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Sample records for psychiatric admission rates

  1. A transition rate model for first admissions to psychiatric institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldehinkel, AJ

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a parametric transition rate model, the generalized log-logistic model, to the duration of first admissions to psychiatric institutions. The final model included diagnosis, gender, age, living conditions and year of admission as covariates. Characteristics of

  2. Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Admission Rates and Subsequent One-Year Mortality in England: 1998-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Anthony; Clacey, Joe; Seagroatt, Valerie; Goldacre, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a time of very rapid change not only in physical but also psychological development. During the teenage years there is a reported rise in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate age- and sex-specific National Health Service (NHS) hospital inpatient admission rates for psychiatric…

  3. Inappropriate involuntary admissions to psychiatric hospitals | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inappropriate involuntary admissions to psychiatric hospitals. P L van der Merwe, A Allan, M M Allan. Abstract. Background. In order to preserve scarce resources, treabnent in tertiary psychiatric hospitals should be restricted to those whose treatment needs make admission to such hospitals essential. However, anecdotal ...

  4. Inpatient treatment of major depression in Austria between 1989 and 2009: impact of downsizing of psychiatric hospitals on admissions, suicide rates and outpatient psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssoki, B; Willeit, M; Blüml, V; Höfer, P; Erfurth, A; Psota, G; Lesch, O M; Kapusta, N D

    2011-09-01

    During the last 20 years Austrian psychiatric services underwent fundamental changes, as a focus was set on downsizing psychiatric hospitals. Little is known about how restructuring of mental health services affected patients with major depression and suicide rates. Monthly hospital discharges from all hospitals in Austria with the diagnosis of unipolar major depression as primary reason for inpatient treatment were obtained for the time period between 1989 and 2008. These data were correlated with relevant parameters from the general health system, such as number of hospital beds, suicide rate, density of psychotherapists and sales of antidepressants. While the number of psychiatric beds was reduced by almost 30%, the total annual numbers of inpatient treatment episodes for depression increased by 360%. This increase was stronger for men than for women. Further on this development was accompanied by a decrease in the suicide rate and an improvement in the availability of professional outpatient mental health service providers. Only aggregated patient data and no single case histories were available for this study. The validity of the correct diagnosis of unipolar major depression must be doubted, as most likely not all patients were seen by a clinical expert. Our data show that although inpatient treatment for unipolar major depression dramatically increased, reduction of psychiatric beds did not lead to an increase of suicide rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of social-psychiatric services and psychiatric clinics on involuntary admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emons, Barbara; Haussleiter, Ida Sybille; Kalthoff, Jörg; Schramm, Anja; Hoffmann, Knut; Jendreyschak, Jasmin; Schaub, Markus; Armgart, Carina; Juckel, Georg; Illes, Franciska

    2014-11-01

    Germany provides a wide range of highly developed mental health care to its citizens. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing the voluntariness of admissions to psychiatric hospitals. Especially the impact of demographic factors of the region, characteristics of the psychiatric hospitals and characteristics of the psychosocial services was analyzed. A retrospective analysis of hospital admission registers from 13 German adult psychiatric hospitals in 2009 was conducted. Public data on the regional psychiatric accommodation and demographic situation were added. Hospitals were dichotomously divided according to their index of involuntary admissions. Group comparisons were performed between the clinics with low and high involuntary admission indices. Analysis was conducted with clinical, psychiatric provision and demographic data related to inpatients in the Landschaftsverbands Westfalen-Lippe (LWL)-PsychiatryNetwork. Especially the range of services provided by the social-psychiatric services in the region such as number of supervised patients and home visits had an influence on the proportion of involuntary admissions to a psychiatric hospital. Some demographic characteristics of the region such as discretionary income showed further influence. Contrary to our expectations, the characteristics of the individual hospital seem to have no influence on the admission rate. Social-psychiatric services show a preventive impact on involuntary acute psychiatry interventions. Sociodemographic factors and patient variables play a role with regard to the number of involuntary hospitalizations, whereas characteristics of hospitals seemed to play no role. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. The therapeutic relationship after psychiatric admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roche, Eric

    2014-03-01

    The therapeutic relationship is one of the most central and important factors in the treatment of mental health disorders. A better therapeutic relationship is associated with service engagement, medication adherence, and satisfaction with services. This study aimed to compare the demographic and clinical factors associated with the therapeutic relationship in voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric service users. We found that individuals who had been admitted involuntarily, who had a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, and who reported higher levels of perceived pressures on admission were more likely to have a poorer therapeutic relationship with their consultant psychiatrist. Greater levels of insight and treatment satisfaction, together with higher levels of procedural justice experienced on admission, were associated with a better therapeutic relationship. We found that the level of perceived coercion on admission was not related to the therapeutic relationship. Targeted interventions to improve the therapeutic relationship, particularly for involuntarily admitted service users, are discussed.

  7. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals

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    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables—namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature—influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  8. Aggressive behavior during the first 24 hours of psychiatric admission

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    Vitor Crestani Calegaro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between aggression in the first 24 hours after admission and severity of psychopathology in psychiatric inpatients.METHODS: This cross-sectional study included psychiatric patients admitted to Hospital Universitário de Santa Maria, in Santa Maria, southern Brazil, from August 2012 to January 2013. At their arrival at the hospital, patients were interviewed to fill in the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS form, and any aggressive episodes in the first 24 hours after admission were recorded using the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare patients according to aggressiveness: aggressive versus non-aggressive, hostile versus violent, and aggressive against others only versus self-aggressive.RESULTS: The sample was composed of 110 patients. Aggressive patients in general had higher BPRS total scores (p = 0.002 and individual component scores, and their results showed more activation (p < 0.001 and thinking disorders (p = 0.009, but less anxious-depression (p = 0.008. Violent patients had more severe psychomotor agitation (p = 0.027, hallucinations (p = 0.017 and unusual thought content (p = 0.020. Additionally, self-aggressive patients had more disorientation (p = 0.011 and conceptual disorganization (p = 0.007.CONCLUSIONS: Aggression in psychiatric patients in the first 24 hours after admission is associated with severity of psychopathology, and severity increases with severity of patient psychosis and agitation.

  9. Pattern of psychiatric inpatient admission in Ibadan: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Such audit of psychiatric services is not a popular research venture in Nigeria. Objectives: The study aims to describe the pattern of old psychiatric admissions in a tertiary health facility and the socio-cultural and environmental factors that may influence the pattern. Methods: Data on monthly admissions over a 5-year period ...

  10. Self-harm induced somatic admission after discharge from psychiatric hospital - a prospective cohort study.

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    Mellesdal, L; Kroken, R A; Lutro, O; Wentzel-Larsen, T; Kjelby, E; Oedegaard, K J; Jørgensen, H A; Mehlum, L

    2014-05-01

    Few studies have examined rate and predictors of self-harm in discharged psychiatric patients. To investigate the rate, coding, timing, predictors and characteristics of self-harm induced somatic admission after discharge from psychiatric acute admission. Cohort study of 2827 unselected patients consecutively admitted to a psychiatric acute ward during three years. Mean observation period was 2.3 years. Combined register linkage and manual data examination. Cox regression was used to investigate covariates for time to somatic admission due to self-harm, with covariates changing during follow-up entered time dependently. During the observation period, 10.5% of the patients had 792 somatic self-harm admissions. Strongest risk factors were psychiatric admission due to non-suicidal self-harm, suicide attempt and suicide ideation. The risk was increased throughout the first year of follow-up, during readmission, with increasing outpatient consultations and in patients diagnosed with recurrent depression, personality disorders, substance use disorders and anxiety/stress-related disorders. Only 49% of the somatic self-harm admissions were given hospital self-harm diagnosis. Self-harm induced somatic admissions were highly prevalent during the first year after discharge from acute psychiatric admission. Underdiagnosing of self-harm in relation to somatic self-harm admissions may cause incorrect follow-up treatments and unreliable register data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Supplier-induced demand for psychiatric admissions in Northern New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The development of hospital service areas (HSAs) using small area analysis has been useful in examining variation in medical and surgical care; however, the techniques of small area analysis are underdeveloped in understanding psychiatric admission rates. We sought to develop these techniques in order to understand the relationship between psychiatric bed supply and admission rates in Northern New England. Our primary hypotheses were that there would be substantial variation in psychiatric admission across geographic settings and that bed availability would be positively correlated with admission rates, reflecting a supplier-induced demand phenomenon. Our secondary hypothesis was that the construction of psychiatric HSAs (PHSAs) would yield more meaningful results than the use of existing general medical hospital service areas. Methods To address our hypotheses, we followed a four-step analytic process: 1) we used small area analytic techniques to define our PHSAs, 2) we calculated the localization index for PHSAs and compared that to the localization index for general medical HSAs, 3) we used the number of psychiatric hospital beds, the number of psychiatric admissions, and census data to calculate population-based bed-supply and psychiatric admission rates for each PHSA, and 4) we correlated population-based admission rates to population-based psychiatric bed supply. Results The admission rate for psychiatric diagnosis varied considerably among the PHSAs, with rates varying from 2.4 per 100,000 in Portsmouth, NH to 13.4 per 100,000 in Augusta, ME. There was a positive correlation of 0.71 between a PHSA's supply of beds and admission rate. Using our PSHAs produced a substantially higher localization index than using general medical hospital services areas (0.69 vs. 0.23), meaning that our model correctly predicted geographic utilization at three times the rate of the existing model. Conclusions The positive correlation between admission and bed supply

  12. Admission to women's crisis houses or to psychiatric wards: women's pathways to admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Louise M; Rigon, Elena; Cole, Laura; Lawlor, Caroline; Johnson, Sonia

    2008-12-01

    This study compared the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and pathways to admission for women admitted to women's crisis houses and to psychiatric hospitals. A women's crisis house is a residential mental health crisis facility for women who would otherwise be considered for voluntary hospital admission. A survey of all 388 female admissions to women's crisis houses and psychiatric hospitals in four boroughs of London during a 12-week period in 2006 was conducted with questionnaires administered to key workers involved in the admissions. Pathways to admission were significantly less complex for women admitted to the crisis houses (fewer preadmission contacts with police, emergency departments, and other services). Women admitted to psychiatric wards were more likely to require supervision or observation. A multivariate analysis of data for the 245 voluntary admissions indicated that women admitted to women's crisis houses were significantly less likely to have a care coordinator (odds ratio [OR]=.528) or to have gone to an accident and emergency department (OR=.214) before admission. No other differences were found between the two groups. Pathways to admission were somewhat different for women admitted to women's crisis houses, but few clinical or sociodemographic differences were found between the two groups. Women's crisis houses may be a viable alternative to traditional wards for voluntary patients not needing intensive supervision and observation. Research should examine whether women's crisis houses are as effective as traditional inpatient services in treating women with acute psychiatric problems.

  13. pattern of psychiatric inpatient admission in ibadan: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pattern of psychiatric admission that may be found in. Nigeria. Such findings may improve the preparedness of mental health facilities by guiding service organisation and planning in most sub-Sahara African countries like Nigeria where mental health services are poorly developed and professionals are scarce5.

  14. Involuntary Psychiatric Admissions and Development of Psychiatric Services as an Alternative to Full-Time Hospitalization in France.

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    Gandré, Coralie; Gervaix, Jeanne; Thillard, Julien; Macé, Jean-Marc; Roelandt, Jean-Luc; Chevreul, Karine

    2017-09-01

    The development of alternatives to full-time hospitalization in psychiatry is limited because consensus about the benefits of such alternatives is lacking. This study assessed whether the development of such alternatives in French psychiatric sectors was associated with a reduction in involuntary inpatient care, taking into account other factors that are potentially associated with involuntary admission. Data on whether a patient had at least one involuntary full-time admission in 2012 were extracted from the French national discharge database for psychiatric care. The development of alternatives to full-time hospitalization was estimated as the percentage of human resources allocated to these alternatives out of all human resources allocated to psychiatry, measured at the level of the hospital hosting each sector. Other factors potentially associated with involuntary admission (characteristics of patients, health care providers, and the environment) were extracted from administrative databases, and a multilevel logistic model was carried out to account for the nested structure of the data. Significant variations were observed between psychiatric sectors in rates of involuntary inpatient admissions. A large portion of the variation was explained by characteristics of the sectors. A significant negative association was found between involuntary admissions and the development of alternatives to full-time hospitalization, after adjustment for other factors associated with involuntary admissions. Findings suggest that the development of alternatives to full-time hospitalization is beneficial for quality of care, given that it is negatively associated with involuntary full-time admissions. The reduction of such admissions aligns with international recommendations for psychiatric care.

  15. The effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2012-08-02

    Several studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.

  16. A latent class analysis of brief postpartum psychiatric hospital admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlomi Polachek, Inbal; Fung, Kinwah; Putnam, Karen; Brody, Samantha Meltzer; Vigod, Simone N

    2017-09-11

    Almost 40% of postpartum psychiatric hospital admissions are brief, lasting 72h or less. We aimed to identify unique subgroups of women within this group to inform better intervention. All women in Ontario, Canada with a brief postpartum psychiatric admission (≤ 72h) (2007-2012)(N = 631) were studied using latent class analysis. We identified distinct subtypes of women and compared women within each subtype on post-discharge mental health indicators: physician visits, emergency department (ED) visits and readmissions. We identified four clinically distinct classes: (1)women with no diagnosed mental illness (2 years before delivery) (n = 179; 28.4% of the sample); (2)women with pre-existing history of severe mental illness (i.e. psychosis) (n = 161; 25.5%); (3)women with pre-existing history of non-psychotic mental illness (n = 211; 33.4%); and (4)adolescent rural-dwelling women with alcohol and substance use disorders (n = 80; 12.7%). In the 1 year post-discharge, women in classes 1-3 were more likely to have post-discharge physician visit than women in class 4 (p class 2 were most likely to be readmitted (p planning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychiatric admissions fall following the Christchurch earthquakes: an audit of inpatient data.

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    Beaglehole, Ben; Bell, Caroline; Beveridge, John; Frampton, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Following the devastating earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand, there was the widespread perception that the demand for inpatient mental health services would increase. However, our clinical observation was to the contrary, with substantial reductions in inpatient utilisation being noted. We therefore examined psychiatric bed occupancy and admission data to improve understanding of the impact of the disaster on mental health services. We audited acute psychiatric bed occupancy and admission rates prior to and following a major earthquake. After the earthquake, total bed occupancy reduced from an average of 93% to 79%. Daily admissions also reduced by 20.2% for the 30 days following the earthquake. All diagnostic groups, with the exception of the 'Schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders' category, contributed to the reduction. No rebound to increased occupancy or admissions was seen over the study period. The study confirmed our clinical observation that demand for acute inpatient psychiatric services were markedly reduced after the February 2011 earthquake. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  18. The experience of admission to psychiatric hospital among Chinese adult patients in Hong Kong

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    Lam Linda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paper reports on a study to evaluate the psychometric properties and cultural appropriateness of the Chinese translation of the Admission Experience Survey (AES. Methods The AES was translated into Chinese and back-translated. Content validity was established by focus groups and expert panel review. The Chinese version of the Admission Experience Survey (C-AES was administered to 135 consecutively recruited adult psychiatric patients in the Castle Peak Hospital (Hong Kong SAR, China within 48 hours of admission. Construct validity was assessed by comparing the scores from patients admitted voluntarily versus patients committed involuntarily, and those received physical or chemical restraint versus those who did not. The relationship between admission experience and psychopathology was examined by correlating C-AES scores with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS scores. Results Spearman's item-to-total correlations of the C-AES ranged from 0.50 to 0.74. Three factors from the C-AES were extracted using factor analysis. Item 12 was omitted because of poor internal consistency and factor loading. The factor structure of the Process Exclusion Scale (C-PES corresponded to the English version, while some discrepancies were noted in the Perceived Coercion Scale (C-PCS and the Negative Pressure Scale (C-NPS. All subscales had good internal consistencies. Scores were significantly higher for patients either committed involuntarily or subjected to chemical or physical restrain, independent on severity of psychotic symptoms. Conclusion The Chinese AES is a psychometrically sound instrument assessing the three different aspects of the experience of admission, namely "negative pressure, "process exclusion" and "perceived coercion". The potential of C-AES in exploring subjective experience of psychiatric admission and effects on treatment adherence should be further explored.

  19. Predominant diagnoses, gender, and admission duration in an adult psychiatric inpatient hospital in United Kingdom

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    Carlo Lazzari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study objective was to epidemiologically analyse patients presenting at an adult and mixed-gender psychiatric inpatient unit in Essex, Kingswood Centre, UK, to report the predominant diagnoses, gender, and admission duration. Method and material: Meta-analysis and descriptive statistics analysed the year 2016 discharge data on Excel® for 162 patients. ICD-10 codes classified their mental illnesses. Results: Meta-analysis evidenced statistically significant heterogeneity in numbers admissions (I2=95%; p≤0.001, length (I2=78%; p≤0.001, and gender (I2=76%; p≤0.001. The prevailing diagnosis was borderline personality disorder (BPD (rate, 95% CI=0.46 [0.38-0.54]. The longest admission was for schizoaffective disorder (mean duration, 95% CI=53 [22.65-83.34], p=0.001. Gender presented a prevalence of male over female admissions for schizophrenia (OR, 95% CI=0.14 [0.05-0.35], p≤0.001 and BPD with prevalence of female over male admissions (OR, 95% CI=2.79 [1.35-5.76], p=0.05. Conclusion: Female patients with BPD were the most represented category in non-forensic psychiatric inpatient wards in the population studied. Male patients with schizophrenia represented the other gender highly represented. The longest admission was recorded for schizoaffective disorder due to the complexity to treat both mood and psychotic symptoms. It is likely that women with BPD will be the future recipients of psychiatric inpatient and outpatient healthcare services.

  20. Deliberate self-harm before psychiatric admission and risk of suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatric illness and deliberate self-harm (DSH) are major risk factors of suicide. In largely 15 % of psychiatric admissions in Denmark, the patient had an episode of DSH within the last year before admission. This study examined the survival and predictors of suicide in a suicidal high...

  1. Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study

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    Russo Federico

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA, including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii to assess the aggressive behavior and the clinical management of FPA patients in Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura = psychiatric service for diagnosis and management. Method Cross-sectional observational multi-center study involving 62 Italian SPDCs (PERSEO – Psychiatric EmeRgency Study and EpidemiOlogy. Results 253 FPA aged Conclusion Subjects presenting at their first psychiatric ward admission have often not undergone previous adequate psychiatric assessment and diagnostic procedures. The first hospital admission allows diagnosis and psychopharmacological treatment to be established. In our population, aggressive behaviors were rather frequent, although most commonly verbal. Psychiatric symptoms, as evaluated by psychiatrists and patients, improved significantly from admission to discharge both for FPA and non-FPA patients.

  2. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Barbara; Salize, Hans Joachim; Dressing, Harald; Rüsch, Nicolas; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bühlmann, Monika; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Korinth, Lena; Rössler, Wulf

    2012-09-05

    The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates) has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients' perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be compared with standard care procedures (control group

  3. Admission of people with dementia to psychiatric hospitals in Japan: factors that can shorten their hospitalizations.

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    Morikawa, Takako; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Osaki, Tohmi; Kajita, Hiroyuki; Yotsumoto, Kayano; Kawamata, Toshio

    2017-11-01

    People exhibiting serious behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia are usually voluntarily or involuntarily committed to psychiatric hospitals for treatment. In Japan, the average hospital stay for individuals with dementia is about 2 years. Ideally, individuals should be discharged once their symptoms have subsided. However, we see cases in Japan where individuals remain institutionalized long after behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia are no longer apparent. This study will attempt to identify factors contributing to shorter stays in psychiatric hospitals for dementia patients. Questionnaires consisting of 17 items were mailed to 121 psychiatric hospitals with dementia treatment wards in western Japan. Out of 121 hospitals that received the questionnaires, 45 hospitals returned them. The total number of new patient admissions at all 45 hospitals during the month of August 2014 was 1428, including 384 dementia patients (26.9%). The average length of stay in the dementia wards in August 2014 was 482.7 days. Our findings revealed that the rate of discharge after 2 months was 35.4% for the dementia wards. In addition, we found that the average stay in hospitals charging or planning to charge the rehabilitation fee to dementia patients was significantly shorter than in hospitals not charging the rehabilitation fee. In Japan, dementia patients account for over 25% of new admissions to psychiatric hospitals with dementia wards. The average length of stay in a psychiatric hospital dementia ward is more than 1 year. A discharge after fewer than 2 months is exceedingly rare for those in a dementia ward compared with dementia patients in other wards. If institutions focus on rehabilitation, it may be possible to shorten the stay of dementia patients in psychiatric hospitals. © 2017 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  4. Exploring and explaining involuntary care: The relationship between psychiatric admission status, gender and other demographic and clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Aoife; Agada, Emmanuel; Emechebe, Afam; Anamdi, Chike; Ng, Xiao Ting; Duffy, Richard; Kelly, Brendan D

    2016-01-01

    Involuntary admission and treatment are features of psychiatric care in many countries, but the relationship between involuntary status and gender (among other factors) is not clear. We examined demographic and diagnostic factors associated with involuntary admission in a general adult psychiatry service in a deprived area of Dublin's north inner-city over a 7-year period (2008 to 2014 inclusive). Over this period, there were 1099 admissions, yielding an annual admission rate of 504.8 admissions per 100,000 population per year. When adjusted for deprivation, this rate (387.7) was lower than the national rate (413.9). Consistent with other inner-city areas in Dublin, 14.1% of admissions were involuntary, yielding an involuntary admission rate of 71.2 per 100,000 population per year (deprivation-adjusted rate: 54.8), which is higher than the national rate (39.4). After controlling for age, occupation, marital status and diagnosis, the only independent predictors of admission status were place of origin (pnational differences are likely related to differing legal traditions and different criteria for involuntary admission, possibly related to varying emphases placed on "dangerousness" as a mandatory criterion for involuntary hospitalization. This merits further, cross-national study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

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    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days

  6. Compulsory and voluntary admission in psychiatric hospitals in northern Norway 2009-2010. A national registry-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Olsen, Aina; Nybrodahl, Inger; Sørgaard, Knut W

    2013-02-01

    During the last decade, Norwegian healthcare authorities have been concerned about the frequent use of coercive measures in psychiatric care. On this background, we aimed to explore the voluntary and compulsory admissions in psychiatric hospitals in northern Norway, the University Hospital of North Norway in Tromsø (UNN-T) and the Nordland Hospital in Bodø (NH-B). All voluntary and compulsory admissions (2009-2010) among patients aged ≥18 years registered by the Norwegian Patient Registry (NPR) were analyzed retrospectively. Compulsory admission was registered according to the general practitioner's (GP's) decision and the patients were hospitalized in Bodø or Tromsø. A total of 12,237 admissions and 242,148 days in hospital were identified. The female/male ratio of admission and stay was 1.17 and 1.15, respectively. The admission rate (northern Norway =1.0) varied significantly from south to north (0.60-1.52). Whereas patients living close to the hospitals had the same admission rate as others, the mean hospital stay was significantly longer (ratio =1.32). Furthermore, the UNN-T had a higher re-admission rate (2% vs. 5%). Municipalities with District Psychiatric Centers (DPC) did not differ from others. A significant difference in the use of coercive measures was revealed between hospitals. Forced medication was the most frequent measure employed. The study documented a south-north gradient in admission rate and indicated differences in the use of coercion. Variation may partly be due to different reporting procedures. This finding and why patients living in the neighborhood of hospitals stay longer should be explored in future studies.

  7. The Low Proportion and Associated Factors of Involuntary Admission in the Psychiatric Emergency Service in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Pang; Chiu, Chih-Chiang; Yang, Tsu-Hui; Liu, Tzong-Hsien; Wu, Chia-Yi; Chou, Pesus

    2015-01-01

    Background The involuntary admission regulated under the Mental Health Act has become an increasingly important issue in the developed countries in recent years. Most studies about the distribution and associated factors of involuntary admission were carried out in the western countries; however, the results may vary in different areas with different legal and socio-cultural backgrounds. Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the proportion and associated factors of involuntary admission in a psychiatric emergency service in Taiwan. Methods The study cohort included patients admitted from a psychiatric emergency service over a two-year period. Demographic, psychiatric emergency service utilization, and clinical variables were compared between those who were voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to explore the associated factors of involuntary admission. Results Among 2,777 admitted patients, 110 (4.0%) were involuntarily admitted. Police referrals and presenting problems as violence assessed by psychiatric nurses were found to be associated with involuntary admission. These patients were more likely to be involuntarily admitted during the night shift and stayed longer in the psychiatric emergency service. Conclusions The proportion of involuntary admissions in Taiwan was in the lower range when compared to Western countries. Dangerous conditions evaluated by the psychiatric nurses and police rather than diagnosis made by the psychiatrists were related factors of involuntary admission. As it spent more time to admit involuntary patients, it was suggested that multidisciplinary professionals should be included in and educated for during the process of involuntary admission. PMID:26046529

  8. Psychiatric screening of admissions to an accident and emergency ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, G; Reinstein, D Z; Rajiyah, G; Rosser, R

    1991-04-01

    One hundred medical and surgical patients admitted to an accident and emergency ward were screened for psychiatric disorder. A psychiatric diagnosis was made in 37 patients, 32 of whom were correctly identified by the GHQ. Psychiatric morbidity was associated with being single, lower social class, unemployment, homelessness and living in Bloomsbury Health District or north-east London. It was also associated with not being registered with a GP. The 14 overdose patients were no more likely to receive a psychiatric diagnosis than other patients, yet constituted most of the psychiatric referrals. Few patients were asked by medical staff about emotional worries or problems. A desire to be asked such questions and a past psychiatric history were associated with a psychiatric diagnosis. Routine screening of psychiatric morbidity in both medical and surgical patients and appropriate psychiatric referral of identified patients is recommended. A system of facilitating GP registration is necessary, as much of the morbidity identified could be contained within primary care.

  9. Hostility during admission interview as a short-term predictor of aggression in acute psychiatric male inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, Alfonso; Kustermann, Stefano; Di Genio, Massimo; Siracusano, Alberto

    2003-12-01

    A critical step for improving the prediction of on-ward violence is the identification of variables that are not only consistently associated with an increased risk of aggression but also easily evaluated during the admission interview. The goal of this prospective study was to assess the predictive utility of hostility during admission interview. The sample consisted of 80 newly admitted male patients with heterogeneous DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses recruited from the psychiatric ward of an urban public hospital. Psychiatric symptoms at admission were assessed with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). Aggressive behavior during the first week of hospitalization was measured with the Modified Overt Aggression Scale. Data were collected between January and June 1998. In a multiple regression model, BPRS items hostility and tension-excitement emerged as significant predictors of verbal aggression, whereas thinking disturbance (high) and suspiciousness-uncooperativeness (low) emerged as significant predictors of aggression against objects. In contrast, when aggression was treated as a binary dependent variable in a logistic model, hostility during the admission interview had no utility in predicting on-ward aggressive behavior. This study confirms the importance of distinguishing between different types of aggression to improve the accuracy of predictions of violence. The findings suggest that the question whether hostility is a useful short-term predictor of aggression in psychiatric inpatients cannot be answered conclusively. The predictive utility of hostility was relatively high for predicting verbal aggression but was negligible for predicting other types of aggressive behavior.

  10. An analysis of acute admissions to a general hospital psychiatric unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid turnover of patients in a general hospital psychiatric unit demands stabilization and discharge as soon as possible. It is likely that patients are being prematurely discharged because of this pressure. Aim: The study sought to analyse admissions to an acute psychiatric unit with a view to determining the demographic ...

  11. An analysis of acute admissions to a general hospital psychiatric unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    Aim: The study sought to analyse admissions to an acute psychiatric unit with a view to determining the demographic distribution of the patients, duration ... males with a past psychiatric history of either an Axis I or a co-morbid Axis II disorder, and had defaulted on their regular follow up. .... The effectiveness of stigma coping.

  12. Involuntary admission of psychiatric patients in the Northern Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The majority (81.4%) of patients were found “certifiable” and 77.4% were known psychiatric patients. Two-thirds of the patients were referred by general practitioners doing session for the state hospitals. The overall accuracy of psychiatric diagnosis by the referring doctors was considered correct if any of the provisional ...

  13. Clinical and demographic differences between voluntary and involuntary psychiatric admissions in a university hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tais Michele Minatogawa Chang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To assess the frequency of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations from 2001 to 2008 and to determine associated clinical and socio-demographic characteristics, a retrospective cohort study was conducted. Adult admission data were collected from a university hospital in Brazil. Hospitalizations were classified as voluntary (VH or involuntary (IH. Groups were compared using chi-square test for categorical variables and Mann-Whitney test for continuous non-parametric variables. The relative risk of certain events was estimated by the odds ratio statistic. Of 2,289 admissions, 13.3% were IH. The proportion of IH increased from 2.5% to 21.2% during the eight year period. IH were more frequently associated with female gender, unmarried status, unemployment, and more than 9 years of schooling. Psychotic symptoms were more common among IH. There were no differences in age, duration of hospitalization, or rate of attendance at first appointment after hospital discharge. Understanding of the characteristics associated with IH is necessary to improve the treatment of psychiatric disorders.

  14. Admissions to acute adolescent psychiatric units: a prospective study of clinical severity and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several countries have established or are planning acute psychiatric in-patient services that accept around-the-clock emergency admission of adolescents. Our aim was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcomes of a cohort of patients at four Norwegian units. Methods We used a prospective pre-post observational design. Four units implemented a clinician-rated outcome measure, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales for Children and Adolescents (HoNOSCA, which measures mental health problems and their severity. We collected also data about the diagnoses, suicidal problems, family situations, and the involvement of the Child Protection Service. Predictions of outcome (change in HoNOSCA total score were analysed with a regression model. Results The sample comprised 192 adolescents admitted during one year (response rate 87%. Mean age was 15.7 years (range 10-18 and 70% were girls. Fifty-eight per cent had suicidal problems at intake and the mean intake HoNOSCA total score was 18.5 (SD 6.4. The largest groups of main diagnostic conditions were affective (28% and externalizing (26% disorders. Diagnoses and other patient characteristics at intake did not differ between units. Clinical psychiatric disorders and developmental disorders were associated with severity (on HoNOSCA at intake but not with outcome. Of adolescents ≥ 16 years, 33% were compulsorily admitted. Median length of stay was 8.5 days and 75% of patients stayed less than a month. Compulsory admissions and length of stay varied between units. Mean change (improvement in the HoNOSCA total score was 5.1 (SD 6.2, with considerable variation between units. Mean discharge score was close to the often-reported outpatient level, and self-injury and emotional symptoms were the most reduced symptoms during the stay. In a regression model, unit, high HoNOSCA total score at intake, or involvement of the Child Protection Service predicted improvement during admission

  15. [History of treatment of schizophrenic forensic patients prior to admission: a comparison with schizophrenic general psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piontek, K; Kutscher, S-U; König, A; Leygraf, N

    2013-01-01

    The number of schizophrenic patients admitted to forensic hospitals according to section 63 of the German Criminal Code has increased continuously over the past years. Prior to admission to a forensic ward, two thirds of schizophrenic patients have been admitted to a general psychiatric institution at least once. Among other factors, forensic admission is seen as a consequence of insufficient pretreatment in general psychiatry. This study aims to identify differences regarding the history of treatment of forensic and general psychiatric patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. The matched samples include 72 male patients from forensic wards and 72 male patients from general psychiatry diagnosed with schizophrenia. The history of psychiatric treatment was reconstructed by interviewing the patients as well as the outpatient psychiatrists and by analyzing these patients' medical records. Both groups showed similar risk factors, however, forensic patients had a higher number of previous convictions and were convicted more often for violent offences. Furthermore, the data indicate that forensic patients are less integrated into psychiatric care and showed a lower rate of treatment compliance prior to admission to a forensic ward. The results provide support for the arrangement of an intensive outpatient aftercare, especially for schizophrenic patients with comorbid substance abuse disorders and previous convictions for violent offences.

  16. A descriptive analysis of admissions to Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were the top two discharge diagnoses. The median length of hospital stay (LOS) was 63 days. Diagnosis of schizophrenia and place of residence, i.e. living outside of Addis Ababa independently predicted LOS above the median. Conclusion: Admission data demonstrated a huge mental ...

  17. Involuntary admission of psychiatric patients in the Northern Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mental healthcare user. The Northern Cape has five admin- istrative districts, comprising the Up- per Karoo, Frances Baard, Siyanda, the Namaqua region and Kgalagadi.3. The only mental healthcare facility avail- able in the province for involuntary ad- missions of psychiatric patients is the. West End Hospital in Kimberley.

  18. Which patients are in highest risk of coercive measures after admission to a general psychiatric ward?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Mikkel; Høgh, Lene; Nørregaard, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    contact with psychiatric outpatient services prior to admission. Conclusions The majority of coercive episodes happened within the rst 24 hours after admission, and in patients with concurrent psychotic disorder and substance abuse. We propose an intervention based upon these data which includes......: Systematic evaluation of violence risk, individual plans for patients in increased risk of violence, systematic analysis of all episodes and near-episodes of coercion, group therapy during admission dedicated towards substance abuse, better staf ng levels and continuous training of staff. This intervention...

  19. Local Geographical Distribution of Acute Involuntary Psychiatric Admissions in Subdistricts In and Around Utrecht, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, Arjan W; van Ommeren, Omar W H R; van Buuren, Melissa L; Laan, Wijnand; Smeets, Hugo M; Engelhard, Iris M

    BACKGROUND: Acute involuntary psychiatric admissions (AIPA) tend to be applied more often in urban areas. OBJECTIVE: The current study aims to describe AIPA prevalence differences between the subdistricts in an urban area, and to identify which district characteristics are associated with a higher

  20. Is there an impact of global and local disasters on psychiatric inpatient admissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, Helene; Lauber, Christoph; Malti, Tina; Rössler, Wulf

    2004-10-01

    Disasters of the magnitude of September 11, 2001 have a serious public health impact. By dominating media broadcasts, this effect is not limited to the site of the disaster. We tested the hypothesis whether such extraordinary burden results in an increase of psychiatric inpatient treatment. As such we analysed all psychiatric inpatient admissions in the Canton of Zurich/Switzerland. To test the influence of proximity to a disaster, we additionally analysed the impact of a local amok run on September 27, 2001. Psychiatric inpatient admissions in the Canton of Zurich from September 2000 to September 2002 were analysed based on the data of the psychiatric case register. ARIMA modelling was employed to describe time-series of admissions per week over the 2-year period and to identify the impact of the incidents of 9/11 and 9/27, 2001. Mean numbers of weekly admissions were comparable in a time span of one month before and one month after the two incidents, thus, no significant changes were detected by the ARIMA modelling. Against widespread beliefs, for patients with severe mental disorders requiring hospitalisation illness factors seem to play a more relevant role for decompensation than external psychosocial factors such as the described incidents.

  1. Ethnicity and dangerousness criteria for court ordered admission to a psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkers, D J; de Vries, S C; van Baars, A W B; Mulder, C L

    2010-02-01

    Black and minority ethnic (BME) populations are disproportionately detained in psychiatric hospitals. To examine the dangerousness criteria for compulsory court ordered admission to a psychiatric hospital in White and BME persons. We examined the psychiatric examinations for court ordered compulsory admissions in 506 White and 299 BME persons from October 2004 until January 2008 in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The White and BME groups are compared using Chi-square tests and in case of significant differences with logistic regression models adjusted for age, gender, mental disorders and socio-economic background. In BME persons, violence towards others and neglect of relatives were more often reasons to request court order admission as compared with Whites (39.8 vs. 25.3%, P mental disorders and socio-economic background [OR 1.56 (95% CI 1.12-2.18), P = 0.01, respectively; OR 3.08 (95% CI 1.31-7.26), P = 0.01]. The other reasons for a request of court order admission had a similar prevalence in both groups (suicide or self-harm, social decline, severe self-neglect, arousal of aggression of others, danger to the mental health of others, and the general safety of persons and goods). Violence towards others and neglect of relatives are more often a reason to request court ordered admission in BME than in White persons. BME patients are more often perceived as potentially dangerous to others.

  2. Effects of legal and illegal use of benzodiazepines at acute admission to a psychiatric acute department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaaler Arne E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the psychiatric acute and emergency services patients present in severe crisis often complicated by behavioral problems, substance use, and multiple axis 1 diagnoses. In these clinical settings both legal and illegal use of benzodiazepines are difficult to evaluate since benzodiazepines could in some patients be regarded as first line treatment and in other patients as the cause of the acute psychiatric condition. The aims of this study were to evaluate the frequency and clinical effects of both legal and illegal use of benzodiazepines at admittance to a psychiatric acute department. Methods All patients acutely admitted to a Norwegian acute psychiatric university department serving a catchment area were asked about use of benzodiazepines, other medications and substances before admission. Patients were asked to give urine samples for analyses of benzodiazepines and substances. Results In 227 consecutive admissions there was legal use of benzodiazepines before admission in 39%, illegal use in 13% and no use in 48%. Patients with legal use of benzodiazepines were older, used more often antidepressants and a higher number of prescribed psychotropic medications. Illegal users of benzodiazepines more often used other illegal substances, were evaluated as clinically affected by a substance at admittance and were diagnosed with a substance use disorder. Patients with psychoses or major affective disorders treated with adequate medication (antidepressants, antipsychotics or mood-stabilizers before admission more often received benzodiazepines than patients without adequate medication. Conclusions The patients using benzodiazepines at admittance to psychiatric acute departments could be divided in illegal and legal users. The illegal users were young, used illegal substances and were more often regarded clinically affected by substances at admittance. The legal users were older, did not use other substances and were not regarded

  3. [Discharge curve among psychiatric patients after admission and risk factors associated with long stay based on "patient survey"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshiharu; Takeshima, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    The "Reform Vision of Mental Health Services" (2004) announced the basic policy for the transition from hospital based to community based care, and set up numerical objectives, such as the average proportion remaining hospitalized in the first year after admission and the incidence rate of discharge among psychiatric patients hospitalized for more than one year. Using data from the "Patient Survey" performed in 2002 by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, we estimated discharge curves for each mental disorder during the first year after admission and assessed the effects of variables, i.e., diagnosis, sex, age, hospital type, and residential area, on remaining hospitalized after one year from admission and the incidence rate of discharge among psychiatric patients hospitalized for more than one year. The estimated number of discharged psychiatric patients was 27,974 in September, 2002, and 86% of them were discharged less than one year after admission. The incidence rate of discharge (per 100 person-year) in the first year was 314.8, but the rate after the second year sharply decreased to 19.9. Patients with dementia, mental retardation, and schizophrenia tended to stay for a long period in hospital, and proportions remaining hospitalized after one year from admission were 27.0%, 16.4%, and 14.6% respectively. Based on multivariate analysis using the weighted Poisson regression model, risk factors associated with an increased chance of remaining hospitalized after the first year included a long length of continuous hospitalization, diagnoses of dementia, mental retardation, and schizophrenia, male, older age, and being in a mental hospital. On the other hand, as to the incidence rate of discharge after one year, a long length of continuous hospitalization and being in a mental hospital were related with a long stay, but other variables were slightly different. Being female, patients aged 45-54 years old, and diagnoses of epilepsy and schizophrenia were

  4. Brief report: Correlates of inpatient psychiatric admission in children and adolescents with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Matthew J; Watson, Hunna J; Egan, Sarah J; Hoiles, Kimberley J; Harper, Emily; McCormack, Julie; Shu, Chloe; Forbes, David A

    2015-06-01

    To examine the prevalence and importance of psychological, behavioural, and situational correlates of impending psychiatric inpatient admissions in children and adolescents with eating disorders. The sample consisted of 285 patients (8-17 years, M = 14.4, SD = 1.49) with DSM-5 eating disorders assessed between 2006 and 2013 from the Helping to Outline Pediatric Eating Disorders (HOPE) Project. The sample was split into two groups, those with (n = 38) and without (n = 247) impending psychiatric admission; Discriminant function analysis was used to examine correlates. The prevalence of impending psychiatric admission was 13.3%. Suicidal ideation provided the greatest discriminating power, followed by eating pathology, depressive symptoms, anxiety, multiple methods of weight control, binge eating, and family functioning. Earlier recognition of comorbid symptoms in eating disorders in the community may reduce the number of young people with eating disorders who present needing critical psychiatric care. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-psychiatric inpatient care preceding admission for self-harm in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idenfors, Hans; Strömsten, Lotta M J; Renberg, Ellinor Salander

    2016-09-01

    Many young people contact health services before they harm themselves intentionally. However, they often seek care for non-suicidal or non-psychiatric causes despite having suicidal thoughts. We investigated the non-psychiatric hospital diagnoses received by young people during the year before their first admission to hospital for self-harm. From a national register, we selected people who were hospitalised for an episode of self-harm during the period 1999-2009, at which time they were aged 16 to 24. We compared them with matched controls regarding the probability for having been admitted with different diagnoses during the year preceding the self-harm admission. The study included 48,705 young people (16,235 cases and 32,470 controls). Those admitted for self-harm were more likely than controls to have been hospitalised for non-psychiatric reasons, which included symptomatic diagnoses such as abdominal pain, syncope/collapse, unspecified convulsions, and chest pain. Certain chronic somatic illnesses were also overrepresented, such as epilepsy, diabetes mellitus type 1, and asthma. Symptomatic diagnoses were more common in those who had been admitted for self-harm. It is possible that psychiatric problems could have been the cause of the symptoms in some of these admissions where no underlying illness could be found, and if this was not uncovered it might lead to a delay in suicide risk assessment. For several chronic illnesses, when admitted to hospital, a psychiatric evaluation might be indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Increasing the relative weight of noncognitive admission criteria improves underrepresented minority admission rates to medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballejos, Marlene P; Rhyne, Robert L; Parkes, Jay

    2015-01-01

    CONSTRUCT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of varying the relative weights of cognitive versus noncognitive admission criteria on the proportion of underrepresented minorities admitted to medical school. It answers the question, "Can medical schools increase the admission rates of underrepresented minority (URM) students by balancing cognitive criteria with the experiences, attributes, and metrics of noncognitive data in the admission process?" U.S. demographics are shifting, and by 2042 ethnic minority groups will make up approximately 50% of the population. Increasing diversity of the U.S. population foreshadows the need to increase the number of physicians from underrepresented minorities to help address healthcare disparities that are on the rise. A cohort of three medical school applicant classes (2007-2009) was used to model the impact on URM admission rates as the relative weights of cognitive and noncognitive admission criteria were varied. This study used the minimum admission standards established for the actual incoming classes. The URM rate of admission to medical school was the outcome. Cognitive criteria included Medical College Admission Test scores and grade point averages. Noncognitive criteria included four categories: background and diversity, interest and suitability for a career in medicine, problem-solving and communication skills, and letters of recommendation. A cohort of 480 applicants from the three applicant classes were enrolled in the study. As the weighting scheme was varied from 50% cognitive/50% noncognitive weights to 35%/65%, the proportion of URM students accepted to medical school increased from 24% (42/177) to 30% (57/193; p noncognitive higher relative to cognitive criteria without compromising admission standards. Challenging conventional practice in the admissions process may improve health disparities and diversify the physician workforce.

  7. Social deprivation and hospital admission rates, length of stay and readmissions in emergency medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, Seán; Byrne, Declan; Conway, Richard; O'Riordan, Deirdre; Coveney, Seamus; Silke, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Patients from deprived backgrounds have a higher in-patient mortality following an emergency medical admission. How deprivation relates to the admission or readmission incidence rates, episode length of stay (LOS) and ancillary resource utilization is less clear. All emergency medical admissions (66,861 episodes in 36,214 patients) between 2002 and 2013, categorized by quintile of Irish National Deprivation Index were assessed against admission or readmission incidence rates (/1000 local population by electoral division), LOS and utilization of five ancillary services. Univariate and multi-variable risk estimates (odds ratios (OR) or incidence rate ratios (IRR)) were calculated, using truncated Poisson regression. The deprivation index quintile was strongly correlated with the emergency medical admission rate with IRR (as compared with quintile 1) as follows: Q2 1.99 (95% CI: 1.96, 2.01), Q3 3.45 (95% CI: 3.41, 3.49), Q4 3.27 (95% CI: 3.23, 3.31) and Q5 4.29 (95% CI: 4.23, 4.35). LOS was not influenced by deprivation status; although increasing deprivation resulted in increased utilization of social services (OR 1.04: 95% CI: 1.03, 1.06), with a lower requirement for occupational therapy (OR 0.94: 95% CI: 0.93, 0.96) and speech/language services (OR 0.83: 95% CI: 0.80, 0.86). There was a rather decreased use of ancillary services with increasing deprivation; however, the readmission rate was strongly predicted by deprivation status. Deprivation status strongly influenced the admission and readmission rates for medical patients admitted as emergencies; however, ancillary resource utilization was not increased. Deprivation index will increase demand on hospital resources due to the aggregate effect on both admission and readmission incidence rates. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Security rules and banned items in psychiatric acute admission wards in Athens, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukia, Evmorfia; Giannouli, Eleni; Gonis, Nikolaos; Douzenis, Athanassios

    2010-12-01

    Mental health nurses play a key role in maintaining the safety of patients, themselves, and others during hospitalization. The aim of the research was to evaluate the safety measures that are taken by mental health nurses to identify the security policies that exist in acute mental health wards. The Ward Safety and Security Rules Survey was used as a method of data collection. Descriptive analysis and content analysis were carried out in order to identify nurses' practices. The total sample consisted of 172 mental health nurses and nurses' assistants who worked in 14 acute inpatient psychiatric wards in three psychiatric hospitals in the greater area of Athens, Greece. The results show a minimum number of security features existing in the wards. Only one of the 14 wards had an intercom system. In only nine wards, there was a panic alarm in the office, and in eight, an emergency response telephone extension. A wide range of practices were noted concerning banned items and patient searches upon admission and return from leave. The results indicate the significant lack of protocols and specific safety rules to guide nurses' actions across psychiatric acute admission wards in Athens. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2010 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  9. An investigation of factors associated with psychiatric hospital admission despite the presence of crisis resolution teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolan Fiona

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crisis resolution teams (CRTs provide a community alternative to psychiatric hospital admission for patients presenting in crisis. Little is known about the characteristics of patients admitted despite the availability of such teams. Methods Data were drawn from three investigations of the outcomes of CRTs in inner London. A literature review was used to identify candidate explanatory variables that may be associated with admission despite the availability of intensive home treatment. The main outcome variable was admission to hospital within 8 weeks of the initial crisis. Associations between this outcome and the candidate explanatory variables were tested using first univariate and then multivariate analysis. Results Patients who were uncooperative with initial assessment (OR 10.25 95% CI-4.20–24.97, at risk of self-neglect (OR 2.93 1.42–6.05, had a history of compulsory admission (OR 2.64 1.07–6.55, assessed outside usual office hours (OR 2.34 1.11–4.94 and/or were assessed in hospital casualty departments (OR 3.12 1.55–6.26, were more likely to be admitted. Other than age, no socio-demographic features or diagnostic variables were significantly associated with risk of admission. Conclusion With the introduction of CRTs, inpatient wards face a significant challenge, as patients who cooperate little with treatment, neglect themselves, or have previously been compulsorily detained are especially likely to be admitted. The increased risk of admission associated with casualty department assessment may be remediable.

  10. [Comprehensive Assessment of Psychiatric Residents: An Addition to the Program Admission Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, E Jaramillo G; Elena, Martín C

    2012-01-01

    The training of medical specialists is a long and complex process. Its purpose is to guarantee the society that they are the right professionals to meet the health needs of the population. The first step to ensure this objective is the admission process. In psychiatry this process, monitoring resident students and the criteria for each one are different in each country. Admission in Colombia is a heterogeneous process, not standardized, which varies greatly from one university to another, even between private and public universities. At the National University of Colombia, the admissions process is handled by the Admissions Office and includes: a written test for which you must obtain a minimum score, a resume rating and an interview. The Teaching Committee and the Department of Psychiatry considered the admission procedure in general to be good, but in need of refinement. Due to the experience of some teachers and given the current rules, a "comprehensive assessment" for master and doctoral students was required and in 1996 it was decided that this method of assessment for admission to a specialization in Psychiatry would serve to complement the admission process. The article describes the experience of the process and its outcomes, strengths and weaknesses. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychiatric intervention and repeated admission to emergency centres due to drug overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehara, Akiko; Yamana, Hayato; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Ando, Shuntaro; Okamura, Tsuyoshi; Kumakura, Yousuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2015-10-01

    Repeated drug overdose is a major risk factor for suicide. Data are lacking on the effect of psychiatric intervention on preventing repeated drug overdose. To investigate whether psychiatric intervention was associated with reduced readmission to emergency centres due to drug overdose. Using a Japanese national in-patient database, we identified patients who were first admitted to emergency centres for drug overdose in 2010-2012. We used propensity score matching for patient and hospital factors to compare readmission rates between intervention (patients undergoing psychosocial assessment) and unexposed groups. Of 29 564 eligible patients, 13 035 underwent psychiatric intervention. In the propensity-matched 7938 pairs, 1304 patients were readmitted because of drug overdose. Readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in the unexposed group (7.3% v. 9.1% respectively, PCommercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence.

  12. Changes in Inpatient and Postdischarge Suicide Rates in a Nationwide Cohort of Danish Psychiatric Inpatients, 1998-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-01-01

    A reduction in the number of inpatient beds as well as shorter admissions have aroused concern that tendencies to deinstitutionalize may increase the suicide rate for psychiatric patients who have been hospitalized. One study indicates that a decreasing inpatient suicide rate may actually reflect...... a transfer to an increasing postdischarge suicide rate; however, uncertainties exist about this transfer, since it is not well studied. The objectives of this study were to estimate adjusted changes over time in suicide rates among psychiatric inpatients and recently discharged psychiatric patients...

  13. The Effects of Air Pollution on Ischemic Stroke Admission Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Hossein; Fakhri, Sara; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Hosseini-Zijoud, Seyed-Mostafa; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationship between the level of air pollutants and the rate of ischemic stroke (IS) admissions to hospitals. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, stroke admissions (January-March 2012 and 2013) to an emergency department and air pollution and meteorological data were gathered. The relationship between air pollutant levels and hospital admission rates were evaluated using the generalize additive model. In all 379 patients with IS were referred to the hospital (52.5% male; mean age 68.2±13.3 years). Both transient (p<0.001) and long-term (p<0.001) rises in CO level increases the risk of IS. Increased weekly (p<0.001) and monthly (p<0.001) average O3 levels amplifies this risk, while a transient increase in NO2 (p<0.001) and SO2 (p<0.001) levels has the same effect. Long-term changes in PM10 (p<0.001) and PM2.5 (p<0.001) also increase the risk of IS. The findings showed that the level of air pollutants directly correlates with the number of stroke admissions to the emergency department. PMID:26866000

  14. Model-based testing for space-time interaction using point processes: An application to psychiatric hospital admissions in an urban area

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Sebastian; Rössler, Wulf; Held, Leonhard

    2015-01-01

    Spatio-temporal interaction is inherent to cases of infectious diseases and occurrences of earthquakes, whereas the spread of other events, such as cancer or crime, is less evident. Statistical significance tests of space-time clustering usually assess the correlation between the spatial and temporal (transformed) distances of the events. Although appealing through simplicity, these classical tests do not adjust for the underlying population nor can they account for a distance decay of interaction. We propose to use the framework of an endemic-epidemic point process model to jointly estimate a background event rate explained by seasonal and areal characteristics, as well as a superposed epidemic component representing the hypothesis of interest. We illustrate this new model-based test for space-time interaction by analysing psychiatric inpatient admissions in Zurich, Switzerland (2007-2012). Several socio-economic factors were found to be associated with the admission rate, but there was no evidence of genera...

  15. Prevalence and patterns of antipsychotic use in youth at the time of admission and discharge from an inpatient psychiatric facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procyshyn, Ric M; Su, Johnny; Elbe, Dean; Liu, Angela Y; Panenka, William J; Davidson, Jana; Honer, William G; Barr, Alasdair M

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence and patterns of antipsychotic use in children and adolescents at the time of admission and discharge from a tertiary care inpatient psychiatric facility. This retrospective analysis included all patients 18 years and younger, who were admitted and discharged from a child and adolescent tertiary care inpatient psychiatric facility between May 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009. Data for medications at admission were obtained using a province-wide network that links all pharmacies in British Columbia, Canada to a central set of data systems, whereas data for medications at discharge were obtained using the Department of Pharmacy's (British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) inpatient computer database. Apart from antipsychotics, overall drug use included antidepressants, mood stabilizers, benzodiazepines, anticholinergics, stimulants, and sleep medications. Referral and discharge diagnoses were also examined. During the study period, 335 patients were admitted and discharged from the tertiary care inpatient psychiatric facility. Significantly, more patients were prescribed with an antipsychotic at the time of discharge from hospital compared with that of the time when they were admitted to hospital (51.6% vs 30.7%; P discharge (32.0% vs 42.2%, respectively) followed by attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder medications (22.3% vs 24.9% at admission and discharge, respectively) and anticonvulsants (19.4% vs 19.1% at admission and discharge, respectively). Whether the significant increase in antipsychotic use seen from the time of admission to discharge is solely attributed to clinical worsening or other variables requires further investigation.

  16. A Longitudinal Study of Child Maltreatment and Mental Health Predictors of Admission to Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick A. Rose

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The child welfare system is an access point for children’s mental health services. Psychiatric residential treatment facilities (PRTFs are the most restrictive, and most expensive setting for children to receive long-term care. Given the high rates of behavioral health concerns among maltreated children in out-of-home care, research is needed to examine the factors that predict entry in PRTFs among children investigated for maltreatment. This exploratory study used cross-sector administrative records linked across multiple systems, including child welfare records and Medicaid claims, from a single state over a five-year period (n = 105,982. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to predict entry into a PRTF. After controlling for many factors, PRTF entry was predicted by diagnosis code indicating a trauma-related condition, antipsychotic medication prescriptions, and entry into lower levels of out-of-home care, supporting the view that youth are admitted to PRTFs largely due to clinical need. However, PRTF admission is also associated with characteristics of their experiences with the social service system, primarily foster care placement stability and permanency. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  17. A Longitudinal Study of Child Maltreatment and Mental Health Predictors of Admission to Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Roderick A; Lanier, Paul

    2017-09-28

    The child welfare system is an access point for children's mental health services. Psychiatric residential treatment facilities (PRTFs) are the most restrictive, and most expensive setting for children to receive long-term care. Given the high rates of behavioral health concerns among maltreated children in out-of-home care, research is needed to examine the factors that predict entry in PRTFs among children investigated for maltreatment. This exploratory study used cross-sector administrative records linked across multiple systems, including child welfare records and Medicaid claims, from a single state over a five-year period ( n = 105,982). Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to predict entry into a PRTF. After controlling for many factors, PRTF entry was predicted by diagnosis code indicating a trauma-related condition, antipsychotic medication prescriptions, and entry into lower levels of out-of-home care, supporting the view that youth are admitted to PRTFs largely due to clinical need. However, PRTF admission is also associated with characteristics of their experiences with the social service system, primarily foster care placement stability and permanency. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  18. Hospital Admission Patterns in Children with CAH: Admission Rates and Adrenal Crises Decline with Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Louise Rushworth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine patterns of hospitalisation for acute medical conditions in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH. Design. A retrospective study of hospitalisation using administrative data. Setting. All hospitals in NSW, Australia. Patients. All patients admitted with CAH and a random sample of admissions in patients aged 0 to 18 years without adrenal insufficiency (AI. Main Outcome Measures. Admissions and comorbidities by age and sex. Results. Of 573 admissions for medical problems in CAH children, 286 (49.9% were in males, and 236 (41.2% had a principal diagnosis of CAH or had an adrenal crisis (AC. 37 (6.5% ACs were recorded. An infection was found in 43.5% (n=249 of the CAH patient admissions and 51.7% (n=1613 of the non-AI group, p<0.001. Children aged up to one year had the highest number of admissions (n=149 and six ACs (four in males. There were 21 ACs recorded for children aged 1–5 years. Older CAH children had fewer admissions and fewer ACs. No in-hospital deaths were recorded. Conclusions. Admission for medical problems in CAH children declines with age. An AC was recorded in 6.5% of the admissions, with the majority of ACs occurring in the 1 to 5 years age group and there were no deaths.

  19. Wide Variability in Emergency Physician Admission Rates: A Target to Reduce Costs Without Compromising Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J. Guterman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Attending physician judgment is the traditional standard of care for emergency department (ED admission decisions. The extent to which variability in admission decisions affect cost and quality is not well understood. We sought to determine the impact of variability in admission decisions on cost and quality. Methods: We performed a retrospective observational study of patients presenting to a university-affiliated, urban ED from October 1, 2007, through September 30, 2008. The main outcome measures were admission rate, fiscal indicators (Medicaid-denied payment days, and quality indicators (15- and 30-day ED returns; delayed hospital admissions. We asked each Attending to estimate their inpatient admission rate and correlated their personal assessment with actual admission rates. Results: Admission rates, even after adjusting for known confounders, were highly variable (15.2%-32.0% and correlated with Medicaid denied-payment day rates (p=0.038. There was no correlation with quality outcome measures (30-day ED return or delayed hospital admission. There was no significant correlation between actual and self-described admission rate; the range of mis-estimation was 0% to 117%. Conclusion: Emergency medicine attending admission rates at this institution are highly variable, unexplained by known confounding variables, and unrelated to quality of care, as measured by 30-day ED return or delayed hospital admission. Admission optimization represents an important untapped potential for cost reduction through avoidable hospitalizations, with no apparent adverse effects on quality.

  20. Low rate of obesity among psychiatric inpatients in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthoenis, M; Aichberger, Marion; Puteh, Ibrahim; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam

    2014-01-01

    A vast majority of psychiatric medication causes weight gain, however the rate of obesity in psychiatric patients has yet to be thoroughly studied in Indonesia. The present study aims to assess the prevalence of obesity among psychiatric inpatients in Indonesia. This cross sectional study was conducted in Banda Aceh Psychiatric Hospital, Indonesia from December 2012 to January 2013. The Body Mass Index (BMI) and blood pressure of a total 242 inpatients was measured, and data on their demographic information and medication were collected from the patient's chart. The prevalence rate of obesity among psychiatric inpatients was 5% (95% CI = 2.6-8.5%), and overweight was 8% (95% CI = 5.1-12.4). The mean BMI was 21.44 kg/m² (SD: 3.43). Stage I hypertension and stage II hypertension was found among 7% (95% CI = 4.1-11), and 2% (95% CI = 0.9-5.3%) inpatients, respectively. The findings suggest that the rate of overweight, obesity and hypertension in the present study population was relatively low compared to rates of the general population. The inpatients have limited access to food and only eat meals that are provided to them by the hospital.

  1. Low hospital admission rates for respiratory diseases in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.J.M. Uijen (Hans); F.G. Schellevis (François); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick); S.P. Willemsen (Sten); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract BACKGROUND: Population-based data on hospital admissions for children aged 0-17 years concerning all respiratory diseases are scarce. This study examined hospital admissions in relation to the preceding consultations in general practice in this age group. METHODS: Data on

  2. Low hospital admission rates for respiratory diseases in children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, J.H.J.M.; Schellevis, F.G.; Bindels, P.J.E.; Willemsen, S.P.; Wouden, J.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Population-based data on hospital admissions for children aged 0-17 years concerning all respiratory diseases are scarce. This study examined hospital admissions in relation to the preceding consultations in general practice in this age group. METHODS: Data on children aged 0-17 years

  3. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lay, Barbara; Salize, Hans Joachim; Dressing, Harald; Rüsch, Nicolas; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bühlmann, Monika; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Korinth, Lena; Rössler, Wulf

    2012-01-01

    .... In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve...

  4. Family caregivers' experiences of involuntary psychiatric hospital admissions of their relatives--a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Jelena; Yeeles, Ksenija; Katsakou, Christina; Amos, Tim; Morriss, Richard; Rose, Diana; Nichol, Peter; McCabe, Rosemarie; Priebe, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Family caregivers of people with mental disorders are frequently involved in involuntary hospital admissions of their relatives. To explore family caregivers' experience of involuntary admission of their relative. 30 in-depth interviews were conducted with family caregivers of 29 patients who had been involuntarily admitted to 12 hospitals across England. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Four major themes of experiences were identified: relief and conflicting emotions in response to the relative's admission; frustration with a delay in getting help; being given the burden of care by services; and difficulties with confidentiality. Relief was a predominant emotion as a response to the relative's admission and it was accompanied by feelings of guilt and worry. Family caregivers frequently experienced difficulties in obtaining help from services prior to involuntary admission and some thought that services responded to crises rather than prevented them. Family caregivers experienced increased burden when services shifted the responsibility of caring for their mentally unwell relatives to them. Confidentiality was a delicate issue with family caregivers wanting more information and a say in decisions when they were responsible for aftercare, and being concerned about confidentiality of information they provided to services. Compulsory admission of a close relative can be a complex and stressful experience for family caregivers. In order for caregivers to be effective partners in care, a balance needs to be struck between valuing their involvement in providing care for a patient and not overburdening them.

  5. Family caregivers' experiences of involuntary psychiatric hospital admissions of their relatives--a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Jankovic

    Full Text Available Family caregivers of people with mental disorders are frequently involved in involuntary hospital admissions of their relatives.To explore family caregivers' experience of involuntary admission of their relative.30 in-depth interviews were conducted with family caregivers of 29 patients who had been involuntarily admitted to 12 hospitals across England. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis.Four major themes of experiences were identified: relief and conflicting emotions in response to the relative's admission; frustration with a delay in getting help; being given the burden of care by services; and difficulties with confidentiality. Relief was a predominant emotion as a response to the relative's admission and it was accompanied by feelings of guilt and worry. Family caregivers frequently experienced difficulties in obtaining help from services prior to involuntary admission and some thought that services responded to crises rather than prevented them. Family caregivers experienced increased burden when services shifted the responsibility of caring for their mentally unwell relatives to them. Confidentiality was a delicate issue with family caregivers wanting more information and a say in decisions when they were responsible for aftercare, and being concerned about confidentiality of information they provided to services.Compulsory admission of a close relative can be a complex and stressful experience for family caregivers. In order for caregivers to be effective partners in care, a balance needs to be struck between valuing their involvement in providing care for a patient and not overburdening them.

  6. Does psychopathology at admission predict the length of inpatient stay in psychiatry? Implications for financing psychiatric services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herwig Uwe

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The debate on appropriate financing systems in inpatient psychiatry is ongoing. In this context, it is important to control resource use in terms of length of stay (LOS, which is the most costly factor in inpatient care and the one that can be influenced most easily. Previous studies have shown that psychiatric diagnoses provide only limited justification for explaining variation in LOS, and it has been suggested that measures such as psychopathology might be more appropriate to predict resource use. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between LOS and psychopathological syndromes or symptoms at admission as well as other characteristics such as sociodemographic and clinical variables. Methods We considered routine medical data of patients admitted to the Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich in the years 2008 and 2009. Complete data on psychopathology at hospital admission were available in 3,220 inpatient episodes. A subsample of 2,939 inpatient episodes was considered in final statistical models, including psychopathology as well as complete datasets of further measures (e.g. sociodemographic, clinical, treatment-related and psychosocial variables. We used multivariate linear as well as logistic regression analysis with forward selection procedure to determine the predictors of LOS. Results All but two syndrome scores (mania, hostility were positively related to the length of stay. Final statistical models showed that syndromes or symptoms explained about 5% of the variation in length of stay. The inclusion of syndromes or symptoms as well as basic treatment variables and other factors led to an explained variation of up to 25%. Conclusions Psychopathological syndromes and symptoms at admission and further characteristics only explained a small proportion of the length of inpatient stay. Thus, according to our sample, psychopathology might not be suitable as a primary indicator for estimating LOS and contingent

  7. Psychiatric symptoms and disorders in HIV infected mine workers in South Africa. A retrospective descriptive study of acute first admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säll, L; Salamon, E; Allgulander, C; Owe-Larsson, B

    2009-08-01

    The social and living conditions of mine workers in South Africa contribute to a rapid transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted infections. HIV-associated dementia is a serious condition during HIV disease. Several other psychiatric symptoms and disorders, such as psychosis, secondary mania and depression, have also been associated with clinical HIV infection. We describe the onset of psychiatric symptoms and signs in a group of untreated, HIV infected male mine workers first admitted for psychiatric treatment at the Rand Mutual Hospital in Johannesburg. Between 1987 and 1997, 38 consecutive cases were admitted, and their files were retrieved for study in 2006. The subjects were 38 black male mine workers admitted acutely for psychiatric care due to psychiatric symptoms, and subsequently diagnosed with HIV infection. The presenting psychiatric symptoms on admission and diagnoses at discharge were compiled for all patients, not to infer causality but to establish the range of symptoms that the clinician has to deal with. The 38 patients presented with a wide range of psychiatric symptoms. The dominating symptoms were those of cognitive deficits, and different psychotic manifestations. 12 of the patients, almost one third of the individuals, were diagnosed with dementia. The patients with dementia exhibited cognitive deficits, and in addition often abnormal behaviour and psychotic symptoms, and several also had symptoms of secondary mania. 5 of the patients presented with delirium. Psychosis, without concurrent dementia, was diagnosed in 5 patients. Bipolar disorder with mania, without concurrent dementia, and major depression was present in 2 patients, respectively. Screening for substance abuse showed that 9 of the patients had ongoing cannabis abuse and 10 had alcohol abuse. Cannabis-induced psychotic disorder was present in 5 patients. The findings confirm that patients with a new diagnosis of HIV may present with

  8. Suicide Mortality of Suicide Attempt Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Admitted Suicide Attempt Patients, and Admitted Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae W.; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K.; Hong, Jin P.

    2012-01-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients…

  9. Inequalities in neighborhood child asthma admission rates and underlying community characteristics in one US county.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew F; Moncrief, Terri; Huang, Bin; Simmons, Jeffrey M; Sauers, Hadley; Chen, Chen; Kahn, Robert S

    2013-08-01

    To characterize variation and inequalities in neighborhood child asthma admission rates and to identify associated community factors within one US county. This population-based prospective, observational cohort study consisted of 862 sequential child asthma admissions among 167 653 eligible children ages 1-16 years in Hamilton County, Ohio. Admissions occurred at a tertiary-care pediatric hospital and accounted for nearly 95% of in-county asthma admissions. Neighborhood admission rates were assessed by geocoding addresses to city- and county-defined neighborhoods. The 2010 US Census provided denominator data. Neighborhood admission distribution inequality was assessed by the use of Gini and Robin Hood indices. Associations between neighborhood rates and socioeconomic and environmental factors were assessed using ANOVA and linear regression. The county admission rate was 5.1 per 1000 children. Neighborhood rates varied significantly by quintile: 17.6, 7.7, 4.9, 2.2, and 0.2 admissions per 1000 children (P Robin Hood index of 0.38 indicated significant inequality. Neighborhood-level educational attainment, car access, and population density best explained variation in neighborhood admission rates (R(2) = 0.55). In a single year, asthma admission rates varied 88-fold across neighborhood quintiles in one county; a reduction of the county-wide admission rate to that of the bottom quintile would decrease annual admissions from 862 to 34. A rate of zero was present in 15 neighborhoods, which is evidence of what may be attainable. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Numbers and patterns in compulsory admissions in 3 Dutch cities; problems in urban areas and regional differences in the implementation of the law on special admissions to psychiatric hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierdsma, A I; van Marle, P D; Mulder, C L

    2010-01-01

    In the Netherlands little research has been done on the regional variability in the implementation of the law on Special Admissions to Psychiatric Hospitals (Dutch acronym Bopz). To investigate regional variability in the numbers, combinations and characteristics of emergency compulsory admissions and other types of legally authorised admissions. Data from the Bopz information system covering a 12-month period were analysed. Missing data were supplied by the courts in Maastricht, Groningen and Rotterdam. There was regional variability in the way in which compulsory measures were implemented, particularly as far as emergency compulsory admissions were concerned. The relative number of Bopz measures increased in relation to the degree of urbanisation. Rotterdam had the highest percentage of emergency compulsory admissions. Patients in Maastricht and Rotterdam were more often involved in legally authorised admissions only. In Rotterdam an unlinked combination of emergency compulsory admissions and legally authorised admissions was more common. In Maastricht a larger number of patients were admitted because they were a danger to themselves, whereas in Groningen and Rotterdam admissions were also used as a means of safeguarding the public. The number of admissions and the diversity of Bopz measures are highest in urban areas. Regional variations in the way in which compulsory measures are applied persist, but there is room for improvement in the monitoring of the effects of these differences and the types of services that are available.

  11. Psychiatric rating scales in Urdu: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmer, Syed; Faruqui, Rafey A; Aijaz, Anita

    2007-10-26

    Researchers setting out to conduct research employing questionnaires in non-English speaking populations need instruments that have been validated in the indigenous languages. In this study we have tried to review the literature on the status of cross-cultural and/or criterion validity of all the questionnaires measuring psychiatric symptoms available in Urdu language. A search of Medline, Embase, PsycINFO and http://www.pakmedinet.com was conducted using the search terms; Urdu psychiatric rating scale, and Urdu and Psychiatry. References of retrieved articles were searched. Only studies describing either cross-cultural or criterion validation of a questionnaire in Urdu measuring psychiatric symptoms were included. Thirty two studies describing validation of 19 questionnaires were identified. Six of these questionnaires were developed indigenously in Urdu while thirteen had been translated from English. Of the six indigenous questionnaires five had had their criterion validity examined. Of the thirteen translated questionnaires only four had had both their cross-cultural and criterion validity assessed. There is a paucity of validated questionnaires assessing psychiatric symptoms in Urdu. The BSI, SRQ and AKUADS are the questionnaires that have been most thoroughly evaluated in Urdu.

  12. Psychiatric rating scales in Urdu: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruqui Rafey A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers setting out to conduct research employing questionnaires in non-English speaking populations need instruments that have been validated in the indigenous languages. In this study we have tried to review the literature on the status of cross-cultural and/or criterion validity of all the questionnaires measuring psychiatric symptoms available in Urdu language. Methods A search of Medline, Embase, PsycINFO and http://www.pakmedinet.com was conducted using the search terms; Urdu psychiatric rating scale, and Urdu and Psychiatry. References of retrieved articles were searched. Only studies describing either cross-cultural or criterion validation of a questionnaire in Urdu measuring psychiatric symptoms were included. Results Thirty two studies describing validation of 19 questionnaires were identified. Six of these questionnaires were developed indigenously in Urdu while thirteen had been translated from English. Of the six indigenous questionnaires five had had their criterion validity examined. Of the thirteen translated questionnaires only four had had both their cross-cultural and criterion validity assessed. Conclusion There is a paucity of validated questionnaires assessing psychiatric symptoms in Urdu. The BSI, SRQ and AKUADS are the questionnaires that have been most thoroughly evaluated in Urdu.

  13. Establishment of a local psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1981-01-01

    of senile psychoses. The total increase amounts to 2.4 times the admission rates of psychiatric cases to the General Hospital and 4.4 times the admission rates to the Psychiatric Hospital in Nykøbing in the last years prior to the start of the local service. The outpatient department has grown steadily...

  14. Evaluating Psychiatric Hospital Admission Decisions for Children in Foster Care: An Optimal Classification Tree Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Jessica A.; Leon, Scott C.; Bryant, Fred B.; Lyons, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored clinical and nonclinical predictors of inpatient hospital admission decisions across a sample of children in foster care over 4 years (N = 13,245). Forty-eight percent of participants were female and the mean age was 13.4 (SD = 3.5 years). Optimal data analysis (Yarnold & Soltysik, 2005) was used to construct a nonlinear…

  15. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  16. Frequency of Djinnati Syndrome among Inpatient Admissions at Baharan Psychiatric Hospital in Zahedan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Ghasemi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A culture-bound syndrome common in Baluchistan is Djinnati that is classified as trance and possession state, a sub-class of dissociative disorders NOS, in DSM IV-TR. The present study aims to determine the frequency of Djinnati syndrome among in-patients at Baharan psychiatric hospital in Zahedan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, the statistical community includes all patients (N=773 who were admitted in Baharan psychiatric hospital during a 6 months period. After considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 150 subjects (61 males and 89 females were selected. Semi-structural interview and Dissociative Experience Scale (DES questionnaire were performed for them. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, χ2, and t-tests were employed for analysis of data in SPSS-18. Results: Frequency of Djinnati syndrome among patients admitted in this referral psychiatric hospital was 4.1% and this syndrome showed a significant dominance in female sex (M/F=1/3. There was also a positive and significant correlation between child abuse and dissociative experiences including Djinnati. Conclusion: The study has shown that dissociative disorders NOS, in the form of trance and possession states (such as Djinnati, are not rare especially in the eastern parts of Iran and among poor and young women. It is important to define Djinnati syndrome in this region and prepare medical students and psychiatric residents for diagnosing and managing this condition. Its relationship with child abuse should be considered in preventive medicine.

  17. Increasing the admission rate to upper secondary school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoest, A.; Jensen, V.M.; Nielsen, L.P.

    2013-01-01

    the effects of a school intervention that introduces structured student career guidance in lower secondary school on upper secondary school admission. Disregarding the sunk-cost of implementation, the reform was cost-neutral. In a difference-in-difference framework, we find that the reform increases admission......Although several studies investigate the effects of school resources on student performance, these studies tend to focus more on intervention effect sizes than on their cost-effectiveness. Exploiting policy-induced variation in Denmark and using high-quality administrative data, we investigate...

  18. Discharged from a mental health admission ward: is it safe to go home? A review on the negative outcomes of psychiatric hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loch AA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alexandre Andrade LochLaboratory of Neurosciences, Department and Institute of Psychiatry, University of São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Before psychiatry emerged as a medical discipline, hospitalizing individuals with mental disorders was more of a social stigmatizing act than a therapeutic act. After the birth of the mental health disciplines, psychiatric hospitalization was legitimized and has proven to be indispensable, preventing suicides and helping individuals in need. However, despite more than a century passing since this legitimization occurred, psychiatric hospitalization remains a controversial issue. There is the question of possible negative outcomes after a psychiatric admission ceases to take its protective effect, and even of whether the psychiatric admission itself is related to a negative setback after discharge. This review aims to summarize some of the most important negative outcomes after discharge from a psychiatric institution. These experiences were organized into two groups: those after a brief psychiatric hospitalization, and those after a long-stay admission. The author further suggests possible ways to minimize these adversities, emphasizing the need of awareness related to this important issue.Keywords: suicide, stigma, rehabilitation, relapse, rehospitalisation

  19. The Factor Structure of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (Expanded Version) in a Sample of Forensic Psychiatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, J. van; Vuijk, P.J.; Harte, J.M.; Smit, B.L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Scherder, E.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Severe behavioral problems, aggression, unlawful behavior, and uncooperativeness make the forensic psychiatric population both hard to treat and study. To fine-tune treatment and evaluate results, valid measurement is vital. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale-Extended (BPRS-E) is a widely used scale

  20. The factor structure of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (Expanded version) in a sample of forensic psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, J.; Vuijk, P.J.; Harte, J.M.; Smit, B.L.; Nijman, H.; Scherder, E.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Severe behavioral problems, aggression, unlawful behavior, and uncooperativeness make the forensic psychiatric population both hard to treat and study. To fine-tune treatment and evaluate results, valid measurement is vital. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale-Extended (BPRS-E) is a widely used scale

  1. Interventions following a high violence risk assessment score: a naturalistic study on a Finnish psychiatric admission ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaunomäki, Jenni; Jokela, Markus; Kontio, Raija; Laiho, Tero; Sailas, Eila; Lindberg, Nina

    2017-01-11

    Patient aggression and violence against staff members and other patients are common concerns in psychiatric units. Many structured clinical risk assessment tools have recently been developed. Despite their superiority to unaided clinical judgments, staff has shown ambivalent views towards them. A constant worry of staff is that the results of risk assessments would not be used. The aims of the present study were to investigate what were the interventions applied by the staff of a psychiatric admission ward after a high risk patient had been identified, how frequently these interventions were used and how effective they were. The data were collected in a naturalistic setting during a 6-month period in a Finnish psychiatric admission ward with a total of 331 patients with a mean age of 42.9 years (SD 17.39) suffering mostly from mood, schizophrenia-related and substance use disorders. The total number of treatment days was 2399. The staff assessed the patients daily with the Dynamic Appraisal of Situational Aggression (DASA), which is a structured violence risk assessment considering the upcoming 24 h. The interventions in order to reduce the risk of violence following a high DASA total score (≥4) were collected from the patients' medical files. Inductive content analysis was used. There were a total of 64 patients with 217 observations of high DASA total score. In 91.2% of cases, at least one intervention aiming to reduce the violence risk was used. Pro re nata (PRN)-medication, seclusion and focused discussions with a nurse were the most frequently used interventions. Non-coercive and non-pharmacological interventions like daily activities associated significantly with the decrease of perceived risk of violence. In most cases, a high score in violence risk assessment led to interventions aiming to reduce the risk. Unfortunately, the most frequently used methods were psychopharmacological or coercive. It is hoped that the findings will encourage the staff to use

  2. Impact of primary care on hospital admission rates for diabetes patients: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, R.J.; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Wensing, M.

    2017-01-01

    High-quality primary care for diabetes patients may be related to lowered hospital admissions. A systematic search was performed to assess the impact of structure, process, and outcome of primary diabetes care on hospital admission rates, considering patient characteristics. Studies on diabetes

  3. Services Use of Children and Adolescents before Admission to Psychiatric Inpatient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmeister-Koss, Ingrid; Winkler, Roman; Fritz, Corinna; Thun-Hohenstein, Leonhard; Tuechler, Heinz

    2016-06-01

    Although 20% of children and adolescents in Europe suffer from overt mental health problems, their illness-related service utilisation is often unknown. If at all, existing research has only addressed the health care sector while services requirements in mental health care go far beyond the health care system, including the social, the educational and the criminal justice system. This paper aims at describing the service contact patterns of children and adolescents within and outside the health care sector before they are admitted to a child and adolescent mental health hospital. Additionally, we evaluate the private out-of-pocket payments that occur for primary carers. A cohort of consecutive admissions to a child and adolescent hospital in Austria was prospectively analysed. We collected data on service use and out-of-pocket expenses before hospital admission from primary carers through face-to-face interviews using an adapted version of the European Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Receipt Inventory (EU-CAMHSRI). Clinical data came from validated questionnaires (CBCL, YSR) and from the anamnestic documentation. Ninety percent from a cohort of 441 patients had some contact with services or took medication before they were admitted to hospital. Most often, services in the health care outpatient setting were used. Outside of the health care system, support in school, as well as counselling services, were used most frequently, whereas the persons hardly sought support in living or employment. Roughly 32,400 per 100 patients was spent privately, yet these out-of pocket expenses were very unevenly distributed. Service use and out-of-pocket spending increased with social status and were gender-specific. The more severe external behaviour symptoms were, the more non-health care services were used. Mentally ill children and adolescents use a broad range of services across sectors before admission to hospital. Service use is associated with specific symptoms of

  4. Assessing the diagnostic validity of a structured psychiatric interview in a first-admission hospital sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, Julie; Revsbech, Rasmus; Sæbye, Ditte

    2012-01-01

    The use of structured psychiatric interviews performed by non-clinicians is frequent for research purposes and is becoming increasingly common in clini-cal practice. The validity of such interviews has rarely been evaluated empirically. In this study of a sample of 100 diagnostically heterogeneous......, first-admitted inpatients, the results of an assessment with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), yielding a DSM-IV diagnosis and performed by a trained non-clinician, were compared with a consensus lifetime best diagnostic estimate (DSM-IV) by two experienced research clinicians, based...... performed by non-clinicians are not recommendable for clinical work and should only be used in research with certain precautions. It is suggested that a revival of systematic theoretical and practical training in psychopathology is an obvious way forward in order to improve the validity and therapeutic...

  5. Tensions between policy and practice: A qualitative analysis of decisions regarding compulsory admission to psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fistein, Elizabeth C; Clare, Isabel C H; Redley, Marcus; Holland, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    The use of detention for psychiatric treatment is widespread and sometimes necessary. International human rights law requires a legal framework to safeguard the rights to liberty and personal integrity by preventing arbitrary detention. However, research suggests that extra-legal factors may influence decisions to detain. This article presents observational and interview data to describe how decisions to detain are made in practice in one jurisdiction (England and Wales) where a tension between policy and practice has been described. The analysis shows that practitioners mould the law into 'practical criteria' that appear to form a set of operational criteria for identifying cases to which the principle of soft paternalism may be applied. Most practitioners also appear willing, albeit often reluctantly, to depart from their usual reliance on the principle of soft paternalism and authorise detention of people with the capacity to refuse treatment, in order to prevent serious harm. We propose a potential resolution for the tension between policy and practice: two separate legal frameworks to authorise detention, one with a suitable test of capacity, used to enact soft paternalism, and the other to provide legal justification for detention for psychiatric treatment of the small number of people who retain decision-making capacity but nonetheless choose to place others at risk by refusing treatment. This separation of detention powers into two systems, according to the principle that justifies the use of detention would be intellectually coherent, consistent with human rights instruments and, being consistent with the apparent moral sentiments of practitioners, less prone to idiosyncratic interpretations in practice. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Systematic Review of Interventions to Reduce Psychiatric Morbidity in Parents and Children After PICU Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Samantha C; Gledhill, Julia A

    2017-04-01

    To describe and evaluate interventions aimed at reducing psychiatric morbidity in parents and children discharged from PICU. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken, searching EMBASE, PSYCHinfo, MEDLINE, and CINAHL. Experts in the field were contacted to identify unpublished studies. Exclusion criteria: Studies with participants above age 18 or drawn from a neonatal ICU, studies not in English, and those not measuring psychopathology. Seven hundred fifty-three articles initially identified were hand searched which identified three studies, with a further three studies found by contacting experts in the field. Of these, three were randomized controlled trials and three feasibility studies. The interventions primarily targeted parents (particularly mothers), with the aim of reducing psychopathology especially posttraumatic stress disorder. Findings from these few studies demonstrated that interventions can lead to a reduction in parent and child psychopathology. Key ingredients of these interventions included psychoeducation, parent support after discharge, offering intervention to those families at high risk of developing psychopathology as identified by screening at the point of discharge, follow-up of all families with the aim of case finding, and specific interventions to target posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Intervention studies are few but do lead to reductions in parent and child psychopathology. There is sufficient information to suggest some of these interventions could be supported and further evaluated.

  7. Psychiatric admission and readmission in a general hospital of Porto Alegre: sociodemographic, clinic, and use of Network for Psychosocial Care characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardo, Gabriela Lemos de Pinho; Silveira, Luísa Horn de Castro; Rocha, Cristianne Maria Famer; Rocha, Kátia Bones

    2017-01-01

    The revolving door phenomenon is characterized by repeated and frequent psychiatric readmissions. We aim to investigate sociodemographic, clinic, and follow-up characteristics in health services associated to psychiatric admissions and readmissions of inpatients in a general hospital of Porto Alegre. It is a cross-sectional study with a sample of 96 participants. More than half of the sample (53.1%) were female, 51% were single, and the average age was 44.3 years old. From clinic data, 36% (n = 35) of the users were in their first admission, and 36% (n = 35) met the criteria for frequent readmission. The results show that users with frequent readmissions significantly mentioned fewer people on whom they could rely. Alternatively, users in first admission lived with a significant larger number of people than the rest of the sample and had, with less frequency, bond with health services other than hospitals, using hospitals as an entrance door to mental health care. Regarding follow-up in the network, 34.4% of the sample did not visit often NPC services before admission, and only 4.1% used psychosocial rehabilitation services. We highlight the importance of hospitals as an articulation point in the network, and as strategic to connect with NPC services. In spite of international literature investigation and registration of the frequent psychiatric readmission phenomenon, we notice it is a field that needs greater investigation in Brazil.

  8. The impact of emergency department observation units on United States emergency department admission rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capp, Roberta; Sun, Benjamin; Boatright, Dowin; Gross, Cary

    2015-11-01

    Prior studies suggesting that the presence of emergency department (ED) observation units decrease overall ED hospital admissions have been either single-center studies or based on model simulations. The objective of this preliminary national study is to determine if the presence of ED observation units is associated with hospitals having lower ED admission rates. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional analysis using the 2010 National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey and estimated ED risk-standardized hospital admission rates (RSHAR) for each center. The following were excluded from the study: ages unit status were also excluded. We used linear regression analysis to determine the association between ED RSHAR and presence of observation units. There were 24,232 ED visits in 315 hospitals in the United States. Of these, 82 (20.6%) hospitals had an ED observation unit. The average ED risk-standardized hospital admission rates for hospitals with observation units and without hospital observation units were 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.3-16.0) and 16.0% (95% CI: 14.1-17.7), respectively. The difference of 2.3% was not statistically significant. In this preliminary study, we did not find an association between the presence of observation units and ED hospital admission rates. Further studies with larger sample sizes should be performed to further evaluate the impact of ED observation units on ED hospital admission rates. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  9. Deprivation index and dependency ratio are key determinants of emergency medical admission rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Richard; Byrne, Declan; O'Riordan, Deirdre; Cournane, Seán; Coveney, Seamus; Silke, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Patients from deprived backgrounds have a higher in-patient mortality following an emergency medical admission; there has been debate as to the extent to which deprivation and population structure influences hospital admission rate. All emergency medical admissions to an Irish hospital over a 12-year period (2002-2013) categorized by quintile of Deprivation Index and Dependency Ratio (proportion of population Dependency Ratio was an independent predictor of the admission rate with adjusted predicted rates of Q1 20.8 (95%CI 20.5 to 21.1), Q2 19.2 (95%CI 19.0 to 19.4), Q3 27.6 (95%CI 27.3 to 27.9), Q4 43.9 (95%CI 43.5 to 44.4) and Q5 34.4 (95%CI 34.1 to 34.7). A high concurrent Deprivation Index and Dependency Ratio were associated with very high admission rates. Deprivation Index and population Dependency Ratio are key determinants of the rate of emergency medical admissions. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reducing the rate and duration of Re- ADMISsions among patients with unipolar disorder and bipolar disorder using smartphone-based monitoring and treatment - the RADMIS trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Frost, Mads; Martiny, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Background: Unipolar and bipolar disorder combined account for nearly half of all morbidity and mortality due to mental and substance use disorders, and burden society with the highest health care costs of all psychiatric and neurological disorders. Among these, costs due to psychiatric...... trials aim to investigate whether using a smartphone-based monitoring and treatment system, including an integrated clinical feedback loop, reduces the rate and duration of re-admissions more than standard treatment in unipolar disorder and bipolar disorder. Methods: The RADMIS trials use a randomized...... controlled, single-blind, parallel-group design. Patients with unipolar disorder and patients with bipolar disorder are invited to participate in each trial when discharged from psychiatric hospitals in The Capital Region of Denmark following an affective episode and randomized to either (1...

  11. Seasonal Admission Rates of Geriatric Patients with Musculoskeletal Problems to Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Zubeyir; Yurdalan, Saadet Ufuk; Polat, Mine Gulden; Ozgul, Bahar; Kanberoglu, Ayfer; Onel, Selma

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal variations in the admission rates of geriatric patients with musculoskeletal problems to physical therapy and rehabilitation clinics were examined in this study. Totally 2257 patients (1802, 79.84% female; 455, 20.16% male) over the age of 65 years (mean age 72.32±5.67years) who were admitted to Duygu Private Hospital and Burcu Private Physical Therapy Branch Center in Istanbul were included. Monthly admissions and seasonal distribution were retrospectively calculated for 2 years. Ad...

  12. Growth Rate Lags Again in Graduate Schools' International Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The number of foreign students admitted to graduate schools at American colleges and universities grew in 2008 for the fourth straight year, but the rate of increase over the previous year declined for the third consecutive year, according to survey results released by the Council of Graduate Schools. Based on previous years' data, this year's…

  13. Impact of universal health coverage on urban-rural inequity in psychiatric service utilisation for patients with first admission for psychosis: a 10-year nationwide population-based study in Taiwan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chiang, Chih-Lin; Chen, Pei-Chun; Huang, Ling-Ya; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Tung, Yu-Chi; Liu, Chen-Chung; Chen, Wei J

    2016-01-01

    To examine the disparities in psychiatric service utilisation over a 10-year period for patients with first admission for psychosis in relation to urban-rural residence following the implementation...

  14. Relationship of medical students' admission interview scores to their dean's letter ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F R; Regan-Smith, M; Tivnan, T

    1992-12-01

    The authors examined the relationship between the admission interview scores for 62 students in the 1986 entering class at Dartmouth Medical School and the students' dean's letter ratings given four years later; they found the relationship to be significant (V = .372, p = .014) and the interview scores to be better independent predictors of the ratings than were total Medical College Admission Test scores or science grade-point averages. Among the 17 students receiving "strong" admission interview scores, 53% received dean's letter ratings in the top one-third and 47% received ratings in the lower two-thirds. Of those 34 who received "medium" interview scores, 68% received ratings in the lower two-thirds; all 11 students who received "weak" interview scores received ratings in the lower two-thirds. The authors suggest (1) that admission interview scores help schools to identify more clearly those applicants most likely to become strong, competitive performers in residency and (2) that the significant relationship between interview scores and dean's letter ratings indicates a need to discover what qualities the interview actually measures and to consider the methods by which interviewers are trained, rather than to forsake the interview.

  15. Necessity of admission to improve the hearing-recovery rate in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jae; Heo, Kyung Wook; Jeon, Pil Hyun; Lee, Jae Jun; Lee, Jun Ho

    2017-11-13

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic potential of admission of a patient for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). Retrospective clinical study. We conducted a retrospective study of 301 patients with ISSNHL. The patients were divided into a study (57 patients at out-patients department (OPD) based treatment, using systemic steroids and intra-tympanic (IT) steroid injection) and a control groups (301 patients at admission, using systemic steroids and IT steroid injection). We compared the success rate (15 dB cut off), Siegel's criteria and hearing gain decibels between two groups. The overall recovery rate of the OPD based treatment group (29.8%) was poor than that of the admission group (52.9%) (p = .002). The odd ratio of OPD based treatment factor was 2.035 when the OPD based treatment and poor prognostic factors were analyzed at logistic regression test (Duration of delayed treatment, 1.073; average hearing loss level, 0.972) (p = .041). Admission must be strongly recommended when the patients with ISSNHL asked about the necessity of admission. We hypothesized that resting, getting out of their social stress, and relief of anxiety might be helpful to their hearing recoveries.

  16. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care: Perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning after 12 months of preventive monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eLay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate effects of a preventive monitoring program targeted to reduce compulsory re-hospitalization and perceived coercion in patients with severe mental disorder. We analyze patient outcomes in terms of perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning at 12 months. Methods: The program consists of individualized psycho-education, crisis cards and, after discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a 24-month preventive monitoring. In total, 238 psychiatric inpatients who had had compulsory admission(s during the past 24 months were included in the trial. T1-assessment 12 months after baseline was achieved for 182 patients. Results: Study participants reported lower levels of perceived coercion, negative pressures and process exclusion, a higher level of optimism, and a lesser degree of distress due to symptoms, interpersonal relations and social role functioning (significant time effects. However, improvements were not confined to the intervention group, but seen also in the TAU group (no significant group or interaction effects. Altered perceptions were linked to older age, shorter illness duration, female sex, non-psychotic disorder, and compulsory hospitalization not due to risk of harm to others. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that changes in the subjective perspective were fuelled primarily by participation in this study, rather than by having received the specific intervention. The study contributes to a better understanding of the interaction between 'objective' measures (compulsory readmissions and patients’ perceptions and highlights the need for treatment approaches promoting empowerment in individuals with a history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations.

  17. Preventing Compulsory Admission to Psychiatric Inpatient Care: Perceived Coercion, Empowerment, and Self-Reported Mental Health Functioning after 12 Months of Preventive Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Barbara; Drack, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a preventive monitoring program targeted to reduce compulsory rehospitalization and perceived coercion in patients with severe mental disorder. We analyze patient outcomes in terms of perceived coercion, empowerment, and self-reported mental health functioning at 12 months. The program consists of individualized psychoeducation, crisis cards and, after discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a 24-month preventive monitoring. In total, 238 psychiatric inpatients who had had compulsory admission(s) during the past 24 months were included in the trial. T1-assessment 12 months after baseline was achieved for 182 patients. Study participants reported lower levels of perceived coercion, negative pressures, and process exclusion, a higher level of optimism, and a lesser degree of distress due to symptoms, interpersonal relations, and social role functioning (significant time effects). However, improvements were not confined to the intervention group, but seen also in the treatment-as-usual group (no significant group or interaction effects). Altered perceptions were linked to older age, shorter illness duration, female sex, non-psychotic disorder, and compulsory hospitalization not due to risk of harm to others. Our findings suggest that changes in the subjective perspective were fueled primarily by participation in this study rather than by having received the specific intervention. The study contributes to a better understanding of the interaction between "objective" measures (compulsory readmissions) and patients' perceptions and highlights the need for treatment approaches promoting empowerment in individuals with a history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations.

  18. Childhood malaria admission rates to four hospitals in Malawi between 2000 and 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emelda A Okiro

    Full Text Available The last few years have witnessed rapid scaling-up of key malaria interventions in several African countries following increases in development assistance. However, there is only limited country-specific information on the health impact of expanded coverage of these interventions.Paediatric admission data were assembled from 4 hospitals in Malawi reflecting different malaria ecologies. Trends in monthly clinical malaria admissions between January 2000 and December 2010 were analysed using time-series models controlling for covariates related to climate and service use to establish whether changes in admissions can be related to expanded coverage of interventions aimed at reducing malaria infection.In 3 of 4 sites there was an increase in clinical malaria admission rates. Results from time series models indicate a significant month-to-month increase in the mean clinical malaria admission rates at two hospitals (trend P<0.05. At these hospitals clinical malaria admissions had increased from 2000 by 41% to 100%. Comparison of changes in malaria risk and ITN coverage appear to correspond to a lack of disease declines over the period. Changes in intervention coverage within hospital catchments showed minimal increases in ITN coverage from <6% across all sites in 2000 to maximum of 33% at one hospital site by 2010. Additionally, malaria transmission intensity remained unchanged between 2000-2010 across all sites.Despite modest increases in coverage of measures to reduce infection there has been minimal changes in paediatric clinical malaria cases in four hospitals in Malawi. Studies across Africa are increasingly showing a mixed set of impact results and it is important to assemble more data from more sites to understand the wider implications of malaria funding investment. We also caution that impact surveillance should continue in areas where intervention coverage is increasing with time, for example Malawi, as decline may become evident within a

  19. Childhood Malaria Admission Rates to Four Hospitals in Malawi between 2000 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiro, Emelda A.; Kazembe, Lawrence N.; Kabaria, Caroline W.; Ligomeka, Jeffrey; Noor, Abdisalan M.; Ali, Doreen; Snow, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The last few years have witnessed rapid scaling-up of key malaria interventions in several African countries following increases in development assistance. However, there is only limited country-specific information on the health impact of expanded coverage of these interventions. Methods Paediatric admission data were assembled from 4 hospitals in Malawi reflecting different malaria ecologies. Trends in monthly clinical malaria admissions between January 2000 and December 2010 were analysed using time-series models controlling for covariates related to climate and service use to establish whether changes in admissions can be related to expanded coverage of interventions aimed at reducing malaria infection. Results In 3 of 4 sites there was an increase in clinical malaria admission rates. Results from time series models indicate a significant month-to-month increase in the mean clinical malaria admission rates at two hospitals (trend Pmalaria admissions had increased from 2000 by 41% to 100%. Comparison of changes in malaria risk and ITN coverage appear to correspond to a lack of disease declines over the period. Changes in intervention coverage within hospital catchments showed minimal increases in ITN coverage from malaria transmission intensity remained unchanged between 2000–2010 across all sites. Discussion Despite modest increases in coverage of measures to reduce infection there has been minimal changes in paediatric clinical malaria cases in four hospitals in Malawi. Studies across Africa are increasingly showing a mixed set of impact results and it is important to assemble more data from more sites to understand the wider implications of malaria funding investment. We also caution that impact surveillance should continue in areas where intervention coverage is increasing with time, for example Malawi, as decline may become evident within a period when coverage reaches optimal levels. PMID:23638008

  20. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder: rate of referral for neurorehabilitation and psychiatric co-morbidity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Herlihy, D

    2012-04-01

    Despite advances in antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected patients continue to present with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) which may be associated with significant psychiatric co-morbidity. We audited our patients with HAND referred for psychiatric assessment against the National Service Framework guidelines that they should receive neurorehabilitation. We found that despite these patients posing a risk to themselves and others due to poor insight and medication adherence, high rates of psychiatric co-morbidity and severely challenging behaviour, few were referred for neurorehabilitation. We recommend that clear referral pathways for psychiatric intervention and neurorehabilitation are established in HIV treatment centres.

  1. Stable admission rate for acute asthma in Danish children since 1977

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevelsted, Astrid; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Bisgaard, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is consistently reported to have increased in recent decades in most westernized countries, but it is unknown if this increase is similar across severities. We aimed to study the time-trend of acute hospital admission and readmission for asthma of school-aged children in the recent...... 35 years in Denmark. We analyzed time-trends in the national incidence rate of hospitalization for acute severe asthma in children aged 5-15 in Denmark during the 35-year period 1977-2012 in the Danish national registry. Only in-patient admissions with a principal diagnosis of asthma (ICD-8: 493...... per thousand children at risk and a per-year incidence rate ratio 0.999 [95 % CI 0.997-1.001]. The rate of any readmission decreased from approximately 20 per thousand children in the eighties to less than 10 in the early nineties before stabilizing at around 10 per thousand children from mid...

  2. Mental disorders in early adulthood and later psychiatric hospital admissions in relation to mortality in a cohort study of a million men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Catharine R; Batty, G David; Osborn, David P J; Tynelius, Per; Whitley, Elise; Rasmussen, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Context Mental disorders have been associated with increased mortality, but the evidence is primarily based on hospital admissions for psychoses. The underlying mechanisms are unclear. Objective To investigate whether the risks of death associated with mental disorders diagnosed in young men are similar to those associated with admission for these disorders, and to examine the role of confounding or mediating factors. Design Prospective cohort study in which mental disorders were assessed by psychiatric interview during a medical examination on conscription for military service at a mean age of 18.3 years and data on psychiatric hospital admissions and mortality during a mean 22.6 years of follow-up were obtained from national registers. Setting Sweden. Participants 1,095,338 men conscripted between 1969 and 1994. Main outcome measure All-cause mortality according to diagnoses of schizophrenia, other non-affective psychoses, bipolar or depressive disorders, neurotic/adjustment disorders, personality disorders, alcohol-related or other substance use disorders at conscription and on hospital admission. Results Diagnosis of mental disorder at conscription or on hospital admission was associated with increased mortality. Age-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) according to diagnoses at conscription ranged from 1.81 (1.54, 2.10) (depressive disorders) to 5.55 (1.79, 17.2) (bipolar disorders). The equivalent figures according to hospital diagnoses ranged from 5.46 (5.06, 5.89) (neurotic/adjustment disorders) to 11.2 (10.4, 12.0) (other substance use disorders) in men born 1951-8 and increased in men born later. Adjustment for early-life socioeconomic status, body mass index and blood pressure had little effect on these associations, but they were partially attenuated by adjustment for smoking, alcohol intake, intelligence, education and late-life socioeconomic position. These associations were not primarily due to deaths from suicide. Conclusions The

  3. Al Ain Community Survey of Psychiatric Morbidity III. The natural history of psychopathology and the utilization rate of psychiatric services in Al Ain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daradkeh, T K; Ghubash, R; Abou-Saleh, M T

    2000-12-01

    We evaluated the natural history of psychopathology in a stratified sample (n = 245) comprising subjects with no DSM-III-R psychiatric disorder, subthreshold disorder and threshold (DSM-III-R) psychiatric disorder, respectively, over a 12-months period, using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R mental disorders (SCID) as an assessment tool. A representative sample categorized 1 year earlier into DSM-III-R psychiatric disorder, subthreshold disorder and no DSM-III-R psychiatric disorder were reassessed with SCID 1 year on. The incidence, recovery rates and the percentage of subthreshold disorders which become DSM-III-R disorders were calculated. The utilization rate of psychiatric services was also assessed. The incidence rate of new cases was 10.4%. The recovery (remission) rate was 41.5%, and approximately 20% of subthreshold disorders became definitive disorders (DSM-III-R) after 1 year. Anxiety disorders tend to have a higher magnitude of temporal stability in comparison with depressive disorders. Male sex and contact with psychiatric services were found to affect the recovery rate. Approximately 13% of the sample had made contact with psychiatric services with no gender differences, but men were significantly more often hospitalized than women. Our findings indicate that mental disorders are relatively common. The high incidence rate found in this study is attributed in part to the high negative rate at baseline assessment. Approximately 60% of psychiatric disorders in the community are persistent, and patients with emotional disorder under-utilize existing services.

  4. Inpatient Psychiatric Admission Rates in a U.S. Air Force Basic Military Training Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-20

    entity or an entity seeking to do business with the government, then your presentation should have an ethics review. If your travel is being paid...the date (month, day and year) along with the location of your presentation. It is important to update this information so that we can provide quality...request form to clinical investigations. S02 ISG/JAC ( Ethics Review) and Public Affa irs {S9 MOW/PA) for review and then forward you a final letter of

  5. Mortality, Rehospitalisation and Violent Crime in Forensic Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Hospital: Rates and Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seena Fazel

    Full Text Available To determine rates and risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services.We conducted a historical cohort study of all 6,520 psychiatric patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1973 and 2009 in Sweden. We calculated hazard ratios for mortality, rehospitalisation, and violent crime using Cox regression to investigate the effect of different psychiatric diagnoses and two comorbidities (personality or substance use disorder on outcomes.Over mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 30% of patients died (n = 1,949 after discharge with an average age at death of 52 years. Over two-thirds were rehospitalised (n = 4,472, 69%, and 40% violently offended after discharge (n = 2,613 with a mean time to violent crime of 4.2 years. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and outcome varied-substance use disorder as a primary diagnosis was associated with highest risk of mortality and rehospitalisation, and personality disorder was linked with the highest risk of violent offending. Furthermore comorbid substance use disorder typically increased risk of adverse outcomes.Violent offending, premature mortality and rehospitalisation are prevalent in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals. Individualised treatment plans for such patients should take into account primary and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses.

  6. Associations of Physician Empathy with Patient Anxiety and Ratings of Communication in Hospital Admission Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Rachel; Vittinghoff, Eric; Fang, Margaret C; Cimino, Jenica E W; Chasteen, Kristen Adams; Arnold, Robert M; Auerbach, Andrew D; Anderson, Wendy G

    2017-10-01

    To assess the association between the frequency of empathic physician responses with patient anxiety, ratings of communication, and encounter length during hospital admission encounters. Analysis of coded audio-recorded hospital admission encounters and pre- and postencounter patient survey data. Two academic hospitals. Seventy-six patients admitted by 27 attending hospitalist physicians. Recordings were transcribed and analyzed by trained coders, who counted the number of empathic, neutral, and nonempathic verbal responses by hospitalists to their patients' expressions of negative emotion. We developed multivariable linear regression models to test the association between the number of these responses and the change in patients' State Anxiety Scale (STAI-S) score pre- and postencounter and encounter length. We used Poisson regression models to examine the association between empathic response frequency and patient ratings of the encounter. Each additional empathic response from a physician was associated with a 1.65-point decline in the STAI-S anxiety scale (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48-2.82). Frequency of empathic responses was associated with improved patient ratings for covering points of interest, feeling listened to and cared about, and trusting the doctor. The number of empathic responses was not associated with encounter length (percent change in encounter length per response 1%; 95% CI, -8%-10%). Responding empathically when patients express negative emotion was associated with less patient anxiety and higher ratings of communication but not longer encounter length.

  7. Secular Trends in Admissions and Mortality Rates from Diabetes Mellitus in the Central Belt of Ghana: A 31-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfo-Kantanka, Osei; Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Oparebea Ansah, Eunice; Eghan, Benjamin; Ayisi-Boateng, Nana Kwame; Acheamfour-Akowuah, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is currently a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa where a significant proportion of diabetes cases are now found. Longitudinal profiling of in-patient admissions and mortality trends from diabetes provide useful insights into the magnitude of the burden of diabetes, serve as a sentinel on the state of out-patient diabetes care and provide effective tools for planning, delivering and evaluating the health care needs relating to the disease in sub-Saharan Africa. To evaluate the 31-year trend in diabetic admissions and mortality rates in central Ghana. This is a retrospective analysis of data on diabetes admissions and deaths at a tertiary referral hospital in central Ghana between 1983 and 2014. Rates of diabetes admissions or deaths were expressed as diabetes admissions or deaths divided by the total number of admissions or deaths respectively. Yearly crude fatality rates for diabetes were calculated. Trends were analysed for in patient diabetes admissions and mortality for the period. Predictors of diabetes mortality were determined using multiple logistic regression. A total of 11,414 diabetes patients were admitted over the period with a female predominance; female:male ratio of 1.3:1.0. Over the study period, diabetes admission rates increased significantly from 2.36 per 1000 admissions in 1983 to 14.94 per 1000 admissions in 2014 (plinear trend), representing a 633% rise over the 31-year period. In-patient diabetes fatality rates increased from 7.6 per 1000 deaths in 1983 to 30 per 1000 deaths in 2012. The average 28-day mortality rate was 18.5%. The median age of patients increased significantly over the period. So was the proportion of females admitted over the years. Predictors of in-patient mortality were increasing age- aOR of 1.23 (CI: 1.15-1.32) for age > 80 years compared with diabetic admissions and admissions without end organ complications respectively. Diabetes

  8. Associations between Familial Rates of Psychiatric Disorders and De Novo Genetic Mutations in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyleen Luhrs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the confluence of genetic and familial risk factors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD with distinct de novo genetic events. We hypothesized that gene-disrupting mutations would be associated with reduced rates of familial psychiatric disorders relative to structural mutations. Participants included families of children with ASD in four groups: de novo duplication copy number variations (DUP, n=62, de novo deletion copy number variations (DEL, n=74, de novo likely gene-disrupting mutations (LGDM, n=267, and children without a known genetic etiology (NON, n=2111. Familial rates of psychiatric disorders were calculated from semistructured interviews. Results indicated overall increased rates of psychiatric disorders in DUP families compared to DEL and LGDM families, specific to paternal psychiatric histories, and particularly evident for depressive disorders. Higher rates of depressive disorders in maternal psychiatric histories were observed overall compared to paternal histories and higher rates of anxiety disorders were observed in paternal histories for LGDM families compared to DUP families. These findings support the notion of an additive contribution of genetic etiology and familial factors are associated with ASD risk and highlight critical need for continued work targeting these relationships.

  9. Hospital admission rates for alcoholic intoxication after policy changes in the canton of Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicki, Matthias; Gmel, Gerhard

    2011-11-01

    In February, 2005, the canton of Geneva in Switzerland prohibited the off-premise sale of alcoholic beverages between 9 pm and 7 am, and banned their sale in gas stations and video stores. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this policy change on hospital admission rates for alcoholic intoxication. An interrupted time series analysis of this natural experiment was performed with data on hospitalisations for acute alcoholic intoxication during the 2002-2007 period. The canton of Geneva was treated as the experimental group, while all other Swiss cantons were used as the control group. In the experimental site, the policy change was found to have a significant effect on admission rates among adolescents and young adults. Depending on the age group, hospitalisation rates for alcoholic intoxication fell by an estimated 25-40% as the result of restricted alcohol availability. Modest restrictions on opening hours and the density of off-premise outlets were found to be of relevance for public health in the canton of Geneva. In light of this finding, policy makers should consider such action as a promising approach to alcohol prevention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Using Roadside Billboard Posters to Increase Admission Rates to Problem Gambling Services: Reflections on Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Kimberly A; Wellington, William J

    2015-07-01

    Based on the stimulus-response model of advertising, this study sought to increase admission rates to a local problem gambling service (PGS) in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, by adding a series of locally based 10 foot by 20 foot roadside billboard posters to PGS's existing communications tools for a 24-week period. Using proof of performance reports, a pre-post survey of new callers to PGS, a website visit counter, and a media awareness survey, the findings showed that at least some individuals were influenced by billboard exposure, but admission rates continued to decline during the billboard campaign period. While one possible explanation for the communications failure was that the whole PGS communications campaign was below the minimal threshold for communications perception, another possible explanation is that the stimulus-response model of advertising used may not have been appropriate for such advertising that targets behavior change. Reflections on using an information-processing model instead of a stimulus-response model, and considerations of a two-step flow of communication, are provided. Recommendations are made regarding matching communications messages to stages of behavior change, use of online promotion, and strategies for future research. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  11. Self-rated psychiatric symptoms and their correlates among senior high school students in Hualien City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y M; Yen, L L

    1998-09-01

    The association between mental health disorders beginning in adolescence and disorders in early adulthood is increasingly acknowledged. The mental health of adolescents has not been studied in the eastern area of Taiwan, where the mortality of teenagers is highest in Taiwan. The purpose of this study was to assess psychiatric symptoms among senior high school students in Hualien City, and to identify their associated factors. A total of 1,195 students were selected, via a stratified cluster sampling method, from nine high schools in Hualien City. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess students' demographic characteristics, neurotic traits, perceived daily-life stress, social support, and psychiatric symptoms. There were 1,141 valid responses. From principal components analysis, depression-anxiety, impulsivity-paranoia, and psychoticism-obsession were found to be the most common self-rated psychiatric symptoms. About 70% of the students felt blue, 48.2% reported urges to injure someone, and 25% felt tense. Overall, about 5% to 10% of high school students had severe psychiatric symptoms. Stress from schoolwork, peer relationships, and neurotic traits were important predictors of psychiatric symptoms. The findings of this study imply that screening for psychiatric symptoms at senior high schools is essential for improving the mental health of students. The mental health care of adolescents should be school-based and in collaboration with medical professionals. Life skills must be taught at school.

  12. Dropout rates in medical students at one school before and after the installation of admission tests in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibnegger, Gilbert; Caluba, Hans-Christian; Ithaler, Daniel; Manhal, Simone; Neges, Heide Maria; Smolle, Josef

    2011-08-01

    Admission to medical studies in Austria since academic year 2005-2006 has been regulated by admission tests. At the Medical University of Graz, an admission test focusing on secondary-school-level knowledge in natural sciences has been used for this purpose. The impact of this important change on dropout rates of female versus male students and older versus younger students is reported. All 2,860 students admitted to the human medicine diploma program at the Medical University of Graz from academic years 2002-2003 to 2008-2009 were included. Nonparametric and semiparametric survival analysis techniques were employed to compare cumulative probability of dropout between demographic groups. Cumulative probability of dropout was significantly reduced in students selected by active admission procedure versus those admitted openly (P dropout were higher for females (P dropout hazard is highest during the second year of study. The introduction of admission testing significantly decreased the cumulative probability for dropout. In openly admitted students a significantly higher risk for dropout was found in female students and in older students, whereas no such effects can be detected after admission testing. Future research should focus on the sex dependence, with the aim of improving success rates among female applicants on the admission tests.

  13. Paradise lost or paradise regained? Changes in admission system affect academic performance and drop-out rates of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Hans Georg; Lamina, Claudia; Kluckner, Thomas; Wild, Christoph; Prodinger, Wolfgang M

    2013-05-01

    The Austrian State medical universities had to change their admission system in 2005. Until this year admission to medical studies was unrestricted. Innsbruck Medical University chose the Eignungstest für das Medizinstudium in der Schweiz (EMS) aptitude test for admission testing. Did the implementation of a selection process affect the academic performance and drop-out rates of students according to gender? Two groups of students were compared: 'open admission' (2002-2004), and 'selected' (2006-2009). Academic performance was tested according to results in the final exams after year 1 (SIP 1; SIP, summative integrierte Prüfung) and after year 3 (SIP 3). Drop-out rates were recorded using the registration system of the university. Both, male and female 'selected' students had a higher passing rate regarding SIP 1 and they passed SIP 1 in shorter time and using fewer attempts than the open admission group. The percentage in passing SIP 3 did not change due to change in admission. The drop-out rates were significantly reduced for male and female students. 'Unselected' female students had a significantly higher drop-out ratio than 'unselected' male counterparts. After EMS testing, the drop-out ratios of female and male students were not significantly different. Selected applicants were more able and better motivated to study medicine.

  14. Why are hospital admission and mortality rates for childhood asthma higher in New Zealand than in the United Kingdom?

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, E.A.; Anderson, H R; Freeling, P; White, P T

    1990-01-01

    New Zealand has higher mortality and hospital admission rates for asthma than England and Wales. To determine the reasons for this the available data on asthma mortality and hospital admissions from the Auckland region of New Zealand were compared with data from the South West Thames Region of England for 1979-86 and data from previous surveys on prevalence of wheeze (Auckland 1985, Croydon 1978). In addition, a survey of general practitioners was carried out to determine their approach to th...

  15. Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada: a trend analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Eric; Weichenthal, Scott; Wong, Joan; Smith-Doiron, Marc; Dugandzic, Rose; Kosatsky, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of mortality and morbidity from carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada has received little attention. Our objective was to evaluate trends in mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada. Age- and sex-standardized mortality (1981-2009) and hospital admission (1995-2010) rates by age group, sex and site of carbon monoxide exposure were calculated for each province and for all of Canada. We quantified the long-term trends by calculating the average annual percent change. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of carbon monoxide poisoning across age groups, sex and month of occurrence. In Canada, there were 1808 unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning deaths between 1981 and 2009 and 1984 admissions to hospital between 1995 and 2010. Average annual decreases of 3.46% (95% confidence interval [CI] -4.59% to -2.31%) and 5.83% (95% CI -7.79% to -3.83%) were observed for mortality and hospital admission rates, respectively. Mortality (IRR 5.31, 95% CI 4.57 to 6.17) and hospital admission (IRR 2.77, 95% CI 2.51 to 3.03) rates were elevated in males compared with females. Decreased trends in the rates were observed for all sites of carbon monoxide exposure, but the magnitude of this decrease was lowest in residential environments. Deaths and admissions to hospital were most frequent from September to April, with peaks in December and January. Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada have declined steadily. Continued efforts should focus on reducing carbon monoxide poisoning during the cooler months and in residential environments.

  16. Effectiveness of psychiatric and counseling interventions On fertility rate in infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramezanzadeh F.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the psycho-social model of diseases, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychiatric intervention on the pregnancy rate of infertile couples.Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 638 infertile patients referred to a university infertility clinic were evaluated. Among them, 140 couples with different levels of depression in at least one of the spouses were included in this substudy. These couples were divided randomly into two groups. The patients in the case group received 6-8 sessions of psychotherapy before starting infertility treatment and were given fluoxetine 20-60 mg per day during the same period. The control group did not receive any intervention. Three questionnaires including the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Holmes-Rahe stress scale and a socio-demographic questionnaire were applied for all patients. The clinical pregnancy rates of the two groups, based on sonographic detection of the gestational sac six weeks after LMP, were compared. The data were analyzed by paired-T test, T-test, χ2 and the logistic regression method. Results: The pregnancy rate was 47.1% in the case group and 7.1% in the control group. The pregnancy rate was significantly related to the duration and cause of infertility and the level of stress in both groups (p< 0.001. The pregnancy rate was shown to be higher in couples in which the male has a secondary level of education (p< 0.001.Conclusions: Psychiatric interventions greatly improve pregnancy rates, and it is therefore crucial to mandate psychiatric counseling in all fertility centers in order to diagnose and treat infertile patients with psychiatric disorders and help couples deal with stress.

  17. High rates of hospital admission among older residents in assisted living facilities: opportunities for intervention and impact on acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, David B; Amuah, Joseph E; Strain, Laurel A; Wodchis, Walter P; Soo, Andrea; Eliasziw, Misha; Gruneir, Andrea; Hagen, Brad; Teare, Gary; Maxwell, Colleen J

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about health or service use outcomes for residents of Canadian assisted living facilities. Our objectives were to estimate the incidence of admission to hospital over 1 year for residents of designated (i.e., publicly funded) assisted living (DAL) facilities in Alberta, to compare this rate with the rate among residents of long-term care facilities, and to identify individual and facility predictors of hospital admission for DAL residents. Participants were 1066 DAL residents (mean age ± standard deviation 84.9 ± 7.3 years) and 976 longterm care residents (85.4 ± 7.6 years) from the Alberta Continuing Care Epidemiological Studies (ACCES). Research nurses completed a standardized comprehensive assessment for each resident and interviewed family caregivers at baseline (2006 to 2008) and 1 year later. We used standardized interviews with administrators to generate facility- level data. We determined hospital admissions through linkage with the Alberta Inpatient Discharge Abstract Database. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to identify predictors of hospital admission. The cumulative annual incidence of hospital admission was 38.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35.9%- 41.9%) for DAL residents and 13.7% (95% CI 11.5%-15.8%) for long-term care residents. The risk of hospital admission was significantly greater for DAL residents with greater health instability, fatigue, medication use (11 or more medications), and 2 or more hospital admissions in the preceding year. The risk of hospital admission was also significantly higher for residents from DAL facilities with a smaller number of spaces, no licensed practical and/ or registered nurses on site (or on site less than 24 hours a day, 7 days a week), no chain affiliation, and from select health regions. The incidence of hospital admission was about 3 times higher among DAL residents than among long-term care residents, and the risk of hospital admission was associated with a number of

  18. Increasing Suicide Rates Among Middle-age Persons and Interventions to Manage Patients with Psychiatric Complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Chakravarthy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has published significant data and trends related to suicide rates in the United States (U.S.. Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in U.S. adults, and rates are increasing across all geographic regions. There is a significant increase in the suicide rate among adults in the 35-64 age range. We present findings from the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR with commentary on current resources and barriers to psychiatric care. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(1:11–13.

  19. Using geographic variation in unplanned ambulatory care sensitive condition admission rates to identify commissioning priorities: an analysis of routine data from England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, John; Purdy, Sarah; Hollingworth, William

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To use geographic variation in unplanned ambulatory care sensitive condition admission rates to identify the clinical areas and patient subgroups where there is greatest potential to prevent admissions and improve the quality and efficiency of care. Methods We used English Hospital Episode Statistics data from 2011/2012 to describe the characteristics of patients admitted for ambulatory care sensitive condition care and estimated geographic variation in unplanned admission rates. We contrasted geographic variation across admissions with different lengths of stay which we used as a proxy for clinical severity. We estimated the number of bed days that could be saved under several scenarios. Results There were 1.8 million ambulatory care sensitive condition admissions during 2011/2012. Substantial geographic variation in ambulatory care sensitive condition admission rates was commonplace but mental health care and short-stay (care. Further work to explore the causes of these differences is required and should focus on mental health and short-stay admissions.

  20. The relationship between thermal sensation and the rate of hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease in Kermanshah, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Bakhtiyar; Karimi, Shilan

    2017-11-01

    Climate and weather conditions are the most important factors that influence activities and human health. Bioclimatology/biometeorology are concerned with the study of weather effects on living creatures, including humans, plants, and animals. This research was prepared in order to understand the bioclimatic condition of Kermanshah and its relation to the level of hospital admissions of cardiovascular patients in this city. In addition to the climatic variables, the statistics on the number of daily admissions of cardiovascular patients in Kermanshah during March 27, 2009 to April 30, 2015 was prepared. First, Kermanshah's bioclimatic conditions were identified on a daily basis. Then, the relationship between each of the thermal sensations with the level of hospital admissions of cardiovascular patients in Kermanshah using Levene's test, univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA), Scheffe and Games-Howell post hoc tests was investigated. The results of this study showed that in each index, only very few bioclimatic conditions have had an impact on the increase of hospital admissions of cardiovascular diseases. For example, based on the equivalent temperature index (Tek or EqT), there is a significant relationship between extreme conditions and the rate of cardiovascular admissions. But, however, in the effective temperature index (TE), a significant correlation between warm/hot conditions and an increase in the number of cardiovascular admissions was seen. Based on the predicted mean vote (PMV) and physiological equivalent temperature (PET) indices, cool and cold conditions more than warm and comfort conditions have an effect on the number of hospital admissions of cardiovascular patients. Overall, the obtained results showed that the extreme climatic conditions were directly related to an increase in cardiovascular disease in Kermanshah.

  1. Increasing rates of psychiatric publication from low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Matthew; Nielssen, Olav; Farooq, Saeed; Glozier, Nick

    2010-09-01

    The low level of psychiatric research in low- and middle-income (LAMI) countries has been identified as a cause for concern, particularly because the extent of the unmet need for psychiatric treatment in many LAMI countries is not known. The aim of this study was to establish if the worldwide increase in research publication during the last decade included an increase in publication about mental disorders from LAMI countries. We searched PubMed for articles about mental disorder, depression and schizophrenia using the names of LAMI and high-income (HI) countries in the institutional affi liation address (AD) field published during two five-year periods: 1998-2002 and 2003-2007. We then examined the relationship between per capita publications about mental disorder and the independent variables of per capita gross domestic product purchasing power parity (GDP ppp), per capita psychiatric beds, per capita psychiatrists, total population and whether the country had a designated mental health budget. The number of medical research publications per capita, and the number of publications about mental disorder from LAMI countries is low when compared to the rate from HI countries. However, the absolute number of publications from LAMI regions and the proportion of research publications about mental disorder, schizophrenia and depression increased significantly during the decade of the study. There were independent associations between GDP ppp and population size and the rate of publications about mental disorder in LAMI countries. The overall increase in the number of publications about mental disorder in the last decade probably reflects an increase in psychiatric research in LAMI countries. The increase in rates of publication was greatest in middle-income countries with the largest populations.

  2. Predictors of psychiatric inpatient suicide: a national prospective register-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Agerbo, Esben; Mortensen, Preben B

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the incidence and risk factors of psychiatric inpatient suicide within a national cohort representing all psychiatric hospital admissions. METHOD: This national prospective register-based study followed all psychiatric hospital admissions in Denmark from the date of patient...... admission until patient discharge or inpatient suicide over a 10-year study period from 1997 through 2006. By using survival analysis techniques, this study was the first to take the inpatient time at risk into account in the estimation of the suicide rate and the predictors of suicide among hospital......-admitted psychiatric patients. RESULTS: Among 126,382 psychiatric inpatients aged 14 years or older, 279 suicides occurred. The risk of inpatient suicide was high: 860 suicides per 100,000 inpatient years. Of those individuals who completed suicide, 50% died within 18 days of admission. The inpatient suicide rate...

  3. Using preventive home monitoring to reduce hospital admission rates and reduce costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Birthe; Hæsum, Lisa Korsbakke Emtekær; Sørensen, Natascha

    2012-01-01

    We studied whether preventive home monitoring of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could reduce the frequency of hospital admissions and lower the cost of hospitalization. Patients were recruited from a health centre, general practitioner (GP) or the pulmonary hospital ward....... They were randomized to usual care or tele-rehabilitation with a telehealth monitoring device installed in their home for four months. A total of 111 patients were suitable for inclusion and consented to be randomized: 60 patients were allocated to intervention and three were lost to follow...... of admissions was €3461 per patient in the intervention group and €4576 in the control group; this difference was not significant. The Kaplan-Meier estimates for time to hospital admission were longer for the intervention group than the controls, but the difference was not significant. Future work requires...

  4. Cross-cultural adaptation to Brazil of Medication Adherence Rating Scale for psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icaro Carvalho Moreira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this research was to make a cross-cultural adaptation of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS for psychiatric patients to the Brazilian context. Methods The procedure consisted of four phases: translation of the original scale, back-translation, review by an Expert Committee and Pre-test study with a patients’ sample. Results The Expert Committee corrected the items’ translation when necessary and modified the scale administration format and its instructions from self-report to face-to-face interview form in order to ensure easy understanding by the target population. During Pre-test, the instructions and most of the items were properly understood by patients, with the exception of three of them which had to be changed in order to ensure better understanding. The Pre-test sample was composed by 30 psychiatric patients, with severe and persistent disorders mainly single (46.7%, female (60.0%, with a mean age of 43.8 years old and an average of five years of education. Conclusion The Brazilian version of MARS scale is now adapted to the Brazilian Portuguese language and culture and is easily understood by the psychiatric target population. It is necessary to do further research to evaluate the scale psychometric qualities of validity and reliability in order to use it in Brazil.

  5. [Impact of admission heart rate on short-term outcome of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Yang, Yan-min; Zhu, Jun; Tan, Hui-qiong; Liu, Li-sheng

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of admission heart rate (HR) on 30-day all-cause death and cardiovascular events in Chinese patients with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). A total of 7485 Chinese STEMI patients from a global randomized controlled trial (CREATE) database were divided into six groups by admission HR: bpm. The primary outcome was 30-day all-cause death; the secondary outcomes were the composite of 30-day all-cause death, reinfarction, cardiogenic shock or deadly arrhythmia. Admission glucose level, proportion of female gender, incidence of anterior myocardial infarction, previous diabetes mellitus, hypertension and Killip level II-IV were significantly higher in patients with admission HR ≥ 90 bpm compared to 60 - 69 bpm group (P bpm group and was 9.6% in HR bpm group (P bpm group). In patients with admission HR > 60 bpm, the 30-day mortality increased in proportion to higher admission HR: 8.1% in 70 - 79 bpm, 9.2% in 80 - 89 bpm, 12.6% in 90 - 99 bpm and 24.6% in ≥ 100 bpm groups (all P bpm group). The incidence of MACE was similar as that of 30-day mortality: 27.0% in bpm, 12.5% in 60 - 69 bpm, 13.7% in 70 - 79 bpm, 14.3% in 80 - 89 bpm, 17.5% in 90 - 99 bpm and 31.1% in ≥ 100 bpm groups. Multivariate analysis showed that the incidence of 30-day mortality positively correlated with the admission HR (P bpm (OR = 0.832, P = 0.299), the risk of joint endpoint events was higher in the patients with HR bpm (OR = 1.532, 95%CI: 1.201 - 1.954, P bpm (OR = 1.436, 95%CI: 1.091 - 1.889, P bpm (OR = 1.893, 95%CI: 1.471 - 2.436, P < 0.001). Admission HR is an independent risk factor for short-term outcome in Chinese STEMI patients.

  6. Simultaneous vaccination with MMR and DTaP-IPV-Hib and rate of hospital admissions with any infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Signe; Benn, Christine S; Poulsen, Anja

    2016-01-01

    and inactivated vaccines may increase child mortality compared with the live vaccine alone. We examined the hypothesis that simultaneous administration of MMR and the inactivated DTaP-IPV-Hib vaccine compared with MMR alone is associated with higher incidence of infectious disease admissions. METHODS: Nationwide......BACKGROUND: In Denmark, live measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) is associated with a reduced risk of infectious disease admissions, particularly for lower respiratory tract infections. In low-income countries, simultaneous vaccination (i.e. vaccination at the same visit) with live......, 4965 children had simultaneous MMR and DTaP-IPV-Hib as their most recent vaccination. Compared with MMR alone, simultaneous administration was associated with a higher rate of lower respiratory tract infections (adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1...

  7. Quality Indicators but Not Admission Volumes of Neonatal Intensive Care Units Are Effective in Reducing Mortality Rates of Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochow, Niels; Landau-Crangle, Erin; Lee, Sauyoung; Schünemann, Holger; Fusch, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    To investigate how two different strategies to form larger neonatal intensive care units (NICU) impact neonatal mortality rates. Cross-sectional study modeling admission volumes and mortality rates of 177,086 VLBW infants aggregated into 862 NICUs. Cumulative 3-year data was abstracted from Vermont Oxford Network. The model simulated a reduction in number of NICUs by stepwise exclusion using either admission volume (VOL) or quality (QUAL) cut-offs. After randomly redirecting infants of excluded to remaining NICUs resulting system mortality rates were calculated with and without adjusting for effects of experience levels (EL) using published data to reflect effects of different team-to-patient exposure. The quality-based strategy is more effective in reducing mortality; while VOL alone was not able to reduce system mortality, QUAL already achieved a 5% improvement after reducing 8% of NICUs and redirecting 6% of infants. Including "EL", a 5% improvement of mortality was achieved by reducing 77% (VOL) vs. 7% (QUAL) of NICUs and redirecting 54% (VOL) vs. 5% (QUAL) of VLBW infants, respectively. While a critical number of admissions is needed to maintain skills this study emphasizes the importance of including quality parameters to restructure neonatal care. The findings can be generalized to other medical fields.

  8. Increasing the admission rate to secondary school: The case of primary school student career guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Anders; Jensen, Vibeke Myrup; Nielsen, Lisbeth Palmhøj

    Although several studies investigate the effects of school resources on student performance, these studies tend to focus more on intervention effect sizes than on their cost-effectiveness. Exploiting policy-induced variation in Denmark and using high-quality administrative data, we investigate...... the effects of a school intervention that introduces structured student career guidance in lower secondary school on upper secondary school admission. Disregarding the sunk-cost of implementation, the reform was cost-neutral. In a difference-in-difference framework we find that the reform increases admission...... to upper secondary school between 4.0-6.3 percentage points for immigrants, but shows at best small improvements for the native students....

  9. Effect of inhaled hypertonic saline on hospital admission rate in children with viral bronchiolitis: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzik, Brian A; Flavin, Michael P; Kent, Steven; Zielinski, David; Kwan, Charisse W; Adeleye, Adetayo; Vegsund, Bjorn C; Rossi, Carlo

    2010-11-01

    We sought to determine whether inhaled 3% hypertonic saline (HS) reduces admission to hospital in ambulatory children with moderately severe viral bronchiolitis. Secondary objectives compared changes in respiratory scores before and after treatment and assessed the need for unscheduled medical intervention within 7 days. Children under the age of 2 years presenting with moderately severe viral bronchiolitis to the emergency department of 4 general hospitals from November 2008 to March 2009 were randomly assigned to receive 3 consecutive 4-mL doses of nebulized 3% HS (treatment group) or 0.9% normal saline (NS; control group) in a double blind fashion, each coadministered with 1 mg salbutamol. Outcome measures included the difference in hospital admission rate and changes in respiratory distress scores. A total of 81 children (mean age 8.9 mo, range 0.7-22 mo) were assessed over 88 visits on an intention-to-treat basis. No statistically significant differences were found between treatment groups. Children in the HS group had a nonsignificant trend toward greater improvement compared with NS controls with a same-day admission rate of 18% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9%-32%) versus 27% (95% CI 16%-42%), respectively. Respiratory Assessment Change Scores (RACS) favoured the HS group over NS controls (mean RACS 4.7 [95% CI 3.6-5.8] v. 3.7 [95% CI 2.5-4.9], respectively), although the CIs overlap and these differences were not statistically significant. The short-term use of nebulized 3% HS did not result in any statistically significant benefits, although a nonsignificant trend toward a decrease in admission rate and improvement in respiratory distress was found. A larger study would be required to determine whether these trends arise from a clinically relevant treatment effect.

  10. Why are hospital admission and mortality rates for childhood asthma higher in New Zealand than in the United Kingdom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E A; Anderson, H R; Freeling, P; White, P T

    1990-03-01

    New Zealand has higher mortality and hospital admission rates for asthma than England and Wales. To determine the reasons for this the available data on asthma mortality and hospital admissions from the Auckland region of New Zealand were compared with data from the South West Thames Region of England for 1979-86 and data from previous surveys on prevalence of wheeze (Auckland 1985, Croydon 1978). In addition, a survey of general practitioners was carried out to determine their approach to the management of asthma, patient simulations being used. Asthma mortality in children of European descent aged 5-14 years was 2.5 times higher in Auckland than in South West Thames. The reported lifetime, 12 month, and one month prevalences of wheeze were also higher in Auckland (by 18.5%, 32.1%, and 87.5%). Unexpectedly, the hospital admission rate for asthma in children of European descent aged 5-14 years was 5% less in Auckland than in South West Thames. Comparative studies of hospital case notes and of the replies from general practitioners showed that in Auckland the duration of illness before admission was greater and that general practitioners were less likely to admit patients with acute asthma. The overall standard of general practitioner care in Auckland was, if anything, higher than in South West Thames but in both areas there was considerable variation. On balance it was concluded that the higher mortality rate in New Zealand is explained by higher levels of morbidity rather than relative deficiencies in care. Nevertheless, the implications of the lesser use of hospital care for acute asthma observed in Auckland need further consideration.

  11. Suicide Rates After Discharge From Psychiatric Facilities: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daniel Thomas; Ryan, Christopher James; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Singh, Swaran Preet; Stanton, Clive; Large, Matthew Michael

    2017-07-01

    High rates of suicide after psychiatric hospitalization are reported in many studies, yet the magnitude of the increases and the factors underlying them remain unclear. To quantify the rates of suicide after discharge from psychiatric facilities and examine what moderates those rates. English-language, peer-reviewed publications published from January 1, 1946, to May 1, 2016, were located using MEDLINE, PsychINFO, and EMBASE with the search terms ((suicid*).ti AND (hospital or discharg* OR inpatient or in-patient OR admit*).ab and ((mortality OR outcome* OR death*) AND (psych* OR mental*)).ti AND (admit* OR admis* or hospital* OR inpatient* OR in-patient* OR discharg*).ab. Hand searching was also done. Studies reporting the number of suicides among patients discharged from psychiatric facilities and the number of exposed person-years and studies from which these data could be calculated. The meta-analysis adhered to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines. A random-effects model was used to calculate a pooled estimate of postdischarge suicides per 100 000 person-years. The suicide rate after discharge from psychiatric facilities was the main outcome, and the association between the duration of follow-up and the year of the sampling were the main a priori moderators. A total of 100 studies reported 183 patient samples (50 samples of females, 49 of males, and 84 of mixed sex; 129 of adults or unspecified patients, 20 of adolescents, 19 of older patients, and 15 from long-term or forensic discharge facilities), including a total of 17 857 suicides during 4 725 445 person-years. The pooled estimate postdischarge suicide rate was 484 suicides per 100 000 person-years (95% CI, 422-555 suicides per 100 000 person-years; prediction interval, 89-2641), with high between-sample heterogeneity (I2 = 98%). The suicide rate was highest within 3 months

  12. Time trends in first admission rates for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders in Taiwan, 1998-2007: a 10-year population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chih-Lin; Chen, Pei-Chun; Huang, Ling-Ya; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Tung, Yu-Chi; Liu, Chen-Chung; Chen, Wei J

    2017-02-01

    To examine the trend in annual first admission rates for psychotic disorders as a whole as well as individual psychotic disorders in Taiwan from 1998 to 2007, and influences of age, sex, and geographic region on the trend. Using the inpatient claims records in the National Health Insurance Research Database, we estimated the yearly first admission rates for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, including voluntary (1998-2007) and involuntary (2004-2007) admissions. Both narrow and broad definitions of psychotic disorders were examined. While involuntary first admission rates were stable, a crescendo-decrescendo change in voluntary first admission rates for psychotic disorders was observed, peaking in 2001. The increase from 1998 to 2001 was closely associated with health insurance expansion. Before 2001, the voluntary first admission rates in males aged 15-24 were underestimated as military personnel records were not included in the database. From 2001 to 2007, voluntary first admissions for psychotic disorders decreased 38%; the decrease could not be accounted for by the mild diagnostic shifts away from schizophrenia to affective psychosis or substance-induced psychosis. During the entire observation period, first admission rates for schizophrenia decreased 48%, while affective psychosis increased 84%. Gender disparities in the first admission rates gradually diminished, but geographic disparities persisted. First admission rates for psychosis significantly reduced in Taiwan between 1998 and 2007, mainly driven by the reduced hospitalization risk for schizophrenia. Special attention should be paid to the increased hospitalization for other types of psychotic disorders (especially affective psychosis) and the unresolved geographic disparities.

  13. Risk factors leading to increased rehospitalization rates among adolescents admitted to an acute care child and adolescent psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Logan; Pullen, Lisa M; Savage, Jennifer; Cayce, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Suicide is the third leading cause of death in adolescents in the United States, with suicidal behavior peaking in adolescence. Suicidal and self-harming behavior is often chronic, with an estimated 15-30% of adolescents who attempt suicide having a second suicide attempt within a year. The focus of acute psychiatric hospitalization is on stabilization of these psychiatric symptoms resulting at times in premature discharge. Finding from studies based on high rehospitalization rates among adolescents admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital indicates that adolescents continue to experience crisis upon discharge from an acute psychiatric hospital, leading to the question of whether or not these adolescents are being discharged prematurely. A chart review was performed on 98 adolescent clients admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital to identify risk factors that may increase rehospitalization among adolescents admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital. Clients admitted to the hospital within a 12-month time frame were compared to clients who were not readmitted during that 12-month period. History of self-harming behavior and length of stay greater than 5 days were found to be risk factors for rehospitalization. Adolescent clients who are admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital with a history of self-harming behavior and extended length of stay need to be identified and individualized treatment plans implemented for preventing repeat hospitalizations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effects of Italian smoking regulation on rates of hospital admission for acute coronary events: a country-wide study.

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    Francesco Barone-Adesi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported a reduction in acute coronary events (ACEs in the general population after the enforcement of smoking regulations, although there is uncertainty concerning the magnitude of the effect of such interventions. We conducted a country-wide evaluation of the health effects of the introduction of a smoking ban in public places, using data on hospital admissions for ACEs from the Italian population after the implementation of a national smoking regulation in January 2005. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Rates of admission for ACEs in the 20 Italian regions from January 2002 to November 2006 were analysed using mixed-effect regression models that allowed for long-term trends and seasonality. Standard methods for interrupted time-series were adopted to assess the immediate and gradual effects of the smoking ban. Effect modification by age was investigated, with the assumption that exposure to passive smoking in public places would be greater among young people. In total, 936,519 hospital admissions for ACEs occurred in the Italian population during the study period. A 4% reduction in hospital admissions for ACEs among persons aged less than 70 years was evident after the introduction of the ban (Rate Ratio [RR], 0.96; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 0.95-0.98. No effect was found among persons aged at least 70 years (RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.99-1.02. Effect modification by age was further suggested by analyses using narrower age categories. CONCLUSIONS: Smoke-free policies can constitute a simple and inexpensive intervention for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and thus should be included in prevention programmes.

  15. Tasas de ingreso inicial por esquizofrenia en hospitales de Costa Rica Rates of first hospital admissions for schizophrenia in Costa Rica

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    Norma Handal N.

    1997-06-01

    the number of hospitalized cases and the total population of the country. The average annual incidence was found to be 48.2 cases per 100 000 inhabitants. High frequencies of first admissions were seen among males 40 to 44 years of age and females 45 to 49. Incidence was highest among unmarried women, followed by divorced women. There was a significant inverse relationship between educational attainment and rates of admission for schizophrenia, and incidence rates were highest among unemployed women and housewives. The association between rate of hospitalization for schizophrenia and 10 characteristics of the cantons was studied by means of logistic regression. Only two variables--the distance between the canton's principal town and the hospital and the volume of coffee harvest per resident--showed a direct significant association with admission rates for schizophrenia. The cantons which had the highest number of births of children who were diagnosed as schizophrenic in adulthood were those closest to the psychiatric hospital and those that had a low level of industrial or agricultural activity, low population density, and high proportions of single or divorced persons.

  16. The Impact of Prematriculation Admission Characteristics on Graduation Rates in an Accelerated Doctor of Pharmacy Program

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    Morin, Anna K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of admission characteristics on graduation in an accelerated doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Methods. Selected prematriculation characteristics of students entering the graduation class years of 2009-2012 on the Worcester and Manchester campuses of MCPHS University were analyzed and compared for on-time graduation. Results. Eighty-two percent of evaluated students (699 of 852) graduated on time. Students who were most likely to graduate on-time attended a 4-year school, previously earned a bachelor’s degree, had an overall prematriculation grade point average (GPA) greater than or equal to 3.6, and graduated in the spring just prior to matriculating to the university. Factors that reduced the likelihood of graduating on time were also identified. Work experience had a marginal impact on graduating on time. Conclusion. Although there is no certainty in college admission decisions, prematriculation characteristics can help predict the likelihood for academic success of students in an accelerated PharmD program. PMID:26689686

  17. The Impact of Prematriculation Admission Characteristics on Graduation Rates in an Accelerated Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Michael; Morin, Anna K

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of admission characteristics on graduation in an accelerated doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Methods. Selected prematriculation characteristics of students entering the graduation class years of 2009-2012 on the Worcester and Manchester campuses of MCPHS University were analyzed and compared for on-time graduation. Results. Eighty-two percent of evaluated students (699 of 852) graduated on time. Students who were most likely to graduate on-time attended a 4-year school, previously earned a bachelor's degree, had an overall prematriculation grade point average (GPA) greater than or equal to 3.6, and graduated in the spring just prior to matriculating to the university. Factors that reduced the likelihood of graduating on time were also identified. Work experience had a marginal impact on graduating on time. Conclusion. Although there is no certainty in college admission decisions, prematriculation characteristics can help predict the likelihood for academic success of students in an accelerated PharmD program.

  18. The relationship between admission heart rate and early prognosis in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

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    Salwa, Paweł; Gorczyca-Michta, Iwona; Wożakowska-Kapłon, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) is a basic cardiovascular parameter. The relationship between HR and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity has been indicated in clinical trials and epidemiological studies. The evaluation of the relationship between HR upon hospital admission and the in-hospital prognosis in a group of patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The medical records of 927 patients were subject to retrospective analysis. The patients were classified on the basis of HR upon hospital admission: bpm (n = 75), 60-69 bpm (n = 169), 70-79 bpm (n = 245), 80-89 bpm (n = 172), 90-99 bpm (n = 134), and ≥ 100 bpm (n = 132). A group of patients with HR of 60-69 bpm on hospital admission (n = 169) constituted a reference group. Patients with atrioventricular blocks and arrhythmias were excluded from the analysis. Early mortality and co-existing diseases were evaluated in the study population. Patients with HR ≥ 90 bpm demonstrated heart failure symptoms considerably more often than patients with HR of 60-69 bpm (p = 0.0010). In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with a HR of more than 90 bpm and bradycardia. The relationship between HR and cardiovascular mortality is shown with a J-shaped curve. HR is strictly correlated with early cardiovascular mortality in a population of patients with STEMI. The relationship between HR and early mortality is demonstrated by a J-shaped curve.

  19. Differential Effects of Temperature Extremes on Hospital Admission Rates for Respiratory Disease between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians in the Northern Territory.

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    Green, Donna; Bambrick, Hilary; Tait, Peter; Goldie, James; Schultz, Rosalie; Webb, Leanne; Alexander, Lisa; Pitman, Andrew

    2015-12-03

    The health gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians may be exacerbated by climate change if temperature extremes have disproportionate adverse effects on Indigenous people. To explore this issue, we analysed the effect of temperature extremes on hospital admissions for respiratory diseases, stratified by age, Indigenous status and sex, for people living in two different climates zones in the Northern Territory during the period 1993-2011. We examined admissions for both acute and chronic respiratory diagnoses, controlling for day of the week and seasonality variables. Our analysis showed that: (1) overall, Indigenous hospital admission rates far exceeded non-Indigenous admission rates for acute and chronic diagnoses, and Top End climate zone admission rates exceeded Central Australia climate zone admission rates; (2) extreme cold and hot temperatures were associated with inconsistent changes in admission rates for acute respiratory disease in Indigenous and non-Indigenous children and older adults; and (3) no response to cold or hot temperature extremes was found for chronic respiratory diagnoses. These findings support our two hypotheses, that extreme hot and cold temperatures have a different effect on hospitalisations for respiratory disease between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, and that these health risks vary between the different climate zones. We did not, however, find that there were differing responses to temperature extremes in the two populations, suggesting that any increased vulnerability to climate change in the Indigenous population of the Northern Territory arises from an increased underlying risk to respiratory disease and an already greater existing health burden.

  20. Effects of maternal breathing rate, psychiatric status, and cortisol on fetal heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Catherine; Fifer, William P; Myers, Michael M; Bagiella, Emilia; Duong, Jimmy K; Chen, Ivy S; Leotti, Lauren; Altincatal, Arman

    2011-04-01

    Women's experiences during pregnancy are predictive of variation in neurobehavioral profiles in their children. Few studies have assessed these relationships during the prenatal period. In 113 women in the 36(th) -38(th) gestational week (mean age 26.3 ± 5.4 years), electrocardiogram, blood pressure, respiration, salivary cortisol, and fetal heart rate (HR) were measured during baseline, a psychological challenge (Stroop color-word matching task), and a standardized paced breathing protocol. Subjects underwent the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV prior to testing and were grouped as: depressed, co-morbid for depression and anxiety, anxiety disorder only, and control. There was a significant main effect of maternal diagnostic group on fetal HR only during the Stroop task: fetuses of women in the co-morbid group had a greater HR increase compared to controls (p breathing (p < .0001), and there was no significant difference by maternal diagnosis. For both tasks, changes in fetal HR were independent of women's concurrent cardiorespiratory activity. Finally, although cortisol was higher in the co-morbid group (p < .05), across all participants, there was a trend for maternal baseline cortisol to be positively associated with average fetal HR (p = .06). These findings indicate that variation in fetal HR reactivity-an index of emerging regulatory capacities-is likely influenced by multiple acute and chronic factors associated with women's psychobiology. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A period prevalence study of being a parent in a secure psychiatric hospital and a description of the parents, the children and the impact of admission on parent-child contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argent, Sarah Elizabeth; Riddleston, Laura; Warr, Jodie; Tippetts, Hannah; Meredith, Zoe; Taylor, Pamela Jane

    2017-07-14

    Most secure psychiatric hospital patients are of childbearing age, but their parental status is minimally researched. The aim of the study is to describe the parent patients in one regional secure hospital and explore post-admission child-parent contact. A 9-year records survey of a complete secure hospital admissions cohort was conducted. Nearly half of the cohort of 165 patients (46%) were parents. Parent patients were less likely than childless patients to have diagnostic co-morbidity or to have received childhood mental health care but were more likely to have committed a homicide/life-threatening index offence with family or friend victims. Men, whether fathers or not, and childless women were unlikely ever to have harmed a child, but it was more likely than not that mother patients had. Records indicated minimal discussion about childlessness. Ninety-four (60%) of the 157 children involved were under 18 years on parental admission. Adult children who had been living with the parent patient before the parent's admission invariably maintained contact with them afterwards, but nearly half (48%) of such under 18-year-olds lost all contact. The only characteristic related to such loss was the index offence victim having been a nuclear family member. As the discrepancy in whether or not parent patients and their children continued contact with each other after the parent's admission seemed to depend mainly on the child's age and his or her resultant freedom to choose, acquisition of accurate data about affected children's perspective on visiting seems essential. Given that parent patients had experienced relative stability in interpersonal relationships and had rarely had childhood disorders, parenting support in conjunction with treatment seems appropriate. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. What are key determinants of hospital admissions, readmission rate and day case rate within the South African medical schemes population?

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    Nondumiso Gugu Khumalo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  BACKGROUND: In South Africa, private hospitals absorb a high proportion of the total health expenditure on private health care. Between 2008-2010 private hospital expenditure which includes ward fees, theatre fees, consumables, medicines and per diem arrangements consumed between 40.5% and 40.9% of the total benefits paid by medical schemes from the risk pool, whilst in-hospital managed care fees ranged between 1.8% and 2.8% for the equivalent years.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to highlight key factors contributing to utilisation of hospital services within the medical schemes population and to recommend “appropriate” and cost effective strategies on hospital utilisation management.METHODS: A cross sectional survey informed by retrospective analysis of quantitative data was used. Researchers also triangulated quantitative data with systematic review of literature.RESULTS: The results show that demographic indicators such as age profile, dependency ratio, pensioner ratio and prevalence of chronic conditions are not the only key factors influencing hospital admissions, but rather the effectiveness of each medical scheme in containing hospital admissions is also influenced by available technical capacity on utilisation review and audit as well as the managed care methodology including the philosophy underpinning benefit option design.CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance of “value based” managed care programs linked to benefit option design in health care utilisation management. The choice of one managed care program over the other often leads to tradeoffs whereby unintended consequences emanate. Medical schemes are therefore encouraged to continuously review their managed care programs to ensure value for money as well as better access and health outcomes.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/fe.v13i2.207

  3. Prevalence Rates of Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms and Psychiatric Comorbidity Among Adolescents in Iran

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    Homayoon Amini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological studies show that obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and its comorbidity with psychiatric problems is more prevalent among children and adolescents than was previously believed. The primary aim of the current study is to investigate the point-prevalence rate of obsessive compulsive symptoms in a sample of adolescent high school student in Iran. A two-stage epidemiological study was carried out through a clustered random sampling method. All participants went through a two-stage assessment procedure, in the first screening phase, the Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (MOCI was administered to 909 randomly selected students (in the age range 14-18 years. Participants were considered possible sub-clinical or clinical OCD cases, if they obtained a score of MOCI≥15. In the second stage, the Symptoms Checklist -90-revised (SCL-90-R was administered to student who fulfilled the screening criteria. The prevalence of OC symptoms was found to be 11.2 percent for the total sample. The most prevalent comorbid conditions were depression and anxiety with prevalence rates of 91.2 and 78.4 percent respectively. Gender, age, birth-order, parent's education and family income had no statistically significant association with OC symptoms. Further research in this area is warranted in order to establish a set of comprehensive global assessment and measurement tools, which would allow cross-cultural studies in the field of OCD.

  4. Psychiatric symptoms and response quality to self-rated personality tests: Evidence from the PsyCoLaus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Marc; Meier, Emanuele; Rudaz, Dominique; Strippoli, Marie-Pierre F; Castelao, Enrique; Preisig, Martin; Capel, Roland; Vandeleur, Caroline L

    2017-06-01

    Despite the fact that research has demonstrated consistent associations between self-rated measures of personality dimensions and mental disorders, little has been undertaken to investigate the relation between psychiatric symptoms and response patterns to self-rated tests. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between psychiatric symptoms and response quality using indices from our functional method. A sample of 1,784 participants from a Swiss population-based cohort completed a personality inventory (NEO-FFI) and a symptom checklist of 90 items (SCL-90-R). Different indices of response quality were calculated based on the responses given to the NEO-FFI. Associations among the responses to indices of response quality, sociodemographic characteristics and the SCL-90-R dimensions were then established. Psychiatric symptoms were associated with several important differences in response quality, questioning subjects' ability to provide valid information using self-rated instruments. As suggested by authors, psychiatric symptoms seem associated with differences in personality scores. Nonetheless, our study shows that symptoms are also related to differences in terms of response patterns as sources of differences in personality scores. This could constitute a bias for clinical assessment. Future studies could still determine whether certain subpopulations of subjects are more unable to provide valid information to self-rated questionnaires than others. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Implementing a Music Therapy Program at a New 72-Hour Acute Psychiatric Admissions Unit: A Case Study of a Patient Who Was Malingering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the relatively poor treatment available, the high financial costs of hospitalization, multiple and complex issues of persons with severe mental illnesses, and advancements in pharmacotherapy, psychiatric patients are often only hospitalized for a few days before they are discharged. Thus, brief psychosocial interventions for persons who…

  6. Variation in chest pain emergency department admission rates and acute myocardial infarction and death within 30 days in the Medicare population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterill, Philip G; Deb, Partha; Shrank, William H; Pines, Jesse M

    2015-08-01

    The objective was to assess the relationship between emergency department (ED) admission rates for Medicare beneficiaries with chest pain and outcomes, specifically 30-day rates of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and mortality. Using a 20% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries in 2009, 158,295 beneficiaries with a primary diagnosis of chest pain at the conclusion of their ED visits were selected to assess outcomes based on the decision to hospitalize or discharge home. The proportions of these patients admitted to inpatient or observation status at 2,219 U.S. hospitals were calculated, adjusting for differences in patient and hospital characteristics. Both bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to estimate the effect of the adjusted admission rates (designed to be a measure of care intensity) on patient outcomes. Other covariates in the multivariable model included patient demographics, medical conditions, and hospital utilization in the 30 days prior to the ED visits. Results from the bivariate and multivariable analyses were compared for consistency. The adjusted Medicare admission rate for ED patients with chest pain averaged 63% for the middle quintile of the patient sample and ranged from 38% to 81% in the lowest and highest quintiles. The multivariable model yielded estimates of 3.6 fewer cases of AMI (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5 to 5.1 cases) and 2.8 fewer deaths (95% CI = 0.6 to 4.1 deaths) per 1,000 chest pain patients associated with an admission rate of 81% versus 38%. The estimates from the bivariate analysis were of similar magnitude. Considerable variation exists across U.S. hospitals in ED admission rates for Medicare patients with chest pain. Hospitals that approach admissions more conservatively (i.e., higher admission rates) in this population have lower rates of AMI and mortality. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  7. Intervention analysis of introduction of rotavirus vaccine on hospital admissions rates due to acute diarrhea

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    Maria de Lourdes Teixeira Masukawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of rotavirus vaccine on hospitalization rates for acute diarrhea in children younger than 5 years old after the introduction of the vaccine in 2006. A descriptive analytical observational study was carried out of the hospitalization rates occurred between 2000 and 2011 in 22 Regional Health Centers of Paraná State, Brazil. The effect of the vaccine was assessed by applying the SARIMA/Box-Jenkins time series methodology of intervention analysis, which allows verifying the slopes of the series are different after the introduction of the vaccine and estimating the magnitude of these effects for children younger than five years of age, by age group, for each region center. It was verified a statistically significant reduction by center/month on hospitalization rates for children 1 year old and younger, with averages of 47% and 58%, respectively, in December 2011.

  8. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

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    Margari Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs. Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV, reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30. Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1% or without (47.7% aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0% patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7% at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%, 686 (94.2% and 676 (92.9%. The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%, typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%, atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8% and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%. Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20

  9. The importance of relationships in mental health care: A qualitative study of service users' experiences of psychiatric hospital admission in the UK

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    Slade Mike

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a number of studies have looked at life on service users' experiences of life on psychiatric wards, no research exists that have approached these experiences from the user perspective since the introduction of community care. Methods This user-led study uses a participatory approach to develop an understanding of the processes and themes which define the user experience of hospitalisation. Nineteen service users who had all had inpatient stays in psychiatric hospitals in London were interviewed in the community. Results Relationships formed the core of service users' experiences. Three further codes, treatment, freedom and environment defined the role of hospital and its physical aspects. Themes of communication, safety, trust, coercion, and cultural competency contributed to the concept of relationships. Conclusion Relationships with an individual which comprised effective communication, cultural sensitivity, and the absence of coercion resulted in that person being attributed with a sense of trust. This resulted in the patient experiencing the hospital as a place of safety in terms of risk from other patients and staff. Barriers to positive relationships included ineffective and negative communication, a lack of trust, a lack of safety in terms of staff as ineffective in preventing violence, and as perpetrators themselves, and the use of coercion by staff. This unique perspective both acts as a source of triangulation with previous studies and highlights the importance of the therapeutic relationship in providing a safe and therapeutic milieu for the treatment of people with acute mental health problems.

  10. Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Children with Autism: Interview Development and Rates of Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyfer, Ovsanna T.; Folstein, Susan E.; Bacalman, Susan; Davis, Naomi O.; Dinh, Elena; Morgan, Jubel; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2006-01-01

    The Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia was modified for use in children and adolescents with autism by developing additional screening questions and coding options that reflect the presentation of psychiatric disorders in autism spectrum disorders. The modified instrument, the Autism Comorbidity Interview-Present and…

  11. [Forensic psychiatric patients in Denmark].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Tina Gram; Valbak, Lone; Perto, Gurli; Reinert, Kjeld

    2006-06-05

    In Denmark the number of forensic psychiatric patients is increasing. The objective of this study was to explore whether the increased number of forensic psychiatric patients has been reflected in the use of psychiatric inpatient facilities. Furthermore, we wanted to investigate differences in the treatment of various diagnostic groups of forensic patients and of forensic and non-forensic patients with schizophrenia. Information about admissions and outpatient contact was extracted from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register for all Danish patients sentenced to psychiatric treatment in the period 1994-2003. Furthermore, a group of first-admission forensic patients suffering from schizophrenia was compared to a control group of first-admission non-forensic patients with schizophrenia, matched for sex, age and time of admission. The number of forensic psychiatric patients increased markedly in the period 1994-2003; at the same time, the use of inpatient facilities for this group of patients did not increase to a similar degree but actually decreased. Forensic patients in the group F20-F29 spent more time in hospital than did forensic patients with affective disorders and personality disorders. Forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia had significantly longer periods of hospitalization than did non-forensic patients with schizophrenia. Forensic psychiatric patients' use of psychiatric inpatient facilities during the last 10 years did not increase to the extent expected relative to the increasing number of forensic psychiatric patients. This raises the question of whether these patients are receiving necessary and sufficient treatment.

  12. Decrease in mortality rate and hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction after the enactment of the smoking ban law in São Paulo city, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tania M O; Scholz, Jaqueline; de Masi, Eduardo; Nobre, Moacyr R C; Filho, Roberto Kalil

    2017-11-01

    Smoking restriction laws have spread worldwide during the last decade. Previous studies have shown a decline in the community rates of myocardial infarction after enactment of these laws. However, data are scarce about the Latin American population. In the first phase of this study, we reported the successful implementation of the law in São Paulo city, with a decrease in carbon monoxide rates in hospitality venues. To evaluate whether the 2009 implementation of a comprehensive smoking ban law in São Paulo city was associated with a reduction in rates of mortality and hospital admissions for myocardial infarction. We performed a time-series study of monthly rates of mortality and hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction from January 2005 to December 2010. The data were derived from DATASUS, the primary public health information system available in Brazil and from Mortality Information System (SIM). Adjustments and analyses were performed using the Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average with exogenous variables (ARIMAX) method modelled by environmental variables and atmospheric pollutants to evaluate the effect of smoking ban law in mortality and hospital admission rate. We also used Interrupted Time Series Analysis (ITSA) to make a comparison between the period pre and post smoking ban law. We observed a reduction in mortality rate (-11.9% in the first 17 months after the law) and in hospital admission rate (-5.4% in the first 3 months after the law) for myocardial infarction after the implementation of the smoking ban law. Hospital admissions and mortality rate for myocardial infarction were reduced in the first months after the comprehensive smoking ban law was implemented. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Analysis of the burns profile and the admission rate of severely burned adult patient to the National Burn Center of Chile after the 2010 earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Claudia; Villegas, Jorge; Sylvester, Marilu; Peña, Veronica; Bravo, Iside

    2011-06-01

    Chile is located in the Ring of Fire, in South America. An earthquake 8.8° affected 80% of the population in February 27th, 2010. This study was conducted to assess any change in burns profile caused by the earthquake. This was an ecologic study. We compared the 4 months following the earthquake in 2009 and 2010. age, TBSA, deep TBSA, agent, specific mortality rate and rate of admissions to the National burn Center of Chile. Mann-Whitney test and a Poisson regression were performed. Age, agent, TBSA and deep TBSA percentages did not show any difference. Mortality rate was lower in 2010 (0.52 versus 1.22 per 1,000,000 habitants) but no meaningful difference was found (Poisson regression p = 0.06). Admission rate was lower in 2010, 4.6 versus 5.6 per 1,000,000 habitants, but no differences were found (p = 0.26). There was not any admissions directly related to the earthquake. As we do not have incidence registries in Chile, we propose to use the rate of admission to the National Burn Reference Center as an incidence estimator. There was not any significant difference in the burn profile, probably because of the time of the earthquake (3 am). We conclude the earthquake did not affect the way the Chilean people get burned. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence and influence of psychiatric comorbidity on rehabilitation outcome for older hospital inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluyas, Cathy; Lum, Carmel; Chong, Sinn Yuin; Borg, Cynthia; Haines, Terry P

    2011-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the psychiatric comorbidity of a group of older subacute inpatients and then determine whether their psychiatric comorbidity affected measures of rehabilitation outcomes. Eighty-eight older subacute inpatients were recruited for this prospective study. Psychiatric comorbidity was defined according to a participants' performance on four inventory scales: the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Geriatric Anxiety Inventory (GAI), Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and Health of the Nation Outcome Scale 65+. Rehabilitation outcome referred to the participants' length of stay and their performance at discharge on the EuroQol-5D health-related quality of life questionnaire and Barthel index. 68% of the participants scored in the clinical range on at least one of the four scales assessing psychiatric comorbidity at admission, with 51% in the clinical range for GDS and 32% for the GAI. The decrease in scores by the time of discharge was significant for all four scales. Linear regression analyses pointed to a trend for depressive symptoms at admission to be an influential but nonsignificant predictor of rehabilitation outcome. An interesting association was found between the length of the previous acute admission and the GDS score on admission to the subacute unit. A high prevalence of psychological symptoms was identified upon admission, with a significant decrease by the time of discharge. These factors did not significantly predict the selected measures of rehabilitation outcome. Opportunities for future longitudinal research on the prevalence and impact of psychiatric comorbidities on patient outcomes are considered.

  15. Seasonal variations in hospital admissions for mania: Examining for associations with weather variables over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Clara Reece; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Parker, Gordon

    2016-11-15

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by a seasonal pattern with emerging evidence that weather conditions may trigger symptoms. Thus, our aims were to investigate if year-to-year variations in admissions with mania correlated with year-to-year variations in key meteorological variables, if there was a secular trend in light of climate change and if gender or admission status influenced the seasonal pattern. We undertook a Danish register-based nationwide historical cohort study. We included all adults hospitalized to psychiatric care from 1995 to 2012 with mania using the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The Danish Meteorological Institute provided the meteorological variables. The association between weather and admissions was tested using linear regression. Our database comprised 24,313 admissions with mania. There was a seasonal pattern with admission rates peaking in summer. Higher admission rates were associated with more sunshine, more ultraviolet radiation, higher temperature and less snow but were unassociated with rainfall. We did not find a secular trend in the seasonal pattern. Finally, neither gender nor admission status impacted on the overall seasonal pattern of admissions with mania. Only patients in psychiatric care were included. We could not subdivide by type of bipolar disorder. This cohort study based on more than 24,000 admissions identified a distinct seasonal pattern in hospital admissions for those with mania. We found no secular trend. This could indicate that the climate change is not impacting on seasonal patterns, that there is no link between the proposed variables or that change is currently not sufficiently distinctive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A President Views Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, John S.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the changing role of admissions officers which corresponds to the declining student enrollment rate. Looks at changes in higher education over the past 15 years, and considers such issues as marketing, consumerism, and integrity as they relate to college admissions. (WAS)

  17. Short-term effects of Italian smoking regulation on rates of hospital admission for acute myocardial infarction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barone-Adesi, Francesco; Vizzini, Loredana; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    We used the hospital discharge records of Piedmont region (northern Italy) to evaluate whether a national law banning smoking in public resulted in a short-term reduction in hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI...

  18. Admission Heart Rate Predicts Poor Outcomes in Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: The Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trial Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Miaoyan; Sato, Shoichiro; Zheng, Danni; Wang, Xia; Carcel, Cheryl; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Sandset, Else C; Delcourt, Candice; Arima, Hisatomi; Wang, Jiguang; Chalmers, John; Anderson, Craig S

    2016-06-01

    Faster heart rate predicts higher mortality in coronary heart disease and acute ischemic stroke, but its prognostic significance in intracerebral hemorrhage remains uncertain. We aimed to determine the effect of admission heart rate on clinical and imaging outcomes in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. A post hoc pooled analysis of the pilot and main phases of the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trial (INTERACT 1 and 2). Clinical outcomes were mortality and modified Rankin Scale score at 90 days; and imaging outcome was absolute growth in hematoma volume during the initial 24 hours. Patients were divided into 4 categories according to baseline heart rate (<65, 65-74, 75-84, and ≥85 bpm) and analyzed using multivariable adjusted models with the lowest heart rate group as the reference. Of 3185 patients with available data, higher admission heart rate was associated with both mortality and worse modified Rankin Scale score: adjusted hazard ratio for heart rate (≥85 versus <65 bpm) 1.50 (95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.11) and adjusted odds ratio 1.33 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.63), respectively (both P-trend <0.05). There was no significant relationship between heart rate and absolute growth in hematoma volume (P-trend, 0.196). Higher admission heart rate is independently associated with death and poor functional outcome after acute intracerebral hemorrhage. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00226096 and NCT00716079. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Low Infection-Related Re-Admission Rates in a Retrospective of 4725 Children with Appendicitis Using a Clinical Pathway in a Tertiary Care Pediatric Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Nikolas E; Davenport, Kate; Hilfiker, Mary; Langness, Simone; Fairbanks, Timothy; Stucky Fisher, Erin; Newbury, Robert; Andrews, Allyson; Wells, Alan; Chaparro, Juan D; Bradley, John S

    2017-10-24

    Standardization of antibiotic management of appendicitis in tertiary care pediatric centers has been associated with improved outcomes. Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego implemented an appendicitis clinical pathway in 2005. We evaluated infection-related re-admission risk factors since 2010, when an electronic medical record was established, with the aim to optimize the clinical pathway. Between January 2010 and August 2015, 4725 children with a diagnosis of appendicitis were evaluated for demographic data, pathology diagnoses, culture results, and inpatient and oral step-down antibiotic therapy regimens. From children originally admitted for appendicitis, those who were re-admitted with infection were compared with those who were not re-admitted for infection. The populations were controlled by severity of infection using a pathology-defined appendicitis severity scale: Grade 0, no appendicitis; grade 1, simple acute appendicitis with gross and microscopic evidence of inflammation, but no perforation; grade 2, gangrenous/necrotizing/micro-perforated appendicitis with subserosal or serosal exudate, but no frank or visually appreciated perforation; and grade 3, frank perforation. Of 4725 children (total population, TP) admitted with a diagnosis of appendicitis, only 199 (4.2%) were re-admitted, with 125 of these admissions for infection (2.65% of the TP). Age, race/ethnicity, language preference, and body mass index were not found to correlate with re-admission for infection. Length of stay significantly differed between the no infection-related re-admission population and infection-related re-admission population (3.02 vs. 4.03 d, p admission rates as the pathology grade increased (odds ratio grade 1 vs. grade 3 = 2.28, 95% confidence interval 1.03, 5.03). Infection-related re-admission rates for children on the clinical pathway in our institution were infrequent. The greater association of all-cause and infection-related re-admission rates with pathology

  20. Forty-Five-Year Mortality Rate as a Function of the Number and Type of Psychiatric Diagnoses Found in a Large Danish Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madarasz, Wendy; Manzardo, Ann; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2012-01-01

    diagnostic categories. Mortality rates were examined as a function of number and type of co-occurring diagnoses. Results: Psychiatric outcomes for 1247 subjects were associated with 157 deaths. Early mortality risk in psychiatric patients correlated with the number of diagnostic categories (Wald ¿² = 25.......0, df = 1, P anxiety and personality disorders, but not for schizophrenia and substance abuse, which had intrinsically high mortality rates with no comorbidities. Conclusions: Risk of early mortality among psychiatric patients appears to be a function of both...

  1. Forty-Five-Year Mortality Rate as a Function of the Number and Type of Psychiatric Diagnoses Found in a Large Danish Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madarasz, Wendy; Manzardo, Ann; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2012-01-01

    diagnostic categories. Mortality rates were examined as a function of number and type of co-occurring diagnoses. Results: Psychiatric outcomes for 1247 subjects were associated with 157 deaths. Early mortality risk in psychiatric patients correlated with the number of diagnostic categories (Wald χ² = 25.......0, df = 1, P anxiety and personality disorders, but not for schizophrenia and substance abuse, which had intrinsically high mortality rates with no comorbidities. Conclusions: Risk of early mortality among psychiatric patients appears to be a function of both...

  2. A hospital-based palliative care service for patients with advanced organ failure in sub-Saharan Africa reduces admissions and increases home death rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Taylor; Cupido, Clint; Pitout, Elizabeth; van Niekerk, Lindi; Badri, Motasim; Gwyther, Liz; Harding, Richard

    2014-04-01

    Despite emerging data of cost savings under palliative care in various regions, no such data have been generated in response to the high burden of terminal illness in Africa. This evaluation of a novel hospital-based palliative care service for patients with advanced organ failure in urban South Africa aimed to determine whether the service reduces admissions and increases home death rates compared with the same fixed time period of standard hospital care. Data on admissions and place of death were extracted from routine hospital activity records for a fixed period before death, using standard patient daily expense rates. Data from the first 56 consecutive deaths under the new service (intervention group) were compared with 48 consecutive deaths among patients immediately before the new service (historical controls). Among the intervention and control patients, 40 of 56 (71.4%) and 47 of 48 (97.9%), respectively, had at least one admission (P service reduced admissions and improved the rate of home deaths and offers a feasible and cost-effective model for such settings. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Simultaneous vaccination with MMR and DTaP-IPV-Hib and rate of hospital admissions with any infections: A nationwide register based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørup, Signe; Benn, Christine S; Poulsen, Anja; Krause, Tyra G; Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik

    2016-12-07

    In Denmark, live measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) is associated with a reduced risk of infectious disease admissions, particularly for lower respiratory tract infections. In low-income countries, simultaneous vaccination (i.e. vaccination at the same visit) with live and inactivated vaccines may increase child mortality compared with the live vaccine alone. We examined the hypothesis that simultaneous administration of MMR and the inactivated DTaP-IPV-Hib vaccine compared with MMR alone is associated with higher incidence of infectious disease admissions. Nationwide, retrospective, register based cohort study of 520,859 children born in Denmark 1997-2006, who were followed from 15months to 4years of age. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of hospital admissions were estimated by Cox regression and adjusted for background factors including exact age. By 2years of age, 4965 children had simultaneous MMR and DTaP-IPV-Hib as their most recent vaccination. Compared with MMR alone, simultaneous administration was associated with a higher rate of lower respiratory tract infections (adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.13-1.42). There was no effect on other infections. Overall, simultaneous administration was associated with a 7% (95% CI, 0-15%) increase in infectious disease admissions. Simultaneous administration of MMR and DTaP-IPV-Hib compared with MMR alone may increase the rate of hospital admissions related to lower respiratory tract infections. These findings require replication in other high-income settings. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Coerced hospital admission and symptom change--a prospective observational multi-centre study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Kallert

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Coerced admission to psychiatric hospitals, defined by legal status or patient's subjective experience, is common. Evidence on clinical outcomes however is limited. This study aimed to assess symptom change over a three month period following coerced admission and identify patient characteristics associated with outcomes. METHOD: At study sites in 11 European countries consecutive legally involuntary patients and patients with a legally voluntary admission who however felt coerced, were recruited and assessed by independent researchers within the first week after admission. Symptoms were assessed on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Patients were re-assessed after one and three months. RESULTS: The total sample consisted of 2326 legally coerced patients and 764 patients with a legally voluntary admission who felt coerced. Symptom levels significantly improved over time. In a multivariable analysis, higher baseline symptoms, being unemployed, living alone, repeated hospitalisation, being legally a voluntary patient but feeling coerced, and being initially less satisfied with treatment were all associated with less symptom improvement after one month and, other than initial treatment satisfaction, also after three months. The diagnostic group was not linked with outcomes. DISCUSSION: On average patients show significant but limited symptom improvements after coerced hospital admission, possibly reflecting the severity of the underlying illnesses. Social factors, but not the psychiatric diagnosis, appear important predictors of outcomes. Legally voluntary patients who feel coerced may have a poorer prognosis than legally involuntary patients and deserve attention in research and clinical practice.

  5. 76 FR 4997 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Rate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... payment system (PPS) payment rate update period to a rate year (RY) that coincides with a fiscal year (FY... the IPF PPS Payment Rate Update Period from a Rate Year to a Fiscal Year III. Proposed Rebasing and... to change the payment rate update period to a RY that coincides with a FY. If we finalize this...

  6. Prevalence rates of borderline symptoms reported by adolescent inpatients with BPD, psychiatrically healthy adolescents and adult inpatients with BPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Mary C; Temes, Christina M; Magni, Laura R; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Aguirre, Blaise A; Goodman, Marianne

    2017-08-01

    The validity of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in children and adolescents has not been studied in a rigorous manner reflecting the criteria of Robins and Guze first detailed in 1970. This paper and the others in this series address some aspects of this multifaceted validation paradigm, which requires that a disorder has a known clinical presentation, can be delimited from other disorders, 'runs' in families, and something of its aetiology, treatment response and course is known. Three groups of subjects were studied: 104 adolescent inpatients meeting the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines and DSM-IV criteria for BPD, 60 psychiatrically healthy adolescents and 290 adult inpatients meeting the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines and DSM-III-R criteria for BPD. Adolescents with BPD had significantly higher prevalence rates of 22 of the 24 symptoms studied than psychiatrically healthy adolescents. Only rates of serious treatment regressions and countertransference problems failed to reach the Bonferroni-corrected level of 0.002. Adolescents and adults with BPD had only four symptomatic differences that reached this level of significance, with adolescents with BPD reporting significantly lower levels of quasi-psychotic thought, dependency/masochism, devaluation/manipulation/sadism and countertransference problems than adults with BPD. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that adolescents report BPD as severe as that reported by adults. They also suggest that BPD in adolescents is not a tumultuous phase of normal adolescence. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Intelligence in early adulthood and subsequent hospitalisation and admission rates for the whole range of mental disorders: longitudinal study of 1,049,663 men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Catharine R.; Batty, G. David; Tynelius, Per; Deary, Ian J.; Rasmussen, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Background Lower intelligence is a risk factor for several specific mental disorders, but it is unclear whether it is a risk factor for all mental disorder or whether it is associated with illness severity. We examined the relation between pre-morbid intelligence and risk of hospital admission and total admission rates for the whole range of mental disorders. Methods Participants were 1,049,663 Swedish men who took tests of intelligence on conscription into military service and were followed up for hospital admissions for mental disorder for a mean of 22.6 years. International Classification of Diseases diagnoses were recorded at discharge from hospital. Results Risk of hospital admission for all categories of disorder rose with each point decrease in the nine-point IQ score. For a standard deviation decrease in IQ, age-adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) were 1.60 (1.55, 1.65) for schizophrenia, 1.49 (1.45, 1.53) for other non-affective psychoses, 1.50 (1.47, 1.51) for mood disorders, 1.51 (1.48, 1.54) for neurotic disorders, 1.60 (1.56, 1.64) for adjustment disorders, 1.75 (1.70, 1.80) for personality disorders, 1.75 (1.73, 1.77) for alcohol-related and 1.85 (1.82, 1.88) for other substance use disorders. Lower intelligence was associated with greater comorbidity. Associations changed little on adjustment for potential confounders. Men with lower intelligence had higher total admission rates, a possible marker of clinical severity. Conclusions Lower intelligence is a risk factor for the whole range of mental disorders and for illness severity. Understanding the underlying mechanisms is crucial if we are to find ways to reduce the burden of mental illness. PMID:19907333

  8. Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale - Excited Component (BPRS-EC) and neuropsychological dysfunction predict aggression, suicidality, and involuntary treatment in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Christian G; Schöttle, Daniel; Lambert, Martin; Hottenrott, Birgit; Agorastos, Agorastos; Naber, Dieter; Schroeder, Katrin

    2012-02-01

    Aggression, suicidality and involuntary treatment constitute severe clinical problems in first-episode psychosis (FEP). Although there are studies on prevalence and clinical predictors of these conditions, little is known on the influence of psychopathology and neuropsychological dysfunction. 152 FEP inpatients were prospectively assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) and a neuropsychological examination covering the domains 'processing speed', 'concentration and attention', 'executive function', 'working memory', 'verbal memory', 'verbal comprehension', 'logical reasoning', 'global cognition', and 'general intelligence'. Clinical data were collected retrospectively in a structured file audit trial. Patients were aged 24.5±4.9years, and 112 (74%) were male. At admission, 13 (9%) patients presented with severe aggression, and 28 (18%) with severe suicidality. 31 patients (20%) received involuntary treatment. In multivariate analyses, aggression was predicted by BPRS-Excited Component (BPRS-EC; p=.001), suicidality was predicted by BPRS-EC (p=.013) and general intelligence (p=.016), and predictors for involuntary treatment were BPRS-EC (p=.001) and neuropsychological dysfunction in the domain 'concentration and attention' (p=.016). Psychopathology and neuropsychological functioning independently predict dangerous behavior in FEP patients. Some correlations with neuropsychology (e.g., of aggression with concentration/attention) are absent in multivariate analyses and may thus constitute a proxy of psychopathological features. In addition to clinical data, BPRS-EC can be used as a predictor of dangerous behavior. Patients with severe aggression and suicidality show different patterns of neuropsychological dysfunction, indicating that suicidality should not be conceptualized as subtype of aggressive behavior. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Continuity Between Interview-Rated Personality Disorders and Self-Reported DSM-5 Traits in a Danish Psychiatric Sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Anderson, Jaime; Simonsen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    diagnoses found in DSM-5 Section II, specified sets of facets are configured into familiar PD types. The current study aimed to evaluate the continuity across the Section II and III models of PDs. A sample of 142 psychiatric outpatients were administered the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 and rated...... showed that, overall, the interview-rated DSM-5 Section II disorders were most strongly associated with expected self-reported Section III traits. Results also supported the addition of facets not included in the proposed Section III PD criteria. These findings partly underscore the continuity between...... the Section II and III models of PDs and suggest how it may be enhanced; however, additional research is needed to further evaluate where continuity exists, where it does not exist, and how the traits system could be improved. (PsycINFO Database Record...

  10. [Rate and characteristics of dementia patients who visit psychiatric emergency hospitals for the treatment of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yoshiro; Kazui, Hiroaki; Sawa, Yutaka; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms and behavioral changes, known as behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), are often observed in patients with dementia. BPSD impairs a patient's quality of life, increases the burden on the caregivers, and can be a predictor of the need for institutionalization. BPSD can aggravate on holidays or at night, when general psychiatric clinics are closed. When psychiatric symptoms aggravate on holidays or at night in patients with psychiatric disorders other than dementia, such as schizophrenia and manic psychosis, the patients visit psychiatric emergency hospitals. However, it has not been assessed whether patients with dementia visit psychiatric emergency hospitals for the treatment of BPSD on holidays or at night, although dementia patients are increasing and account for 10.5% of psychiatric outpatients in Japan. To determine the percentage of dementia patients with BPSD in all psychiatric patients who visit psychiatric emergency hospitals, and the characteristics of patients with BPSD in Japan. We developed two questionnaires. One was for psychiatric emergency hospitals and assessed the numbers of all patients, patients over 65 years old, and patients over 65 years and with BPSD or BPSD-like symptoms, who visited the psychiatric emergency hospitals on holidays or at night. The other questionnaire was for each patient over 65 years and with BPSD, and assessed the patients' characteristics, including their diagnosis, sex, what kinds of BPSD or BPSD-like symptoms brought them to the hospital, and whether they had visited a psychiatric clinic or hospital during the preceding 12 months. The questionnaires were sent to 360 hospitals that belong to the Japan Psychiatric Hospitals Association and treat patients with acute psychotic symptoms or dementia. This prospective survey was conducted from October 1 to November 30, 2009. One hundred and forty-three hospitals returned the questionnaires (response rate: 39.7%). In the survey

  11. Truncating mutations in SPAST patients are associated with a high rate of psychiatric comorbidities in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelban, Viorica; Tucci, Arianna; Lynch, David S; Polke, James M; Santos, Liana; Jonvik, Hallgeir; Groppa, Stanislav; Wood, Nicholas W; Houlden, Henry

    2017-08-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a rare and heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterised by progressive lower limb spasticity. They are classified as either 'pure' or 'complex' where spastic paraplegia is complicated with additional neurological features. Mutations in the spastin gene (SPAST) are the most common cause of HSP and typically present with a pure form. We assessed in detail the phenotypic and genetic spectrum of SPAST-related HSP focused on 118 patients carrying SPAST mutations. This study, one of the largest cohorts of genetically confirmed spastin patients to date, contributes with the discovery of a significant number of novel SPAST mutations. Our data reveal a high rate of complex cases (25%), with psychiatric disorders among the most common comorbidity (10% of all SPASTpatients). Further, we identify a genotype-phenotype correlation between patients carrying loss-of-function mutations in SPAST and the presence of psychiatric disorders. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Predictors of violent behavior among acute psychiatric patients: clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amore, Mario; Menchetti, Marco; Tonti, Cristina; Scarlatti, Fabiano; Lundgren, Eva; Esposito, William; Berardi, Domenico

    2008-06-01

    Violence risk prediction is a priority issue for clinicians working with mentally disordered offenders. The aim of the present study was to determine violence risk factors in acute psychiatric inpatients. The study was conducted in a locked, short-term psychiatric inpatient unit and involved 374 patients consecutively admitted in a 1-year period. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained through a review of the medical records and patient interviews. Psychiatric symptoms at admission were assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). Psychiatric diagnosis was formulated using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Past aggressive behavior was evaluated by interviewing patients, caregivers or other collateral informants. Aggressive behaviors in the ward were assessed using the Overt Aggression Scale. Patients who perpetrated verbal and against-object aggression or physical aggression in the month before admission were compared to non-aggressive patients, moreover, aggressive behavior during hospitalization and persistence of physical violence after admission were evaluated. Violent behavior in the month before admission was associated with male sex, substance abuse and positive symptoms. The most significant risk factor for physical violence was a past history of physically aggressive behavior. The persistent physical assaultiveness before and during hospitalization was related to higher BPRS total scores and to more severe thought disturbances. Higher levels of hostility-suspiciousness BPRS scores predicted a change for the worse in violent behavior, from verbal to physical. A comprehensive evaluation of the history of past aggressive behavior and psychopathological variables has important implications for the prediction of violence in psychiatric settings.

  13. Personality traits as predictors of inpatient aggression in a high-security forensic psychiatric setting: prospective evaluation of the PCL-R and IPDE dimension ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Calvin M; Hogue, Todd E; Daffern, Michael; Mannion, Aisling; Howells, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    The Dangerous and Severe Personality Disorder (DSPD) initiative in England and Wales provides specialized care to high-risk offenders with mental disorders. This study investigated the predictive utility of personality traits, assessed using the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) and the International Personality Disorder Examination, with 44 consecutive admissions to the DSPD unit at a high-security forensic psychiatric hospital. Incidents of interpersonal physical aggression (IPA) were observed for 39% of the sample over an average 1.5-year period following admission. Histrionic personality disorder (PD) predicted IPA, and Histrionic, Borderline, and Antisocial PDs all predicted repetitive (2+ incidents of) IPA. PCL-R Factor 1 and Facets 1 and 2 were also significant predictors of IPA. PCL-R Factor 1 and Histrionic PD scores were significantly associated with imminence of IPA. Results were discussed in terms of the utility of personality traits in risk assessment and treatment of specially selected high-risk forensic psychiatric patients in secure settings.

  14. Effect of a Multi-Diagnosis Observation Unit on Emergency Department Length of Stay and Inpatient Admission Rate at Two Canadian Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Amy H Y; Barclay, Neil G; Abu-Laban, Riyad B

    2016-12-01

    Observation units (OUs) have been shown to reduce emergency department (ED) lengths of stay (LOS) and admissions. Most published studies have been on OUs managing single complaints. Our aim was to determine whether an OU reduces ED LOS and hospital admission rates for adults with a variety of presenting complaints. We comparatively evaluated two hospitals in British Columbia, Canada (hereafter ED A and ED B) using a pre-post design. Data were extracted from administrative databases. The post-OU cohort included all adults presenting 6 months after OU implementation. The pre-OU cohort included all adults presenting in the same 6-month period 1 year before OU implementation. There were 109,625 patient visits during the study period. Of the 56,832 visits during the post-OU period (27,512 to ED A and 29,318 to ED B), 1.9% were managed in the OU in ED A and 1.4% in ED B. Implementation was associated with an increase in the median ED LOS at ED A (179.0 min pre vs. 192.0 min post [+13.0 min]; p < 0.001; mean difference -12.5 min, 95% confidence interval [CI] -15.2 to -9.9 min), but no change at ED B (182.0 min pre vs. 182.0 min post; p = 0.55; mean difference +2.0 min, 95% CI -0.7 to +4.7 min). Implementation significantly decreased the hospital admission rate for ED A (17.8% pre to 17.0% post [-0.8%], 95% CI -0.18% to 0.15%; p < 0.05) and did not significantly change the hospital admission rate at ED B (18.9% pre to 18.3% post [-0.6%], 95% CI -1.19% to -0.09%; p = 0.09). A multi-diagnosis OU can reduce hospital admission rate in a site-specific manner. In contrast to previous studies, we did not find that an OU reduced ED LOS. Further research is needed to determine whether OUs can reduce ED overcrowding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prediction of Eventual Suicide in Psychiatric Inpatients by Clinical Ratings of Hopelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Aaron T.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Used 9-point clinical rating scale to assess severity of hopelessness in 141 patients hospitalized with suicide ideation. Followed patients from 5 to 10 years; 10 eventually committed suicide. Mean hopelessness rating for patients committing suicide was significantly higher than that for patients not committing suicide. Cutoff score of 6 or above…

  16. Admission heart rate in relation to presentation and prognosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Treatment regimens in German chest pain units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perne, A; Schmidt, F P; Hochadel, M; Giannitsis, E; Darius, H; Maier, L S; Schmitt, C; Heusch, G; Voigtländer, T; Mudra, H; Gori, T; Senges, J; Münzel, T

    2016-05-01

    Higher heart rates on admission have been associated with poor outcomes in patients with an acute coronary syndrome in previous cohorts. Whether such a linear relationship still exists in contemporary high-level care is unclear. Prospectively collected data from patients presenting with myocardial infarction (MI) in centers participating in the Chest Pain Unit (CPU) Registry between December 2008 and July 2014 were analyzed. Patients were classified according to their initial heart rate (I:  90 bpm experience reduced survival at 3 months despite optimal treatment. Patients with bradycardia also seem to be at increased risk for cardiovascular events despite much earlier presentation and treatment.

  17. Migration background and juvenile mental health: a descriptive retrospective analysis of diagnostic rates of psychiatric disorders in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilman Jakob Gaber

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This article presents diagnostic rates for specific mental disorders in a German pediatric inpatient population over a period of 20 years with respect to migration background and socioeconomic status (SES. Methods: Diagnostic data were obtained over a period of 20 years from 8,904 patients who visited a child and adolescent psychiatry mental health service in Germany. Data from 5,985 diagnosed patients (ICD-9 and ICD-10 criteria were included with respect to gender, migration background, and SES. Results:Migration- and gender-specific effects were found for both periods of assessment. The group of boys with a migration background showed significantly higher rates of reactions to severe stress, adjustment disorders, and posttraumatic stress disorder compared to their male, non-migrant counterparts. Conversely, boys without a migration background showed a significantly higher percentage rate of hyperkinetic disorders than male migrants. Similar results were found for female migrants in the latter assessment period (ICD-10. In addition, female migrants showed lower rates of emotional disorders whose onset occurs in childhood compared to their non-migrant counterparts. Conclusions: Data from this investigation provide preliminary evidence that the prevalence of various psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents is influenced by migration background and SES.

  18. Diagnosis, admission, discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark

    2009-06-01

    The respiratory syncytial virus should be considered as the most likely pathogen in an infant or young child with a significant acute lower respiratory tract infection during the characteristic epidemic season. While the diagnosis of an RSV infection is relatively straight forward, the clinical diagnosis applied to the associate illness is far less clear cut. Criteria for assessment is based on clinical assessment of severity at examination and associated risk factors. Social factors may further influence the likelihood of admission. Guidelines are consistent in noting that there are no scoring systems or other tests that can reliably predict the need for supportive care or HDU admission. Criteria for the administration of oxygen vary. There are marked differences in the duration of hospitalisation for RSV admission between the USA, UK and Scandinavia. Longer length of admission is associated with significantly higher rates of nosicomial infection.

  19. Variation in use of coercive measures in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, B; Nordt, C; Rössler, W

    2011-05-01

    The use of coercive measures in psychiatry is still poorly understood. Most empirical research has been limited to compulsory admission and to risk factors on an individual patient level. This study addresses three coercive measures and the role of predictive factors at both patient and institutional levels. Using the central psychiatric register that covers all psychiatric hospitals in Canton Zurich (1.3 million people), Switzerland, we traced all inpatients in 2007 aged 18-70 (n = 9698). We used GEE models to analyse variation in rates between psychiatric hospitals. Overall, we found quotas of 24.8% involuntary admissions, 6.4% seclusion/restraint and 4.2% coerced medication. Results suggest that the kind and severity of mental illness are the most important risk factors for being subjected to any form of coercion. Variation across the six psychiatric hospitals was high, even after accounting for risk factors on the patient level suggesting that centre effects are an important source of variability. However, effects of the hospital characteristics 'size of the hospital', 'length of inpatient stay', and 'work load of the nursing staff' were only weak ('bed occupancy rate' was not statistically significant). The significant variation in use of coercive measures across psychiatric hospitals needs further study. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. 76 FR 26431 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Rate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    .... Medicare Cost Reports b. Other Data Sources 2. Final Cost Category Computation 3. Selection of Price... Assignment 2. Payment for Comorbid Conditions 3. Patient Age Adjustments 4. Variable Per Diem Adjustments C... established the Federal per diem base rate for each patient day in an IPF derived from the national average...

  1. Does mental health service integration affect compulsory admissions?

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    André I. Wierdsma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over recent years, the number of compulsory admissions in many countries has increased, probably as a result of the shift from inpatient to outpatient mental health care. This might be mitigated by formal or collaborative relationships between services. Methods: In a retrospective record linkage study, we compared two neighboring districts, varying in level of service integration. Two periods were combined: 1991–1993 and 2001–2003. We included patients aged 18–60, who had a first emergency compulsory admission (n=830. Their psychiatric history was assessed, and service-use after admission was monitored over a 12-month follow-up. Results: Over a 10-year period, compulsory admission rates increased by 47%. Difference in relative increase between the integrated and non-integrated services was 14%. Patient characteristics showed different profiles in the two districts. Length of stay was >10 days shorter in the integrated district, where the proportion of involuntary readmissions decreased more, and where aftercare was swift and provided to about 10% more patients than in the non-integrated district. Conclusions: Services outcomes showed better results where mental healthcare was more integrated. However, limited effects were found and other factors than integration of services may be more important in preventing compulsory admissions.

  2. To use the brief psychiatric rating scale to detect disorganized speech in schizophrenia: Findings from the REAP-AP study

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    Yong Chon Park

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Our study aimed to assess the psychometric validity of the conceptual disorganization item and other items of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS for detecting disorganized speech in patients with schizophrenia. We included 357 schizophrenia patients with disorganized speech and 1082 without disorganized speech from the survey centers in India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, and Taiwan, using the data from the Research on Asian Psychotropic Patterns for Antipsychotics (REAP-AP study. After adjusting the effects of confounding variables, a binary logistic regression model was fitted to identify BPRS items independently associated with disorganized speech. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were used to identify optimum cut-off scores and their sensitivities and specificities for detecting disorganized speech. After adjusting the effects of confounding variables, the fitted binary logistic regression model indicated that conceptual disorganization (P < 0.0001, uncooperativeness (P = 0.010 and excitement (P = 0.001 were independently associated with disorganized speech. The ROC curve revealed that the conceptual disorganization item could accurately detect disorganized speech in patients with schizophrenia both separately and in combination with uncooperativeness and excitement. The subscale for conceptual disorganization, uncooperativeness and excitement items in the BPRS is a promising psychometric tool for detecting disorganized speech.

  3. Common mental disorders among HIV-infected individuals in South Africa: prevalence, predictors, and validation of brief psychiatric rating scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Landon; Smit, Joalida; Roux, Liezel Le; Parker, Siraaj; Stein, Dan J; Seedat, Soraya

    2008-02-01

    Despite the high prevalence of both mental disorders and HIV infection in much of sub-Saharan Africa, little is known about the occurrence of mental health disorders among HIV-infected individuals. We conducted a cross-sectional study among individuals enrolled into HIV care and treatment services near Cape Town, South Africa. Psychiatric diagnoses were measured using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) administered by trained research nurses. In addition, all participants were administered brief rating scales for depression (the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale [CES-D]), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ), and alcohol dependence/abuse (the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test [AUDIT]). The median age among the 465 participants was 33 years and 75% were female; 48% were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Overall, the prevalence of depression, PTSD and alcohol dependence/abuse was 14% (n = 62), 5% (n = 24), and 7% (n = 35), respectively. In multivariate analysis, the prevalence of all disorders was significantly higher among individuals who spoke Afrikaans compared to Xhosa. While the AUDIT showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in detecting MINI-defined dependence/abuse (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, 0.96), the HTQ and CES-D had lower performance characteristics in detecting PTSD (0.74) and depression (0.76), respectively. These data demonstrate high levels of depression, PTSD and alcohol dependence/abuse among HIV-infected individuals in this setting. Additional research is required to refine these rating scales for maximum applicability in cross-cultural populations. More generally, HIV care and treatment services represent an important venue to identify and manage individuals with common mental disorders in resource-limited settings.

  4. SELF-RATED EXPECTATIONS OF SUICIDAL BEHAVIOR PREDICT FUTURE SUICIDE ATTEMPTS AMONG ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, Ewa K; Horwitz, Adam G; King, Cheryl A

    2016-06-01

    This study's purpose was to examine the predictive validity and clinical utility of a brief measure assessing youths' own expectations of their future risk of suicidal behavior, administered in a psychiatric emergency (PE) department; and determine if youths' ratings improve upon a clinician-administered assessment of suicidal ideation severity. The outcome was suicide attempts up to 18 months later. In this medical record review study, 340 consecutively presenting youths (ages 13-24) seeking PE services over a 7-month period were included. Subsequent PE visits and suicide attempts were retrospectively tracked for up to 18 months. The 3-item scale assessing patients' perception of their own suicidal behavior risk and the clinician-administered ideation severity scale were used routinely at the study site. Cox regression results showed that youths' expectations of suicidal behavior were independently associated with increased risk of suicide attempts, even after adjusting for key covariates. Results were not moderated by sex, suicide attempt history, or age. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses indicated that self-assessed expectations of risk improved the predictive accuracy of the clinician-administered suicidal ideation measure. Youths' ratings indicative of lower confidence in maintaining safety uniquely predicted follow-up attempts and provided incremental validity over and above the clinician-administered assessment and improved its accuracy, suggesting their potential for augmenting suicide risk formulation. Assessing youths' own perceptions of suicide risk appears to be clinically useful, feasible to implement in PE settings, and, if replicated, promising for improving identification of youth at risk for suicidal behavior. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Optimal Admission to Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaek, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses admission decisions when students from different high school tracks apply for admission to university programmes. I derive a criterion that is optimal in the sense that it maximizes the graduation rates of the university programmes. The paper contains an empirical analysis that documents the relevance of theory and illustrates…

  6. Fairness and Undergraduate Admission: A Qualitative Exploration of Admissions Choices at the University of Oxford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimdars, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The article investigates unequal admissions patterns at the University of Oxford. Statistical work shows differences in admission rates by social class, ethnicity, gender, qualification status and secondary schooling. In-depth interviews with admissions tutors, college and university officials and observations of eight admissions meetings provide…

  7. Spatial analysis of drug-related hospital admissions: an auto-Gaussian model to estimate the hospitalization rates in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Colasante

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to evaluate, even if partially, how much the drug use phenomenon impacts on the Italian National Heatlh System throughout the estimation at local level (Local Health Unit of the hospitalization rate caused by substance use and abuse such as opiates, barbiturates-sedativeshypnotics, cocaine and cannabis, and keeping in mind the phenomenon distribution in the space and so the fact that what happens in a specific area depends on what is happening in the neighbourhoods close to it (spatial autocorrelation.

    Methods: Data from hospital discharge database were provided by the Ministry of Health and an auto- Gaussian model was fitted. The spatial trend can be a function of other explanatory variables or can simply be modeled as a function of spatial location. Both models were fitted and compared using the number of subjects kept in charge by Drug Addiction Services and the number of beds held by hospitals as covariates.

    Results: Concerning opiates use related hospitalizations, results show areas where the phenomenon was less prominent in 2001 (Lombardy, part of Liguria, Umbria, part of Latium, Campania, Apulia and Sicily. In the following years, the hospitalization rates increased in some areas, such as the north of Apulia, part of Campania and Latium. A dependence of the opiates related hospitalization rates on the rate of subjects kept in charge by the Drug Addiction Services is highlighted. Concerning barbiturates-sedatives-hypnotics consumption, the best model is the one without covariates and estimated hospitalization rates are lower then 3 per thousand. The model with only the covariate “rate of subjects kept in charge by Drug Addiction Services” has been used both for cocaine and cannabis. In these two cases, more than a half of the Local Health Units report hospitalization rates lower than 0.5 per thousand

  8. Comparison of the rates of fight-related trauma admissions in Ramadan and the non-Ramadan months during 8 years in public hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran

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    Gholamreza Mohseni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ramadan is a time when Muslims are expected to be calm and peaceful in daily life both mentally and physiologically. Some people believe that they should try to don’t have be involved in bad and deviant behaviors in Ramadan. As increasing social safety and reducing crime in society are the most important concerns of the authorities , psychologists, sociologists and governments, they are try to find ways to increase the social safety and decrease the crime rates. The aim of this study was to investigate the statisticaltraumas Due to fights and rate of ’deviant behaviors during Ramadan compared to Non-Ramadan months  of the years 2001 to 2008 in public hospitals in the city of Kermanshah, Iran. Method: Our study was a prospective study. It included patients who were involved in four types of traumas including beating, gunshot, falling from height and car-accident during Ramadan and the Non-Ramadan months of the years 2001 to 2008 admitted to the Emergency Trauma Center Departments (ETCDs of Taleghani and Imam Reza Hospitals in Kermanshah, Iran. Results: The study included 168753 patients. 155705 patients (442.34 mean ± 436.77 SD were admitted in Non-Ramadan months and the remaining 13048 patients (407.75 mean ± 427.16 SD in Ramadan month. Based on the results, the average of trauma instances in Non-Ramadan months was higher, but no statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups. We did not observe significant differences for types of traumatic events in Ramadan compared to Non-Ramadan months, but for Non Ramadan months all types of traumatic except gunshot and beating were significant. Conclusion: Although Ramadan is not a special controlling factor for trauma admissions, but it can has an important effect on the reduction of numbers and types of fight-related trauma admissions in ETCD of hospitals.

  9. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

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    B. A. Nicks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1% requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years, with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140 versus 340 min, CI (304–375; <0.001 when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198 compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue.

  10. Trends in hospital admissions, re-admissions, and in-hospital mortality among HIV-infected patients between 1993 and 2013: Impact of hepatitis C co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijide, Héctor; Mena, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Osorio, Iria; Pértega, Sonia; Castro-Iglesias, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Martínez, Guillermo; Pedreira, José; Poveda, Eva

    2017-01-01

    New patterns in epidemiological characteristics of people living with HIV infection (PLWH) and the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) have changed the profile of hospital admissions in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions, re-admissions, and mortality rates in HIV patients and to analyze the role of HCV co-infection. A retrospective cohort study conducted on all hospital admissions of HIV patients between 1993 and 2013. The study time was divided in two periods (1993-2002 and 2003-2013) to be compared by conducting a comparative cross-sectional analysis. A total of 22,901 patient-years were included in the analysis, with 6917 hospital admissions, corresponding to 1937 subjects (75% male, mean age 36±11 years, 37% HIV/HCV co-infected patients). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days (5-16), and the 30-day hospital re-admission rate was 20.1%. A significant decrease in hospital admissions related with infectious and psychiatric diseases was observed in the last period (2003-2013), but there was an increase in those related with malignancies, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and chronic respiratory diseases. In-hospital mortality remained high (6.8% in the first period vs. 6.3% in the second one), with a progressive increase of non-AIDS-defining illness deaths (37.9% vs. 68.3%, P<.001). The admission rate significantly dropped after 1996 (4.9% yearly), but it was less pronounced in HCV co-infected patients (1.7% yearly). Hospital admissions due to infectious and psychiatric disorders have decreased, with a significant increase in non-AIDS-defining malignancies, cardiovascular, and chronic respiratory diseases. In-hospital mortality is currently still high, but mainly because of non-AIDS-defining illnesses. HCV co-infection increased the hospital stay and re-admissions during the study period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y

  11. Stress levels of psychiatric nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looff, P.C. de; Kuijpers, E.; Nijman, H.L.I.

    2014-01-01

    During a total of 30 shifts, the arousal levels of 10 psychiatric nurses were assessed while working on a (forensic) psychiatric admissions ward. Arousal was assessed by means of a small device (wristband) by which the Skin Conductance Level (SCL) of the participating nurses was monitored. Each

  12. Dimensional approach to symptom factors of major depressive disorder in Koreans, using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Jang, Eun Young; Kim, Daeho; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Jung-Bum; Jo, Sun-Jin; Park, Yong Chon

    2015-01-01

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) has a variety of symptoms beyond the affective dimensions, the factor structure and contents of comprehensive psychiatric symptoms of this disorder have rarely been explored using the 18-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). We aimed to identify the factor structure of the 18-item BPRS in Korean MDD patients. A total of 258 MDD patients were recruited from a multicenter sample of the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS), depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), global severity (Clinical Global Impression of Severity Scale), suicidal ideation (Scale for Suicide Ideation), functioning (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale), and quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-abbreviated version). Common factor analysis with oblique rotation was used to yield factor structure. A four-factor structure was designed and interpreted by the symptom dimensions to reflect mood disturbance, positive symptoms/apathy, bipolarity, and thought distortion/mannerism. These individual factors were also significantly correlated with clinical variables. The findings of this study support the view that the BPRS may be a promising measuring tool for the initial assessment of MDD patients. In addition, the four-factor structure of the BPRS may be useful in understanding the mood and psychotic characteristics of these patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  13. Dimensional approach to symptom factors of major depressive disorder in Koreans, using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale: The Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Cheol Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although major depressive disorder (MDD has a variety of symptoms beyond the affective dimensions, the factor structure and contents of comprehensive psychiatric symptoms of this disorder have rarely been explored using the 18-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS. We aimed to identify the factor structure of the 18-item BPRS in Korean MDD patients. A total of 258 MDD patients were recruited from a multicenter sample of the Clinical Research Center for Depression of South Korea study. Psychometric scales were used to assess overall psychiatric symptoms (BPRS, depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, anxiety (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, global severity (Clinical Global Impression of Severity Scale, suicidal ideation (Scale for Suicide Ideation, functioning (Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale, and quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-abbreviated version. Common factor analysis with oblique rotation was used to yield factor structure. A four-factor structure was designed and interpreted by the symptom dimensions to reflect mood disturbance, positive symptoms/apathy, bipolarity, and thought distortion/mannerism. These individual factors were also significantly correlated with clinical variables. The findings of this study support the view that the BPRS may be a promising measuring tool for the initial assessment of MDD patients. In addition, the four-factor structure of the BPRS may be useful in understanding the mood and psychotic characteristics of these patients.

  14. Psychiatric emergency services in Copenhagen 2012: A 27-year psychiatric and demographic follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltke, Katinka; Høegh, Erica B; Sæbye, Ditte; Larsen, Peter Lindorff; Reff, Kasper Thybo; Knop, Joachim

    2015-08-01

    Since the first publication of the psychiatric emergency units (PEUs) in Copenhagen 1985, outpatient facilities have undergone considerable changes. Our aim is to examine how these changes have influenced the activities in the PEUs in the same catchment area. We conducted a follow-up study to describe this development in the past 27 years by comparing 1985 variables with same measures in 2012. A random sample of all visits every 10 days in 2012 to three PEUs in Copenhagen were registered and compared with data collected, using the same study design in 1985. The number of visits has decreased significantly from 367 visits/year/10,000 inhabitants in 1985 to 225 in 2012. Apart from a considerable number (15.6%) of visitors with non-Danish background, the demographic variables have not changed significantly since 1985. Compared with 1985, the diagnostic distribution among the 2012 visitors shows an increased frequency of affective disorders and neurotic and stress disorders, while schizophrenia spectrum and personality disorders show almost the same frequencies in 1985 and 2012. Rates of alcoholism and organic mental disorders show a minor reduction during the 27-year follow-up period. In 1985, 20.7% of the visits ended up without any referrals, compared with 4.8% in 2012. The rate of acute admissions into a psychiatric ward was 60.8% in 2012 compared with 35.65% in 1985. The extension of the psychiatric outpatients' facilities since 1985 has reduced the number of visits in the PEUs considerably. The results have shown a change of diagnostic distribution and more severe conditions requiring acute admissions for emergency treatment. Close collaboration with the patients' families, GPs, social authorities and specialized psychiatric outpatient clinics is emphasized.

  15. Self-reported symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: rate of endorsement and association with neuropsychological performance in an adult psychiatric sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Brooke C; Thoering, Teresa; Cludius, Barbara; Moritz, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    The lack of specificity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms represents a diagnostic challenge, especially when assessing psychiatric patients reporting a wide range of complaints. Rate of endorsement of ADHD symptoms, and their association with neuropsychological performance, was examined in a psychiatric sample of 71 adults, who had been referred for a neuropsychological evaluation. Patients completed two self-report measures of ADHD symptoms, the ADHD Self-Report Scale (ADHD-SR) and the Wender Utah Rating Scale-Short Form, as well as measures of attention, executive functioning, visuoconstructional ability, and verbal learning and memory. On the ADHD-SR, 74.6% of the sample met the cutoff for inattention or hyperactivity, while 81.7% met the cutoff for impulsivity. Neuropsychological performance was weakly associated with self-reported symptoms. Our results suggest that psychiatric patients commonly report symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Assessment utilizing multiple sources is necessary to confirm whether self-reported symptoms are indicative of ADHD or reflect other causes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Psychiatric Nursing Care for Adult Survivors of Child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thóra van der Hafsteinsdóttir; Cokky van der Venne; Yvonne van der Zalm; Nienke Kool; Willem Nugteren; prof Berno van Meijel

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to

  17. Understanding the management of people seeking voluntary psychiatric hospitalization who do not meet the criteria for inpatient admission: a qualitative study of mental health liaison nurses working in accident and emergency departments in the north of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Iain; McGowan, Linda

    2015-02-01

    Mental health liaison nurses assess people who self-present at accident and emergency departments seeking inpatient admission, however not all presentations meet the criteria for admission. Little is known about how liaison nurses manage this client group. This qualitative study explored how liaison nurses manage this client group. This study used the think aloud technique to recreate clinical scenarios of clients requesting admission who do not meet the criteria for such admission. Participants were then subsequently interviewed. Eighteen liaison nurses working in hospitals across the North of England participated. Data were analysed using framework analysis methods. Findings indicate that the liaison nurses use a variety of therapeutic skills and methods in managing this client group. Liaison nurses were found to 'sell' crisis and home-based treatment as an equivalent, or superior in quality, to hospital care. However, the existing evidence base does not fully support this assertion. Liaison nurses face numerous difficulties in this role. In the absence of any formalized training, liaison nurses rely on their own clinical knowledge and expertise. Implications for future service provision and further research are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonimmigrant Admissions - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  19. Borderline intellectual functioning is associated with poor social functioning, increased rates of psychiatric diagnosis and drug use--a cross sectional population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigi, Karny; Werbeloff, Nomi; Goldberg, Shira; Portuguese, Shirly; Reichenberg, Abraham; Fruchter, Eyal; Weiser, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Borderline intellectual functioning is defined by the DSM IV as an IQ range that is between one to two standard deviations below the mean (71borderline intellectual functioning is associated with various mental disorders, problems in everyday functioning, social disability and poor academic or occupational achievement. Using data from the Israeli military, we retrieved the social and clinical characteristics of 76,962 adolescents with borderline intellectual functioning and compared their social functioning, psychiatric diagnoses and drug abuse with those of 96,580 adolescents with average IQ (± 0.25 SD from population mean). The results demonstrated that the borderline intellectual functioning group had higher rates of poor social functioning compared to the control group (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.85-1.94). Individuals with borderline intellectual functioning were 2.37 times more likely to have a psychiatric diagnosis (95% CI=2.30-2.45) and 1.2 times more likely to use drugs (95% CI=1.07-0.35) than those with average IQ. These results suggest that adolescents with borderline intellectual functioning are more likely to suffer from psychiatric disorders, poor social functioning and drug abuse than those with average intelligence, and that borderline intellectual functioning is a marker of vulnerability to these poor outcomes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Social class, social mobility and risk of psychiatric disorder--a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiikkaja, Sanna; Sandin, Sven; Malki, Ninoa; Modin, Bitte; Sparén, Pär; Hultman, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    This study explored how adult social class and social mobility between parental and own adult social class is related to psychiatric disorder. In this prospective cohort study, over 1 million employed Swedes born in 1949-1959 were included. Information on parental class (1960) and own mid-life social class (1980 and 1990) was retrieved from the censuses and categorised as High Non-manual, Low Non-manual, High Manual, Low Manual and Self-employed. After identifying adult class, individuals were followed for psychiatric disorder by first admission of schizophrenia, alcoholism and drug dependency, affective psychosis and neurosis or personality disorder (N=24,659) from the Swedish Patient Register. We used Poisson regression analysis to estimate first admission rates of psychiatric disorder per 100,000 person-years and relative risks (RR) by adult social class (treated as a time-varying covariate). The RRs of psychiatric disorder among the Non-manual and Manual classes were also estimated by magnitude of social mobility. The rate of psychiatric disorder was significantly higher among individuals belonging to the Low manual class as compared with the High Non-manual class. Compared to High Non-manual class, the risk for psychiatric disorder ranged from 2.07 (Low Manual class) to 1.38 (Low Non-manual class). Parental class had a minor impact on these estimates. Among the Non-manual and Manual classes, downward mobility was associated with increased risk and upward mobility with decreased risk of psychiatric disorder. In addition, downward mobility was inversely associated with the magnitude of social mobility, independent of parental class. Independently of parental social class, the risk of psychiatric disorder increases with increased downward social mobility and decreases with increased upward mobility.

  1. Social class, social mobility and risk of psychiatric disorder--a population-based longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Tiikkaja

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study explored how adult social class and social mobility between parental and own adult social class is related to psychiatric disorder. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, over 1 million employed Swedes born in 1949-1959 were included. Information on parental class (1960 and own mid-life social class (1980 and 1990 was retrieved from the censuses and categorised as High Non-manual, Low Non-manual, High Manual, Low Manual and Self-employed. After identifying adult class, individuals were followed for psychiatric disorder by first admission of schizophrenia, alcoholism and drug dependency, affective psychosis and neurosis or personality disorder (N=24,659 from the Swedish Patient Register. We used Poisson regression analysis to estimate first admission rates of psychiatric disorder per 100,000 person-years and relative risks (RR by adult social class (treated as a time-varying covariate. The RRs of psychiatric disorder among the Non-manual and Manual classes were also estimated by magnitude of social mobility. RESULTS: The rate of psychiatric disorder was significantly higher among individuals belonging to the Low manual class as compared with the High Non-manual class. Compared to High Non-manual class, the risk for psychiatric disorder ranged from 2.07 (Low Manual class to 1.38 (Low Non-manual class. Parental class had a minor impact on these estimates. Among the Non-manual and Manual classes, downward mobility was associated with increased risk and upward mobility with decreased risk of psychiatric disorder. In addition, downward mobility was inversely associated with the magnitude of social mobility, independent of parental class. CONCLUSIONS: Independently of parental social class, the risk of psychiatric disorder increases with increased downward social mobility and decreases with increased upward mobility.

  2. Respiratory rate and pulse oximetry derived information as predictors of hospital admission in young children in Bangladesh: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Ainara; Zhou, Guohai; Raihana, Shahreen; Dunsmuir, Dustin; Karlen, Walter; Dekhordi, Parastoo; Huda, Tanvir; Arifeen, Shams El; Larson, Charles; Kissoon, Niranjan; Dumont, Guy A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2016-08-17

    Hypoxaemia is a strong predictor of mortality in children. Early detection of deteriorating condition is vital to timely intervention. We hypothesise that measures of pulse oximetry dynamics may identify children requiring hospitalisation. Our aim was to develop a predictive tool using only objective data derived from pulse oximetry and observed respiratory rate to identify children at increased risk of hospital admission. Tertiary-level hospital emergency department in Bangladesh. Children under 5 years (n=3374) presenting at the facility (October 2012-April 2013) without documented chronic diseases were recruited. 1-minute segments of pulse oximetry (photoplethysmogram (PPG), blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR)) and respiratory rate were collected with a mobile app. The need for hospitalisation based on expert physician review and follow-up. Pulse rate variability (PRV) using pulse peak intervals of the PPG signal and features extracted from the SpO2 signal, all derived from pulse oximetry recordings, were studied. A univariate age-adjusted logistic regression was applied to evaluate differences between admitted and non-admitted children. A multivariate logistic regression model was developed using a stepwise selection of predictors and was internally validated using bootstrapping. Children admitted to hospital showed significantly (ppower in the low frequency band (OR associated with a 0.01 unit increase, 0.93; 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98), greater time spent below an SpO2 of 98% and 94% (OR associated with 10 s increase, 1.4; 95% CI 1.3 to 1.4 and 1.5; 95% CI 1.4 to 1.6, respectively), high respiratory rate, high HR, low SpO2, young age and male sex. These variables provided a bootstrap-corrected AUC of the receiver operating characteristic of 0.76. Objective measurements, easily obtained using a mobile device in low-resource settings, can predict the need for hospitalisation. External validation will be required before clinical adoption. Published

  3. Psychiatric diagnosis and aggression before acute hospitalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colasanti, A; Natoli, A; Moliterno, D; Rossattini, M; De Gaspari, I F; Mauri, M C

    2008-09-01

    To examine the predictors of aggressive behaviours occurring before acute hospitalisation. We analysed 350 acute admissions to a psychiatric ward during a 12-month period. The diagnoses were formulated according to the DSM IV axis I and II criteria. Aggressive behaviours occurring in the week before admission were retrospectively assessed using the modified overt aggression scale. The patients' clinical and sociodemographic variables, concurrent drug or alcohol abuse, and admission status were recorded at the time of admission. Aggressive and violent behaviours were highly prevalent, respectively, in 45% and 33% of the cases. Violence before admission was independently associated with drug abuse, involuntary admission status, and severe psychopathology. A diagnosis of a psychotic disorder did not increase the risk of aggression or violence, compared to the other psychiatric diagnoses. Personality disorders were significantly more associated to aggressive behaviours than psychotic disorders. The diagnosis of psychotic disorder is a poor predictor of aggression in a sample of psychiatric patients. Other clinical and non-clinical variables are associated to aggression before hospitalisation: they include drug abuse, involuntary admission status, general severity of symptoms, and diagnosis of personality disorder.

  4. Time trends in lifetime incidence rates of first-time diagnosed anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa across 16 years in a Danish nationwide psychiatric registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Jensen, Christina Mohr

    2015-11-01

    To study recent time trends in the incidence of diagnosed anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) based on nationwide psychiatric register data. The Danish Psychiatric Central Research Registry was used to identify the incidence of diagnosed cases with AN and BN at the ages of 4-65 years from 1995 to 2010. Age- and sex-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000 person-years were calculated and were adjusted for time trends in the total number of people diagnosed in psychiatry. Time trends were analyzed using JoinPoint regression analysis. A total of N = 5,902 persons had a first-time incidence of AN, and a total of N = 5,113 had first-time incidence of BN. Incidence rates increased for AN from 6.4 to 12.6 per 100,000 person-years, and for BN from 6.3 to 7.2 per 100,000 person-years. In 2010, the male-to-female ratio was 1:8 for AN, and 1:20 for BN. There was an earlier onset for AN than for BN, and age at incidence decreased during the observation period for AN but not for BN. A sizeable part of the increasing incidence rates for AN and in particular, the younger AN age groups, could be attributed to an increase in the total number of N = 249,607 persons with first-time diagnoses in psychiatry. Incidence rates had increased slightly for AN, but were stable for BN across 16 years in this nationwide study and to a large extent were reflective of a general increase in diagnosed mental disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Patterns and determinants of acute psychiatric readmissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Michael Behr

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives . Deinstitutionalisation and shortage of psychiatric beds worldwide has led to extensive research into the risk fac- tors and interventions associated with rapid and recurrent admission to hospital. Little research of this nature has taken place in South Africa, particularly with regard to acute hospital admissions. This study attempted primarily to assess the effect of length of stay and administration of depot antipsychotics in hospital on time to readmission. Design. A retrospective cohort of 180 admissions was fol- lowed up for 12 months, after an index discharge, by means of multiple hospital and community-based record reviews. Each readmission was analysed as an event using a survival analysis model. Setting. Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, Gauteng. Subjects. A random sample of patients admitted during a 6-month period in 1996. Outcome measures. Time to readmission. Results. Two hundred and eighty-four admissions were analysed. The only factor that provided a significant protective effect was being married or cohabiting ( P = 0.015. Clinic attendance showed a slight protective effect early on but con- ferred a significantly higher risk of readmission on those who had been out of hospital for a long period ( P = 0.001. Only 21% of discharged patients ever attended a clinic. The overall risk of readmission was significantly higher in the first 90 days post discharge. Conclusions. The lack of impact of length of hospital stay and use of depot neuroleptics on time to readmission may indicate that patients are being kept for appropriate duration and that the most ill patients are receiving depot medication. Several sampling and statistical artefacts may explain some of our findings. These results confirm the worldwide difficulty in finding consistent and accurate predictors of readmission. Low rates of successful referral to community aftercare need to be addressed before their effectiveness can be reasonably assessed. The inherent

  6. Associations between routine coronary computed tomographic angiography and reduced unnecessary hospital admissions, length of stay, recidivism rates, and invasive coronary angiography in the emergency department triage of chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Michael; Cortegiano, Michael; Abramowicz, Alexander J; Hines, Margaret; Singer, Adam J; Henry, Mark C; Viccellio, Peter; Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Ferraro, Summer; Poon, Annie; Raff, Gilbert L; Voros, Szilard; Farkouh, Michael E; Noack, Pamela

    2013-08-06

    This study was designed to assess the effects on resource utilization of routine coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in triaging chest pain patients in the emergency department (ED). The routine use of CCTA for ED evaluation of chest pain is feasible and safe. We conducted a retrospective multivariate analysis of data from two risk-matched cohorts of 894 ED patients presenting with chest pain to assess the impact of CCTA versus standard evaluation on admissions rate, length of stay, major adverse cardiovascular event rates, recidivism rates, and downstream resource utilization. The overall admission rate was lower with CCTA (14% vs. 40%; p evaluation was associated with a 5.5-fold greater risk for admission (odds ratio [OR]: 5.53; p evaluation was about 1.6 times longer (OR: 1.55; p acute myocardial infarction within 30 days of the index visit between the two groups. The likelihood of returning to the ED within 30 days for recurrent chest pain was 5 times greater with standard evaluation (OR: 5.06; p = 0.022). Standard evaluation was associated with a 7-fold greater likelihood of invasive coronary angiography without revascularization (OR: 7.17; p evaluation of chest pain reduces healthcare resource utilization. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Medicare Program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system changes and FY2011 rates; provider agreements and supplier approvals; and hospital conditions of participation for rehabilitation and respiratory care services; Medicaid program: accreditation for providers of inpatient psychiatric services. Final rules and interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    : We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs. We also are setting forth the update to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. We are updating the payment policy and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and setting forth the changes to the payment rates, factors, and other payment rate policies under the LTCH PPS. In addition, we are finalizing the provisions of the August 27, 2009 interim final rule that implemented statutory provisions relating to payments to LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities and increases in beds in existing LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities under the LTCH PPS. We are making changes affecting the: Medicare conditions of participation for hospitals relating to the types of practitioners who may provide rehabilitation services and respiratory care services; and determination of the effective date of provider agreements and supplier approvals under Medicare. We are also setting forth provisions that offer psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs increased flexibility in obtaining accreditation to participate in the Medicaid program. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs will have the choice of undergoing a State survey or of obtaining accreditation from a national accrediting organization whose hospital accreditation

  8. Differential access to care: The role of age, insurance, and income on race/ethnicity-related disparities in adult perforated appendix admission rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogg, Cheryl K; Scott, John W; Jiang, Wei; Wolf, Lindsey L; Haider, Adil H

    2016-11-01

    Differences in perforated appendix admission rates (PAAR) are an ambulatory-sensitive measure of access to care. While pediatric studies report disparities in PAAR, initial adult investigations suggest a lack of racial/ethnic inequity. The objectives of this study were to (1) assess for risk-adjusted, racial/ethnic differences in PAAR among adults on a national scale, (2) consider the extent to which variations (or lack thereof) are explained by age, insurance, and income, and (3) compare results within the United States population to a national segment of the population who are completely insured. According to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality definition of PAAR, adults (aged 18-64 years) in the 2006-2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample were queried for the occurrence and perforation of acute appendicitis. Risk-adjusted differences were compared by race/ethnicity over 5-year age increments using logistic regression with reweighted estimating equations. Noting disparate outcomes between younger (aged 18-34 years) versus older (aged 35-64 years) adults, age-stratified variations were further considered. Results were compared relative to differences among national military/civilian-dependent patients with universal insurance and were assessed for the extent to which disparities could be explained by variations in insurance and income. A total of 129,257 (weighted: 638,452) patients were included. Despite a lack of differences overall, significantly worse outcomes among younger (odds ratio point-estimates ranged from 1.11-1.32) and better outcomes among older (0.78-0.93) minority patients were found. This observation contrasted a lack of differences among completely insured military/civilian-dependent patients (n = 12,154). A total of 22.4% (non-Hispanic black versus non-Hispanic white) and 39.0% (Hispanic versus non-Hispanic white) of younger adult differences were explained by insurance-12.2% and 13.6% by income, 29.8% and 44.0% combined. This national

  9. Characteristics and Needs of Psychiatric Patients with Prolonged Hospital Stay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aflalo, Marc; Soucy, Nathalie; Xue, Xiaoqing; Colacone, Antoinette; Jourdenais, Emmanuelle; Boivin, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the characteristics and needs prior to, on admission, during the first month in hospital, at the thirtieth day of hospitalization and posthospital discharge of psychiatric patients occupying acute beds. Methods...

  10. Low blood pressure in psychiatric inpatients.

    OpenAIRE

    Masterton, G; Main, C J; Lever, A F; Lever, R S

    1981-01-01

    Blood pressure recordings in 116 female psychiatric inpatients were analysed. Sixty-nine women had schizophrenia, the remainder a variety of psychiatric conditions. All had been in hospital continuously for more than one year, the average for 19 years continuously. An average of seven recordings of blood pressure per patient had been made during that time. The latest of these compared well with measurements made independently using a sphygmomanometer free from observer bias. On admission to h...

  11. Seeking the Admission Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucido, Jerome A.

    2012-01-01

    When one thinks of seminal publications in college admission, the first piece that comes to mind is B. Alden Thresher's "College Admissions in the Public Interest" (1966). Thresher's work, relevant to this day, is credited with being the foundational document of the admission profession. McDonough and Robertson's 1995 study, commissioned by NACAC,…

  12. Changes in monthly unemployment rates may predict changes in the number of psychiatric presentations to emergency services in South Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bidargaddi, Niranjan; Bastiampillai, Tarun; Schrader, Geoffrey; Adams, Robert; Piantadosi, Cynthia; Strobel, Jörg; Tucker, Graeme; Allison, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    ...) monthly unemployment rates. Times series modelling of relationships between monthly MHED presentations to South Australian Public Hospitals derived from the Integrated South Australian Activity Collection (ISAAC...

  13. The Predictive Validity of using Admissions Testing and Multiple Mini-interviews in Undergraduate University Admissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Havmose, Philip S.; Vang, Maria

    2017-01-01

    year of study, compared to the grade-based admissions procedure. Finally, students admitted through the MMI and the admissions test scored significantly higher on academic learning self-efficacy and critical thinking compared to students selected by grades. The implications for higher education......The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of a two-step admissions procedure that included a cognitive ability test followed by multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) used to assess non-cognitive skills, compared to grade-based admissions relative to subsequent drop-out rates......-significant lower drop-out rates after the second year of study for the admission procedure that included the assessment of non-cognitive skills though the MMI and the admissions test. Furthermore, this admission procedure resulted in a significant lower risk of failing the final exam after the first and second...

  14. Do ‘Virtual Wards’ reduce rates of unplanned hospital admissions and at what cost? A research protocol using propensity matched controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraint Hywel Lewis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: This retrospective study will assess the extent to which multidisciplinary case management in the form of virtual wards (VWs leads to changes in the use of health care and social care by patients at high risk of future unplanned hospital admission. VWs use the staffing, systems and daily routines of a hospital ward to deliver coordinated care to patients in their own homes. Admission to a VW is offered to patients identified by a predictive risk model as being at high risk of unplanned hospital admission in the coming 12 months.Study design and data collection methods: We will compare the health care and social care use of VW patients to that of matched controls. Controls will be drawn from (a national, and (b local, individual-level pseudonymous routine data. The costs of setting up and running a VW will be determined from the perspectives of both health and social care organizations using a combination of administrative data, interviews and diaries.Methods of analysis: Using propensity score matching and prognostic matching, we will create matched comparator groups to estimate the effect size of virtual wards in reducing unplanned hospital admissions.Conclusions: This study will allow us to determine relative to matched comparator groups: whether VWs reduce the use of emergency hospital care; the impact, if any, of VWs on the uptake of primary care, community health services and council-funded social care; and the potential costs and savings of VWs from the perspectives of the national health service (NHS and local authorities.

  15. Psychiatric comorbidity : fact or artifact?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loo, Hanna; Romeijn, Johannes

    The frequent occurrence of comorbidity has brought about an extensive theoretical debate in psychiatry. Why are the rates of psychiatric comorbidity so high and what are their implications for the ontological and epistemological status of comorbid psychiatric diseases? Current explanations focus

  16. Changes in monthly unemployment rates may predict changes in the number of psychiatric presentations to emergency services in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidargaddi, Niranjan; Bastiampillai, Tarun; Schrader, Geoffrey; Adams, Robert; Piantadosi, Cynthia; Strobel, Jörg; Tucker, Graeme; Allison, Stephen

    2015-07-24

    To determine the extent to which variations in monthly Mental Health Emergency Department (MHED) presentations in South Australian Public Hospitals are associated with the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) monthly unemployment rates. Times series modelling of relationships between monthly MHED presentations to South Australian Public Hospitals derived from the Integrated South Australian Activity Collection (ISAAC) data base and the ABS monthly unemployment rates in South Australia between January 2004-June 2011. Time series modelling using monthly unemployment rates from ABS as a predictor variable explains 69% of the variation in monthly MHED presentations across public hospitals in South Australia. Thirty-two percent of the variation in current month's male MHED presentations can be predicted by using the 2 months' prior male unemployment rate. Over 63% of the variation in monthly female MHED presentations can be predicted by either male or female prior monthly unemployment rates. The findings of this study highlight that even with the relatively favourable economic conditions, small shifts in monthly unemployment rates can predict variations in monthly MHED presentations, particularly for women. Monthly ABS unemployment rates may be a useful metric for predicting demand for emergency mental health services.

  17. Suicide Risk, Aggression and Violence in Major Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mousavi

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aggression, violence and Suicide are important problems of mental health in our society. They almost always cause disability, death, or other social problems. Appropriate measures can be taken if the distribution of behaviors and suicide risk are well studied in various psychiatric disorders. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. We studied 801 psychiatric patients who were admitted in a psychiatric emergency unit in Isfahan, Iran, for aggression, violence and risk of suicide. Information was obtained from a 30-item questionnaire, filled by the same physician. Results: About one-third of patients had aggression and/or violence on admission or during hours before it. It was most prevalent in men of 12-26 years old and in bipolar mood disorder patients. "High suicide risk" was markedly found in patients with major depressive disorder. Differences of these phenomena were statistically Conclusion: Our findings show a higher rate of aggression and violence in emergency psychiatric patients than in studies done in other countries. It may be due to higher prevalence of bipolar patients in the study field. The finding of "High suicidal risk" in major depression patients warrent systematic preventive programs. Keywords: Suicide risk, Aggression, Violence

  18. Psychiatric Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sullivan, Patrick F; Agrawal, Arpana; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2018-01-01

    into biologically, clinically, and therapeutically meaningful insights. The emerging findings suggest that we are entering a phase of accelerated genetic discovery for multiple psychiatric disorders. These findings are likely to elucidate the genetic portions of these truly complex traits, and this knowledge can...... then be mined for its relevance for improved therapeutics and its impact on psychiatric practice within a precision medicine framework. [AJP at 175: Remembering Our Past As We Envision Our Future November 1946: The Genetic Theory of Schizophrenia Franz Kallmann's influential twin study of schizophrenia in 691...

  19. Optimal Admission to Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten

    This paper constructs higher education admission rules that maximise graduation rates and thus increase the skill level of the work force. An application shows that students with a low level in mathematics in secondary school ought to find it easier to be admitted to an economics programme than...... to law or psychology programmes, even though economics is the most difficult programme from which to graduate without a strong background in mathematics. Indirect gains from optimal admission include the potential of making whole cohorts of students more able to graduate with a higher education degree....

  20. Prevalencia de trastornos psiquiátricos en pacientes ingresados por el Servicio de Psiquiatría en el Módulo Penitenciario del H.U.M.S. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders on patients admissed by the psychiatric service in the security area of H.U.M.S. (University Hospital "Miguel Servet"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Calvo Estopiñán

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Estudios epidemiológicos recientes destacan el aumento de prevalencia de trastornos psiquiátricos en presos. El objetivo del presente estudio es determinar los trastornos psiquiátricos principales y secundarios más prevalentes, datos sociodemográficos y estancia media, de los pacientes ingresados en el Módulo Penitenciario de un hospital general a cargo del Servicio de Psiquiatría. Material y método: Estudio descriptivo transversal retrospectivo. La muestra está compuesta por los pacientes ingresados en el Módulo Penitenciario a cargo de Psiquiatría durante 5 años, siendo n=136. Resultados: El 90,4% fueron hombres y el 9,6% mujeres. La edad media fue de 34,18 años. Los diagnósticos psiquiátricos principales más prevalentes fueron: Tr. Personalidad 22%, Tr. Esquizofrénicos 16,3%. Como diagnósticos psiquiátricos secundarios más prevalentes encontramos: Tr. Personalidad 11,9%, Abuso de drogas 10,7%. Conclusiones: El diagnóstico psiquiátrico principal y secundario más prevalente fue el trastorno de personalidad. Se documentó la existencia de una alta comorbilidad con el abuso-dependencia de tóxicos. Actualmente las prisiones carecen de equipos multidisciplinares en Salud Mental, con lo que en muchas ocasiones se hace necesario el traslado del preso al hospital con la carga asistencial y el incremento de costes que esto supone.Introduction: recent epidemiological studies highlight an increase in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders amongst prison inmates. The objective of this study to determine the most prevalent primary and secondary psychiatric disorders, socio-demographic data and average stay period amongst patients admitted to the Prison Unit of a general hospital as charges of the Psychiatric Service. Materials and Methods: retrospective cross-sectional descriptive study. The sample group consisted of a number of patients admitted into the Prison Unit as charges of the Psychiatric Service during a

  1. Improving patient care with shorter hospital admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, K J; Tewari, R; Nordin, A J

    2009-08-01

    Prolonged hospital admissions frequently overshadow the experience of gynaecological cancer patients. In East Kent, we identified obstacles in the inpatient journey through the hospital by performing a patient pathway mapping audit of admissions in May/June 2006 and 2007. We achieved substantial reductions in the length of stay for major gynaecological oncology surgery. The number of the lead consultant's patients with a total duration of admission of no more than 5 days increased from one of 28 in Q1 2006 (3.6%), to 17 of 28 (60.7%) in Q4 2007. Identified problems prolonging the length of stay included admission the day before surgery, prolonged use of i.v. antibiotics and late referrals to social services. Early discharge planning involving staff and patients as active participants has the greatest impact on reduction of duration of hospital admission. A reduction in duration of hospital admissions is associated with an increase in the rate of readmissions.

  2. [Psychiatric and Psychotherapeutic Care of Refugees by Reference of a Large Psychiatric Care Hospital in Western Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffrath, Jonas; Schmitz-Buhl, Mario; Gün, Ali Kemal; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2017-04-01

    Medical and psychological care of refugees is among the most important current challenges in German health politics. Work with patients from this heterogeneous group who have often faced severe stress before, during and after their migration is currently based on a thin data foundation. Based on introductory information on current knowledge concerning psychiatric morbidity of refugees this article presents the psychiatric care of refugees at LVR Clinics Cologne - a psychiatric specialty hospital situated in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. A sample of 239 cases of refugee patients who were referred to in- and outpatient departments of the LVR Clinics Cologne between April 2015 and March 2016 are evaluated in respect of diagnoses, admission modalities and socio-demographic variables. The majority of principal diagnoses (40.2%) belong to the group of stress-related and somatoform disorders (F4 in ICD-10). Mood disorders (F3 in ICD-10) represented 31.0%, followed by mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance use (F1 in ICD-10) with 15.1%. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) was the most prevalent diagnose (13.0%). Among the 29 countries of the patients' origin Afghanistan (10,0%), Serbia (9.6%) and Kosovo (8.8%) were the most abundant. The diagnoses and the high rate of acute psychiatric events reflect the massive psychological pressure of the patients. The important role of interpreters and mediators specialized in language and integration in the treatment process is emphasized. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Profile in Action: Linking Admission and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    A profile-oriented retention strategy embraces the admission process as a powerful lever in improving retention and completion rates and recognizes that the student profile can be shaped by changes in admission policies or priorities--even within the current market position of the institution. In addition, the student body can be oriented toward…

  4. Rate of Nonadherence to Antipsychotic Medications and Factors Leading to Nonadherence among Psychiatric Patients in Gondar University Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abyot Endale Gurmu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main aim of this study was to assess the rate of medication nonadherence among psychiatry patients at University of Gondar Hospital. Materials and Methods. Cross-sectional, descriptive method was conducted over a period of one month in May, 2013, at University of Gondar Hospital. Rate of nonadherence was computed using Medication Adherence Rating Scale questionnaire and self-reporting via a structured patient interview. Chi-square was used to determine the statistical significance of the association of variables with adherence. Result. Out of 209 respondents, 105 (50.2% were found to be nonadherent. Patients who were forced to take their medication against their will (P<0.001, those who did not believe they require medication (P=0.026, and those who discontinued their medication without consulting their prescriber (P<0.001 had significant association with nonadherence. Adherence among schizophrenia was 75.7%; psychotic was 46.7%; bipolar disorder was 37.5%; and psychosis with depression was 52.6%. Reasons for nonadherence included recovery from the illness (26.7%, seeking alternative therapy and unavailability of drugs (18.1% each, adverse drug reaction (12.7%, forgetfulness (10.6%, and being busy (8.6%. Conclusion. The observed rate of antipsychotic medication nonadherence in this study was high. Interventions to increase adherence are therefore crucial.

  5. Barometric pressure, emergency psychiatric visits, and violent acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schory, Thomas J; Piecznski, Natasha; Nair, Sunil; el-Mallakh, Rif S

    2003-10-01

    Associations between human behaviour and psychiatric decompensation and weather variables have been inconsistent. We studied the association of certain weather variables (specifically, humidity, wind speed, and barometric pressure) with emergent psychiatric presentations, psychiatric admissions, incidence of violent crimes, and suicides in a metropolitan area. We performed a retrospective study for the year 1999 in a mid-sized city. We included all documented emergent psychiatric visits to the city's psychiatric emergency room. We obtained violence data from the city police department and suicide data from the country medical examiner. The data suggest that total numbers of acts of violence and emergency psychiatry visits are significantly associated with low barometric pressure. Psychiatric inpatient admissions and suicides are not associated with any of the weather variables investigated. While alternate conclusions can be drawn, we propose that the data support the interpretation that low barometric pressure is associated with an increase in impulsive behaviours. Additional investigation is warranted.

  6. TEN-YEAR MORTALITY REVIEW IN A PIONEER PSYCHIATRIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kateee

    2003-07-01

    Jul 1, 2003 ... FWACP, Consultant Psychiatrist/ Director of Clinical Services, Psychiatric Hospital, Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria, and A. O. Owoeye, MBChB, Senior Registrar in ... 1:1.6. Schizophrenia (26%) and major depression (25%) constituted the main psychiatric diagnoses at the time of admission among the cohort.

  7. Psychiatric Aspects of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacer Sezgin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Infertility can be defined as a crisis with cultural, religious, and class related aspects, which coexists with medical, psychiatric, psychological, and social problems. Relation between psychiatric and psychological factors stem from a mutual interaction of both. Family is an important institution in maintaining human existence and raising individuals in line with society's expectations. Fertility and reproduction are seen as universal functions unique to women with raising children as the expected result of the family institution. Incidence of infertility has increased recently and can become a life crisis for a couple. Even though not being able to have a child affects both sexes emotionally, women feel greater amounts of stress, pressure, anxiety, and depression.Consequences of infertility arise from short and long-term devastating effects on both individual's physical and mental health, and marital system. Many studies focus on infertility related psychological and psychiatric disorders (depression, anxiety, grief, marital conflict, gender differences, relation between the causes of infertility and psychopathology, the effects of psychiatric evaluation and intervention -when necessaryon the course of infertility treatment, pregnancy rates, and childbirth. The most important underlying causes of high levels of stress and anxiety that infertile women experience are the loss of maternity, reproduction, sense of self, and genetic continuity. In this review article is to investigate the relationship between medically unexplained symptoms and psychiatric symptoms. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(2.000: 165-185

  8. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L. Gabriels

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and/or intellectual disabilities (ID are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children’s hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33% and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days. Available data from a subset of patients (=43 in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes.

  9. Parental psychiatric hospitalisation and offspring schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L; Reinisch, June M

    2009-01-01

    The risk of schizophrenia has been linked with a family history of schizophrenia and less strongly with other psychiatric disorders in family members. Using data from the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort and from the Danish Psychiatric Case Register, we studied the relationship between offspring risk...... of schizophrenia and a range of psychotic and non-psychotic psychiatric diagnoses in parents. Psychiatric admission data after 1969 were available for 7047 cohort members born between 1959 and 1961, and for 7006 mothers and 6993 fathers. Univariate analysis showed that neurosis, alcohol and substance dependence...... in both parents were associated with elevated risk of offspring schizophrenia; in addition, maternal schizophrenia, affective disorder and personality disorder were associated with elevated risk. Controlling for parental age, parental social status, and parental psychiatric co-diagnosis, offspring risk...

  10. OCCUPATIONAL ROLE AFTER PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GH.R GHASSEMI

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Severe Psychiatricillness is accompanied by gross disturbances in patient's occupational role. This study presents a comparative picture of work performance before and after psychiatric hospitalization. Method: Subjects comprised 440 psychiatric admitters from Noor Medical center - Isfahan - Iran, who were followed from November 1999 to November 2000. Their work adjustment was measured by means of Weiss man's index. Data were computer analyzed using SPSS by running paired t- student and ANOVA. Results: Majority of the patients (53 % were without permanent sources of income before psychiatric hospitalization, about 12 percent of those who were working prior to hospitalization lost their job after being discharged from hospital. Better work adjustment before hospitalization was positively correlated with better work adjustment after discharge for working patients (r =0/66. Working ability of the patients after discharge was lesser than before the attack f9r patients with regular and irregular job (P < 001. Discussion: Job loss or poor working ability after psychiatric admission reported by several researchers and has bean confirmed in this study as well. These observatoins have been discussed in view of the current socio economic problems in the society and nature of psychiatric disturbances.

  11. The impact of the 2008 economic crisis on the increasing number of young psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medel-Herrero, Alvaro; Gomez-Beneyto, Manuel

    2017-11-21

    Little is published about the impact of the 2008 economic crisis on mental health services in Spain. An interrupted time series analysis was conducted to investigate a potential short-term association between the 2008 economic crisis and the number of psychiatric hospital admissions. The timing of the intervention (April 2008) was based on observed changes in Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Data on 1,152,880 psychiatric inpatients from the national Hospital Morbidity Survey, 69 months before and after the onset of the economic crisis (April 2008), were analyzed. Age-adjusted psychiatric (ICD9 290-319) hospital discharge rates significantly increased from April 2008, matching the onset of the crisis, especially for inpatients aged 15-24 years old and to a less extend for inpatients aged 25-34 years old. Other age groups were not affected. There was a significant increase in diagnoses for disturbance of conduct and emotions, depression, neurotic and personality disorders and alcohol and drug disorders; however, diagnoses for mental retardation and organic psychosis for 15-34 years old inpatients were unaffected. Psychiatric hospital admissions abruptly increased in April 2008, coinciding with the onset of the economic crisis. We identified age groups and diagnoses affected. Increased hospitalizations were found only at the age-ranges most affected by the rise in unemployment. The diagnoses affected were those most sensitive to environmental changes. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Obstetric conditions and risk of first admission with schizophrenia: A Danish national register based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Majella; Agerbo, Esben; Bennedsen, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    -control study based on Danish longitudinal registers was conducted to investigate the risk of schizophrenia associated with exposure to a range of obstetric events. The sample included 1039 first admissions to, or contacts with Danish psychiatric services with an ICD-8 or ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia......A range of complications of pregnancy, abnormal fetal growth and development, and complications of delivery have been associated with increased risk of schizophrenia. Few studies have been able to adjust for a broad range of potential confounding factors. A national population nested case...... and 24, 826 individually matched controls. Adjusting for the other obstetric factors, family psychiatric history, and socio-economic and demographic factors, risk of schizophrenia was associated with maternal non-attendance at antenatal appointments (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR) 2.08, 95% CI: 1.0, 4...

  13. Tics, ADHD and Psychiatric Comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of teacher-rated tic behaviors in 3006 school children, from preschool to adolescence, was determined in a study of comorbid psychiatric symptoms at State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY.

  14. Tics, ADHD and Psychiatric Comorbidity

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The prevalence of teacher-rated tic behaviors in 3006 school children, from preschool to adolescence, was determined in a study of comorbid psychiatric symptoms at State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY.

  15. Psychiatric nursing care for adult survivors of child maltreatment: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zalm, Y.C.; Nugteren, W.A.; Hafsteinsdottir, T.B.; van der Venne, C.G.J.M.; Kool, N.; van Meijel, B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what is known from the literature about nursing care of psychiatric patients with a history of child maltreatment. Conclusions: Psychiatric nurses underline the importance of a routine inquiry of child abuse on admission of patients to psychiatric care, but are reluctant to ask

  16. Gender, status, and psychiatric labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroska, Amy; Harkness, Sarah K; Brown, Ryan P; Thomas, Lauren S

    2015-11-01

    We examine a key modified labeling theory proposition-that a psychiatric label increases vulnerability to competence-based criticism and rejection-within task- and collectively oriented dyads comprised of same-sex individuals with equivalent education. Drawing on empirical work that approximates these conditions, we expect the proposition to hold only among men. We also expect education, operationalized with college class standing, to moderate the effects of gender by reducing men's and increasing women's criticism and rejection. But, we also expect the effect of education to weaken when men work with a psychiatric patient. As predicted, men reject suggestions from teammates with a psychiatric history more frequently than they reject suggestions from other teammates, while women's resistance to influence is unaffected by their teammate's psychiatric status. Men also rate psychiatric patient teammates as less powerful but no lower in status than other teammates, while women's teammate assessments are unaffected by their teammate's psychiatric status. Also as predicted, education reduces men's resistance to influence when their teammate has no psychiatric history. Education also increases men's ratings of their teammate's power, as predicted, but has no effect on women's resistance to influence or teammate ratings. We discuss the implications of these findings for the modified labeling theory of mental illness and status characteristics theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Technology in International Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In a relatively short time, technology applications have become an essential feature of the admissions business. They make the jobs of international admissions professionals easier in many ways, allowing for more robust communication with applicants and counselors, a streamlined application process, and quicker access to information about…

  18. Association between bullying and pediatric psychiatric hospitalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Hadassa; Singh, Jasmine; Ghaffar, Ayesha; de Silva, Cheryl

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Bullying is a serious public health issue. We sought to demonstrate an association between bullying victimization and hospital admissions for acute psychiatric problems. We described the demographics and types of bullying in a sample of hospitalized patients in Staten Island, NY, and compared bullying victimization scores with psychiatric versus medical admissions. Methods: Patients in grades 3–12 were recruited from the Staten Island University Hospital Inpatient Pediatrics unit and emergency department. Patients completed the validated Olweus Bully/Victim Questionnaire (OBQ) was analyzed to formulate a report of bullying in our sample as well as a sub-score measurement of bullying victimization. Pediatric residents simultaneously documented whether the subject was a medical versus an in-patient psychiatry admission. Statistical analysis was performed to look for an association between the victimization sub-score and a psychiatric indication for admission. Results: A total of 185 surveys were analyzed. Peak bullying occurred in 7th and 8th grades. Demographics and types of bullying in our sample were described. A strong association between bullying victimization and hospitalization for in-patient psychiatry was demonstrated. Association between bullying victimization and suicidal ideation, psychiatry, and social work consults was also shown. Concern for an association between hospitalization for psychogenic illness and bullying victimization was also raised. Conclusions: There is a significant association between bullying victimization and psychiatric hospital admissions. This raises the specter of the serious consequences of bullying as it is the first study to prospectively link hospital admissions to bullying. Studies using a valid measure of psychogenic illness to look for an association with bullying victimization are needed. PMID:29326819

  19. Investigation of the criteria for involuntary admission to a general hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Malla, A.

    1988-01-01

    The case records of all patients admitted involuntarily to the psychiatric unit of a teaching general hospital between May 1, 1985, and Apr. 30, 1986, were examined to assess the criteria used for admission in relation to several patient characteristics. Of the 55 patients 42 were admitted under the terms of form 1 (application for psychiatric assessment) and 13 under the terms of form 3 (certificate of involuntary admission). All of the former patients and 70% of the latter were admitted und...

  20. [Prescription drug abuse in elderly psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterling, Tilman; Schneider, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    Due to demographic changes there will be a fraction of elderly patients with substance use disorders. However, only a few data have been published about elderly abusers of prescription drugs. Since substance abuse is frequently comorbid with psychiatric disorders, treatment in a psychiatric hospital is often needed. In this explorative study elderly people with prescription drug abuse who required psychiatric inpatient treatment should be characterized. This study was part of the gerontopsychiatry study Berlin (Gepsy-B), an investigation of the data of all older inpatients (≥ 65 years) admitted to a psychiatric hospital within a period of 3 years. Among 1266 documented admissions in 110 cases (8.7 %) (mean age: 75.7 ± 7.1 years) prescription drug abuse, mostly of benzodiazepines was diagnosed. Females showed benzodiazepine abuse more often than males. In only a small proportion of the cases the reason for admission was withdrawal of prescribed drugs. 85.5 % suffered from psychiatric comorbidity, mostly depression. As risk factors for abuse depressive symptoms (OR: 3.32) as well as concurrent nicotine (OR: 2.69) or alcohol abuse (OR: 2.14) were calculated. Psychiatric inpatient treatment was primarily not necessary because of prescription drug abuse but because of other psychopathological symptoms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Perceived coercion in voluntary hospital admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, Brian

    2014-01-30

    The legal status of service users admitted to psychiatric wards is not synonymous with the level of coercion that they can perceive during the admission. This study aimed to identify and describe the proportion of individuals who were admitted voluntarily but experienced levels of perceived coercion comparable to those admitted involuntarily. Individuals admitted voluntarily and involuntarily to three psychiatric hospitals were interviewed using the MacArthur Admission Experience Interview and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnoses. One hundered sixty-one individuals were interviewed and 22% of the voluntarily admitted service users had levels of perceived coercion similar to that of the majority of involuntarily admitted service users. Voluntarily admitted service users who experienced high levels of perceived coercion were more likely to have more severe psychotic symptoms, have experienced more negative pressures and less procedural justices on admission. Individuals brought to hospital under mental health legislation but who subsequently agreed to be admitted voluntarily and those treated on a secure ward also reported higher levels of perceived coercion. It needs to be ensured that if any service user, whether voluntary or involuntary, experiences treatment pressures or coercion that there is sufficient oversight of the practice, to ensure that individual\\'s rights are respected.

  2. Indeterminate EMU admissions: does repeating the admission help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkou, Srijana; Grade, Madeline; Hoerth, Matthew T; Noe, Katherine H; Sirven, Joseph I; Drazkowski, Joseph F

    2011-04-01

    Epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) admissions during 2007-2009 at Mayo Clinic Hospital Arizona were reviewed. Of the 106 indeterminate admissions, 13 (12%) went on to have a second admission. During the second admission, 8 (62%) were diagnosed. Five patients went on to have a third or fourth admission, with none of them receiving a diagnosis. Nineteen (18%) patients had ambulatory EEG monitoring after an indeterminate admission, with only one (5%) receiving a diagnosis after ambulatory EEG monitoring. Even in patients who were initially indeterminate, medication management changed 37% of the time. Admission to the EMU was helpful for spell classification, with 80% of the patients receiving a diagnosis after the first admission. Based on this study, a second admission should be considered if no diagnosis is reached after the first admission. If no diagnosis is made after the second EMU admission, subsequent admissions are unlikely to produce a definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Predictive Validity of Using Admissions Testing and Multiple Mini-Interviews in Undergraduate University Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makransky, Guido; Havmose, Philip; Vang, Maria Louison; Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Nielsen, Tine

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of a two-step admissions procedure that included a cognitive ability test followed by multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) used to assess non-cognitive skills, compared to grade-based admissions relative to subsequent drop-out rates and academic achievement after one and two years of study.…

  4. Concurrent Medical and Psychiatric Disorders among Schizophrenic and Neurotic Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Bruno R.; Pai, Shaila

    Although the occurrence of medical illnesses in psychiatric patients is quite high, medical illnesses manifested by psychiatric symptoms are often overlooked. The higher mortality rates among psychiatric patients when compared to the general population may be a reflection of neglect or inadequate treatment of the psychiatric patients' medical…

  5. Psychiatric readmissions and their association with physical comorbidity: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šprah, Lilijana; Dernovšek, Mojca Zvezdana; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Haaramo, Peija

    2017-01-03

    Comorbidity between mental and physical disorder conditions is the rule rather than the exception. It is estimated that 25% of adult population have mental health condition and 68% of them suffer from comorbid medical condition. Readmission rates in psychiatric patients are high and we still lack understanding potential predictors of recidivism. Physical comorbidity could be one of important risk factors for psychiatric readmission. The aim of the present study was to review the impact of physical comorbidity variables on readmission after discharge from psychiatric or general inpatient care among patients with co-occurring psychiatric and medical conditions. A comprehensive database search from January 1990 to June 2014 was performed in the following bibliographic databases: Ovid Medline, PsycINFO, ProQuest Health Management, OpenGrey and Google Scholar. An integrative research review was conducted on 23 observational studies. Six studies documented physical comorbidity variables only at admission/discharge and 17 also at readmission. The main body of studies supported the hypothesis that patients with mental disorders are at increased risk of readmission if they had co-occurring medical condition. The impact of physical comorbidity variables on psychiatric readmission was most frequently studied in in patients with affective and substance use disorders (SUD). Most common physical comorbidity variables with higher probability for psychiatric readmission were associated with certain category of psychiatric diagnoses. Chronic lung conditions, hepatitis C virus infection, hypertension and number of medical diagnoses were associated with increased risk of readmission in SUD; Charlson Comorbidity Index, somatic complaints, physical health problems with serious mental illnesses (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, personality disorders); not specified medical illness, somatic complaints, number of medical diagnoses, hyperthyroidism with affective disorders

  6. Comparative study of forensic psychiatric system between China and America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gangqin; Gutheil, Thomas G; Hu, Zeqing

    2016-01-01

    Laws and regulations about the forensic psychiatric systems in China and America were compared, and suggestions for improving the forensic psychiatric system of China were provided. There are many differences regarding the role of the forensic psychiatrist, the initiation of the assessment and the admission of expert opinion because of elements in the legal systems in China and America. The Chinese system has the advantages of objectivity, cost saving and high efficiency; but it has deficiencies in procedural justice and the admission of expert opinion. China can persist with the current system while taking measures to give more rights to the litigants to participate in their assessment, and while improving the quality and utility of the expert opinion; however, this review article will compare broadly the two systems without addressing human rights issues or procedural justice issues, nor will it presume to address the entirety of Chinese systems. In addition, China is developing its legal system for dealing with the mentally ill defendant in situations involving the criminal justice system and civil commitment. Although China enacted new laws regarding the mandatory treatment for the mentally ill, both in criminal and civil systems, there remain many aspects to be improved, including but not limited to a system of review of the decision to detain a patient on psychiatric grounds, and the need for provisions in the laws preventing indefinite detention. From this viewpoint, America's laws and regulations are instructive for us, in matters such as the method of dealing with the mentally ill defendant who is "incompetent to stand trial", "not guilty only by reason of insanity" or "guilty but mentally ill". The conditional release of the committed mentally ill person and the special programs in the forensic security hospital are all worthy of study by China in order to manage the mentally ill offender and to reduce the recidivism rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  8. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  9. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  10. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  11. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  12. Nonimmigrant Admissions - Fiscal Year 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  13. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  14. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  15. Nonimmigrant Admission: Fiscal Year 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  16. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  17. Analisis factorial y validación de la versión en español de la escala Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale en Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Sánchez

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes. Se llevó a cabo este estudio para validar la escala Brief Psychiatric Rating Sca/e (BPRS en Colombia, usando una versión en lengua española. Utilizamos este instrumento por ser una de las escalas más ampliamente usadas en escenarios clínicos y de investigación en salud mental. Métodos. La estructura factorial y la consistencia interna se evaluaron en una muestra de 149 pacientes psiquiátricos hospitalizados. La confiabilidad prueba-reprueba e interevaluador se analizó en una submuestra de 30 pacientes. La validez concurrente se evaluó comparando los puntajes de la escala BPRS con los de la escala de impresión clínica global (ICG. La sensibilidad al cambio se evaluó comparando las puntuaciones en dos momentos clínicamente diferentes. Resultados. El análisis de los componentes principales indica una estructura conformada por tres dominios: esquizofreniforme, bipolaridad y depresión. El instrumento mostró una buena consistencia interna (alfa de Cronbach de 0,79. Los coeficientes correspondientes a la confiabilidad interevaluador y prueba-reprueba fueron de 0,94 y 0,82, respectivamente. La correlación entre la escala BPRS y la ICG fue de 0,7 (r de Spearman. Un análisis de Anova de los sujetos mostró que la escala es un instrumento con buena sensibilidad para detectar cambios de las condiciones clínicas. Conclusión. A partir de este estudio concluimos que la versión en lengua española que se evaluó, es un instrumento de registro por parte del médico que es válido y tiene adecuadas propiedades psicométricas.

  18. Assessing the Need for Hospitalization in Order to Conduct a Psychiatric Evaluation as part of Criminal Law Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmer, Ahikam; Greenberg, Binyamin; Strous, Rael D

    2015-09-01

    In criminal law, psychiatrists are consulted regarding the "insanity defense" and the defendant's competency to stand trial. Court-ordered hospital admissions for such evaluations are on the increase, creating a major burden on the health system. To assess, in a hospital setting, whether hospitalization of the defendant is necessary for conducting a psychiatric evaluation. A 6 month prospective observational study exploring the phenomenon was conducted at the Beer Yaakov Mental Health Center. The psychiatrist was asked both at the initiation and at the end of the assessment process whether the subject was competent to stand trial and responsible for his/her actions and if hospitalization was necessary in order to conduct the evaluation. During the study period there were 112 admissions with a court request for a psychiatric evaluation. In 73 of the cases (65.2%) the evaluating psychiatrist believed there was no need for hospitalization. This assessment did not change by the end of the hospitalization in all cases. Employment and alcohol use were the only factors associated with a lower need for hospitalization (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.07-0.77, and OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13-0.90, respectively). In the majority of cases, based on the evaluating psychiatrist's responses, the evaluation could have been conducted without need for hospitalization. The findings indicate that an outpatient unit designated to write court-requested psychiatric evaluations could significantly reduce the rates of hospital admissions for this purpose.

  19. High Rates of Psychiatric Comorbidity in Narcolepsy: Findings From the Burden of Narcolepsy Disease (BOND) Study of 9,312 Patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Chad M; Reaven, Nancy L; Funk, Susan E; McGaughey, Karen J; Ohayon, Maurice M; Guilleminault, Christian; Black, Jed

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate psychiatric comorbidity patterns in patients with a narcolepsy diagnosis in the United States. Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Research Databases were accessed to identify individuals ≥ 18 years of age with ≥ 1 ICD-9 diagnosis code(s) for narcolepsy continuously insured between 2006 and 2010 and non-narcolepsy controls matched 5:1 (age, gender, region, payer). Extensive subanalyses were conducted to confirm the validity of narcolepsy definitions. Narcolepsy subjects and controls were compared for frequency of psychiatric comorbid conditions (based on ICD-9 codes/Clinical Classification Software [CCS] level 2 categories) and psychiatric medication use. The final population included 9,312 narcolepsy subjects and 46,559 controls (each group, mean age = 46.1 years; 59% female). All categories of mental illness were significantly more prevalent in patients with narcolepsy versus controls, with the highest excess prevalence noted for CCS 5.8 Mood disorders (37.9% vs 13.8%; odds ratio [OR] = 4.0; 95% CI, 3.8-4.2), CCS 5.8.2 Depressive disorders (35.8% vs 13.0%; OR = 3.9; 95% CI, 3.7-4.1), and CCS 5.2 Anxiety disorders (25.1% vs 11.9%; OR = 2.5; 95% CI, 2.4-2.7). Excess prevalence of anxiety and mood disorders (narcolepsy vs controls) was higher in younger age groups versus older age groups. Psychiatric medication usage was higher in the narcolepsy group versus controls in the following categories: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (36% vs 17%), anxiolytic benzodiazepines (34% vs 19%), hypnotics (29% vs 13%), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (21% vs 6%), and tricyclic antidepressants (13% vs 4%) (all P values Narcolepsy is associated with significant comorbid psychiatric illness burden and higher psychiatric medication usage compared with the non-narcolepsy population.

  20. Dropping out of outpatient psychiatric treatment: a preliminary report of a 2-year follow-up of 1500 psychiatric outpatients in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaie, Habibolah; Rezaie, Leeba; de Jong, Desiree M

    2013-01-01

    Outpatient psychiatric treatment provides both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for a large portion of psychiatric patients. Dropping out, or early termination of treatment, may be considered a common barrier to outpatient's psychiatric treatment. There are limited studies on this issue in Iran. The current study aimed to examine rates, predictors and reasons of dropping out of an outpatient psychiatric treatment. In this 6-month cohort study, 1500 outpatients who visited 10 psychiatrist's offices in the Iranian city of Kermanshah were recruited and followed for 2 years (2009-2011) for recommended treatments including admission to hospital, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy and a combination of both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. Characteristics of patients who dropped out of the current study were collected, and reasons for dropping out were collected via phone or in person interview. Dropouts were prevalent in prescribed treatments. Pretreatment (primary) dropout rates in psychotherapy treatment were 4 times greater than dropout rates in pharmacotherapy treatment (80% and 20%, respectively). There were significance differences between dropouts and non-dropouts of pharmacotherapy with respect to patient characteristics; younger age, male gender, low level of education, unemployment, lack of insurance, new cases and divorce were more prevalent among dropouts (P<.001). With regard to diagnosis, dropping out was more prevalent among patients with substance-related disorders, schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders when compared to other diagnoses (P<.001). Commonly reported reasons for dropping out included overslept and too ill to attend treatment and fear of becoming addicted to prescribed psychotropic medication (30% and 18%, respectively). Lack of confidence in therapist ability and lack of confidence in the efficacy of the treatment were more prevalent in patients who dropped out of psychotherapy (P<.001). Patient dropout is a common problem in outpatient

  1. Psychiatric emergency services in Copenhagen 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moltke, Katinka; Høegh, Erica B; Sæbye, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the first publication of the psychiatric emergency units (PEUs) in Copenhagen 1985, outpatient facilities have undergone considerable changes. Our aim is to examine how these changes have influenced the activities in the PEUs in the same catchment area. METHODS: We conducted...... reduced the number of visits in the PEUs considerably. The results have shown a change of diagnostic distribution and more severe conditions requiring acute admissions for emergency treatment. Close collaboration with the patients' families, GPs, social authorities and specialized psychiatric outpatient...

  2. Diagnoses, Requests and Timing of 503 Psychiatric Consultations in Two General Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Sahimi Izadian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high comorbidity of medical and psychiatric diagnoses in the general hospital population requires collaboration between various medical fields to provide comprehensive health care. This study aims to find the rate of psychiatric consultations, their timing and overall diagnostic trend in comparison to previous studies. Tehran University of Medical Sciences has got an active psychiatric consultation-liaison service which includes services provided by four faculty psychiatrists (two full-time and two part-time. This study was done in two general hospitals by simple sampling in available cases. For each consultation, a board-certified faculty psychiatrist conducted a clinical evaluation based on DSM-IV-TR. Other than psychiatric diagnoses, socio-demographic variables, relative consultation rates, reasons for referral, medical diagnoses and the time stay after admission were assessed. Among 503 patients who were visited by the consultation-liaison service, there were 54.3% female with mean age of 39.8 years. In 90.1% of consultations, at least one DSM-IV-TR diagnosis was made. The most frequent diagnosis groups were mood disorder (43.5%, adjustment disorder (10.9% and cognitive disorder (7.6%. In about 10.9% of the consultations, multiple psychiatric diagnoses were made. The mean length of hospital stay before the consultation was 12.56 days (range=1-90, SD=13. Based on our findings, the mood and cognitive disorders still remain major foci of consultation-liaison practice in general hospitals; however our findings showed high rate of adjustment disorders diagnosis and ambiguous request for psychiatric consultation which need more interdisciplinary interaction.

  3. Psychiatric characteristics of homicide defendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martone, Christine A; Mulvey, Edward P; Yang, Suzanne; Nemoianu, Andrei; Shugarman, Ryan; Soliman, Layla

    2013-09-01

    The authors examined the rate of mental disorders in an unselected sample of homicide defendants in a U.S. jurisdiction, seeking to identify psychiatric factors associated with offense characteristics and court outcomes. Defendants charged with homicide in a U.S. urban county between 2001 and 2005 received a psychiatric evaluation after arrest. Demographic, historical, and psychiatric variables as well as offense characteristics and legal outcomes were described. Bivariate analyses examined differences by age group and by race, and logistic models examined predictors of multiple victims, firearm use, guilty plea, and guilty verdict. Fifty-eight percent of the sample had at least one axis I or II diagnosis, most often a substance use disorder (47%). Axis I or II diagnoses were more common (78%) among defendants over age 40. Although 37% of the sample had prior psychiatric treatment, only 8% of the defendants with diagnosed axis I disorders had outpatient treatment during the 3 months preceding the homicide; African Americans were less likely than non-African Americans to be in treatment. African American males were more likely to use a firearm and to have a male victim. In exploratory analyses, psychiatric factors did not predict multiple victims, firearm use in the crime, or a guilty verdict. Rates of axis I disorders were lower than reported in previous studies. Few homicide defendants were in psychiatric treatment at the time of the crime, suggesting limited opportunities for prevention by mental health providers.

  4. Critérios para admissão de pacientes na unidade de terapia intensiva e mortalidade Criteria for patient admissiwwon in the intensive care unit and mortality rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Maria Horta Caldeira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar os critérios utilizados na prática clínica, no processo de triagem de pacientes para admissão em UTI. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte prospectivo, em hospital terciário. Foram comparados quatro grupos diferentes de pacientes em relação à necessidade para admissão na UTI e divididos em prioridades 1, 2, 3 e 4, ou seja, prioridade 1 mais necessária até prioridade 4, menos necessária. RESULTADOS: Incluiu-se 359 pacientes, idade 66 (53,2-75,0 anos. APACHE II foi 23 (18-30. Obtevese 70,4% de vagas cedidas na UTI. A idade foi maior nos pacientes para os quais foram recusadas vagas em UTI 66,2±16,1 vs 61,9±15,2 anos (p= 0,02 e a prioridade 1 apresentou mais vagas cedidas 39,1% vs 23,8% vagas recusadas (p=0,01, o contrário ocorreu com prioridades 3 e 4. Pacientes com prioridades 3 e 4 apresentaram maiores idade, escores prognósticos e mais disfunções orgânicas, assim como maiores taxas de recusas. Ocorreram altas mortalidades destes grupos na UTI, 86,7% vs 31,3% no grupo de prioridades 1 e 2 (pOBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate criteria used in clinical practice, for screening of patients for ICU admission. METHODS: Cohort prospective study in a tertiary hospital. Four groups were compared in relation to ICU admission by ranking priorities into groups 1, 2, 3 and 4; highest priority 1, lowest priority 4. RESULTS: Enrolled were 359 patients, 66 (53.2-75.0 years old. APACHE II was 23 (18-30. The ICU made available 70.4% of beds. Patients who were refused beds in the ICU were older, 66.2±16.1 versus 61.9±15.2 years of age (p= 0.02 and the priority 1 group had less refusal of beds, which means, 39.1% versus 23.8% had beds refused (p=0.01. The opposite occurred with priorities 3 and 4. Patients in priority 3 and 4 showed older ages, score system and more organ dysfunctions as well as more refusals of beds. ICU mortality rates were higher for priority groups 3 and 4 when compared to 1 and

  5. Demonstrating the impact and model of care of a Statewide psychiatric intensive care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart; Hollander, Yitzchak; Scarff, Lisa; Dube, Ryan; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Stafrace, Simon

    2013-10-01

    To characterise patients and their outcomes following referral to a Statewide psychiatric intensive care service. This study conducted a medical audit for patients referred to the Statewide service during the first four years of operation (2007-2011). Demographics and the presence of alcohol and other drug and forensic comorbidities were documented along with the treatment received prior to and during admission. In the first four years of operation, 58 referrals were received, 41 resulting in admission and seven in secondary consultation delivered to the referring inpatient psychiatry service. Admitted patients were most commonly experiencing a psychotic illness, had high levels of substance comorbidities and antisocial personality traits, required lengthy admissions (mean days = 41.5), and were in most cases successfully discharged back to the referring inpatient psychiatry service or the community. Significant reductions in clinician-rated difficulties measured via the Health of the Nations Outcome Scale were found at discharge, and despite the significant presenting aggression risk, few attempted or actual assaults occurred. Improved outcomes were achieved with patients deemed unsafe for psychiatric care in high dependency units in other Victorian acute mental health services through management by an acute service that has developed special expertise in this area.

  6. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide—An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-01-01

    People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools. PMID:28257103

  7. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide—An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Madsen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools.

  8. Risk Estimates and Risk Factors Related to Psychiatric Inpatient Suicide-An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Trine; Erlangsen, Annette; Nordentoft, Merete

    2017-03-02

    People with mental illness have an increased risk of suicide. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of suicide risk estimates among psychiatric inpatients based on the body of evidence found in scientific peer-reviewed literature; primarily focusing on the relative risks, rates, time trends, and socio-demographic and clinical risk factors of suicide in psychiatric inpatients. Psychiatric inpatients have a very high risk of suicide relative to the background population, but it remains challenging for clinicians to identify those patients that are most likely to die from suicide during admission. Most studies are based on low power, thus compromising quality and generalisability. The few studies with sufficient statistical power mainly identified non-modifiable risk predictors such as male gender, diagnosis, or recent deliberate self-harm. Also, the predictive value of these predictors is low. It would be of great benefit if future studies would be based on large samples while focusing on modifiable predictors over the course of an admission, such as hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and family/social situations. This would improve our chances of developing better risk assessment tools.

  9. Prevalence of dissociative disorders in psychiatric outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Brad; Smolin, Yvette; Kaplan, Margaret; Legatt, Michael E; Lipschitz, Deborah

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of DSM-IV dissociative disorders in an inner-city outpatient psychiatric population. Subjects were 231 consecutive admissions (84 men and 147 women, mean age=37 years) to an inner-city, hospital-based outpatient psychiatric clinic. The subjects completed self-report measures of dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale) and trauma history (Traumatic Experiences Questionnaire). Eighty-two patients (35%) completed a structured interview for dissociative disorders (Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule). The 82 patients who were interviewed did not differ significantly on any demographic measure or on the self-report measures of trauma and dissociation from the 149 patients who were not interviewed. Twenty-four (29%) of the 82 interviewed patients received a diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in five (6%) patients. Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder diagnosis, patients with a dissociative disorder were significantly more likely to report childhood physical abuse (71% versus 27%) and childhood sexual abuse (74% versus 29%), but the two groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measure, including gender. Chart review revealed that only four (5%) patients in whom a dissociative disorder was identified during the study had previously received a dissociative disorder diagnosis. Dissociative disorders were highly prevalent in this clinical population and typically had not been previously diagnosed clinically. The high prevalence of dissociative disorders found in this study may be related to methodological factors (all patients were offered an interview rather than only those who had scored high on a screening self-report measure) and epidemiological factors (extremely high prevalence rates for childhood physical and sexual abuse were present in the overall study population).

  10. [How medical students perform academically by admission types?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Hoon; Lee, Keumho; Hur, Yera; Kim, Ji-Ha

    2013-09-01

    Despite the importance of selecting students whom are capable for medical education and to become a good doctor, not enough studies have been done in the category. This study focused on analysing the medical students' academic performance (grade point average, GPA) differences, flunk and dropout rates by admission types. From 2004 to 2010, we gathered 369 Konyang University College of Medicine's students admission data and analyzed the differences between admission method and academic achievement, differences in failure and dropout rates. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), ordinary least square, and logistic regression were used. The rolling students showed higher academic achievement from year 1 to 3 than regular students (p admission type variable as control variable in multiple regression model similar results were shown. But unlike the results of ANOVA, GPA differences by admission types were shown not only in lower academic years but also in year 6 (p admission types, regular admission type students showed higher drop out rate than the rolling ones which demonstrates admission types gives significant effect on flunk or dropout rates in medical students (p admissions type students tend to show lower flunk rate and dropout rates and perform better academically. This implies selecting students primarily by Korean College Scholastic Ability Test does not guarantee their academic success in medical education. Thus we suggest a more in-depth comprehensive method of selecting students that are appropriate to individual medical school's educational goal.

  11. Psychiatric disorders in a Dutch Health Area: a repeated cross-sectional survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodiamont, P.P.G.; Rijnders, C.A.T.H.; Mulder, J.; Furer, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decades of psychiatric epidemiology have shown a wide variation in prevalence rates, but a consistent relationship between psychiatric disorder and sociodemographic variables. In this repeated cross-sectional survey, the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and their distribution in the

  12. Benzodiazepine use in the real world of psychiatric practice: low-dose, long-term drug taking and low rates of treatment discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Antonio; Garatti, Massimo; Cipriani, Andrea; Barbui, Corrado

    2007-09-01

    The present study was designed to (1) estimate the frequency of benzodiazepine use in psychiatric practice, (2) investigate factors associated with use, (3) establish whether a relationship exists between benzodiazepine dose and length of use, and (4) investigate factors associated with time to discontinuation. This study was conducted in South Verona, Italy. All individuals who were exposed to benzodiazepines during 2005 were extracted from the local Psychiatric Case Register, and the longitudinal history of benzodiazepine exposure was retrospectively described. In 2005, a total of 1,771 individuals were in contact with at least one of the psychiatric facilities of the South Verona catchment area. Of these, 535 were benzodiazepine users, yielding a frequency of use of 30.2% [95% confidence intervals (CI) 28.0, 32.4]. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, lower level of education, diagnosis of affective illness, longer length of illness and higher service use were significantly associated with benzodiazepine exposure. An increase in dosages over time to maintain the drug's effectiveness was not evident from the analysis of the relationship between daily dose and length of therapy. A total of 17.3% (93/535) of patients exposed to benzodiazepines discontinued treatment. Cox regression analysis revealed that age and length of illness were negatively associated with the probability of discontinuing therapy, while the concomitant use of antipsychotics and mood stabilisers was positively associated with discontinuing therapy. The finding that in the great majority of psychiatric patients, low doses of benzodiazepines are routinely prescribed on a long-term basis suggests that, in this specific setting of care, treatment recommendations stating that use should be short term may not be applicable.

  13. Emotional reactions to involuntary psychiatric hospitalization and stigma-related stress among people with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüsch, Nicolas; Müller, Mario; Lay, Barbara; Corrigan, Patrick W; Zahn, Roland; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Blank, Christina; Rössler, Wulf

    2014-02-01

    Compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient treatment can be experienced as disempowering and stigmatizing by people with serious mental illness. However, quantitative studies of stigma-related emotional and cognitive reactions to involuntary hospitalization and their impact on people with mental illness are scarce. Among 186 individuals with serious mental illness and a history of recent involuntary hospitalization, shame and self-contempt as emotional reactions to involuntary hospitalization, the cognitive appraisal of stigma as a stressor, self-stigma, empowerment as well as quality of life and self-esteem were assessed by self-report. Psychiatric symptoms were rated by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. In multiple linear regressions, more self-stigma was predicted independently by higher levels of shame, self-contempt and stigma stress. A greater sense of empowerment was related to lower levels of stigma stress and self-contempt. These findings remained significant after controlling for psychiatric symptoms, diagnosis, age, gender and the number of lifetime involuntary hospitalizations. Increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment in turn predicted poorer quality of life and reduced self-esteem. The negative effect of emotional reactions and stigma stress on quality of life and self-esteem was largely mediated by increased self-stigma and reduced empowerment. Shame and self-contempt as reactions to involuntary hospitalization as well as stigma stress may lead to self-stigma, reduced empowerment and poor quality of life. Emotional and cognitive reactions to coercion may determine its impact more than the quantity of coercive experiences. Interventions to reduce the negative effects of compulsory admissions should address emotional reactions and stigma as a stressor.

  14. An analysis of clinical activity, admission rates, length of hospital stay, and economic impact after a temporary loss of 50% of the non-operative podiatrists from a tertiary specialist foot clinic in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooday, Catherine; Murchison, Rachel; Dhatariya, Ketan

    2013-01-01

    Podiatrists form an integral part of the multidisciplinary foot team in the treatment of diabetic foot-related complications. A set of unforeseen circumstances within our specialist diabetes foot service in the United Kingdom caused a loss of 50% of our non-operative podiatry team for almost 7 months during 2010. Some of this time was filled by non-specialist community non-operative podiatrists. We assessed the economic impact of this loss by examining data for the 5 years prior to this 7-month interruption, and for the 2 years after 'normal service' was resumed. Our data show that the loss of the non-operative podiatrists led to a significant rise in the numbers of admissions into hospital, and hospital length of stay also increased. At our institution a single bed day cost is £275. During the time that the numbers of specialist non-operative podiatry staff were depleted, and for up to 6 months after they returned to normal activities, the extra costs increased by just less than £90,000. The number of people admitted directly from specialist vascular and orthopaedic clinics is likely to have increased due to the lack of capacity to manage them in the diabetic foot clinic. Our data were unable to assess these individuals and did not look at the costs saved from avoiding surgery. Thus the actual costs incurred are likely to be higher. Our data suggest that specialist non-operative podiatrists involved in the treatment of the diabetic foot may prevent unwarranted hospital admission and increased hospitalisation rates by providing skilled assessment and care in the outpatient clinical settings.

  15. Pattern and Outcome of Admissions in the Children's Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A five-year review of the pattern and outcome of paediatric admissions in the Children Emergency Room (CHER) of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) Enugu, showed a total of 10,267 admissions, a discharge rate of 50.4 percent, a transfer-out rate of 44.3 percent, and a mortality of 5.1 percent.

  16. Assisted admissions? A national survey of general practitioner experience of involuntary admissions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, M

    2011-10-01

    The 2001 Mental Health Act introduced in 2006, changed how a patient is admitted involuntarily to a psychiatric unit. This paper reports on a national survey of general practitioners\\' experience implementing the Act. Five hundred and sixty eight (568) GPs completed the survey. Twenty five percent (25%) of respondants had not used it. When used, twenty four percent (24%) report that it takes seven hours or more to complete an admission. Fifty percent (50%) of respondents are confident to complete the necessary paperwork. Overall GPs are dissatisfied with arrangements for transport of patients (mean Likert score 3.5), primarily due to the time delay. GPs believe this places risk on the patient, family and GP. Only thirty-three percent (33%) of respondents feel that the Mental Health Act has improved the patient, GP and family experience of involuntary admission.

  17. Psychiatric emergencies (part II): psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Dain, S

    2013-02-01

    In this Part II psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases are discussed. "Comorbidity phenomenon" defines the not univocal interrelation between medical illnesses and psychiatric disorders, each other negatively influencing morbidity and mortality. Most severe psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, show increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease, related to poverty, use of psychotropic medication, and higher rate of preventable risk factors such as smoking, addiction, poor diet and lack of exercise. Moreover, psychiatric and organic disorders can develop together in different conditions of toxic substance and prescription drug use or abuse, especially in the emergency setting population. Different combinations with mutual interaction of psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders are defined by the so called "dual diagnosis". The hypotheses that attempt to explain the psychiatric disorders and substance abuse relationship are examined: (1) common risk factors; (2) psychiatric disorders precipitated by substance use; (3) psychiatric disorders precipitating substance use (self-medication hypothesis); and (4) synergistic interaction. Diagnostic and therapeutic difficulty concerning the problem of dual diagnosis, and legal implications, are also discussed. Substance induced psychiatric and organic symptoms can occur both in the intoxication and withdrawal state. Since ancient history, humans selected indigene psychotropic plants for recreational, medicinal, doping or spiritual purpose. After the isolation of active principles or their chemical synthesis, higher blood concentrations reached predispose to substance use, abuse and dependence. Abuse substances have specific molecular targets and very different acute mechanisms of action, mainly involving dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems, but finally converging on the brain's reward pathways, increasing dopamine in nucleus accumbens. The most common

  18. Professional perspectives on systemic barriers to admission avoidance: learning from a system dynamics study of older people's admission pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Bronagh; Lattimer, Valerie; Wintrup, Julie; Brailsford, Sally

    2015-06-01

    There is debate worldwide about the best way to manage increased healthcare demand within ageing populations, particularly rising rates of unplanned and avoidable hospital admissions. To understand health and social care professionals' perspectives on barriers to admission avoidance throughout the admissions journey, in particular: the causes of avoidable admissions in older people; drivers of admission and barriers to use of admission avoidance strategies; and improvements to reduce unnecessary admissions. A qualitative framework analysis of interview data from a System dynamics (SD) modelling study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty health and social care professionals with experience of older people's admissions. The interviews were used to build understanding of factors facilitating or hindering admission avoidance across the admissions system. Data were analysed using framework analysis. Three overarching themes emerged: understanding the needs of the patient group; understanding the whole system; and systemwide access to expertise in care of older people. There were diverse views on the underlying reasons for avoidable admissions and recognition of the need for whole-system approaches to service redesign. Participants recommended system redesign that recognises the specific needs of older people, but there was no consensus on underlying patient needs or specific service developments. Access to expertise in management of older and frailer patients was seen as a barrier to admission avoidance throughout the system. Providing access to expertise and leadership in care of frail older people across the admissions system presents a challenge for service managers and nurse educators but is seen as a prerequisite for effective admission avoidance. System redesign to meet the needs of frail older people requires agreement on causes of avoidable admission and underlying patient needs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Adaptive Admissions Process for Effective and Fair Graduate Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Judith; von Davier, Alina; Heinimann, Hans Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Graduate admission has become a critical process for quality assurance in tertiary education. Hitherto, most research has investigated the validity of admissions instruments. However, surprisingly little work has been conducted on the overall organization of admission, which often remains "informal, ad hoc, and lacking in…

  20. Psychiatric disorders and urbanization in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, J.J.M.; Peen, J.; Koelen, J.A.; Smit, H.F.E.; Schoevers, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Epidemiological studies over the last decade have supplied growing evidence of an association between urbanization and the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to examine the link between levels of urbanization and 12-month prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in a

  1. Psychiatric disorders and urbanization in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, J.J.M.; Peen, J.; Koelen, J.A.; Smit, H.F.E.; Schoevers, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Epidemiological studies over the last decade have supplied growing evidence of an association between urbanization and the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to examine the link between levels of urbanization and 12-month prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in

  2. Traditional and cyberbullying co-occurrence and its relationship to psychiatric symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tural Hesapcioglu, Selma; Ercan, Filiz

    2017-01-01

    The effect of cyberbullying accompanied by traditional bullying on mental health has been less studied. In this study, the frequency, co-occurrence, and the relationship to psychiatric symptoms of traditional bullying and cyberbullying among bullies and victims are examined. All of the high schools in the province of Mus, Turkey were stratified according to Placement Test for High Schools admission points for 2014-2015. By choosing schools using simple random sampling, 1276 students were reached. Students were given the Brief Symptom Inventory and three separate scale assessments: peer bullying rating, cybervictimization, and cyberbullying scales. High scores in all subscale scores of bullying and victimization were significantly related to higher depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, somatization, and hostility scores. For people who were exposed to cyberbullying in addition to traditional bullying, the severity of the psychiatric symptoms was significantly higher. For all psychiatric symptoms, major predictors were gender, total victimization score, and total cybervictimization score. Moreover, the bullying total score was among the predictors of low self-esteem and hostility. Cybervictimization and cyberbullying occur less often than traditional bullying and victimization, but people who were exposed to or performed cyberbullying were also exposed to or performed traditional bullying. The addition of cyberbullying to traditional bullying is associated with more intense psychiatric symptoms. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. A predictive model for alternative admission to dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christersson, C; Bengmark, D; Bengtsson, H; Lindh, C; Rohlin, M

    2015-11-01

    To compare academic progress and performance of students admitted through two admission systems and to analyse the predictive power of different components in an alternative admission. The subjects were students admitted to the dental programme at Malmö University, Sweden. The grade admission group was admitted on grades from secondary school (n = 126) and the alternative admission group via an alternative admission procedure (n = 157). The alternative admission procedure consisted of the following components: problem-solving matrices, spatial capacity tested with folding and tin models, manual dexterity, capacity for empathy and interview. Comparisons were made for academic progress (dropouts from the programme and study rate) and academic performance (examinations failed and outcomes of a comprehensive clinical examination). Spearman correlation was calculated for each component of the alternative admission procedure and academic progress as well as academic performance. Multivariate analyses were also carried out. Compared to the grade admission group, the alternative admission group presented lower rate of dropouts (3% vs. 20%, P admission selection criteria, particularly emphatic capacity that predicts important student academic achievements. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hospital admissions in Alicante (Spain): a comparative analysis of foreign citizens from high-income countries, immigrants from low-income countries, and Spanish citizens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramos, José M; Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva M; Pinargote, Hector; Sastre, Jaume; Seguí, José M; Rugero, María J

    2013-01-01

    ...) and its surrounding area. Utilization rates were estimated. Multivariate analysis adjusting for age and sex was performed on hospital admission rates, diagnoses at hospital discharge, service of admission, and mortality during hospital admission in FCHICs...

  5. Admission Test and Pregnancy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Akhavan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The admission test (AT has been carried out for many years, but there are still debates about the prognostic value of the test. Therefore, we aimed to examine the value of the AT in predicting the adverse outcome in neonates. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 425 pregnant women with normal vaginal delivery were studied between2009 and 2014at Vali-e-Asr Hospital. Based on the results, the women were divided into 2groups of normal and abnormal ATs. All the patients were followed up until the birth of their baby, when the status of mother and neonate was determined. The main outcomes of the study were cesarean rate, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU admission, fetus demise, neonatal acidosis, and Apgar score. The independent t-test, chi-square test, Fisher exact test, and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. The data were analyzed using SPSS (version 17. Results: Of 425 pregnant women studied, 142 (33.4% had abnormal ATs with a mean age of 29 (±4.5 years. Multivariate analysis showed that an abnormal AT was able to predict the incidence of cesarean section, intrauterine growth restriction, turned cord, and Apgar<7, but it could not predict neonatal death and hypoxia. Conclusion: The AT was shown to be a useful screening test with risk factors such as oligohydramnios, bloody amniotic fluid, meconium amniotic fluid, intrauterine growth restriction, and turned cord. Additionally, the test was also able to predict NICU admission and the need for cesarean section, but it could not predict the occurrence of neonatal death.

  6. Mathematics Admission Test Remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ideon Erge

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2014, there have been admission tests in mathematics for applicants to the Estonian University of Life Sciences for Geodesy, Land Management and Real Estate Planning; Civil Engineering; Hydraulic Engineering and Water Pollution Control; Engineering and Technetronics curricula. According to admission criteria, the test must be taken by students who have not passed the specific mathematics course state exam or when the score was less than 20 points. The admission test may also be taken by those who wish to improve their state exam score. In 2016, there were 126 such applicants of whom 63 took the test. In 2015, the numbers were 129 and 89 and in 2014 150 and 47 accordingly. The test was scored on scale of 100. The arithmetic average of the score was 30.6 points in 2016, 29.03 in 2015 and 18.84 in 2014. The test was considered to be passed with 1 point in 2014 and 20 points in 2015 and 2016. We analyzed test results and gave examples of problems which were solved exceptionally well or not at all.

  7. Midlife suicide risk, partner's psychiatric illness, spouse and child bereavement by suicide or other modes of death: a gender specific study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbo, Esben

    2005-01-01

    been first admitted with a psychiatric disorder after 31 December two years earlier was 6.9 (95% CI 3.6 to 13.0), whereas their male counterpart experienced a risk of 3.9 (2.7 to 5.6); p value gender difference = 0.39. Men who had lost their partner by suicide or other causes of death experienced......STUDY OBJECTIVE: To describe gender specific suicide rates associated with partner's psychiatric disorder, loss of a spouse, or child by suicide or other causes, being a parent, and marital status. DESIGN: Nested case-control study. Information on causes of death, psychiatric admission, marital...... status, children, and socioeconomic factors was obtained from routine registers. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 9011 people aged 25-60 years who committed suicide; 180 220 age-gender matched controls; 111 172 marital partners; 174 672 children. MAIN RESULTS: The suicide risk in women whose partner had...

  8. The use of psychiatric services by young adults who came to Sweden as teenage refugees: a national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhica, H; Almquist, Y; Rostila, M; Hjern, A

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the patterns of use of different forms of psychiatric care in refugees who settled in Sweden as teenagers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the use of different forms of psychiatric care from 2009 to 2012 in a population of 35 457 refugees, aged from 20 to 36, who had settled in Sweden as teenagers between 1989 and 2004. These findings were compared with 1.26 million peers from the same birth cohorts in the general Swedish population. Unaccompanied and accompanied refugees were more likely to experience compulsory admission to a psychiatric hospital compared with the native Swedish population, with hazard ratios (HRs) of 2.76 (1.86-4.10) and 1.89 (1.53-2.34), respectively, as well as psychiatric inpatient care, with HRs of 1.62 (1.34-1.94) and 1.37 (1.25-1.50). Outpatient care visits by the young refugees were similar to the native Swedish population. The longer the refugees had residency in Sweden, the more they used outpatient psychiatric care. Refugees born in the Horn of Africa and Iran were most likely to undergo compulsory admission, with HRs of 3.98 (2.12-7.46) and 3.07 (1.52-6.19), respectively. They were also the groups who were most likely to receive inpatient care, with HRs of 1.55 (1.17-2.06) and 1.84 (1.37-2.47), respectively. Our results also indicated that the use of psychiatric care services increased with the level of education in the refugee population, while the opposite was true for the native Swedish population. In fact, the risks of compulsory admissions were particularly higher among refugees who had received a secondary education, compared with native Swedish residents, with HRs of 4.72 (3.06-7.29) for unaccompanied refugees and 2.04 (1.51-2.73) for accompanied refugees. Young refugees received more psychiatric inpatient care than the native Swedish population, with the highest rates seen in refugees who were not accompanied by their parents. The discrepancy between the use of inpatient and outpatient care

  9. Suicide among older psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Zarit, Steven H; Tu, Xin

    2006-01-01

    characteristics. RESULTS: Affective disorders were found to be associated with an almost twofold higher risk of suicide among psychiatric inpatients than other types of disorders (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-2.6). Patients with dementia had a significantly lower risk ratio of 0.2 (95% CI: 0......OBJECTIVE: Older adults have elevated suicide rates, especially in the presence of a psychiatric disorder, yet not much is known about predictors for suicide within this high-risk group. The current study examines the characteristics associated with suicide among older adults who are admitted...

  10. Lamotrigine in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jennifer G; Gitlin, Michael J; Altshuler, Lori L

    2013-07-01

    Owing to the prevalence of medication side effects and treatment resistance, prescribers often consider off-label uses of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved agents for the treatment of persistent symptoms. The authors review the available literature on the FDA-approved and non-FDA-approved uses of lamotrigine in adults with psychiatric disorders. We used PubMed, MEDLINE, and a hand search of relevant literature to find studies published between 1990 and 2012 and available in English language. The following keywords were searched: lamotrigine, psychiatric, mood disorders, depression, personality disorders, anxiety, schizophrenia, side effects, and rash. Data were selected from 29 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). When RCTs were not available, open-label trials (6), retrospective case reviews (10), and case series (4) were summarized. We extracted results of monotherapy and augmentation trials of lamotrigine on primary and secondary outcome measures. Lamotrigine is generally well tolerated, with the best evidence for the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder, particularly in prevention of depressive episodes. In acute bipolar depression, meta-analyses suggested a modest benefit, especially for more severely depressed subjects, with switch rates similar to placebo. In unipolar depression, double-blind RCTs noted benefit on subsets of symptoms and improved response in more severely depressed subjects. Data are limited but promising in borderline personality disorder. Use of lamotrigine in schizophrenia and anxiety disorders has little supportive evidence. Lamotrigine is recommended in bipolar maintenance when depression is prominent. It also has a role in treating acute bipolar depression and unipolar depression, though the latter warrants more research. Data are too limited in other psychiatric disorders to recommend its use at this time. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  11. Self-harm in Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhand, Naista; Matheson, Katherine; Courtney, Darren

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive report of children and adolescents who engaged in self-harm during their admission to a psychiatric inpatient unit. A chart review was conducted on all admissions to an acute care psychiatric inpatient unit in a Canadian children's hospital over a one-year period. Details on patients with self-harm behaviour during the admission were recorded, including: demographics, presentation to hospital, self-harm behaviour and outcome. Baseline variables for patients with and without self-harm behaviour during admission were compared. Self-harm incidents were reported in 60 of 501 (12%) admissions during the one-year period of the study. Fourteen percent of patients (50 of 351) accounted for total number of 136 self-harm incidents. Half of these incidents (49%) occurred outside of the hospital setting, when patients were on passes. Using the Beck Lethality Scale (0-10), mean severity of the self-injury attempts was 0.33, and there were no serious negative outcomes. Self-harm behaviour during inpatient psychiatric admission is a common issue among youth, despite safety strategies in place. While self-harm behaviour is one of the most common reasons for admission to psychiatric inpatient unit, our understanding of nature of these acts during the admission and contributing factors are limited. Further research is required to better understand these factors, and to develop strategies to better support these patients.

  12. The Epidemiology of Psychiatric Disorders among Repeat DUI Offenders Accepting a Treatment-Sentencing Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Howard J.; Nelson, Sarah E.; LaPlante, Debi A.; LaBrie, Richard A.; Albanese, Mark; Caro, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity likely contributes to driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol among repeat offenders. This study presents one of the first descriptions of the prevalence and comorbidity of psychiatric disorders among repeat DUI offenders in treatment. Participants included all consenting eligible admissions (N = 729) to a 2-week…

  13. Short-term diagnostic stability among re-admitted psychiatric in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prospective and retrospective consistency of diagnoses among readmitted psychiatric in-patients at the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital in Eldoret, Kenya. Method: Admission and discharge diagnoses among a consecutive sample of 114 psychiatric in-patients readmitted at the Moi Teaching ...

  14. Increased admissions for diabetes mellitus after burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Janine M; Randall, Sean M; Fear, Mark W; Boyd, James H; O'Halloran, Emily; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M

    2016-12-01

    Currently, limited long-term data on hyperglycaemia and insulin sensitivity in burn patients are available and the data that do exist are primarily related to paediatric severe burns. The aim of this study was to assess if burn is associated with increased post-burn admissions for diabetes mellitus. A population-based longitudinal study using linked hospital morbidity and death data from Western Australia was undertaken of all persons hospitalized for a first burn (n=30,997) in 1980-2012 and a frequency matched non-injury comparison cohort, randomly selected from Western Australia's birth registrations and electoral roll (n=123,399). Crude admission rates and summed length of stay for diabetes mellitus were calculated. Negative binomial and Cox proportional hazards regression modelling were used to generate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and hazard ratios (HR), respectively. After adjustment for socio-demographic factors and pre-existing health status, the burn cohort had 2.21 times (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.36-1.56) as many admissions and almost three times the number of days in hospital with a diabetes mellitus diagnosis (IRR, 95% CI: 2.94, 2.12-4.09) than the uninjured cohort. Admission rates were significantly elevated for those burned during childhood (diabetes mellitus in the burn cohort provide evidence that burns have longer term effects on blood glucose and insulin regulation after wound healing. The first five years after burn discharge appears to be a critical period with significantly elevated incident admissions for diabetes mellitus during this time. Results would suggest prolonged clinical management after discharge and or wound healing to minimise post-burn admissions for diabetes mellitus is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Involuntary treatment of psychiatric patients in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disruptive and aggressive behavior during their previous hospital stays; residential and vocational instability, family disruption, and higher premorbid dysfunction.9 Over two thirds of patients have a violent episode within the first 72 hours of admission to an acute psychiatric unit, suggesting that there is a relatively high ...

  16. Frequency and correlates of comorbid psychiatric illness in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Demographic, personal, psychiatric and substance-use history, in addition to mental state examination on admission, were collected from the case notes. Results. The largest group of patients (n=56, 40%) had not been abstinent from heroin use since drug debut, and most had been arrested for drug-related activities ...

  17. Psychiatric hospitalisation and suicide among the very old in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Vach, Werner

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Very old people have higher suicide rates than the younger elderly population. Psychiatric disorders are known to have a strong association with suicide among elderly people. AIMS: To analyse the analyse the suicide risk associated with psychiatric hospitalisation among the very old......: The association between suicide and psychiatric hospitalisation is much weaker for the very old than for the old. Psychiatric disorders among very old people may be interacting with other disorders, may be underdiagnosed or treated in other healthcare settings....

  18. Clinical Characteristics and Precipitating Factors of Adolescent Suicide Attempters Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Care in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Bae, Jeong-Hoon; Shin, Min-Sup; Yoo, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to examine the rates, correlates, methods, and precipitating factors of suicide attempts among adolescent patients admitted for psychiatric inpatient care from 1999 to 2010 in a university hospital in Korea. Methods The subjects consisted of 728 patients who were admitted for psychiatric inpatient care in a university hospital over a 12-year period and who were aged 10-19 years at the time of admission. We retrospectively investigated the information on suicidal behaviors and other clinical information by reviewing the subjects' electronic medical records. Whether these patients had completed their suicide on 31 December 2010 was determined by a link to the database of the National Statistical Office. Results Among 728 subjects, 21.7% had suicidal ideation at admission, and 10.7% admitted for suicidal attempts. Female gender, divorced/widowed parents, and the presence of mood disorders were associated with a significantly increased likelihood of suicide attempts. Most common method of suicide attempts was cutting, and most common reason for suicide attempts was relationship problems within the primary support group. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was associated with increased risk of death by suicide after discharge. Conclusion These results highlight the role of specific psychosocial factor (e.g., relational problems) and psychiatric disorders (e.g., mood disorders) in the suicide attempts of Korean adolescents, and the need for effective prevention strategies for adolescents at risk for suicide. PMID:25670943

  19. The Admission Index as a Predictor of Freshman GPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Everard

    The Admission Index, created from high school counselor ratings of academic promise and motivation, is recommended to admission officers and college counselors as a variable as good or better than those traditionally used from the cognitive domain. This index was found not only to be substantially valid and consistent as an achievement motivation…

  20. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND SLEEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystal, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Psychiatric disorders and sleep are related in important ways. In contrast to the longstanding view of this relationship which viewed sleep problems as symptoms of psychiatric disorders, there is growing experimental evidence that the relationship between psychiatric disorders and sleep is complex and includes bi-directional causation. In this article we provide the evidence that supports this point of view, reviewing the data on the sleep disturbances seen in patients with psychiatric disorders but also reviewing the data on the impact of sleep disturbances on psychiatric conditions. Although much has been learned about the psychiatric disorders-sleep relationship, additional research is needed to better understand these relationships. This work promises to improve our ability to understand both of these phenomena and to allow us to better treat the many patients with sleep disorders and with psychiatric disorders. PMID:23099143

  1. Paraphilias in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Patrick J; Odlaug, Brian L; Thomarios, Nick; Davis, Andrew A; Buchanan, Stephanie N; Meyer, Craig S; Grant, Jon E

    2010-05-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the prevalence of paraphilias in an adult inpatient psychiatric population. One hundred twelve consecutive, voluntarily admitted, adult male psychiatric inpatients were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Sexual Disorders Module, Male Version, to assess the rates of DSM-IV paraphilias. Fifteen patients (13.4%) reported symptoms consistent with at least one lifetime DSM-IV paraphilia. The most common paraphilias were voyeurism (n = 9 [8.0%]), exhibitionism (n = 6 [5.4%]), and sexual masochism (n = 3 [2.7%]). Patients who screened positive for a paraphilia had significantly more psychiatric hospitalizations (P = .006) and, on a trend level, were more likely to have attempted suicide. In addition, patients with paraphilias were significantly more likely to report having been sexually abused than patients without a paraphilia (P = paraphilia. Paraphilias appear to be more common in adult male psychiatric inpatients than previously estimated. The study also demonstrated that these disorders were not screened for by the treating physician and thus may go untreated. Further, larger-scale studies are necessary in order to further examine the rates of these disorders in the general population.

  2. Do intercultural factors play a role in exacerbating psychiatric symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Yong Lock; Yap, Hwa Ling

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old mixed-race woman suffering from recurrent major depressive episodes, with suicidal ideation and risk, involving several inpatient admissions. A comorbid diagnosis of borderline personality disorder was also recorded in one of her previous inpatient admissions. During her last inpatient admission, a multidisciplinary case discussion and review of the patient's life highlighted several possible intercultural trigger factors that could have contributed to the exacerbation of her psychiatric illness. We emphasise the need to explore intercultural predisposing and precipitating factors for a more complete psychodynamic understanding of psychiatric illnesses among the multiracial population of Singapore. This also adds to the discussion on the management of such patients with the option of formal in-depth psychotherapy in adjunct to medication. This may prevent recurrent relapses, modify suicide intent and reduce the necessity for inpatient treatment, which will be cost-effective and result in efficacious treatment.

  3. Filicide in offspring of parents with severe psychiatric disorders: a population-based cohort study of child homicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, T M; Munk-Olsen, T; Mortensen, P B; Abel, K M; Appleby, L; Webb, R T

    2011-05-01

    Although rare in absolute terms, risk of homicide is markedly elevated among children of parents with mental disorders. Our aims were to examine risk of child homicide if 1 or both parents had a psychiatric history, to compare effects by parental sex and diagnostic group, and to assess likelihood of child homicide being perpetrated by parents according to their psychiatric history. A prospective, register-based cohort study using the entire Danish population born between January 1, 1973, and January 1, 2007, was conducted. Follow-up of the cohort members began on their date of birth and ended on January 1, 2007; their 18th birthday; their date of death; or their date of emigration, whichever came first. We used the Danish national registers from 1973 to 2007 to study homicide risk between children whose parents were previously admitted to a psychiatric hospital, including diagnosis-specific analyses, versus their unexposed counterparts. In addition, we used police records during 2000 to 2005 to examine whether or not 1 of the parents was the perpetrator. Rates of homicide were analyzed using survival analysis. Children of parents previously admitted to a psychiatric hospital had an overall higher risk of being homicide victims (MRR = 8.94; 95% CI, 6.56-12.18). The risk differed according to parental sex and psychiatric diagnosis (ICD-8 and ICD-10 criteria). The absolute risk of homicide was 0.009% if neither parent had been admitted before the birth of their child and 0.051% if 1 of the parents had previously been admitted. During 2000 to 2005, 88% of the child homicide cases were filicide victims. This percentage was not significantly different for parents with a previous psychiatric admission versus those without such a history. In the large majority of Danish child-homicide cases, a parent was the perpetrator, regardless of whether there had been parental admission to a psychiatric hospital. Children of parents previously admitted had a higher risk of being

  4. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with Atypical Odontalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Anna; Tu, Trang T H; Shinohara, Yukiko; Mikuzuki, Lou; Kawasaki, Kaoru; Sugawara, Shiori; Suga, Takayuki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Watanabe, Motoko; Umezaki, Yojiro; Yoshikawa, Tatsuya; Motomura, Haruhiko; Takenoshita, Miho; Maeda, Hidefumi; Toyofuku, Akira

    2018-01-01

    Atypical Odontalgia (AO) is a condition characterized by tooth pain with no apparent cause. Although psychiatric comorbidity seems to be very common, it has rarely been studied. To clarify the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the clinical features in patients with AO, we retrospectively evaluated their examination records. Clinical features and psychiatric diagnoses of 383 patients with AO were investigated by reviewing patients' medical records and referral letters. Psychiatric diagnoses were categorized according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). We also analyzed visual analogue scale (VAS), self-rating depression scale (SDS), and the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ) scores. Of the 383 patients with AO, 177 (46.2%) had comorbid psychiatric disorders. The most common were depressive disorders (15.4%) and anxiety disorders (10.1%). Serious psychotic disorders such as bipolar disorder (3.0%) and schizophrenia (1.8%) were rare. Dental trigger of AO was reported in 217 (56.7%) patients. There were no significant correlations between psychiatric comorbidities and most of the demographic features. Higher VAS and SDS scores, higher frequency of sleep disturbance, and higher ratings of "Fearful" and "Punishing-cruel" descriptors of the SF-MPQ were found in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. About half of AO patients had comorbid psychiatric disorders. Dental procedures are not necessarily causative factors of AO. In AO patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders, pain might have a larger emotional component than a sensory one. VAS, SDS, and SF-MPQ scores might aid in the noticing of underlying comorbid psychiatric disorders in AO patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Emergency department orthopedics observation unit as an alternative to admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Amy A; Jones, Jaime; Weiss, Steven J; Silva, Otono

    2014-10-01

    Inclusion of select orthopedic problems in the orthopedics observation unit (OOU) may reduce hospital admissions. Our system allows OOU status for 24 hours, but the effect on admissions is unknown. Our primary hypothesis was that we could predict which OOU patients required admission based on the presence of uncontrolled pain. Data were prospectively collected for all OOU patients in this prospective observational study, including data on extremity cellulitis, fractures, and spine injuries awaiting brace placement.The primary outcome variable was admission to the hospital versus discharge home. The a priori hypotheses were that patients with more persistent or worsening pain would require admission more often and that the OOU would result in fewer patients needing a costlier inpatient admission to the hospital. An a priori power analysis showed adequate power of 80% to detect a difference between admitted and discharged patients. Data were prospectively collected from August 2011 to August 2012 for 199 consecutive OOU patients, 62% of whom were men. Diagnoses included infection (cellulitis or abscess of extremity) in 76%, fracture in 15% and other in 9% of the patients. Sixty-two patients (31%) were admitted and 7 patients (4%) made return visits for the same problem within a 30-day period. No significant relations existed between any of the independent variables and admission on bivariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression found no significant predictors of hospital admission. Logistic regression was not performed on 30-day returns because of the low event rate (4%). An OOU prevented 138 of 199 (69%) patients from being admitted to a hospital. There were no significant predictors of which patients would require admission. Pain was not a predictor of need for admission. The lack of significant predictors is important in suggesting that without the ability to predict which patients require admission, a system using an OOU can reduce admissions by more than

  6. Solar radiation is inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Francisca; Riutort, Maria C; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Hoyos-Bachiloglu, Rodrigo; Camargo, Carlos A; Borzutzky, Arturo

    To explore the associations between latitude and solar radiation with inflammatory bowel disease admission rates in Chile, the country with the largest variation in solar radiation in the world. This is an ecological study, which included data on all hospital-admitted population for inflammatory bowel disease between 2001 and 2012, according to different latitudes and solar radiation exposures in Chile. The data were acquired from the national hospital discharge database from the Department of Health Statistics and Information of the Chilean Ministry of Health. Between 2001 and 2012 there were 12,869 admissions due to inflammatory bowel disease (69% ulcerative colitis, 31% Crohn's disease). Median age was 36 years (IQR: 25-51); 57% were female. The national inflammatory bowel disease admission rate was 6.52 (95% CI: 6.40-6.63) per 100,000 inhabitants with increasing rates over the 12-year period. In terms of latitude, the highest admission rates for pediatric ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, as well as adult ulcerative colitis, were observed in the southernmost region with lowest annual solar radiation. Linear regression analysis showed that regional solar radiation was inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admissions in Chile (β: -.44, p = .03). Regional solar radiation was inversely associated with inflammatory bowel disease admission rates in Chile; inflammatory bowel disease admissions were highest in the southernmost region with lowest solar radiation. Our results support the potential role of vitamin D deficiency on inflammatory bowel disease flares.

  7. The Effect of Dexamethasone on Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression after Cardiac Surgery and Intensive Care Admission : Longitudinal Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Lotte; Hillegers, Manon H; Veldhuijzen, Judy; Cornelisse, Sandra; Nierich, Arno P; van der Maaten, Joost M; Rosseel, Peter M; Hofland, Jan; Sep, Milou S; Dieleman, Stefan; Vinkers, Christiaan H; Peelen, Linda M; Joëls, Marian; van Dijk, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cardiac surgery and postoperative admission to the ICU may lead to posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. Perioperatively administered corticosteroids potentially alter the risk of development of these psychiatric conditions, by affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  8. The Effect of Dexamethasone on Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression After Cardiac Surgery and Intensive Care Admission : Longitudinal Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Lotte; Hillegers, Manon H.; Veldhuijzen, Dieuwke S.; Cornelisse, Sandra; Nierich, Arno P.; Maaten, van der Joost M.; Rosseel, Peter M.; Hofland, Jan; Sep, Milou S.; Dieleman, Jan M.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.; Peelen, Linda M.; Joels, Marian; van Dijk, Diederik

    Objective: Cardiac surgery and postoperative admission to the ICU may lead to posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. Perioperatively administered corticosteroids potentially alter the risk of development of these psychiatric conditions, by affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  9. Nitrogen dioxide increases cardiorespiratory admissions in Torrelavega (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, Javier; Salas, Ana; Prieto-Salceda, Dolores; Chinchon-Bengoechea, Veronica; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel

    2005-09-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to analyze relationships between levels of air pollutants and emergency admissions for cardiorespiratory disease. Admission data from January 1, 1992, to December 31, 1995, were obtained from the Marques de Valdecilla University Hospital Admission Service; meteorological data (rainfall, temperatures wind speed, wind direction) were obtained from the National Meteorology Institute in Santander. Pollutant data on sulfur dioxide (SO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), total suspended particles (TSP), nitrogen oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were provided by the secretary of environment for the Cantabrian Regional Government. Rate ratios were estimated for each pollutant by Poisson regression; they were adjusted for meteorological variables. It was found that elevated NO2 increased by 20 percent the risk of having an admission for cardiorespiratory diseases; this effect was mainly due to respiratory diseases (rate ratio = 1.7, p pollutant model, elevated particulates and nitrogen monoxide were also related to admissions, but this effect disappeared when a five-pollutant model was used (p = .21 and p = 0.36, respectively. SO2 and SH2 did not show any relationship with admissions. Thus, nitrogen dioxide was the only pollutant the authors found to be related to emergency admissions for cardiorespiratory diseases. It is difficult to generalize from these results because of the small number of daily admissions and the variability in pollutant levels; therefore, more studies are necessary to improve knowledge about the relationship between air pollution and health in small towns.

  10. 77 FR 47223 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... resource use and costs among psychiatric hospitals and psychiatric units. Section 405(g)(2) of the Medicare... differences in patient resource use and costs among psychiatric hospitals and psychiatric units. Section 405(g...(s)(3)(B)) for RYs 2013 and 2014 that reduces the update to the IPF PPS base rate for the FY...

  11. The new asylums in the community: severely ill psychiatric patients living in psychiatric supported housing facilities. A Danish register-based study of prognostic factors, use of psychiatric services, and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Pedersen, Marianne G; Pedersen, Carsten B

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reorganization of psychiatric treatment in Denmark involved a declining number of psychiatric long-stay beds and an increasing number of psychiatric supported housing facilities in the community. Very few studies have focused on the population in such facilities. METHODS: Information...... was generated combining addresses of supported psychiatric housing facilities with information from the Danish Civil Registration System to create a case register of persons living in supported psychiatric housing facilities. Through linkage with the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, we examined predictors...... of becoming a resident in a psychiatric housing facility, use of psychiatric services around the time of entrance to a supported psychiatric housing facility, and mortality rates for residents in a psychiatric housing facility compared to non-residents and to persons in the general population who never...

  12. Student Admission Criteria as Predictors of Research Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Gary L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study at one university found that traditional admission criteria for a graduate microbiology program, undergraduate grade point average, and Graduate Record Examination scores, were not good predictors of student potential as a researcher, as measured by faculty ratings. (MSE)

  13. General Practitioners and Involuntary Admission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Britta; Lomborg, Kirsten; Engberg, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    in involuntary admissions. Setting: General practice, Aarhus, Denmark. Method: One focus group interview and six individual interviews were conducted with 13 Danish GPs, who had recently sectioned one of their own patients. Results: GPs experienced stress and found the admission procedure time consuming...

  14. Optimal admission to higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    that documents the relevance of theory and illustrates how to apply optimal admission procedures. Indirect gains from optimal admission procedures include the potential for increasing entire cohorts of students' probability of graduating with a higher education degree, thereby increasing the skill level...

  15. Substance use and violence among psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D; Bowers, L

    2015-03-01

    Nursing staff on psychiatric wards often attribute patient violence and aggression to substance use. This study examined incidents of alcohol and illicit drug use among acute psychiatric inpatients and associations between substance use and violence or other forms of aggression. A sample of 522 adult psychiatric inpatients was recruited from 84 acute psychiatric wards in England. Data were collected from nursing and medical records for the first 2 weeks of admission. Only a small proportion of the sample was reported to have used or been under the influence of alcohol (5%) or drugs (3%). There was no physical violence during a shift when a patient had used alcohol or drugs. Substance using patients were also no more likely than others to behave violently at any point during the study period. However, incidents of substance use were sometimes followed by verbal aggression. Beliefs that substance using patients are likely to be violent were not supported by this study, and could impact negatively on therapeutic relationships between nurses and this patient group. Future studies are needed to examine how staff intervene and interact with intoxicated patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The association between serum potassium at hospital admission and the case-fatality rate of leptospirosis in men Associação entre potássio sérico na admissão hospitalar e letalidade da leptospirose em homens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alberto LOPES

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Severe leptospirosis affects predominantly males and presents a high susceptibility to hypokalemic acute renal failure. As hypokalemia and hyperkalemia induce severe complications, it is important to evaluate if the initial serum potassium is an independent risk factor for death in leptospirosis. The medical records of 1016 patients hospitalized with the diagnosis of leptospirosis were reviewed. The analysis was restricted to 442, according to the following criteria: male, 18 years or older, information about death or hospital discharge and recorded values of serum potassium, serum creatinine and duration of symptoms at admission. Potassium values lower than 3.5 mEq/L (hypoK, 3.5-5 mEq/L (normoK and above 5 mEq/L (hyperK were detected in 180, 245 and 17 patients, respectively. The death rate increased with serum potassium: 11.1% in the hypoK, 14.7% in the normoK and 47.1% in the hyperK group (p = 0.002. In a logistic regression model (normoK as referent, including age, creatinine and duration of symptoms, hypoK was not associated with increased death rate (odds ratio (OR = 0.80; p > 0.1. On the other hand, hyperK showed a significant association with increased risk of death (OR = 3.95, p = 0.021. In conclusion, in this sample of men with leptospirosis initial serum potassium was positively and independently correlated with the risk of in-hospital death.Leptospirose grave afeta predominantemente os homens e apresenta alta susceptibilidade para insuficiência renal aguda com hipocalemia. Como hipocalemia e hipercalemia induzem complicações graves, é importante avaliar se o potássio sérico é um independente fator de risco de morte na leptospirose. Foram revistos os prontuários de 1016 pacientes internados com o diagnóstico de leptospirose. A análise foi restrita a 442, obedecendo os seguintes critérios: sexo masculino, idade igual ou superior a 18 anos, informação sobre morte ou alta hospitalar e registro dos valores do potássio s

  17. Psychiatric disorders in the parents of individuals with infantile autism: a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2007-01-01

    The rates and types of psychiatric disorders were studied in the parents of individuals with infantile autism (IA).......The rates and types of psychiatric disorders were studied in the parents of individuals with infantile autism (IA)....

  18. Violent behavior in acute psychiatric inpatient facilities: a national survey in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancosino, Bruno; Delmonte, Sara; Grassi, Luigi; Santone, Giovanni; Preti, Antonio; Miglio, Rossella; de Girolamo, Giovanni

    2009-10-01

    Violence committed by acute psychiatric inpatients represents an important and challenging problem in clinical practice. Sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment information were collected for 1324 patients (677 men and 647 women) admitted to Italian public and private acute psychiatric inpatient facilities during an index period in 2004, and the sample divided into 3 groups: nonhostile patients (no episodes of violent behavior during hospitalization), hostile patients (verbal aggression or violent acts against objects), and violent patients (authors of physical assault). Ten percent (N = 129) of patients showed hostile behavior during hospitalization and 3% (N = 37) physically assaulted other patients or staff members. Variables associated with violent behavior were: male gender, attitude at admission, and a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, personality disorder, mental retardation, organic brain disorder or substance/alcohol abuse. Violent behavior during hospitalization was a predictive factor for higher Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale scores and for lower Personal and Social Performance scale scores at discharge. Despite the low percentage of violent and hostile behavior observed in Italian acute inpatient units, this study shed light on a need for the careful assessment of clinical and treatment variables, and greater effort aimed at improving specific prevention and treatment programs of violent behavior.

  19. Reducing the rate and duration of Re-ADMISsions among patients with unipolar disorder and bipolar disorder using smartphone-based monitoring and treatment -- the RADMIS trials: study protocol for two randomized controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Frost, Mads; Martiny, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    are a major burden. Smartphones comprise an innovative and unique platform for the monitoring and treatment of depression and mania. No prior trial has investigated whether the use of a smartphone-based system can prevent re-admission among patients discharged from hospital. The present RADMIS trials aim...

  20. Compulsory admission and treatment in schizophrenia: a study of ethical attitudes in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Tilman; Lepping, Peter; Baranyai, Réka; Hoffmann, Markus; Leherr, Herbert

    2005-08-01

    This study was conducted to compare attitudes of psychiatrists, other professionals, and laypeople towards compulsory admission and treatment of patients with schizophrenia in different European countries. Three case reports of patients with schizophrenia were presented to N=1,737 persons: 235 in England, 622 in Germany, 319 in Hungary, and 561 in Switzerland; 298 were psychiatrists, 687 other psychiatric or medical professionals, and 752 laypeople. The case reports presented typical clinical situations with refusal of consent to treatment (first episode and social withdrawal, recurrent episode and moderate danger to others and patient with multiple episodes and severe self-neglect). The participants were asked whether they would agree with compulsory admission and compulsory neuroleptic treatment. The rates of agreement varied between 50.8 and 92.1% across countries and between 41.1 and 93.6% across the different professional groups. In all countries, psychologists and social workers supported compulsory procedures significantly less than the psychiatrists who were in tune with laypeople and nurses. Country differences were highly significant showing more agreement with compulsion in Hungary and England and less in Germany and Switzerland (odds ratios up to 4.33). Own history of mental illness and having mentally ill relatives had no major impact on the decisions. Evidence suggests that compulsory procedures are based on traditions and personal attitudes to a considerable degree. Further research should provide empirical data and more definite criteria for indications of compulsive measures to achieve a common ethical framework for those critical decisions across Europe.

  1. Ethics in Psychiatric Research: Issues and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Shobhit; Kuppili, Pooja Patnaik; Pattanayak, Raman Deep; Sagar, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Psychiatric research has increased remarkably over recent decades to help in understanding the current trends and better therapeutic options for illness. On the other hand, there is also a trend toward higher rates of retraction of published papers in the recent years. Ethics is required to maintain and increase the overall quality and morality of research. Psychiatric research faces several unique ethical challenges. Ethical guidelines are very important tool of research which safeguards par...

  2. Psychiatric disorders and urbanization in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Koelen Jurrijn; Peen Jaap; Dekker Jack; Smit Filip; Schoevers Robert

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Epidemiological studies over the last decade have supplied growing evidence of an association between urbanization and the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to examine the link between levels of urbanization and 12-month prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in a nationwide German population study, controlling for other known risk factors such as gender, social class, marital status and the interaction variables of these factors with urbanization. Method...

  3. Psychiatric services in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmebarek, Zoubir

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the current provision of psychiatric services in Algeria - in particular, in-patient and out-patient facilities, child psychiatry and human resources. Education, training, associations and research in the field of mental health are also briefly presented. The challenges that must dealt with to improve psychiatric care and to comply with international standards are listed, by way of conclusion.

  4. Psychiatric disorders among the elderly on non-psychiatric wards in an African setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasujja, Noeline; Musisi, Seggane; Walugembe, James; Wallace, Daphne

    2007-08-01

    The elderly are vulnerable to illness and particularly to psychiatric illness. Many mentally ill elderly patients end up on non-psychiatric wards owing to somatization of their illnesses. Even for these patients, a psychiatric diagnosis may not be made. The literature on the elderly in Uganda is very scanty. This study aims to establish the prevalence and factors associated with psychiatric disorders among elderly patients admitted to non-psychiatric wards. We carried out a descriptive cross-sectional study of 127 consenting elderly patients. They were administered a standardized questionnaire comprising the Self Reporting Questionnaire 25, the Mini-mental State Examination and the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV. Study variables included socio-demographic characteristics, physical illnesses, psychiatric disorders and the treatment given. The rate of psychiatric morbidity was 48%. The sex ratio was 1:1; however, women had a higher rate of psychiatric illness than men, 54.6% and 41.3% respectively. Being widowed or separated and having cancer were associated with SRQ>5, p=0.02 and p=0.04 respectively. Depressive disorders were the most common at 25.2% and were more common in women. Increasing age was associated with dementia (pUganda. Particular attention should be given to the psychological health of elderly people admitted to general hospitals.

  5. Reducing Psychiatric Inpatient Readmissions Using an Organizational Change Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfenter, Todd; Connor, Tim; Ford, James H; Hyatt, John; Zimmerman, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-day hospital readmission rates have become a quality indicator for many regulators and payers, but published accounts of reducing these rates across a patient population are lacking. This article describes and evaluates the Wisconsin Mental Health Readmissions Project, which aimed to reduce psychiatric inpatient 30-day readmission rates in Wisconsin. Nineteen county human services boards representing 23 of Wisconsin's 72 counties and 61% of the state's residential admissions participated in a statewide quality improvement collaborative from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Participants applied a standardized organizational change model, called NIATx, in the context of a multicounty quality improvement collaborative to reduce 30-day readmission rates. Readmission rates were tracked through national and state databases, using 2009 as a baseline, and analyzed using a chi-square analysis to test the proportion of means. The study team compared readmission rates of Wisconsin counties that participated in the statewide collaborative with those that did not. Between 2009 and 2013, the 30-day readmission rates in Wisconsin declined significantly for counties that participated in the project when compared to those that did not (2009-2013) [Χ2(4) = 54.503, P < .001], based on a 2.5% decline for participants vs a 0.7% decline for nonparticipants. Reductions to behavioral health inpatient readmission rates beyond individual case examples have been difficult to document. This analysis evaluates a method that Wisconsin behavioral health providers applied as part of a multicounty program addressing readmission rates. The findings highlight quality improvement program design elements and interventions to consider in reducing inpatient behavioral health readmissions, as well as the need for further research on this complex systems issue.

  6. Psychiatric disorders and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "SH. Akhondzadeh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are common in women during their childbearing years. Special considerations are needed when psychotic disorders present during pregnancy. Early identification and treatment of psychiatric disorders in pregnancy can prevent morbidity in pregnancy and in postpartum with the concomitant risks to mother and baby. Nevertheless, diagnosis of psychiatric illnesses during pregnancy is made more difficult by the overlap between symptoms of the disorders and symptoms of pregnancy. In majority of cases both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy should be considered. However, psychiatric disorders in pregnancy are often under treated because of concerns about potential harmful effects of medication. This paper reviews findings about the presentation and course of major psychiatric disorders during pregnancy.

  7. Primary Psychiatric Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Mercan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of these dermatological diseases is entirely psychiatric origin. These patients show overconcern to their skin or self inflicted dermatoses unconsciously instead of facing with their real problems. In this group, delusions, dermatitis artefacta, trichotillomania, body dysmorphic disorder can be seen. They use denial as defence mechanism to their real psychiatric problems and prefer to apply dermatology instead of psychiatry. Dermatologist should be very careful before asking psychiatric consultation. Denial mechanism help patients to overcome agressive impulses like suicide or prevent further psychiatric damage like psychosis. Dermatologist should see these patients with short and frequent intervals with a good empathic approach. This will help to progress a powerful patient doctor relationship which will lead to a psychiatric evaluation.

  8. Perinatal psychiatric episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Olsen, Trine; Maegbaek, M L; Johannsen, B M

    2016-01-01

    and childbirth, which suggests differences in the underlying etiology. We further speculate varying treatment incidence and prevalence in pregnancy vs postpartum may indicate that the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 peripartum specifier not adequately describes at-risk periods......Perinatal psychiatric episodes comprise various disorders and symptom severity, which are diagnosed and treated in multiple treatment settings. To date, no studies have quantified the incidence and prevalence of perinatal psychiatric episodes treated in primary and secondary care, which we aimed...... psychiatric facilities, 2.5 births were followed by an episode treated at outpatient psychiatric facility and 12 births by GP-provided pharmacological treatment. We interpret our results the following way: treated severe and moderate psychiatric disorders have different risk patterns in relation to pregnancy...

  9. Psychiatric (Axis I) and personality (Axis II) disorders and subjective psychiatric symptoms in chronic tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlsten, Hanna; Taiminen, Tero; Karukivi, Max; Sjösten, Noora; Nikkilä, Johanna; Virtanen, Juuso; Paavola, Janika; Joutsa, Juho; Niinivirta-Joutsa, Katri; Takala, Mari; Holm, Anu; Rauhala, Esa; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Johansson, Reijo; Jääskeläinen, Satu K

    2017-11-30

    Chronic tinnitus has been associated with several psychiatric disorders. Only few studies have investigated these disorders using validated diagnostic interviews. The aims were to diagnose psychiatric and personality disorders with structured interviews, to assess self-rated psychiatric symptoms and elucidate temporal relations between psychiatric disorders and tinnitus. Current and lifetime DSM-IV diagnoses of axis-I (psychiatric disorders) and axis-II (personality disorders) were assessed using structured clinical interviews (SCID-I and -II). Current subjective psychiatric symptoms were evaluated via self-rating instruments: the Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90), the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). 83 patients (mean age 51.7, 59% men) with chronic, disturbing tinnitus and a median Tinnitus Handicap Inventory score of 32. The rates of lifetime and current major depression were 26.5% and 2.4%. The lifetime rate of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (type C) was 8.4%. None of the patients had cluster B personality disorder or psychotic symptoms. The SCL-90 subscales did not differ from the general population, and median DES score was low, 2.4. Tinnitus patients are prone to episodes of major depression and often also have obsessive-compulsive personality features. Psychiatric disorders seem to be comorbid or predisposing conditions rather than consequences of tinnitus. Clinical trial reference: ClinicalTrials.gov (ID NCT 01929837).

  10. Pre-trial psychiatric evaluations and ethnicity in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkers, David J; de Beurs, Edwin; Barendregt, Marko; Rinne, Thomas; Hoek, H Wijbrand

    2010-01-01

    Black and ethnic minorities (BME) are disproportionally represented in western prisons and forensic psychiatric facilities. The authors wished to determine whether patient-related or services-related factors account for this overrepresentation. This study examined the relationship among the assessments of psychological accountability for a crime, treatment recommendations, and ethnicity among persons accused of a crime and suspected of having a mental disorder. We examined all 21,857 pre-trial psychiatric reports requested by Dutch courts between 2000 and 2006. Ethnicity was classified as Dutch native (n=15,004), Black and minority ethnic (BME) groups (n=6202), and Whites from other western countries (n=638). Accountability assessments and treatment recommendations were compared using chi-square tests and logistic regression models, adjusted for demographic, psychiatric, and judiciary characteristics. Among BME and Whites from other western countries, accountability for the crimes committed was more often judged to be at the extreme ends of the spectrum, that is, "fully responsible" or "not responsible." Compulsory admission to a psychiatric hospital was more frequently recommended for BME persons (OR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.16-1.64) and Whites from other western countries (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 1.05-2.27), but not admission to a penitentiary hospital or use of medication. The compulsory admission findings are largely explained by a higher prevalence of psychotic disorders in BME persons (19.8%) and Whites from other western countries (19.3%) as compared to Dutch natives (9.2%). Outpatient treatment was less often recommended for BME persons (OR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.76-0.87) and Whites from other western countries (OR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70-0.99) than for Dutch natives. Both patient-related and services-related factors play a role in the increased admission of BME groups and Whites from other western countries to psychiatric hospitals.

  11. Trends in hospital admissions involving suicidal behaviour in the Northern Territory, 2001-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckning, Bernard A; Li, Shu Qin; Cunningham, Teresa; Guthridge, Steven; Robinson, Gary; Nagel, Tricia; Silburn, Sven

    2016-06-01

    To investigate trends in hospital admissions involving suicidal behaviour in the Northern Territory (NT) resident population over the period 2001-2013. Estimates of age-standardised rates and average changes in the annual rate of hospital admissions involving suicidal behaviour were calculated by socio-demographic characteristics and types of suicidal behaviour. Overall rates for Indigenous admissions were 2.7 times higher than non-Indigenous admissions and had increased by almost twice as much. While male and female rates of admission were similar for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous residents, the average annual change in rates was greater for Indigenous females (13.4%) compared to males (8.8%) and for non-Indigenous males (7.7%) compared to females (5.2%). Younger and middle-aged Indigenous admissions experienced increasing rates of admissions, whilst trends were similar across age groups for non-Indigenous admissions. Admissions with a diagnosis of suicidal ideation increased the most across all groups. Trends in intentional self-harm admissions differed according to Indigenous status and sex. There have been substantial increases in hospital admissions involving suicidal behaviour in the NT, most markedly for Indigenous residents. Indigenous females and youth appear to be at increasing risk. The steep increase in suicidal ideation across all groups warrants further investigation. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  12. Abstinence phenomena of chronic cannabis-addicts prospectively monitored during controlled inpatient detoxification (Part II): Psychiatric complaints and their relation to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and its metabolites in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Udo; Borda, Thorsten; Scherbaum, Norbert; Specka, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the impact of inpatient detoxification treatment on psychiatric symptoms of chronic cannabis addicts and to analyze the influence of serum cannabinoid levels on the severity of these symptoms. Thirty five treatment-seeking, not active co-morbid chronic cannabis dependents (ICD-10) were studied on admission and on abstinence days 8 and 16, using several observational and self-report scales, such as Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA), Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Simultaneously obtained serum was analyzed with regard to levels of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and its main metabolites 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-OH) and 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH). At admission, nearly 90% of the patients were not, or only mildly, affected by depression, anxiety or manic symptoms. In contrast, patients' self-description indicated a strong psychiatric burden in approximately 60% of the cases. All patients improved significantly within 16 days of the treatment. Effect sizes ranged from 0.7 to 1.4. (Cohen's d) for the respective scales. Serum THC-levels were positively associated with impairment of cognition in HAMA and motor retardation in BPRS. All other test results were not significantly related to the serum levels of the measured cannabinoids. Effects of the cannabis withdrawal syndrome and executive dysfunctions might explain the discrepancy between the observer ratings and self-reported psychiatric burden. Inpatient cannabis detoxification treatment significantly improved psychiatric symptoms. Serum THC-levels were not associated with affective symptoms and anxiety but predicted cognitive impairment and motor retardation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. The Collateral Damage of Mass Incarceration: Risk of Psychiatric Morbidity Among Nonincarcerated Residents of High-Incarceration Neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Keyes, Katherine; Hamilton, Ava; Uddin, Monica; Galea, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether residence in neighborhoods with high levels of incarceration is associated with psychiatric morbidity among nonincarcerated community members. Methods. We linked zip code-linked information on neighborhood prison admissions rates to individual-level data on mental health from the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study (2008-2012), a prospective probability sample of predominantly Black individuals. Results. Controlling for individual- and neighborhood-level risk factors, individuals living in neighborhoods with high prison admission rates were more likely to meet criteria for a current (odds ratio [OR] = 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.7, 5.5) and lifetime (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.4, 4.6) major depressive disorder across the 3 waves of follow-up as well as current (OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.0, 4.2) and lifetime (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.2, 4.5) generalized anxiety disorder than were individuals living in neighborhoods with low prison admission rates. These relationships between neighborhood-level incarceration and mental health were comparable for individuals with and without a personal history of incarceration. Conclusions. Incarceration may exert collateral damage on the mental health of individuals living in high-incarceration neighborhoods, suggesting that the public mental health impact of mass incarceration extends beyond those who are incarcerated.

  14. Admissibility of logical inference rules

    CERN Document Server

    Rybakov, VV

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the fundamental theoretical results concerning inference rules in deductive formal systems. Primary attention is focused on: admissible or permissible inference rules the derivability of the admissible inference rules the structural completeness of logics the bases for admissible and valid inference rules. There is particular emphasis on propositional non-standard logics (primary, superintuitionistic and modal logics) but general logical consequence relations and classical first-order theories are also considered. The book is basically self-contained and

  15. Adolescents and Dual Diagnosis in a Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matali, José Luis; Andión, Oscar; Pardo, Marta; Iniesta, Raquel; Serrano, Eduard; San, Luis

    2016-03-02

    In recent years, both the prevalence of drug use and related child and adolescent psychiatric emergencies have risen sharply. There are few studies about the impact on child and adolescent emergency services. This study has a twofold aim. The first is to describe the prevalence of substance use disorders, mental disorders and dual diagnosis (substance use problems plus mental disorder) in adolescents in psychiatric emergency service. The second is to analyze clinical and healthcare differences between patients with dual diagnosis and patients with a mental disorder without substance use disorder.We retrospectively reviewed 4012 discharge forms for emergencies treated at the psychiatric emergency department during the period 2007-2009. We obtained a sample of 1795 visits. This sample was divided into two groups: the dual diagnosis group (n = 477) and the psychiatric disorder group (n = 1318).The dual diagnosis group accounted for 26.5% of psychiatric emergencies analyzed. Compared to the psychiatric disorder group,the dual diagnosis group had significantly more conduct disorders, social problems, involuntariness in the visit, less hospital admissions and less connection with the healthcare network.Adolescents with a dual diagnosis account for a high percentage of visits at child and adolescent psychiatric emergency services. This patient group requires specialized care both at emergency services and in specific units. Accordingly, these units should play a triple role when handling dual diagnosis: detection, brief treatment and referral to a specialised unit.

  16. Psychiatric disorders and clinical correlates of suicidal patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Tokyo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishimoto Kayo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital with suicidal behavior (SB are considered to be especially at high risk of suicide. However, the number of studies that have addressed this patient population remains insufficient compared to that of studies on suicidal patients in emergency or medical settings. The purpose of this study is to seek features of a sample of newly admitted suicidal psychiatric patients in a metropolitan area of Japan. Method 155 suicidal patients consecutively admitted to a large psychiatric center during a 20-month period, admission styles of whom were mostly involuntary, were assessed using Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV Axis I and II Disorders (SCID-I CV and SCID-II and SB-related psychiatric measures. Associations of the psychiatric diagnoses and SB-related characteristics with gender and age were examined. Results The common DSM-IV axis I diagnoses were affective disorders 62%, anxiety disorders 56% and substance-related disorders 38%. 56% of the subjects were diagnosed as having borderline PD, and 87% of them, at least one type of personality disorder (PD. SB methods used prior to admission were self-cutting 41%, overdosing 32%, self-strangulation 15%, jumping from a height 12% and attempting traffic death 10%, the first two of which were frequent among young females. The median (range of the total number of SBs in the lifetime history was 7 (1-141. Severity of depressive symptomatology, suicidal intent and other symptoms, proportions of the subjects who reported SB-preceding life events and life problems, and childhood and adolescent abuse were comparable to those of the previous studies conducted in medical or emergency service settings. Gender and age-relevant life-problems and life events were identified. Conclusions Features of the studied sample were the high prevalence of affective disorders, anxiety disorders and borderline PD, a variety of SB methods used prior to admission

  17. Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT) for the Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors: A Multi-Site Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    0106 TITLE: Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT) for the Inpatient Treatment of Military Personnel with Suicidal Behaviors : A Multi- Site...evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive behavioral intervention, titled, Post Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), for military personnel psychiatrically...EUC) or (2) EUC. The PACT+EUC condition will consist of six 60-90 minute individual cognitive behavioral therapy sessions administered over

  18. Oxytocin and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Nur Say

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that plays critical role in mother-infant bonding, pair bonding and prosocial behaviors. Several neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, alcohol/substance addiction, aggression, suicide, eating disorders and personality disorders show abnormalities of oxytocin system. These findings have given rise to the studies searching therapeutic use of oxytocin for psychi-atric disorders. The studies of oxytocin interventions in psychiatric disorders yielded potentially promising findings. This paper reviews the role of oxytocin in emotions, behavior and its effects in psychiatric disorders. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 102-113

  19. Substance abuse in patients admitted voluntarily and involuntarily to acute psychiatric wards: a national cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Opsal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance abuse and mental disorder comorbidity is high among patients admitted to acute psychiatric wards. The aim of the study was to identify this co-occurrence as a reason for involuntary admission and if specific substance use-related diagnoses were associated with such admissions.Methods: The study was a part of a multicentre, cross-sectional national study carried out during 2005-2006 within a research network of acute mental health services. Seventy-five percent of Norwegian hospitals providing acute in-patient treatment participated. Substance use was measured using the Clinician Rating Scale and the ICD-10 diagnoses F10-19. Diagnostic assessments were performed by the clinicians during hospital stay.Results: Overall, 33.2% (n=1,187 of the total patient population (3,506 were abusing alcohol or drugs prior to admission according to the Clinician Rating Scale. No difference in the overall prevalence of substance abuserelated diagnoses between the two groups was found. Overall, 310 (26% of the admissions, 216 voluntarily and 94 involuntarily admitted patients received a double diagnosis. Frequent comorbid combinations among voluntarily admitted patients were; a combination of alcohol and either mood disorder (40% or multiple mental disorders (29%. Among involuntarily admitted patients, a combination of poly drug use and schizophrenia was most frequent (47%. Substance abusing patients diagnosed with mental and behavioral disorders due to the use of psychoactive stimulant substances had a significantly higher risk of involuntary hospitalization (OR 2.3.Conclusion: Nearly one third of substance abusing patients are involuntarily admitted to mental hospitals, in particular stimulant drug use was associated with involuntarily admissions.

  20. Pregnant Adolescents Admitted to an Inpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Unit: An Eight-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Teresa M; Markley, Laura A; Nelson, Dana; Crane, Stephen S; Fitzgibbon, James J

    2015-12-01

    To assess patient outcomes and describe demographic data of pregnant adolescents admitted to an inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit, as well as to determine if it is safe to continue to admit pregnant adolescents to such a unit. A descriptive retrospective chart review conducted at a free-standing pediatric hospital in northeast Ohio of all pregnant adolescents aged 13 to 17 years admitted to the inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit from July 2005 to April 2013. Data collection included details on demographic, pregnancy status, and psychiatric diagnoses. Eighteen pregnant adolescents were admitted to the psychiatric unit during the time frame. Sixteen of those were in the first trimester of pregnancy. Pregnancy was found to be a contributing factor to the adolescent's suicidal ideation and admission in 11 of the cases. Admission to an inpatient psychiatric facility did not lead to adverse effects in pregnancy. Pregnant adolescents did not have negative pregnancy outcomes related to admission to an inpatient psychiatric unit. Results of this study suggest that it is safe to continue to admit uncomplicated pregnant adolescents in their first trimester to an inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit for an acute stay. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Admission tests for medical education

    OpenAIRE

    O?Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Wallstedt, Birgitta; Hartvigsen, Jan; Eika, Berit

    2012-01-01

    This state of the art article explores what is known from the international and Danish literature on admission criteria as predictors of success in medical education. Previous academic performance is the best known predictor of medical students' grades. Poorer entry qualifications, broadly defined, are associated with dropout in medical education. Admission interviews may have a small additive explanatory effect on medical students' grades, but the effect on dropout has barely been investigat...

  2. Effects of mandatory screening labs in directing the disposition of the apparently healthy psychiatric patient in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagel, Karyn E; Smith, Meghan; Latyshenko, Ilya V; Mitchell, Christopher; Kagel, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether mandatory psychiatric admission laboratory tests yield results that change the disposition of a patient with primary psychiatric complaint from admission to a psychiatric service to admission to a medical service. This was a single center retrospective cohort chart review study approved by the facility Institutional Review Board in which we used a records database maintained by the emergency department's social workers to access the records of every patient that presented to our emergency department with a psychiatric chief complaint between the dates of December 1, 2011, and December 1, 2013. We focused on those that were admitted to either a psychiatric service or a medical service after a thorough evaluation by the department of social work and an emergency provider. We applied our inclusion and exclusion criteria and reviewed the results of the mandatory psychiatric laboratory tests (complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, thyroid stimulating hormone, acetaminophen, aspirin, blood alcohol level, urinalysis, urine pregnancy test, urine drug screen) required for admission. Our independent variables were the compulsory psychiatric admission laboratory tests and our dependent variable was the admission to a medical service. Of 5,606 laboratory tests that were ordered and produced results for the 682 patients enrolled in our study, 51 results were considered clinically significant abnormal results, or results requiring treatment prior to psychiatric service admission, by the 2 reviewing emergency physicians. Only one of 682 psychiatric patients received a final disposition to a medical service based upon abnormal laboratory studies. That patient presented without any medical complaints but a chief complaint of "suicidal ideation," and was found to have diabetic ketoacidosis. Based on our data, the probability that an abnormal laboratory test will result in a change in disposition is 1/682=0.1% (95% CI: 0.0% to 0.9%). Patients

  3. Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide - Table of Contents Facts For Families Guide - View by Topic Chinese Facts for Families Guide ... Psychiatric Evaluation No. 52; Updated October 2017 Evaluation by a child and adolescent psychiatrist is appropriate for any child or adolescent ...

  4. Psychiatric trainees in Finland 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkonen, Hanna; Holi, Matti; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Korkeila, Jyrki; Eronen, Markku

    2005-01-01

    This study examined Finnish psychiatric trainees' views on their education. This was a survey study of nationwide data on Finnish psychiatric trainees in 2001. The quality of training was considered at least moderate by 84% of the respondents. Training on epidemiology, on taking history and status, and on psychopharmacology was considered the best. Quality was rated bad for training in leadership and administration, and educating the community. Research was done by 20%, and a personal clinical supervisor was appointed to 52% of the respondents. Offensive treatment had been experienced by 49% of the trainees in this study. Generally, studies of training also reflect strengths and weaknesses of the profession. Based on our results, it seems especially that training in leadership and in educating the community need to be improved; both of these are quintessential skills to survive in the struggle for economic and human resources. Furthermore, treatment of the trainees could still be better; attention should be paid to supervision of all trainees. Moreover, research must become more attractive. Psychiatry can be developed by the development of psychiatric training.

  5. Culture and Psychiatric Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, a number of components related to psychiatric diagnosis have come under criticism for their inaccuracies and inadequacies. Neurobiologists and anthropologists have particularly criticized the rigidity of DSM-IV diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopat...

  6. Hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Frans; Thvilum, Marianne; Pedersen, Dorthe Almind

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity.......Thyroid hormones are essential for the normal development of the fetal brain, while hyperthyroidism in adults is associated with mood symptoms and reduced quality of life. We aimed to investigate the association and temporal relation between hyperthyroidism and psychiatric morbidity....

  7. [Influence of postcode on paediatric admissions in Seville].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero Patricio, Sebastián; Charris-Castro, Liliana; Granero Asencio, Mercedes; Daponte Codina, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    The postcode (where the home is situated) is an indicator of socioeconomic status and is associated with morbidity, mortality, and the use of health services. The aim of this study was to analyse its effects on paediatric admissions and to determine the rates of the most common causes of paediatric admissions in Seville. An observational cross-sectional study with two analysis units: under 15 year-old "admissions" in public hospitals in Seville (n=2,660) and "city districts" of Seville (n=11). The independent variable analysed was whether the postcode of the admitted patients was within a Regional Government designated "area with social transformation needs". The analysis of the admissions was performed using X 2 -test, Fisher test and Student-t test, with the description of rates using the calculation of crude and specific rates, and by rate ratio. Children living in districts with a lower socioeconomic status were on average 7 months younger (P<.001), and they were significantly more likely to be admitted via the emergency department (P<.001). There was no statistical difference detected in either the length of hospital stay or mortality. The crude admission rate ratio was higher in districts with a lower socioeconomic status (1.8), with a higher specific rate ratio detected in admissions due to asthma, respiratory infections, inguinal hernia, and epilepsy/convulsions. Paediatric hospital admission rates of the main diagnoses were higher in districts with a lower socioeconomic status. Children living in these districts were more likely to be admitted younger and via the emergency department. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychiatric disorders and sleep issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Eliza L

    2014-09-01

    Sleep issues are common in people with psychiatric disorders, and the interaction is complex. Sleep disorders, particularly insomnia, can precede and predispose to psychiatric disorders, can be comorbid with and exacerbate psychiatric disorders, and can occur as part of psychiatric disorders. Sleep disorders can mimic psychiatric disorders or result from medication given for psychiatric disorders. Impairment of sleep and of mental health may be different manifestations of the same underlying neurobiological processes. For the primary care physician, key tools include recognition of potential sleep effects of psychiatric medications and familiarity with treatment approaches for insomnia in depression and anxiety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Forecasting paediatric malaria admissions on the Kenya Coast using rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuri, Stella Wanjugu; Snow, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a vector-borne disease which, despite recent scaled-up efforts to achieve control in Africa, continues to pose a major threat to child survival. The disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium and requires mosquitoes and humans for transmission. Rainfall is a major factor in seasonal and secular patterns of malaria transmission along the East African coast. The goal of the study was to develop a model to reliably forecast incidences of paediatric malaria admissions to Kilifi District Hospital (KDH). In this article, we apply several statistical models to look at the temporal association between monthly paediatric malaria hospital admissions, rainfall, and Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures. Trend and seasonally adjusted, marginal and multivariate, time-series models for hospital admissions were applied to a unique data set to examine the role of climate, seasonality, and long-term anomalies in predicting malaria hospital admission rates and whether these might become more or less predictable with increasing vector control. The proportion of paediatric admissions to KDH that have malaria as a cause of admission can be forecast by a model which depends on the proportion of malaria admissions in the previous 2 months. This model is improved by incorporating either the previous month's Indian Ocean Dipole information or the previous 2 months' rainfall. Surveillance data can help build time-series prediction models which can be used to anticipate seasonal variations in clinical burdens of malaria in stable transmission areas and aid the timing of malaria vector control.

  10. Beneficial effect of brief intensive cognitive behavioural therapy-based psychiatric aftercare for early discharged non-psychotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnfred, Sidse M H; Nilsson, Maria Elisabeth; Larsen, Jens Knud

    2013-03-01

    In Denmark, following psychiatric emergency admission, patients with depression, anxiety or personality disorders are discharged as early as possible due to pressure on psychiatric beds. However, the receiving out-patient units frequently have waiting time. The design of a brief, cognitive-based psychiatric aftercare service and the early treatment results are presented. This was a descriptive study of symptom levels before and after the individual therapy part of a new aftercare programme. The initial new intensive aftercare consisted of psychiatric consultations, telephone outreach and individual cognitive behavioural therapy-based therapy twice a week, in total five times. Focus was on collaborative goal setting and next-of-kin participation. Self-ratings (WHO-5 Well-Being Scale (WHO-5); Becks Depression Inventory-II (BDI)) were obtained at the first day and at end of individual therapy. The self-ratings at discharge showed a high BDI rating in the patient sample (mean = 32.0 (standard deviation (SD) = 11.9; n = 105)), and much lower well-being at discharge than previously seen in a comparable Danish setting (mean WHO-5 at onset = 5.6 (SD = 4.8; n = 102)). Ratings improved by the end of the individual therapy (i.e. WHO-5 = 8.3 (SD = 5.6; n = 102); BDI = 26.1 (SD = 12.3; n = 105)). Symptom reduction was evident in the first period after discharge, and the patients were satisfied with the contents and format of the service. However, the results are preliminary as we lack data from a comparable patient group receiving no treatment or treatment as usual. not relevant. Danish Data Protection Agency, The Capital Region 2007-58-0015.

  11. Watching pornographic pictures on the Internet: role of sexual arousal ratings and psychological-psychiatric symptoms for using Internet sex sites excessively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Matthias; Laier, Christian; Pawlikowski, Mirko; Schächtle, Ulrich; Schöler, Tobias; Altstötter-Gleich, Christine

    2011-06-01

    Excessive or addictive Internet use can be linked to different online activities, such as Internet gaming or cybersex. The usage of Internet pornography sites is one important facet of online sexual activity. The aim of the present work was to examine potential predictors of a tendency toward cybersex addiction in terms of subjective complaints in everyday life due to online sexual activities. We focused on the subjective evaluation of Internet pornographic material with respect to sexual arousal and emotional valence, as well as on psychological symptoms as potential predictors. We examined 89 heterosexual, male participants with an experimental task assessing subjective sexual arousal and emotional valence of Internet pornographic pictures. The Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and a modified version of the IAT for online sexual activities (IATsex), as well as several further questionnaires measuring psychological symptoms and facets of personality were also administered to the participants. Results indicate that self-reported problems in daily life linked to online sexual activities were predicted by subjective sexual arousal ratings of the pornographic material, global severity of psychological symptoms, and the number of sex applications used when being on Internet sex sites in daily life, while the time spent on Internet sex sites (minutes per day) did not significantly contribute to explanation of variance in IATsex score. Personality facets were not significantly correlated with the IATsex score. The study demonstrates the important role of subjective arousal and psychological symptoms as potential correlates of development or maintenance of excessive online sexual activity.

  12. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson′s disease (PD is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the "tip of the iceberg" of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control, sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD.

  13. The interview in the admission process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J C; Johnson, E K; Molidor, J B

    1990-03-01

    Significant demographic, legal, and educational developments during the last ten years have led medical schools to review critically their selection procedures. A critical component of this review is the selection interview, since it is an integral part of most admission processes; however, some question its value. Interviews serve four purposes: information gathering, decision making, verification of application data, and recruitment. The first and last of these merit special attention. The interview enables an admission committee to gather information about a candidate that would be difficult or impossible to obtain by any other means yet is readily evaluated in an interview. Given the recent decline in numbers of applicants to and interest in medical school, many schools are paying closer attention to the interview as a powerful recruiting tool. Interviews can be unstructured, semistructured, or structured. Structuring involves analyzing what makes a medical student successful, standardizing the questions for all applicants, providing sample answers for evaluating responses, and using panel interviews (several interviewers simultaneously with one applicant). Reliability and validity of results increase with the degree of structuring. Studies of interviewers show that they are often biased in terms of the rating tendencies (for instance, leniency or severity) and in terms of an applicant's sex, race, appearance, similarity to the interviewer, and contrast to other applicants). Training interviewers may reduce such bias. Admission committees should weigh the purposes of interviewing differently for various types of candidates, develop structured or semistructured interviews focusing on nonacademic criteria, and train the interviewers.

  14. Dissociative identity disorder in psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkin, A; Ghisalbert, D; Dimatou, S; Jin, C; Sethi, M

    1998-06-01

    The aim of this study was to replicate reports of a high rate of dissociative identity disorder in psychiatric inpatients. Subjects were 100 randomly selected women, 16-50 years old, who had recently been admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital. Diagnoses were made by two interviewers through use of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders. One percent (N = 1) of the interviewed subjects had dissociative identity disorder. Contrary to previous studies, the authors found a low rate of dissociative identity disorder, perhaps because of the different methodology used.

  15. The psychiatric inpatient physical health assessment sheet (PIPHAS): a useful tool to improve the speed, efficiency, and documentation of physical examination in new psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettipher, Alexander; Ovens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    There is increased morbidity and mortality among patients suffering from mental illness. This is believed to be multi-factorial. Poor access to healthcare, the stigma of mental illness, reduced clinic attendance, lifestyle factors, and side effects of medications are cited as possible contributing factors. It is therefore vital to perform a physical examination to identify previously undiagnosed conditions during the admission of a psychiatric inpatient. The Royal College of Psychiatrists recommends that all patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital should receive a full physical examination on admission, or within twenty-four hours of admission. A snapshot audit was carried out at Prospect Park Hospital in Reading, which highlighted that The Royal College of Psychiatrist's recommendation, along with Trust guidelines regarding physical examination were not being met, with only 78 out of 111 patients (70.3%) undergoing an examination during their admission. In addition to this, examinations were often poorly documented and not covering all examination domains. A psychiatric inpatient physical health assessment sheet (PIPHAS) was designed and introduced, providing a quick and standardised approach to the documentation of a physical examination. After the intervention was put into practice, its impact was assessed by performing a retrospective review of the admission clerking notes of the next 100 admissions to Prospect Park Hospital. Following the introduction of the PIPHAS form there was an increase in the number of patients undergoing physical examination on admission to hospital (75 out of 100 patients, 75%). There was also an increase in the thorough documentation of all examination domains (e.g. respiratory examination) for patients that had a completed PIPHAS form scanned within their medical records. This quality improvement project demonstrates that the PIPHAS form is a useful tool to improve the speed, efficiency, and documentation of a thorough physical

  16. Exploring unplanned ICU admissions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Nerée

    2011-01-01

    anesthetic procedures (UIA). 2) Only a few studies examined patients on general wards being at risk for clinical deterioration. The overall incidence of surgical and medical adverse events compared with ICU admissions ranged from 1.1% to 37.2%. 3) The third category of studies examined patients that were readmitted on ICUs. ICU readmission rates varied from 0% to 18.3%. Nine studies explicitly reported on the preventability of adverse outcomes. The preventability rates of the adverse events varied from 17% to 76.5%. Preventable adverse events are further synthesized by type of event and patterns of preventability are being formulated. Consequences of the adverse events included a mean length of ICU stay that ranged from 1.5 days to 10.4 days for the patient's first stay in ICU. Mortality rates varied between 0% and 58%. Adverse events are a persistent and an important reason for admission to the ICU. However, there is relatively weak evidence to estimate an overall incidence and preventability rate of these events. In addition, estimates on preventability are prone to subjective judgments. Variability in methodology and definitions, and poor reporting in studies may be the main reasons for study heterogeneity. Unplanned intensive care admission within 24 hours of a procedure with an anesthetist in attendance (UIA) is a recommended clinical indicator in surgical patients. Several authors recommend early detection of patients with clinical instability on general wards and the implementation of rapid response teams. Step-down or intermediate care units could be a useful strategy for patients that require monitoring to avoid ICU readmissions. There is a need for further studies on the detection of adverse events. The poor quality of current research evidence and the heterogeneity across studies requires that planning of future studies should aim to standardize measures of outcomes to allow for comparisons across studies. This area of research is important in order to identify

  17. College Admissions Policies for the 1970's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    The papers included in this collection are (1) "Problems and Issues Confronting the Admissions Community" by Clyde Vroman; (2) "Frozen Assumptions in Admissions" by B. Alden Thresher; (3) "The Effect of Federal Programs on Admissions Policies" by John F. Morse; (4) "State Plans for Higher Education and Their Influence on Admissions" by Charles W.…

  18. Clinically useful predictors for premature mortality among psychiatric patients visiting a psychiatric emergency room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Buus, Niels; Wernlund, Andreas Glahn

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine changes in the distribution of causes of death and mortality rates among psychiatric patients visiting a psychiatric emergency room (PER), to determine clinically useful predictors for avoiding premature mortality among these patients and to discuss...... by substance use disorder is preventable, and PERs are ideal points of early intervention. Systematic screening for substance use disorder at the PER and/or crisis intervention teams may be effective intervention strategies....

  19. Why is psychiatric nursing not the preferred option for nursing students: A cross-sectional study examining pre-nursing and nursing school factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hui Lin; Seow, Esmond; Chua, Boon Yiang; Xie, Huiting; Wang, Jia; Lau, Ying Wen; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-05-01

    There is a shortage of nurses working in the mental health field globally. The aim of the present study was to examine Singapore nursing students' attitudes towards specializing in psychiatric nursing by examining the pre-nursing and nursing school factors as well as attitudes towards psychiatry and personality traits. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted with 500 nursing students from four nursing institutions in Singapore. Students' attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP-18), perception of psychiatric nursing career aspects relative to other fields, and personality traits (mini-IPIP) were assessed. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatric nursing. Logistic regression was used to examine the combined effect of factors upon the outcome. Twenty-six students (5.2%) rated "definitely decided to do" psychiatric nursing. Pre-nursing school factors associated with choosing psychiatry included ethnicity, current education, parents' wishes, having personal/family experience of mental illness, prior work experience, interest in psychiatric nursing and psychology module taken prior to current school admission. Nursing school factors such as teaching methods and clinical exposure were not associated with choosing psychiatric nursing. Positive attitudes towards psychiatry, perception of better career aspects in psychiatric nursing relative to other fields, and the personality traits of extraversion and intellect/imagination were associated with likelihood of choosing psychiatric nursing. Logistic regression revealed Malay (OR: 1.90, 1.14-3.16, p=0.013) and Indian ethnicity (OR: 2.56, 1.32-4.96, p=0.005), interest in psychiatry (OR: 22.56, 8.22-61.92, pnursing than other fields (OR: 1.91, 1.21-3.04, p=0.006), extraversion (OR: 1.09, 1.02-1.17, p=0.012) and positive attitude towards psychiatry (OR: 2.72, 1.75-4.23, pstudents choosing psychiatric nursing. The selection of psychiatry as a specialty by nursing students was affected by pre

  20. Puberty menorrhagia requiring inpatient admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, A H; Devi, L; Goel, P; Saha, P K

    2010-01-01

    Puberty menorrhagia is a significant health problem in adolescent age group and severe cases may require admission and blood transfusion. Aim of this study was to evaluate the causes, associated complications and management of puberty menorrhagia. Hospital records of all patients of puberty menorrhagia requiring admission were analyzed for etiology, duration since menarche, duration of bleeding, investigation profile and management. There were 18 patients of puberty menorrhagia requiring hospital admission. Etiology was anovulatory bleeding in 11 patients, bleeding disorders in five which included idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura in three and one each with Von-Willebrand disease and leukemia. Two patients had hypothyroidism as the cause. Fourteen patients presented with severe anaemia and required blood transfusion. All except one responded to oral hormonal therapy. Puberty menorrhagia can be associated with severe complications and requiring blood transfusion. Although most common cause is anovulation but bleeding disorder, other medical condition and other organic causes must be ruled out in any patient of Puberty menorrhagia.

  1. The Usefulness of Confusion, Urea, Respiratory Rate, and Shock Index or Adjusted Shock Index Criteria in Predicting Combined Mortality and/or ICU Admission Compared to CURB-65 in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtain, James P.; Sankaran, Prasanna; Kamath, Ajay V.; Myint, Phyo K.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The study aims to assess the usefulness of age-independent criteria CURSI and temperature adjusted CURSI (CURASI) compared to CURB-65 in predicting community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) mortality. The criteria, CRSI and CRASI, were adapted for use in primary care and compared to CRB-65. Methods. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively identified cohort of community-acquired pneumonia inpatients was conducted. Outcomes were (1) mortality and (2) mortality and/or ICU admission within six weeks. Results. 95 patients (median age = 61 years) were included. All three criteria had similar sensitivity in predicting mortality alone, with CURB-65 having slightly higher specificity. When predicting mortality and/or intensive care admission, CURSI/CURASI showed higher sensitivity and slightly lower specificity. CRSI and CRASI had higher sensitivity and lower specificity when compared with CRB-65 for predicting both primary and secondary outcomes. Results for both analyses had P values >0.05. Conclusions. In a cohort of younger patients CURSI and adjusted CURSI perform at least as well as CURB-65, with a similar trend for CRSI and adjusted CRSI compared to CRB-65. Further studies are needed in different age groups and in primary and secondary care settings. PMID:24024203

  2. The Usefulness of Confusion, Urea, Respiratory Rate, and Shock Index or Adjusted Shock Index Criteria in Predicting Combined Mortality and/or ICU Admission Compared to CURB-65 in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Curtain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. The study aims to assess the usefulness of age-independent criteria CURSI and temperature adjusted CURSI (CURASI compared to CURB-65 in predicting community-acquired pneumonia (CAP mortality. The criteria, CRSI and CRASI, were adapted for use in primary care and compared to CRB-65. Methods. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively identified cohort of community-acquired pneumonia inpatients was conducted. Outcomes were (1 mortality and (2 mortality and/or ICU admission within six weeks. Results. 95 patients (median age = 61 years were included. All three criteria had similar sensitivity in predicting mortality alone, with CURB-65 having slightly higher specificity. When predicting mortality and/or intensive care admission, CURSI/CURASI showed higher sensitivity and slightly lower specificity. CRSI and CRASI had higher sensitivity and lower specificity when compared with CRB-65 for predicting both primary and secondary outcomes. Results for both analyses had P values >0.05. Conclusions. In a cohort of younger patients CURSI and adjusted CURSI perform at least as well as CURB-65, with a similar trend for CRSI and adjusted CRSI compared to CRB-65. Further studies are needed in different age groups and in primary and secondary care settings.

  3. [Compulsive buying and psychiatric comorbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Astrid; Mühlhans, Barbara; Silbermann, Andrea; Müller, Ulrike; Mertens, Christian; Horbach, Thomas; Mitchell, James E; de Zwaan, Martina

    2009-08-01

    Compulsive buying is an excessive behavior that has begun to receive attention from researchers in recent years. The current study provides an overview of research on compulsive buying and examines the psychiatric co-morbidity in a German female treatment seeking compulsive buying sample in comparison with age and gender-matched normal buying control groups. Thirty women suffering from compulsive buying disorder, 30 community controls, and 30 bariatric surgery candidates were assessed with the German versions of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnoses (SCID). Women with compulsive buying disorder showed significantly higher prevalence rates of affective, anxiety, and eating disorders compared to community controls, and suffered significantly more often from affective and anxiety disorders compared to bariatric surgery candidates. The compulsive buying group presented with the highest rates of personality disorders, most commonly avoidant, depressive, obsessive-compulsive, and borderline personality disorder, and reported the highest prevalence rates of other impulse control disorders, especially for intermittent explosive disorder. The findings suggest an elevated psychiatric co-morbidity in patients with compulsive buying disorder.

  4. Mindfulness-Based Crisis Interventions for patients with psychotic symptoms on acute psychiatric wards (amBITION study): Protocol for a feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Pamela; Peters, Emmanuelle; Chadwick, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Inpatient psychiatric care is a scarce and expensive resource in the National Health Service (NHS), with chronic bed shortages being partly driven by high re-admission rates. People often need to go into hospital when they have a mental health crisis due to overwhelming distressing psychotic symptoms, such as hearing voices (hallucinations) or experiencing unusual beliefs (delusions). Brief talking therapies may be helpful for people during an acute inpatient admission as an adjunct to medication in reducing re-admission rates, and despite promising findings from trials in the USA, there have not yet been any clinical trials on this kind of intervention within NHS settings. The amBITION study is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a manualised brief talking therapy (Mindfulness-Based Crisis Intervention; MBCI). Inpatients on acute psychiatric wards are eligible for the study if they report at least one positive psychotic symptom, and are willing and able to engage in a talking therapy. In addition to treatment as usual (TAU), participants will be randomly allocated to receive either MBCI or a control intervention (Social Activity Therapy; SAT) which will be based on doing activities on the ward with the therapist. The primary objective of the study is to find out whether it is possible to carry out this kind of trial successfully within UK inpatient settings and to find out whether patients and staff find it an acceptable intervention. The secondary objective is to collect pilot data on primary and secondary outcome measures, including re-admission rates at 6 month follow-up. This will provide information on the appropriateness of re-admission as the primary outcome measure for future efficacy trials, as well as data on the acceptability and utility of the clinical self-report measures. The results of the feasibility trial will indicate whether a subsequent efficacy pilot trial is warranted, and if so, will provide vital information for the planning

  5. Psychiatric diagnoses during institutionalization: an investigation of 1334 psychiatric patients hospitalized in an Italian asylum during the 20th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarelli, Roberto; Serafini, Gianluca; Innamorati, Marco; Lester, David; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio

    2011-03-01

    Interest in the history of psychiatry continues to grow, with an increasing emphasis on topics of current interest such as the history of nosology and the interplay between psychiatry and society. The present study was designed to investigate diagnoses and sociodemographic characteristics of patients during the course of the last century in a sample of Italian psychiatric inpatients. The study also throws light on changes in the practice of explaining and classifying mental disorders. This was a chart analysis of clinical records of 1334 patients hospitalized at "Santa Maria della Pietà" in Rome from 1920 to 1980. We chose every tenth year and the month of May because, on average, there was a reasonable number of admissions compared with the peak of admissions in August and an almost lack of admissions in January. There were relevant differences in diagnostic nomenclature and course of illnesses from 1920 to 1980 in Italy. Schizophrenia was first diagnosed in 1930 and 1940 and then rapidly declined; melancholia was first diagnosed in 1930 but rapidly decreased, whereas dysthymia appeared later in 1960. Dysthymia, manic, and depressive disorders rapidly appeared since 1980. In the "other disorders" group category, there were three peaks in frequency--one in 1930, another in 1940, and the most frequent in 1980. The consistency in diagnosis and the organization of psychiatric services in the last century were quite poor. Improving psychiatric services and quality of care remain a relevant challenge for physicians.

  6. When should governments increase the supply of psychiatric beds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S; Bastiampillai, T; Licinio, J; Fuller, D A; Bidargaddi, N; Sharfstein, S S

    2017-07-11

    Low numbers of hospital-based psychiatric beds create problems for people with severe mental illness (SMI), when they face extended emergency department (ED) waits, higher thresholds for admission to an acute bed, and short revolving-door stays with high rates of rehospitalisation. Limited access to inpatient treatment has been associated with higher suicide risk, premature mortality, homelessness, violent crime and incarceration. Ultimately, people with SMI can be transinstitutionalised to the criminal justice system. In the USA, for example, prisons have replaced mental hospitals as the largest institutions housing people with SMI. There is no international consensus on the safe minimum numbers of acute, forensic and rehabilitation beds needed to reduce these risks. As a consequence, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries have wide variations in the mix of hospital beds with an average of 71 beds per 100 000 population. Policymakers face difficult choices with few studies to guide decisions on supplying beds. The UK Royal College of Psychiatrists offered a policy framework, which was adapted for Australia. The government of the State of South Australia increased the supplies of crisis, acute and forensic beds to meet a mandatory target to safely reduce mental health boarding in the EDs.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 July 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.139.

  7. Recurrent abdominal pain in children: psychiatric diagnoses and parental psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, J; Zeman, J; Walker, L S

    1990-07-01

    Approximately 12% of children report recurrent episodes of abdominal pain. In only about 10% of these cases, however, can an organic etiology be identified, and therefore it often is assumed that these children have emotional problems. To test this hypothesis, children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) with no identifiable organic cause were compared to children with an organic diagnosis for their abdominal pain, children with psychiatric disorders, and healthy controls. Both groups of children with abdominal pain had significantly more psychiatric disorders (predominantly anxiety and depression) than did the healthy group. Both RAP and psychiatric children had significantly higher Child Behavior Checklist internalizing scores; psychiatric children were rated as significantly more maladjusted on the Children's Global Assessment Scale. Mothers of RAP children were significantly more anxious than mothers of organic pain and healthy children. Psychiatric children were significantly more likely than the other three groups to underreport their psychiatric symptoms relative to their mothers.

  8. Caracterização das internações psiquiátricas para desintoxicação de adolescentes dependentes químicos Caracterización de las admisiones psiquiátricas para desintoxicación de adolescentes adictos a las drogas Characterization of psychiatric admissions for detoxification of drug addicted adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Augusta Mombelli

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi caracterizar as internações de adolescentes hospitalizados para desintoxicação em um hospital público do Oeste do Paraná e correlacionar as variáveis sócio-demográficas com o uso de drogas ilícitas. Trata-se de um estudo retrospectivo a partir de consultas em 81 protocolos de admissão dos adolescentes dependentes químicos internados no período de março de 2007 a abril de 2008. A maioria das internações foi de adolescentes do sexo masculino (79%. As drogas consumidas com maior frequência foram o crack (87,6% e a maconha (85,2%, sendo que, 79% dos adolescentes usam tais drogas de forma concomitante. Identificaram-se fatores que levam ao consumo abusivo de drogas, como o acesso fácil, abandono escolar, o uso de drogas na família e a falta de motivação para o tratamento.El objetivo de esta investigación fue caracterizar las internaciones de adolescentes hospitalizados para desintoxicación en un hospital público del Oeste de Paraná y correlaceonar las variables sociodemográficas con el uso de drogas ilícitas. Se trata de un estudio retrospectivo apartir de consultas en 81 protocolos de admisión de los adolescentes internados en el periodo de marzo de 2007 hasta abril de 2008. La mayoría de las internaciones fue de adolescentes del sexo masculino (79%. Las drogas consumidas con más frecuencia fueron el crack (87,6% y la marihuana (85,2%, siendo que, 79% de los adolescentes usan tales drogas de forma armônica. Se identificaron fatores que llevan al consumo abusivo de las drogas, como el acceso fácil, abandono escolar, el uso de drogas en la família y la falta de motivaciones para el tratamento.The purpose of this research was to characterize the profile of adolescents hospitalized for detoxification in a public hospital in the West of Paraná and correlate the socio-demographic variables with the use of street drugs. It is a retrospective study from the consultations in 81 protocols of

  9. Psychiatric patient and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joginder Pal Attri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients with psychiatric illnesses are prescribed long-term drug treatment, and the anaesthesiologist must be aware of potential interactions with anaesthetic agents. Psychotropic drugs often given in combination with each other or with other non-psychiatric drugs generally exert profound effects on the central and peripheral neurotransmitter and ionic mechanisms. Hence, prior intake of these drugs is an important consideration in the management of the patient about to undergo anaesthesia and surgery. This article highlights the effects of anaesthetics on patients taking antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and lithium carbonate. The risk that should be considered in the perioperative period are the extent of surgery, the patient′s physical state, anaesthesia, the direct and indirect effects of psychotropics, risk of withdrawal symptoms and risk of psychiatric recurrence and relapse.

  10. Predictive factors for psychiatric morbidity among women with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the psychosocial and clinical factors that are associated with psychiatric morbidity among women with infertility attending ... difference in the rate of psychiatric morbidity between women with primary infertility and those with secondary infertility (χ2 = ..... Emotional distress of infertile women in Japan.

  11. Psychiatric morbidity among children and young persons appearing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The crude psychiatric morbidity (CPM) rate was 44.4%. ICD-10 documented psychiatric disorders detected in those with CPM were conduct disorders 45%, mixed disorders of conduct and emotion 20%, emotional disorders with onset specific to childhod 20%, mood disorders 12.5% and hyperkinetic disorders 2.5% ...

  12. Occupational disability on psychiatric grounds in South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: School-teachers are exposed to high levels of stress and have high rates of premature retirement on psychiatric grounds. This study investigated factors ... displayed classroom phobia. Conclusion: Work-related stress is a major factor in South African teachers with occupational disability on psychiatric grounds.

  13. The prediction of discharge from in-patient psychiatric rehabilitation: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mountain Debbie A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At any time, about 1% of people with severe and enduring mental illness such as schizophrenia require in-patient psychiatric rehabilitation. In-patient rehabilitation enables individuals with the most challenging difficulties to be discharged to successful and stable community living. However, the length of rehabilitation admission that is required is highly variable and the reasons for this are poorly understood. There are very few case-control studies of predictors of outcome following hospitalisation. None have been carried out for in-patient rehabilitation. We aimed to identify the factors that are associated with achieving discharge from in-patient rehabilitation by carrying out a case-control study. Methods We compared two groups: 34 people who were admitted to the Rehabilitation Service at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital and discharged within a six year study period, and 31 people who were admitted in the same period, but not discharged. We compared the groups on demographic, illness, treatment and risk variables that were present at the point of their admission to rehabilitation. We used independent t tests and Pearson Chi-Square tests to compare the two groups. Results We found that serious self harm and suicide attempts, treatment with high dose antipsychotics, antipsychotic polypharmacy and previous care in forensic psychiatric services were all significantly associated with non-discharge. The non-discharged group were admitted significantly later in the six year study period and had already spent significantly longer in hospital. People who were admitted to rehabilitation within the first ten years of developing psychosis were more likely to have achieved discharge. Conclusions People admitted later in the study period required longer rehabilitation admissions and had higher rates of serious self harm and treatment resistant illness. They were also more likely to have had previous contact with forensic services. This

  14. A comprehensive psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive psychiatric service was established in 1969 in the Faroe Islands. This service was created as a department of a general hospital. The spheres covered by this department, operating in the midst of the community were: acute and chronic patients, a liaison-psychiatric service......, and an outpatient service. The number of chronic patients has not decreased, due to an influx of unruly senile patients. The close proximity of the service to the community has increased the pressure with regard to the care of such patients. Other services, such as outpatient treatment of alcoholics and neurotics...

  15. A comprehensive psychiatric service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, A G

    1984-01-01

    , and an outpatient service. The number of chronic patients has not decreased, due to an influx of unruly senile patients. The close proximity of the service to the community has increased the pressure with regard to the care of such patients. Other services, such as outpatient treatment of alcoholics and neurotics......A comprehensive psychiatric service was established in 1969 in the Faroe Islands. This service was created as a department of a general hospital. The spheres covered by this department, operating in the midst of the community were: acute and chronic patients, a liaison-psychiatric service...

  16. Admission to Selective Schools, Alphabetically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurajda, Stepan; Munich, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    One's position in an alphabetically sorted list may be important in determining access to over-subscribed public services. Motivated by anecdotal evidence, we investigate the importance of the position in the alphabet of Czech students for their admission chances into over-subscribed schools. Empirical evidence based on the population of students…

  17. Open Admissions: Before the Deluge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Theodore M.

    Institutions of higher education will have to change themselves radically if they are seriously interested in instituting open admissions policies, and one of the biggest obstacles to creating a learning environment conducive to a new kind of student will be overcoming institutional pride in its own elitism. Students have traditionally entered the…

  18. SIP Controlled Admission and Preemption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babiarz, J.; Chan, K.; Karagiannis, Georgios; Eardley, P

    2006-01-01

    This framework defines a method of providing Explicit Congestion Control to real-time inelastic traffic like voice and video through the use of session admission control and preemption mechanisms. This approach uses the Pre-Congestion Notification Marking (PCN) [1] mechanism. PCN marking is deployed

  19. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcomes in neonates with acute surgical conditions in Alexandria, Egypt. HL Wella, SMM Farahat. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  20. Undergraduate Programme: Admissions for 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2013-02-01

    Feb 1, 2013 ... Undergraduate Programme: Admissions for 2013. The Indian Institute of Science, a leading institution of higher learning with a strong tradition of research, offers a four-year Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Programme which is designed as a balanced blend of core science and interdisciplinary topics to serve as ...

  1. Admission Conditions and Graduates' Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Fernando; Portela, Miguel; Sa, Carla

    2009-01-01

    In a context of increasing competition for students, admission conditions have been used as an instrument in a strategy of differentiation. Such a strategy is guided by short-run concerns, that is, the immediate need to attract more students. This article takes a longer term view, by examining graduates' employability. The authors find that…

  2. Prevalence of use, abuse and dependence on legal and illegal psychotropic substances in an adolescent inpatient psychiatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niethammer, Oliver; Frank, Reiner

    2007-06-01

    To examine the prevalence of use, abuse, and dependence on legal and illegal psychotropic substances in an adolescent in-patient psychiatric population in relation to age and gender. Participants were all consecutive admissions (patients aged from 14 to 17) to the adolescent psychiatric in-patient unit. Of the 86 patients who met all the criteria for taking part in the study 70 were interviewed, giving a response rate of 81%. Prevalence of use and of substance use disorders were assessed through structured diagnostic interviews (M-CIDI), conducted from March 2000 through July 2000. We found high prevalence of use and of the diagnosis of legal and illegal psychotropic substances. Around 76% reported a regular use of tobacco, 44% regular alcohol use, and 40% regular use of illegal substances. Diagnosis (abuse or dependence) was found in 50% of cases for nicotine, 29% for alcohol, and 26% for illegal substances. The adolescent in-patient psychiatric population is at high risk of use, abuse, and dependence on legal and illegal psychotropic substances. It is important to diagnose these disorders (anamnesis, screening tools) and to install preventive and therapeutic programs in clinical therapeutic settings.

  3. Patient Aggression and the Wellbeing of Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study in Psychiatric and Non-Psychiatric Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virve Pekurinen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wellbeing of nurses is associated with patient aggression. Little is known about the differences in these associations between nurses working in different specialties. We aimed to estimate and compare the prevalence of patient aggression and the associations between patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses in psychiatric and non-psychiatric specialties (medical and surgical, and emergency medicine. A sample of 5288 nurses (923 psychiatric nurses, 4070 medical and surgical nurses, 295 emergency nurses participated in the study. Subjective measures were used to assess both the occurrence of patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses (self-rated health, sleep disturbances, psychological distress and perceived work ability. Binary logistic regression with interaction terms was used to compare the associations between patient aggression and the wellbeing of nurses. Psychiatric nurses reported all types of patient aggression more frequently than medical and surgical nurses, whereas nurses working in emergency settings reported physical violence and verbal aggression more frequently than psychiatric nurses. Psychiatric nurses reported poor self-rated health and reduced work ability more frequently than both of the non-psychiatric nursing groups, whereas medical and surgical nurses reported psychological distress and sleep disturbances more often. Psychiatric nurses who had experienced at least one type of patient aggression or mental abuse in the previous year, were less likely to suffer from psychological distress and sleep disturbances compared to medical and surgical nurses. Psychiatric nurses who had experienced physical assaults and armed threats were less likely to suffer from sleep disturbances compared to nurses working in emergency settings. Compared to medical and surgical nurses, psychiatric nurses face patient aggression more often, but certain types of aggression are more common in emergency settings. Psychiatric nurses have

  4. Psychiatric disorders in ASEAN-migrants in Malaysia--a university hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahl, W; Hashim, A

    1998-09-01

    Malaysia's workforce presently includes 13% foreigners most coming from the neighboring ASEAN-countries. No data of the prevalence of psychiatric disorders amongst this population is currently available. All patients from ASEAN-countries admitted to the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur between January 1994 and June 1996 were included in a prospective study. During the study period 39 patients were admitted. Five patients were male (12.8%) and 34 female (87.2%). Most came from Indonesia (51.3%) and the Philippines (41.0%), while one each was from Brunei, Singapore and Thailand. Thirty (76.9%) were working in Malaysia as unskilled workers, 23 (59.0%) as maids. Six of the patients (15.4%) were married to Malaysians and only three (7.2%) held white-collar jobs. Three patients (7.2%) received the diagnosis schizophrenia and ten (25.6%) acute and transient psychotic disorder. Two (5.1%) were diagnosed as bipolar affective disorder--manic and two (5.1%) as depression without psychotic features. Five patients (12.8%) were depressed and had as well presence of psychotic features. Adjustment disorders mostly with depressed mood was diagnosed in fourteen (35.9%), three (7.2%) received another diagnosis. The study showed high rates of acute and transient psychosis as well as adjustment disorders indicating high stress level in this population. In particular maids from Indonesia and the Philippines with their dependent and isolated situation seem vulnerable to develop psychiatric disorders. However, overall the rates of psychiatric admissions (only 1.3%) in the ASEAN-nationals is relatively low and tends to support the view that migrants do not suffer from an excess of mental disorders.

  5. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.; Jansen, G.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatient aggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this "Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale" (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff

  6. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.L.I.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.E.; Jansen, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatienaggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff members

  7. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  8. Paediatric admissions and outcome in a general intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Embu Henry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is believed that intensive care greatly improves the prognosis for critically ill children and that critically ill children admitted to a dedicated Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU do better than those admitted to a general intensive care unit (ICU. Methods: A retrospective study of all paediatric (< 16 years admissions to our general ICU from January 1994 to December 2007. Results: Out of a total of 1364 admissions, 302 (22.1% were in the paediatric age group. Their age ranged from a few hours old to 15 years with a mean of 4.9 ± 2.5 years. The male: female ratio was 1.5:1. Postoperative admissions made up 51.7% of the admissions while trauma and burn made up 31.6% of admissions. Medical cases on the other hand constituted 11.6% of admissions. Of the 302 children admitted to the ICU, 193 were transferred from the ICU to other wards or in some cases other hospitals while 109 patients died giving a mortality rate of 36.1%. Mortality was significantly high in post-surgical paediatric patients and in patients with burn and tetanus. The length of stay (LOS in the ICU ranged from less than one day to 56 days with a mean of 5.5 days. Conclusion: We found an increasing rate of paediatric admissions to our general ICU over the years. We also found a high mortality rate among paediatric patients admitted to our ICU. The poor outcome in paediatric patients managed in our ICU appears to be a reflection of the inadequacy of facilities. Better equipping our ICUs and improved man-power development would improve the outcome for our critically ill children. Hospitals in our region should also begin to look into the feasibility of establishing PICUs in order to further improve the standard of critical care for our children.

  9. Paediatric admissions and outcome in a general intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embu, Henry Y; Yiltok, Simon J; Isamade, Erdoo S; Nuhu, Samuel I; Oyeniran, Olushola O; Uba, Francis A

    2011-01-01

    It is believed that intensive care greatly improves the prognosis for critically ill children and that critically ill children admitted to a dedicated Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) do better than those admitted to a general intensive care unit (ICU). A retrospective study of all paediatric (< 16 years) admissions to our general ICU from January 1994 to December 2007. Out of a total of 1364 admissions, 302 (22.1%) were in the paediatric age group. Their age ranged from a few hours old to 15 years with a mean of 4.9 ± 2.5 years. The male: female ratio was 1.5:1. Postoperative admissions made up 51.7% of the admissions while trauma and burn made up 31.6% of admissions. Medical cases on the other hand constituted 11.6% of admissions. Of the 302 children admitted to the ICU, 193 were transferred from the ICU to other wards or in some cases other hospitals while 109 patients died giving a mortality rate of 36.1%. Mortality was significantly high in post-surgical paediatric patients and in patients with burn and tetanus. The length of stay (LOS) in the ICU ranged from less than one day to 56 days with a mean of 5.5 days. We found an increasing rate of paediatric admissions to our general ICU over the years. We also found a high mortality rate among paediatric patients admitted to our ICU. The poor outcome in paediatric patients managed in our ICU appears to be a reflection of the inadequacy of facilities. Better equipping our ICUs and improved man-power development would improve the outcome for our critically ill children. Hospitals in our region should also begin to look into the feasibility of establishing PICUs in order to further improve the standard of critical care for our children.

  10. acute psychiatric readmissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study attempted primarily to assess the effect of length of stay and administration of depot antipsychotics in hospital on time to readmission. Design. A retrospective cohort of 180 admissions was fol- lowed up for 12 months, after an index discharge, by means of multiple hospital and community-based record reviews.

  11. acute psychiatric readmissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Psychiatry, Maudsley Hospital, London). Centre for Health Policy, University of the Witwaters- rand, Johannesburg. International trends have seen a policy shift from chronic psychi- atric institutions and long hospital admissions towards acute, short hospital stays and community-based care. Following this ...

  12. Psychiatric impairment and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-12-03

    Dec 3, 2002 ... Impairment and disability assessment on psychiatric grounds has always been subjective, controversial ... informed medical advisors doing their disability assessments. Many of these advisors have expressed ..... that will empower the affected employee and that is non- stigma- tising. In order to do so it is ...

  13. Aggression in Psychiatric Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidhjelm, Jacob; Sestoft, Dorte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers are often exposed to violence and aggression in psychiatric settings. Short-term risk assessments, such as the Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC), are strong predictors of such aggression and may enable staff to take preventive measures against aggression. This study evaluated wh...

  14. Psychiatric genetics:AJP

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pippa

    their caregivers in South Africa. The heritability of the majority of the psychiatric disorders is ... linkage analyses in a cohort of Bantu-speaking black South. Africans.17-22 Areas of implied linkage to schizophrenia ... one of the studies of a Bantu-speaking schizophrenia cohort. Table I. Glossary of genetic terminology. Allele.

  15. Cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Baldaçara,Leonardo; Borgio,João Guilherme Fiorani; Lacerda,Acioly Luiz Tavares de; Jackowski,Andrea Parolin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this update article is to report structural and functional neuroimaging studies exploring the potential role of cerebellum in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. METHOD: A non-systematic literature review was conducted by means of Medline using the following terms as a parameter: "cerebellum", "cerebellar vermis", "schizophrenia", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "anxiety disorders", "dementia" and "attention deficit hyperactivity disorder". The electron...

  16. Psychiatric Disability in Law Enforcement Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Marilyn

    2017-03-01

    Law enforcement officers all across the world are exposed to violence, confrontation, and traumatic incidents. They regularly witness death and suffering and are at risk of personal injury. Psychiatric sequelae include an increased risk for trauma-related symptoms, depression, alcohol-use disorders, and stress-related medical conditions. Law enforcement officers have been applying for early disability retirement pensions at an increased rate for stress-related psychiatric and medical conditions. As a result, law enforcement agencies are prematurely losing valuable resources, officers with training and experience. Departments have become proactive in trying to address mental health issues to prevent psychiatric disability by implementing employee wellness plans and stress reduction interventions. Programs have been developed to mitigate the effects of stress on law enforcement personnel. Many law enforcement agencies have developed strategies to encourage early confidential referral for psychiatric treatment. They utilize peer support groups and employee assistance programs and develop alliances with mental health professionals. When these approaches fail, a fitness for duty process can be used to identify impairment in work functioning due to psychiatric factors with the prospect of later returning the officer to full duty. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. An interprofessional psychiatric advanced pharmacy practice experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Lisa W; Cooley, Janet

    2013-08-12

    To create an interprofessional psychiatry advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) and assess the initial outcomes. An elective psychiatry APPE was developed in a setting of interdisciplinary practice. Preceptor responsibilities were shared between a psychiatric pharmacist and an attending psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner. Students were also given the opportunity to shadow and work with other health care professionals such as nurses, social workers, therapists, family nurse practitioners, and utilization review staff members. Midpoint and final evaluations demonstrated student advancement throughout the experience as well as the development of communication skills with patients and an increased ability to work collaboratively with other health care providers. Students rated this practice experience highly and their comments reflected achievement of the established learning objectives. An interdisciplinary elective practice experience in psychiatry at a local teaching hospital was effective in teaching psychiatric care and interprofessional interaction. This teaching model can be adapted for use in other practice settings or specialty areas.

  18. A review of ECG and QT interval measurement use in a public psychiatric inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berling, Ingrid; Gupta, Rahul; Bjorksten, Cecilia; Prior, Felicity; Whyte, Ian M; Berry, Sherman

    2017-08-01

    There is an increased rate of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in mental health patients. Some antipsychotic medications are known to prolong the QT interval, thus increasing a patient's risk of SCD via the arrhythmia, torsades de pointes (TdP). Our aim was to evaluate assessment for QT prolongation within a public inpatient mental health facility by auditing electrocardiograph (ECG) use. We reviewed records of all mental health inpatient admissions to a public emergency mental health inpatient unit between 1 January 2016 and 11 February 2016. ECG availability was noted and QT interval was manually measured and assessed for risk of TdP using the QT nomogram when present. Demographic information and medication use was collected. Of 263 mental health inpatient admissions, 50 (19%) presentations had an ECG. A total of four (8%) had a prolonged QT interval. Of the 50 patients with an ECG, 12 (24%) were taking medication known to prolong the QT interval. There was very limited risk assessment for QT prolongation in a public hospital psychiatric inpatient unit, with less than 20% of patients having an ECG performed. Our study supports an association between QT-prolonging drugs and a clinically significant prolonged QT interval; however, a larger study with routine ECG screening is required.

  19. A virtual psychiatric ward for orientating patients admitted for the first time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wai-Chi; Choi, Kup-Sze; Chung, Wai-Yee

    2010-12-01

    Misconceptions about psychiatric wards frequently cause newly admitted mental patients to stay away from these wards despite their need for treatment. Although ward orientation is typically conducted by nurses in an attempt to help patients to adapt to the new environment, it is considered time-consuming, and the method of orientation and the explanations given may vary among different nurses. This situation calls for a more effective and standardized approach to orientating mental patients on their first admission. To this end, a computer-based interactive virtual environment was developed based on a real psychiatric ward by using virtual reality (VR) technologies. It enables the patient to navigate around to gain understanding about the ward through a virtual guided tour. The effectiveness of this VR orientation approach was investigated by a randomized controlled trial with consecutive sampling. Fifty-four Chinese participants were randomly assigned to undergo ward orientation by either using the VR-based approach or reading text-based electronic information sheets about the ward with a computer. Subjective and objective measures were obtained respectively using the Chinese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and the heart-rate variability measurement before and after the intervention. In addition, a test on the level of understanding about the ward was administered at the end of the session. The results showed that the VR orientation approach is helpful in reducing patients' anxiety while also improving their level of understanding about the ward.

  20. Police referral to psychiatric emergency services and its effect on disposition decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, M A; Segal, S P; Newhill, C E

    1993-11-01

    Some clinicians and researchers have questioned the appropriateness of police referrals to psychiatric emergency services and have suggested that police exercise undue influence on hospital admission decisions. The purpose of this study was to test these assertions. Research clinicians in nine emergency services in California observed staff evaluations of 772 cases and rated patients' symptom severity, danger to self or others, and grave disability. They also reviewed the criminal justice records of these patients both before and for 18 months after the index evaluation. A total of 186 patients referred by police were compared with 577 patients not referred by police. Patients brought by police were more likely to be subsequently hospitalized, but they were also more psychiatrically disturbed. They were more dangerous to others and more gravely disabled. They were no more likely to have a criminal record than patients not referred by police. Police did not exercise undue influence on dispositions nor were the patients they brought in more "criminal" than others.

  1. Brief Admissions During Prolonged Treatment in a Case Involving Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Use and Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helleman, M.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Kaasenbrood, A.; Achterberg, T. van

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study describes the use of brief admissions to a psychiatric ward by a single patient across a period of 7 years. The patient suffered from a borderline personality disorder and a complex posttraumatic stress disorder. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe how brief

  2. Psychiatric disorders in a Dutch Health Area: a repeated cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodiamont, P.P.G.; Rijnders, C.A.T.; Mulder, J.; Furer, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Decades of psychiatric epidemiology have shown a wide variation in prevalence rates. but a consistent relationship U between psychiatric disorder and sociodemographic variables. In this repeated cross-sectional survey. the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and their distribution in the

  3. The Overlap between Psychiatric Symptoms and Challenging Behaviour: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Borge; Gitlesen, Jens Petter

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly, challenging behaviour is explained by way of psychiatric symptomatology. This poses possible pitfalls. First, the possibility exists that both psychiatric symptoms and challenging behaviour are concurrent expressions of common underlying factors. Second, psychiatric symptoms may be rated as present on the basis of challenging…

  4. Admission Criteria for MBA Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Silvana Dakduk; José Malavé; Carmen Cecilia Torres; Hugo Montesinos; Laura Michelena

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a review of studies on admission criteria for MBA programs. The method consisted in a literary review based on a systematic search in international databases (Emerald, ABI/INFORM Global, ProQuest Education Journals, ProQuest European Business, ProQuest Science Journal, ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Psychology Journals, ProQuest Social Science Journals and Business Source Complete) of studies published from January 1990 to December 2013, which explore the academic perf...

  5. Who’s Boarding in the Psychiatric Emergency Service?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Simpson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: When a psychiatric patient in the emergency department requires inpatient admission, but no bed is available, they may become a “boarder.” The psychiatric emergency service (PES has been suggested as one means to reduce psychiatric boarding, but the frequency and characteristics of adult PES boarders have not been described. Methods: We electronically extracted electronic medical records for adult patients presenting to the PES in an urban county safety-net hospital over 12 months. Correlative analyses included Student’s t-tests and multivariate regression. Results: 521 of 5363 patient encounters (9.7% resulted in boarding. Compared to non-boarding encounters, boarding patient encounters were associated with diagnoses of a primary psychotic, anxiety, or personality disorder, or a bipolar manic/mixed episode. Boarders were also more likely to be referred by family, friends or providers than self-referred; arrive in restraints; experience restraint/ seclusion in the PES; or be referred for involuntary hospitalization. Boarders were more likely to present to the PES on the weekend. Substance use was common, but only tobacco use was more likely associated with boarding status in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Boarding is common in the PES, and boarders have substantial psychiatric morbidity requiring treatment during extended PES stays. We question the appropriateness of PES boarding for seriously ill psychiatric patients. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:669-674

  6. Psychotherapy in Contemporary Psychiatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipavlou, George; Hernandez, Carlos A Sierra; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: American data suggest a declining trend in the provision of psychotherapy by psychiatrists. Nevertheless, the extent to which such findings generalize to psychiatric practice in other countries is unclear. We surveyed psychiatrists in British Columbia to examine whether the reported decline in psychotherapy provision extends to the landscape of Canadian psychiatric practice. Method: A survey was mailed to the entire population of fully licensed psychiatrists registered in British Columbia (n = 623). The survey consisted of 30 items. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and psychotherapy practice patterns. Associations between variables were evaluated using nonparametric tests. Results: A total of 423 psychiatrists returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 68%. Overall, 80.9% of psychiatrists (n = 342) reported practicing psychotherapy. A decline in the provision of psychotherapy was not observed; in fact, there was an increase in psychotherapy provision among psychiatrists entering practice in the last 10 years. Individual therapy was the predominant format used by psychiatrists. The most common primary theoretical orientation was psychodynamic (29.9%). Regarding actual practice, supportive psychotherapy was practiced most frequently. Professional time constraints were perceived as the most significant barrier to providing psychotherapy. The majority (85%) of clinicians did not view remuneration as a significant barrier to treating patients with psychotherapy. Conclusions: Our findings challenge the prevailing view that psychotherapy is in decline among psychiatrists. Psychiatrists in British Columbia continue to integrate psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in clinical practice, thus preserving their unique place in the spectrum of mental health services. PMID:26175328

  7. Epigenetic signaling in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Catherine J; Bagot, Rosemary C; Labonté, Benoit; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-10-09

    Psychiatric disorders are complex multifactorial illnesses involving chronic alterations in neural circuit structure and function. While genetic factors are important in the etiology of disorders such as depression and addiction, relatively high rates of discordance among identical twins clearly indicate the importance of additional mechanisms. Environmental factors such as stress or prior drug exposure are known to play a role in the onset of these illnesses. Such exposure to environmental insults induces stable changes in gene expression, neural circuit function, and ultimately behavior, and these maladaptations appear distinct between developmental and adult exposures. Increasing evidence indicates that these sustained abnormalities are maintained by epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions. Indeed, transcriptional dysregulation and associated aberrant epigenetic regulation is a unifying theme in psychiatric disorders. Aspects of depression and addiction can be modeled in animals by inducing disease-like states through environmental manipulations (e.g., chronic stress, drug administration). Understanding how environmental factors recruit the epigenetic machinery in animal models reveals new insight into disease mechanisms in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Aggressive behavior against self and others among first-admission patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, T; Wiebe, C; Gebhardt, R P

    1999-01-01

    Aggressive behavior directed against self and others was examined in a sample of patients with schizophrenia during their first hospitalization and during any subsequent hospitalizations over the next two years. The charts of 138 patients (77 men and 61 women) with a first episode of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Weissenau, Germany, were reviewed to obtain information about four types of aggressive behavior (verbal aggression and aggression against objects, self, and others). Similar chart reviews were conducted for 83 patients (47 men and 36 women) who were rehospitalized during the next two years. The severity of the four types of behavior was rated using the Modified Overt Aggression Scale. Stepwise multiple regression was used to identify predictors of the number and duration of rehospitalizations. Seventy-five percent of the men and 53 percent of the women in the sample exhibited some type of aggressive behavior during the first or subsequent admissions. Seventeen percent of men and 26 percent of women attempted suicide. Among the predictors of rehospitalization that were examined, which did not include medication compliance, only aggressive behavior against self and against others were significant predictors during the two years after first admission. Predictors of aggressive behavior against others were male sex, number of hospitalizations, and alcohol abuse (among men only). Self-directed aggressive behavior was correlated with days of hospitalization but not with number of rehospitalizations. Aggressive behavior against self and others is a frequent symptom of schizophrenia in the first two years of illness and plays a major role in rehospitalization.

  9. Adolescent Admissions to Emergency Departments for Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Zanus

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to describe the incidence and the characteristics of Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors (SITBs, among adolescents aged 11-18 admitted, over a two year period, to all the Emergency Departments of a Region of North-eastern Italy through a comprehensive analysis of medical records. A two-step search was performed in the regional ED electronic database. First, we identified the cases that had been clearly diagnosed as SITBs by an Emergency Department physician. Secondly, suspect cases were detected through a keyword search of the database, and the medical records of these cases were hand screened to identify SITBs. The mean annual incidence rate of SITBs was 90 per 100,000 adolescents aged 11-18 years. Events were more frequent in females. Drug poisoning was the most frequently adopted method (54%. In 42% of cases a diagnosis of SITB was not explicitly reported by the physician. In 65% of cases adolescents were discharged within hours of admission. Only 9% of patients started a psychiatric assessment and treatment program during hospital stay. This research confirms the high incidence of SITBs among adolescents and highlights the difficulty in their proper diagnosis and management. Such difficulty is confirmed by the fact that only a few patients, even among those with a clear diagnosis, were sent for psychiatric assessment. Correct identification and management of SITB patients needs to be improved, since SITBs are an important public health problem in adolescence and one of the main risk factors for suicide.

  10. A retrospective chart review of the clinical and psychosocial profile of psychotic adolescents with co-morbid substance use disorders presenting to acute adolescent psychiatric services at Tygerberg Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Lachman

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. A large number of adolescents meet criteria for ‘dual diagnosis’ (a psychiatric disorder plus co-morbid substance use disorder (SUD, which prolongs treatment response and complicates intervention strategies. The current service model in Cape Town divides the care of such patients into psychiatric treatment and a separate substance use intervention. Child and adolescent mental health services face the challenge of high rates of readmission of adolescents into psychiatric facilities before utilisation of community-based substance abuse services. Objective. There is a scarcity of available treatment guidelines for dual-diagnosis adolescents, and a lack of systematically documented epidemiological and clinical data in South African adolescent populations. Method. A retrospective chart review of adolescent psychiatric admissions to the Tygerberg Adolescent Psychiatric Unit during 2010 was conducted. Relevant epidemiological, clinical and demographic data for those presenting with a dual diagnosis (specifically psychotic disorders and SUD was recorded. Results. Results suggest a high prevalence of SUD among adolescents presenting with a first-episode psychosis. Statistically significant correlations with lower levels of education were found in those with ongoing substance abuse (specifically cannabis and methamphetamine, and a significant relationship between choice of debut drug and ongoing drug use was also demonstrated. Risk factors for SUD (psychosocial adversities, childhood trauma, family and community exposure to substances, early debut drug ages, risky sexual behaviours, and clinical psychiatric profiles of adolescents with dual diagnosis are described. Conclusions. This cohort had an enhanced risk as a result of genetic vulnerability and environmental availability of substances, and the findings emphasise the differences in presentation, choice of drugs of abuse and psychosocial difficulties of adolescents with a dual

  11. Psychiatric hospitalization and suicide among the very old in Denmark: population-based register study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Mortensen, Preben Bo; Vach, Werner

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Very old people have higher suicide rates than the younger elderly population. Psychiatric disorders are known to have a strong association with suicide among elderly people. AIMS: To analyse the analyse the suicide risk associated with psychiatric hospitalisation among the very old......: The association between suicide and psychiatric hospitalisation is much weaker for the very old than for the old. Psychiatric disorders among very old people may be interacting with other disorders, may be underdiagnosed or treated in other healthcare settings....

  12. The Evolution of College Admission Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    The development of college admissions requirements during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was basically the story of the admission policies and practices at Harvard College. Candidates for admission were examined on their ability to read and translate Latin and Greek, and a careful check was made of their character and background. With…

  13. Policies Governing Admission to Jordanian Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massadeh, Nassar

    2012-01-01

    This paper intends to discuss the policy of admission to Jordanian public universities. This admission rules are variable and open to almost 100% of the graduates from secondary schools. This might refer to the historical events and economic conditions that the country has gone through since its establishment. Furthermore, the admission policy is…

  14. Should compulsory admission to hospital be part of suicide prevention strategies?

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Daniel Wei L.; Colucci, Erminia

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization report Preventing Suicide: A Global Imperative provides governments with guidance for comprehensive suicide prevention strategies. However, it does not mention the role that compulsory admission to hospital of psychiatric patients should have in policies for suicide prevention. This was a missed opportunity for international discussion and guidance about a measure that, although widely used, is becoming increasingly controversial in light of the existing evidence...

  15. Should compulsory admission to hospital be part of suicide prevention strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daniel Wei L.; Colucci, Erminia

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization report Preventing Suicide: A Global Imperative provides governments with guidance for comprehensive suicide prevention strategies. However, it does not mention the role that compulsory admission to hospital of psychiatric patients should have in policies for suicide prevention. This was a missed opportunity for international discussion and guidance about a measure that, although widely used, is becoming increasingly controversial in light of the existing evidence and human rights norms. PMID:28584655

  16. [Rheumatic fibromyalgia: psychiatric features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarró Alvarez, S

    2002-01-01

    Rheumatic fibromyalgia, also known as fibrositis or myofascial pain, is a common syndrome whose diagnoses, founded mainly on physical examination, usually delays due to symptom unspecificity, amount of complementary tests requested and intercourse with psychiatric disorders. Psychyatrists and psychologists get often involved in fibromyalgia treatment. Its proper knowledge prevents not only physicians and patients' psychological discourage but also development of depression and mental health expenses, as well as allows designing a treatment plan according to the main symptoms which may offer improvement chances to fibromyalgia patients. This article intends to offer an up-to-date and complete information about this entity, focused on psychiatric aspects, to better identify and manage such a puzzling disease.

  17. Dissociative disorders in the psychiatric emergency ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sar, Vedat; Koyuncu, Ahmet; Ozturk, Erdinc; Yargic, L Ilhan; Kundakci, Turgut; Yazici, Ahmet; Kuskonmaz, Ekrem; Aksüt, Didem

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of dissociative disorders among emergency psychiatric admissions. Forty-three of the 97 consecutive outpatients admitted to the psychiatric emergency unit of a university hospital were screened using the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). Seventeen (39.5% of the 43 evaluated) patients with a DES score above 25.0 were then interviewed with the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule and the Structured Clinical Interview for Dissociative Disorders. Fifteen emergency unit patients (34.9% of the 43 evaluated participants) were diagnosed as having a dissociative disorder. Six (14.0%) patients had dissociative identity disorder, 6 (14.0%) had dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, and 3 (7.0%) had dissociative amnesia. The average DES score of dissociative patients was 43.7. A majority of them had comorbid major depression, somatization disorder, and borderline personality disorder. Most of the patients with dissociative disorder reported auditory hallucinations, symptoms associated with psychogenic amnesia, flashback experiences, and childhood abuse and/or neglect. Dissociative disorders constitute one of the diagnostic groups with high relevance in emergency psychiatry.

  18. Culture and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2013-01-01

    Since the publication of DSM-IV in 1994, neurobiologists and anthropologists have criticized the rigidity of its diagnostic criteria that appear to exclude whole classes of alternate illness presentations, as well as the lack of attention in contemporary psychiatric nosology to the role of contextual factors in the emergence and characteristics of psychopathology. Experts in culture and mental health have responded to these criticisms by revising the very process of diagnosis for DSM-5. Specifically, the DSM-5 Cultural Issues Subgroup has recommended that concepts of culture be included more prominently in several areas: an introductory chapter on Cultural Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis - composed of a conceptual introduction, a revised Outline for Cultural Formulation, a Cultural Formulation Interview that operationalizes this Outline, and a glossary on cultural concepts of distress - as well as material directly related to culture that is incorporated into the description of each disorder. This chapter surveys these recommendations to demonstrate how culture and context interact with psychiatric diagnosis at multiple levels. A greater appreciation of the interplay between culture, context, and biology can help clinicians improve diagnostic and treatment planning. Copyright © 2013 APA*

  19. Individual and parental psychiatric history and risk for suicide among adolescents and young adults in Denmark : A population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, Kirstina; Qin, Ping

    2008-01-01

    in adolescents and young adults, and the effect of such a history was greater in females than males. The elevated risk peaked in the two periods immediately after admission and discharge for both sexes, and exceeded in females who had multiple admissions and in males who were diagnosed with schizophrenia......, affective disorders or substance abuse disorders. At the same time, a parental psychiatric history constituted a substantial risk factor for suicide in young people, in particular, if having a mother admitted for psychiatric illness. The elevated risk associated with parental psychiatric history was greater...

  20. THE ANALYSIS OF FACTORS INFLUENCING THE TERMS OF HOSPITAL ADMISSION IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROM (ACCORDING TO THE LIS STUDY DATA – LYUBERTSY STUDY ON MORTALITY RATE IN PATIENTS AFTER ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Ginzburg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate main factors influencing admission time to cardiovascular care unit in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Material and methods. Anonymous questionnaire was used to study factors associated with prehospital delay. A total of 363 patients aged 63.2±12.3 (24-89 years were enrolled into the study: women – 132 (37%, men – 231 (63%. Results. The main reason for emergency call was typical pain syndrome (87%. 52% of the patients experienced the pain syndrome for the first time, the others noted change in the pain characteristics. 28% of the patients did nothing to relieve the chest pain; only one third of the patients used short-acting nitrates. The main reasons for delay in emergency call were the follows: hope that the symptoms will pass off aidless, unwillingness to disturb medical staff, various family circumstances and so on. Almost third part of the patients sought medical attention more than one hour after pain syndrome onset, about half of the patients called an ambulance within the first 40 minutes. Women sought medical advice later than men and used nitroglycerin less often. Experience of myocardial infarctions decreased in time before emergency call and increase in frequency of nitroglycerin intake before ambulance arrival but these correlations were weak (r≤0.25. Conclusion. Very high and high cardiovascular risk patients underestimate severity of possible complications of their disease and necessity for emergency call, they are also not familiar with the first aid algorithm in emergency cases. To reduce prehospital delay hospital and out-patient clinic doctors have to regularly inform high-risk patients and their relatives about the ACS symptoms and methods of the first aid.

  1. THE ANALYSIS OF FACTORS INFLUENCING THE TERMS OF HOSPITAL ADMISSION IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROM (ACCORDING TO THE LIS STUDY DATA – LYUBERTSY STUDY ON MORTALITY RATE IN PATIENTS AFTER ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Ginzburg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate main factors influencing admission time to cardiovascular care unit in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Material and methods. Anonymous questionnaire was used to study factors associated with prehospital delay. A total of 363 patients aged 63.2±12.3 (24-89 years were enrolled into the study: women – 132 (37%, men – 231 (63%. Results. The main reason for emergency call was typical pain syndrome (87%. 52% of the patients experienced the pain syndrome for the first time, the others noted change in the pain characteristics. 28% of the patients did nothing to relieve the chest pain; only one third of the patients used short-acting nitrates. The main reasons for delay in emergency call were the follows: hope that the symptoms will pass off aidless, unwillingness to disturb medical staff, various family circumstances and so on. Almost third part of the patients sought medical attention more than one hour after pain syndrome onset, about half of the patients called an ambulance within the first 40 minutes. Women sought medical advice later than men and used nitroglycerin less often. Experience of myocardial infarctions decreased in time before emergency call and increase in frequency of nitroglycerin intake before ambulance arrival but these correlations were weak (r≤0.25. Conclusion. Very high and high cardiovascular risk patients underestimate severity of possible complications of their disease and necessity for emergency call, they are also not familiar with the first aid algorithm in emergency cases. To reduce prehospital delay hospital and out-patient clinic doctors have to regularly inform high-risk patients and their relatives about the ACS symptoms and methods of the first aid.

  2. A nested case-control study of the risk of suicide attempts after discharge from psychiatric care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Erik; Jensen, Børge

    2008-01-01

    The literature suggests that the risk of suicide is high within the first weeks after discharge from psychiatric care, but practically no studies have estimated the risk of suicide attempt after discharge from psychiatric care. The aim of this study was to examine the risk level for suicide attempt...... after discharge from psychiatric care, and to control for effects from psychiatric diagnoses, number and length of previous admission. An analysis of the role of co-morbid substance use disorder in suicide attempts risk was completed. The study is a Danish register-based nested case-control study; 3037...... cases were identified from Register for Suicide Attempts, and 60,295 individuals, matched by gender and age, were identified for comparison. Retrospective personal data on psychiatric care was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. Risk of suicide attempts was estimated by the use...

  3. Preventable complications in epilepsy admissions: The "July effect".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Natalie S; Kramer, Daniel R; Wen, Timothy; Ho, Lianne; Patel, Arati; Donoho, Daniel; Mehta, Vivek; Heck, Christianne; Lee, Brian; Mack, William J; Liu, Charles Y

    2017-11-01

    Inpatient hospital stays for patients with epilepsy represent a significant burden on patients and society. Identifying factors that contribute to such costs aides in developing effective strategies to address this burden. July admissions have been associated with higher rates of complications and worse outcomes, attributed to the presence of new physicians. This study aims to evaluate whether epilepsy patients admitted in July have higher preventable complication rates and mortality than during the rest of the year. Data was derived from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) for epilepsy admissions for the years 2000-2010. Multivariable analyses assessed the effect of July against non-July admission on "hospital acquired complications" (HAC), which are complications identified as owing to preventable causes and mortality. Additionally, the total adjusted charges and prolonged length of stay (pLOS) for July admissions were compared to the 50th percentile. A total of 12,997,181 admissions for epilepsy were identified with 993,619 (8%) occurring in July, 10,810,900 (83%) were non-July months, and 1,192,662 (9%) were missing data. Patients admitted in July showed an increased association for HAC events (RR=1.02, [1.01,1.03], pepilepsy population, although July admissions were associated with a slight increase in HAC events, there was a non-significant or decreased rate of mortality, LOS, and total charge. Our results suggest that although complications were increased in July, possibly due to new staff, supervision is sufficient to prevent significant burden on patients and hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Short-term prediction of threatening and violent behaviour in an Acute Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit based on patient and environment characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The aims of the present study were to investigate clinically relevant patient and environment-related predictive factors for threats and violent incidents the first three days in a PICU population based on evaluations done at admittance. Methods In 2000 and 2001 all 118 consecutive patients were assessed at admittance to a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Patient-related conditions as actuarial data from present admission, global clinical evaluations by physician at admittance and clinical nurses first day, a single rating with an observer rated scale scoring behaviours that predict short-term violence in psychiatric inpatients (The Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC)) at admittance, and environment-related conditions as use of segregation or not were related to the outcome measure Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R). A multiple logistic regression analysis with SOAS-R as outcome variable was performed. Results The global clinical evaluations and the BVC were effective and more suitable than actuarial data in predicting short-term aggression. The use of segregation reduced the number of SOAS-R incidents. Conclusions In a naturalistic group of patients in a PICU segregation of patients lowers the number of aggressive and threatening incidents. Prediction should be based on clinical global judgment, and instruments designed to predict short-term aggression in psychiatric inpatients. Trial registrations NCT00184119/NCT00184132 PMID:21418581

  5. Short-term prediction of threatening and violent behaviour in an Acute Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit based on patient and environment characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morken Gunnar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims of the present study were to investigate clinically relevant patient and environment-related predictive factors for threats and violent incidents the first three days in a PICU population based on evaluations done at admittance. Methods In 2000 and 2001 all 118 consecutive patients were assessed at admittance to a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU. Patient-related conditions as actuarial data from present admission, global clinical evaluations by physician at admittance and clinical nurses first day, a single rating with an observer rated scale scoring behaviours that predict short-term violence in psychiatric inpatients (The Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC at admittance, and environment-related conditions as use of segregation or not were related to the outcome measure Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R. A multiple logistic regression analysis with SOAS-R as outcome variable was performed. Results The global clinical evaluations and the BVC were effective and more suitable than actuarial data in predicting short-term aggression. The use of segregation reduced the number of SOAS-R incidents. Conclusions In a naturalistic group of patients in a PICU segregation of patients lowers the number of aggressive and threatening incidents. Prediction should be based on clinical global judgment, and instruments designed to predict short-term aggression in psychiatric inpatients. Trial registrations NCT00184119/NCT00184132

  6. Profile and Outcome Analysis of Paediatric Admissions into a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mortality rate was 36.5% while 63.5% were transferred to the paediatric wards for further management. TBI accounted for the largest number of deaths (26.3%) in the unit, followed by burns (15.8%) and intracranial tumours (10.5%). Conclusion/ Recommendation: Paediatric admissions in our general intensive care unit are ...

  7. Obstetric and gynaecological admissions in an intensive care unit of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Management of critically ill women in intensive care units (ICU) is crucial in reducing maternal mortality. This study sought to determine the ICU obstetric and gynaecology utilization rate, indications for admissions, assess the outcome and risk factors associated with mortality. Design/ settings: A retrospective ...

  8. Admission control for differentiated services in future generation CDMA networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H.-P.; Núñez-Queija, R.; Gabor, A.F.; Boxma, O.J.

    2009-01-01

    Future Generation CDMA wireless systems, e.g., 3G, can simultaneously accommodate flow transmissions of users with widely heterogeneous applications. As radio resources are limited, we propose an admission control rule that protects users with stringent transmission bit-rate requirements ("streaming

  9. Seasonal variation in admission for heart failure, hypertension and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Seasonal variation in hospitalization for cardiovascular disease has been described in the temperate regions of the world as well as in Northern Nigeria. Increase admission rates during the cold seasons have been reported in these areas. No studies have been done in Southern Nigeria. This study is thus ...

  10. Review of road traffic accident admissions in a Nigerian tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 20.6 % of the patients had multiple injuries. The mortality rate was 6.8%. Conclusion: Trauma is an established cause of requiring emergency care and hospital admissions and since the cost of trauma care is enormous. Implementation of road safety legislation will be of tremendous help in reducing road traffic injuries.

  11. Indications and Outcome of Admission of Diabetic Patients into The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The indications for admission were chronic diabetic complications involving different body systems (of which renal system involvement was the commonest), poorly controlled diabetes, acute emergencies and foot ulcers. Outcome was good in the majority while a case fatality rate of 23.7% was recorded. Conclusion: Chronic ...

  12. Pattern of Admission and Outcome of Patients Admitted into the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of Admission and Outcome of Patients Admitted into the Intensive Care Unit of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital Enugu: A 5‑Year Review. ... mechanical ventilation during their stay in ICU. Only 15% (34 patients) of all the cases of severe TBI patients received invasive mechanical ventilation. Mortality rate was ...

  13. Risk Factors for Maternal Deaths in Unplanned Obstetric Admissions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    eclampsia (41.1%), obstetric haemorrhage (37.5%), and .... expensive ICU admissions by 53% 10, while guaranteeing expert obstetric and critical care management 11. The mortality rate in this study is similar to that reported from other studies in ...

  14. Celebrating our past. The history of Hamilton Psychiatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forchuk, C; Tweedell, D

    2001-10-01

    1. There is a risk of losing important parts of our psychiatric nursing history as a result of the rapid rate of mental health reform and the closing or changing of governance of major psychiatric facilities. 2. Hamilton Psychiatric Hospital provided leadership in psychiatric nursing in Canada for more than a century and is now changing governance from being a provincial psychiatric hospital to part of a community general hospital. 3. The hospital's tradition includes nonrestrictive care policies that have been in place for more than a century, a humanistic approach to care, being the first facility in Canada to require theory-based nursing care from all nursing staff, innovative practice models, and achieving authorship or co-authorship from more than 17% of the RN staff.

  15. Investigation of the criteria for involuntary admission to a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, A

    1988-01-01

    The case records of all patients admitted involuntarily to the psychiatric unit of a teaching general hospital between May 1, 1985, and Apr. 30, 1986, were examined to assess the criteria used for admission in relation to several patient characteristics. Of the 55 patients 42 were admitted under the terms of form 1 (application for psychiatric assessment) and 13 under the terms of form 3 (certificate of involuntary admission). All of the former patients and 70% of the latter were admitted under the criteria for dangerousness; however, one-third of these patients had failed to show any evidence of violent or suicidal behaviour. Most of the patients admitted because of their dangerousness had a nonpsychotic disorder, whereas 83% of those admitted because of lack of competence had a psychotic disorder. These findings are discussed in relation to the criteria for involuntary admission in the 1980 Mental Health Act of Ontario. The difficulties encountered in the admission process by physicians appear to be the result of a lack of clinical considerations and a predominant emphasis on dangerousness. PMID:3167735

  16. Estimating the costs of psychiatric hospital services at a public health facility in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenduka, Charles; Ichoku, Hyacinth; Ochonma, Ogbonnia

    2012-09-01

    Information on the cost of mental health services in Africa is very limited even though mental health disorders represent a significant public health concern, in terms of health and economic impact. Cost analysis is important for planning and for efficiency in the provision of hospital services. The study estimated the total and unit costs of psychiatric hospital services to guide policy and psychiatric hospital management efficiency in Nigeria. The study was exploratory and analytical, examining 2008 data. A standard costing methodology based on ingredient approach was adopted combining top-down method with step-down approach to allocate resources (overhead and indirect costs) to the final cost centers. Total and unit cost items related to the treatment of psychiatric patients (including the costs of personnel, overhead and annualised costs of capital items) were identified and measured on the basis of outpatients' visits, inpatients' days and inpatients' admissions. The exercise reflected the input-output process of hospital services where inputs were measured in terms of resource utilisation and output measured by activities carried out at both the outpatient and inpatient departments. In the estimation process total costs were calculated at every cost center/department and divided by a measure of corresponding patient output to produce the average cost per output. This followed a stepwise process of first allocating the direct costs of overhead to the intermediate and final cost centers and from intermediate cost centers to final cost centers for the calculation of total and unit costs. Costs were calculated from the perspective of the healthcare facility, and converted to the US Dollars at the 2008 exchange rate. Personnel constituted the greatest resource input in all departments, averaging 80% of total hospital cost, reflecting the mix of capital and recurrent inputs. Cost per inpatient day, at $56 was equivalent to 1.4 times the cost per outpatient visit at

  17. Asthma and myocardial infarction inpatient hospitalization and emergency room visit counts and rates by county, year and month of admission, age group, race/ethnicity and gender of California residents, 2000-2009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Environmental Health Tracking Program — This dataset contains case counts, rates, and confidence intervals of asthma (ICD9-CM 493.0-493.9) and myocardial infarction (ICD9-CM 410) inpatient hospitalizations...

  18. Using the MDRD value as an outcome predictor in emergency medical admissions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chin, Jun Liong

    2011-10-01

    Both physiological- and laboratory-derived variables, alone or in combination, have been used to predict mortality among acute medical admissions. Using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) not as an estimate of glomerular filtration rate but as an outcome predictor for hospital mortality, we examined the relationship between the MDRD value and in-hospital death during an emergency medical admission.

  19. Admission Criteria for MBA Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Dakduk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a review of studies on admission criteria for MBA programs. The method consisted in a literary review based on a systematic search in international databases (Emerald, ABI/INFORM Global, ProQuest Education Journals, ProQuest European Business, ProQuest Science Journal, ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Psychology Journals, ProQuest Social Science Journals and Business Source Complete of studies published from January 1990 to December 2013, which explore the academic performance of students or graduates of MBA programs. A quantitative review was performed. Results show that most researchers studied relations between GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test and UGPA (Undergraduate Grade Point Average as predictors of GGPA (Graduate Grade Point Average. On the other hand, work experience and personal traits (such as personality, motivation, learning strategies, self-efficacy beliefs and achievement expectations and their relation with GGPA had been less studied, and results are not consistent enough to consider them valid predictors of student performance at this time.

  20. Prevalence of smoking in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Marie-France; Canceil, Olivier; Baylé, Franck; Millet, Bruno; Bourdel, Marie-Chantal; Moatti, Cécile; Olié, Jean-Pierre; Attar-Lévy, Dominique

    2002-04-01

    Compelling evidence that tobacco-smoking is a form of drug addiction exists. The aim of this study is to determine the following: (1) prevalence of tobacco-smoking and of nicotine dependence in French psychiatric patients; (2) rates and patterns of tobacco smoking and of nicotine dependence according to diagnosis; (3) relationship between current smoking status and antipsychotic medications; and (4) relationship between cigarette smoking and neurological side effects induced by neuroleptics. A population of 711 psychiatric in- and outpatients was assessed using: (1) a detailed smoking self-questionnaire for smoking history and nicotine dependence; and (2) a questionnaire for staff covering treatments and DSMIII-R diagnoses. Data were analyzed using chi2 analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests (one factor) for quantitative comparisons between groups of patients, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) test with age covariate was performed for age-dependent variables. Prevalence of smoking in the population of psychiatric patients was significantly higher than in the French general population. Diagnoses among current smokers were mainly substance-related disorder and schizophrenia. The authors established correlations between prevalence of smoking and age, sex, marital and socioeconomic status, alcohol use, coffee consumption and other psychoactive substance use or abuse. The authors did not find relationship between smoking prevalence and institutionalization. Neuroleptic neurological side effects were significantly fewer among smokers compared to nonsmokers. However, the rate of smokers was significantly higher in psychiatric patients receiving neuroleptic drugs. Nicotine abuse in psychiatric patients, and especially in schizophrenic patients, could support the hypothesis that smoking is consistent with self-medication.

  1. Psychiatric disorders and urbanization in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Jack; Peen, Jaap; Koelen, Jurrijn; Smit, Filip; Schoevers, Robert

    2008-01-17

    Epidemiological studies over the last decade have supplied growing evidence of an association between urbanization and the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to examine the link between levels of urbanization and 12-month prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in a nationwide German population study, controlling for other known risk factors such as gender, social class, marital status and the interaction variables of these factors with urbanization. The Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI) was used to assess the prevalence of mental disorders (DSM-IV) in a representative sample of the German population (N = 4181, age: 18-65). The sample contains five levels of urbanization based on residence location. The epidemiological study was commissioned by the German Ministry of Research, Education and Science (BMBF) and approved by the relevant Institutional Review Board and ethics committee. Written informed consent was obtained for both surveys (core survey and Mental Health Supplement). Subjects did not get any financial compensation for their study participation. Higher levels of urbanization were linked to higher 12-month prevalence rates for almost all major psychiatric disorders (with the exception of substance abuse and psychotic disorders). The weighted prevalence percentages were highest in the most urbanized category. Alongside urbanization, female gender, lower social class and being unmarried were generally found to be associated with higher levels of psychopathology. The impact of urbanization on mental health was about equal (for almost all major psychiatric disorders) in young people and elderly people, men and women, and in married and single people. Only people from a low social class in the most urbanized settings had more somatoform disorders, and unmarried people in the most urbanized settings had more anxiety disorders. Psychiatric disorders are more prevalent among the inhabitants of more urbanized areas

  2. Psychiatric disorders and urbanization in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koelen Jurrijn

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies over the last decade have supplied growing evidence of an association between urbanization and the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. Our aim was to examine the link between levels of urbanization and 12-month prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in a nationwide German population study, controlling for other known risk factors such as gender, social class, marital status and the interaction variables of these factors with urbanization. Methods The Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI was used to assess the prevalence of mental disorders (DSM-IV in a representative sample of the German population (N = 4181, age: 18–65. The sample contains five levels of urbanization based on residence location. The epidemiological study was commissioned by the German Ministry of Research, Education and Science (BMBF and approved by the relevant Institutional Review Board and ethics committee. Written informed consent was obtained for both surveys (core survey and Mental Health Supplement. Subjects did not get any financial compensation for their study participation. Results Higher levels of urbanization were linked to higher 12-month prevalence rates for almost all major psychiatric disorders (with the exception of substance abuse and psychotic disorders. The weighted prevalence percentages were highest in the most urbanized category. Alongside urbanization, female gender, lower social class and being unmarried were generally found to be associated with higher levels of psychopathology. The impact of urbanization on mental health was about equal (for almost all major psychiatric disorders in young people and elderly people, men and women, and in married and single people. Only people from a low social class in the most urbanized settings had more somatoform disorders, and unmarried people in the most urbanized settings had more anxiety disorders. Conclusion Psychiatric disorders are more

  3. [Psychiatric complications of abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurpegui, Manuel; Jurado, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The psychiatric consequences of induced abortion continue to be the object of controversy. The reactions of women when they became aware of conception are very variable. Pregnancy, whether initially intended or unintended, may provoke stress; and miscarriage may bring about feelings of loss and grief reaction. Therefore, induced abortion, with its emotional implications (of relief, shame and guilt) not surprisingly is a stressful adverse life event. METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS: There is agreement among researchers on the need to compare the mental health outcomes (or the psychiatric complications) with appropriate groups, including women with unintended pregnancies ending in live births and women with miscarriages. There is also agreement on the need to control for the potential confounding effects of multiple variables: demographic, contextual, personal development, previous or current traumatic experiences, and mental health prior to the obstetric event. Any psychiatric outcome is multi-factorial in origin and the impact of life events depend on how they are perceived, the psychological defence mechanisms (unconscious to a great extent) and the coping style. The fact of voluntarily aborting has an undeniable ethical dimension in which facts and values are interwoven. No research study has found that induced abortion is associated with a better mental health outcome, although the results of some studies are interpreted as or Some general population studies point out significant associations with alcohol or illegal drug dependence, mood disorders (including depression) and some anxiety disorders. Some of these associations have been confirmed, and nuanced, by longitudinal prospective studies which support causal relationships. With the available data, it is advisable to devote efforts to the mental health care of women who have had an induced abortion. Reasons of the woman's mental health by no means can be invoked, on empirical bases, for inducing an abortion.

  4. Parricide: Psychiatric morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunjić Bojana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Parricide is defined as a murder of parents by their children; the patricide is murder of father, while matricide is murder of mother. This entity is classified as homicide, but it differs in the fact that victims are parents and the killers are their children. Mostly, it is associated with psychiatric morbidity. OBJECTIVE To describe sociodemographic and psychopathological characteristics of parricide committers and to analyze circumstances of parricide and psychiatric morbidity in order to achieve better recognition and prevention of risks. METHOD This retrospective study included all homicide autopsy records (1991-2005 performed at the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Medical School, University of Belgrade. For further analyses, all parricide records were selected out. The study analyzed all available parameters, which concerned parricide committers, victims and the act itself. Methods of descriptive statistics were used. RESULTS Between 1991 and 2005, there were 948 cases of homicide; of these, 3.5% were parricides. The committers of parricide were on average 31.2±11.9 years old, 87.8% were males, 60.6% with psychiatric symptoms most commonly with schizophrenia, alcohol dependence, personality disorder etc. Victims were on average 63.7±11.9 years old, 54.5% males, and 21.2% had a diagnosed mental illness. CONCLUSION Parricide is a rare kind of homicide accounting for 3% of all homicides. Committers are mostly unemployed males in early adulthood who have mental disorder. The phenomenon of parricide deserves a detailed analysis of the committer (individual bio-psycho-social profile and the environ- mental factors (family, closely related circumstances to enable a precise prediction of the act and prevention of the fatal outcome, which logically imposes the need of further studies.

  5. Frequency and correlates of comorbid psychiatric illness in patients with heroin use disorder admitted to Stikland Opioid Detoxification Unit, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Dannatt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is a lack of studies addressing the frequency and correlates of comorbidities among heroin users admitted for treatment in South Africa (SA. Objective. To assess the frequency and correlates of psychiatric comorbidity among patients with heroin use disorder admitted to the Opioid Detoxification Unit at Stikland Hospital in the Western Cape, SA. Method. Participants (N=141 were assessed for psychiatric illness (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, comorbid substance use disorders (World Health Organization’s Alcohol Smoking Substance Involvement Screening Tool, and legal and social problems (Maudsley Addiction Profile. Demographic, personal, psychiatric and substance-use history, in addition to mental state examination on admission, were collected from the case notes. Results. The largest group of patients (n=56, 40% had not been abstinent from heroin use since drug debut, and most had been arrested for drug-related activities (n=117, 83% and had family conflicts related to use (n=135, 96%. Nicotine was the most common comorbid substance of dependence (n=137, 97% and methamphetamine was the most common comorbid substance abused (n=73, 52%. The most common comorbid psychiatric illness was previous substance-induced psychosis (n=42, 30% and current major depressive disorder (n=37, 26%. Current major depressive disorder was significantly associated with females (p=0.03, intravenous drug use (p=0.03, alcohol use (p=0.02, and a higher number of previous rehabilitation attempts (p=0.008. Conclusion. Patients with heroin use disorders present with high rates of psychiatric comorbidities, which underscores the need for substance treatment services with the capacity to diagnose and manage these comorbidities.

  6. Risk factors for unplanned admission after ambulatory laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Dorda, Guillermo; San Emeterio Gonzalez, Enrique; Martón Bedia, Paula

    2016-02-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) performed as day-case (DC) surgery has more unexpected admissions than most day-case procedures. We revised the literature about factors associated with unexpected admissions in LC as well as reconversion to open laparotomy and we investigate these factors in our series. Retrospective cohort study, period 1999-2013 (511 cases). We study factors that in the literature have been associated with unpredicted admissions in DC or reconversion. In the period 1999-2013 511 patients were included (166 male/345 female), median age 53 years. Surgical indication was: Symptomatic cholelithiasis (386 cases), previous episode of cholecystitis (52 cases), biliary pancreatitis (47 cases) and ERCP for common duct stones (11 cases). 70% were discharged on the same day, 13% overnight and 17% stayed longer than 24 hours. Reconversion rate was 3.3%, readmission rate 2.8% and reoperation rate 1.2%. Bivariant study showed significant statistical association with age 65 or, ASA classification II or higher, previous admission for acute cholecystitis and logistic regression showed them to be significantly associated with readmission (sensibility: 10.6%, specificity: 98.6%, R2 coefficient: 0.046-0.066). The model's predictive capacity is null. We think that factors other than indications are responsible for the high proportion of failure showed by LC in DC. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Psychiatric aspects of dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, J S; Ford, C V; Rimoin, D L

    1976-02-01

    Sixteen adult dwarfs - 11 with achondroplasia and 5 with hypopituitarism - were studied by means of psychiatric interviews and psychological tests. There were no significant differences between the two groups; in general, the subjects had achieved a satisfactory life adjustment despite the stress of having bodies uniquely different from those of the general population. They had secure identities as "little people" and successfully used coping mechanisms such as a sense of humor and a pleasant interpersonal style. Male dwarfs tended to experience more emotional distress than female dwarfs.

  8. Impact of early admission in labor on method of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnama, P; Ziaei, S; Faghihzadeh, S

    2006-03-01

    The effect of the timing of admission in labor unit on the method of delivery was evaluated in a cohort study. Four hundred and sixty six low-risk nulliparous women who were admitted in the labor unit in latent phase (group 1) were compared with 329 parturient women who were admitted in the active phase (group 2) to determine rate of and reasons for cesarean section, cervical dilation at the time of cesarean, and the rate of labor augmentation. The number of cesarean deliveries in group 1 was greater than that in the group 2 (301 vs 80, p<0.0001 ). The main reason for cesarean section in group 1 was dystocia, and in 2, fetal distress. The rate of cesarean section in the women who were augmented was greater in group 1 than in group 2 (54% vs 23%, p<0.0001). Later admission in labor increases the rate of spontaneous vaginal delivery in low risk nulliparous women.

  9. Psychiatric Assessment and Rehabilitation of Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Akarsu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Psychiatric rehabilitation has gained significance owing to improved healthcare facilities for burn injuries and decreased mortality/ morbidity rates. Burn traumas may result in psychiatric signs such as denial, anger, guilt, confusion, disgrace, anxiety, distress, and nervousness. Psychiatric disorders such as delirium, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and sexual problems can also be encountered. Therefore, it is necessary to look for these signs and disorders through regular sessions with burn patients and appropriate psychometric tests. This study aims at examining the process of psychological rehabilitation for burn patients in light of the current literature. Material and Methods: This study has been carried out in the light of the main and current literature review. The study intends to put forth the data observed in the course of the psychological diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of burn patients. The study has been conducted in accordance with the Helsinki Declaration Guidelines. Results: Treatment and rehabilitation process requires a multidisciplinary teamwork that consists of physicians, dieticians, psychologists, social service specialists, and other healthcare workers who can meet the needs of burn patients and their families. It is necessary for the team to contribute both to the hospitalization process and the social environment of the patients and their families. Conclusion: It is observed that the quality of life of these patients can be considerably improved with the effective assessment of psychiatric signs that occur during or after the injury and with appropriate treatment methods.

  10. [Discharge dynamics and related factors of newly-admitted patients in psychiatric hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Toshiaki; Shiraishi, Hiromi; Tachimori, Hisateru; Koyamas, Asuka; Naganuma, Yoichi; Takeshima, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    The focus of psychiatric services in Japan is being shifted from hospitalization to community care, and the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare aims for the prompt discharge of newly-admitted patients. Correspondingly, it set a goal to lower the "mean residual rate (MRR)", which indicates the discharge dynamics of newly-admitted patients, to 24%. As a measure to achieve this goal, the present situation should be investigated in each homogeneous patient group. In this study, we conducted a survey of newly-admitted patients to investigate discharge dynamics and related factors by the diagnosis and type of hospitalization. Out of 1,459 psychiatric hospitals to which we sent questionnaires, 183 (12.5%) replied. Each hospital completed questionnaires regarding a maximum of 5 patients for each type of hospitalization (voluntary hospitalization [VH], hospitalization for medical care and protection [HMCP], and involuntary hospitalization ordered by the prefectural governor [IHOPG]) between October 2005 and January 2006. We weighted the obtained patient data in proportion to the estimated total number of patients, and analyzed valid data on 1,784 patients. The MRR for the whole sample was 29.4%. By diagnosis, dementia showed the highest MRR (45.6%), followed by schizophrenia (34.9%); depression, bipolar disorder, and alcoholism showed the lowest MRRs (20-21%). We calculated MRRs by the type of hospitalization for dementia and the other diagnoses separately, considering confounding effect between the diagnosis and type of hospitalization (markedly high proportion of HMCP observed in dementia). In dementia, HMCP showed a higher MRR (46.8%) than VH (43.7%). In the other diagnoses, IHOPG showed the highest MRR (43.7%), followed by HMCP (34.5%) and VH (25.6%). Dementia differed from the other diagnoses in the distribution of residential settings before admission, with a higher proportion of residential care facilities (25.5%) and hospitalization in other departments (19

  11. Hospital Admissions for Childhood Asthma After Smoke-Free Legislation in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Tayu; Laverty, Anthony A.; Glantz, Stanton A.; Majeed, Azeem

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the implementation of English smoke-free legislation in July 2007 was associated with a reduction in hospital admissions for childhood asthma. METHODS: Interrupted time series study using Hospital Episodes Statistics data from April 2002 to November 2010. Sample consisted of all children (aged ≤14 years) having an emergency hospital admission with a principle diagnosis of asthma. RESULTS: Before the implementation of the legislation, the admission rate for childhood asthma was increasing by 2.2% per year (adjusted rate ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–1.03). After implementation of the legislation, there was a significant immediate change in the admission rate of −8.9% (adjusted rate ratio 0.91; 95% CI: 0.89–0.93) and change in time trend of −3.4% per year (adjusted rate ratio 0.97; 95% CI: 0.96–0.98). This change was equivalent to 6802 fewer hospital admissions in the first 3 years after implementation. There were similar reductions in asthma admission rates among children from different age, gender, and socioeconomic status groups and among those residing in urban and rural locations. CONCLUSIONS: These findings confirm those from a small number of previous studies suggesting that the well-documented population health benefits of comprehensive smoke-free legislation appear to extend to reducing hospital admissions for childhood asthma. PMID:23339216

  12. Relatives of psychiatric inpatients--do physical violence and suicide attempts of patients influence family burden and participation in care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellin, Lars; Ostman, Margareta

    2005-01-01

    A common concern of psychiatric patients' relatives is that patients might be a danger to themselves or others. The aim of this study was to investigate family burden and relatives' participation in care in relation to physical violence towards others and suicide attempts by psychiatric inpatients before admission. Information concerning violence and suicide attempts by the patients prior to admission was collected from the medical records of 155 acutely voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric inpatients. Relatives were interviewed a month after admission, using a semi-structured questionnaire. Violence towards other persons and suicide attempts were recorded in 16% and 17% of the cases, respectively. There were no differences between relatives of patients who had been violent and other relatives regarding burden and participation in care. Relatives of patients with suicide attempts more often stated they had been prevented from having own company, worried about suicide attempts by the patient, had mental health problems of their own, and had own need for care and support. It was concluded that violence of acutely admitted psychiatric patients, targeted at other people, was not associated with burden of family, but the results corroborate the need for psychiatric services to involve and support relatives of psychiatric patients with suicidal behaviour.

  13. Cerebellum and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldaçara, Leonardo; Borgio, João Guilherme Fiorani; Lacerda, Acioly Luiz Tavares de; Jackowski, Andrea Parolin

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this update article is to report structural and functional neuroimaging studies exploring the potential role of cerebellum in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. A non-systematic literature review was conducted by means of Medline using the following terms as a parameter: "cerebellum", "cerebellar vermis", "schizophrenia", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "anxiety disorders", "dementia" and "attention deficit hyperactivity disorder". The electronic search was done up to April 2008. Structural and functional cerebellar abnormalities have been reported in many psychiatric disorders, namely schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, dementia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Structural magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported smaller total cerebellar and vermal volumes in schizophrenia, mood disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies using cognitive paradigms have shown alterations in cerebellar activity in schizophrenia, anxiety disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In dementia, the cerebellum is affected in later stages of the disease. Contrasting with early theories, cerebellum appears to play a major role in different brain functions other than balance and motor control, including emotional regulation and cognition. Future studies are clearly needed to further elucidate the role of cerebellum in both normal and pathological behavior, mood regulation, and cognitive functioning.

  14. Shared Decision Making for Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services Before Discharge from Psychiatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisman-Ilani, Yaara; Roe, David; Elwyn, Glyn; Kupermintz, Haggai; Patya, Noa; Peleg, Ido; Karnieli-Miller, Orit

    2018-02-02

    Shared decision making (SDM) is an effective health communication model designed to facilitate patient engagement in treatment decision making. In mental health, SDM has been applied and evaluated for medications decision making but less for its contribution to personal recovery and rehabilitation in psychiatric settings. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the effect of SDM in choosing community psychiatric rehabilitation services before discharge from psychiatric hospitalization. A pre-post non-randomized design with two consecutive inpatient cohorts, SDM intervention (N = 51) and standard care (N = 50), was applied in two psychiatric hospitals in Israel. Participants in the intervention cohort reported greater engagement and knowledge after choosing rehabilitation services and greater services use at 6-to-12-month follow-up than those receiving standard care. No difference was found for rehospitalization rate. Two significant interaction effects indicated greater improvement in personal recovery over time for the SDM cohort. SDM can be applied to psychiatric rehabilitation decision making and can help promote personal recovery as part of the discharge process.

  15. Case-based reimbursement for psychiatric hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederer, L I; Eisen, S V; Dill, D; Grob, M C; Gougeon, M L; Mirin, S M

    1992-11-01

    A fixed-prepayment system (case-based reimbursement) for patients initially requiring hospital-level care was evaluated for one year through an arrangement between a private nonprofit psychiatric hospital and a self-insured company desiring to provide psychiatric services to its employees. This clinical and financial experiment offered a means of containing costs while monitoring quality of care. A two-group, case-control study was undertaken of treatment outcomes at discharge, patient satisfaction with hospital care, and service use and costs during the program's first year. Compared with costs for patients in the control group, costs for those in the program were lower per patient and per admission; cumulative costs for patients requiring rehospitalization were also lower. However, costs for outpatient services for patients in the program were not calculated. Treatment outcomes and patients' satisfaction with hospital care were comparable for the two groups.

  16. Hospital admissions following childhood accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, D; Tal, Y; Winter, S T; Jaffe, M

    1982-09-01

    This study comprises 260 children aged less than or equal to 13 yr hospitalized following accidents during a 9-mo period for a total of 923 hospital days. The ratio of boys to girls was 1.8:1. There were 21 road accidents and 104 accidents in the home; 75.4% of the accidents took place after school hours. Half of the admissions were for head trauma; 96 injuries were serious; and 78 patients required general anesthesia. In 67 families, there had been at least one previous childhood accident requiring hospitalization of the cohort child or sibling; factors in this group may have been the child's temperament or tension in the home.

  17. Substance Use and Mental Health Outcomes for Comorbid Patients in Psychiatric Day Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Magura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The study's purpose was to determine treatment outcomes for patients who present with drug use vs. those presenting with no drug use at admission to a psychiatric day treatment program. Consecutively admitted patients completed confidential interviews which included psychological distress and quality of life measures and provided urine specimens for toxicology at admission and six month follow-up. Subjects positive by past 30 day self-report or urinalysis were categorized as drug users. Major psychiatric diagnoses were: major depression 25%; bipolar, 13%; other mood 13%; schizoaffective 13%; schizophrenia 13%. Drug use at admission was: cocaine 35%; marijuana 33%; opiates 18%, (methamphetamines, 6% For each of these drugs, the percentage of patients positive at admission who remitted from using the drug significantly exceeded the percentage negative at baseline who initiated using the drug. Overall, there were significant decreases in psychological distress and significant improvement on quality of life, but no change on positive affect. There were no significant differences between drug users and non-drug users on symptom reduction and improvement in quality of life. Psychiatric day treatment appears to benefit comorbid patients by reducing the net number of patients who actively use certain common drugs and by improving psychological status and quality of life to the same degree as for non-drug using patients.

  18. Substance Use and Mental Health Outcomes for Comorbid Patients in Psychiatric Day Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Magura

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The study’s purpose was to determine treatment outcomes for patients who present with drug use vs. those presenting with no drug use at admission to a psychiatric day treatment program. Consecutively admitted patients completed confidential interviews which included psychological distress and quality of life measures and provided urine specimens for toxicology at admission and six month follow-up. Subjects positive by past 30 day self-report or urinalysis were categorized as drug users. Major psychiatric diagnoses were: major depression 25%; bipolar, 13%; other mood 13%; schizoaffective 13%; schizophrenia 13%. Drug use at admission was: cocaine 35%; marijuana 33%; opiates 18%, (methamphetamines, 6% For each of these drugs, the percentage of patients positive at admission who remitted from using the drug significantly exceeded the percentage negative at baseline who initiated using the drug. Overall, there were significant decreases in psychological distress and significant improvement on quality of life, but no change on positive affect. There were no significant differences between drug users and non-drug users on symptom reduction and improvement in quality of life. Psychiatric day treatment appears to benefit comorbid patients by reducing the net number of patients who actively use certain common drugs and by improving psychological status and quality of life to the same degree as for non-drug using patients.

  19. Treating the disconfirmed psychiatric client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineken, J

    1983-01-01

    Frequent disconfirmation behaviors have been documented in psychiatric clients. Individuals who demonstrate maladaptive patterns of disconfirmation can learn to understand and modify this dysfunctional sequence. Through one to one interactions and group discussions, psychiatric nurses can help clients learn more positive communication behaviors. This accomplishment will positively affect the client's interpersonal responsiveness and self-esteem.

  20. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  1. Local macroeconomic trends and hospital admissions for child abuse, 2000-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joanne N; Medina, Sheyla P; Feudtner, Chris; Luan, Xianqun; Localio, Russell; Fieldston, Evan S; Rubin, David M

    2012-08-01

    To examine the relationship between local macroeconomic indicators and physical abuse admission rates to pediatric hospitals over time. Retrospective study of children admitted to 38 hospitals in the Pediatric Hospital Information System database. Hospital data were linked to unemployment, mortgage delinquency, and foreclosure data for the associated metropolitan statistical areas. Primary outcomes were admission rates for (1) physical abuse in children <6 years old, (2) non-birth, non-motor vehicle crash-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) in infants <1 year old (which carry high risk for abuse), and (3) all-cause injuries. Poisson fixed-effects regression estimated trends in admission rates and associations between those rates and trends in unemployment, mortgage delinquency, and foreclosure. Between 2000 and 2009, rates of physical abuse and high-risk TBI admissions increased by 0.79% and 3.1% per year, respectively (P ≤ .02), whereas all-cause injury rates declined by 0.80% per year (P < .001). Abuse and high-risk TBI admission rates were associated with the current mortgage delinquency rate and with the change in delinquency and foreclosure rates from the previous year (P ≤ .03). Neither abuse nor high-risk TBI rates were associated with the current unemployment rate. The all-cause injury rate was negatively associated with unemployment, delinquency, and foreclosure rates (P ≤ .007). Multicenter hospital data show an increase in pediatric admissions for physical abuse and high-risk TBI during a time of declining all-cause injury rate. Abuse and high-risk TBI admission rates increased in relationship to local mortgage delinquency and foreclosure trends.

  2. Potentially preventable admissions to New Zealand public hospitals for dental care: a 20-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyman, Robin A; Mahoney, Erin K; Morrison, David; Stanley, James

    2014-06-01

    To describe the prevalence of admissions to New Zealand public hospitals for dental care and associated time trends for people of all ages during the 20-year period 1990-2009. The New Zealand Ministry of Health National Minimum Data Set (NMDS), a collection that covers all publicly funded hospital discharges, was the primary data source for this study. Data over a 20-year period from 1 January 1990 to 31 December 2009 were included, and a subset of ICD 10 codes (K02-K09 and K12 and K13) were selected to identify potentially preventable or ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) leading to admission to hospital. Volumes, proportions and rates of admission are presented to describe the patterns of admission to hospital. There were 120,046 admissions to public hospitals in New Zealand between 1990 and 2009 for which the provision of dental care was the primary reason for admission. The rate of admission to hospital for dental care increased from 0.92 per 1000 population in the period 1990-1994 to 2.15 per 1000 population in 2005-2009. Dental admission rates were greatest in the 3- to 4-year-old age group, for Maori and Pacific people and for people in the most deprived quintile of the NZDep 2006 index. Almost one-third of people aged 18-34 years who were admitted to hospital primarily for dental care were acute admissions. Both the volume and the rate of admission to New Zealand public hospitals for dental care have increased over the period of this study. A continued focus on strategies to reduce the impact of dental disease, particularly in the early childhood population and on ensuring accessible primary dental care for the adult population, is required. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Psychiatric hospitalizations due to alcohol and drug consumption among young people in Ceará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Dido Balbinot

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to analyze the evolution of psychiatric hospitalizations among children and adolescents due to psychoactive substance use in the public health system in the state of Ceará, Brazil. Hospitalizations between 2000 and 2015 were used as indicators. Methods: Ecological study using secondary data. Data analysis was performed with the software Stata 11.1® from StataCorp LLC (Texas/USA using Poisson regression with robust variance and Spearman correlation. A 95% confidence interval was adopted and significance level was set at 5%. Results: The variables hospitalization rates and mean length of hospital stay did not vary significantly. There was no variation when data were stratified by sex. A negative correlation was found between hospitalization rates and mean length of hospital stay (P < 0.05 among girls, but not among boys or overall population. Conclusion: In Ceará, the creation of alternative mechanisms to hospital admission has not resulted in reduced hospitalization rates. Keywords: Hospitalization, Ceará (Brazil, mental health, public health system.

  4. Gene therapy for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Yaroslav; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy has become of increasing interest in clinical neurosurgery with the completion of numerous clinical trials for Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and pediatric genetic disorders. With improved understanding of the dysfunctional circuitry mediating various psychiatric disorders, deep brain stimulation for refractory psychiatric diseases is being increasingly explored in human patients. These factors are likely to facilitate development of gene therapy for psychiatric diseases. Because delivery of gene therapy agents would require the same surgical techniques currently being employed for deep brain stimulation, neurosurgeons are likely to lead the development of this field, as has occurred in other areas of clinical gene therapy for neurologic disorders. We review the current state of gene therapy for psychiatric disorders and focus specifically on particular areas of promising research that may translate into human trials for depression, drug addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. Issues that are relatively unique to psychiatric gene therapy are also discussed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The psychiatric interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2012-01-01

    that are historically rooted in logical positivism and behaviorism. These theoretical approaches marked decisively the so-called "operational revolution in psychiatry" leading to the creation of DSM-III. This paper attempts to examine the theoretical assumptions that underlie the use of a fully structured psychiatric...... person), actionable format, used for classification, treatment, and research. Our central thesis is that psychiatry targets the phenomena of consciousness, which, unlike somatic symptoms and signs, cannot be grasped on the analogy with material thing-like objects. We claim that in order to perform...... faithful distinctions in this particular domain, we need a more adequate approach, that is, an approach that is guided by phenomenologically informed considerations. Our theoretical discussion draws upon clinical examples derived from structured and semi-structured interviews. We conclude that fully...

  6. Web of Objects Based Ambient Assisted Living Framework for Emergency Psychiatric State Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Golam Rabiul; Abedin, Sarder Fakhrul; Al Ameen, Moshaddique; Hong, Choong Seon

    2016-09-06

    Ambient assisted living can facilitate optimum health and wellness by aiding physical, mental and social well-being. In this paper, patients' psychiatric symptoms are collected through lightweight biosensors and web-based psychiatric screening scales in a smart home environment and then analyzed through machine learning algorithms to provide ambient intelligence in a psychiatric emergency. The psychiatric states are modeled through a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), and the model parameters are estimated using a Viterbi path counting and scalable Stochastic Variational Inference (SVI)-based training algorithm. The most likely psychiatric state sequence of the corresponding observation sequence is determined, and an emergency psychiatric state is predicted through the proposed algorithm. Moreover, to enable personalized psychiatric emergency care, a service a web of objects-based framework is proposed for a smart-home environment. In this framework, the biosensor observations and the psychiatric rating scales are objectified and virtualized in the web space. Then, the web of objects of sensor observations and psychiatric rating scores are used to assess the dweller's mental health status and to predict an emergency psychiatric state. The proposed psychiatric state prediction algorithm reported 83.03 percent prediction accuracy in an empirical performance study.

  7. [ADHD in adult psychiatric outpatients: prevalence and comorbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Şahut; Fıstıkcı, Nurhan; Keyvan, Ali; Bilici, Mustafa; Çalışkan, Mecit

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adult psychiatric outpatients. Moreover, comorbid psychiatric diagnoses in adults with ADHD were determined. Patients with and without ADHD were compared regarding DSM Axis I-II comorbidity and sociodemographic characteristics. The study included patients that presented for the first time to a psychiatric outpatient clinic during a 3-month period and were evaluated for adult ADHD. A sociodemographic form, Wender Utah Rating Scale, Turgay's Adult ADD/ADHD Evaluation Scale, Structured Clinical Interview I and II, Symptom Check List-90-R, and Beck Depression Inventory were administered. The study included 246 patients. Among the 39 patients diagnosed with ADHD, 25 were female (64.1%) and 14 were male (35.9%), and the mean age was 27.38 ± 8.3 years. The prevalence of ADHD in adult psychiatric patients was 15.9%. Adults with ADHD usually presented due to comorbid psychiatric problems; major depression (43%), generalized anxiety disorder (23%), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (17%) were the most common comorbid diagnoses. Substance abuse (58.9%) and attempted suicide (38.5%) were among the most prevalent psychiatric problems. The present findings show that ADHD is an important comorbidity in adult patients that present to psychiatric clinics, and may cause serious mental health problems or complicate mental illness.

  8. Stigma and higher rates of psychiatric re-hospitalization: São Paulo public mental health system Estigma e frequências mais altas de re-hospitalização psiquiátrica: o sistema público de saúde mental de São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Andrade Loch

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess re-hospitalization rates of individuals with psychosis and bipolar disorder and to study determinants of readmission. METHODS: Prospective observational study, conducted in São Paulo, Brazil. One hundred-sixty-nine individuals with bipolar and psychotic disorder in need of hospitalization in the public mental health system were followed for 12 months after discharge. Their families were contacted by telephone and interviews were conducted at 1, 2, 6 and 12 months post-discharge to evaluate readmission rates and factors related. RESULTSOne-year re-hospitalization rate was of 42.6%. Physical restraint during hospital stay was a risk factor (OR = 5.4-10.5 for readmission in most models. Not attending consultations after discharge was related to the 12-month point readmission (OR = 8.5, 95%CI 2.3-31.2 and to the survival model (OR = 3.2, 95%CI 1.5-7.2. Number of previous admissions was a risk factor for the survival model (OR = 6.6-11.9. Family's agreement with permanent hospitalization of individuals with mental illness was the predictor associated to readmission in all models (OR = 3.5-10.9 and resulted in shorter survival time to readmission; those readmitted were stereotyped as dangerous and unhealthy. CONCLUSIONS: Family's stigma towards mental illness might contribute to the increase in readmission rates of their relatives with psychiatric disorders. More studies should be conducted to depict mechanisms by which stigma increases re-hospitalization rates.OBJETIVO: O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar a frequência de re-hospitalizações de indivíduos portadores de psicose e transtorno bipolar, para estudar os determinantes da readmissão. MÉTODOS: Estudo de observação prospectivo realizado em São Paulo, Brasil. Foram acompanhados 169 portadores de psicose e de transtorno bipolar precisando de hospitalização no sistema público de saúde mental por 12 meses após a alta. Após contato por

  9. Decline in adolescent treatment admissions for methamphetamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives. The purpose of this report is to describe the changing trends in adolescent treatment admissions for methamphetamine in Cape Town, and to discuss possible implications. Method. Data were collected on admissions for drug abuse treatment through a regular monitoring system involving drug ...

  10. An admission model for medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J C; Elam, C L; Wagoner, N E

    2001-12-01

    Complex societal issues affect medical education and thus require new approaches from medical school admission officers. One of these issues--the recognition that the attributes of good doctors include character qualities such as compassion, altruism, respect, and integrity--has resulted in the recent focus on the greater use of qualitative variables, such as those just stated, for selected candidates. In addition, more emphasis is now being placed on teaching and licensure testing of the attributes of the profession during the four-year curriculum. The second and more contentious issue concerns the system used to admit white and minority applicants. Emphasizing character qualities of physicians in the admission criteria and selection process involves a paradigm shift that could serve to resolve both issues. To make this or any paradigm shift in admission policy, medical schools must think about all the elements of admission and their interrelationships. A model of medical school admission is proposed that can provide understanding of the admission system and serve as a heuristic guide. This model consists of (1) the applicant pool; (2) criteria for selection; (3) the admission committee; (4) selection processes and policies; and (5) outcomes. Each of these dimensions and the interrelationships among the dimensions are described. Finally, a hypothetical example is provided in which the model is used to help a medical school change its admission process to accommodate a new emphasis in the school's mission.

  11. Children's Hospital Admissions and Mother's Menstruation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Katharina

    1970-01-01

    Of 100 children's emergency admissions to hospital nearly half (49%) were admitted during the mother's paramenstruum. There was a statistically significant association between the mother's menstruation and the child's admission both for accidents and for illnesses. The eldest child in the family appeared to be most affected. PMID:5440570

  12. 46 CFR 502.156 - Evidence admissible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evidence admissible. 502.156 Section 502.156 Shipping...; Presiding Officers; Evidence § 502.156 Evidence admissible. In any proceeding under the rules in this part, all evidence which is relevant, material, reliable and probative, and not unduly repetitious or...

  13. 17 CFR 201.320 - Evidence: Admissibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence: Admissibility. 201... PRACTICE Rules of Practice Rules Regarding Hearings § 201.320 Evidence: Admissibility. The Commission or the hearing officer may receive relevant evidence and shall exclude all evidence that is irrelevant...

  14. 46 CFR 201.136 - Evidence admissible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evidence admissible. 201.136 Section 201.136 Shipping... PROCEDURE Evidence (Rule 14) § 201.136 Evidence admissible. In any proceeding under the regulations in this part all evidence which is relevant, material, reliable and probative, and not unduly repetitious or...

  15. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of § 17...

  16. Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... therefore assessed the perception and attitude of Nigerian doctors working in the ICU about inappropriate admissions and request for ... In addition, each of the 4 possible actions in the setting of a full ICU was graded from 0 ... Key words: Intensive care, patient admission, perception, resource allocation.

  17. Grade Inflation and Law School Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsurawat, Winai

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence on whether grade inflation has led to an increasing emphasis on standardized test scores as a criterion for law school admissions. Design/methodology/approach: Fit probabilistic models to admissions data for American law schools during the mid to late 1990s, a period during which…

  18. Admission to Law School: New Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Marjorie M.; Zedeck, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    Standardized tests have been increasingly controversial over recent years in high-stakes admission decisions. Their role in operationalizing definitions of merit and qualification is especially contested, but in law schools this challenge has become particularly intense. Law schools have relied on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and an INDEX…

  19. 22 CFR 146.300 - Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... determining whether a person satisfies any policy or criterion for admission, or in making any offer of... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Admission. 146.300 Section 146.300 Foreign... relating to marital or parental status. In determining whether a person satisfies any policy or criterion...

  20. 22 CFR 229.300 - Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) In determining whether a person satisfies any policy or criterion for admission, or in making any... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Admission. 229.300 Section 229.300 Foreign... relating to marital or parental status. In determining whether a person satisfies any policy or criterion...

  1. 15 CFR 8a.300 - Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... prohibitions. (1) In determining whether a person satisfies any policy or criterion for admission, or in making... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission. 8a.300 Section 8a.300 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN...

  2. Effect of crisis plans on admissions and emergency visits: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asia Ruchlewska

    Full Text Available To establish whether patients with a crisis plan had fewer voluntary or involuntary admissions, or fewer outpatient emergency visits, than patients without such a plan.Multicenter randomized controlled trial with two intervention conditions and one control condition.Adult outpatients diagnosed with psychotic or bipolar disorder who had experienced at least one psychiatric crisis in the previous two years.Two types of advance statement were used: (1 a crisis plan formulated by the patient with the help of a patient advocate (Patient Advocate Crisis Plan: PACP; and (2 a crisis plan developed together with the clinician (Clinician-facilitated Crisis Plan: CCP.The percentages of patients admitted voluntarily or involuntarily (on an emergency basis or by court order, and the percentage who made outpatient emergency visits over an 18-month follow-up period.A total of 212 patients were included: 69 in the PACP condition, 70 in the CCP condition, and 73 in the control condition. No effects of the two interventions were found on the numbers of voluntary admissions, involuntary admissions and emergency visits. Regarding involuntary admissions, there was no significant effect on emergency admissions, which were 17% (12/69 in the PACP condition, 10% (7/70 in the CCP condition, and 19% (14/73 in the control condition. There was a significant effect on planned court-ordered admissions, with 16% (11/69 in the PACP condition, 10% (7/70 in the CCP condition, and 26% (19/73 in the control condition. Finally, the interventions had no effect on outpatient emergency visits, with 32% (22/69 in the PACP group, 31% (22/70 in the CCP group, and 34% (25/73 in the control group.Crisis plans may be an effective intervention for reducing court-ordered admissions in patients with psychotic and bipolar disorders.Current Controlled Trails NTR1166.

  3. The use of noncognitive factors in physician assistant admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, M Jane; Thrasher, Ashley; Hiatt, Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    To identify the most influential noncognitive factors valued in admissions processes by physician assistant (PA) programs throughout the United States, as well as the motivators for and barriers to using these factors. A literature search was performed using PubMed and the Journal of Physician Assistant Education to identify noncognitive factors that were reported to have an effect on admissions in various health professions. A survey was developed incorporating the most frequently identified factors and was electronically distributed to all program directors of the Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA). Respondents were asked to rank the noncognitive factors that were most valued by their program's admissions process as well as to rate motivators and barriers for the use of these noncognitive factors in admissions. Survey responses were anonymous but respondents reported program location by geographic region as defined by PAEA. There were 94 respondents from 154 programs surveyed (61% response rate). The five most influential noncognitive factors were faculty/staff/interviewer interactions, career motivation, knowledge of profession, maturity, and professionalism. The most important motivators for using noncognitive factors were identified as academic success and career success. All aforementioned factors and motivators did not vary based on PA program region (P > .05). The factors identified with the highest level of regional variance were leadership experience (P = .014), self-awareness (P = .034), cultural sensitivity (P = .022), undergraduate institution (P = .010), and peer interaction (P = .035). These study results will assist PA applicants in becoming more competitive and provide programs with additional factors for consideration in current admissions practices. Further considerations for research include correlating results to academic success as well as success on the Physician Assistant National Certifying Exam (PANCE).

  4. Deep brain stimulation for intractable psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Wayne K; Alterman, Ron L

    2012-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has virtually replaced ablative neurosurgery for use in medication-refractory movement disorders. DBS is now being studied in severe psychiatric conditions, such as treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and intractable obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Effects of DBS have been reported in ∼100 cases of OCD and ∼50 cases of TRD for seven (five common) anatomic targets. Although these published reports differ with respect to study design and methodology, the overall response rate appears to exceed 50% in OCD for some DBS targets. In TRD, >50% of patients responded during acute and long-term bilateral electrical stimulation in a different target. DBS was generally well tolerated in both OCD and TRD, but some unique, target- and stimulation-specific adverse effects were observed (e.g., hypomania). Further research is needed to test the efficacy and safety of DBS in psychiatric disorders, compare targets, and identify predictors of response.

  5. Hospital admissions for meningococcal infection in Spain (1997-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, J M San Roman; Prieto, R Gil; Alejandre, C Gomez; Meca, L Alvaro; Portugal, P; de Miguel, A Gil

    2009-01-01

    Spanish hospital surveillance system was analyzed to estimate the burden of hospital admissions for meningococcal infection in Spain during a nine-year period (1997-2005). Data were obtained from the national surveillance system for hospital data (Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos) maintained by the Ministry of Health and covering more than 95% of Spanish hospitals. There were 9480 hospital admissions for meningococcal infection (ICD 9 CM 036; any listed diagnosis) during the study period. Annual incidence was 2.66 cases per 100,000 population. Rate of death and case-fatality rate were 0.17 per 100,000 population and 6.45%, respectively. The average length of hospitalization was 11.2 days. Youngest age group showed the highest incidence and rate of death (43.15 and 1.17 per 100,000 population respectively in 0-4 years old group), but case-fatality rate was higher in the oldest group (12.16%; more than 30 years old group). The cost of acute hospital care is estimated to be on average 4470 euro per case, which imposes an annual direct cost of 3-5 million euro to the Spanish health system. Meningococcal infection is still an important cause of hospital admissions in Spain and results in large cost to the Health Care System.

  6. The influence of staffing on diagnostic yield of EMU admissions: a comparison study between two institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spritzer, Scott D; Pirotte, Benjamin D; Agostini, Susan D; Aniles, Ejerzain; Hentz, Joseph G; Noe, Katherine H; Drazkowski, Joseph F

    2014-12-01

    Patients with recurrent, stereotyped neurological events of unclear etiology often warrant admission for continuous video-EEG monitoring in an epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) for diagnosis. Epilepsy monitoring unit admission duration has been reported to range from days to weeks. To date, there are limited data on the average duration of admission for patients admitted to the EMU for spell classification. Many EMUs are forced to limit the overall duration of admission for numerous reasons including limited resources. It is unclear if a time-limited EMU stay reduces the event capture rate and, therefore, diagnostic yield of event classification admissions. The goal of this study was to determine how a time-limited length of stay strategy impacted event capture in patients admitted for spell classification. A retrospective chart review was performed at two comparable adult epilepsy monitoring units, Mayo Clinic Hospital (MCH) in Phoenix, Arizona, and Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center (BGSMC) in Phoenix, Arizona. Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center is only staffed Monday through Friday, thereby limiting the total possible duration of admission to five days. The goal was to determine if the rate of event capture differed between two institutions employing a time-limited EMU admission (BGSMC) when compared with the nonlimited admission (MCH). A total of 300 patient admissions at MCH and 260 patient admissions at BGSMC were reviewed over a comparable time period. The event capture rates at MCH and BGSMC were 74% and 72%, respectively. There was a greater percentage of patients with nonepileptic events (NEEs) at MCH than at BGSMC (62.7% vs. 47.3%). The mean duration until first event was 31h at MCH and 38 h at BGSMC. The mean length of stay was greater at MCH (4.5 days) when compared with BGSMC (3.3 days). The overall diagnostic yield of a time-limited EMU admission was similar to that of a nonlimited admission for the purpose of spell classification. There was a

  7. Increased Guillain-Barre syndrome admissions in Shiraz, southern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Anahid; Heydari, Seyed Taghi; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri

    2013-01-01

    Background Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an acute immune-mediated peripheral neuropathy usually after an incident. This study was performed to investigate the basic epidemiologic features of GBS in south of Iran. Methods We studied consecutive patients with GBS in Nemazi Hospital of Shiraz, southern Iran. Demographic characteristics of the subjects, i.e. age, sex, and length of hospital stay were extracted. Information regarding yearly admissions for the entire hospital was also gathered. The prevalence of GBS per 10,000 hospital admissions was calculated and stratified by sex and year. Yearly prevalence was compared using the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results From January 2000 to December 2009, 389 (232 males and 157 females) patients with GBS were admitted in our center. The mean age of patients was 29.8 ± 23.0 years and their mean length of hospital stay was 12.9 ± 11.6 days. The overall mortality rate was 6%. The ratio of admissions due to GBS to the total admissions was significantly higher in 2009, the year of an influenza A (H1N1) virus pandemic. Conclusion There appears to be an increase in the incidence of GBS in Shiraz. This is in parallel with the increasing trend of some other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24250891

  8. Selective Admission Tests and Students' Performances. Evidence from a Natural Experiment in a Large Italian University

    OpenAIRE

    Carrieri, Vincenzo; D'Amato, Marcello; Zotti, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Using a difference-in-differences approach, we exploit a quasi-experiment occurred in a large public university located in Southern Italy, to study whether the introduction of a selective admission test affects two indicators of students’ performances: dropout rate and grade point average (GPA). Our analysis shows that a change of regime to a more restrictive admission policy improves college performances, reducing the dropout rate of first year students by about 11% and increasing their grad...

  9. Refugee children have fewer contacts to psychiatric healthcare services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barghadouch, Amina; Kristiansen, Maria; Jervelund, Signe Smith

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Studies show a high level of mental health problems among refugee children. This study examined whether a subset of refugee children living in Denmark accessed psychiatric healthcare services more than those born in the country. Methods: This study compared 24,427 refugee children from...... and psychiatrists in private practice. Results: Between 1 January 1996 and 30 June 2012, 3.5 % of the refugee children accessed psychiatric healthcare services compared to 7.7 % of the Danish-born children. The rate ratio of having any first-time psychiatric contact was 0.42 (95 % CI 0.40–0.45) among refugee boys...... and 0.35 (95 % CI 0.33–0.37) among refugee girls, compared to Danish-born children. Figures were similar for those accessing private psychologists or psychiatrists, emergency room, inpatient and outpatient services. Conclusions: Refugee children used fewer psychiatric healthcare services than Danish...

  10. Psychiatric disorders in myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Inés Ybarra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG. METHOD: Forty-one patients with MG answered to a structured psychiatric interview (MINI-Plus. RESULTS: Eleven (26.1% patients were diagnosed with a depressive disorder and 19 (46.3% were diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Patients with dysthymia were older (p=0.029 and had longer disease duration (p=0.006. Patients with social phobia also had longer disease duration (p=0.039. CONCLUSION: Psychiatric disorders in MG are common, especially depressive and anxiety disorders.

  11. The cerebellum and psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph ePhillips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum has been considered for a long time to play a role solely in motor coordination. However, studies over the past two decades have shown that the cerebellum also plays a key role in many motor, cognitive, and emotional processes. In addition, studies have also shown that the cerebellum is implicated in many psychiatric disorders including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. In this review, we discuss existing studies reporting cerebellar dysfunction in various psychiatric disorders. We will also discuss future directions for studies linking the cerebellum to psychiatric disorders.

  12. [Qualitative methods in psychiatric research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Claudia; Glaesmer, Heide

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the usage of qualitative methods in psychiatric research and presents the qualitative approach in more detail. Recent original empirical work of a German psychiatric journal was systematically reviewed. Methods used to collect and analyse the information are detailed. One third of the articles used a solely qualitative research design. One further article applied a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Three kinds of the qualitative interviews were used (in depth, narrative and problem-focussed interview). Additionally, focus groups (group discussions) and qualitative content analysis were applied by studies. Qualitative approaches are an integral part of psychiatric research. Further work should assure to use adequate sampling strategies.

  13. Reduction of pediatric emergency hospital admissions by a change in pediatric emergency department policy

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    Marzouq A Alazmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reduction in admissions is an important aim of emergency department working policy to overcome the problems of a shortage of inpatient beds, rising costs and exhausted resources. A new policy was instituted in the pediatric emergency department (PED of a hospital in Kuwait with the following components: (1 assigning senior doctor staff (2 implementation of new disease management guidelines; and (3 maximizing the use of the pediatric emergency department observation unit. Objective: to evaluate the effect of change in our policy on the admission rate. Materials and Methods: The effects of this policy on reduction of admission rates for total pediatric admissions and for some selected common pediatric conditions were prospectively studied over a period of 3 years from institution of the policy and compared with the 3-year period before the policy was instituted. Results: There was a significant reduction in admission rates after institution of the new policy. The proportion of hospital admissions to PED observation unit cases was significantly reduced as a whole from 64.9% ± 5.1% to 33.2 ± 0.6% and also for the common pediatric problems studied. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary pediatric emergency department policy, using as much available evidence as possible, was successful in significantly reducing pediatric hospital admissions.

  14. [Current issues in psychiatric ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, József

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzes some ethical problems in psychiatry that have been emerging in recent years. It deals with the ongoing intensive debates about the DSM-5 before its publication, and with some of the criticisms of the DSM-5 itself. Then it goes on to analyze the use of placebo. This is followed by the ethical problems of the treatment of ADHD with stimulant drugs, among which one is the question of authenticity, namely whether the pre-treatment or the post-treatment personality is the real, authentic self of the patient. This question has been raised not only in the case of the ADHD, but also in relation with the antidepressant treatment of depression earlier, and in relation with deep brain stimulation and dopamine replacement therapy now, all of which causes changes in the treated patient's personality and motivations. Finally the article describes some ethical problems of informed consent in the case of antidepressant medication, together with the necessity to involve psychiatric nurses and rating scales in the assessment of the patient's decision making capacity.

  15. Rabeprazole and psychiatric symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Giovanni; Cutroneo, Paola; Gallo, Adele; Gallo, Salvatore; Spina, Edoardo; Caputi, Achille P

    2007-07-01

    To report the case of a patient who developed marked anxiety associated with episodes of panic attacks after starting rabeprazole therapy. An otherwise healthy 55-year-old woman was prescribed rabeprazole 20 mg/day administered in the morning for persistent symptoms of dyspepsia. Ten days later, she presented with a 7 day history of marked anxiety associated with panic attacks, night terror (pavor nocturnus), episodic mental confusion, and attention deficit. Within 2 days of discontinuing rabeprazole, the patient recovered completely from the neuropsychiatric manifestations. Subsequent esomeprazole therapy did not cause psychiatric symptoms. Rabeprazole-induced hypergastrinemia may have played a role in this neuropsychiatric adverse reaction. Several lines of evidence have indicated that gastrin-releasing peptide, whose release is mediated by proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced secretion of gastrin, is involved in regulating aspects of behavior that might be altered in disorders such as anxiety, depression, and dementia. The fact that rabeprazole has the highest capacity of inducing gastrin increase compared with other PPIs might explain why our patient's panic symptoms disappeared after switching to esomeprazole. Based on the Naranjo probability scale, rabeprazole was the probable cause of the adverse reaction. Specific studies are needed to investigate the potential role of PPI-induced hypergastrinemia in neuropsychiatric adverse reactions.

  16. Demographic, seasonal, and spatial differences in acute myocardial infarction admissions to hospital in Melbourne Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholls Neville

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seasonal patterns in cardiac disease in the northern hemisphere are well described in the literature. More recently age and gender differences in cardiac mortality and to a lesser extent morbidity have been presented. To date spatial differences between the seasonal patterns of cardiac disease has not been presented. Literature relating to seasonal patterns in cardiac disease in the southern hemisphere and in Australia in particular is scarce. The aim of this paper is to describe the seasonal, age, gender, and spatial patterns of cardiac disease in Melbourne Australia by using acute myocardial infarction admissions to hospital as a marker of cardiac disease. Results There were 33,165 Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI admissions over 2186 consecutive days. There is a seasonal pattern in AMI admissions with increased rates during the colder months. The peak month is July. The admissions rate is greater for males than for females, although this difference decreases with advancing age. The maximal AMI season for males extends from April to November. The difference between months of peak and minimum admissions was 33.7%. Increased female AMI admissions occur from May to November, with a variation between peak and minimum of 23.1%. Maps of seasonal AMI admissions demonstrate spatial differences. Analysis using Global and Local Moran's I showed increased spatial clustering during the warmer months. The Bivariate Moran's I statistic indicated a weaker relationship between AMI and age during the warmer months. Conclusion There are two distinct seasons with increased admissions during the colder part of the year. Males present a stronger seasonal pattern than females. There are spatial differences in AMI admissions throughout the year that cannot be explained by the age structure of the population. The seasonal difference in AMI admissions warrants further investigation. This includes detailing the prevalence of cardiac disease in the

  17. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology survey

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    Russo Federico

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management. The aims of this paper are: (i to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46% showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%, than in aggression toward other people (20%. A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%, followed by depression (16% and personality disorders (14%, and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge, while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge. Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%. Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self

  18. Lesion procedures in psychiatric neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shaun R; Aronson, Joshua P; Sheth, Sameer A; Eskandar, Emad N

    2013-01-01

    Lesion procedures for psychiatric indications have a history that spans more than a century. This review provides a brief history of psychiatric surgery and addresses the most recent literature on lesion surgery for the treatment of anxiety and mood disorders. Relevant data described in publications from the early 1900 s through the modern era regarding lesion procedures for psychiatric indications, both historical and current use, are reported. The early procedures of Burkhardt, Moniz, and Freeman are reviewed, followed by descriptions of the more refined techniques of Leksell, Knight, Foltz, White, and Kelly. The application of lesion procedures to obsessive-compulsive disorder, mood disorders, and addiction are discussed. Lesioning procedures have informed modern deep brain stimulation targets. Recent lesioning studies demonstrate the efficacy and durability of these procedures in severely disabled patients. Judicious application of these techniques should continue for appropriately selected patients with severe, refractory psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Psychiatric disorders in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Ingmar

    2011-07-01

    Recent research has shown that depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosis are more common than previously supposed in elderly populations without dementia. It is unclear whether the frequency of these disorders increases or decreases with age. Clinical expression of psychiatric disorders in old age may be different from that seen in younger age groups, with less and often milder symptoms. Concurrently, comorbidity between different psychiatric disorders is immense, as well as comorbidity with somatic disorders. Cognitive function is often decreased in people with depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosis, but whether these disorders are risk factors for dementia is unclear. Psychiatric disorders in the elderly are often related to cerebral neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular disease, although psychosocial risk factors are also important. Psychiatric disorders, common among the elderly, have consequences that include social deprivation, poor quality of life, cognitive decline, disability, increased risk for somatic disorders, suicide, and increased nonsuicidal mortality.

  20. Admission, management and outcomes of acute pancreatitis in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Peter S; Mittal, Anhubav; Brown, Lisa; McArthur, Colin; Phillips, Anthony J R; Petrov, Max; Windsor, John A

    2017-12-01

    A review of the management of acute pancreatitis (AP) at a tertiary intensive care unit (ICU) in Auckland, New Zealand, was published in 2004. This paper aims to update this series and identify changes in admission criteria, management and outcomes. A retrospective review of patients admitted to the Department of Critical Care Medicine, Auckland City Hospital, with AP from 2003 to 2014 was undertaken and data compared with the previous study (1988-2001). Eighty-four patients (male 53, mean ± SD age = 56.9 ± 15 years) with 85 admissions to ICU from 2003 to 2014 were compared with 112 patients in the previous study. Maori were over-represented. Median duration of symptoms prior to admission to ICU decreased from 7 to 3 days. The proportion of total AP patients admitted to ICU halved and the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score on admission decreased from mean 19.9 ± 8.2 SD to 15.4 ± 7.3 (P < 0.001). Two thirds of patients had persistent organ failure. The use of enteral feeding doubled from 46/112 (41%) to 71/85 (84%) (P < 0.001). The use of primary percutaneous drainage increased from 14/112 (13%) to 24/85 (28%) (P = 0.007). Rate of necrosectomy was similar (36/112 (32%) versus 20/85 (24%), P = 0.205), although minimally invasive necrosectomy was introduced. Overall hospital mortality decreased by 29% (P = 0.198). There have been changes to the admission criteria and management in line with evolving guidelines and, overall, outcomes have improved. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.