaluative case study was developed in a CAPSad, using fourth generation evaluation. Data collection occurred from January to March 2013 by means of semi-structured interviews applied to 36 subjects, these being health care professionals, patients, patients' relatives and managers. Data analysis identified the category strategies in mental health work. Results showed that recovery programs should provide spaces for dialogue, aiming to clarify the process of psychiatric internment to the user and family, and involve these in the therapy, implementing educational practices and ongoing consideration of mental health activities. In conclusion, it is important to discuss the technologies used in everyday care services, in light of the complexity of crack use.

  13. The health care information directive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Vivek

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developments in information technology promise to revolutionise the delivery of health care by providing access to data in a timely and efficient way. Information technology also raises several important concerns about the confidentiality and privacy of health data. New and existing legislation in Europe and North America may make access to patient level data difficult with consequent impact on research and health surveillance. Although research is being conducted on technical solutions to protect the privacy of personal health information, there is very little research on ways to improve individuals power over their health information. This paper proposes a health care information directive, analogous to an advance directive, to facilitate choices regarding health information disclosure. Results and Discussion A health care information directive is described which creates a decision matrix that combines the ethical appropriateness of the use of personal health information with the sensitivity of the data. It creates a range of possibilities with in which individuals can choose to contribute health information with or without consent, or not to contribute information at all. Conclusion The health care information directive may increase individuals understanding of the uses of health information and increase their willingness to contribute certain kinds of health information. Further refinement and evaluation of the directive is required.

  14. Occupational therapists’ conceptions on mental health care line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Helena Pereira de Paiva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The care line recommended by the Brazilian Health System - SUS must be attained by every professionalof the area, milieu and subject. This study aimed to know the occupational therapists’ conceptions about the lineof care in mental health. The data of this study were obtained from a questionnaire sent via virtual network ofcontacts and snowball technique. Data were subjected to qualitative and quantitative analysis. Most participantswere professionals from the southeast region of the country with over five years of training. They exercise theprofessional activity mainly in Psychiatric Hospitals, Psychosocial Assistance Centers – CAPS II and MentalHealth Clinics. There was no registry of professional performance in Residential Therapeutic Services – SRTand Outpatient Clinics - UBS. Regarding care line, six participants did not respond and five were unaware of theterm, followed by the psychosocial rehabilitation principles and therapeutic project; only one answer identified care line as a practice based on care management with reception principles and articulation of social networksand services. Results showed that the professionals’ practices are little guided in care line logic; however, thereis the need systematization of the assistance according this logic in order to apply the Psychiatric Reform,searching the quality of life improvement and reestablishment of the citizenship of people with psychologicaldistress insofar as, in addition to optimizing the care network, which promotes comprehensive humane careand social contractualism.

  15. How staff and patient experience shapes our perception of spiritual care in a psychiatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffay, Julian

    2014-10-01

    To explore how our understanding of care practice is shaped by the extent of our engagement with staff and patient experience. In spite of the fact that service users desire good spiritual care and that government guidelines recognize its importance, frontline staff in psychiatric settings often find current spiritual assessment tools hard to use and the concept of spirituality difficult to comprehend. A database search was conducted, the grey literature analysed, spirituality assessment tools were explored, and an approach based on user experience was considered. Each of these four perspectives resulted in different perceptions of care. By engaging patient and staff experience, we begin to see spiritual care very differently. There may be rich opportunities for research into the lived experience of the support systems that service users create for each other on wards when they experience staff as inaccessible. Deeper engagement with patients and staff and their concerns is likely to result in breakthroughs in both the understanding and the practice of spiritual care as well as potentially other areas of nursing care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE COMMUNITY MEDICINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health care and reproductive health. It plays a major role in reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity. Access to family planning also has the and mortality. It confers important health and potential to control population growth and in the development benefits to individuals, families, long run reduce green house gas emission ...

  17. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    activities in the health centres ( Table 2) The study showed that community health extension workers were responsible for ... development goals for mothers and children as distant as it was 40 years ago when primary health care strategy was adopted for ... Most of them were very experienced, 50% of. The study (Table II) ...

  18. The physical and mental health of children in foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Pietro; Romani, Lorenza; Bottaro, Giorgia; Ianniello, Francesca; Fabrizio, Giovanna Carmela; Chiaretti, Antonio; Alvaro, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate physical and mental health in children in foster care and comparison with general population. The study is carried out between September 2011 and April 2012 into nine group homes in Rome. It involved 112 children ranging in age 2-17 years, living in temporary care facilities or institutes. All data came out of clinical history and physical exams, validated by a pediatrician. Such data were being then compared with samples of general population. Significant themes were high percentage of children with psychiatric disorders in foster care (22.3%); high percentage of psychiatric disorders diagnosed immediately while arriving at the foster care (56%); no significant differences in weight, height and BMI between children in foster care and general population; significant differences (Pfoster care and general population. The results suggest that the physical health of children in group homes is no worse than that of children living care in their own homes and that the foster care provides necessary conditions to support the growth of the children and their physical, mental and social needs.

  19. Association of psychiatric history and type D personality with symptoms of anxiety, depression, and health status prior to ICD implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starrenburg, Annemieke H; Kraaier, Karin; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Personality factors and psychiatric history may help explain individual differences in risk of psychological morbidity and poor health outcomes in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).......Personality factors and psychiatric history may help explain individual differences in risk of psychological morbidity and poor health outcomes in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD)....

  20. Conscientious objection in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuře Josef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with conscientious objection in health care, addressing the problems of scope, verification and limitation of such refusal, paying attention to ideological agendas hidden behind the right of conscience where the claimed refusal can cause harm or where such a claim is an attempt to impose certain moral values on society or an excuse for not providing health care. The nature of conscientious objection will be investigated and an ethical analysis of conscientious objection will be conducted. Finally some suggestions for health care policy will be proposed.

  1. Racial Disparities in Mental Health Outcomes after Psychiatric Hospital Discharge among Individuals with Severe Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M.; Newhill, Christina E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial disparities in mental health outcomes have been widely documented in noninstitutionalized community psychiatric samples, but few studies have specifically examined the effects of race among individuals with the most severe mental illnesses. A sample of 925 individuals hospitalized for severe mental illness was followed for a year after…

  2. Home Health Care Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all Home Health Agencies that have been registered with Medicare. The list includes addresses, phone numbers, and quality measure ratings for each agency.

  3. Health care agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sloane PD, Warshaw GA, et al, eds. Ham's Primary Care Geriatrics: A Case-Based Approach . 6th ed. ... Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, ...

  4. Salutogenic Model in Mental Health and Psychiatric Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyhan Bag

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing number of people who live with mental health problems for many years in the community brings into focus the need for recovery within a coping and mental health promotion perspective. The value of the salutogenic theory is that it emphasizes promoting coping and health. This article aims to illustrate how Antonovsky’s salutogenic theory and its central concept of sense of coherence and discusses how mental health nurses can use the theories in their praxis. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2017; 9(3.000: 284-300

  5. Adherence and health care costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuga AO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aurel O Iuga,1,2 Maura J McGuire3,4 1Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2Johns Hopkins University, 3Johns Hopkins Community Physicians, 4Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Medication nonadherence is an important public health consideration, affecting health outcomes and overall health care costs. This review considers the most recent developments in adherence research with a focus on the impact of medication adherence on health care costs in the US health system. We describe the magnitude of the nonadherence problem and related costs, with an extensive discussion of the mechanisms underlying the impact of nonadherence on costs. Specifically, we summarize the impact of nonadherence on health care costs in several chronic diseases, such as diabetes and asthma. A brief analysis of existing research study designs, along with suggestions for future research focus, is provided. Finally, given the ongoing changes in the US health care system, we also address some of the most relevant and current trends in health care, including pharmacist-led medication therapy management and electronic (e-prescribing. Keywords: patient, medication, adherence, compliance, nonadherence, noncompliance, cost

  6. Mental Health Service Use Across the Life Course Among Adults With Psychiatric Disorders and Prior Suicidal Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Amy L; Lai, Amy X; Arean, Patricia; Nelson, J Craig; Yaffe, Kristine

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about mental health service use by adults with prior suicidal behavior and current mood or anxiety disorders. This study determined nationally representative prevalence estimates of current mental health service use by these adults, examining racial-ethnic, age, and gender differences. Service use across the life course was examined with Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Survey data from 1,139 adults with a history of suicidal behavior and current mood or anxiety disorders. Overall service use was 47.3%. Across the life course, African Americans showed increasing service use that paralleled use by non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, and others, whereas use by these three groups decreased in the latter half of the life course (p interaction=.01). Adults with prior suicidal behavior and current mood or anxiety disorders have low mental health service use. Findings of racial-ethnic disparities in use can help identify those in need of care.

  7. Towards Sustainable Health Care Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro ROMANELLI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Health care organizations have to develop a sustainable path for creating public value by seeking legitimacy for building and maintaining public trust with patients as social and economic institutions creating value and sustaining both health and wealth for people and communities within society. Health care organizations having at disposal decreasing resources and meeting increasing demands of citizens are following an unsustainable path. Designing sustainable health care systems and organizations is emerging as a strategic goal for developing the wealth of people and communities over time. Building sustainable organizations relies on valuing human resources, designing efficient and effective processes, using technology for better managing the relationships within and outside organizations. Sustainable health care organizations tend to rediscover the importance of human resource management and policies for effectively improving communication with patients and building trust-based relationships. While processes of accreditation contribute to legitimizing effectiveness and quality of health care services and efficient processes, introducing and using new information and communication technologies (ICTs and informatics helps communication leading to restore trust-based relationships between health care institutions and patients for value creation within society.

  8. Sleep apnea, psychopathology, and mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Christopher N; Susukida, Ryoko; Depp, Colin A

    2017-08-01

    Sleep apnea has been shown to be associated with mental health conditions. This study examined the association between sleep apnea and psychopathology and mental health service utilization in a US nationally-representative sample. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). United States. We used data on 264,653 individuals who participated in the 2008-2014 waves of the NSDUH, of which 5498 (3.3%) reported having sleep apnea within the past year. Not applicable. Based on NSDUH responses, participants were categorized as having depression, suicidal ideation, anxiety, and serious psychological distress within the past year. Analyses consisted of using logistic regression models with sleep apnea as the main predictor and mental health conditions as the outcomes of interest, controlling for potential confounding variables. Compared with those without sleep apnea, those reporting past-year sleep apnea had 3.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.77-3.50) times increased odds of having depression, 2.75 (95% CI, 2.34-3.23) times increased odds of suicidal ideation, 3.68 (95% CI, 3.30-4.10) times increased odds of anxiety, and 2.88 (95% CI, 2.61-3.17) times increased odds of severe psychological distress, after controlling for confounders. Among those with each psychiatric outcome, individuals with sleep apnea were substantially more likely to report unmet need for mental health care, despite reporting greater mental health service use. Individuals with sleep apnea have increased risk for psychopathology, including suicidal ideation. Efforts to address the mental health care needs of those with sleep apnea are needed. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Tobacco smoking and psychiatric intensive care unit: Impact of the strict smoking ban on the risk of violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumaza, S; Lebain, P; Brazo, P

    2015-06-01

    Tobacco smoking is the main cause of death among mentally ill persons. Since February 2007, smoking has been strictly forbidden in French covered and closed psychiatric wards. The fear of an increased violence risk induced by tobacco withdrawal is one of the most frequent arguments invoked against this tobacco ban. According to the literature, it seems that the implementation of this ban does not imply such a risk. All these studies compared inpatients' violence risk before and after the tobacco ban in a same psychiatric ward. We aimed to analyse the strict tobacco withdrawal consequences on the violence risk in a retrospective study including patients hospitalised in a psychiatric intensive care unit of the university hospital of Caen during the same period. We compared clinical and demographic data and the violence risk between the smoker group (strict tobacco withdrawal with proposed tobacco substitution) and the non-smoker group (control group). In order to evaluate the violence risk, we used three indicators: a standardised scale (the Bröset Violence Checklist) and two assessments specific to the psychiatric intensive care setting ("the preventing risk protocol" and the "seclusion time"). The clinical and demographic data were compared using the Khi2 test, Fisher test and Mann-Whitney test, and the three violence risk indicators were compared with the Mann-Whitney test. Firstly, comparisons were conducted in the total population, and secondly (in order to eliminate a bias of tobacco substitution) in the subgroup directly hospitalised in the psychiatric intensive care setting. Finally, we analysed in the smoker group the statistical correlation between tobacco smoking intensity and violence risk intensity using a regression test. A population of 72 patients (50 male) was included; 45 were smokers (62.5%) and 27 non-smokers. No statistically significant differences were found in clinical and demographic data between smoker and non-smoker groups in the whole

  10. Associations Between Psychiatric Impairment and Sexual Risk Behavior Among Teens in Mental Health Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Wendy; Barker, David H; Lescano, Celia M; Stewart, Angela J; Affleck, Katelyn; Donenberg, Geri; DiClemente, Ralph; Brown, Larry K

    2014-04-01

    To assess the associations of sexual risk behavior with psychiatric impairment and individual, peer, and partner attitudes among adolescents receiving mental health treatment. Adolescents (N=893, 56% female, 67% African American) completed assessments of psychiatric impairment, rejection sensitivity, peer norms, HIV knowledge, perceived vulnerability, self-efficacy and condom use intentions. Two structural equation models were used to test the study hypotheses; one for sexually active youth and one for non-active youth. For non-active youth, psychiatric impairment influenced self-efficacy and condom use intentions via peer norms, rejection sensitivity, and perceived vulnerability. Among the sexually active youth, sexual risk was related to impairment and previous condom use. These results suggest that individual, peer, and partner factors are related to impairment and to sexual risk attitudes, but depend on previous sexual experience.

  11. Change management in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert James

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces health care managers to the theories and philosophies of John Kotter and William Bridges, 2 leaders in the evolving field of change management. For Kotter, change has both an emotional and situational component, and methods for managing each are expressed in his 8-step model (developing urgency, building a guiding team, creating a vision, communicating for buy-in, enabling action, creating short-term wins, don't let up, and making it stick). Bridges deals with change at a more granular, individual level, suggesting that change within a health care organization means that individuals must transition from one identity to a new identity when they are involved in a process of change. According to Bridges, transitions occur in 3 steps: endings, the neutral zone, and beginnings. The major steps and important concepts within the models of each are addressed, and examples are provided to demonstrate how health care managers can actualize the models within their health care organizations.

  12. The Use of Telemedicine and Mobile Technology to Promote Population Health and Population Management for Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvey, Carolyn; Fortney, John

    2017-10-16

    This article discusses recent applications in telemedicine to promote the goals of population health and population management for people suffering psychiatric disorders. The use of telemedicine to promote collaborative care, self-monitoring and chronic disease management, and population screening has demonstrated broad applicability and effectiveness. Collaborative care using videoconferencing to facilitate mental health specialty consults has demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of depression, PTSD, and also ADHD in pediatric populations. Mobile health is currently being harnessed to monitor patient symptom trajectories with the goal of using machine learning algorithms to predict illness relapse. Patient portals serve as a bridge between patients and providers. They provide an electronically secure shared space for providers and patients to collaborate and optimize care. To date, research has supported the effectiveness of telemedicine in promoting population health. Future endeavors should focus on developing the most effective clinical protocols for using these technologies to ensure long-term use and maximum effectiveness in reducing population burden of mental health.

  13. Limited English proficiency as a barrier to mental health service use: a study of Latino and Asian immigrants with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Giyeon; Aguado Loi, Claudia X; Chiriboga, David A; Jang, Yuri; Parmelee, Patricia; Allen, Rebecca S

    2011-01-01

    Language barriers pose problems in mental health care for foreign-born individuals in the United States. Immigrants with psychiatric disorders may be at particular risk but are currently understudied. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of limited English proficiency (LEP) on mental health service use among immigrant adults with psychiatric disorders. Drawn from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS), Latino and Asian immigrant adults aged 18-86 with any instrument-determined mood, anxiety, and substance use disorder (n = 372) were included in the present analysis. Results from hierarchical logistic regression analyses showed that having health insurance, poor self-rated mental health, and more psychiatric disorders were independently associated with higher probability of mental health service use in the Latino group. After controlling for all background characteristics and mental health need factors, LEP significantly decreased odds of mental health service use among Latino immigrants. None of the factors including LEP predicted mental health service use among Asian immigrants, who were also the least likely to access such services. LEP was a barrier to mental health service use among Latino immigrants with psychiatric disorders. This study suggests that future approaches to interventions might be well advised to include not only enhancing the availability of bilingual service providers and interpretation services but also increasing awareness of such options for at least Latino immigrants. In addition, further investigation is needed to identify factors that can enhance access to mental health care services among Asians. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Job satisfaction and resilience in psychiatric nurses: A study at the Institute of Mental Health, Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhimin; Gangaram, Poornima; Xie, Huiting; Chua, Stephanie; Ong, Samantha Bee Cheng; Koh, Sioh Eng

    2017-12-01

    Job satisfaction ranks highly as one of the main factors influencing turnover rates among nurses. Mental health nursing has been reported to be a particularly stressful specialty, yet little is known about the level of job satisfaction among psychiatric nurses in Singapore. Resilience is defined as a means of adapting to stress at the workplace, and could serve as a factor influencing job satisfaction. The present study aimed to explore the current level of job satisfaction among psychiatric nurses working in the only tertiary psychiatric institution in Singapore, the influencing factors, and the relationship between resilience and job satisfaction. A survey questionnaire consisting of the following was administered to all eligible nurses working in the Institute of Mental Health between the period of 16-24 December 2014: (i) The McCloskey and Mueller Satisfaction Scale; (ii) The Resilience Scale; and (iii) sociodemographic data form. A total of 874 nurses were eligible for participation in the study, and a total of 748 nurses responded, totalling 85.6% response. A mean satisfaction score of 95.21 and mean resilience score of 125.74 were obtained. Mean satisfaction and resilience scores were the highest for nurses with longer working experience and those of older age. A positive and significant association between satisfaction and resilience scores (P = 0.001) was obtained. Psychiatric nurses in Singapore are generally satisfied with their job, but this can be further improved with the strengthening of personal resilience. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL. 26, NO 1, MARCH 2014. INTRODUCTION disability from complications of pregnancy and. 1 child birth. MI in birth preparedness is. Birth preparedness by a couple ensures that indispensible in rural communities where patriarchy appropriate care ...

  16. Health care technology in Sweden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonsson, E.; Banta, H.D.

    1994-01-01

    Health care in Sweden is a public sector responsibility and equity in access to care is quite important. The Swedish system is organized into several levels, with the Federation of County Councils at the top, and with regional, county, and local levels. In theory, the four hospital tiers developed

  17. "Cloud" health-care workers.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherertz, R J; Bassetti, S.; Bassetti-Wyss, B.

    2001-01-01

    Certain bacteria dispersed by health-care workers can cause hospital infections. Asymptomatic health-care workers colonized rectally, vaginally, or on the skin with group A streptococci have caused outbreaks of surgical site infection by airborne dispersal. Outbreaks have been associated with skin colonization or viral upper respiratory tract infection in a phenomenon of airborne dispersal of Staphylococcus aureus called the "cloud" phenomenon. This review summarizes the data supporting the e...

  18. [Corruption and health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasović Šušnjara, Ivana

    2014-06-01

    Corruption is a global problem that takes special place in health care system. A large number of participants in the health care system and numerous interactions among them provide an opportunity for various forms of corruption, be it bribery, theft, bureaucratic corruption or incorrect information. Even though it is difficult to measure the amount of corruption in medicine, there are tools that allow forming of the frames for possible interventions.

  19. Periodontal Health among Non-Hospitalized Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Mangaluru City-India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Sangeeta Umesh; Singh, Rashmi; Kota, Keshava Pai

    2016-08-01

    A substantial section of society constituting the mentally ill and psychiatric patients deserve special attention. Evidence has suggested that psychological factors have contributed to an increase in the susceptibility to periodontal disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the gingival and periodontal health of chronically non-hospitalized psychiatric patients in Mangaluru city, India. Forty one psychiatric patients having chronic psychiatric illness and on neuroleptic medications for a minimum of 2 years were included in the study. The control group consisted of 41 healthy dental patients who were selected to match the study group by age and gender, and for both groups 20 teeth excluding the third molars should be present. Demographic characteristics, dental examination including gingival index and periodontal health according to the community periodontal index were recorded for each patient in both the groups. In the psychiatric patient group (Group A) 47.1% subjects were suffering from schizophrenia and 17.6% subjects were having mood disorder. Gingivitis varied from mild to severe among the patients of both the groups. Bleeding on probing (CPI 1) was recorded in 23.5% in Group A and 14.6% in Group B. Dental calculus (CPI 2) in 38.2% in Group A and 58.5% in Group B of the subjects, 20.6% with at least one 4mm to 5mm pocket (CPI 3), and 17.6% with at least one 6mm pocket (CPI 4). The present study underlines a considerable need for prevention and treatment of periodontal disease among chronic psychiatric patients in Mangaluru city. Every effort should be made to increase the awareness of this cohort regarding the importance of oral hygiene practices and on the early diagnosis of periodontal problems.

  20. Challenges to Improve Inter-Professional Care and Service Collaboration for People Living With Psychiatric Disabilities in Ordinary Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ann-Christine; Ainalem, Ingrid; Berg, Agneta; Janlöv, Ann-Christin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe health care- and social service professionals' experiences of a quality-improvement program implemented in the south of Sweden. The focus of the program was to develop inter-professional collaboration to improve care and service to people with psychiatric disabilities in ordinary housing. Focus group interviews and a thematic analysis were used. The result was captured as themes along steps in process. (I) Entering the quality-improvement program: Lack of information about the program, The challenge of getting started, and Approaching the resources reluctantly. (II) Doing the practice-based improvement work: Facing unprepared workplaces, and Doing twice the work. (III) Looking back--evaluation over 1 year: Balancing theoretical knowledge with practical training, and Considering profound knowledge as an integral part of work. The improvement process in clinical practice was found to be both time and energy consuming, yet worth the effort. The findings also indicate that collaboration across organizational boundaries was broadened, and the care and service delivery were improved.

  1. Burnout, depression and job satisfaction in acute psychiatric and secure mental health settings

    OpenAIRE

    Chabinska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Chapter 1: Objective: The systematic review aimed to review the literature on burnout and its relationship to depression within the acute in-patient mental health services: psychiatric units and specifically, secure forensic mental health services. Methods: The review process included a systematic search across five databases (Medline, PsychINFO, Cinahl Plus, EMBASE and SCOPUS). Eligible studies included a cross-sectional design, using validated measures on burnout and de...

  2. Faster return to work after psychiatric consultation for sicklisted employees with common mental disorders compared to care as usual. A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Hoedeman, Rob; de Jong, Fransina J; Meeuwissen, Jolanda AC; Drewes, Hanneke W; van der Laan, Niels C; Adèr, Herman J

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Return to work (RTW) of employees on sick leave for common mental disorders may require a multidisciplinary approach. This article aims to assess time to RTW after a psychiatric consultation providing treatment advice to the occupational physician (OP) for employees on sick leave for common mental disorders in the occupational health (OH) setting, compared to care as usual (CAU). Methods Cluster randomized clinical trial evaluating patients of 12 OPs receiving consultation by a psychiatrist, compared to CAU delivered by 12 OPs in the control group. 60 patients suffering from common mental disorders and ≥ six weeks sicklisted were included. Follow up three and six months after inclusion. Primary outcome measure was time to RTW. Intention- to-treat multilevel analysis and a survival analysis were performed to evaluate time to RTW in both groups. Results In CAU, referral was the main intervention. Both groups improved in terms of symptom severity and quality of life, but time to RTW was significantly shorter in the psychiatric consultation group. At three months follow up, 58% of the psychiatric consultation group had full RTW versus 44% of the control group, a significant finding (P = 0.0093). Survival analysis showed 68 days earlier RTW after intervention in the psychiatric consultation group (P = 0.078) compared to CAU. Conclusion Psychiatric consultation for employees on sick leave in the OH setting improves time to RTW in patients with common mental disorders as compared to CAU. In further research, focus should be on early intervention in patients with common mental disorders on short sick leave duration. Psychiatric consultation might be particularly promising for improvement of RTW in those patients. Trial registration number ISRCTN: 86722376 PMID:20856601

  3. Delivering Health Care and Mental Health Care Services to Children in Family Foster Care after Welfare and Health Care Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Mark D.; Freundlich, Madelyn; Battistelli, Ellen S.; Kaufman, Neal D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the essential features of a health care system that can meet the special needs of children in out-of-home care. Discusses some of the major recent changes brought about by welfare and health care reform. Notes that it remains to be seen whether the quality of services will improve as a result of these reforms. (Author)

  4. The experience of primary care providers with an integrated mental health care program in safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, Wayne D; Ratzliff, Anna; Harrison, David; Chan, Ya-Fen; Vannoy, Steven; Unützer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Primary care providers participating in a statewide implementation of an integrated mental health care program for "safety-net" patients in primary care clinics were surveyed to elicit their experiences and level of satisfaction. Quantitative analyses were performed to identify respondent characteristics and satisfaction with the program. Qualitative analyses were done to identify common themes in response to the question "How could psychiatric consultation [in the program] be improved?" Primary care providers were generally satisfied with the integrated mental health care program and raised several concerns that suggest important principles for successful future implementations of these types of programs.

  5. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control Preventing infections can help the respiratory home care patient stay as healthy as possible. Hand-washing is the single most important thing for patients and caregivers to perform on a routine basis. Use a liquid soap and lots of warm running water. Work up a good lather and scrub for at ...

  6. Making strides towards better mental health care in Peru: Results from a primary care mental health training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borba, C P C; Gelaye, B; Zayas, L; Ulloa, M; Lavelle, J; Mollica, R F; Henderson, D C

    2015-04-01

    Our program attempted to improve attitudes and confidence of Peruvian primary care physicians (PCPs) providing mental health care. The training program underwent an evaluation to determine impact of sustained confidence in performing medical and psychiatric procedures, and application of learned skills. Fifty-two Peruvian primary care practitioners were trained at the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma (HPRT) over a two-week period. There was significant improvement in PCPs' confidence levels of performing psychiatric procedures (counseling, prescribing medications, psychiatric diagnosis, assessing the risk for violence, and treating trauma victims) when comparing baseline and post-two-week to one year follow-up. When comparing post-two-week and one-year follow-up quantitative measures, confidences levels went slightly down. This may be an implication that the frequency of trainings and supervisions are needed more frequently. In contrast, qualitative responses from the one-year follow-up revealed increase in victims of violence clinical care, advocacy, awareness, education, training, policy changes, accessibility of care, and sustainment of diagnostic tools. This study supports the feasibility of training PCP's in a culturally effective manner with sustainability over time.

  7. Health care entrepreneurship: financing innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazier, Kyle L; Metzler, Bridget

    2006-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is often described as the ability to create new ventures from new or existing concepts, ideas and visions. There has been significant entrepreneurial response to the changes in the scientific and social underpinnings of health care services delivery. However, a growing portion of the economic development driving health care industry expansion is threatened further by longstanding use of financing models that are suboptimal for health care ventures. The delayed pace of entrepreneurial activity in this industry is in part a response to the general economy and markets, but also due to the lack of capital for new health care ventures. The recent dearth of entrepreneurial activities in the health services sector may also due to failure to consider new approaches to partnerships and strategic ventures, despite their mutually beneficial organizational and financing potential. As capital becomes more scarce for innovators, it is imperative that those with new and creative ideas for health and health care improvement consider techniques for capital acquisition that have been successful in other industries and at similar stages of development. The capital and added expertise can allow entrepreneurs to leverage resources, dampen business fluctuations, and strengthen long term prospects.

  8. Faster return to work after psychiatric consultation for sicklisted employees with common mental disorders compared to care as usual. A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Christina M van der Feltz-Cornelis1, Rob Hoedeman2, Fransina J de Jong3, Jolanda AC Meeuwissen3, Hanneke W Drewes3, Niels C van der Laan4, Herman J Adèr51Department of Developmental, Clinical and Crosscultural Psychology, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands; 2Department of Health Sciences, University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands; 3Trimbos instituut, NIMHA, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 4Psychiatric Consultation Practice, The Netherlands; 5Retired from Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsIntroduction: Return to work (RTW of employees on sick leave for common mental ­disorders may require a multidisciplinary approach. This article aims to assess time to RTW after a psychiatric consultation providing treatment advice to the occupational physician (OP for employees on sick leave for common mental disorders in the occupational health (OH setting, compared to care as usual (CAU. Methods: Cluster randomized clinical trial evaluating patients of 12 OPs receiving ­consultation by a psychiatrist, compared to CAU delivered by 12 OPs in the control group. 60 patients ­suffering from common mental disorders and ≥ six weeks sicklisted were included. ­Follow up three and six months after inclusion. Primary outcome measure was time to RTW. ­Intention-to-treat multilevel analysis and a survival analysis were performed to evaluate time to RTW in both groups. Results: In CAU, referral was the main intervention. Both groups improved in terms of ­symptom severity and quality of life, but time to RTW was significantly shorter in the ­psychiatric ­consultation group. At three months follow up, 58% of the psychiatric consultation group had full RTW versus 44% of the control group, a significant finding (P = 0.0093. Survival analysis showed 68 days earlier RTW after intervention in the psychiatric consultation group (P = 0.078 compared to CAU. Conclusion: Psychiatric

  9. Health Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in medical offices or in the dialysis unit. Nephrology Nurse Nephrology nurses are licensed, registered nurses who ... nutritional intake to ensure the patient's optimal health. Nephrology Social Worker Most nephrology social workers have a ...

  10. Decentralizing provision of mental health care in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Neil; Suveendran, Thirupathy; de Silva, Chithramalee

    2017-04-01

    In the past, mental health services in Sri Lanka were limited to tertiary-care institutions, resulting in a large treatment gap. Starting in 2000, significant efforts have been made to reconfigure service provision and to integrate mental health services with primary health care. This approach was supported by significant political commitment to establishing island-wide decentralized mental health care in the wake of the 2004 tsunami. Various initiatives were consolidated in The mental health policy of Sri Lanka 2005-2015, which called for implementation of a comprehensive community-based, decentralized service structure. The main objectives of the policy were to provide mental health services of good quality at primary, secondary and tertiary levels; to ensure the active involvement of communities, families and service users; to make mental health services culturally appropriate and evidence based; and to protect the human rights and dignity of all people with mental health disorders. Significant improvements have been made and new cadres of mental health workers have been introduced. Trained medical officers (mental health) now provide outpatient care, domiciliary care, mental health promotion in schools, and community mental health education. Community psychiatric nurses have also been trained and deployed to supervise treatment adherence in the home and provide mental health education to patients, their family members and the wider community. A total of 4367 mental health volunteers are supporting care and raising mental health literacy in the community. Despite these important achievements, more improvements are needed to provide more timely intervention, combat myths and stigma, and further decentralize care provision. These, and other challenges, will be targeted in the new mental health policy for 2017-2026.

  11. Agents of Change for Health Care Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely recognized throughout the health care industry that the United States leads the world in health care spending per capita. However, the chilling dose of reality for American health care consumers is that for all of their spending, the World Health Organization ranks the country's health care system 37th in overall performance--right…

  12. Mental Health Care: Who's Who

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Mental Health Care: Who's Who Page Content Article Body Psychiatrist: ... degree in psychology, counseling or a related field. Mental Health Counselor: Master’s degree and several years of supervised ...

  13. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    the children didnot receive BCG vaccine while spiritual homes was the pattern in 6.9 households. 22.9% did not receive measles vaccine. A total of 63 under-five deaths were reported in 53. Table VI shows the health-seeking behaviour of. 6. JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY MEDICINE AND PRIMARY HEALTH CARE VOL.

  14. Babesiosis for Health Care Providers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-25

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing babesiosis and providing patients at risk with tick bite prevention messages.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/25/2012.

  15. Health promotion innovation in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra McManus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, the main focus of primary health care practices was to diagnose and treat patients. The identification of risk factors for disease and the prevention of chronic conditions have become a part of everyday practice. This paper provides an argument for training primary health care (PHC practitioners in health promotion, while encouraging them to embrace innovation within their practice to streamline the treatment process and improve patient outcomes. Electronic modes of communication, education and training are now commonplace in many medical practices. The PHC sector has a small window of opportunity in which to become leaders within the current model of continuity of care by establishing their role as innovators in the prevention, treatment and management of disease. Not only will this make their own jobs easier, it has the potential to significantly impact patient outcomes.

  16. Health promotion innovation in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Previously, the main focus of primary health care practices was to diagnose and treat patients. The identification of risk factors for disease and the prevention of chronic conditions have become a part of everyday practice. This paper provides an argument for training primary health care (PHC) practitioners in health promotion, while encouraging them to embrace innovation within their practice to streamline the treatment process and improve patient outcomes. Electronic modes of communication, education and training are now commonplace in many medical practices. The PHC sector has a small window of opportunity in which to become leaders within the current model of continuity of care by establishing their role as innovators in the prevention, treatment and management of disease. Not only will this make their own jobs easier, it has the potential to significantly impact patient outcomes.

  17. [Increased financial risks for health insurers: a challenge for providers of mental health care in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daansen, P J; van Schilt, J

    2014-01-01

    As from 2014 Dutch health insurance companies will bear the full financial risk for their clients in mental health care. Over the next years the existing risk settlement shared between insurance companies will gradually be brought to a close. Municipalities and the Ministry of Justice are already responsible for or will soon become responsible for financing health care for adolescents, patients with severe psychiatric disorders and forensic psychiatric patients. As a result, the health insurance companies are beginning to impose ever stricter conditions regarding the care 'product' they are 'buying'. To study the possible consequences, for mental health care institutions, of the increased risk to be borne by health care insurers. Use was made of relevant marketing literature and literature relating to mental health care. Studies of Dutch mental health care literature indicate that in the future the purchasing procedure will no longer consider the immediate treatment outcome as the sole performance indicator but will also take into account additional factors such as long-term improvements in patients' health, customer satisfaction and degree of patient participation, patient empowerment and autonomy. In formulating the details of their health products and business strategies, health care providers will now have to take into account not only the efficacy of the treatment they provide but also the purchasing policy and strategy of the health insurance companies.

  18. Rural migration and health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase; Jensen, Marit Vatn

    This literature study focuses on possible links between access to health services and migration in rural areas. Why do people move to or from rural areas or why do they stay? What determines where people settle? And, in this context, do local health care services play an important or minor role......, or no role at all? First, the paper reports on key findings from rural migration studies, in order to shed light on two migration trends: urbanization and counter-urbanization. Then we take a closer look on settlement preferences in rural areas, including the impact of health care facilities. Finally, we end...

  19. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lay, Barbara; Salize, Hans Joachim; Dressing, Harald; Rüsch, Nicolas; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bühlmann, Monika; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Korinth, Lena; Rössler, Wulf

    2012-01-01

    .... In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve...

  20. Mental health recovery for psychiatric inpatient services: perceived importance of the elements of recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, B W M; Ng, B F L; Li, V C K; Yeung, Y M; Lee, M K L; Leung, A Y H

    2012-06-01

    OBJECTIVES. To develop a questionnaire for measuring the perceived importance of the elements of mental health recovery in psychiatric inpatients in Hong Kong and to test the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. METHODS. Thematic content analysis of identified literature on mental health recovery was performed to identify the elements related to mental health recovery. A questionnaire was developed to assess the perceived importance of the identified elements. An expert panel was set up to evaluate the content validity and patient focus group's face validity of the questionnaire. Participants were recruited from medium-stay and rehabilitation wards of Castle Peak Hospital. RESULTS. A total of 101 psychiatric inpatients completed the questionnaire, the majority of whom suffered from schizophrenia (75%). Having meaning in life was rated by 91% of the participants as an important element of recovery, followed by hope (86%) and general health and wellness (85%). Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency was 0.91. Explorative factor analysis yielded 7 factors and intraclass correlation coefficients revealed a fair-to-good test-retest reliability. CONCLUSIONS. The results supported the psychometric properties of the questionnaire for measurement of mental health recovery and serve as a basis for the future development of recovery-oriented services in the psychiatric inpatient settings in this locality.

  1. Prevalence of serum anti-neuronal autoantibodies in patients admitted to acute psychiatric care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, M; Sæther, S G; Borowski, K

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autoimmune encephalitis associated with anti-neuronal antibodies may be challenging to distinguish from primary psychiatric disorders. The significance of anti-neuronal antibodies in psychiatric patients without clear evidence of autoimmune encephalitis is unknown. We investigated the...

  2. [Fragments of history in psychiatric care Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miranda, Francisco Arnoldo Nunes; Santos, Raionara Cristina de Araújo; de Azevedo, Dulcian Medeiros; Fernandes, Rafaella Leite; Costa, Tarciana Sampaio

    2010-09-01

    This article aims to rescue aspects of the performing therapeutic of the Day Hospital (HD) Dr Elger Nunes, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, during its term, and analyze the results regarding to the number of patients assisted from 1996 to 2004. This is an empirical, descriptive and exploratory study, ex post facto with a quantitative approach, carried out through the analysis of the records of 910 people attended in the hospital. The data was submitted to the informational resource software Microsoft Excel and converted into diagrams. The results show a greater accessibility to this treatment modality, decreasing in hospitalization-time length and improving hospital discharge conditions for users, with reduction in number of patients who interrupted treatment. It focus on the importance of the Day Hospital in the process of psychiatric reform, with care grounded on the use of the humanized therapeutic practices, and still not losing the bond with family and society.

  3. [Discussion of medically supervised family care in Germany. Historical development of a policy for social integration of psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddies, T; Schmiedebach, H P

    2001-01-01

    This article is based on the thesis that family care in the 20th century was practiced mainly under pragmatical/economical and therapeutical aspects. Depending on time and place, one of the two aspects would dominate while the other would serve as supporting motive. The subject of this article is to examine selected models of family care in Germany at different times as to their aim regarding the social integration of psychiatric patients. The family care patients not only lived outside the psychiatric hospitals, but were usually employed in household, farming or trade of the foster home. So the integrative potential of family care was, and still is, aimed at establishing a living and working condition as "normal" as possible. Until 1945, patients who could not or were not allowed to return to a completely independent lifestyle, family care offered them the widest range of integration and freedom. The often observed long lasting stays in families, reflect this rise in quality of life, although many were formally still associated with the mental institution. Up to the fifties, family care can be evaluated as an attempt of psychiatric hospitals to encounter the social isolation of the mentally ill. Nowadays family care is seeing a certain renaissance as part of social psychiatry. It is however not always clear whether family care can serve as a mean of real integration in the sense of a completely independent living and working condition, or whether it leads only to an, even if permanent, extramural accommodation of the chronically ill patients.

  4. [Job Satisfaction Among Young Physicians Working in Psychiatric and Psychosomatic Care - Results of a Survey in Saxony, Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantenburg, Birte; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2016-11-01

    Objective: Analysis of job satisfaction and intentions to quit among physicians working in psychiatric/psychosomatic care compared to physicians working in somatic care. Methods: Full postal survey of all physicians ≤ 40 years of age registered with the State Chamber of Physicians of Saxony (response rate 40 %, n = 2357). Analysis was restricted to physicians working in patient care (n = 1901). Results: Physicians working in psychiatric/psychosomatic care as well as those in somatic care were rather satisfied with their overall job situation (mean: 3.48 [standard deviation: 1.01] vs. 3.40 [0.94], 5 point Likert scale). Physicians working in psychiatric/psychosomatic care were less satisfied with only 2 out of 20 aspects of job satisfaction. Nearly a quarter wished to leave patient care or to go abroad, which did not differ from physicians working in somatic care. Conclusion: The present study did not confirm international results indicating lower job satisfaction among psychiatrists. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Screening for mental disorder among primary care patients. Usefulness of the General Health Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, P D; Goldberg, I D; Kessler, L G; Nycz, G R

    1982-07-01

    The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and a structured psychiatric interview (lifetime version of the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia) were administered to a sample of primary care patients in the United States. Responses to the GHQ tended to form factors that have substantive interpretations, such as depression, anxiety, sleep problems, and social functioning. However, there seems to be little gain in using subscale scores to help identify persons with different types of psychiatric disorders.

  6. Integrating mental health into primary health care – Uganda's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most developing countries and indeed many African countries have been undertaking reforms of the mental health policies and strategies to improve access and equity for the community to mental health and psychiatric services. This has been in conformity with a health policy philosophy which emphasize decentralization ...

  7. Psychiatric admission and readmission in a general hospital of Porto Alegre: sociodemographic, clinic, and use of Network for Psychosocial Care characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardo, Gabriela Lemos de Pinho; Silveira, Luísa Horn de Castro; Rocha, Cristianne Maria Famer; Rocha, Kátia Bones

    2017-01-01

    The revolving door phenomenon is characterized by repeated and frequent psychiatric readmissions. We aim to investigate sociodemographic, clinic, and follow-up characteristics in health services associated to psychiatric admissions and readmissions of inpatients in a general hospital of Porto Alegre. It is a cross-sectional study with a sample of 96 participants. More than half of the sample (53.1%) were female, 51% were single, and the average age was 44.3 years old. From clinic data, 36% (n = 35) of the users were in their first admission, and 36% (n = 35) met the criteria for frequent readmission. The results show that users with frequent readmissions significantly mentioned fewer people on whom they could rely. Alternatively, users in first admission lived with a significant larger number of people than the rest of the sample and had, with less frequency, bond with health services other than hospitals, using hospitals as an entrance door to mental health care. Regarding follow-up in the network, 34.4% of the sample did not visit often NPC services before admission, and only 4.1% used psychosocial rehabilitation services. We highlight the importance of hospitals as an articulation point in the network, and as strategic to connect with NPC services. In spite of international literature investigation and registration of the frequent psychiatric readmission phenomenon, we notice it is a field that needs greater investigation in Brazil.

  8. Violence towards health care workers in a Public Health Care Facility in Italy: a repeated cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, Nicola; Heponiemi, Tarja

    2012-05-02

    Violence at work is one of the major concerns in health care activities. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of physical and non-physical violence in a general health care facility in Italy and to assess the relationship between violence and psychosocial factors, thereby providing a basis for appropriate intervention. All health care workers from a public health care facility were invited to complete a questionnaire containing questions on workplace violence. Three questionnaire-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted. The response rate was 75% in 2005, 71% in 2007, and 94% in 2009. The 2009 questionnaire contained the VIF (Violent Incident Form) for reporting violent incidents, the DCS (demand/control/support) model for job strain, the Colquitt 20 item questionnaire for perceived organizational justice, and the GHQ-12 General Health Questionnaire for the assessment of mental health. One out of ten workers reported physical assault, and one out of three exposure to non-physical violence in the workplace in the previous year. Nurses and physicians were the most exposed occupational categories, whereas the psychiatric and emergency departments were the services at greatest risk of violence. Workers exposed to non-physical violence were subject to high job strain, low support, low perceived organizational justice, and high psychological distress. Our study shows that health care workers in an Italian local health care facility are exposed to violence. Workplace violence was associated with high demand and psychological disorders, while job control, social support and organizational justice were protective factors.

  9. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  10. Pharmaceutical care in Brazil's primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Patricia Sodré; Costa, Ediná Alves; Guerra, Augusto Afonso; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis; Guibu, Ione Aquemi; Álvares, Juliana; Costa, Karen Sarmento; Karnikowski, Margô Gomes de Oliveira; Soeiro, Orlando Mario; Leite, Silvana Nair

    2017-11-13

    To characterize the activities of clinical nature developed by pharmacists in basic health units and their participation in educational activities aiming at health promotion. This article is part of the Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos - Serviços, 2015 (PNAUM - National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines - Services, 2015), a cross-sectional and exploratory study, of evaluative nature, consisting of a survey of information in a representative sample of cities, stratified by the Brazilian regions that constitute domains of study, and a subsample of primary health care services. The interviewed pharmacists (n=285) were responsible for the delivery of medicines and were interviewed in person with the use of a script. The characterization of the activities of clinical nature was based on information from pharmacists who declared to perform them, and on participation in educational activities aiming at health promotion, according to information from all pharmacists. The results are presented in frequency and their 95% confidence intervals. From the interviewed subjects, 21.3% said they perform activities of clinical nature. Of these, more than 80% considered them very important; the majority does not dispose of specific places to perform them, which hinders privacy and confidentiality in these activities. The main denominations were "pharmaceutical guidance" and "pharmaceutical care." The registration of activities is mainly made in the users' medical records, computerized system, and in a specific document filed at the pharmacy, impairing the circulation of information among professionals. Most pharmacists performed these activities mainly along with physicians and nurses; 24.7% rarely participated in meetings with the health team, and 19.7% have never participated. Activities of clinical nature performed by pharmacists in Brazil are still incipient. The difficulties found point out

  11. National Health Care Reform, Medicaid, and Children in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, Neal; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Outlines access to health care for children in out-of-home care under current law, reviews how health care access for these children would be affected by President Clinton's health care reform initiative, and proposes additional measures that could be considered to improve access and service coordination for children in the child welfare system.…

  12. [Care of psychiatric disorders: thoughts about human rights and the patient's rights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamma, R C; Forcella, H T

    2001-06-01

    Considering the social, political and economical changes such as occurred during the construction of the Psychiatric Nursing History, as well as the ongoing modifications in teaching nursing due the new Law for Directories and Bases, and taking also into account the existing preoccupation of some sections as far as the compliance with the Human Rights and Patient Rights are concerned, the present study proposes some reflections about the ethical conducts by nursing professionals in relation to patients interned in Psychiatric Hospitals, giving emphasis to the aspects related to the human dignity. The discussion is based in the Directory of the Rights of Patients proposed by the Secretary of Health of the Government of the State of São Paulo, as well as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The study gives furthermore emphasis to the responsibility in the area of teaching as far as the mobilization process for transforming the preconceptions regarding the mental diseases are concerned and examines the effective practice of equality, democracy, liberty and the exercise of the citizenship of the patient.

  13. Engaging with Families Is a Challenge: Beliefs among Healthcare Professionals in Forensic Psychiatric Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörberg, Ulrica; Erlingsson, Christen; Syrén, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Being healthcare professionals in the complex field of forensic psychiatry care (FPC) seems particularly challenging. Historically, families have almost been invisible in FPC. The aim of this study was to uncover beliefs among healthcare professionals concerning families of patients admitted for FPC. Using a hermeneutical approach inspired by Gadamer's philosophy, group interviews with healthcare professionals in four Swedish forensic psychiatric clinics were analyzed. Analysis resulted in seven key beliefs. There were three beliefs about families: family belongingness is a resource for the patient; most families are broken and not possible to trust; and most families get in the way of the patient's care. Four beliefs concerned encounters with families: it is important to achieve a balance and control over the family; it is essential to set aside one's own values and morals; family-oriented work is an impossible mission; and family oriented work requires welcoming the families. Despite ethical dilemmas of working with families in FPC, healthcare professionals showed a willingness and desire to work in a more family-oriented manner. More knowledge, understanding, and caring tools are needed in order to meet the needs of the family as well as support the family's resources. PMID:26448874

  14. Do mental health consumers want to improve their long-term disease risk behaviours? A survey of over 2000 psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlem, Kate; Bailey, Jacqueline; Metse, Alexandra; Asara, Ashley; Wye, Paula; Clancy, Richard; Wiggers, John; Bowman, Jenny

    2017-12-02

    Policies and clinical guidelines acknowledge the role mental health services have in addressing the physical health of individuals with a mental illness; however, little research has explored interest in reducing health risk behaviours or the acceptability of receiving support to reduce such risks among psychiatric inpatients. This study estimated the prevalence of four long-term disease risk behaviours (tobacco smoking, hazardous alcohol consumption, inadequate fruit and/or vegetable consumption, and inadequate physical activity); patient interest in reducing these risks; and acceptability of being provided care to do so during a psychiatric inpatient stay. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with 2075 inpatients from four inpatient psychiatric facilities in one health district in Australia (October 2012-April 2014). Prevalence of risk behaviours ranged from 50.2% (inadequate physical activity) to 94.8% (inadequate fruit and/or vegetable consumption). The majority of respondents (88.4%) had more than one risk behaviour, and most were seriously considering improving their risk behaviours (47.6% to 65.3%). The majority (80.4%) agreed that it would be acceptable to be provided support and advice to change such behaviours during their psychiatric inpatient stay. Some diagnoses were associated with smoking and hazardous alcohol consumption, interest in reducing alcohol consumption and increasing fruit and/or vegetable consumption, and acceptability of receiving advice and support. The findings reinforce the need and opportunity for psychiatric inpatient facilities to address the long-term disease risk behaviours of their patients. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Mental Health Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  15. A Longitudinal Study of Child Maltreatment and Mental Health Predictors of Admission to Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick A. Rose

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The child welfare system is an access point for children’s mental health services. Psychiatric residential treatment facilities (PRTFs are the most restrictive, and most expensive setting for children to receive long-term care. Given the high rates of behavioral health concerns among maltreated children in out-of-home care, research is needed to examine the factors that predict entry in PRTFs among children investigated for maltreatment. This exploratory study used cross-sector administrative records linked across multiple systems, including child welfare records and Medicaid claims, from a single state over a five-year period (n = 105,982. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to predict entry into a PRTF. After controlling for many factors, PRTF entry was predicted by diagnosis code indicating a trauma-related condition, antipsychotic medication prescriptions, and entry into lower levels of out-of-home care, supporting the view that youth are admitted to PRTFs largely due to clinical need. However, PRTF admission is also associated with characteristics of their experiences with the social service system, primarily foster care placement stability and permanency. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  16. A Longitudinal Study of Child Maltreatment and Mental Health Predictors of Admission to Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Roderick A; Lanier, Paul

    2017-09-28

    The child welfare system is an access point for children's mental health services. Psychiatric residential treatment facilities (PRTFs) are the most restrictive, and most expensive setting for children to receive long-term care. Given the high rates of behavioral health concerns among maltreated children in out-of-home care, research is needed to examine the factors that predict entry in PRTFs among children investigated for maltreatment. This exploratory study used cross-sector administrative records linked across multiple systems, including child welfare records and Medicaid claims, from a single state over a five-year period ( n = 105,982). Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to predict entry into a PRTF. After controlling for many factors, PRTF entry was predicted by diagnosis code indicating a trauma-related condition, antipsychotic medication prescriptions, and entry into lower levels of out-of-home care, supporting the view that youth are admitted to PRTFs largely due to clinical need. However, PRTF admission is also associated with characteristics of their experiences with the social service system, primarily foster care placement stability and permanency. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  17. Psychiatric screening of admissions to an accident and emergency ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, G; Reinstein, D Z; Rajiyah, G; Rosser, R

    1991-04-01

    One hundred medical and surgical patients admitted to an accident and emergency ward were screened for psychiatric disorder. A psychiatric diagnosis was made in 37 patients, 32 of whom were correctly identified by the GHQ. Psychiatric morbidity was associated with being single, lower social class, unemployment, homelessness and living in Bloomsbury Health District or north-east London. It was also associated with not being registered with a GP. The 14 overdose patients were no more likely to receive a psychiatric diagnosis than other patients, yet constituted most of the psychiatric referrals. Few patients were asked by medical staff about emotional worries or problems. A desire to be asked such questions and a past psychiatric history were associated with a psychiatric diagnosis. Routine screening of psychiatric morbidity in both medical and surgical patients and appropriate psychiatric referral of identified patients is recommended. A system of facilitating GP registration is necessary, as much of the morbidity identified could be contained within primary care.

  18. Privatizing health care: caveat emptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D W

    1990-01-01

    Many Western European countries are moving toward privatization of their health care systems. The United States' health care system, since it is almost entirely privatized, is therefore worthy of study. Doing so raises several questions. How is privatization being managed in the US? How could its management be improved? What management lessons must be kept in mind if it is to be used effectively? What potential pitfalls should European countries consider as they move toward greater privatization? With operating costs, European countries must avoid the mistakes that have led to dramatic increases in annual health care costs in the US, simultaneous with reductions in access and quality. Doing so requires designing systems that promote hospital behavior consistent with a country's health objectives. With capital costs, an approach must be designed that allows policy-makers to work closely with both managers and physicians in order to make strategically sound choices about access and quality. Such an approach will require physicians to incorporate their clinical judgments into community standards of care, and to adopt a regional (rather than an institutional or personal) perspective in the determination of any incremental capital expenditures. By making regulation proactive and strategic, rather than punitive, health policymakers in Western Europe can achieve the best privatization has to offer without feeling the sting of its unintended consequences. In so doing they can help to move their health systems toward achieving the multiple and illusive goals of access, quality and reasonable cost.

  19. Gender Roles in a Traditionally Female Occupation: A Study of Emergency, Operating, Intensive Care, and Psychiatric Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchmeyer, Catherine; Bullin, Carol

    1997-01-01

    A study of 12 emergency, 27 operating, 25 intensive care, and 22 psychiatric nurses in Canada demonstrated that, although gender roles appeared androgynous, the masculine component of nursing was more valued and rewarded. High masculinity was associated with higher pay, high femininity with low experience. Gender roles represented complex…

  20. Psychiatric screening in the emergency department: validation of the General Health Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, I; Haughey, L; Baraff, L J

    1985-09-01

    Both a 28-item psychiatric scale, the Goldberg General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) were administered to 25 emergency department patients to determine the validity of the GHQ as a screening instrument for psychopathology in the emergency department setting. There was a significant association (P = 0.0343) between GHQ scores and DIS assessment. The sensitivity of the GHQ in this series was 55.6% and the specificity was 87.5% when compared with the DIS. This suggests that the GHQ may prove to be a valuable screening tool for patients with somatic complaints to detect unsuspected psychiatric illness in the emergency department.

  1. Multipurpose Health Care Telemedicine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    telemonitoring . In emergency cases where immediate medical treatment is the issue, recent studies conclude that early and specialized pre-hospital patient ...Lama, J Vila: “Intelligent Telemonitoring of Critical Care Patients ”, IEEE EMB Mag, Vol 18, No 4, pp 80-88, Jul/Aug 1999. [7] Strode S, Gustke S...Abstract- In this study we present a multipurpose health care telemedicine system, which can be used for emergency or patient monitoring cases

  2. Access to Health Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-11-09

    This podcast is based on the November, 2010 CDC Vital Signs report which indicates that more than one in four adults 18-64 years old (about 50 million) report being uninsured for at least part of the past 12 months, and focuses on the growing number of middle-income adults and those with a chronic illness or disability who have no health insurance.  Created: 11/9/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/9/2010.

  3. Nanotechnology in health care

    CERN Document Server

    Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2012-01-01

    Nanomedicine: Emerging Field of Nanotechnology to Human HealthNanomedicines: Impacts in Ocular Delivery and TargetingImmuno-Nanosystems to CNS Pathologies: State of the Art PEGylated Zinc Protoporphyrin: A Micelle-Forming Polymeric Drug for Cancer TherapyORMOSIL Nanoparticles: Nanomedicine Approach for Drug/Gene Delivery to the BrainMagnetic Nanoparticles: A Versatile System for Therapeutic and Imaging SystemNanobiotechnology: A New Generation of Biomedicine Application of Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery and Targeting to LungsAptamers and Nanomedicine in C

  4. Health promotion and primary health care: examining the discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    The health promotion discourse is comprised of assumptions about health and health care that are compatible with primary health care. An examination of the health promotion discourse illustrates how assumptions of health can help to inform primary health care. Despite health promotion being a good fit for primary health care, this analysis demonstrates that the scope in which it is being implemented in primary health care settings is limited. The health promotion discourse appears largely compatible with primary health care-in theory and in the health care practices that follow. The aim of this article is to contribute to the advancement of theoretical understanding of the health promotion discourse, and the relevance of health promotion to primary health care.

  5. Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care Home For Patients Search ... Pregnancy: Preconception Care FAQ056, April 2017 PDF Format Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care Pregnancy What is a ...

  6. Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special ... for and what to ask will help you choose an organization that provides safe, quality care, treatment ...

  7. [Contribution of Health Care Research to Establishing Social Equality in Health and Health Care Opportunities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, H; Pförtner, T-K

    2016-02-01

    Social inequalities in health and health care services represent issues of major concern. Findings in this area reveal inequalities in health and health care indicating disadvantages for individuals with a low socioeconomic background. Although the health care system plays a marginal role in the explanation of inequalities in health, health services research can be an important part in the development of equal health opportunities. The current article describes the causal associations between social inequalities, health inequalities and the health care service. Health services research can make a contribution to increasing equal opportunities in health and health care service. Against this background, we discuss the existing potential and need of research in the area of health services. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Managing Depression: Stories of Patients and Their Families Pursuing Mental Health after Psychiatric Hospitalization

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, Catherine B.

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative research study was designed to follow-up with ten participants in a relapse prevention program at an inpatient psychiatric unit with a diagnosis of major depression for the purpose of determining their experiences post-discharge in practicing relapse prevention and in pursuing and maintaining wellness in their mental health. It relied upon narrative theory, theories of self-efficacy, and theories of depression to guide the research process as well as the field of knowledge a...

  9. “They can do whatever they want”: Meanings of receiving psychiatric care based on a common staff approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Enarsson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study deepens our understanding of how patients, when cared for in a psychiatric ward, experience situations that involve being handled according to a common staff approach. Interviews with nine former psychiatric in-patients were analyzed using a phenomenological–hermeneutic method to illuminate the lived experience of receiving care based on a common staff approach. The results revealed several meanings: discovering that you are as subjected to a common staff approach, becoming aware that no one cares, becoming aware that your freedom is restricted, being afflicted, becoming aware that a common staff approach is not applied by all staff, and feeling safe because someone else is responsible. The comprehensive understanding was that the patient's understanding of being cared for according to a common staff approach was to be seen and treated in accordance with others’ beliefs and valuations, not in line with the patients’ own self-image, while experiencing feelings of affliction.

  10. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  11. The impact of caring for an adult with intellectual disability and psychiatric comorbidity on carer stress and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, F; Shanahan, S; Fitzsimons, E; O'Malley, G; Mac Giollabhui, N; Bramham, J

    2016-06-01

    Given that carers of individuals with intellectual disability (ID) and carers of individuals with psychiatric disorders experience elevated levels of stress and psychological distress, carers of individuals with both ID and a comorbid psychiatric disorder are potentially at even greater risk for psychological difficulties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the psychological well-being of carers of adults with a dual diagnosis compared with carers of adults with intellectual disability alone. Four-hundred and forty-two questionnaires were sent to four community services and seventy-five family carers of adults with intellectual disability responded. Psychological well-being of carers was assessed using the Questionnaire on Resources and Stress - Friedrich edition (QRS-F) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Comorbid psychopathology for their family member with ID was assessed using the Reiss Screen for Maladaptive Behaviour (RSMB). Twenty-four percent of the individuals with ID were reported to have comorbid psychopathology. Between-group analyses compared carers of people with ID and comorbid psychopathology to carers of people with ID alone. Regression analyses examined the relationship between psychopathology and other care-related variables to carer stress and psychological distress. Carers of people with ID and comorbid psychopathology were found to have significantly higher levels of stress and psychological distress than carers of people with ID alone. Autism was found to be the only significant predictor of both stress and psychological distress among measures of psychopathology. Additional comorbid psychopathology in individuals with intellectual disability has a significant impact on their carers' psychological well-being. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Health Care Procedure Considerations and Individualized Health Care Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2011-01-01

    Teachers need to maintain a safe, healthy environment for all their students in order to promote learning. However, there are additional considerations when students require health care procedures, such as tube feeding or clean intermittent catheterization. Teachers must effectively monitor their students and understand their roles and…

  13. Primary health care services for effective health care development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is an empirical study of 7 communities among the O-kun Yoruba of Ijumu, Kogi State, Nigeria. The general objective of the study was to investigate the prioritizing pattern of the various Primary Health Care services (PHC) in the study area. Data for the study were generated mainly through multi-stage sampling ...

  14. Chiropractic care and public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Claire; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Côté, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this collaborative summary is to document current chiropractic involvement in the public health movement, reflect on social ecological levels of influence as a profession, and summarize the relationship of chiropractic to the current public health topics of: safety, health issues...... through the lifespan, and effective participation in community health issues. The questions that are addressed include: Is spinal manipulative therapy for neck and low-back pain a public health problem? What is the role of chiropractic care in prevention or reduction of musculoskeletal injuries...... of prevention and public health? What role do citizen-doctors of chiropractic have in organizing community action on health-related matters? How can our future chiropractic graduates become socially responsible agents of change?...

  15. [The Need of a New Integral Approach to the Care of Patient with Severe Mental Disorder Thirty Years after the Psychiatric Reform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madoz-Gúrpide, Agustín; Ballesteros Martín, Juan Carlos; Leira Sanmartín, Mónica; García Yagüe, Ernesto

    2017-01-18

    More than thirty years have passed since the beginning of the psychiatric reform, a period of intense and relevant social, scientific and cultural changes which have directly impacted on mental disorders and their management. Improvement in psychopharmacological treatment, a new model of physician-patient relationship, patient´s empowerment as a key issue and the fight against social stigma related to mental health disorders, changes in clinical governance and health policy, the assistential burden derived from the treatment of less severe pathology in mental health community centers, improvements in teamwork and coordination with other resources involved… are some of the relevant changes which determine the scene of community-based mental health assistance. We think this is a right time to check the state of the community-based care programmes for severe mental disorders, and the role of mental health center. We propose to have a reflexion about two relevant topics: where we are and where we are heading.

  16. The effects of Snoezelen (multi-sensory behavior therapy) and psychiatric care on agitation, apathy, and activities of daily living in dementia patients on a short term geriatric psychiatric inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, Jason A; Sacks, Amanda; Matheis, Robert; Collier, Lesley; Calia, Tina; Hanif, Henry; Kofman, Eugene S

    2007-01-01

    A randomized, controlled, single-blinded, between group study of 24 participants with moderate to severe dementia was conducted on a geriatric psychiatric unit. All participants received pharmacological therapy, occupational therapy, structured hospital environment, and were randomized to receive multi sensory behavior therapy (MSBT) or a structured activity session. Greater independence in activities of daily living (ADLs) was observed for the group treated with MSBT and standard psychiatric inpatient care on the Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living (KI-ADL; P = 0.05) than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone. The combination treatment of MSBT and standard psychiatric care also reduced agitation and apathy greater than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone as measured with the Pittsburgh Agitation Scale and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease (P = 0.05). Multiple regression analysis predicted that within the multi-sensory group, activities of daily living (KI-ADL) increased as apathy and agitation reduced (R2 = 0.42; p = 0.03). These data suggest that utilizing MSBT with standard psychiatric inpatient care may reduce apathy and agitation and additionally improve activities of daily living in hospitalized people with moderate to severe dementia more than standard care alone.

  17. [A new classification for better care. The promises of the translational psychiatric neuroscience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidoux, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the way neuroscientists call for the "deconstruction" of the classifications of mental disorders as we know them, in order to provide solutions to the slowdown of therapeutical innovation in psychiatry. It is based on the case study of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project of the US National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). My purpose is to show that neuroscience interested in mental disorders offers narratives of innovation, transformation, and desirable futures that are at the heart of the ambitious current research projects and influence them. I approach the versions of the futures proposed by the promoters of translational psychiatric neuroscience in terms of productivity at the scientific, epistemological and socio-political levels. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Costs of health care across primary care models in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Maude; Wodchis, Walter P; Barnsley, Jan; Laporte, Audrey

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between newly introduced primary care models in Ontario, Canada, and patients' primary care and total health care costs. A specific focus is on the payment mechanisms for primary care physicians, i.e. fee-for-service (FFS), enhanced-FFS, and blended capitation, and whether providers practiced as part of a multidisciplinary team. Utilization data for a one year period was measured using administrative databases for a 10% sample selected at random from the Ontario adult population. Primary care and total health care costs were calculated at the individual level and included costs from physician services, hospital visits and admissions, long term care, drugs, home care, lab tests, and visits to non-medical health care providers. Generalized linear model regressions were conducted to assess the differences in costs between primary care models. Patients not enrolled with a primary care physicians were younger, more likely to be males and of lower socio-economic status. Patients in blended capitation models were healthier and wealthier than FFS and enhanced-FFS patients. Primary care and total health care costs were significantly different across Ontario primary care models. Using the traditional FFS as the reference, we found that patients in the enhanced-FFS models had the lowest total health care costs, and also the lowest primary care costs. Patients in the blended capitation models had higher primary care costs but lower total health care costs. Patients that were in multidisciplinary teams (FHT), where physicians are also paid on a blended capitation basis, had higher total health care costs than non-FHT patients but still lower than the FFS reference group. Primary care and total health care costs increased with patients' age, morbidity, and lower income quintile across all primary care payment types. The new primary care models were associated with lower total health care costs for patients compared to the

  19. Childhood trauma and psychiatric comorbidities in patients with depressive disorder in primary care in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitriol, Verónica; Cancino, Alfredo; Leiva-Bianchi, Marcelo; Serrano, Carlos; Ballesteros, Soledad; Asenjo, Andrea; Cáceres, Cristian; Potthoff, Soledad; Salgado, Carolina; Orellana, Francisca; Ormazábal, Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Childhood trauma is associated with different psychiatric disorders during adulthood. These disorders are often presented in comorbidity with depression. To establish the relationship between psychiatric comorbidities and childhood traumatic events in patients with depression in Chile. Three hundred and ninety-four patients with major depression were assessed using the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview and a screening for childhood trauma. Social anxiety disorder was associated with having witnessed domestic violence during childhood (OR = 2.2, CI 1.2 - 3.8), childhood physical abuse (OR = 2.7, CI 1.6 - 4.4), physical injury associated with physical abuse (OR = 2.3, CI 1.3 - 4.7) and sexual abuse by a non-relative (OR = 2.7, CI 1.3 - 4.2). Posttraumatic stress disorder was associated with physical injury associated with physical abuse (OR = 1.9, CI 1.1 - 3.6), sexual abuse by a relative (OR = 3.2, IC 1.8 - 5.9) and sexual abuse by a non-relative (OR = 2.2, CI 1.2 - 4.1). Antisocial personality disorder was associated with traumatic separation from a caregiver (OR = 3.2, CI 1.2 - 8.5), alcohol abuse by a family member (OR = 3.1, CI 1.1 - 8.1), physical abuse (OR = 2.8, CI 1.1 - 6.9) and sexual abuse by a non-relative (OR = 4.8, CI 1.2 - 11.5). Panic disorder was associated with sexual abuse by a relative (OR = 1.9, CI 1.1 - 3.1). Generalized anxiety disorder was associated with sexual abuse by a non-relative (OR = 1.9, CI 1.1- 3.3). Further clinical recognition is required in patients seeking help for depression in primary care. This recognition must take into account the patient's current psychiatric comorbidities and adverse childhood experiences.

  20. Services Use of Children and Adolescents before Admission to Psychiatric Inpatient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmeister-Koss, Ingrid; Winkler, Roman; Fritz, Corinna; Thun-Hohenstein, Leonhard; Tuechler, Heinz

    2016-06-01

    Although 20% of children and adolescents in Europe suffer from overt mental health problems, their illness-related service utilisation is often unknown. If at all, existing research has only addressed the health care sector while services requirements in mental health care go far beyond the health care system, including the social, the educational and the criminal justice system. This paper aims at describing the service contact patterns of children and adolescents within and outside the health care sector before they are admitted to a child and adolescent mental health hospital. Additionally, we evaluate the private out-of-pocket payments that occur for primary carers. A cohort of consecutive admissions to a child and adolescent hospital in Austria was prospectively analysed. We collected data on service use and out-of-pocket expenses before hospital admission from primary carers through face-to-face interviews using an adapted version of the European Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Receipt Inventory (EU-CAMHSRI). Clinical data came from validated questionnaires (CBCL, YSR) and from the anamnestic documentation. Ninety percent from a cohort of 441 patients had some contact with services or took medication before they were admitted to hospital. Most often, services in the health care outpatient setting were used. Outside of the health care system, support in school, as well as counselling services, were used most frequently, whereas the persons hardly sought support in living or employment. Roughly 32,400 per 100 patients was spent privately, yet these out-of pocket expenses were very unevenly distributed. Service use and out-of-pocket spending increased with social status and were gender-specific. The more severe external behaviour symptoms were, the more non-health care services were used. Mentally ill children and adolescents use a broad range of services across sectors before admission to hospital. Service use is associated with specific symptoms of

  1. Inpatient psychiatric care experience and its relationship to posthospitalization treatment participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowersox, Nicholas W; Bohnert, Amy S B; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2013-06-01

    This study used factor analysis of a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) survey to identify factors that measure satisfaction with inpatient treatment and to examine the factors' utility in evaluating treatment participation following discharge. The Survey of Healthcare Experiences of Patients (inpatient version) (I-SHEP) was mailed to 34,237 veterans who were discharged from inpatient to outpatient care in the VHA during fiscal year 2009 and was completed by 7,408 patients. A factor analysis of survey responses identified underlying I-SHEP factors and evaluated relationships between the factors, patient characteristics, and attendance at VHA mental health appointments within seven and 30 days of discharge. The factor analysis identified three domains of satisfaction: respect and caring by nurses-overall hospital impression; involvement and information about care; and respect and caring by doctors. These factors demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α=.93, .90, and .94, respectively) and accounted for a moderate amount of variance in patient responses (r2=.167). Only the care involvement and information factor was associated with participation in follow-up care: increased satisfaction (one standard deviation change in scale score) was associated with improved odds of a mental health visit within seven and 30 days of discharge (odds ratio=1.14 and 1.17, respectively, p<.01). After discharge, persons may not generalize satisfaction about the respect and caring shown by inpatient treatment teams toward their decision to attend outpatient care. Providing patients with information about treatment and involving them in care decisions during inpatient care may help facilitate the transition to outpatient settings.

  2. Psychiatric care utilization among older people with intellectual disability in comparison with the general population: a register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmon, A; Björne, P; Nylander, L; Ahlström, G

    2016-11-09

    People with intellectual disability have been found to have higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders than the general population. However, they do not seem to have a corresponding increase in psychiatric care utilization. The aim of the present study was to investigate psychiatric care utilization among older people with intellectual disability. We used a cohort of people with intellectual disability, 55+ years in 2012 (n = 7936), and an equally sized age and sex matched reference cohort from the general population. Psychiatric care utilization was measured using registrations in the Swedish National Patient register during 2002-2012, where each registration corresponds to a psychiatric care occasion. About 20 % of those with intellectual disability had at least one registration during the study period, compared to some 6 % in the general population sample. In the whole cohort as well as stratified by sex, people with intellectual disability were 3-4 times more likely than those in the general population sample to have had at least one registration during the study period. The effect was, however, only consistent in age groups comprising people younger than 65 years. Among people with intellectual disability, men were more likely than women to have had at least one registration, and people living in special housing (group home or service home) during the entire study period were less likely than those who only lived in special housing for parts of the study or not at all. People with intellectual disability had longer stays per inpatient registration compared with the general population sample. When stratifying on sex, the effect was found only among men, although there were no sex differences within the cohort of people with intellectual disability. Among people with intellectual disability, living in special housing during the entire study period was associated with shorter stays per inpatient registration. Although people with intellectual disability

  3. Mental health of asylum seekers: a cross-sectional study of psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeren Martina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asylum procedures are known to be protracted, stretching to over ten years in many host countries. International research shows high levels of distress for asylum seekers. Little is known about actual psychiatric morbidity in this population, especially during the first few years postmigration. Methods The mental health status of two groups of asylum seekers was assessed: Group 1 (n = 43 had arrived in Switzerland 2.9 (SD 1.1 months prior to assessment, while Group 2 (n = 43 had arrived 15.5 (SD 3.2 months prior to assessment. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. Symptom severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist, depression (Hopkins Symptom Checklist, and pain (Verbal Rating Scale were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Postmigratory factors such as German language proficiency and social contacts were also assessed. Interviews were conducted with the assistance of trained interpreters. Results Four out of ten participants met diagnostic criteria for at least one DSM-IV disorder. Groups did not differ with respect to psychiatric morbidity or symptom levels. Major depression (31.4% and PTSD (23.3% were diagnosed most frequently. The number of experienced traumatic event types was highly correlated with psychiatric morbidity. Conclusions Psychiatric morbidity in asylum seekers in the first two years after arrival is high, with no indication of a decrease in mental distress over time. Traumatic experiences seem to play a major role in morbidity during this time. Considering the magnitude of clinically relevant distress, a short psychological screening upon arrival with a focus on traumatic experiences may be warranted.

  4. Health Care Reform: A Values Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popko, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the crisis in health care, considering costs, lack of access, and system ineffectiveness. Reviews "Setting Relationships Right," the Catholic Health Association's proposal for health care reform. Advocates educators' awareness of children's health needs and health care reform issues and support for the Every Fifth Child Act of…

  5. Improving Educational Preparation for Transcultural Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Var, Rita M. H.

    1998-01-01

    Nurses and health care professionals must be prepared for transcultural health care because society is becoming increasingly multicultural and current health services are not meeting the needs of minority ethnic groups in Britain. (SK)

  6. Association of Psychiatric History and Type D Personality with Symptoms of Anxiety, Depression, and Health Status Prior to ICD Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starrenburg, Annemieke H.; Kraaier, Karin; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Hout, Moniek; Scholten, Marcoen; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Personality factors and psychiatric history may help explain individual differences in risk of psychological morbidity and poor health outcomes in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). PURPOSE: We examined associations between previous anxiety and depressive

  7. [Integrated health care at Potsdam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willberg, A; Heger, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports in detail on a project of Integrated Health Care in cardiology at Potsdam, Germany. Information on the structure of the contract, the participants, the agreed claiming of benefits and provision of services are provided as well as relevant figures and contact data.

  8. Relationship marketing in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, H C; Fleming, D; Mangold, W G; LaForge, R W

    1994-01-01

    Building relationships with patients is critical to the success of many health care organizations. The authors profile the relationship marketing program for a hospital's cardiac center and discuss the key strategic aspects that account for its success: a focus on a specific hospital service, an integrated marketing communication strategy, a specially designed database, and the continuous tracking of results.

  9. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Centres in Sabon Gari Local Government Area, Kaduna State Nigeria. journal of. COMMUNITY MEDICINE. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE. 1. 1. 1. M.B Sufiyan , A.A Umar , A. Shugaba . 1Department of Community Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. KEYWORDS. Assessment,. Client satisfaction, ANC,. PHC centers.

  10. Health care insolvency and bankruptcy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, L; Speiser, M; Maltz, A; Kirpalani, S

    1998-08-01

    Bankruptcy is an event that is often considered a business' worst nightmare. Debt, lawyers, and the U.S. government can lead to the eventual destruction of a business. This article shows how declaring bankruptcy can be a helpful instrument in continuing a successful venture in the health care marketplace.

  11. The Chinese Health Care System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter; Yu, Yi

    In the present paper we describe the structure of the Chinese health care system and sketch its future development. We analyse issues of provider incentives and the actual burden sharing between government, enterprises and people. We further aim to identify a number of current problems and link...

  12. Mental health care in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, D. J.; van de Put, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    An effort is being made in Cambodia to involve grass-roots personnel in the integration of the care of the mentally ill into a broad framework of health services. This undertaking is examined with particular reference to the work of the Transcultural Psychosocial Organization. PMID:10212521

  13. Mental health care in Cambodia.

    OpenAIRE

    Somasundaram, D. J.; van de Put, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    An effort is being made in Cambodia to involve grass-roots personnel in the integration of the care of the mentally ill into a broad framework of health services. This undertaking is examined with particular reference to the work of the Transcultural Psychosocial Organization.

  14. Reengineering health care materials management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, L R

    1998-01-01

    Health care executives across the country, faced with intense competition, are being forced to consider drastic cost cutting measures as a matter of survival. The entire health care industry is under siege from boards of directors, management and others who encourage health care systems to take actions ranging from strategic acquisitions and mergers to simple "downsizing" or "rightsizing," to improve their perceived competitive positions in terms of costs, revenues and market share. In some cases, management is poorly prepared to work within this new competitive paradigm and turns to consultants who promise that following their methodologies can result in competitive advantage. One favored methodology is reengineering. Frequently, cost cutting attention is focused on the materials management budget because it is relatively large and is viewed as being comprised mostly of controllable expenses. Also, materials management is seldom considered a core competency for the health care system and the organization performing these activities does not occupy a strongly defensible position. This paper focuses on the application of a reengineering methodology to healthcare materials management.

  15. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    to eat together and lying on the same bed with ocular have far reaching implications in terms of cancers patients. management, prognosis and mortality of ocular cancer. Such individuals may not access available. Further analysis indicates that respondents'. 3,9 education, gender and marital status have no health care ...

  16. [Integrated health care at Nuremberg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Männl, V

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports in detail on a project of Integrated Health Care in cardiology at Nuremberg, Germany. Information on the structure of the contract, the participants, the agreed claiming of benefits and provision of services are provided as well as relevant figures and contact data.

  17. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    Improving skilled attendants at birth: Experience in a primary health care facility in Rivers State, South-South Nigeria. 1. 2. Ordinioha B. , Seiyefa B. 1Community Medicine Department, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt. 2Department of Family Medicine, Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital, ...

  18. Intercultural Health Care and Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Artiklen har fokus på undervisning, planlægning, udvikling og evaluering af et internationalt tværfagligt valgfag Intercultural Health Care and Welfare, der udbydes på Det Sundhedsfaglige og Teknologiske Fakultet på Professionshøjskolen Metropol. Ifølge den tysk-amerikanske professor Iris Varner og...

  19. Lower Costs, Better Care- Reforming Our Health Care Delivery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act includes tools to improve the quality of health care that can also lower costs for taxpayers and patients. This means avoiding costly...

  20. Psychiatric disorders in a Dutch Health Area: a repeated cross-sectional survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodiamont, P.P.G.; Rijnders, C.A.T.H.; Mulder, J.; Furer, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decades of psychiatric epidemiology have shown a wide variation in prevalence rates, but a consistent relationship between psychiatric disorder and sociodemographic variables. In this repeated cross-sectional survey, the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and their distribution in the

  1. Goal-Directed Health Care: Redefining Health and Health Care in the Era of Value-Based Care

    OpenAIRE

    Mold, James

    2017-01-01

    Health care reform efforts have increasingly emphasized payment models that reward value (quality/cost). It seems appropriate, therefore, to examine what we value in health care, and that will require that we examine our definition of health. In spite of admonitions from the World Health Organization and others, our current health care system operates under the assumption that health represents the absence of health problems. While that perspective has led to incredible advances in medical sc...

  2. A decentralised model of psychiatric care: Profile, length of stay and outcome of mental healthcare users admitted to a district-level public hospital in the Western Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is a lack of studies assessing the profile and outcome of psychiatric patients at entry-level public hospitals that are prescribed by the Mental Health Care Act to provide a decentralised model of psychiatric care. Objective. To assess the demographic and clinical profile as well as length of stay and outcomes of mental healthcare users admitted to a district-level public hospital in the Western Cape.  Method. Demographic data, clinical diagnosis, length of stay, referral profile and outcomes of patients (N=487 admitted to Helderberg Hospital during the period 1 January 2011 - 31 December 2011 were collected.  Results. Psychotic disorders were the most prevalent (n=287, 59% diagnoses, while 228 (47% of admission episodes had comorbid/secondary diagnoses. Substance use disorders were present in 184 (38% of admission episodes, 37 (57% of readmissions and 19 (61% of abscondments. Most admission episodes (n=372, 76% were discharged without referral to specialist/tertiary care.  Conclusion. Methamphetamine use places a significant burden on the provision of mental healthcare services at entry-level care. Recommendations for improving service delivery at this district-level public hospital are provided.

  3. Managed consumerism in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  4. Religion/spirituality in African-American culture: an essential aspect of psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, James H

    2002-05-01

    There is an astonishing diversity of religious beliefs and practices in the history of African Americans that influences the presentation, diagnosis, and management of both physical and mental disorders. The majority of African Americans, however, are evangelical Christians with religious experiences originating in the regions of ancient Africa (Cush, Punt, and to a great extent, Egypt), as well as black adaptation of Hebraic, Jewish, Christian, and Islamic beliefs and rituals. Consequently, more than 60 of the nation's 125 medical schools offer classes in spirituality and health. Although there is a lack of empirical evidence that religion improves health outcomes, physicians should understand patients as a biopsychosocial-spiritual whole. Asking about religion/spirituality during a health assessment can help the physician determine whether religious/spiritual factors will influence the patient's medical decisions and compliance. Two psychiatric case histories of African Americans are presented in which religion/spirituality significantly influenced treatment decisions and results. Neither of these patients suffered major debilitating medical comorbidity.

  5. [Health care systems and aspects of health care economics. Sector ophthalmology - part 1: development of the German health care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, T; Kohnen, T

    2010-11-01

    Although many health care reforms have been enacted in the last few years in Germany, many of the key points in the current social health care system have been retained from former times. All those introductions for an effective health care system from the last 150 years beginning with mandatory guild membership via Bismarck's social laws to the modern health care systems in Germany with the current problems of financing the heavy burden in the German budget are reported. Data and facts on the current health care system are provided. In the following two articles of this series ambulatory and inpatient treatment in the light of economic aspects of health care are reported.

  6. Personal health care of internal medicine residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataraman Palabindala

    2012-01-01

    sick but did not drop the call. Half of the residents had concerns that they might be having a psychiatric illness, but only 5% of them received a formal evaluation at their own hospital and 23 (12.4% at an outside hospital.It is very important to have more studies to emphasize on resident's physical and mental health and encourage them to have a primary care physician. There are several reasons preventing residents from getting a formal evaluation, confidentiality reasons, lack of time – schedule constraints, fear of being labeled, and social repercussions are few of them. Program directors should encourage the residents to not only care of the health of their patients but also be enthusiastic about their personal health issues for upgraded, revised patient care, and ultimately for their overall well-being.

  7. The Impact of Patient Language Proficiency and Interpreter Service Use on the Quality of Psychiatric Care: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy M.; Alegría, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of limited English proficiency and use of interpreters on the quality of psychiatric care. Methods A systematic literature search for English-language publications was conducted in PubMed, PsycInfo, and CINAHL and by review of the reference lists of included articles and expert sources. Of 321 citations, 26 peer-reviewed articles met inclusion criteria by reporting primary data on the clinical care for psychiatric disorders among patients with limited proficiency in English or in the providers’ language. Results Little systematic research has addressed the impact of language proficiency or interpreter use on the quality of psychiatric care in contemporary US settings. Therefore, the literature to date is insufficient to inform evidence-based guidelines for improving quality of care among patients with limited English proficiency. Nonetheless, evaluation in a patient’s non-primary language can lead to incomplete or distorted mental status assessment whereas assessments conducted via untrained interpreters may contain interpreting errors. Consequences of interpreter errors include clinicians’ failure to identify disordered thought or delusional content. Use of professional interpreters may improve disclosure and attenuate some difficulties. Diagnostic agreement, collaborative treatment planning, and referral for specialty care may be compromised. Conclusions Clinicians should become aware of the types of quality problems that may occur when evaluating patients in a non-primary language or via an interpreter. Given demographic trends in the US, future research should aim to address the deficit in the evidence base to guide clinical practice and policy. PMID:20675834

  8. Physical restraint for psychiatric patients and its associations with clinical characteristics and the National Mental Health Law in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Feng-Rong; Sha, Sha; Zhang, Qing-E; Ungvari, Gabor S; Ng, Chee H; Chiu, Helen F K; Wu, Ping-Ping; Jin, Xin; Zhou, Jian-Song; Tang, Yi-Lang; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-07-30

    Physical restraint (PR) for patients is an ongoing controversial topic in psychiatry. This study examined the percentage of PR and its associations with clinical characteristics and the implementation of the National Mental Health Law (NMHL) in China. The study consecutively assessed a sample of 1364 psychiatric inpatients. Socio-demographic and clinical data including use of PR were collected from the medical records using a form designed for this study and confirmed via interview. Psychopathology and insight were measured using standardized instruments. The percentage of PR was 27.2% in the whole sample with 30.7% and 22.4% occurring respectively before and after the NMHL implementation (p=0.001). In multiple logistic regression analysis PR was positively associated with unemployment, lower income, aggression in the past month, being admitted before the NMHL implementation and poorer insight. The percentage of PR in Chinese psychiatric patients is associated with various clinical factors and appeared to decrease after the implementation of the NMHL. Focused and individualized care for patients who are unemployed, have low income, recent aggression and poor insight would be necessary at early stages of admission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Health care technology as a policy issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banta, H.D.

    1994-01-01

    Health care technology has become an increasingly visible issue in many countries, primarily because of the rising costs of health care. In addition, many questions concerning quality of care are being raised. Health care technology assessment has been seen as an aid in addressing questions

  10. The effectiveness of a nursing discharge programme to improve medication adherence and patient satisfaction in the psychiatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgolesi, Michele; Pucciarelli, Gianluca; Colantoni, Anna Maria; D'Andrea, Fabio; Di Donato, Barbara; Giorgi, Fabio; Landi, Lidia; Salustri, Eleonora; Turci, Carlo; Proietti, Maria Grazia

    2017-12-01

    To observe the extent to which a nursing discharge plan is effective in promoting therapeutic adherence and improving patient satisfaction with their treatment based on information interventions provided by nursing staff, direct hospital medication distribution and follow-up telephone calls. Patient adherence is a fundamental requirement for the treatment of chronic diseases. Among psychiatric patients, adherence to the prescribed course of treatment allows patients to keep the symptoms of their disease under control, allowing for improvements in the management of their condition, minimising the risks of relapse and reducing the number of hospitalisations. This study uses a prospective correlational design. The Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, the Satisfaction with Information about Medicine Scale and the General Satisfaction Questionnaire were used. Of the 135 patients enrolled in the study, 57% of the sample was female, and, on average, patients were aged 33 years. About 72.9% were unmarried, and 88.1% were educated at less than high school level. This study showed that patients who received more information on their health status and on what would be done for them after their hospitalisation had a higher adherence to treatment. In addition, patients who were more satisfied with the nursing care provided had a higher rate of adherence to their treatment plan. The interpersonal and educational nursing intervention improves adherence to a treatment plan by allowing patients to express themselves not only as individuals who rely on health care but also as protagonists able to effectively manage their disease and to empower themselves by acquiring disease management skills. A patient-nurse communication programme could help to analyse the individual patient circumstances that might become barriers to adherence and to apply nursing interventions that promote better patient adherence. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Child psychiatry in the Finnish health care reform: national criteria for treatment access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukonen, Pälvi; Salmelin, Raili K; Luoma, Ilona; Puura, Kaija; Rutanen, Mervi; Pukuri, Tarja; Tamminen, Tuula

    2010-06-01

    As a part of the Finnish National Health Care Project, to develop and validate nationwide standardised criteria for assessing the need for non-urgent child psychiatric specialised medical care (SMC). The Finnish criteria tool, a cutpoint measure indicating access to SMC, was developed on the basis of the Western Canada Waiting List Criteria Tool. The Finnish criteria were widely discussed at national level and finally confirmed by a national child psychiatric consensus meeting. The testing data included 949 new cases, aged 5-18 years, from SMC, family guidance clinics, primary health care and child protection. The Finnish Child Psychiatric Criteria Tool covers the entire case-mix of child psychiatric disorders. Danger to self or others and psychotic symptoms have been combined into a threshold item. This alone suffices to indicate access to SMC. Sensitivity of the tool was 82% and specificity 74% with cutoff point 16/75. Child psychiatric non-urgent SMC is provided in accordance with national criteria, publicly accessible in the Internet. The criteria development process evoked multisectoral discussion on organising child mental health services and, by determining the need of treatment requiring SMC, defined health policy. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Care, Closeness, and Becoming "Better": Transformation and Therapeutic Process in American Adolescent Psychiatric Custody

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katie Rose Hejtmanek

    2016-01-01

      In the United States, young people are remanded to psychiatric custody for the institutionalized treatment of mental illness, behavior disorders, and emotional disturbances, and forced to participate...

  13. Determinants of Mental Health Care Utilization in a Suicide High-risk Group With Suicidal Ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Moo-Sik; Hong, Jee-Young

    2016-01-01

    The suicide rate in Korea is increasing every year, and is the highest among the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. Psychiatric patients in particular have a higher risk of suicide than other patients. This study was performed to evaluate determinants of mental health care utilization among individuals at high risk for suicide. Korea Health Panel data from 2009 to 2011 were used. Subjects were individuals at high risk of suicide who had suicidal ideation, a past history of psychiatric illness, or had utilized outpatient services for a psychiatric disorder associated with suicidal ideation within the past year. The chi-square test and hierarchical logistic regression were used to identify significant determinants of mental health care utilization. The total number of subjects with complete data on the variables in our model was 989. Individuals suffering from three or more chronic diseases used mental health care more frequently. Mental health care utilization was higher in subjects who had middle or high levels of educational attainment, were receiving Medical Aid, or had a large family size. It is important to control risk factors in high-risk groups as part of suicide prevention strategies. The clinical approach, which includes community-based intervention, entails the management of reduction of suicidal risk. Our study identified demographic characteristics that have a significant impact on mental health care utilization and should be considered in the development of suicide prevention strategies. Further studies should examine the effect of mental health care utilization on reducing suicidal ideation.

  14. Health Care, capabilities and AI assistive technologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Scenarios involving the introduction of artificially intelligent (AI) assistive technologies in health care practices raise several ethical issues. In this paper, I discuss four objections to introducing AI assistive technologies in health care practices as replacements of human care. I analyse them as demands for felt care, good care, private care, and real care. I argue that although these objections cannot stand as good reasons for a general and a priori rejection of AI assistive technolog...

  15. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Four health care challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Four health care challenges : 10/10/2017 To use the sharing ... to follow up on weekly topics. The U.S. health care delivery system needs to address four challenges in ...

  16. Patient experienced continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system-a study including immigrants, refugees and ethnic danes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne; Krasnik, Allan; Norredam, Marie

    2014-09-17

    The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups.

  17. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System—A Study Including Immigrants, Refugees and Ethnic Danes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne; Krasnik, Allan; Norredam, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. Conclusions: The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups. PMID:25233017

  18. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System—A Study Including Immigrants, Refugees and Ethnic Danes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasja Koitzsch Jensen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes. Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. Conclusions: The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups.

  19. The South African Society of Psychiatrists (SASOP and SASOP State Employed Special Interest Group (SESIG position statements on psychiatric care in the public sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Janse van Rensburg

    2012-08-01

    others, become the universal goals by which we measure service provision, should be adopted as soon as possible. Culture, mental health and psychiatry: culture, religion and spirituality should be considered in the current approach to the local practice and training of specialist psychiatry, within the professional and ethical scope of the discipline. Forensic psychiatry: an important and significant field within the scope of state-employed psychiatrists, with 3 recognised groups of patients (persons referred for forensic psychiatric observation, state patients, and mentally ill prisoners, each with specific needs, problems and possible solutions. Security in psychiatric hospitals and units: it is necessary to protect public sector mental healthcare practitioners from assault and injury as a result of performing their clinical duties by, among others, ensuring that adequate security procedures are implemented, appropriate for the level of care required, and that appointed security staff members are appropriately trained and equipped.

  20. Ageing world: Health care challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Mahishale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The world population reached 7 billion in 2012, which is 6 billion more than in 1800. This remarkable population growth is the result of several factors like advances in the medical, technological and public health systems resulting in the control and treatment of communicable diseases, the control of pandemics, the end of large-scale wars, improvements in living conditions and the revolutions in the field of agriculture. Because of all these factors, there has been a considerable improvement in the life expectancy of human beings. There is also an alarming reduction in fertility rates. The combination of declining fertility rate and augmented life expectancies has led to a change in the demographics of the population with the strata of older individuals growing faster than the younger individuals. The aging of populations is poised to become the next global public health challenge. Advances in medicine and socioeconomic development have substantially reduced mortality and morbidity rates due to infectious conditions and, to some extent, non-communicable diseases. These demographic and epidemiological changes, coupled with rapid urbanization, modernization, globalization, and accompanying changes in risk factors and lifestyles, have increased the prominence of chronic non-infective conditions. Health systems need to find effective strategies to extend health care and to respond to the needs of older adults. This review highlights the pathophysiology of aging, biological and physiological changes, impact of aging on health, epidemiological transitions, multi-morbidity in elderly and challenges for health care system.