WorldWideScience

Sample records for psoriatic arthritis research

  1. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  2. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Language Publications Portal en espanol Community Outreach Initiative Menu Menu Close Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases Ankylosing Spondylitis ... Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy Open Source Data Public Data Listing NIH... ...

  3. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also can cause tender spots where tendons and ligaments join onto bones. This condition, called enthesitis, can ... will help to avoid undue stress on feet, ankles, or knees affected by arthritis. An exercise bike ...

  4. Epidemiology of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Salvarani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies on psoriatic arthritis have long been hampered by the absence of widely accepted classification criteria. The development of the CASPAR (ClASsification criteria for Psoriatic ARthritis criteria has recently provided the framework for conducting epidemiological studies in psoriatic arthritis using uniform recruitment criteria. However, so far, only a minority of studies have adopted such criteria. In addition to the lack of shared classification criteria, differences in study settings, designs, and ascertainment methods have contributed to yield substantial disparities in the estimates of the incidence (from 3,02 to 23,1 cases per 100,000 people and prevalence (from 49,1 to 420 cases per 100,000 people of psoriatic arthritis around the globe. Overall, the available data suggests that the prevalence of psoriasis in the general population is approximately 2-3%, with about a third of patients with psoriasis having arthritis. Therefore, psoriatic arthritis may affect 0,3- 1,0% of the population, a frequency not dissimilar from that of rheumatoid arthritis. Future epidemiological studies should be carried out in larger numbers of patients diagnosed using consistent criteria.

  5. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  6. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI); other modalities such as computed tomography are not used routinely. Imaging is an integral part of management of PsA. In this article, we provide an overview of the status, virtues, and limitations of imaging modalities in PsA, focusing on radiography, US, and MRI.......Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...

  7. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  8. Psoriatic arthritis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ferrer, A; Laiz-Alonso, A

    2014-12-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis and clinical aspects of the disease justify the present review. Studies have identified common inflammatory pathways related to the innate immune response, such as the IL-12/IL-23 axis, along with numerous genes that affect susceptibility to both diseases and influence phenotypic development. Interest has grown in biomarkers that can be used for early diagnosis or prognosis or to predict joint destruction and the response to treatment. Recent reports describe important differences between the effects of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics on the process of new bone formation. Other issues that have been discussed include the need for reliable screening methods, particularly for early detection of oligoarticular arthritis, and for protocols to guide referral to specialists, especially in newly created multidisciplinary practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment recommendations for psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchlin, C T; Kavanaugh, A; Gladman, D D; Mease, P J; Helliwell, P; Boehncke, W-H; de Vlam, K; Fiorentino, D; Fitzgerald, O; Gottlieb, A B; McHugh, N J; Nash, P; Qureshi, A A; Soriano, E R; Taylor, W J

    2009-09-01

    To develop comprehensive recommendations for the treatment of the various clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) based on evidence obtained from a systematic review of the literature and from consensus opinion. Formal literature reviews of treatment for the most significant discrete clinical manifestations of PsA (skin and nails, peripheral arthritis, axial disease, dactylitis and enthesitis) were performed and published by members of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). Treatment recommendations were drafted for each of the clinical manifestations by rheumatologists, dermatologists and PsA patients based on the literature reviews and consensus opinion. The level of agreement for the individual treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members was assessed with an online questionnaire. Treatment recommendations were developed for peripheral arthritis, axial disease, psoriasis, nail disease, dactylitis and enthesitis in the setting of PsA. In rotal, 19 recommendations were drafted, and over 80% agreement was obtained on 16 of them. In addition, a grid that factors disease severity into each of the different disease manifestations was developed to help the clinician with treatment decisions for the individual patient from an evidenced-based perspective. Treatment recommendations for the cardinal physical manifestations of PsA were developed based on a literature review and consensus between rheumatologists and dermatologists. In addition, a grid was established to assist in therapeutic reasoning and decision making for individual patients. It is anticipated that periodic updates will take place using this framework as new data become available.

  10. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  11. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  12. Nail involvement in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewski, Piotr; Walecka, Irena; Dopytalska, Klaudia

    2017-01-01

    Nail psoriasis is considered a significant psychological and social problem causing functional impairment in affected patients. Nail changes hamper their daily and occupational activities and contribute to a worse quality of life. Almost 50% of patients with psoriasis vulgaris and up to 80% of patients with psoriatic arthritis are afflicted with nail lesions. The important correlation between psoriatic arthritis and nail changes is well established - the presence of the latter is a strong predictor of the development of arthritis. There is a broad spectrum of nail dystrophies associated with psoriasis, ranging from the common pitting, subungual hyperkeratosis and loosening of the nail plate to less frequent discolouration and splinter haemorrhages. Some of these symptoms are also observed in other nail diseases, and further diagnostics should be performed. The assessment tools NAPSI (Nail Psoriasis Severity Index), mNAPSI (Modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index), and PNSS (Psoriasis Nail Severity Score) are most commonly used to grade the severity of nail involvement in psoriasis and enable the evaluation of therapy effectiveness. The treatment of nail psoriasis is a major clinical challenge. It should be adjusted to the extent of dermal, articular and ungual lesions. Systemic therapies of psoriasis, especially biological agents, are most likely to be effective in treating nail psoriasis. However, as their use is limited in scope and safety, topical therapy remains a mainstay, and the combination of corticosteroids and vitamin D3 analogues is considered to be most helpful.

  13. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiovascular involvement in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. De Gennaro Colonna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, genetically determined and immunomediated inflammatory skin disease that affects 2-3% of the Caucasian population. A considerable proportion of these patients develop a form of inflammatory arthritis known as psoriatic arthritis (PsA, although the prevalence of this has not been well defined. Patients with PsA have a higher mortality rate than the general population and the risk of mortality is related to disease severity at the time of presentation. Endothelial dysfunction and early atherosclerosis have been found in patients with PsA without any cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, and experts believe that CVD is one of the leading causes of death, as it is in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Various disease-related mechanisms may be involved in the development of premature vascular damage in both cases, including an increased synthesis of proinflammatory mediators (such as cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules, autoantibodies against endothelial cell components, perturbations in T-cell subsets, genetic polymorphisms, hyperhomocysteinemia, oxidative stress, abnormal vascular repair, and iatrogenic factors. In a recent study of 22 patients with PsA without any signs of CVD, we found that the plasma concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA levels were significantly high and coronary flow reserve (CFR was significantly reduced. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between CFR and plasma ADMA levels in the PsA group. The significant correlation between the reduced CRF and increased ADMA levels suggests that, like patients with early RA, PsA patients suffer from endothelial dysfunction and impaired coronary microcirculation. Active PsA is a risk factor for CVD, and so PsA patients should be screened for subclinical forms of the disease and its risk factors, and an early treatment approach should be adopted.

  15. Fatigue - an underestimated symptom in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena; Owczarczyk-Saczonek, Agnieszka; Placek, Waldemar

    2017-01-01

    The nature of fatigue is very complex and involves physiological, psychological and social phenomena at the same time, and the mechanisms leading to occurrence and severity of fatigue are still poorly understood. The condition of chronic inflammation associated with psoriatic arthritis can be regarded as a potential factor affecting development of fatigue. Only a few studies so far have focused on the occurrence of fatigue in psoriatic arthritis. The problem of chronic fatigue is underestimated in everyday clinical practice. Identification and analysis of subjective fatigue components in each patient can provide an objective basis for optimal fatigue treatment in daily practice. This review presents a definition of chronic fatigue and describes mechanisms that may be associated with development of fatigue, highlighting the role of chronic inflammation, selected fatigue measurement methods and relations of fatigue occurrence with clinical aspects of psoriatic arthritis.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foreign invaders (such as viruses and bacteria). Each HLA gene has many different normal variations, allowing each person's ... wide range of foreign proteins. Variations of several HLA genes seem to affect the risk of developing psoriatic ...

  17. Temporomandibular joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis | Okkesim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriasis is a chronic, papulosquamous, and an inflammatory skin disease. It has been found that between 5% and 24% of patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PA) at the same time after or even prior to skin findings. The involvement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition. In this report, a-46-year-old male ...

  18. Etanercept in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, L; López-Ferrer, A; Laiz, A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present review is to provide an update on the most important recent studies on the use of etanercept in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Using various assessment tools, such as the Disease Activity Score 28-joint count (DAS28), the PsA Response Criteria (PsARC), and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) score, several authors have shown that etanercept can reduce the signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis and inhibit radiographic progression in studies with follow-up periods of up to 2 years. There is evidence that etanercept is effective in the treatment of psoriatic enthesitis, dactylitis, and axial joint disease as well as in disease affecting the skin and nails. In clinical trials, etanercept had a safety profile similar to that of placebo and this profile did not change over time. Cost-effectiveness models have found etanercept to be the most cost-effective tumor necrosis factor inhibitor in patients with psoriatic arthritis and mild to moderate psoriasis. Etanercept has a favorable risk-benefit profile in the short term. The concomitant use of methotrexate does not alter etanercept survival. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  19. Psoriatic arthritis: treatment strategies using biologic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Palazzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA includes NSAIDs, corticosteroids and DMARDs. Advancement in the knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of PsA has been associated with the development of biologic agents which have revolutionized the management of the disease. Among biologics drugs, there are the 4 currently availablee anti-TNFα blocking agents (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab and golimumab which are more effective than traditional DMARDs on symptoms/signs of inflammation, quality of life, function, and in inhibiting the progression of the structural joint damage. Despite of the high cost, TNF inhibitors are costeffective on both the musculoskeletal and skin manifestations of psoriatic disease.

  20. Psoriatic Arthritis with Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P Syamasundara; Pattabhiraman, V

    1979-01-01

    Six cases of p-,oriatic arthritis are presented with clinical, laboratory and radiological features and review of literature. Four out of six cases are 'distal arthrits' and two cases are arthritis mufilans of long duration. All our cases are males and hence no case of rheumatoid variety, which is common in females, is being reported. The aim of this paper is to represent all the parameters for this study of psoriatic arthritis namely clinical, laboratory and radiological features, which are not well documented in Indian literature.

  1. Psoriatic Arthritis with Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Syamasundara Rao

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Six cases of p-,oriatic arthritis are presented with clinical, laboratory and radiological features and review of literature. Four out of six cases are ′distal arthrits′ and two cases are arthritis mufilans of long duration. All our cases are males and hence no case of rheumatoid variety, which is common in females, is being reported. The aim of this paper is to represent all the parameters for this study of psoriatic arthritis namely clinical, laboratory and radiological features, which are not well documented in Indian literature.

  2. [Active psoriatic arthritis during pregnancy: challenges and limitations of pharmacotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Misterska-Skóra, Maria; Wiland, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Cases of psoriatic arthritis coexisting with pregnancy are sparse and therefore little is known about the fetal effect of medication in women with psoriatic arthritis. As a rule, drugs and dosages are minimized in these patients. Among disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, cyclosporine and sulphasalazine are preferred. Methotrexate and leflunomide are strictly contraindicated and must be withdrawn 3 months or 2 years, respectively, before a pregnancy is planned. Psoriatic arthritis may be treated during pregnancy with glucocorticosteroids, especially with prednisone or prednisolone. We present the case ofa 40-year-old gravida with psoriatic arthritis which exacerbated during the first trimester of pregnancy. Therapeutic implications in such cases are discussed.

  3. Therapy for psoriatic arthritis with infliximab

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Badokin; Yu. L. Korsakova; V G Barskova; M S Eliseyev; F M Kudayeva

    2009-01-01

    Objective: to study the efficacy and tolerability of infliximab (Remicade) in the major syndromes of psoriatic arthritis (PA). Subjects and methods. The study was based on Remicade therapy in 22 patients with severe and moderate PA with polyarthritic, osteolytic and spondyloarthritic types of the joint syndrome, generalized psoriasis vulgar and erythrodermata, and pustular psoriasis. Inflammatory activity was determined by DAS 4 and the efficiency of therapy was evaluated by the ACR and EULAR...

  4. Psoriatic arthritis management update - biotherapeutic options.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saber, Tajvur P

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a seronegative spondyloarthropathy (SpA) occurring in up to 30% of patients with psoriasis. It has a wide variation of annual incidence (median 6.4, range 0.1-3.1 per 10(5) people), based on analysis of 13 incidence and prevalence reviews published between 1987 and December 2006. Conventional treatments with antiinflammatory and disease modifying or antirheumatic drugs are not efficacious in all patients, in particular those with axial disease. This review examines new pharmacological developments in the treatment of PsA with a focus on biologic therapies.

  5. Comorbidities in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Haddad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA are often affected by numerous comorbidities that carry significant morbidity and mortality. Reported comorbidities include diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune eye disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, depression, and fibromyalgia. All health care providers for patients with PsA should recognize and monitor those comorbidities, as well as understand their effect on patient management to ensure an optimal clinical outcome.

  6. Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Y. Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. In addition to skin and joint involvement, there is increasing evidence suggesting that patients with PsA also have an increase in risk of clinical and subclinical cardiovascular diseases, mostly due to accelerating atherosclerosis. Both conventional and nonconventional cardiovascular risk factors contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in PsA. Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in PsA, acting independently and/or synergistically with the conventional risk factors. In this paper, we discuss the current literature indicating that patients with PsA are at risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  7. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Psoriasis is widely diffused in the World, with the exception of a few populations, such as the natives from Alaska and Australia, where it is unknown. Its average prevalence is about 3-4%. This is probably an underestimate, for it is mostly based on self-reports. In fact, on the one hand minimal psoriasis, e.g. nail disease, could remain undiagnosed; on the other, precise classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis (PsA are lacking and the skin disease is often of elusive nature. The frequency of PsA may be higher than commonly believed, as suggested by recent studies reporting a prevalence of up to 0.42%. There are no major differences in the frequency of psoriasis between sexes, nor specific time trends. Indirect data suggest that PsA may be more frequent in the old than in the new World, a point that could be clarified only by standardized international studies. In practice, both psoriasis and PsA are relatively common conditions, with major impact on the patients’quality of life, and requiring appropriate intervention strategies. An important advance should be the adoption of univocal definitions of psoriasis and PsA, including guidelines for patterns of skin and joint involvement. Key words: Epidemiology, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis

  8. Management of psoriatic arthritis: Early diagnosis, monitoring of disease severity and cutting edge therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Wilken, Reason; Sukhov, Andrea C; Raychaudhuri, Smriti K; Maverakis, Emanual

    2017-01-01

    Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) will be discussed. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A sonographic spectrum of psoriatic arthritis: "the five targets".

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gutierrez, Marwin

    2010-02-01

    Ultrasound is a rapidly evolving technique that is gaining an increasing success in the assessment of psoriatic arthritis. Most of the studies have been aimed at investigating its ability in the assessment of joints, tendons, and entheses in psoriatic arthritis patients. Less attention has been paid to demonstrate the potential of ultrasound in the evaluation of skin and nail. The aim of this pictorial essay was to show the main high-frequency grayscale and power Doppler ultrasound findings in patients with psoriatic arthritis at joint, tendon, enthesis, skin, and nail level.

  10. Prevalence of eye disease in Brazilian patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda B. F. de Lima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to report the type and frequency of ocular manifestations in Brazilian psoriatic arthritis patients. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a Brazilian tertiary hospital. The test group included 40 patients who had psoriatic arthritis according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis. A control group of 40 individuals was matched for age and gender. All of the patients underwent ophthalmic evaluation, which included best-corrected visual acuity, slit lamp and fundus examinations, and dry eye diagnostic tests (Schirmer I, tear breakup time and rose bengal. Demographic parameters were also evaluated. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 53.9±13.1 years; the mean disease duration was 8±10.5 years. Most of the patients were women (60%, and the majority had polyarticular disease (57.5%. Several ocular abnormalities were found, including punctate keratitis, pinguecula, blepharitis, pterygium, cataract, glaucoma, uveitis, and retinal microvascular abnormalities. There were no significant differences in the rates of these abnormalities compared with the control group, however. The Keratoconjunctivitis sicca and dry eye diagnostic tests were more often positive in the patients with psoriatic arthritis than in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, keratoconjunctivitis sicca was the most common ocular finding related to psoriatic arthritis. Therefore, we recommend early ophthalmologic evaluations for all psoriatic arthritis patients who complain of eye symptoms.

  11. CLINICAL HETEROGENEITY OF EARLY PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the characteristic symptoms and syndromes of early-stage psoriatic arthritis (ePsA, which are pivotal to its early diagnosis.Patients and methods. Fifty-one patients with a PsA duration of less than 2 years (mean 12 months were examined. The diagnosis of PsA was established on the basis of the conventional CASPAR criteria and the Russian criteria developed by the expert method. The conventional current criteria, including the number of tender and swollen joints, DAS28, values of acute-phase indicators, were used to detect inflammatory activity. Skin syndrome was evaluated using the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI. X-ray study of the hands, distal and proximal feet, pelvis, and other involved joints and MRI of the distal hands/feet were performed. The Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Enthesitis Score (MASES and reduced GUESS were used to assess enthesopathy.Results. The types of articular syndrome in ePsA were identified in accordance of the duration of the disease. The authors determined the characteristic features of arthritis, spondylitis, enthesitis, and dactylitis, their diagnostic value and associations with other manifestations in the first 2 years of PsA. There was a relationship of dermatitis and psoriatic onychopathy to the clinical picture of articular syndrome.Conclusion. ePsA is characterized by marked heterogeneity of articular syndrome with predominantly mono/oligoarthritic and polyarthritic articular syndrome. The significant signs are enthesitis and dactylitis, which serve as risk factors for the unfavorable course of the disease. 

  12. Subpopulations Within Juvenile Psoriatic Arthritis: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Stoll

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The presentation of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA has long been recognized to be clinically heterogeneous. As the definition of JPsA expanded to accommodate atypical manifestations of psoriasis in young children, studies began to reflect an increasingly clear biphasic distribution of age of onset, with peaks in the first few years of life and again in early adolescence. These two subpopulations differ in gender ratio, pattern of joint involvement, laboratory findings and potentially response to therapy. Intriguingly, a similar distribution of age of onset has been observed in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA, and correlates with patterns of HLA association. While a secure classification of subpopulations within JPsA awaits improved pathophysiologic understanding, future research must consider the possibility that different disease mechanisms may be operative in distinct subsets of patients with this disorder.

  13. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis. The study group included 112 patients (56 men, 56 women; median age 49.7±12 years) with psoriasis, 25 of them were affected by psoriatic arthritis. A group of 112 subjects without psoriasis (56 men, 56 women; median age 47.7±17 years) served as controls. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were evaluated according to the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Psoriasis patients were subgrouped according to the presence/absence of psoriatic arthritis and by gender, to assess the prevalence of traditional symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders. Patients with psoriasis, and to an even greater extent those with psoriatic arthritis, were more frequently affected by symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders, including an internal temporomandibular joint opening derangement than healthy subjects. A statistically significant increase in symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, in opening derangement, bruxism and sounds of temporomandibular joint was found in patients with psoriatic arthritis as compared with psoriasis patients without arthritis and controls. psoriasis seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders, causing an increase in orofacial pain and an altered chewing function.

  14. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: The study group included 112 patients (56 men, 56 women; median age 49.7±12 years) with psoriasis, 25 of them were affected by psoriatic arthritis. A group of 112 subjects without psoriasis (56 men, 56 women; median age 47.7±17 years) served as controls. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were evaluated according to the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Psoriasis patients were subgrouped according to the presence/absence of psoriatic arthritis and by gender, to assess the prevalence of traditional symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders. RESULTS: Patients with psoriasis, and to an even greater extent those with psoriatic arthritis, were more frequently affected by symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders, including an internal temporomandibular joint opening derangement than healthy subjects. A statistically significant increase in symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, in opening derangement, bruxism and sounds of temporomandibular joint was found in patients with psoriatic arthritis as compared with psoriasis patients without arthritis and controls. CONCLUSIONS: psoriasis seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders, causing an increase in orofacial pain and an altered chewing function. PMID:26019683

  15. [Cardiovascular risk factors in psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebrov, A P; Nikitina, N M; Gaĭdukova, I Z

    2011-01-01

    To study the role of conventional and new factors of cardiovascular risk in development of atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PA). Sixty patients with psoriatic arthritis, 414 RA patients and 79 healthy controls entered the trial. All of them had no manifestations of cardiovascular diseases. Screening was made of the leading risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular complications, thickness of the complex intima-media (TIM) of the carotid arteries, vascular wall stiffness were measured, vasoregulatory function of the endothelium, markers of endothelial damage were examined. Patients with psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis were found to have increased TIM of the carotid arteries, high incidence of atherosclerotic plaques, increased stiffness, damage of the vascular wall, affected endothelial vasoregulation. These alterations were associated with high arthritis activity, systemic manifestations, seropositivity by rheumatoid factor (in RA), presence of entesitis, uveitis and dactilitis (in psoriatic arthritis), dislipidemia, arterial hypertension (AH). To determine cardiovascular risk in patients with arthritis, it is necessary to consider not only standard risk factors (dislipidemia and AH), but also severity of systemic inflammation, arterial stiffness, endothelial damage and ability of the vascular wall to relax reflecting endothelial dysfunction.

  16. Adverse effects of methotrexate in three psoriatic arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maejima, Hideki; Watarai, Akira; Nakano, Toshiaki; Katayama, Chieko; Nishiyama, Hiromi; Katsuoka, Kensei

    2014-04-01

    Methotrexate, a folic acid analogue with anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effects, is commonly used to treat patients with severe destructive psoriatic arthritis and has considerable efficacy. Combined anti-tumor necrosis factor and MTX therapy result in less treatment discontinuation due to adverse events. Despite its efficacy, MTX may result in adverse effects including hepatic, pulmonary, and renal toxicity as well as lymphoproliferative disorders and predisposition to infection. We herein report rare adverse effects of MTX treatment, specifically asymptomatic pulmonary tuberculosis, renal cell carcinoma, and lateral uveitis, in three psoriatic arthritis patients treated with MTX. MTX is an important drug for the treatment for psoriatic arthritis patient, but an awareness of the possible adverse effects is needed.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News Psoriatic Arthritis News Ankylosing Spondylitis News ...

  18. Psoriatic Arthritis and Diabetes: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreiher, Jacob; Freud, Tamar; Cohen, Arnon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Diabetes has been associated with psoriasis, but little is known about the association between psoriatic arthritis and diabetes. Methods. Patients diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis by a rheumatologist were compared to age- and sex-matched patients without psoriatic arthritis regarding the prevalence of diabetes in a population-based cross-sectional study using logistic multivariate models. The study was performed utilizing the medical database of Clalit, the largest healthcare provider organization in Israel. Results. The study included 549 patients with psoriatic arthritis ≥21 years and 1,098 patients without psoriatic arthritis. The prevalence of diabetes in patients with psoriatic arthritis was increased as compared to the prevalence in patients without psoriatic arthritis (15.3% versus 10.7%, P value = 0.008). The difference was prominent among females (18.7% versus 10.3%, P < 0.001) but not among males (11.2% in patients with and without psoriatic arthritis, P = 1.000). In a multivariate analysis, psoriatic arthritis was associated with diabetes among females (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.02–2.52, P = 0.040) but not among males (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.42–1.22, P = 0.213). Conclusion. Our study suggests a possible association between psoriatic arthritis and diabetes in women. Women with psoriatic arthritis might be candidates for diabetes screening. PMID:23843781

  19. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Sundel, Robert P.; Kim, Susan [Harvard Medical School, Rheumatology Program, Division of Immunology and the Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  20. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of biological treatments for psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Eandi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory and possibly destructive form of arthritis; left untreated, psoriatic arthritis can be a progressively disabling disease. The arthritic manifestations often include debilitating disease of the hands and feet, as well as painful inflammation of the tendon insertions and arthritis of the spine. The most common treatments prescribed for the psoriatic arthritis are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, corticosteroids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Due to a recently suggested role of the tumour necrosis factor (TNFα in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis, new therapies specifically blocking TNFα have been investigated. Aim of the present study is to compare cost/effectiveness (CEA and cost/utility (CUA ratios of anti-TNF medications currently available on the Italian market: etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab. The evaluation was conducted through the development of a single Markov model. Clinical data were obtained from three Phase III trials attesting the clinical efficacy of the biological therapies. Both cost/effectiveness and cost/utility analysis were implemented through the deterministic evaluation and the probabilistic evaluation, in order to assess the convenience for the Italian National Healthcare Service. Adalimumab appears to be cost effective for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, especially considering the incremental cost/effectiveness ratio (ICER and the incremental cost/utility ratio (ICUR; the results suggest that ICER and ICUR values of adalimumab over etanercept is definitely lower than the maximum acceptable willingness-to-pay value. Moreover, compared with infliximab, adalimumab is less costly and more effective.

  1. Application of the GRAPPA psoriatic arthritis treatment recommendations in clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic disease presents with a complex array of clinical features, including peripheral synovitis and skin psoriasis, but there is also variable involvement of the nail, dactylitis, enthesitis, and spinal disease. Composite assessment of disease activity and response taking into account the impact of the disease as a whole on an individual\\'s health and quality of life is of vital importance. Following an extensive literature review, discussions, and consensus, the Group for Research in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) published guidelines to help clinicians make treatment decisions. The utility of these guidelines in routine clinical practice is further enhanced by incorporating them into a Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI). The potential application of the CPDAI in typical psoriatic disease patients is presented and discussed. Validation and possible modification of a composite disease activity and responder index is currently being undertaken by GRAPPA.

  2. PsoriaticArthritis among Psoriasis Patients Attending Skin Clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Psoriasis is an autoimmune inflammatory disease which primarily affects the skin but joints may also be targeted. Psoriatic arthritis is a destructive inflammatory arthropathy and ensethopathy which is considered to be rare in sub Saharan Africa. Left untreated the condition is permanently disabling. There are ...

  3. Impaired dendritic cell proinflammatory cytokine production in psoriatic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenink, M.H.; Santegoets, K.C.M.; Butcher, J.; Bon, L. van; Lamers-Karnebeek, F.B.G.; Berg, W.B. van den; Riel, P.L. van; McInnes, I.B.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) remains poorly understood. The underlying chronic inflammatory immune response is thought to be triggered by unknown environmental factors potentially arising from a defective immune function. We undertook this study to determine whether an

  4. Risk of periodontitis in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeberg, A; Mallbris, L; Gislason, G; Hansen, P R; Mrowietz, U

    2017-02-01

    Psoriasis and periodontitis are chronic inflammatory disorders with overlapping inflammatory pathways, but data on risk of periodontitis in psoriasis are scarce and a possible pathogenic link is poorly understood. We investigated the association between psoriasis and periodontitis in a nationwide cohort study. All Danish individuals aged ≥18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2011 (n = 5,470,428), including 54 210 and 6988 patients with mild and severe psoriasis, and 6428 with psoriatic arthritis, were linked through administrative registers. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression. Incidence rates of periodontitis per 10 000 person-years were 3.07 (3.03-3.12), 5.89 (1.07-6.84), 8.27 (5.50-12.45) and 11.12 (7.87-15.73) for the reference population, mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis respectively. Adjusted IRRs were (1.66; 1.43-1.94) for mild psoriasis, (2.24; 1.46-3.44) for severe psoriasis and (3.48; 2.46-4.92) for psoriatic arthritis. Similar results were found when a case-control design was applied. We found a significant psoriasis-associated increased risk of periodontitis, which was highest in patients with severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  5. Psoriatic arthritis: An assessment of clinical, biochemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a well-documented clinical entity,[1] epidemiological, clinical and radiological studies of. South African (SA) patients are scarce. There are, in fact, no published data regarding the prevalence and incidence of PsA in the SA population. In 1973, Moll and Wright[1] defined PsA as an.

  6. Nail Assessment in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (NAPPA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustin, M; Blome, C; Costanzo, A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Existing tools for nail psoriasis are complex and may not adequately measure outcomes that are important to patients. OBJECTIVES: We have developed and validated a new tool, the Nail Assessment in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (NAPPA), with three components: a questionnaire assess...

  7. Psoriatic arthritis: A retrospective study of 162 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in the patients with psoriasis and to analyze retrospectively the results of a 34-year multidisciplinary management of the patients with psoriatic arthritis. Methods. The study included 162 out of 183 treated patients with psoriatic arthritis, aged 48 ± 15 years. All the patients satisfied the current diagnostic criteria for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology. Results. Psoriatic arthritis developed in 183 (9.3% out of 1976 patients with psoriasis. Time interval for establishing the diagnosis was 4 years. A positive family history of the disease had 15.0% of the studied patients. Its onset was most often at 42 years of age in 70.4% of the cases, and 2 months to 59 years after the appearance of psoriasis. Psoriatic arthritis without psoriasis appeared in 1.8% of the patients. A severe form of arthritis had 64.2% of the patients, mainly the patients with scalp psoriasis (χ2=3.2; p<0.05. Nail changes had 35% of the patients. Distal interphalangeal joints were involved in 63.6%, axial skeleton in 36.4%, oligoarthritis in 45.0%, polyarthritis in 55.0%, and mutilating form in 6.8% of the patients. Elevated Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate was reveald in 61.7% of the patients. Immunoglobulin M (IgM rheumatoid factor was altered in 4.3% of the patients. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA typing in the 28 patients were: A2 32.0%, A3 18.0%, Al and A9 14.0%, A28 and A29 3.5%, B8 and B16 14.0%, B5 and B12 11.0%, B13,B15, B18, B27 and B35 7.0%. Radiologic changes were most often in hand and foot joints, less frequently in the knees and quite infrequently in hips and shoulders joints. Sacroiliitis was found in 46.4% of the patients. Psoriasis was treated with topical corticosteroids and salicylic ointments in all the patients, ultraviolet (PUVA therapy in 5.6% and retinoids in 4.3% of them. Artrithis was treated with nonsteroidal anti

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis News ...

  9. perioperative management of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    through a psoriatic plaque is only done when absolutely necessary. Outcomes of surgery. There is paucity of data of outcomes and complications of orthopaedic procedures performed in patients with psoriasis. Majority of these studies are small and retrospective. Postoperative infection stands out as a prominent concern.

  10. HLA associations reveal genetic heterogeneity in psoriatic arthritis and in the psoriasis phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Winchester, Robert

    2012-04-01

    Rigorously ascertained cases of psoriatic arthritis in subjects presenting to a rheumatology unit were compared with cases of psoriasis in subjects presenting to a dermatology unit, where subjects with musculoskeletal features were excluded, to address 1) the extent to which the contribution of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to psoriatic arthritis susceptibility resembles that in psoriasis, and 2) whether MHC genes determine quantitative traits within the psoriatic arthritis phenotype.

  11. Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Patients with Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis has been associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in some, but not all, studies. This study investigated the risk of MI in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in Denmark. All residents aged ≥18 years from 1 January 2008 through 31 December 2012 were inclu.......11-2.72). In analyses restricted to patients with psoriatic arthritis, age-specific strata did not show any association between psoriatic arthritis and MI risk....

  12. High prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in patients with severe psoriasis with suboptimal performance of screening questionnaires.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) among Psoriasis (Ps) patients attending dermatology clinics; (2) identify clinical predictors of the development of PsA; and (3) compare the performance of three PsA screening questionnaires: Psoriatic Arthritis Screening and Evaluation (PASE), Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool (PEST) and Toronto Psoriatic Arthritis Screening (ToPAS).

  13. Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis: Is all inflammation the same?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Laura C; FitzGerald, Oliver; Helliwell, Philip S; Paul, Carle

    2016-12-01

    To review the pathophysiology, co-morbidities, and therapeutic options for psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in order to further understand the similarities and differences in treatment paradigms in the management of each disease. New targets for individualized therapeutic decisions are also identified with the aim of improving therapeutic outcome and reducing toxicity. Using the PubMed database, we searched literature published from 2000 to 2015 using combinations of the key words "psoriasis," "psoriatic arthritis," "rheumatoid arthritis," "pathogenesis," "immunomodulation," and "treatment." This was a non-systematic review and there were no formal inclusion and exclusion criteria. Abstracts identified in the search were screened for relevance and articles considered appropriate evaluated further. References within these selected articles were also screened. Information was extracted from 198 articles for inclusion in this report. There was no formal data synthesis. Articles were reviewed and summarized according to disease area (psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis). The pathophysiology of psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis involves chronic inflammation mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dysfunction in integrated signaling pathways affecting different constituents of the immune system result in varying clinical features in the three diseases. Co-morbidities, including cardiovascular disease, malignancies, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are increased. Increased understanding of the immunopathogenesis allowed development of targeted treatments; however, despite a variety of potentially predictive genetic, protein and cellular biomarkers, there is still significant unmet need in these three inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rossini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2012-08-01

    A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA.

  16. Golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Viktorovna Korotaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α holds a central position in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory diseases of the locomotor apparatus. A separate class of drugs, namely, TNF-α inhibitors, that are effective against multicomponent diseases, such as psoriatic arthritis (PsA, is now available to physicians. The paper reviews the results of clinical trials of the TNF-α inhibitor golimumab, a human TNF-α monoclonal antibody. Golimumab exerts a positive effect on all manifestations of PsA: arthritis, psoriatic skin and nail lesions, dactylitis, enthesitis, and quality of life. The drug is noted for its convenient route of administration – its standard dose is 50 mg injected subcutaneously once a month and for its low molecular immunogenicity. Recent data suggest that golimumab is an effective drug with a safety profile similar to that of the entire class of TNF-α inhibitors.

  17. Risk of periodontitis in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, A; Mallbris, L; Gislason, G

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis and periodontitis are chronic inflammatory disorders with overlapping inflammatory pathways, but data on risk of periodontitis in psoriasis are scarce and a possible pathogenic link is poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between psoriasis...... and periodontitis in a nationwide cohort study. METHODS: All Danish individuals aged ≥18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2011 (n = 5,470,428), including 54 210 and 6988 patients with mild and severe psoriasis, and 6428 with psoriatic arthritis, were linked through administrative registers. Incidence...... rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Incidence rates of periodontitis per 10 000 person-years were 3.07 (3.03-3.12), 5.89 (1.07-6.84), 8.27 (5.50-12.45) and 11.12 (7.87-15.73) for the reference population, mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis...

  18. Early biomarkers of joint damage in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Ardle, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Joint destruction, as evidenced by radiographic findings, is a significant problem for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Inherently irreversible and frequently progressive, the process of joint damage begins at and even before the clinical onset of disease. However, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthropathies are heterogeneous in nature and not all patients progress to joint damage. It is therefore important to identify patients susceptible to joint destruction in order to initiate more aggressive treatment as soon as possible and thereby potentially prevent irreversible joint damage. At the same time, the high cost and potential side effects associated with aggressive treatment mean it is also important not to over treat patients and especially those who, even if left untreated, would not progress to joint destruction. It is therefore clear that a protein biomarker signature that could predict joint damage at an early stage would support more informed clinical decisions on the most appropriate treatment regimens for individual patients. Although many candidate biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis have been reported in the literature, relatively few have reached clinical use and as a consequence the number of prognostic biomarkers used in rheumatology has remained relatively static for several years. It has become evident that a significant challenge in the transition of biomarker candidates to clinical diagnostic assays lies in the development of suitably robust biomarker assays, especially multiplexed assays, and their clinical validation in appropriate patient sample cohorts. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based targeted quantitative protein measurements have transformed our ability to rapidly develop multiplexed protein biomarker assays. These advances are likely to have a significant impact on the validation of biomarkers in the future. In this review, we have comprehensively compiled a list of candidate

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in psoriatic arthritis -- update on current status and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Poggenborg, René Panduro

    2012-01-01

    and future development of MRI and other modern imaging modalities in PsA. This review, presented at the GRAPPA 2010 annual meeting, describes the current status of MRI in PsA, with a focus on its use in diagnosis, monitoring, and prediction of the disease course and treatment response. Important areas......The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for use in clinical practice and research has gained increasing interest over the last decade. International collaborative initiatives from GRAPPA (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis) and/or OMERACT (Outcome...... Measures in Rheumatology) may contribute to facilitating research, identifying appropriate areas for use, and reaching consensus on the optimal examination technique. Accordingly, GRAPPA, a primary driver of international research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), has focused on the current use...

  20. Long term efficacy and safety of etanercept in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivelevitch D

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Dario Kivelevitch, Bobbak Mansouri, Alan Menter Department of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease affecting both the skin and joints. Approximately 20% of patients suffer a moderate to severe form of skin disease and up to 30% have joint involvement. Standard therapies for psoriasis include topical medications, phototherapy, and both oral systemic and biological therapies whereas therapies for psoriatic arthritis include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs followed by disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α inhibitors and interleukin-12/23p40 inhibitors. Treatment of both diseases is typically driven by disease severity. In the past decade, major advances in the understanding of the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have led to the development of numerous biological therapies, which have revolutionized the treatment for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Anti-TNF-α agents are currently considered as first line biological therapies for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Currently approved anti-TNF-α agents include etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis as well as golimumab and certolizumab for psoriatic arthritis. In this article, we aim to evaluate the long term safety and efficacy of etanercept in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Keywords: psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, etanercept, biological therapy, tumor necrosis factor, safety

  1. Multidisciplinary Care Models for Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiro, Rubén; Coto, Pablo; Rodríguez, Jesús; Notario, Jaume; Navío Marco, Teresa; de la Cueva, Pablo; Pujol Busquets, Manel; García Font, Mercè; Joven, Beatriz; Rivera, Raquel; Alvarez Vega, Jose Luis; Chaves Álvarez, Antonio Javier; Sánchez Parera, Ricardo; Ruiz Carrascosa, Jose Carlos; Rodríguez Martínez, Fernando José; Pardo Sánchez, José; Feced Olmos, Carlos; Pujol, Conrad; Galindez, Eva; Pérez Barrio, Silvia; Urruticoechea Arana, Ana; Hergueta, Mercedes; Luelmo, Jesús; Gratacós, Jordi

    To describe (structure, processes) of the multidisciplinary care models in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in Spain, as well as barriers and facilitators of their implementation. A qualitative study was performed following structured interviews with 24 professionals (12 rheumatologists, 12 dermatologists who provide multidisciplinary care for patients with PsA). We collected data related to the hospital, department, population and multidisciplinary care model (type, physical and human resources, professional requirements, objectives, referral criteria, agendas, protocols, responsibilities, decision- making, research and education, clinical sessions, development and planning of the model, advantages and disadvantages of the model, barriers and facilitators in the implementation of the model. The models characteristics are described. We analyzed 12 multidisciplinary care models in PsA, with at least 1-2 years of experience, and 3 subtypes of models, face-to-face, parallel, and preferential circuit. All are adapted to the hospital and professionals characteristics. A proper implementation planning is essential. The involvement and empathy between professionals and an access and well-defined referral criteria are important facilitators in the implementation of a model. The management of agendas and data collection to measure the multidisciplinary care models health outcomes are the main barriers. There are different multidisciplinary care models in PsA that can improve patient outcomes, system efficiency and collaboration between specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  2. A Study of Intima Media Thickness and Their Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhanah Aqashiah Mazlan

    2009-01-01

    activity, disease severity and DMARDS therapy with positive Intima Media Thickness in Psoriatic Arthritis patients. The study was approved by Research and Ethics Committee of the faculty of medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia with project code FF-114-2008 and by Community Research Center (CRC of National Institutes of Health (NIH for the case study in Hospital Putrajaya with the project code NMRR-08- 970-2125.

  3. Current views on the pharmacotherapy of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Taradin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with current pharmacological approaches to treating psoriatic arthritis (PsA. It gives data on the prevalence of psoriasis and psoriatic joint injury that is a common cause of early patient disability. Approaches to evaluating the efficacy of drugs are given on the basis of developed and used criteria with regard to the standardized assessment of the dynamics of joint injury in rheumatic diseases and PSA in particular. The review gives brief information on the mechanism of drug actions and the results of clinical trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of different medicaments in PsA. It also covers the experience in using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, synthetic diseasemodifying antirheumatic drugs (methotrexate, cyclosporine, leflunomide, sulfasalazine, and also a promising group of biologicals. Particular emphasis is placed on the results of using tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab, golimumab, certolizumab pegol, adalimumab, interleukin inhibitors (ustekinumab, brodalumab, and phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors (apremilast.

  4. Reliability, validity and feasibility of nail ultrasonography in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbault, Anaïs; Devilliers, Hervé; Laroche, Davy; Cayot, Audrey; Vabres, Pierre; Maillefert, Jean-Francis; Ornetti, Paul

    2016-10-01

    To determine the feasibility, reliability and validity of nails ultrasonography in psoriatic arthritis as an outcome measure. Pilot prospective single-centre study of eight ultrasonography parameters in B mode and power Doppler concerning the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint, the matrix, the bed and nail plate. Intra-observer and inter-observer reliability was evaluated for the seven quantitative parameters (ICC and kappa). Correlations between ultrasonography and clinical variables were searched to assess external validity. Feasibility was assessed by the time to carry out the examination and the percentage of missing data. Twenty-seven patients with psoriatic arthritis (age 55.0±16.2 years, disease duration 13.4±9.4 years) were included. Of these, 67% presented nail involvement on ultrasonography vs 37% on physical examination (P0.75) for the seven quantitative parameters, except for synovitis of the DIP joint in B mode. The synovitis of the DIP joint revealed by ultrasonography correlated with the total number of clinical synovitis and Doppler US of the nail (matrix and bed). Doppler US of the matrix correlated with VAS pain but not with the ASDAS-CRP or with clinical enthesitis. No significant correlation was found with US nail thickness. The feasibility and reliability of ultrasonography of the nail in psoriatic arthritis appear to be satisfactory. Among the eight parameters evaluated, power Doppler of the matrix which correlated with local inflammation (DIP joint and bed) and with VAS pain could become an interesting outcome measure, provided that it is also sensitive to change. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Axial Disease in Psoriatic Arthritis study: defining the clinical and radiographic phenotype of psoriatic spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadon, Deepak R; Sengupta, Raj; Nightingale, Alison; Lindsay, Mark; Korendowych, Eleanor; Robinson, Graham; Jobling, Amelia; Shaddick, Gavin; Bi, Jing; Winchester, Robert; Giles, Jon T; McHugh, Neil J

    2017-04-01

    To compare the prevalence, clinical and radiographic characteristics of psoriatic spondyloarthritis (PsSpA) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A prospective single-centre cross-sectional observational study recruited consecutive PsA and AS cases. Participants completed outcome measures, and underwent clinical examination, axial radiographic scoring and HLA-sequencing. Multivariable analyses are presented. The 402 enrolled cases (201 PsA, 201 AS; fulfilling classification criteria for respective conditions) were reclassified based upon radiographic axial disease and psoriasis, as: 118 PsSpA, 127 peripheral-only PsA (pPsA), and 157 AS without psoriasis (AS) cases. A significant proportion of patients with radiographic axial disease had PsSpA (118/275; 42.91%), and often had symptomatically silent axial disease (30/118; 25.42%). Modified New York criteria for AS were fulfilled by 48/201 (23.88%) PsA cases, and Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis criteria by 49/201 (24.38%) AS cases. pPsA compared with PsSpA cases had a lower frequency of HLA-B*27 (OR 0.12; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.25). Disease activity, metrology and disability were comparable in PsSpA and AS. A significant proportion of PsSpA cases had spondylitis without sacroiliitis (39/118; 33.05%); they less frequently carried HLA-B*27 (OR 0.11; 95% CI 0.04 to 0.33). Sacroiliac joint complete ankylosis (adjusted OR, ORadj 2.96; 95% CI 1.42 to 6.15) and bridging syndesmophytes (ORadj 2.78; 95% CI 1.49 to 5.18) were more likely in AS than PsSpA. Radiographic axial disease was more severe in AS than PsSpA (Psoriatic Arthritis Spondylitis Radiology Index Score: adjusted incidence risk ratio 1.13; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.19). In a combined cohort of patients with either PsA or AS from a single centre, 24% fulfilled classification criteria for both conditions. The pattern of axial disease was influenced significantly by the presence of skin psoriasis and HLA-B*27. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  6. Minimal Disease Activity as a Treatment Target in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; McGonagle, Dennis; Korotaeva, Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    As in other inflammatory rheumatic diseases, the objective of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treatment is the achievement of a defined target. Recent recommendations propose aiming for remission or low disease activity; however, a consensual definition of remission is lacking. A state of minimal disease....... Since its development, MDA has been used increasingly in studies and clinical trials. In this article, the potential use of MDA as a treatment target in PsA is reviewed. The frequencies of MDA achievement with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are summarized based on data from registries...

  7. Sensitivity and specificity of plain radiographic features of peripheral enthesopathy at major sites in psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helliwell, P.S. [University of Leeds, Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal and Rehabilitation Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Porter, G. [Airedale Hospital NHS Trust, Keighley, West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    It has been proposed that the defining difference between rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathy (including psoriatic arthritis) is the initial pathological lesion where the emphasis in psoriatic arthritis is on the enthesis and in rheumatoid arthritis on the synovium. Classical radiological descriptions of seronegative spondyloarthropathy include enthesopathy at major entheseal insertions characterised by erosions and exuberant new bone formation. In this study, the plain radiographic features of spondyloarthropathy are compared between psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis. The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician diagnosed psoriatic arthritis and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of which had rheumatoid arthritis. Plain radiographs of the pelvis and heels were part of the study protocol, although radiographs of other potential entheseal sites such as the knee, elbow and shoulder, were interpreted if available. All radiographs were read blind by two observers working in tandem. Significant differences in entheseal erosion and entheseal new bone formation were found between psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, rheumatoid arthritis and other diagnoses (entheseal erosion, chi-squared 20.8, p = 0.008; entheseal new bone formation, chi-squared 24.5, p = 0.001). These differences were mainly due to a higher proportion of these features in ankylosing spondylitis. No differences in the plain radiographic features of enthesopathy were found between psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis except in the case of entheseal new bone formation at sites of attachment of inguinal ligament, sartorius and rectus femoris muscles to the ilium (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.13-8.02). Very few subjects with symptomatic heel involvement had radiographic changes and minimal differences were found between those with and without

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available Appointments • Support Our Research Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid ...

  9. Complicated uveitis in late onset juvenile idiopathic psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Ljubetic, L; Peralta Calvo, J; Larrañaga Fragoso, P

    2016-04-01

    A 6 year-old girl with juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA) and bilateral complicated anterior uveitis developed several ocular complications that required 5 surgical procedures. Despite the aggressive course of ocular inflammation, her visual acuity remained good. Arthritis (main criterion for the diagnosis of JPsA) appeared years after ocular involvement. She showed a good anti-tumour necrosis factor initial response. The definitive diagnosis of JPsA was established years after the onset of symptoms. In addition, the patient maintained a good visual acuity, despite its complicated disease course. Finally, she showed a good clinical response to adalimumab. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Promising Results for Drug to Fight Arthritis Linked to Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Results for Drug to Fight Arthritis Linked to Psoriasis Psoriatic arthritis causes painful joint swelling, but new ... of a form of arthritis often linked to psoriasis. According to Stanford University researchers, psoriatic arthritis is ...

  11. Radiographic development during three decades in a patient with psoriatic arthritis mutilans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laasonen, Leena; Gudbjornsson, Björn; Ejstrup, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) is the most severe and rare form of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We describe radiological development in a typical case of PAM covering three decades in order to elucidate the need for early diagnosis of PAM. Radiographs of hands and feet, taken from 1981 to 2010......, were evaluated using the Psoriatic Arthritis Ratingen Score (PARS). When PsA was diagnosed, in 1981, gross deformity was observed in the second PIP joint of the left foot. Several pencil-in-cup deformities and gross osteolysis were present in the feet in the first decade of the disease. Over 10 years...

  12. Mitigation of disease- and treatment-related risks in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Martin; Lundholm, Amy

    2017-03-20

    Psoriatic arthritis is a part of the family of diseases referred to as spondyloarthropathies, a diverse group of chronic inflammatory disorders with common clinical, radiographic, and genetic features. Peripheral arthritis is the most common symptom of psoriatic arthritis and patients also frequently experience involvement of the entheses, spine, skin, and nails. Due to the diverse clinical spectrum of disease severity, tissues affected, and associated comorbidities, the treatment of psoriatic arthritis can be challenging and it is necessary to mitigate risks associated with both the disease and its treatment. These risks include disease-specific, treatment-related, and psychological risks. Disease-specific risks include those associated with disease progression that can limit functional status and be mitigated through early diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Risks also arise from comorbidities that are associated with psoriatic arthritis such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal inflammation. Patient outcomes can be affected by the treatment strategy employed and the pharmacologic agents administered. Additionally, it is important for physicians to be aware of risks specific to each therapeutic option. The impact of psoriatic arthritis is not limited to the skin and joints and it is common for patients to experience quality-of-life impairment. Patients are also more likely to have depression, anxiety, and alcoholism. This article reviews the many risks associated with psoriatic arthritis and provides guidance on mitigating these risks.

  13. Remission in psoriatic arthritis: is it possible and how can it be predicted?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saber, Tajvur P

    2010-01-01

    Since remission is now possible in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) we wished to examine remission rates in PsA patients following anti tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) therapy and to examine possible predictors of response.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the peripheral joints in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been widely used for the evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, with only a minority of studies considering other types of arthritis. This review is concerned with an evaluation of the MRI appearance of peripheral joints in psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Methods: A Medline search was performed to identify all publications from the years 1985 to 2006 concerning MRI of the peripheral joints and PsA. Additional papers were retrieved by scanning the references to the Medline-listed articles. Articles written in English, French, German, and Italian were included. Results: Most papers studied the hand and wrist, and only few of them were concerned with the knee, foot, temporomandibular joint, and elbow. Patients with PsA showed often, but not always, a pattern of joint inflammation which extended beyond the capsule into the extraarticular tissue. Bone oedema and erosions were less frequent than in RA. In particular, bone oedema at the entheseal junction was seen, especially in the knee. The degree of synovitis, assessed by dynamic MRI, was similar in PsA and RA. Discussion: Data on MRI of the peripheral joints in PsA are scanty. Only few studies were specifically designed to evaluate the pattern of arthritis in PsA, with most information deriving from papers where different types of arthritis were considered together. An enthesis-related origin of PsA has been proposed in contrast to the primarily synovial inflammation of RA. This pathogenic interpretation is likely to be true, but does not explain all cases of PsA, and needs to be confirmed by further studies.

  15. Anti-MDA5 dermatomyositis mimicking psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas-Rodríguez, Iván; Morante-Bolado, Isla; Brandy-García, Anahy; Queiro-Silva, Rubén; Mozo, Lourdes; Ballina-García, Francisco Javier

    2016-12-28

    Dermatomyositis causes inflammation and damage of muscle and skin, and sometimes involves internal organs, especially lung parenchyma. Patients with dermatomyositis still represent a diagnostic challenge because of the rarity of this disease and the lack of specificity of some of its cutaneous manifestations. Herein, we describe the case of a patient with dermatomyositis, initially diagnosed as psoriatic arthritis, in which the performance of anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) antibodies was decisive to establish a definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of golimumab, a TNF-alpha inhibitor, in the treatment of the psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Michelon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Melissa A Michelon1, Alice B Gottlieb1,21Tufts University School of Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis that affects many psoriasis patients and can often have a debilitating disease progression. Golimumab is a new tumor necrosis factor (TNF antagonist recently approved by the FDA for controlling signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis. In a Phase III clinical trial in patients with PsA, patients receiving golimumab showed significant improvement in the signs and symptoms of disease. It was usually well tolerated, but adverse events generally occurred more in patients receiving golimumab compared to placebo. Golimumab has also recently shown efficacy in slowing structural damage in PsA. This new biologic therapy provides physicians with another option in the treatment of this inflammatory arthritis while offering patients certain advantages over other TNF antagonists.Keywords: golimumab, psoriatic arthritis, TNF-alpha inhibitor

  17. Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowes, John; Ho, Pauline; Flynn, Edw; Ali, Faisal; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Coates, Laura C; Warren, Rich B; McManus, Ross; Ryan, Anthony W; Kane, David; Korendowych, Eleanor; McHugh, Neil; FitzGerald, Oliver; Packham, Jonathon; Morgan, Ann W; Bruce, Ian N; Barton, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Objective A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA. Methods 56 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapping to 41 genes previously reported as RA susceptibility loci were selected for investigation. PsA was defined as an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis and subjects were recruited from the UK and Ireland. Genotyping was performed using the Sequenom MassArray platform and frequencies compared with data derived from large UK control collections. Results Significant evidence for association with susceptibility to PsA was found toa SNP mapping to the REL (rs13017599, ptrend=5.2×104) gene, while nominal evidence for association (ptrendarthritis. PMID:22328738

  18. Psychometric properties of the painDETECT questionnaire in rhuematoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rifbjerg-Madsen, Signe; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain is inherent in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) and traditionally considered to be of nociceptive origin. Emerging data suggest a potential role of augmented central pain mechanisms in subsets of patients, thus, valid instruments...... that can identify underlying pain mechanisms are needed. The painDETECT questionnaire (PDQ) was originally designed to differentiate between pain phenotypes. The objectives were to evaluate the psychometric properties of the PDQ in patients with inflammatory arthritis by applying Rasch analysis.......86(0.56-0.96), PsA 0.96(0.74-0.99), SpA 0.93(0.76-98), overall 0.94(0.84-0.98). Classification consistency was: RA 70%, PsA 80%, SpA 90%, overall 80%. CONCLUSION: The results support that the PDQ can be used as a classification instrument and assist identification of underlying pain-mechanisms in patients suffering...

  19. AUTONOMIC CARDIOVASCULAR REGULATION DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Rebrov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to identify disorders of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA by determining the heart rate variability (HRV, and also establish the relationship of HRV with systemic inflammation and traditional cardiovascular risk factors.Materials and methods. The study included 53 patients with PsA (mean age 43.64 ± 12.1 years, including 48.2 % men, mean disease durationwas 10.32 ± 10.2 years. The control group included 25 healthy volunteers (average age 46.7 ± 12.45 years, 49.1 % – men. Time andfrequency measures of HRV were analyzed. Active PsA was determined by an index DAS4, rate erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen. Patients with clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease, and patients with symptomsof carotid atherosclerosis, detected by duplex study were excluded.Results. Deterioration of HRV in patients with PsA compared with those in patients of the control group, the availability of statistically significant reverse relationship of temporal and spectral parameters of HRV with PsA activity (ESR, CRP, entezit score, DAS4, duration of arthritis, the classical factors of cardiovascular risk were established.Conclusion. Patients with PsA had noted a violation of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in the form of reduced HRV and activation of the sympathetic part of it. Identified changes were associated with activity of systemic inflammation and classical factors of cardiovascular risk.

  20. IFN-αα induced psoriatic arthritis and HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Therapeutic options and patient’s opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piga

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in the setting of Psoriatic Arthritis is an additional variable to be considered in the therapeutic approach to the disease because of the complications of an immunosuppressive treatment in the course of a chronic infection and the possible hepatotoxicity of many drugs conventionally used to treat psoriatic arthritis. The case reported explores the therapeutic options in a patient with IFN-α induced psoriatic arthritis, characterised by severe arthritis and psoriasis but also the concomitant presence of HCV chronic hepatitis, in light of the patient’s concerns

  1. Incidental findings of massive heel spurs in a veteran with a variant of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Danae L; Osher, Lawrence S; Grady, Angela F

    2012-01-01

    A middle-aged man presented for left foot diabetic ulcer care. Pedal radiographs were negative for signs of osteomyelitis. However, asymptomatic incidental osseous findings demonstrated significant plantar and posterior calcaneal spurring possibly consistent with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). A differential of DISH, psoriatic arthritis, Reiter's, and ankylosing spondylitis was developed. Subsequent spinal imaging and laboratory work-up did not satisfy the diagnostic criteria for DISH. This case illustrates radiographic changes characteristic of multiple seronegative arthropathies. On initial presentation a diagnosis of DISH was most likely, but with further imaging studies a diagnosis of a variant of psoriatic arthritis may be more correct.

  2. Recommendations for the use of methotrexate in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañete, Juan D; Ariza-Ariza, Rafael; Bustabad, Sagrario; Delgado, Concepción; Fernández-Carballido, Cristina; García Llorente, José Francisco; Loza, Estíbaliz; Montilla, Carlos; Naranjo, Antonio; Pinto, José A; Queiro, Rubén; Ramírez, Julio; Tornero-Molina, Jesús

    2017-10-17

    To develop recommendations for the management of methotrexate (MTX) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), based on best evidence and experience. A group of 12 experts on MTX use was selected. The coordinators formulated 14 questions about the use of MTX in PsA patients (indications, efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness). A systematic review was conducted to answer the questions. Using this information, inclusion and exclusion criteria were established, as were the search strategies (Medline, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched). Two different reviewers selected the articles. Evidence tables were created. At the same time, European League Against Rheumatism and American College of Rheumatology abstracts were evaluated. Based on this evidence, the coordinators proposed 12 preliminary recommendations that the experts discussed and voted on in a nominal group meeting. The level of evidence and grade of recommendation were established using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and the level of agreement with the Delphi technique (2 rounds). Agreement was established if at least 80% of the experts voted yes (yes/no). A total of 12 preliminary recommendations on the use of MTX were proposed, 9 of which were accepted. One was included in a different recommendation and another 2 were not voted on and were thereafter clarified in the main text. These recommendations aim to answer frequent questions and help in decision making strategies when treating PsA patients with MTX. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  3. Concepts of pathogenesis in psoriatic arthritis: genotype determines clinical phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Oliver

    2015-05-07

    This review focuses on the genetic features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and their relationship to phenotypic heterogeneity in the disease, and addresses three questions: what do the recent studies on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tell us about the genetic relationship between cutaneous psoriasis (PsO) and PsA - that is, is PsO a unitary phenotype; is PsA a genetically heterogeneous or homogeneous entity; and do the genetic factors implicated in determining susceptibility to PsA predict clinical phenotype? We first discuss the results from comparing the HLA typing of two PsO cohorts: one cohort providing the dermatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsO without evidence of arthritic disease; and the second cohort providing the rheumatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsA. We show that these two cohorts differ considerably in their predominant HLA alleles, indicating the heterogeneity of the overall PsO phenotype. Moreover, the genotype of patients in the PsA cohort was shown to be heterogeneous with significant elevations in the frequency of haplotypes containing HLA-B*08, HLA-C*06:02, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*38 and HLA-B*39. Because different genetic susceptibility genes imply different disease mechanisms, and possibly different clinical courses and therapeutic responses, we then review the evidence for a phenotypic difference among patients with PsA who have inherited different HLA alleles. We provide evidence that different alleles and, more importantly, different haplotypes implicated in determining PsA susceptibility are associated with different phenotypic characteristics that appear to be subphenotypes. The implication of these findings for the overall pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in PsA is discussed with specific reference to their bearing on the discussion of whether PsA is conceptualised as an autoimmune process or one that is based on entheseal responses.

  4. Selected issues in diagnostic imaging of spondyloarthritides: psoriatic arthritis and juvenile spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Spondyloarthritides (also known as spondyloarthropathies) are a group of rheumatic diseases that consists of diversified entities, i.e. ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, arthritis in the course of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and juvenile spondyloarthropathies. In the diagnostics of spondyloarthritides, plain radiography has played a crucial role for years due to its undisputed ability to show distinctive bony changes. Yet as those diseases often manifest themselves by soft tissue pathology and bone marrow inflammation, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are currently a subject of numerous studies in the quest for setting up diagnostic criteria, especially at early stages of inflammatory processes. In our review, we present an up-to-date insight into classifications, etiopathogenesis and imaging of psoriatic arthritis and juvenile spondyloarthritis.

  5. Selected issues in diagnostic imaging of spondyloarthritides: psoriatic arthritis and juvenile spondyloarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Spondyloarthritides (also known as spondyloarthropathies are a group of rheumatic diseases that consists of diversified entities, i.e. ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, arthritis in the course of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and juvenile spondyloarthropathies. In the diagnostics of spondyloarthritides, plain radiography has played a crucial role for years due to its undisputed ability to show distinctive bony changes. Yet as those diseases often manifest themselves by soft tissue pathology and bone marrow inflammation, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging are currently a subject of numerous studies in the quest for setting up diagnostic criteria, especially at early stages of inflammatory processes. In our review, we present an up-to-date insight into classifications, etiopathogenesis and imaging of psoriatic arthritis and juvenile spondyloarthritis.

  6. The Role of p38 MAPK in the Aetiopathogenesis of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Mavropoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for the induction of immune-mediated disorders, such as psoriasis, remain not well characterized. Molecular signaling pathways are not well described in psoriasis, as well as psoriatic arthritis, which is seen in up to 40% of patients with psoriasis. Signaling pathway defects have long been hypothesized to participate in the pathology of psoriasis, yet their implication in the altered psoriatic gene expression still remains unclear. Emerging data suggest a potential pathogenic role for mitogen activated protein kinases p38 (p38 MAPK extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK in the development of psoriasis. The data are still limited, though, for psoriatic arthritis. This review discusses the current data suggesting a crucial role for p38 MAPK in the pathogenesis of these disorders.

  7. Brief report: Enrichment of activated group 3 innate lymphoid cells in psoriatic arthritis synovial fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Emmerik F A; van Kempen, Tessa S.; Boes, Marianne; Michels-van Amelsfort, Jocea M R; Hijnen, Dirkjan; Hartgring, Sarita A Y; van Roon, Joel A G; Wenink, Mark H.; Radstake, Timothy R D J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently discovered group of cells that are essential to epithelial homeostasis and are implicated in psoriasis pathogenesis, yet they have never been reported in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: ILC classes and subsets were characterized in the

  8. Confirmation of TNIP1 and IL23A as susceptibility loci for psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2011-09-01

    To investigate a shared genetic aetiology for skin involvement in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), reported to be associated in genome-wide association studies of psoriasis, in patients with PsA.

  9. The development of candidate composite disease activity and responder indices for psoriatic arthritis (GRACE project)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helliwell, Philip S.; Fitzgerald, Oliver; Fransen, Jaap; Gladman, Dafna D.; Kreuger, Gerald G.; Callis-Duffin, Kristina; McHugh, Neil; Mease, Philip J.; Strand, Vibeke; Waxman, Robin; Azevedo, Valderilio Feijo; Beltran Ostos, Adriana; Carneiro, Sueli; Cauli, Alberto; Espinoza, Luis R.; Flynn, John A.; Hassan, Nada; Healy, Paul; Kerzberg, Eduardo Mario; Lee, Yun Jong; Lubrano, Ennio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Porru, Giovanni; Moreta, Elvia G.; Nash, Peter; Raffayova, Helena; Ranza, Roberto; Raychaudhuri, Siba P.; Roussou, Euthalia; Scarpa, Raphael; Song, Yeong Wook; Soriano, Enrique R.; Tak, Paul P.; Ujfalussy, Ilona; de Vlam, Kurt; Walsh, Jessica A.

    2013-01-01

    To develop new composite disease activity indices for psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Data from routine clinic visits at multiple centres were collected in a systematic manner. Data included all domains identified as important in randomised controlled trials in PsA. Decisions to change treatment were

  10. Interval between onset of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis comparing the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink with a hospital-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, William; Charlton, Rachel; Nightingale, Alison; Snowball, Julia; Green, Amelia; Smith, Catherine; Shaddick, Gavin; McHugh, Neil

    2017-12-01

    To describe the time interval between the onset of psoriasis and PsA in the UK primary care setting and compare with a large, well-classified secondary care cohort. Patients with PsA and/or psoriasis were identified in the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). The secondary care cohort comprised patients from the Bath PsA longitudinal observational cohort study. For incident PsA patients in the CPRD who also had a record of psoriasis, the time interval between PsA diagnosis and first psoriasis record was calculated. Comparisons were made with the time interval between diagnoses in the Bath cohort. There were 5272 eligible PsA patients in the CPRD and 815 in the Bath cohort. In both cohorts, the majority of patients (82.3 and 61.3%, respectively) had psoriasis before their PsA diagnosis or within the same calendar year (10.5 and 23.8%), with only a minority receiving their PsA diagnosis first (7.1 and 14.8%). Excluding those who presented with arthritis before psoriasis, the median time between diagnoses was 8 years [interquartile range (IQR) 2-15] in the CPRD and 7 years (IQR 0-20) in the Bath cohort. In the CPRD, 60.1 and 75.1% received their PsA diagnosis within 10 and 15 years of their psoriasis diagnosis, respectively; this was comparable with 57.2 and 67.7% in the Bath cohort. A similar distribution for the time interval between psoriasis and arthritis was observed in the CPRD and secondary care cohort. These data can inform screening strategies and support the validity of data from each cohort.

  11. Value of Entheseal Ultrasonography and Serum Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Preclinical Diagnosis of Psoriatic Arthritis

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    Moataz Mohammed Samy Elbeblawy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the utility of entheseal ultrasonography and serum COMP in the preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Methods: 60 psoriatic patients were divided into: 30 patients with psoriasis (group I and 30 patients with psoriatic arthritis as control (group II. They underwent independent clinical and ultrasonographic examination of both lower limbs at the calcaneal insertions of Achilles tendons. Psoriatic arthritis disease activity and severity was assessed by modified DAS28 and Steinbrockers scores. Serum levels of COMP were measured for all patients by ELISA. Results: On clinical examination, no entheseal abnormalities were detected in group I while they were present in 23.3% of group II with statistically significant difference between them (P 0.05. Serum COMP were significantly elevated in group I and II with no statistically significant difference between them (mean ± SD 5.9 ± 3 and 6.8 ± 12 respectively, P > 0.05. Entheseal ultrasound was more specific (67% while serum COMP was more sensitive (87% in the preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Serum COMP levels were significantly correlated with CRP in both groups and with DAS28 and Steinbrockers scores in group II (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Entheseal ultrasonography and serum COMP levels may be used complementary to each other for preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Serum COMP seems to be promising prognostic marker for psoriatic arthritis patients.

  12. X-ray diagnosis of mutilating arthritis in patients with psoriatic arthritis Smirnov A.V.

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    A.V. Smirnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The typical X-ray symptoms of psoriatic arthritis (PsA in joints of hands and distal sections of feet (asymmetric lesions; isolated lesion of distal interphalangeal joints (DIJ of hands with no changes in other small joints of hands; axial lesion of three joints in a single finger; transverse lesion of joints of the hand at the same level; destruction of distal phalanges; narrowing of the distal epiphysis of hand finger phalanges and metacarpal bones; cup-shaped deformity of the proximal portion of hand finger phalanges and narrowing of distal epiphysis; osseous ankyloses; multiple osteolytic lesions and destruction of bone epiphysis and joint deformities; inflammatory changes in the sacroiliac joints; and typical degenerative changes in the spine are described. It is especially important to know X-ray manifestations of PsA when there are no typical cutaneous manifestations of psoriasis. 

  13. The Cost of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in 5 European Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Pol, R; Martínez-Sesmero, J M; Ventura-Cerdá, J M; Elías, I; Caloto, M T; Casado, M Á

    2016-09-01

    While the introduction of biologics has improved the quality of life of patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, it may have increased the economic burden of these diseases. To perform a systematic review of studies on the costs associated with managing and treating psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in 5 European countries: Germany, Spain, France, Italy, and the United Kingdom. We undertook a systematic review of the literature (up to May 2015) using the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The methodological quality of the studies identified was evaluated using the Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards checklist. We considered both direct costs (medical and nonmedical) and indirect costs, adjusted for country-specific inflation and converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity exchange rates for 2015 ($US PPP). The search retrieved 775 studies; 68.3% analyzed psoriasis and 31.7% analyzed psoriatic arthritis. The total annual cost per patient ranged from US $2,077 to US $13,132 PPP for psoriasis and from US $10,924 to US $17,050 PPP for psoriatic arthritis. Direct costs were the largest component of total expenditure in both diseases. The severity of these diseases was associated with higher costs. The introduction of biologics led to a 3-fold to 5-fold increase in direct costs, and consequently to an increase in total costs. We have analyzed the economic burden of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and shown that costs increase with the treatment and management of more severe disease and the use of biologics. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Coexistence of polyarteritis nodosa and psoriatic arthritis in a child: an unreported association: Polyarteritis nodosa and Psoriatic arthitritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulego-Erroz, Ignacio; Gautreaux-Minaya, Sandra; Martinez-Sáenz de Jubera, Jorge; Naranjo-Vivas, David; Fernéndez-Hernández, Santiago; Muñíz-Fontán, Manoel

    2011-09-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a non-frequent vasculitis of small- and medium-sized vessels. Psoriatic arthritis (PA) is described as a "unique inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis" with an inexact prevalence rate due to the lack of widely accepted classification criteria. We describe the case of an 11-year-old boy that presented with fever of unknown origin plus clinical signs of sacroiliitis, bilateral enthesitis of the plantar fascia, and skin psoriasis. He acutely developed erythematous and tender nodular lesions in the lower limbs that lasted around 3 weeks and spontaneously disappeared at the same time as the fever. He was diagnosed as having PAN and PA according to clinical and histological criteria. This is the first report of the coexistence of PAN and PA in a child indicating a possible relation (maybe cross-reactivity of an infectious agent) between PAN and spondiloarthritis.

  15. Spanish Cultural Adaptation of the Questionnaire Early Arthritis for Psoriatic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gavín, J; Pérez-Pérez, L; Tinazzi, I; Vidal, D; McGonagle, D

    2017-12-01

    The Early Arthritis for Psoriatic patients (EARP) questionnaire is a screening tool for psoriatic arthritis. The original Italian version has good measurement properties but the EARP required translation and adaptation for use in Spain. This article describes the cultural adaptation process as a step prior to validation. We used the principles of good practice for the cross-cultural adaptation of patient-reported outcomes measurement established by the International Society Pharmacoeconomics and Outcome Research. The steps in this process were preparation, forward translation, reconciliation, back-translation and review, harmonization, cognitive debriefing and review, and proofreading. During preparation the developers of the original questionnaire were asked for their permission to adapt the EARP for use in Spain and to act as consultants during the process. The original questionnaire was translated into Spanish by native Spanish translators, who made slight changes that were approved by the questionnaire's developers. The Spanish version was then back-translated into Italian; that version was reviewed to confirm equivalence with the original Italian text. The reconciled Spanish EARP was then tested for comprehensibility and interpretation in a group of 35 patients. All the patients answered all items without making additional comments. This cultural adaptation of the EARP questionnaire for Spanish populations is the first step towards its later use in routine clinical practice. The application of a cross-cultural adaptation method ensured equivalence between the original and Spanish versions of the EARP. The Spanish questionnaire will be validated in a second stage. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. A comparison of disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Michelsen

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to compare disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA and axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA.In this cross-sectional study, all the RA (1093, PsA (365 and ax-SpA (333 patients who visited the out-patient clinic of the Hospital of Southern Norway Trust during the year 2013 were included; the RA patients all had a RA diagnosis verified by the treating rheumatologist, the PsA patients all fulfilled the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis (CASPAR criteria and the ax-SpA patients all fulfilled the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS classification criteria for ax-SpA. Patient-reported health status, demographic variables, medications, and composite scores of disease activity were assessed. The main analyses were performed using General Linear Models adjusted for age, sex and multiple comparisons. Correlation analyses were performed using Spearman's rho.The reported pain, joint pain, patient's global assessment and fatigue were similar in PsA and ax-SpA, but significantly lower in RA. The 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28 (0.3±0.1, p = 0.003, Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI (1.0±0.4, p = 0.028 and Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3 (0.4±0.1, p = 0.004 were all significantly higher in PsA vs. RA. RAPID3 showed moderate to high correlation with DAS28 (rho = 0.521, p<0.001 and CDAI (rho = 0.768, p<0.001 in RA and PsA, and with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI (rho = 0.902, p<0.001 and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI (0.865, p<0.001 in ax-SpA and PsA.In conclusion, patient- reported outcome measures were similar in our population of PsA and ax-SpA patients, but significantly lower for the RA patients. Composite disease activity measures were lower in RA than in PsA and ax-SpA, but the magnitude of these differences was small and probably not of clinical significance. Our study indicates that

  17. Autoimmune Arthritides, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis, or Peripheral Spondyloarthritis Following Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvikar, Sheila L; Crowley, Jameson T; Sulka, Katherine B; Steere, Allen C

    2017-01-01

    To describe systemic autoimmune joint diseases that develop following Lyme disease, and to compare their clinical features with those of Lyme arthritis (LA). We reviewed records of all adult patients referred to our LA clinic over a 13-year period, in whom we had diagnosed a systemic autoimmune joint disease following Lyme disease. For comparison, records of patients enrolled in our LA cohort over the most recent 2-year period were analyzed. Levels of IgG antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi and to 3 Lyme disease-associated autoantigens were measured. We identified 30 patients who had developed a new-onset systemic autoimmune joint disorder a median of 4 months after Lyme disease (usually manifested by erythema migrans [EM]). Fifteen had rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 13 had psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and 2 had peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA). The 30 patients typically had polyarthritis, and those with PsA or SpA often had previous psoriasis, axial involvement, or enthesitis. In the comparison group of 43 patients with LA, the usual clinical picture was monoarticular knee arthritis, without prior EM. Most of the patients with systemic autoimmune joint disorders were positive for B burgdorferi IgG antibodies, as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, but had significantly lower titers and lower frequencies of Lyme disease-associated autoantibodies than patients with LA. Prior to our evaluation, these patients had often received additional antibiotics for presumed LA, without benefit. We prescribed antiinflammatory agents, most commonly disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, resulting in improvement. Systemic autoimmune joint diseases (i.e., RA, PsA, SpA) may follow Lyme disease. Development of polyarthritis after antibiotic-treated EM, previous psoriasis, or low-titer B burgdorferi antibodies may provide insight into the correct diagnosis. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. The Role of Smoking in the Development of Psoriatic Arthritis and Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Yu. Golovach

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper covers the new data on smoking effects on the development of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. It was found that smoking aggravates the severity of psoriasis, worsens the prognosis, and makes the smoking patients less sensitive to treatment. Pathogenic links indicate that smoke induces oxidative damage, promotes inflammatory chan­ges and increases the expression of genes associated with psoriasis. In addition, nicotine binds acetylcholine receptors on dendritic cells, macrophages, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes. This leads to inflammation and immune stimulation of Th1-cells and later severe leukocyte migration to skin due to the increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 and vascular adhesion molecule‑1 on endothelial cells; to the increased angiogenesis and uncontrolled keratinocyte proli­feration as well. Information about the genetic predisposition to the development of arthritis and psoriasis, and the role of smoking in the modification of genetic factors is provi­ded. Smoking causes a specific metabolic and genetic psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis comorbidity, which determines the frequency of diseases flare, its severity and complications. Currently, physicians can prevent exacerbation of smoking-related di­seases such as psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis by persuading their patients to quit smoking.

  19. The dynamics of response as measured by multiple composite outcome tools in the TIght COntrol of inflammation in early Psoriatic Arthritis (TICOPA) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Laura C; Mahmood, Farrouq; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G; Helliwell, Philip S

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the dynamics of treatment response with different composite measures in the TIght COntrol of inflammation in early Psoriatic Arthritis (TICOPA) trial. Participants with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug-naïve psoriatic arthritis (PsA) were randomised 1:1 to either tight control (TC; 4 weekly review with therapy escalation if criteria not met) or standard care (SC; 12 weekly review). We calculated modified versions of the Psoriatic ArthritiS Disease Activity Score (PASDAS), Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) Composite scorE (GRACE) and Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI) at baseline and 12 weekly to 48 weeks by blinded assessor. For missing data, we used the last observation carried forward. Comparison between groups was made by analysis of covariance and comparison of area under the curve (AUC). 206 people were randomised to TC (n=101) or SC (n=105). Significant differences between treatment groups were seen (pcomposite measures). AUC analysis demonstrated a significant difference between groups for the PASDAS but not GRACE and CPDAI. For participants with oligoarthritis, a significant difference between groups was seen for each measure, although the significance levels were greatly diminished (PASDAS, p=0.04; GRACE p=0.01; CPDAI p=0.04). For oligoarthritis using AUC analysis, none of the measures could distinguish between groups. Composite measures of disease activity were able to distinguish between TICOPA treatment arms, although differences were diminished for those with oligoarthritis. Further data are needed to inform the preferred composite measure for use as the primary outcome in PsA trials. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01106079) and ISCRCTN registry (ISCRCTN30147736). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Combination therapy for pain management in inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthritis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramiro, Sofia; Radner, Helga; van der Heijde, Désirée; van Tubergen, Astrid; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Aletaha, Daniel; Landewé, Robert B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite optimal therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, many people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) continue to have persistent pain that may require additional therapy. To assess the benefits and safety of combination pain therapy for people with IA (rheumatoid arthritis (RA),

  1. Quality of life and psycho-emotional status of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O G Filimonova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life and psycho-emotional status of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Objective. To assess quality of life (QL and psycho-emotional status of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Material and methods. 70 pts with definite PsA were included. QL was studied with SF-36. Psycho-emotional status of patients was assessed with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, Spielberger-Hanin Reactive and Personal Anxiety Scale. Results. All baseline QL measures in PsA pts were significantly lower than in control group (p<0,001. Decrease of physical health measures was most prominent. Majority of PsA pts had anxiety and depressive disorders and their intensity correlated with main clinical symptoms of PsA. Conclusion. Pts with PsA have lower QL measures than persons without joint pathology. Significant frequency and intensity of anxiety and depressive disorders require considering their drug correction.

  2. Developing a magnetic resonance imaging scoring system for peripheral psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona; Lassere, Marissa; Bird, Paul

    2007-01-01

    We describe the first steps in developing an OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system for peripheral psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A preexisting MRI dataset (finger joints) from 10 patients with PsA was scored by 4 readers for bone erosion, bone edema, synovitis, tendinopathy, and ext......We describe the first steps in developing an OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system for peripheral psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A preexisting MRI dataset (finger joints) from 10 patients with PsA was scored by 4 readers for bone erosion, bone edema, synovitis, tendinopathy......, and extracapsular features of inflammation (including enthesitis) according to specified criteria. Scoring reliability between readers was moderate to high for bone edema and erosion, but lower for soft tissue inflammation. Measures to improve reliability for future exercises will include reviewing definitions...

  3. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in a patient on etanercept for psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lahiff, C

    2007-12-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is a rare form of pneumonia associated with immune-suppression. It is common in patients with AIDS and with a CD4 count of less than 200 cells\\/mm(3). We report a case of PCP secondary to immune-suppression in a 41-year-old man with psoriatic arthritis being treated with the immune-modulatory agent etanercept.

  4. Genetic polymorphisms associated with psoriasis and development of psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Nikolai Dyrberg; Skov, Lone; Rasmussen, Mads Kirchheiner

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis (PsO) is a chronic inflammatory disease with predominantly cutaneous manifestations. Approximately one third of patients with PsO develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), whereas the remaining proportion of patients has isolated cutaneous psoriasis (PsC). These two phenotypes share...... and development of PsA in PsO. RESULTS: Eleven polymorphisms in 10 genes were nominally associated with PsO and/or PsC and/or PsA (P

  5. Challenges of biological therapy in patients with pustular psoriasis coexisting with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Narbutt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease affecting approximately 2–3% of the general population. It is a condition with immunological and genetic background, coexisting with psoriatic arthritis in about 25% of cases. Biologic drugs have brought a significant improvement in managing the disease, however they are not approved for the treatment of pustular psoriasis. An increasing number of reports indicate the efficacy of biological drugs in pustular psoriasis. In some patients there are factors responsible for a worse clinical response to biologic therapy. Objective . Presentation of therapeutic difficulties identified in a patient with pustular psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Case report . We report a case of a 48-year-old man with generalized pustular psoriasis coexisting with psoriatic arthritis in whom therapy with multiple biologic drugs (adalimumab, infliximab, golimumab, ustekinumab has failed to bring a satisfactory improvement. Conclusions . Further studies are needed to verify the efficacy and pos­sibly approve biological drugs for the treatment of pustular psoriasis. Also, attempts should be made to identify predictors of poorer response to treatment in order to individualize therapy and prevent the loss of efficacy of biologic drugs during prolonged use.

  6. Ankylosing enthesitis, dactylitis, and onychoperiostitis in male DBA/1 mice: a model of psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lories, R; Matthys, P; de Vlam, K; Derese, I; Luyten, F

    2004-01-01

    Materials and methods: Aging male DBA/1 mice from different litters were caged together (4–6 mice per cage) at the age of 12 weeks, checked twice a week for signs of arthritis, and killed at different times. Hind paws were dissected and processed for histology. Results: Disease incidence varied between 50% and 100% in four different experiments. Besides clinical signs of arthritis, nail abnormalities were noticed. Pathological examination showed the occurrence of dactylitis characterised by diffuse neutrophil infiltration in 6 of 50 paws examined. Onycho-periostitis with progressive destruction of the nail bed and the underlying distal phalanx was seen in 5 of 50 paws examined. Conclusions: Although dactylitis and onychoperiostitis are rare manifestations of the disease process, these data strongly suggest that spontaneous arthritis in aging male DBA/1 mice shares important features with human psoriatic arthritis. This model may therefore be an important tool to study links between stress, sex, inflammation, and new bone formation with particular relevance to human psoriatic arthritis. PMID:15082495

  7. [Total hip replacement in psoriatic arthritis--raport of 4 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Krzysztof; Strzyzewski, Wojciech; Pucher, Andrzej; Kaczmarek, Wiesław

    2011-01-01

    It is unusual for the hips to be affected by psoriatic arthritis. But in that rare cases, totalhip replacement (THR) is at present an accepted treatment in patients with severe and painfull deformity. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the results of THR in patients suffering from psoriatic arthritis of the hip, operated from 2000 to 2008 in the Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Department of Poznan University of Medical Sciences. Material included 4 patients, 2 females and 2 males, on whom 5 THRs were performed, lateral approach was used in all cases. At the time of operation, the age of patients ranged from 48 to 61 years (mean 53). Follow-up ranged from 2 to 10 years (mean 6 years). The operative treatment was a multistage process (during one operation only one joint was replaced). Cementeless total hip arthroplasty was used during all of the THRs. The patients were clinically and radiologically evaluated preoperatively, postoperatively, and at final examination. The clinical state was evaluated with Harris hip score and WOMAC scale. We based our radiological examination on Hip Society system. The average preoperative Harris score for the group of patients was 31, WOMAC score 77. After an average of 6 years follow-up all hips were considered excellent, with average Harris score of 90, WOMAC Score of 5. All patients had increased function and decreased pain. The radiograms of all patients revealed that the acetabular and femoral components were correctly positioned with no radiographic evidence of loosening in the last examination. The inclination angle of the acetabular component was 30-48 (mean: 39 degrees) and the acetabular opening angle was 3-20 degrees (mean: 4 degrees). The stem was neutral-oriented in all hips. No ectopic ossification concentrations were found. The hip may be involved by the psoriatic arthritis. Clinical and radiological evaluation of our material showed that total hip replacement in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis allows regaining

  8. Vitamin D status in men with psoriatic arthritis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petho, Z; Kulcsar-Jakab, E; Kalina, E; Balogh, A; Pusztai, A; Gulyas, K; Horvath, A; Szekanecz, Z; Bhattoa, H P

    2015-07-01

    We determined hypovitaminosis D prevalence in men with psoriatic arthritis. This is a cross-sectional, analyst blinded, age- and sex-matched, case-control study. Men with psoriatic arthritis have significantly lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Men with psoriatic arthritis are at increased odds of suffering from hypovitaminosis D. Skeletal manifestations as a result of abrupted bone metabolism may be predominant in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Vitamin D plays a vital role in maintenance of skeletal health and is known to modulate the immune system in various autoimmune diseases including PsA. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in a treatment naïve, de novo psoriatic arthritis male cohort in a cross-sectional, analyst blinded, age- and sex-matched, case-control study. 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), parathyroid (PTH), osteocalcin (OC) and C-terminal telopeptides of type-I collagen (CTx) levels, and lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density were compared between 53 PsA and controls. The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D (25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels <75 nmol/L) was 81 and 57 % in the PsA and control groups, respectively. Compared to the healthy controls, 25OHD (67.2 (12-137) nmol/L vs. 51.9 (15-95) nmol/L; p = 0.001) was significantly lower, and osteocalcin (13.6 (5-33) μg/L vs. 18.2 (6-35) μg/L; p = 0.003) and C-terminal telopeptides of type-I collagen (0.20 (0.01-0.71) μg/L vs. 0.28 (0.06-0.69) μg/L; p = 0.008) were significantly higher in the PsA group. A significant association was found between hypovitaminosis D and PsA; the odds for patients with PsA of having hypovitaminosis D was 3.297 (95 % confidence interval 1.372 to 7.922). The results of this study suggest that men with PsA have significantly lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, and furthermore, men with PsA are at statistically significant increased odds of suffering from hypovitaminosis D.

  9. Effect of Vitamin D on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Patients with Psoriasis Vulgaris and Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Cubillos

    Full Text Available Psoriasis, a chronic skin disease with or without joint inflammation, has increased circulating proinflammatory cytokine levels. Vitamin D is involved in calcium homeostasis, bone formation, osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, as well as regulation of immune response. We aimed to study osteoclast differentiation and cytokine secretion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis, in response to 1,25(OH2D3.Serum levels of bone turnover markers were measured by ELISA in patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis, and healthy controls. PBMCs were isolated and cultured with or without RANKL/M-CSF and 1,25(OH2D3. Osteoclast differentiation and cytokine secretion were assessed.Psoriatic arthritis patients had lower osteocalcin, as well as higher C-telopeptide of type I collagen and cathepsin K serum levels compared with psoriasis vulgaris patients and controls. RANKL/M-CSF-stimulated PBMCs from psoriatic arthritis patients produced higher proinflammatory cytokine levels and had a differential secretion profile in response to 1,25(OH2D3, compared with psoriasis vulgaris and control PBMCs.Our data confirmed altered bone turnover in psoriatic arthritis patients, and demonstrated increased osteoclastogenic potential and proinflammatory cytokine secretion capacity of these PBMCs compared with psoriasis vulgaris and controls. 1,25(OH2D3 abrogated these effects.

  10. MRI bone oedema scores are higher in the arthritis mutilans form of psoriatic arthritis and correlate with high radiographic scores for joint damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Yu M; Østergaard, Mikkel; Doyle, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of bone disease in the arthritis mutilans (AM) form of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with erosive PsA were enrolled (median disease duration of 14 years). Using x-rays ...

  11. MRI bone oedema scores are higher in the arthritis mutilans form of psoriatic arthritis and correlate with high radiographic scores for joint damage

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Yu M; ?stergaard, Mikkel; Doyle, Anthony; Dalbeth, Nicola; Lobo, Maria; Reeves, Quentin; Robinson, Elizabeth; Taylor, William J.; Jones, Peter B; Pui, Karen; Lee, Jamie; McQueen, Fiona M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of bone disease in the arthritis mutilans (AM) form of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods Twenty-eight patients with erosive PsA were enrolled (median disease duration of 14 years). Using x-rays of both hands and feet, 11 patients were classified as AM and 17 as non-AM (erosive psoriatic arthritis without bone lysis)by two observers. MRI scans (1.5T) of the dominant hand (wrist and fingers scan...

  12. Assessing physician and patient acceptance of infliximab biosimilars in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis across Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waller J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available John Waller,1 Emma Sullivan,1 James Piercy,1 Christopher M Black,2 Sumesh Kachroo2 1Adelphi Real World, Manchester, UK; 2Center for Observational and Real-World Evidence (CORE, Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA Objectives: We examined rheumatologists’ motivation for prescribing biosimilars, assessed their treatment preferences in relation to prescribing behavior and explored patient attitudes to biosimilars. Methods: Data were taken from the Adelphi Real World Biosimilars Programme, a real-world, cross-sectional study undertaken with German rheumatologists and patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondyloarthritis or psoriatic arthritis in 2015–2016. Rheumatologists provided data on their prescribing behavior and attitudes toward biosimilars and invited the next eight eligible consecutive consulting patients to complete a questionnaire. Rheumatologists were split into “investigative”, “conservative” and “other” groups. Results: Overall, 50 rheumatologists and 261 patients participated. Biosimilars accounted for <10% of all biologic therapy prescriptions, and >95% of rheumatologists would prescribe a biooriginator rather than biosimilar as the first- or second-line therapy if unrestricted. Patients showed some reluctance to accept biosimilars, and a small proportion of patients were unhappy when switched from a biooriginator to a biosimilar. Satisfaction with treatment was highest in patients who started treatment with a biooriginator prior to biosimilar availability. Patient concerns when starting treatment with a biooriginator or a biosimilar included not knowing enough about the drug (25%–41%, potential side effects (26%–32% and potential long-term problems (19%–30%. Conclusion: Study results demonstrate that there is some reluctance from patients to accept biosimilars and the need to educate patients who are unsure to allow them to be involved in decision making, highlighting the importance of patient and

  13. Higher rates and clustering of abnormal lipids, obesity, and diabetes mellitus in psoriatic arthritis compared with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labitigan, Monalyn; Bahče-Altuntas, Asena; Kremer, Joel M; Reed, George; Greenberg, Jeff D; Jordan, Nicole; Putterman, Chaim; Broder, Anna

    2014-04-01

    We compared the prevalence and the clustering of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) components (obese body mass index [BMI; ≥30 kg/m(2) ], hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipids, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus) in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA) Registry. We included CORRONA participants with a rheumatologist-confirmed clinical diagnosis of PsA or RA with complete data. We used a modified definition of MetS that did not include insulin resistance, waist circumference, or blood pressure measurements. Logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex, and race. In the overall CORRONA population, the rates of diabetes mellitus and obesity were significantly higher in PsA compared with RA. In 294 PsA and 1,162 RA participants who had lipids measured, the overall prevalence of MetS in PsA versus RA was 27% versus 19%. The odds ratio (OR) of MetS in PsA versus RA was 1.44 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.05-1.96, P = 0.02). The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia was higher in PsA compared with RA (38% versus 28%; OR 1.51 [95% CI 1.15-1.98], P = 0.003). The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus was also higher in PsA compared with RA (15% versus 11%; OR 1.56 [95% CI 1.07-2.28], P = 0.02) in the adjusted model. Similarly, higher rates of hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes mellitus were observed in the subgroup of PsA and RA patients with obese BMI. Compared with RA, PsA is associated with higher rates of obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypertriglyceridemia. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Higher Rates and Clustering of Abnormal Lipids, Obesity, and Diabetes in Psoriatic Arthritis Compared with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labitigan, Monalyn; Bahce-Altuntas, Asena; Kremer, Joel M; Reed, George; Greenberg, Jeff D; Jordan, Nicole; Putterman, Chaim; Broder, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objective We compared the prevalence and the clustering of the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) components: obese body mass index (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2), hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipids, hypertension and diabetes, in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Consortium of Rheumatology Researchers of North America (CORRONA) registry. Methods We included CORRONA participants with the rheumatologist-confirmed clinical diagnoses of PsA and RA with complete data. We used a modified definition of MetS that did not include insulin resistance, waist circumference or blood pressure measurements. Logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex and race. Results In the overall CORRONA population, the rates of diabetes and obesity were significantly higher in PsA compared with RA. In 294 PsA and 1162 RA participants who had lipids measured, the overall prevalence of MetS in PsA vs. RA was 27% vs. 19%. The odds ratio (OR) of MetS in PsA vs. RA was 1.44 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05 to 1.96), p=0.02. The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia was higher in PsA compared with RA, 38% vs. 28%, OR 1.51 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.98), p=0.003. The prevalence of type II diabetes was also higher in PsA compared with RA (15% vs. 11%), OR 1.56 (95% CI 1.07 to 2.28), p=0.02, in the adjusted model. Similarly, higher rates of hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes were observed in the subgroup of PsA and RA patients with obese BMI. Conclusion PsA is associated with the higher rates of obesity, diabetes, and hypertriglyceridemia, compared with RA. PMID:24115739

  15. Clinical Response, Drug Survival, and Predictors Thereof Among 548 Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis Who Switched Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2013-01-01

    To describe the frequency of treatment switching and outcomes among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who switched tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor (TNFi) agents in routine care.......To describe the frequency of treatment switching and outcomes among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who switched tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor (TNFi) agents in routine care....

  16. High Frequency of Fibromyalgia in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina N. Magrey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Widespread pain from fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS is observed in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. We hypothesized that there is increased frequency of FMS in patients with PsA that contributes to fatigue and pain. Method. We prospectively enrolled patients with PsA based on the Classification criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis and healthy subjects were used as controls. The frequency of FMS was determined using London Fibromyalgia Epidemiologic Study Screening Questionnaire (LFESSQ and Symptoms Intensity scale (SIs. Results. 34 PsA patients and 44 controls fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Median age of PsA patients was 52 years with 53.33% females. Median age of controls was 50.5 years with 59% females. FMS was present in 53.33% of PsA patients compared to 4.54% of the controls (, based on LFESSQ. 37.50% of PsA had FMS compared to 6.66% of controls ( based on SIs. There was a significant correlation between LFESSQ and SIs in the psoriatic group (. 76.66% of PsA patients complained of fatigue compared to 40.90% of controls, but the mean fatigue score between the two groups was comparable (5.03 versus 5.18. Conclusion. FMS-associated pain and fatigue are significantly more frequent in patients with PsA compared to controls.

  17. Second-line biologic therapy optimization in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantini, Fabrizio; Niccoli, Laura; Nannini, Carlotta; Cassarà, Emanuele; Kaloudi, Olga; Giulio Favalli, Ennio; Becciolini, Andrea; Benucci, Maurizio; Gobbi, Francesca Li; Guiducci, Serena; Foti, Rosario; Mosca, Marta; Goletti, Delia

    2017-10-01

    The Italian board for the TAilored BIOlogic therapy (ITABIO) reviewed the most consistent literature to indicate the best strategy for the second-line biologic choice in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), spondyloarthritis (SpA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Systematic review of the literature to identify English-language articles on efficacy of second-line biologic choice in RA, PsA, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Data were extracted from available randomized, controlled trials, national biologic registries, national healthcare databases, post-marketing surveys, and open-label observational studies. Some previously stated variables, including the patients׳ preference, the indication for anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) monotherapy in potential childbearing women, and the intravenous route with dose titration in obese subjects resulted valid for all the three rheumatic conditions. In RA, golimumab as second-line biologic has the highest level of evidence in anti-TNF failure. The switching strategy is preferable for responder patients who experience an adverse event, whereas serious or class-specific side effects should be managed by the choice of a differently targeted drug. Secondary inadequate response to etanercept (ETN) should be treated with a biologic agent other than anti-TNF. After two or more anti-TNF failures, the swapping to a different mode of action is recommended. Among non-anti-TNF targeted biologics, to date rituximab (RTX) and tocilizumab (TCZ) have the strongest evidence of efficacy in the treatment of anti-TNF failures. In PsA and AS patients failing the first anti-TNF, the switch strategy to a second is advisable, taking in account the evidence of adalimumab efficacy in patients with uveitis. The severity of psoriasis, of articular involvement, and the predominance of enthesitis and/or dactylitis may drive the choice toward ustekinumab or secukinumab in PsA, and the latter in AS. Taking in account the paucity of controlled trials

  18. Incidence and Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors Among Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriasis, or Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radner, Helga; Lesperance, Tamara; Accortt, Neil A; Solomon, Daniel H

    2017-10-01

    To estimate prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, or psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Patients with RA, psoriasis, or PsA were identified based on medical and pharmacy claims from the MarketScan claims databases from January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2014. Primary outcomes included age- and sex-standardized prevalence of CV risk factors during the 12 months preceding diagnosis date and incidence rates per 1,000 patient-years, with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) during followup. Prevalence for RA, psoriasis, and PsA cohorts for hypertension was 18.6% (95% CI 18.3-18.8), 16.6% (95% CI 16.3-17.0), and 19.9% (95% CI 19.4-20.4), respectively; for diabetes mellitus 6.2% (95% CI 6.1-6.4), 6.3% (95% CI 6.0-6.5), and 7.8% (95% CI 7.4-8.2); for hyperlipidemia 9.9% (95% CI 9.7-10.1), 10.4% (95% CI 10.2-10.7), and 11.6% (95% CI 11.2-12.0); and for obesity 4.4% (95% CI 4.2-4.6), 3.8% (95% CI 3.5-4.0), and 6.0% (95% CI 5.6-6.5). Incidence rates per 1,000 patient-years during followup for RA, psoriasis, and PsA cohorts, respectively, for hypertension were 74.0 (95% CI 72.5-75.5), 68.2 (95% CI 65.9-70.4), and 79.8 (95% CI 76.3-83.3); for diabetes mellitus 10.6 (95% CI 10.1-11.1), 13.0 (95% CI 12.1-13.8), and 14.7 (95% CI 13.5-16.0); for hyperlipidemia 40.3 (95% CI 39.4-41.3), 47.1 (95% CI 45.4-48.7), and 52.0 (95% CI 49.6-54.3); and for obesity 24.4 (95% CI 23.4-25.4), 26.4 (95% CI 25.0-27.8), and 32.9 (95% CI 30.6-35.2). Patients with RA, psoriasis, and PsA have high prevalence and incidence of CV risk factors, suggesting the need for risk factor monitoring of these patients. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Psoriatic Arthritis of TMJ Presenting as a First Articular Complaint in Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Vijay Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PSA is a chronic inflammatory disease that can be progressive and can be associated with permanent joint damage and disability. The diagnosis is made mainly on clinical grounds based on the findings of psoriasis and inflammatory arthritis of the joints. Though we have many reports of Temperomandibular joint (TMJ involvement in psoriasis (Ps, patent generally complain pain in other joints as a first arthritic problem. Here is a case of Ps presenting TMJ arthritis as first articular complaint with clinical signs and symptoms. Early identification of PsA will enable the patients to be treated early and agressively which requires a collaboration between oral physician, dermatologist and rheumatologists.

  20. Perioperative Management of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case presentation: We report the case of a 32 year old lady on treatment for skin psoriasis and arthritis who presents with bilateral hip pain. Investigations reveal grade 2 avascular necrosis of femoral head on magnetic resonance imaging. She also had dyslipidemia, obesity and osteoporosis that may be the consequence ...

  1. Demographics, clinical disease characteristics, and quality of life in a large cohort of psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available B Truong,1,* N Rich-Garg,2,* BD Ehst,1 AA Deodhar,2 JH Ku,2 K Vakil-Gilani,2 A Danve,2 A Blauvelt,1,3 1Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, 2Division of Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases, Oregon Health and Science University, 3Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, OR, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Innovation: What is already known about the topic: psoriasis (PsO is a common skin disease with major impact on quality of life (QoL. Patient-reported data on QoL from large number of PsO patients with and without psoriatic arthritis (PsA are limited. What this study adds: In a large cohort referred to a university psoriasis center, patients with PsO and concomitant PsA (~30% in this group had greater degrees of skin and nail involvement and experienced greater negative impacts on QoL. Despite large numbers of patients with moderate-to-severe disease, use of systemic therapy by community practitioners was uncommon. Background: PsO and PsA are common diseases that have marked adverse impacts on QoL. The disease features and patient-reported QoL data comparing PsO and PsA patients are limited. Objective: To identify and compare demographics, clinical disease characteristics, and QoL scores in a large cohort of PsO patients with and without PsA. Methods: All PsO patients seen in a psoriasis specialty clinic, named the Center of Excellence for Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis, were enrolled in an observational cohort. Demographic, QoL, and clinical data were collected from patient-reported questionnaires and from physical examinations performed by Center of Excellence for Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis dermatologists and a rheumatologists. Cross sectional descriptive data were collected and comparisons between patients with PsO alone and those with concomitant PsA are presented. Results: A total of 568 patients were enrolled in the database. Mean age of PsO onset was 28 years and mean disease

  2. Bioboosters in the treatment of rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review of currently available biologics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Cantini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabrizio Cantini, Carlotta Nannini, Laura NiccoliSecond Division of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Hospital of Prato, ItalyAbstract: Immunologic research has clarified many aspects of the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic disorders. Biologic drugs acting on different steps of the immune response, including cytokines, B- and T-cell lymphocytes, have been marketed over the past 10 years for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of anti-cytokine agents in RA (including the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα drugs infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab, anti-interleukin (IL-1 anakinra, and anti-IL-6 tocilizumab demonstrated a significant efficacy compared to traditional therapies, if combined with methotrexate (MTX, as measured by ACR 20, 50 and 70 response criteria. The new therapies have also been demonstrated to be superior to MTX in slowing or halting articular damage. RCTs have shown the efficacy of anti-TNFα in AS patients through significant improvement of symptoms and function. Trials of anti-TNFα in PsA patients showed marked improvement of articular symptoms for psoriasis and radiological disease progression. More recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of B-cell depletion with rituximab, and T-cell inactivation with abatacept. All these drugs have a satisfactory safety profile. This paper reviews the different aspects of efficacy and tolerability of biologics in the therapy of RA, AS, and PsA.Keywords: anti-TNF, anti-cytokine agents, rituximab, abatacept, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis

  3. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in Peruvian aborigines: a report from the GRAPPA 2011 annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloza, Sergio M A; Vega-Hinojosa, Oscar; Chandran, Vinod; Valle Onate, Rafael; Espinoza, Luis R

    2012-11-01

    To determine the presence of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in aboriginal people living in the Andean Mountains of Peru. Consecutive patients with psoriasis and PsA attending an arthritis clinic in Juliaca, Puno, Peru, located 3824 m above sea level were examined. The CASPAR (ClASsification of Psoriatic ARthritis) criteria were used for classification of PsA. Diagnosis of psoriasis was confirmed by a dermatologist. Seventeen patients [11 (65%) men and 6 (35%) women] fulfilled classification criteria for PsA; one patient was of European ancestry and is not included in this report. Of the 16 aboriginal patients in this report, 5 were natives of Quechua ancestry and one was native Aymara. At the time of their first clinic visit, no native patient with PsA had a family history of psoriasis or PsA, and all patients exhibited an established disease of long duration and severity. Methotrexate was the drug of choice for all patients; 2 patients are currently receiving biological therapy. Contrary to what has been reported in the literature, both psoriasis and PsA are present in aboriginal people from the Andean Mountains of Peru. More studies are needed to further define the phenotype of these disorders, as well as the pathogenetic role of genetic and environmental factors.

  4. Circulating mediators of bone remodeling in psoriatic arthritis: implications for disordered osteoclastogenesis and bone erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Pool, Bregina; Smith, Timothy; Callon, Karen E.; Lobo, Maria; Taylor, William J.; Jones, Peter B; Cornish, Jillian; McQueen, Fiona M

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Diverse bone pathologies are observed in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Uncoupling of bone remodeling with disordered osteoclastogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of PsA. The aim of this study was to examine the role of soluble mediators of bone remodeling within the circulation of patients with PsA. Methods Patients with PsA (n = 38), with psoriasis (n = 10), and healthy controls (n = 12) were studied. Serum was obtained for testing of Dikkopf-1 (Dkk-1), ...

  5. Disease activity in and quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, U; Gudbjornsson, B; Iversen, L

    2017-01-01

    -assessed disease activity, and patient’s education and work status were recorded. Data from the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, Health Assessment Questionnaire and Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire were gathered and correlated with disease duration, pain, and general well-being (visual analogue scale......). The controls were 58 Swedish patients with long-standing psoriatic arthritis sine PAM. Results: Sixty-seven patients were included. Patients with PAM had a protracted disease history (33 ± 14 years) and disease onset at a relatively early age (30 ± 12 years). Overall inflammatory activity at inclusion was mild...

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing, monitoring and prognostication in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Sørensen, Inge Juul; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic systemic, inflammatory disease associated with skin psoriasis. PsA may be difficult to assess with clinical examination and blood tests because of its complex and multifaceted clinical presentation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can visualise all peripheral...... and axial joints and entheses involved in PsA, and allow the rheumatologist to assess inflammation and structural damage in detail. In the present paper, we provide a brief overview of MRI to diagnose, monitor and prognosticate in PsA in clinical care....

  7. A systematic review of measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Klokker, Louise; Orbai, Ana Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: An updated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core outcome set (COS) for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was endorsed at the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) meeting in 2016. Objectives: To synthesize the evidence on measurement properties of patient reported outcome measures...... analogue scale for Patient Global, 36 Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Function subscale, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, PsA Impact of Disease questionnaire, PsA Quality of Life questionnaire, VITACORA-19, Functional Assessment...

  8. Validity and reliability of the Dutch adaptation of the Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL Questionnaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freke Wink

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL questionnaire is a disease- specific instrument developed to measure quality of life (QoL in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. The aim of this study was to translate the measure into Dutch and to determine its psychometric properties. METHOD: Translation of the original English PsAQoL into Dutch was performed by bilingual and lay panel. Ten field-test interviews with PsA patients were performed to assess face and content validity. In total, 211 PsA patients were included in a test-retest postal survey to investigate the reliability and construct validity of the Dutch adaptation of the PsAQoL. The PsAQoL, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ and Skindex-17 were administered on two different occasions approximately two weeks apart. RESULTS: The Dutch version of the PsAQoL was found to be relevant, understandable and easy to complete in only a few minutes. It correlated as expected with the HAQ (Spearman's ρ = 0.72 and the 2 subscales of the Skindex-17 (ρ = 0.40 for the psychosocial and ρ = 0.46 for the symptom scale. Furthermore, the measure had good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.92 and test-retest reliability (ρ = 0.89. The PsAQoL was able to define groups of patients based on self-reported general health status, self-reported severity of PsA and flare of arthritis. Duration of PsA did not influence PsAQoL scores. CONCLUSIONS: The Dutch version of the PsAQoL is a valid and reliable questionnaire suitable for use in clinical or research settings to asses PsA-specific QoL.

  9. Power of crowdsourcing: novel methods of data collection in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Harskamp, Caitlin T; Cheeney, Safia; Wu, Julie; Schupp, Clayton W

    2012-12-01

    Crowdsourcing is a novel method of collecting research data from diverse patient populations. The quality of research data obtained through crowdsourcing is unknown. The primary aim of this pilot study was to examine how data collected from an online crowdsourcing World Wide Web site compare with those from published literature in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Crowdsourced data were collected from a health crowdsourcing site from August 23, 2008, to June 27, 2011. The crowdsourced data were compared with findings from systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical trials. A total of 160 online patients with psoriasis or PsA were included in the analysis. Among them, 127 patients with psoriasis provided 313 complete responses on psoriasis symptoms and 276 complete responses to psoriasis treatments; 33 patients with PsA provided 91 complete responses on PsA symptoms and 79 responses to PsA treatments. We compared topical treatments, phototherapy, and systemic treatments for psoriasis and PsA from crowdsourced data with the published literature. For the treatment with the largest response rates, equivalency testing was performed comparing crowdsourced data and the published literature. Overall, crowdsourced data were not equivalent to those published in the medical literature. Crowdsourcing sites used different outcomes measures from those reported in clinical trials. Differences existed in assessment of treatment effectiveness between crowdsourced data and those published in the literature. With improvements in the collection of crowdsourced data, crowdsourcing can be a valuable tool for collecting patient data in real-world settings for psoriasis and PsA. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis in Indian patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis (PsA varies in different parts of the world and there is little clinical and epidemiological data from the Indian subcontinent. Aims: Our study was designed to evaluate the prevalence and clinical patterns of PsA in Indian patients. Methods: This was a non-interventional, cross-sectional study, in which 1149 consecutive psoriasis patients seen over 1 year were screened for PsA according to classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR criteria. Demographic and disease parameters were recorded including Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI, Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI, and number of swollen and tender joints. Results: Among 1149 patients with psoriasis, 100 (8.7% patients had PsA, of which 83% were newly diagnosed. The most common pattern was symmetrical polyarthritis (58%, followed by spondyloarthropathy 49%, asymmetric oligoarthritis (21%, isolated spondyloarthropathy (5%, predominant distal interphalangeal arthritis (3%, and arthritis mutilans (1%. Enthesitis and dactylitis were present in 67% and 26% of cases, respectively. The mean number of swollen and tender joints were 3.63 ± 3.59 (range, 0-22 and 7.76 ± 6.03 (range, 1-26, respectively. Nail changes were present in 87% of the cases. The median PASI and NAPSI of the subjects with PsA was 3.6 and 20, respectively. There was no significant correlation of number of swollen/tender joints with PASI or NAPSI. Conclusion: There is a relatively low prevalence of PsA among Indian psoriasis patients presenting to dermatologists. No correlation was found between the severity of skin and nail involvement and articular disease.

  11. Newly available treatments for psoriatic arthritis and their impact on skin psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galadari, Hassan; Fuchs, Brian; Lebwohl, Mark

    2003-03-01

    Far from being a "benign" arthropathy, as it was initially characterized, psoriatic arthritis (PsA) affects approximately 0.2% of the US population and can be associated with considerable joint damage, symptomatology, and quality of life impairment. PsA shares many characteristics with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and new, rationally designed drugs that are effective in RA also are proving active in PsA. Two such drugs, etanercept and infliximab, target tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a key component of the inflammatory response. This review discusses the rationale for and experience with the use of these agents in PsA. Etanercept is a dimeric fusion protein that binds specifically to TNF, blocking its interaction with cell surface TNF receptors. Infliximab is a chimeric (murine/human) monoclonal antibody that binds to TNF and inhibits its binding to its receptor. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of etanercept in PsA found statistically significant benefits for this agent in measures of arthritic activity and psoriatic severity. There have been anecdotal reports of the efficacy of infliximab in PsA, but results from controlled clinical trials of this agent in PsA have not been reported. TNF inhibitors represent new therapeutic options for patients with PsA. The potential advantages of treatment with etanercept and infliximab early in the disease course are discussed.

  12. Mixture distributions in multi-state modelling: some considerations in a study of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Aidan G; Tom, Brian D M; Farewell, Vernon T

    2013-02-20

    In many studies, interest lies in determining whether members of the study population will undergo a particular event of interest. Such scenarios are often termed 'mover-stayer' scenarios, and interest lies in modelling two sub-populations of 'movers' (those who have a propensity to undergo the event of interest) and 'stayers' (those who do not). In general, mover-stayer scenarios within data sets are accounted for through the use of mixture distributions, and in this paper, we investigate the use of various random effects distributions for this purpose. Using data from the University of Toronto psoriatic arthritis clinic, we present a multi-state model to describe the progression of clinical damage in hand joints of patients with psoriatic arthritis. We consider the use of mover-stayer gamma, inverse Gaussian and compound Poisson distributions to account for both the correlation amongst joint locations and the possible mover-stayer situation with regard to clinical hand joint damage. We compare the fits obtained from these models and discuss the extent to which a mover-stayer scenario exists in these data. Furthermore, we fit a mover-stayer model that allows a dependence of the probability of a patient being a stayer on a patient-level explanatory variable. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Marine n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Psoriatic Arthritis – Inflammation and Cardiac Autonomic and Hemodynamic Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Salome

    This thesis is based on three studies of patients with established psoriatic arthritis (PsA) aiming at investigating the effect of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on clinical symptoms and selected measures of inflammation, cardiac autonomic and hemodynamic function in these patients...

  14. Cardiovascular risk profiles in a hospital-based population of patients with psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Christoffer B; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the frequency of traditional risk factors for the cardiovascular (CV) disease, to calculate the Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) for CV-related mortality in Danish patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS...

  15. The prevalence of sacroilitis in psoriatic arthritis: new perspectives from a large, multicenter cohort. A Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battistone, M.J.; Clegg, D.O. [Division of Rheumatology, University of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)]|[Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Manaster, B.J. [Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Reda, D.J. [Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center, VA Hospital, Hines, IL (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis in a large population of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Patients and design. Patients were recruited from 15 clinical centers. This was part of a large, multicenter study of patients with an established diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, or reactive arthritis. For this cohort, an established diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis was required, with cutaneous manifestations and involvement of at least three appendicular joints. At entry, patients were not selected for the presence of axial involvement. Radiographs - one anteroposterior view of the pelvis and one oblique view of each sacroiliac joint - were graded using the New York classification scale by a musculoskeletal radiologist masked to the specific diagnosis and clinical symptoms. Re-evaluation of 10% of the films 3 years later quantified intraobserver variability. Results. Two hundred and two patients with psoriatic arthritis were studied. Duration of the disease averaged 12 years; all patients had psoriasis and peripheral arthritis. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis (grade 2 or higher) was 78%; 71% of these had grade 3 disease. Conclusions. Previously reported prevalence of sacroiliitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis ranges from 30% to 50%. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis in this large multicenter cohort of patients with appendicular psoriatic arthritis was substantially higher. (orig.) With 3 figs., 4 tabs., 29 refs.

  16. Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life questionnaire: translation, cultural adaptation and validation into Portuguese language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Anabela; Ambrósio, Catarina; Pereira da Silva, J A; McKenna, Stephen; Wilburn, Jeanette; Lopes Ferreira, Pedro

    2018-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has a strong negative impact on the quality of life of patients. The Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL) questionnaire is a disease-specific instrument developed to measure the quality of life in patients with PsA. The aims of this study were to culturally adapt the questionnaire for Portugal and evaluate its reliability and validity in patients with PsA. The original UK English version of the PsAQoL was translated into Portuguese by a bilingual and lay panel. Structured cognitive debriefing interviews were conducted with ten PsA patients. The Portuguese PsAQoL was subsequently applied to PsA patients followed at the Rheumatology Department of Centro Hospitalar do Baixo Vouga, E.P.E. To assess reproducibility, 30 patients with PsA completed the Portuguese PsAQoL on two occasions, 2 weeks apart. A larger sample was recruited to determine internal consistency and construct validity. The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) was used as a comparator instrument. Translation and adaptation were successful. Cronbach´s alpha for the Portuguese version of the PsAQoL was 0.91 and the test-retest reliability was 0.93. The PsAQoL could distinguish between groups of patients defined by self-reported general health status, self-reported severity of PsA and flare of arthritis. There was a positive correlation between the total score of the PsAQoL and each of the sections of the NHP. The Portuguese version of the PsAQoL was found to be relevant, understandable and easy to complete, reliable and valid.

  17. The relationship between vitamin D, vertebral deformity and quality of life in psoriatic arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedriye Baskan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between vitamin D levels, vertebral deformities, functional status, quality of life, acute phase reactants and enthesopathy in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two patients with PsA and 52 controls were enrolled to the study. Routine blood tests and serums 25-(OHD3 were measured. The thoracic and lumbar vertebrae deformities identified in the radiographies were evaluated by a radiologist. Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PSAQoL was used for evaluating quality of life and disease activity parameters for PsA were assessed. In PsA patients, correlations was performed between the 25(OH-D3 levels and PGE (patient global assessment, PHGE (Physician global assessment, tender JC (joint count, HAQ-S (Health Assessment Questionnaire for the Spondyloarthropathies, PSAQoL, MASES (Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Enthesitis Score and BASDAI(Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index values. Results: The results showed that 25(OH-D3 levels was not correlated with these values. (p>0.05 for r = -0.171, r = -0.167, r=-0.069, r=-0.236, r=-0.062, r= -0.058 and r = -0.106 respectively. It was determined that the PSAQoL score had a positive and statistically significant correlation with the DGD, swollen JC, CRP, HGD, tender JC, VAS-pain, HAQ-S, MASES and BASDAI values in PsA patients. (p>0.05 for r=0.291, r=0.324, r=0.346, r=0.312; and p=0.001 for r=0.472, r=0.380, r=0.565, r=0.696, r=0.359, r=0.633, respectively Statistical analyses demonstrated that PsA patients with vertebral deformities had higher numbers of tender joints, more prolonged periods of morning stiffness, higher DAS28-ESR (Disease Activity Score scores, and higher levels of vitamin D (p<0.05, p<0.05, p=0.05 and p<0.05, respectively. The multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the only factor which had an effect on the development of vertebral deformities was the use of steroids

  18. Profile of certolizumab and its potential in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimenti MS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Maria Sole Chimenti,1 Rosita Saraceno,2 Andrea Chiricozzi,2,3 Alessandro Giunta,2 Sergio Chimenti,2 Roberto Perricone11Unit of Rheumatology, Allergology, and Clinical Immunology, 2Unit of Dermatology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; 3Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with psoriasis (PsO. PsA could be considered an enthesal disease because of the link between mechanical stress (entheses and immunologically active tissue (synovium. Evidence of efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α is supported by reduction of histological vascularity and immune cell infiltrates in synovial tissue after treatment. Certolizumab pegol (CZP is a polyethylene glycolylated (PEGylated Fab′ fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds and neutralizes human TNF-α. The PEG moiety of the Fab fragment, markedly increases the half-life of CZP and confers to the drug a unique structure that differs from the other anti-TNF-α agents tested for the treatment of Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, axial spondyloarthritis, nonradiographic spondyloarthritis, PsO, and PsA. In contrast to other anti-TNF-α agents, CZP did not mediate increased levels of apoptosis, suggesting that these mechanisms are not essential for the anti-TNF-α efficacy in Crohn’s disease. As CZP, infliximab, and adalimumab, but not etanercept, almost completely inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-1 beta release from monocytes, this cytokine-production inhibition may be relevant for drug efficacy. Due to these characteristics, it has been demonstrated in clinical studies that CZP effectively improves signs and symptoms of arthritis and physical function and skin manifestations of PsO, with a safety profile similar to rheumatoid arthritis. This drug can be considered as a valid treatment in patients

  19. Differentiation between early rheumatoid and early psoriatic arthritis by the ultrasonographic study of the synovio-entheseal complex of the small joints of the hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabotti, Alen; Salvin, Sara; Quartuccio, Luca; De Vita, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether ultrasonographic findings of the synovio-entheseal complex of the hand small joints could be used to differentiate between early rheumatoid and early psoriatic arthritis. Thirty-four early rheumatoid and 26 early psoriatic arthritis patients with a prevalent involvement of the hands were examined with ultrasound (US). All exams were performed at the first visit by evaluating synovitis, peritendon extensor digitorum tendon oedema, enthesitis of the central slip of extensor tendon, flexor tenosynovitis and soft tissue oedema. In the same patient, the two most clinically involved joints, if possible of the same digit, were evaluated. Sixty-eight clinically involved joints were evaluated in 34 early rheumatoid arthritis patients and 52 joints in 26 early psoriatic arthritis patients.Synovitis was significantly more frequently detected in early rheumatoid arthritis compared to early psoriatic arthritis patients (p=0.0001), in 91.1% joints of the former and in 59.6% joints of the latter. At metacarpohalangeal joint, the presence of peritendon extensor digitorum tendon inflammation was observed in 2.5% of the joints in the early rheumatoid arthritis group and in 54.1% of the joints in the early psoriatic arthritis group (p=0.0001). At PIP joints, central slip enthesitis was exclusively observed in EPsA (p=0.0045). When considering the most clinically involved finger per patient, soft tissue oedema was detected almost exclusively in psoriatic arthritis (p=0.0002). The US involvement of synovio-entheseal complex and US extrasynovial features may be helpful in the differential diagnosis between early rheumatoid and early psoriatic arthritis.

  20. The OMERACT Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) is reliable and sensitive to change: results from an OMERACT workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøyesen, Pernille; McQueen, Fiona M; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this multireader exercise was to assess the reliability and sensitivity to change of the psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (PsAMRIS) in PsA patients followed for 1 year.......The aim of this multireader exercise was to assess the reliability and sensitivity to change of the psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (PsAMRIS) in PsA patients followed for 1 year....

  1. Development of a preliminary composite disease activity index in psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a preliminary composite psoriatic disease activity index (CPDAI) for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: Five domains were assessed and specific instruments were employed for each domain to determine the extent of domain involvement and the effect of that involvement on quality of life\\/function. Disease activity for each domain was then graded from 0 to 3 giving a CPDAI range of 0-15. Patient and physician global disease activity measures were also recorded and an independent physician was asked to indicate if treatment change was required. Bivariate correlation analysis was performed. Factor, tree analysis and standardised response means were also calculated. RESULTS: Significant correlation was seen between CPDAI and both patient (r = 0.834) and physician (r = 0.825) global disease activity assessments (p = 0.01). Tree analysis revealed that 96.3% of patients had their treatment changed when CPDAI values were greater than 6; no patient had their treatment changed when CPDAI values were less than 5. CONCLUSION: CPDAI correlates well with patient and physician global disease activity assessments and is an effective tool that clearly distinguishes those who require a treatment change from those who do not.

  2. Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip J

    2017-01-01

    24 focus groups with 130 patients from 7 countries representing 5 continents to identify patient domains. We achieved consensus through 2 rounds of separate surveys with 50 patients and 75 physicians, and a nominal group technique meeting with 12 patients and 12 physicians. We conducted a workshop......-related quality of life, and systemic inflammation, which were recommended for all RCT and LOS. These were important, but not required in all RCT and LOS: economic cost, emotional well-being, participation, and structural damage. Independence, sleep, stiffness, and treatment burden were on the research agenda...

  3. Disease activity in and quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, U; Gudbjornsson, B; Iversen, L

    2017-01-01

    capacity with little or no ability to perform self-care or everyday tasks was reported by 21% of the patients. Patients between 45 and 60 years of age reported the most impaired quality of life in comparison to the control group. Conclusion: PAM seriously affects social functioning. Whether early......Objective: To describe the social status and health-related quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries. Method: Patients with at least one mutilated joint confirmed by radiology were studied. Disease activity involving joints and skin, physician......-assessed disease activity, and patient’s education and work status were recorded. Data from the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, Health Assessment Questionnaire and Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire were gathered and correlated with disease duration, pain, and general well-being (visual analogue scale...

  4. Association between tobacco smoking and response to tumour necrosis factor α inhibitor treatment in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Glintborg, Bente; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between tobacco smoking and disease activity, treatment adherence and treatment responses among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) initiating the first tumour necrosis factor α inhibitor therapy (TNFi) in routine care. METHODS: Observational cohort...... study based on the Danish nationwide DANBIO registry. Kaplan-Meier plots, logistic and Cox regression analyses by smoking status (current/previous/never smoker) were calculated for treatment adherence, ACR20/50/70-responses and EULAR-good-response. Additional stratified analyses were performed according...... to gender and TNFi-subtype (adalimumab/etanercept/infliximab). RESULTS: Among 1388 PsA patients included in the study, 1148 (83%) had known smoking status (33% current, 41% never and 26% previous smokers). Median follow-up time was 1.22 years (IQR 0.44-2.96). At baseline, current smokers had lower Body Mass...

  5. Radiographic development during three decades in a patient with psoriatic arthritis mutilans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laasonen, Leena; Gudbjornsson, Björn; Ejstrup, Leif

    2015-01-01

    , were evaluated using the Psoriatic Arthritis Ratingen Score (PARS). When PsA was diagnosed, in 1981, gross deformity was observed in the second PIP joint of the left foot. Several pencil-in-cup deformities and gross osteolysis were present in the feet in the first decade of the disease. Over 10 years......, many joints had reached maximum scores. During the follow-up, other joints became involved and the disease developed clinically. Reporting early signs suggestive of PAM, e.g. pencil-in cup deformities and gross osteolysis in any joint, should be mandatory and crucial. This would heighten our awareness...... of PAM, accelerate the diagnosis, and lead to improved effective treatment in order to minimize joint damages resulting in PAM....

  6. On the heritability of psoriatic arthritis. Disease concordance among monozygotic and dizygotic twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Birger; Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Ejstrup, Leif

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In a nationwide unselected twin population to estimate the relative importance of genetic and environmental effectors in the etiopathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: The study comprised three Danish nationwide twin cohorts. In 1994 and 2002 a total of 37,388 and 46......,418 Danish twin individuals respectively were asked by questionnaire if they had PsA. Twins reporting PsA were invited to participate in a clinical examination. Patients were classified according to the Moll and Wright (M&W) and the CASPAR criteria. Heritability was estimated by probandwise concordance rates...... and variance component analysis. RESULTS: 228 twin individuals reported PsA. Following diagnostic validation in 184 (81%), 50 probands were diagnosed with PsA according to the M&W criteria. Five of their co-twins were either dead, had emigrated, or did not participate in the twin study and nine did not respond...

  7. Societal costs and patients' experience of health inequities before and after diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Erik; Jørgensen, Tanja S; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To comprehensively study the comorbidities, healthcare and public transfer (allowance) costs in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) before and after diagnosis. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study, using data from Danish registries from January 1998 through December 2014. A total of 10...... 525 patients with PsA and 20 777 matched general population comparator (GPC) subjects were included. Societal costs, employment status and occurrence of comorbidities in patients with PsA both before and after diagnosis were compared with GPC subjects. RESULTS: At baseline, patients with PsA had...... significantly more comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease (OR 1(.)70 95% CI 1(.)55 to 1(.)86), respiratory diseases (OR 1(.)73 95% CI 1(.)54 to 1(.)96) and infectious diseases (OR 2(.)03 95% CI 1(.)69 to 2(.)42) compared with GPC subjects. At all time points, patients with PsA had higher total...

  8. Evidence to support IL-13 as a risk locus for psoriatic arthritis but not psoriasis vulgaris.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2011-06-01

    There is great interest in the identification of genetic factors that differentiate psoriatic arthritis (PsA) from psoriasis vulgaris (PsV), as such discoveries could lead to the identification of distinct underlying aetiological pathways. Recent studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the interleukin 13 (IL-13) gene region as risk factors for PsV. Further investigations in one of these studies found the effect to be primarily restricted to PsA, thus suggesting the discovery of a specific genetic risk factor for PsA. Given this intriguing evidence, association to this gene was investigated in large collections of PsA and PsV patients and healthy controls.

  9. Incidence and Prognosis of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in Patients Undergoing Bariatric Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2017-01-01

    Importance: Psoriasis and obesity are strongly linked, and weight loss appears to improve psoriasis symptoms and severity. Bariatric surgery may induce remission of psoriasis, but data are limited to small studies and case series. Objective: To examine the incidence and prognosis of psoriasis...... and psoriatic arthritis in patients undergoing bariatric surgery (gastric bypass and gastric banding). Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study used individual-level linkage of administrative and public health registers in Denmark. All Danish citizens who received gastric bypass...... and 41.0 (10.0) years at the time of surgery. The gastric banding subset was composed of 800 (74.7%) women and 271 (25.3) men; the mean (SD) age of these patients was 32.3 (10.1) years at the study start and 41.7 (10.0) years at the time of surgery. Adjusted HRs of psoriasis were 0.52 (95% CI, 0...

  10. Aortitis due to giant cell arteritis and psoriatic arthritis: An uncommon association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cezón de la Cruz, M Del Pilar; Almodóvar, Raquel; García Pérez, Javier; Dhimes, Patricia Fanny; Zarco, Pedro

    We report the case of a 65-year-old woman with psoriatic arthritis who developed aortitis secondary to giant cell arteritis. She presented with a 2-mounth history of dry cough, fever and fatigue. There was no evidence of tumor or infectious processes. Abdominal computed tomographic and computed tomography coronary angiographic findings were suggestive of aortitis. Histological study of a temporal artery biopsy confirmed temporal arteritis. We also review the available literature on this uncommon condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of psoriatic arthritis and costs generated by treatment of psoriatic arthritis patients in the public health system - the case of Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciborski, Filip; Śliwczyński, Andrzej; Kłak, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Brzozowska, Melania; Tłustochowicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in Poland and to assess the costs generated by treatment of PsA patients in the system of public healthcare. The analysis was based on the database of the public payer, the National Health Fund (NFZ). PsA was defined by the diagnostic ICD-10 codes M07 (Enteropathic arthropathies) and L40.5 (Psoriatic arthropathies). The estimate of the costs was based on the reports submitted to the NFZ by health service providers. The prevalence rates were calculated using the NFZ data and the population estimates from the Central Statistical Office of Poland (GUS). In 2015, the prevalence of PsA (ICD-10: L40.5 and M07) in Poland was 3.2 per 10 000 population (3.7 in women and 2.6 in men). In 2015, nearly 7.3 thousand patients with the diagnosis of M07 and 6.3 thousand patients with the diagnosis of L40.5 received healthcare benefits. Women accounted for 60.6% of those patients. Nearly three fourths of PsA patients were aged 40 to 69 years with the median age of 54 years (56 years in women and 50 years in men). Between 2008 and 2015 the NFZ expenditure on the treatment of PsA increased from 6.6 million Polish zloty (PLN) (1.9 million EUR) to PLN 50.8 million (12.1 million EUR). In the same period, the number of PsA patients increased from 3.4 thousand to 11.9 thousand. In 2015, the mean cost of treatment per PsA patient was PLN 3.8 thousand. The PsA prevalence rates estimated by the authors from the NFZ database are clearly lower than those derived from studies in other European countries, which may suggest that the actual number of PsA patients in Poland may be underestimated. Still the number of patients treated for PsA increased nearly 3.5-fold during 2008-2015, when the cost of PsA treatment rose more than 7 times.

  12. New developments in the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a focus on apremilast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palfreeman AC

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Andrew C Palfreeman, Kay E McNamee, Fiona E McCann The Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Nuffield Department of Orthopedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, London, UK Abstract: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, most commonly resulting in the occurrence of red and silver scaly plaques. About 30% of psoriasis sufferers develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA, a disorder that presents with additional joint inflammation and other clinical features. At present, the most effective treatment for moderate and severe psoriasis and PsA are biologics such as antitumor necrosis factor alpha therapy. Biologics are costly and typically require repeated injections; hence, the development of novel, orally available, small molecular inhibitors that are less expensive to produce is highly desirable. The phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor apremilast is a small molecular inhibitor that acts by increasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels, ultimately suppressing tumor necrosis alpha production. Apremilast has been tested in a number of psoriasis and PsA pilot and Phase II trials to evaluate its efficacy and safety. More recently, three larger double-blinded, and randomized multicenter studies demonstrate that apremilast is efficacious in the treatment of psoriasis and PsA, with significantly higher numbers of apremilast-treated patients achieving endpoints of a 75% reduction compared to baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI-75 or American College of Rheumatology-20 scores, relative to placebo. This encouraging data, along with a tolerable incidence of mild to moderate adverse events, has led to the initiation of several large Phase III trials that aim to further validate apremilast as a treatment for psoriasis and PsA. Here, we provide an overview of the current treatments for psoriasis and PsA, and summarize the findings from multiple Phase II clinical trials where the effects of apremilast in the treatment

  13. Comparison of health-related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis and effects of etanercept treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Sharp, Veronika; Koenig, Andrew S; Park, Grace; Shi, Yifei; Wang, Brian; Zack, Debra J; Fiorentino, David

    2012-07-01

    To compare health-related quality of life (HRQoL) before and after treatment with etanercept in patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis using spydergram representations. Data from randomised, controlled trials of etanercept in patients with RA, PsA and psoriasis were analysed. HRQoL was assessed by the medical outcomes survey short form 36 (SF-36) physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component summary and domain scores. Baseline comparisons with age and gender-matched norms and treatment-associated changes in domain scores were quantified using spydergrams and the health utility SF-6D measure. Mean baseline PCS scores were lower than age and gender-matched norms in patients with RA and PsA, but near normative values in patients with psoriasis; MCS scores at baseline were near normal in PsA and psoriasis but low in RA. Treatment with etanercept resulted in improvements in PCS and MCS scores as well as individual SF-36 domains across all indications. Mean baseline SF-6D scores were higher in psoriasis than in RA or PsA; clinically meaningful improvements in SF-6D were observed in all three patient populations following treatment with etanercept. Patients with RA, PsA and psoriasis demonstrated unique HRQoL profiles at baseline. Treatment with etanercept was associated with improvements in PCS and MCS scores as well as individual domain scores in patients with RA, PsA and psoriasis.

  14. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fast facts: easy-to-read) ¿Qué es la artritis reactiva? Psoriatic Arthritis Overview Questions and Answers about Juvenile Arthritis What Is Juvenile Arthritis? (fast facts, easy-to-read) Esenciales: ¿Qué es la artritis juvenil? Questions and Answers about Ankylosing Spondylitis What ...

  15. How early should psoriatic arthritis be treated with a TNF-blocker?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harty, Leonard

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most commonly identified inflammatory arthropathy in early arthritis clinics. It is a complex multisystem disease involving the skin and joints, but may also present with inflammation of the spine - spondylitis, digits - dactylitis, eyes - uveitis and ligamentous insertions - enthesitis. The skin manifestations may be mild or patchy and often precede the joint inflammation. Joint erosions, however, may occur within the first 2 years in up to half of PsA patients and an erosion rate of 11% per annum has been reported suggesting it is not a benign disease as it was once regarded. RECENT FINDINGS: Therapy with mild anti-inflammatories is only beneficial in very mild or localized disease. In cases of more widespread joint involvement systemic therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) such as methotrexate may be required and in the case of extra-articular or spinal disease, in which DMARDs have failed to show efficacy, biologic therapy may be highly effective. SUMMARY: The question of how early treatment should be instituted should be decided in a specialist rheumatology referral centre following appropriate assessment. Optimal therapy with combination DMARD and biologics may result in remission rates of up to 60%.

  16. Use of methotrexate in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Viktorovna Korotaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the results of using methotrexate (MT in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Results. The mechanism of action of MT, the historical aspects of its use in the treatment of psoriasis and PsA, and the data of clinical trials of the efficacy and safety of the drug are considered. MT therapy is shown to cause a high rate of adverse reactions, which requires measures to prevent and treat adverse events. MT has been found to be frequently used in different combinations, including with other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (sulfasalazine, prednisolone, and biological agents, such as tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. In accordance with the European S3-guidelines S3 on the systemic treatment of psoriasis, MT (15-22.5 mg weekly should be recommended from the results of randomized clinical trials and the extensive clinical experience with this drug. In terms of the present-day views, the indications for immunosuppressive therapy for PsA may be expanded it should be initiated in the early stage of the disease, particularly in its severe forms, until there are destructive changes in the osteoarticular apparatus. Conclusion. MT is an effective drug to treat psoriasis and PsA. It is recommended for use in moderate and severe peripheral arthritis (Grade B and skin lesions (Grade A.

  17. The efficacy of adalimumab in psoriatic arthritis concomitant to overlapping primary biliary cholangitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ross, Teresa; Ruffatti, Amelia; Floreani, Annarosa; Hoxha, Ariela; Punzi, Leonardo

    2016-11-22

    The overlap syndrome of primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis) and primary sclerosing cholangitis is an extremely rare condition that has never been described in association with other immune-mediated diseases, including psoriatic arthritis. While treatment with anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) agents has proved to be effective in inflammatory arthropathies such as psoriatic arthritis, they have been employed in only a limited number of patients with autoimmune hepatitis, and their effectiveness is unclear. We report the case of a 51-year-old female affected with psoriatic arthritis concomitant to overlapping primary biliary cholangitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis in whom 28 months of adalimumab treatment improved the symptoms of the inflammatory arthropathy as well as those of both cholangiopathies. Our results suggest that further studies examining the therapeutic role of this particular TNF-α blocker are warranted in cholestatic autoimmune hepatitis patients, and in particular in those individuals in whom the disease is associated with inflammatory arthropathies.

  18. Obesity and psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to clinical outcome and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russolillo, Anna; Iervolino, Salvatore; Peluso, Rosario; Lupoli, Roberta; Di Minno, Alessandro; Pappone, Nicola; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2013-01-01

    PsA is an axial and/or peripheral inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis, included in the group of spondylarthritides. It has been suggested that PsA could be a systemic disease, involving even coronary arteries and the heart. An increased prevalence of vascular risk factors has been found in PsA subjects as compared with the general population and psoriatic subjects. Moreover, PsA patients exhibit an increased prevalence of liver steatosis, a marker of metabolic syndrome, and of obesity. Interestingly, many reports demonstrate that adipose tissue is metabolically active, representing a source of inflammatory mediators, known as adipokines. The latter include TNF-α, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), IL-6, leptin and adiponectin, leading to a pro-inflammatory status in obese subjects. This evidence supports the idea of obesity as a low-grade inflammatory disease. Accordingly, obesity might be associated with some rheumatic diseases. In particular, it seems to affect several features of PsA, such as its development, cardiovascular risk and clinical outcome. Recent data suggest that increased BMI in early adulthood increases the risk of PsA development in psoriatic patients, supporting a link between fat-mediated inflammation and joint involvement. Obesity may represent an additive cardio-metabolic risk factor in PsA subjects. Abdominal obesity may also determine an increased risk of not achieving minimal disease activity in PsA patients, highlighting the role of abdominal fat accumulation as a negative predictor of good clinical response to biologic agents. This review assesses the relationship between obesity and PsA according to the available literature.

  19. A national survey on the management of psoriatic arthritis using the Delphi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrano, Ennio; Cantini, Fabrizio; Mathieu, Alessandro; Olivieri, Ignazio; Salvarani, Carlo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Marchesoni, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is essential to avoid unnecessary morbidity. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the current approach to the management of PsA among rheumatologists. A 16-item online questionnaire, produced using the Delphi method, was submitted to a panel of rheumatologists who anonymously expressed their opinions on a scale from 1 (maximum disagreement) to 5 (maximum agreement). Positive consensus was defined by ≥66% of the respondents scoring an item 3, 4 or 5. Negative consensus was defined by ≥66% of the respondents scoring an item 1 or 2. The surveyed rheumatologists agreed that in its early stage, PsA is characterised by the involvement of few joints and/or entheses and that psoriasis, although possibly absent, will be present in a patient's past personal or family history. There was no consensus among the rheumatologists regarding normalisation of C-reactive protein levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rates defining remission. The specialists believed that clinical remission was achieved more frequently and for longer among patients with PsA than rheumatoid arthritis. The participants believed that neutralising antibodies altered the efficacy of anti-tumour necrosis factor agents and that monoclonal antibodies induced greater production of neutralising antibodies than receptor proteins. However, knowledge was somewhat lacking in relation to the prophylaxis of latent tuberculosis. The data collected showed that the surveyed rheumatologists had a good knowledge of the diagnosis of early-stage PsA and a good understanding of its management in relation to its clinical phenotype, with the exception of the form having predominantly axial involvement.

  20. Serum IgG galactosylation in psoriatic arthritis patients undergoing a biological treatment. A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jakubiak-Augustyn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : A group of psoriatic arthritis patients (PSA, 11 cases has undergone a treatment. For each patient two serum samples were collected: before the treatment (sample before and after the treatment (sample after. Performed investigation aimed to provide an information whether a treatment of the PSA patients improves the galactosylation of IgG N-glycans, which previously was shown for rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Material and methods : Immunoglobulin G (IgG was isolated from serum of PSA patients, before and after the treatment, using affinity chromatography on Protein A-Sepharose, and was further analyzed regarding the galactose content, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS method and ELISA test, performed with two lectins: Ricinus communis (RCA-I and Griffonia simplicifolia (GSL-II. Based on ELISA results an agalactosylation factor (AF was calculated for each before and after IgG sample. Results: Obtained data regarded galactose content in IgG, AF calculation and estimation of two laboratory indices of inflammation: erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP concentration in serum. Based on statistical methods it was shown that average difference (d of after and before measures of AF for PSA patients was Med HL = –0.097 (95% CI: –0.49–0.25, which means that applied treatment did not affect AF value for this group of patients in a statistically significant manner (p = 0.2936. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that, in the contrary to RA patients, IgG galactosylation in PSA patients, undergoing a treatment, showed no statistically significant changes.

  1. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Research Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of ... a project plan to address relevant challenges for rheumatoid arthritis. Read Part 1 on Lupus in MedlinePlus magazine, ...

  2. Effect of weight loss on activity in psoriatic arthritis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almodóvar, Raquel; Zarco, Pedro; Otón, Teresa; Carmona, Loreto

    2017-03-02

    To evaluate the association between weight loss and changes in disease activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We performed a systematic review of the literature, with searches in Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Library from inception until April 2015. 1) randomized controlled trials (RCT); 2) PsA patients; 3) interventions were any intervention aimed at weight control; and 4) a PsA activity-related outcome measure was evaluated. Risks of bias were assessed by the Cochrane Collaboration scale. Of the 215 articles identified, only 2 RCT met the inclusion criteria, 1 in abstract format. Both showed moderate risk of bias. Patients who managed to lose weight-by any method-had better results in terms of activity and inflammation. The percentage of weight loss correlated moderately with changes in inflammatory outcomes. Weight loss in PsA could be associated with less inflammation; however, the evidence to support this is limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  3. High prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis in psoriatic arthritis patients: a study based on carotid ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Bosch, Rosario; Restrepo-Velez, Juliana; Medina-Malone, Miguel; Garrido-Courel, Laura; Paniagua-Zudaire, Inmaculada; Loza-Cortina, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Analyse the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in psoriatic arthritis patients (PsA). A cross-sectional study of 53 patients with PsA and 53 controls matched for age and sex was designed. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and the presence of carotid plaques (CP) were assessed with carotid ultrasound. Data on cardiovascular (CV) risk factors were collected. Patients with PsA had a higher prevalence rate of obesity and tobacco smoking. CP were detected more frequently in patients with PsA than in controls with an OR of 4.15, 95% CI 1.4-12.1, which adjusted for smoking and those with history of CV disease gave an OR of 3.9, 95% CI 1.2-12.7, p = 0.026. Carotid IMT was significantly higher in patients with PsA adjusted for age and tobacco smoking. According to ultrasound data, 30.2% of patients with PsA had carotid atherosclerosis (presence of CP and/or carotid IMT > 0.90 mm) compared with 9.4% of controls. The SCORE index (Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation) underestimated the CV risk in these patients: most patients with CP had an intermediate CV risk. According to carotid ultrasound data, PsA patients have a high prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis. These results support the importance of screening for CV risk and to include carotid ultrasound in CV prevention strategies in these patients.

  4. Cardiovascular disease and risk factors in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, Anne-Marie

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome compared to the normal population. Patients with psoriasis and PsA may also have increased risk from nonconventional risk factors such as raised levels of homocysteine and excessive alcohol consumption. We conducted a comprehensive review of the literature on CVD and all cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis and PsA. METHODS: Data sources: All studies identified from a Medline (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) search pertaining to CVD, individual risk factors in psoriasis, and PsA were included. Study selection: Studies included a healthy reference population, were published between 1975 and 2009, and were written in English. RESULTS: Our search yielded 14 studies that documented rates of CVD in patients with psoriasis and PsA compared to controls. Substantial evidence points to elevated risk of CVD in patients with psoriasis and PsA. CONCLUSION: It remains difficult to conclude if risk factors are caused by psoriasis or share a common pathogenesis. Physicians treating patients with psoriasis and PsA must be aware of all potential cardiovascular risk factors in their patients.

  5. Bariatric Surgery and the Incidence of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in the Swedish Obese Subjects Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Cristina; Peltonen, Markku; Rudin, Anna; Carlsson, Lena M S

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bariatric surgery (vertical gastroplasty, gastric banding, or gastric bypass) compared with usual care on the incidence of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in the Swedish Obese Subjects study. This report includes 1,991 subjects who underwent bariatric surgery and 2,018 controls with obesity from the SOS study; none of them had psoriasis or PsA at baseline. Information about psoriasis and PsA diagnosis was retrieved through the Swedish National Patient Register and questionnaires. During follow-up for up to 26 years, bariatric surgery was associated with a lower incidence of psoriasis compared with usual care (number of events = 174; hazard ratio 0.65; 95% CI: 0.47-0.89; P = 0.008). Both smoking and a longer duration of obesity were independently associated with a higher risk for psoriasis. No significant difference was detected among the three surgical procedures in terms of lowering the risk of developing psoriasis. The association between bariatric surgery and psoriasis incidence was not influenced by baseline confounders. No significant difference in the risk of developing PsA (number of events = 46) was detected when comparing the surgery and the control groups. This study shows that bariatric surgery is associated with a lower risk of developing psoriasis compared with usual care. © 2017 The Authors. Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  6. The indirect costs of psoriatic arthritis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Paweł; Malinowski, Krzysztof Piotr

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to collect all current data on the indirect costs (IC) related to psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The search was conducted using MEDLINE (via PubMed), Embase and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases. We considered original studies, systematic reviews, economic evaluations, conference abstracts and posters. All collected data were recalculated to average annual cost per patient, expressed using the consumer price index for 2013 and converted to US dollars using purchasing power parity. Eight of the identified publications presented IC of PsA. Average annual IC per patient calculated using the friction cost approach range from US$1693.83 to $12,318.45, while using the human capital approach they range from US$1750.68 to $50,270.52. Result of the meta-analysis was a basis for calculating cost of work disability equaled US$10,754.04 per patient per year in 2013 prices. This systematic review revealed a great economic burden of the disease to the society. A small number of studies on IC in PsA justify further investigations.

  7. Cartilage collagen type II seromarker patterns in axial spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Heidi Lausten; Gudmann, Natasja Staehr; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the possible association between type II collagen turnover seromarkers and disease profile in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Outpatients with axial SpA (n = 110) or PsA (n = 101) underwent clinical examination including......-smokers, 0.43 ng/ml (p = 0.02), while PIIANP was higher in HLA-B27 positive, 2312 ng/ml versus negative patients, 2021 ng/ml (p = 0.03). In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did not differ between patients and controls, but PIIANP was elevated in patients not receiving DMARDs, 2726 ng/ml. In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did...... not differ according to smoking and HLA-B27. Cartilage degradation assessed by C2M is increased in SpA irrespective of treatment but not in PsA. Cartilage synthesis reflected by PIIANP is increased in untreated SpA and PsA. PIIANP correlates with CRP in SpA while not in PsA. In DMARD-naïve SpA but not in PsA...

  8. Effectiveness of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in psoriatic arthritis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maese, Jesús; Díaz Del Campo, Petra; Seoane-Mato, Daniel; Guerra, Mercedes; Cañete, Juan D

    2017-01-13

    Due to the clinical heterogeneity of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), recommendations have been developed by international groups to guide therapeutic decisions of the rheumatologist. The objective of the current systematic review (RS) was to evaluate the evidence of efficacy of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in PsA. Literature search in Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, from 2008 to 2014. We included RS, randomized clinical trials and observational studies, in patients with PsA and an evaluation of efficiency of conventional DMARDs (methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide), according to the following outcomes: peripheral and axial symptoms; peripheral radiological damage; enthesitis according to power Doppler ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging (enthesitis count before and after therapy); dactylitis; uveitis. Title and abstract were used to retrieve 1,662 documents for this review (Medline, n=433; EMBASE n=1,132; Cochrane, n=97), and 48 studies were selected for detailed reading; finally, 8 studies were included. Since the studies included are not robust, and there are arguments to support the effectiveness of methotrexate, the evidence observed with the treatment of DMARDs in PsA is not conclusive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical features and types of articular involvement in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönmez, Salim; Pamuk, Ömer Nuri; Akker, Mustafa; Ak, Recep

    2015-06-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a psoriasis-associated inflammatory arthritis which causes joint destruction. There are some epidemiologic data about PsA; however, there are no sufficient data from Turkey. Herein, we evaluated the frequency of PsA in the Thrace region of Turkey according to hospital-based data. In addition, we evaluated clinical features and types of joint involvement in PsA patients. We included 172 PsA patients fulfilling CASPAR criteria admitted to the Division of Rheumatology, Trakya University Medical Faculty, between 2003 and 2012. Data from Turkish Statistical Institution was used to calculate the incidence and prevalence of PsA. Patients' demographic features, durations of psoriasis and PsA, number of tender and swollen joints, treatment modalities, laboratory data, and X-ray film findings were recorded from hospital files. The annual incidence of PsA was 2.8/100,000. The mean annual incidence was 3.47/100,000 in females and 2.15/100,000 in males. The overall prevalence of PsA in our region was 27.9/100,000 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 23.7-32.1) in individuals >16 years. The prevalence of PsA was higher in females than in males (34.7/100,000 vs. 21.5/100,000). Polyarthritis was present in 67 (38.9 %), oligoarthritis in 47 (27.3 %), spondyloarthritis in 39 (22.6 %), and distal interphalangeal (DIP) arthritis in 19 (11.0 %) patients. The duration of psoriasis was significantly longer in polyarticular PsA patients than in DIP and oligoarticular groups (p values = 0.016 and 0.018, respectively). The number of swollen joints correlated with age (r = 0.21, p = 0.006), duration of psoriasis (r = 0.20, p = 0.01), number of tender joints (r = 0.92, p ≤ 0.001), ESR (r = 0.24, p = 0.001), and CRP (r = 0.17, p = 0.026). The frequency of PsA in Thrace region is similar to that in low-frequency regions. The most frequent type of involvement was polyarticular, and it correlated with the duration of psoriasis

  10. INCIDENCE OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS IN RUSSIA: TRENDS AT THE PRESENT STAGE AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Mishina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The diseases that are hazardous to the health of our planet's population and to the state of national economies should include psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. This disease has been recorded in the official statistics of the Ministry of Health of Russia since only 2009. In 2011 in the Russian Federation as whole, the incidence of PsA, or arthropathic psoriasis (according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD, was 12.3 per 100,000 population or 5.7% of all registered psoriasis cases, which was substantially lowerthan that in other countries. Due to the lack of sufficient information on the epidemiology of PsA in the Russian population, the objective of this investigation was to study agerelated and regional trends in the incidence of this disease in the Russian Federation.Material and methods. The incidence of PsA was analyzed using the data from annual statistical registered form No. 12 of the Ministry of Health of Russia over 2009–2013. The overall and primary morbidity rates of PsA among children and adults were analyzed in intensive values per 100,000 population. The prevalence of PsA and the rate of its incidence increment were analyzed in the Russian Federation's districts and subjects.Results and discussion. The analysis showed a modest increase in overall morbidity rates of PsA in the Russia as a whole over the five years along with a decrease in the rates in the class as a whole. This suggests the disease severity that forces patients to seek medical advice. The situation associated with PsA morbidity among children and adults differs essentially in Russia's regions. The gap between in child and adult rates indicates that there are organizational problems in dermatovenereological care to the pediatric and adult populations in these regions. The alarming fact is that one-third of psoriatic patients experience joint pain and only 8% are diagnosed as having PsA, which also points to the inadequate

  11. Structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis: traditional views, novel insights gained from TNF blockade, and concepts for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes of bone and cartilage are a hallmark of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Despite certain similarities – in particular, inflammation as the driving force for structural changes – the three major inflammatory joint diseases show considerably different pathologies. Whereas RA primarily results in bone and cartilage resorption, PsA combines destructive elements with anabolic bone responses, and AS is the prototype of a hyper-responsive joint disease associated with substantial bone and cartilage apposition. In the present review we summarize the clinical picture and pathophysiologic processes of bone and cartilage damage in RA, PsA, and AS, we describe the key insights obtained from the introduction of TNF blockade, and we discuss the future challenges and frontiers of structural damage in arthritis. PMID:21624183

  12. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF drugs for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: an indirect comparison meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorlund K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Kristian Thorlund,1 Eric Druyts,2 J Antonio Aviña-Zubieta,3,4 Edward J Mills1,21Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 4Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaObjective: To evaluate the comparative effectiveness of available tumor necrosis factor-a inhibitors (anti-TNFs for the management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA in patients with an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs.Methods: We used an exhaustive search strategy covering randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews and health technology assessments (HTA published on anti-TNFs for PsA. We performed indirect comparisons of the available anti-TNFs (adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab measuring relative risks (RR for the psoriatic arthritis response criteria (PsARC, mean differences (MDs for improvements from baseline for the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ by PsARC responders and non-responders, and MD for the improvements from baseline for the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI. When the reporting of data on intervention group response rates and improvements were incomplete, we used straightforward conversions based on the available data.Results: We retrieved data from 20 publications representing seven trials, as well as two HTAs. All anti-TNFs were significantly better than control, but the indirect comparison did not reveal any statistically significant difference between the anti-TNFs. For PsARC response, golimumab yielded the highest RR and etanercept the second highest; adalimumab and infliximab both yielded notably smaller RRs. For HAQ improvement, etanercept and infliximab yielded the largest MD among PsARC responders

  13. Variants in linkage disequilibrium with the late cornified envelope gene cluster deletion are associated with susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2010-12-01

    A common deletion mapping to the psoriasis susceptibility locus 4 on chromosome 1q21, encompassing two genes of the late cornified envelope (LCE) gene cluster, has been associated with an increased risk of psoriasis vulgaris (PsV). One previous report found no association of the deletion with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), suggesting it may be a specific risk factor for PsV. Given the genetic overlap between PsA and PsV, a study was undertaken to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapping to this locus are risk factors for PsA in a UK and Irish population.

  14. PDE3A-SLCO1C1 locus is associated with response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julià, Antonio; Rodríguez, Jesús; Fernández-Sueiro, José Luis; Gratacós, Jordi; Queiró, Rubén; Montilla, Carlos; Torre-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Venegas, José Javier; Manrique-Arija, Sara; Muñoz-Fernández, Santiago; González, Carlos; Roig, Daniel; Zarco, Pedro; Erra, Alba; Castañeda, Santos; García, Alicia; Salvador, Georgina; Díaz-Torne, César; Blanco, Ricardo; Domínguez, Alfredo Willisch; Mosquera, José Antonio; Vela, Paloma; Tornero, Jesús; Sánchez-Fernández, Simón; Corominas, Héctor; Ramírez, Julio; Avila, Gabriela; Alonso, Arnald; Tortosa, Raül; López-Lasanta, María; Cañete, Juan D; Marsal, Sara

    2014-11-01

    Aim: Variation at PDE3A-SLCO1C1 locus has been recently associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. We undertook the present study to determine whether PDE3A-SLCO1C1 is also associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy in psoriatic arthritis. Patients & methods: Genomic DNA was obtained from 81 psoriatic arthritis patients that had been treated with anti-TNF therapy. PDE3A-SLCO1C1 SNP rs3794271 was genotyped using Taqman realt-time PCR. The clinical response to anti-TNF therapy was measured as the change from baseline in the level of disease activity according to the DAS28 score. Results: A significant association between rs3794271 and anti-TNF response in psoriatic arthritis was found (beta = -0.71; p = 0.0036). Conclusion: PDE3A-SLCO1C1 locus is also associated with response to anti-TNF therapy in psoriatic arthritis. Original submitted 12 May 2014; Revision submitted 18 August 2014.

  15. Limited association between scalp psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis severity and treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vlam, Kurt; Mallbris, Lotus; Szumski, Annette; Jones, Heather

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated whether scalp psoriasis (PsO) is associated with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) severity and/or with treatment response to etanercept. Patients with moderate-to-severe PsO and active PsA received etanercept 50 mg once weekly for 24 weeks. Patients were stratified according to whether scalp PsO was present at baseline. Demographics and disease characteristics were compared at baseline and after 12 and 24 weeks of treatment with etanercept. Scalp PsO was present in 273/373 (73.2%) patients; they were significantly younger and a higher proportion were male versus those without scalp PsO. At baseline, the patient global assessment psoriasis score was significantly higher for patients with scalp PsO versus without (67.0 vs. 57.9, pscalp PsO (6.0 vs. 5.0, pscalp PsO achieved enthesitis ≤1 at Week 12 (91.5% vs. 81.7%, pscalp PsO showed significantly greater improvements in fatigue and joint pain at weeks 12 and 24, and a greater proportion achieved a score ≤0.5 in the health assessment questionnaire at week 12 (65.2% vs. 53.0%, pScalp PsO was not clearly associated with PsA severity, and it did not affect treatment response. Patients without scalp PsO exhibited greater improvements in objective joint outcomes, whereas patients with scalp PsO experienced better outcomes in patient-reported outcomes.

  16. A deletion at ADAMTS9-MAGI1 locus is associated with psoriatic arthritis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julià, Antonio; Pinto, José Antonio; Gratacós, Jordi; Queiró, Rubén; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Fonseca, Eduardo; Montilla, Carlos; Torre-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Pérez Venegas, José Javier; Fernández Nebro, Antonio; Fernández, Emilia; Muñoz-Fernández, Santiago; Daudén, Esteban; González, Carlos; Roig, Daniel; Sánchez Carazo, José Luís; Zarco, Pedro; Erra, Alba; López Estebaranz, José Luís; Rodríguez, Jesús; Ramírez, David Moreno; de la Cueva, Pablo; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; Castañeda, Santos; Rubio, Esteban; Salvador, Georgina; Díaz-Torné, César; Blanco, Ricardo; Willisch Domínguez, Alfredo; Mosquera, José Antonio; Vela, Paloma; Tornero, Jesús; Sánchez-Fernández, Simón; Corominas, Héctor; Ramírez, Julio; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; Palau, Nuria; Alonso, Arnald; García-Montero, Andrés C; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Codó, Laia; Day, Kenneth; Absher, Devin; Myers, Richard M; Cañete, Juan D; Marsal, Sara

    2015-10-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have been associated with the risk to develop multiple autoimmune diseases. Our objective was to identify CNVs associated with the risk to develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA) using a genome-wide analysis approach. A total of 835 patients with PsA and 1498 healthy controls were genotyped for CNVs using the Illumina HumanHap610 BeadChip genotyping platform. Genomic CNVs were characterised using CNstream analysis software and analysed for association using the χ(2) test. The most significant genomic CNV associations with PsA risk were independently tested in a validation sample of 1133 patients with PsA and 1831 healthy controls. In order to test for the specificity of the variants with PsA aetiology, we also analysed the association to a cohort of 822 patients with purely cutaneous psoriasis (PsC). A total of 165 common CNVs were identified in the genome-wide analysis. We found a highly significant association of an intergenic deletion between ADAMTS9 and MAGI1 genes on chromosome 3p14.1 (p=0.00014). Using the independent patient and control cohort, we validated the association between ADAMTS9-MAGI1 deletion and PsA risk (p=0.032). Using next-generation sequencing, we characterised the 26 kb associated deletion. Finally, analysing the PsC cohort we found a lower frequency of the deletion compared with the PsA cohort (p=0.0088) and a similar frequency to that of healthy controls (p>0.3). The present genome-wide scan for CNVs associated with PsA risk has identified a new deletion associated with disease risk and which is also differential from PsC risk. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Complement C3 Is the Strongest Predictor of Whole-Body Insulin Sensitivity in Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ursini

    Full Text Available To evaluate the correlation between inflammatory measures and whole-body insulin sensitivity in psoriatic arthritis (PsA patients.For the present study, 40 nondiabetic PsA patients were recruited. A standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT was performed. The insulin sensitivity index (ISI, insulinogenic index (IGI and oral disposition index (ODI were calculated from dynamic values of glucose and insulin obtained during OGTT.In our study population, mean ISI was 3.5 ± 2.5, median IGI was 1.2 (0.7-1.8, mean ODI 4.5 ± 4.5. In univariate correlation analysis, ISI correlated inversely with systolic blood pressure (sBP (R = -0.52, p = 0.001, diastolic blood pressure (dBP (R = -0.45, p = 0.004 and complement C3 (R = -0.43, p = 0.006 and ODI correlated inversely with sBP (R = -0.38, p = 0.02, dBP (R = -0.35, p = 0.03 and complement C3 (R = -0.37, p = 0.02. No significant correlations were found between analyzed variables and IGI. In a stepwise multiple regression, only complement C3 entered in the regression equation and accounted for approximately 50% of the variance of ISI. Using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve we identified the best cut-off for complement C3 of 1.32 g/L that yielded a sensitivity of 56% and a specificity of 96% for classification of insulin resistant patients.In conclusion, our data suggest that serum complement C3 could represent a useful marker of whole-body insulin sensitivity in PsA patients.

  18. Disease activity, quality of life and indirect costs of psoriatic arthritis in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Paweł; Malinowski, Krzysztof Piotr; Pilc, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the indirect costs, health-related quality of life and clinical characteristics of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), measured using a PsA disease activity index in Poland. Additionally, we aimed to investigate the association between the activity, utility of PsA-affected patients and productivity loss in a Polish setting. A questionnaire survey was conducted to assess disease activity, as well as productivity loss, and a paper version of the EuroQoly-5D-3L questionnaire was used to assess productivity loss and the quality of life. Indirect costs were assessed with the human capital approach employing the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, gross value added (GVA) and gross income (GI) per worker in 2014 in Poland and were expressed in Polish zlotys (PLN) as well as in euros. The correlation was presented using the Spearman correlation coefficient. Our analysis was performed on the basis of 50 full questionnaires collected. We observed a mean utility value of 0.6567. The mean number of days off work was 2.88 days per month, and mean on-the-job productivity loss was 24.1 %. Average monthly indirect costs per patient were €206.7 (864.01 PLN) calculated using the GDP; €484.56 (2025.46 PLN) calculated using the GVA; and €209.70 (876.56 PLN) calculated using the GI. PsA reduces the patients' quality of life as well as their productivity loss associated with both absenteeism and presenteeism. Total indirect costs were negatively correlated with utility. The greater the disease activity, the lower the utility and the greater the indirect costs.

  19. Immunogenicity induced by biologicals in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: View of the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present-day views of the immunogenicity of biological agents (BAs used to in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are analyzed. The immunogenicity of these medicaments is noted to depend on their molecular structure, individual patient characteristics, and used treatment regimens. As this takes place, the primary structure of the drug and its posttranslation modifications during manufacture are key factors. It is pointed out that a number of antigenic structures may give rise to the body's BA antibodies – murine epitopes, idiotopes, and allotropes, neoantigens forming in the coupling area of hybrid proteins, nonlinear epitopes present in the aggregated preparations. BAs that tend to form large immune complexes with these antibodies are most immunogenic. The antibodies to most BAs, except drugs based on soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors (etanercept, are neutralizing, i.e. they affect the efficiency of therapy, particularly when used over a long period of time.The results of trials evaluating the impact of antibodies to BAs on their clinical value are considered. It is believed that immunogenicity is itself of great importance in respect to the occurrence of the escape phenomenon of a response to BA therapy and to its safety. Attention is drawn to immunogenicity diagnostic problems; at the same it is noted that none of the used laboratory diagnostic techniques can reveal individual BA antibody forms and isotypes. It is concluded that there is a need for further investigations to standardize optimal methods for diagnosing neutralizing antibodies, to elaborate criteria for predicting a response to therapy in terms of an immunogenicity factor, and to reveal pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for the production of antibodies to BAs. The design of novel medicaments with minimal immunogenicity will depend on whether these mechanisms are common to all drugs or specific.

  20. Treatment modifying factors of biologics for psoriatic arthritis: a systematic review and Bayesian meta-regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druyts, Eric; Palmer, Jacqueline B; Balijepalli, Chakrapani; Chan, Keith; Fazeli, Mir Sohail; Herrera, Vivian; Jansen, Jeroen P; Park, Jay J H; Kanters, Steve; Reimold, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore factors that modify treatment effects of non-conventional biologics versus placebo in patients with psoriatic arthritis. A systematic literature review and meta-regression was conducted. The biologics included etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab, ustekinumab, tocilizumab, anakinra, abatacept, rituximab, and secukinumab. Outcomes included American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 and 50, Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) 75, and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) Physical and Mental Component Summaries (PCS and MCS). Twelve RCTs were eligible for meta-regression. Treatment effects for ACR-20 at 12 weeks were higher in trials with longer disease durations (OR=2.94), and lower in trials enrolling older patients (OR=0.48), and those recently published (OR=0.49). Treatment effects for ACR-50 at 12 weeks were higher in trials with more males (OR=2.27), but lower in trials with high prior anti-TNF use (OR=0.28) and recently published trials (OR=0.37). For PASI-75, trials with more male patients (24 weeks: OR=2.56), and with higher swollen and tender joint counts (12 weeks: OR=8.33; 24 weeks: OR=14.44) showed higher treatment effects, and trials with high prior anti-TNF use had lower effects (OR=0.41). Treatment effects for SF-36 PCS at 24 weeks were higher in trials with longer psoriasis disease durations (OR=2.95) and PsA disease durations (OR=4.76), and those published earlier (OR=4.19). Our analyses show that differences in baseline characteristics may explain some of the differences in response to biologics versus placebo across different trials. Accounting for these factors in future studies will likely be important.

  1. Experience and Satisfaction With a Multidisciplinary Care Unit for Patients With Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urruticoechea-Arana, Ana; Serra Torres, Marta; Hergueta Diaz, Mercedes; González Guerrero, María Eugenia; Fariñas Padron, Leslie; Navarro Martín, Sara; Vargas Osorio, Kelly; Palacios Abufón, Andrés; García de Yébenes, María Jesús; Loza, Estíbaliz

    2017-08-24

    To describe patient's characteristics, the activity and patient's satisfaction with a multidisciplinary care unit in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A retrospective medical records review of patients with psoriasis or PsA attended in a multidisciplinary care unit was performed. Included patients were contacted to fulfill a satisfaction questionnaire. A specific electronic database was set up. Data regarding to patients and their baseline characteristics and the activity of the unit were collected. Descriptive analysis were performed. A total of 112 patients with 154 visits were included in almost 3 years, 54% women, with a mean age of 51 years, 43.7% presented hyperlipidemia and 30.4% arterial hypertension. Half of patients were referred due to diagnostic doubts and the other half for therapeutic problems. After the evaluation of the patients, 66 patients (58.9%) met diagnostic criteria for PsA, and 13 (11.6%) of an inflammatory disease other than PsA, and 95% came back to their usual physician. The most ordered test were laboratory tests (75.6% of patients), followed by X-rays in 57 patients (51.3%). In general the number of patients with different treatments increased, and 55.4% and 42% of patients changed their topic and systemic treatments respectively. The level of satisfaction was very high and all of patients considered that their disease was better controlled in this multidisciplinary care unit. This multidisciplinary care unit has improved the care and satisfaction of patients with psoriasis or PsA, and increased collaboration between rheumatology and dermatology departments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  2. Development and testing of new candidate psoriatic arthritis screening questionnaires combining optimal questions from existing tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Laura C; Walsh, Jessica; Haroon, Muhammad; FitzGerald, Oliver; Aslam, Tariq; Al Balushi, Farida; Burden, A D; Burden-Teh, Esther; Caperon, Anna R; Cerio, Rino; Chattopadhyay, Chandrabhusan; Chinoy, Hector; Goodfield, Mark J D; Kay, Lesley; Kelly, Stephen; Kirkham, Bruce W; Lovell, Christopher R; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; McHugh, Neil; Murphy, Ruth; Reynolds, Nick J; Smith, Catherine H; Stewart, Elizabeth J C; Warren, Richard B; Waxman, Robin; Wilson, Hilary E; Helliwell, Philip S

    2014-09-01

    Several questionnaires have been developed to screen for psoriatic arthritis (PsA), but head-to-head studies have found limitations. This study aimed to develop new questionnaires encompassing the most discriminative questions from existing instruments. Data from the CONTEST study, a head-to-head comparison of 3 existing questionnaires, were used to identify items with a Youden index score of ≥0.1. These were combined using 4 approaches: CONTEST (simple additions of questions), CONTESTw (weighting using logistic regression), CONTESTjt (addition of a joint manikin), and CONTESTtree (additional questions identified by classification and regression tree [CART] analysis). These candidate questionnaires were tested in independent data sets. Twelve individual questions with a Youden index score of ≥0.1 were identified, but 4 of these were excluded due to duplication and redundancy. Weighting for 2 of these questions was included in CONTESTw. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that involvement in 6 joint areas on the manikin was predictive of PsA for inclusion in CONTESTjt. CART analysis identified a further 5 questions for inclusion in CONTESTtree. CONTESTtree was not significant on ROC curve analysis and discarded. The other 3 questionnaires were significant in all data sets, although CONTESTw was slightly inferior to the others in the validation data sets. Potential cut points for referral were also discussed. Of 4 candidate questionnaires combining existing discriminatory items to identify PsA in people with psoriasis, 3 were found to be significant on ROC curve analysis. Testing in independent data sets identified 2 questionnaires (CONTEST and CONTESTjt) that should be pursued for further prospective testing. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Pain management for inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and other spondylarthritis) and gastrointestinal or liver comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radner, Helga; Ramiro, Sofia; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Landewé, Robert B. M.; van der Heijde, Désirée; Aletaha, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Even with optimal disease-modifying treatment and good control of disease activity, persistent pain due to structural damage is common in people with inflammatory arthritis and therefore additional treatment for pain might be required. Because comorbidity is highly prevalent in people with

  4. Higher Levels of Autoantibodies Targeting Mutated Citrullinated Vimentin in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis Than in Patients with Psoriasis Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szandra Dalmády

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies against citrullinated proteins/peptides (ACPAs, and especially antibodies targeting mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCVs, are novel biomarkers of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Whereas ACPAs are specific and sensitive markers for RA, there have hardly been any reports relating to ACPAs in psoriatic arthritis (PsA or in psoriasis without joint symptoms (PsO. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of anti-MCVs in PsA and PsO. Serum anti-MCV titers were measured in 46 PsA and 42 PsO patients and in 40 healthy controls by means of a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The potential correlations of the serum autoantibody levels with several clinical and laboratory parameters were examined. The anti-MCV levels in the PsA patients were significantly higher than those in the PsO group. Among the clinical variables, the presence of tender knee joints and nail psoriasis was significantly associated with anti-MCV positivity in the PsA patients. Higher anti-MCV titers in the PsO patients were associated with a more severe disease course and with the early onset of psoriatic skin symptoms. Our results suggest that anti-MCVs can be used as novel markers in the diagnosis of PsA and in a subset of PsO patients.

  5. Paradoxical onset of psoriatic arthritis during treatment with biologic agents for plaque psoriasis: a combined dermatology and rheumatology clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Balato, Nicola; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Megna, Matteo; Cirillo, Teresa; Balato, Anna; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of new cases of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in patients with plaque psoriasis receiving biologic drugs. A retrospective study was performed on 434 psoriatic patients under biologic treatment, attending the Psoriasis Care Centre of Dermatology at the University Federico II of Naples from January 2011 to November 2015. As part of the routine clinical practice, assessment of disease activity was made at baseline, and every 3 months. PsA diagnosis was performed by a rheumatologist through clinical examination, evaluation of the CASPAR criteria, laboratory and radiological assessment. On the basis of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, we reviewed and analysed the clinical data of 327 patients with plaque psoriasis. The biologic drugs adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab and ustekinumab were prescribed to 116 (35.5%), 88 (27.0%), 27 (8.2%), and 96 (29.3%), respectively. We found that 22 out of 327 patients with plaque psoriasis developed PsA during treatment with biologic drugs. In particular, 6 (27.2%) PsA patients were under etanercept therapy, 10 (45.4%) under adalimumab, 4 (18.2%) under ustekinumab and 2 (9.2%) under infliximab. The results of this study show that in several psoriasis patients, biologic therapy may not be sufficient to prevent the onset of articular involvement. In most of the verified PsA cases, arthritis occurred in concomitance with severe cutaneous involvement.

  6. Infliximab no tratamento da artrite psoriásica grave Infliximab in treatment of severe psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Jaime Consorte Loyola

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A artrite psoriásica tem sido reconhecida como doença imunomediada, em que há participação de células T produtoras de citocinas (fator de necrose tumoral-alfa. O infliximab é anticorpo monoclonal que se liga e inativa o fator de necrose tumoral-alfa. Relata-se um caso de artrite psoriásica grave, refratária a várias terapêuticas sistêmicas, tratado com infliximab 5mg/kg, em infusão venosa de três horas, nas semanas 0, 2, 6 e 14, associado com baixa dose de metotrexato, que apresentou excelente resposta terapêutica.Psoriatic arthritis has been recognized as an auto-immune disease in which there is participation of the cytokine-producing T cells (tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Infliximab is a monoclonal antibody that binds to and inactivates tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Reported is a case of severe psoriatic arthritis which was unresponsive to multiple systemic therapies and treated with an intravenous infusion of infliximab, 5mg/Kg in three hours, in weeks 0,2,6 and 14, associated with a low dose of methotrexate, with an excellent therapeutical response.

  7. The OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging scoring system (PsAMRIS): definitions of key pathologies, suggested MRI sequences, and preliminary scoring system for PsA Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Wiell, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a preliminary OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance image scoring system (PsAMRIS) for evaluation of inflammatory and destructive changes in PsA hands, which was developed by the international OMERACT MRI in inflammatory arthritis group. MRI definitions of important...... pathologies in peripheral PsA and suggestions concerning appropriate MRI sequences for use in PsA hands are also provided....

  8. PTPN22 is associated with susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis but not psoriasis: evidence for a further PsA-specific risk locus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2015-04-28

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis; it has a higher estimated genetic component than psoriasis alone, however most genetic susceptibility loci identified for PsA to date are also shared with psoriasis. Here we attempt to validate novel single nucleotide polymorphisms selected from our recent PsA Immunochip study and determine specificity to PsA.

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Information Disease Information Rheumatoid Arthritis Psoriatic Arthritis Ankylosing Spondylitis Osteoarthritis Gout Lyme Disease Osteoporosis News Rheumatoid Arthritis ...

  10. Rheological blood properties in psoriatic arthritis: relationship with inflammation and cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Korotaeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study possibility of using blood rheological parameters as markers of inflammation and cardiovascular risk (CVR in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA. Material and methods. 130 pts (51 male and 79 female with PA aged from 39 to 48 years (mean age 43 years without clinical signs of coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke were included. Duration of PA varied from 2 months to 42 years (mean 7 years, duration of psoriasis (PS – from 5,5 to 26 years (mean 15 years. Main measures of erythrocyte aggregation (EA including Kt (c-1 – total speed of erythrocytes aggregates formation, T (c – time of linear erythrocytes aggregates formation, I2,5 [%] – parameter characterizing durability of most large erythrocytes aggregates, β (c-1 – hydrodynamic durability of erythrocytes aggregates were evaluated in erythroaggregometer by registration of intensity of inverse light scattering from blood sample. PA activity was measured with DAS4. CHD development risk score was determined considering traditional CVR factors – age, total cholesterol (TCH and high density lipoproteins (HDLP level, systolic blood pressure (SBP, presence of diabetes, smoking. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen concentration was measured with standard methods. Correlation analysis was performed with Spearman range correlation coefficient (R, Mann-Whitney (U test was used for groups comparison and p<0,05 was considered as statistically significant level. Results. EA disturbances corresponding to 2nd stage of severity were present in all pts with PA. Significant correlation between EA parameters (T , Kt, I2,5, β and DAS4 (R=-0,32/0,32/0,33/0,25, p<0,001 as well as significant correlation of all EA parameters (T , Kt, I2,5, β with laboratory inflammation markers: CRP (R=-0,37/0,41/0,46/0,32, ESR (R=-0,34/0,35/0,42/0,26 and most strong – with fibrinogen (R=-0,55/0,55/0,49/0,32 were revealed. Significant correlations of all EA parameters and fibrinogen with CVR

  11. Health-related quality of life in psoriatic arthritis patients in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratacós, Jordi; Daudén, Esteban; Gómez-Reino, Juan; Moreno, José Carlos; Casado, Miguel Ángel; Rodríguez-Valverde, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    To describe the demographic and clinical characteristics, including health-related quality-of-life (HRQL), in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). 287 patients from 18 Spanish centres were assessed. PsA severity was measured using the following criteria: (1) Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI score 0-72, from low to high severity); (2) number of swollen and tender joints; and (3) Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ score 0-3 from low to high impairment in daily activities). HRQL assessment was performed using the following criteria: (a) EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D scores 1-3, with a higher score representing a worse HRQL), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS score 0-100, with a higher score representing a better HQRL) and (b) Short Form-36 (SF-36 score 0-100, with a higher score representing a better HRQL). 24.7% of patients were treated with infliximab. In the two groups, 55.7% of the patients were male with a mean age of 52.40±12.53 years. The average number of swollen joints was higher in patients not receiving biological therapy than in those receiving treatment (2.98 vs. 1.54). The mean PASI score was 3.73±5.83, and there was no difference between groups. HAQ scores were higher in patients receiving infliximab than in those not receiving treatment (0.93 vs. 0.70). The mean EQ-5D scores in the two groups indicated a poorer status based on pain and inability to perform usual/daily activities. HRQL measured by VAS score mean was 60.41 ± 20.08, and there was no difference between the groups. The domains in the SF-36 suggesting poorer functioning in the two groups were the physical role (50.76 ± 43.43), physical pain (49.35 ± 25.69) and the overall physical component (37.88 ± 10.87). PsA is associated with an impaired HRQL characterised by physical pain and poorer functioning in daily activities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Ex Vivo Signaling Protein Mapping in T Lymphocytes in the Psoriatic Arthritis Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Ugo; Martini, Veronica; Accordi, Benedetta; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Felicetti, Mara; Frallonardo, Paola; Facco, Monica; Boso, Daniele; Molena, Beatrice; Zambello, Renato; Ramonda, Roberta; Cozzi, Franco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Basso, Giuseppe; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Doria, Andrea; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We assessed signaling protein mapping in total T cells, to analyze the proportions of T regulatory (Treg) and TCD4+ effector (Teff) cell phenotypes, and the respective interleukin 6Rα (IL-6Rα) expression in the inflammatory microenvironment of synovial fluid (SF) of patients with sustained psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Our approach was to measure the IL-6 level in SF using a multiplex bead immunoassay. Reverse-phase protein array was used to assess Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and JAK2, extra-cellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), signal transducer and activator and transcription (STAT) 1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins in total T cell lysates from SF of patients with PsA. Frequencies of CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD4+ Th cells producing IL-17A and IL-17F (Th17) and CD4+CD25high intracellular forkhead box transcription factor+ (FOXP3+) phenotypes, and the percentage of Treg- and Teff- cells were quantified in SF and matched peripheral blood (PB) of patients with PsA and PB of healthy controls (HC) by flow cytometry. Our results were the following: In PsA SF samples, a coordinate increase of JAK1, ERK1/2, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins was found in total T cells in SF of PsA; where IL-6 levels were higher than in PB from HC. Expanded CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ Th17, CD4+ CD25- Teff- and CD4+CD25(high) FoxP3+Treg subsets, showing similar levels of enhanced IL-6Rδ expression, were confined to PsA joints. In our studies, the transcriptional network profile identified by ex vivo signaling protein mapping in T lymphocytes in PsA joints revealed the complex interplay between IL-1, IL-6, and IL-23 signaling and differentiation of Th17 cells and CD4+Tregs in sustained joint inflammation in PsA.

  13. Patient experience with intravenous biologic therapies for ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn’s disease, psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolge SC

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Susan C Bolge,1 Helen M Eldridge,2 Jennifer H Lofland,3 Caitlin Ravin,3 Philip J Hart,4 Michael P Ingham1 1Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Raritan, 2Payer Provider Insights & Analytics, Janssen Services, LLC, Titusville, NJ, 3Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, 4Value Communications, Medaxial Group, New York, NY, USA Objective: The objective of this study was to describe patient experience with intravenous (IV biologics for ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn’s disease, psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or ulcerative colitis.Methods: Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted in 405 patients with these autoimmune diseases who were receiving an IV biologic to treat their disease.Results: On a 7-point scale (1= not at all satisfied; 7= very satisfied, mean satisfaction with IV medication was rated 6.1; 77% of patients rated satisfaction as 6 or 7. The most frequently perceived benefits of IV therapy were related to supervision provided by health care professionals. Most patients (82%, n=332 preferred their IV medication to subcutaneous injection. The three most common reasons for preferring IV were not wanting to self-inject (43%, less frequent dosing (34%, and preference for administration by a health care professional (24%. African–American/black patients had a stronger preference for IV administration than Caucasian/white patients (97% vs 80%, P<0.05 and a greater dislike of needles/self-injection (71% vs 40%, P<0.05. Hospital outpatient departments were not rated as well as physician in-office infusion. Only half (49% of the patients reported that both they and their physician equally influenced the choice to switch from subcutaneous to IV therapy, and only 30% were given a choice of infusion center.Conclusion: Users of IV biologics are highly satisfied with their medications and perceive the opportunity for health care

  14. A genome-wide association study of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis identifies new disease loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A genome-wide association study was performed to identify genetic factors involved in susceptibility to psoriasis (PS and psoriatic arthritis (PSA, inflammatory diseases of the skin and joints in humans. 223 PS cases (including 91 with PSA were genotyped with 311,398 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and results were compared with those from 519 Northern European controls. Replications were performed with an independent cohort of 577 PS cases and 737 controls from the U.S., and 576 PSA patients and 480 controls from the U.K.. Strongest associations were with the class I region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The most highly associated SNP was rs10484554, which lies 34.7 kb upstream from HLA-C (P = 7.8x10(-11, GWA scan; P = 1.8x10(-30, replication; P = 1.8x10(-39, combined; U.K. PSA: P = 6.9x10(-11. However, rs2395029 encoding the G2V polymorphism within the class I gene HCP5 (combined P = 2.13x10(-26 in U.S. cases yielded the highest ORs with both PS and PSA (4.1 and 3.2 respectively. This variant is associated with low viral set point following HIV infection and its effect is independent of rs10484554. We replicated the previously reported association with interleukin 23 receptor and interleukin 12B (IL12B polymorphisms in PS and PSA cohorts (IL23R: rs11209026, U.S. PS, P = 1.4x10(-4; U.K. PSA: P = 8.0x10(-4; IL12B:rs6887695, U.S. PS, P = 5x10(-5 and U.K. PSA, P = 1.3x10(-3 and detected an independent association in the IL23R region with a SNP 4 kb upstream from IL12RB2 (P = 0.001. Novel associations replicated in the U.S. PS cohort included the region harboring lipoma HMGIC fusion partner (LHFP and conserved oligomeric golgi complex component 6 (COG6 genes on chromosome 13q13 (combined P = 2x10(-6 for rs7993214; OR = 0.71, the late cornified envelope gene cluster (LCE from the Epidermal Differentiation Complex (PSORS4 (combined P = 6.2x10(-5 for rs6701216; OR 1.45 and a region of LD at 15q21 (combined P = 2.9x10(-5 for rs

  15. Persistence with golimumab in immune-mediated rheumatic diseases: a systematic review of real-world evidence in rheumatoid arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis, and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svedbom A

    2017-04-01

    estimates of OLE trials.Conclusion: The data reviewed in this study indicate that golimumab may have higher persistence than other TNFis, a notion that is supported by indirect comparisons of persistence data from OLEs of randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Furthermore, the study suggests that persistence may be lower in biologic-experienced compared with biologic-naive patients and higher in axial spondyloarthritis compared with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Keywords: golimumab, Simponi, Treatment persistence, drug survival, retention rates, real-world evidence (RWE

  16. High-resolution MRI assessment of dactylitis in psoriatic arthritis shows flexor tendon pulley and sheath-related enthesitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ai Lyn; Fukuba, Eiji; Halliday, Nicola Ann; Tanner, Steven F; Emery, Paul; McGonagle, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Dactylitis is a hallmark of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) where flexor tenosynovitis is common. This study explored the microanatomical basis of dactylitis using high-resolution MRI (hrMRI) to visualise the small entheses around the digits. Twelve patients with psoriatic dactylitis (4 fingers, 8 toes), and 10 healthy volunteers (6 fingers, 4 toes) had hrMRI of the digits using a 'microscopy' coil and contrast enhancement. All structures were evaluated including the tendons and ligaments, related enthesis organs, pulleys, volar/plantar plates and tendon sheaths. In dactylitis, collateral ligament enthesitis was seen in nine digits (75%), extensor tendon enthesitis in six digits (50%), functional enthesitis (5 digits, 42%), abnormal enhancement at the volar plates (2/5 joints, 40%) and the plantar plate (1/5 joints, 20%). Nine cases (75%) demonstrated flexor tenosynovitis, with flexor tendon pulley/flexor sheath microenthesopathy observed in 50% of all cases. Less abnormalities which were milder was observed in the normal controls, none of whom had any signal changes in the tendon pulleys or fibrous sheaths. This study provides proof of concept for a link between dactylitis and 'digital polyenthesitis' including disease of the miniature enthesis pulleys of the flexor tendons, further affirming the concept of enthesitis in PsA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. C5a and C5aR are elevated in joints of rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis patients, and C5aR blockade attenuates leukocyte migration to synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornum, Lars; Hansen, Anker Jon; Tornehave, Ditte; Fjording, Marianne Scheel; Colmenero, Paula; Wätjen, Inger Falbe; Søe Nielsen, Niels Henrik; Bliddal, Henning; Bartels, Else Marie

    2017-01-01

    Complement activation correlates to rheumatoid arthritis disease activity, and increased amounts of the complement split product C5a is observed in synovial fluids from rheumatoid arthritis patients. Blockade of C5a or its receptor (C5aR) is efficacious in several arthritis models. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of C5a and C5aR in human rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis-both with respect to expression and function. Synovial fluid, blood and synovial samples were obtained from rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and osteoarthritis patients as a less inflammatory arthritis type, and blood from healthy subjects. Cells infiltrating synovial tissue were analysed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. SF and blood were analysed for biomarkers by flow cytometry or ELISA. The effect of a blocking anti-human C5aR mAb on leukocyte migration was determined using a Boyden chamber. Appropriate statistical tests were applied for comparisons. C5aR+ cells were detected in most rheumatoid arthritis, in all psoriatic arthritis, but not in non-inflammatory control synovia. C5aR+ cells were primarily neutrophils and macrophages. C5aR+ macrophages were mainly found in lymphoid aggregates in close contact with T cells. C5a levels were increased in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis synovial fluid compared to osteoarthritis, and in blood from rheumatoid arthritis compared to healthy subjects. Neutrophil and monocyte migration to rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid was significantly inhibited by anti-C5aR. The data support that the C5a-C5aR axis may be driving the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the synovial fluid and synovium in both rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and suggest that C5a or C5aR may be a promising treatment target in both diseases.

  18. Reductions in healthcare resource utilization in psoriatic arthritis patients receiving etanercept therapy: results from the educate trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Alexa Boer; Jackson, J Mark; Sobell, Jeffrey M; Boh, Erin E; Grekin, Steven; Pharmd, Elaine B Yu; Woolley, J Michael; Xia, H Amy; Chiou, Chiun-Fang; Stevens, Seth R

    2007-03-01

    The Experience Diagnosing, Understanding Care, and Treatment with Enbrel (EDUCATE) trial is a phase IV, 24-week, multicenter, open-label study of etanercept 50 mg weekly in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in community dermatology clinics. In this study, patients with active PsA and moderate to severe plaque psoriasis have measurable uses of healthcare resources at baseline, reflecting a burden of illness. Etanercept significantly reduced healthcare resource utilization, absenteeism, and caregiver assistance in PsA patients after 24 weeks of treatment. These results could translate into savings on both direct and indirect costs and improvements in health-related quality of life for patients with PsA.

  19. The risk of depression, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, J J; Penfold, R B; Primatesta, P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sparse information is available concerning mental health issues in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. OBJECTIVE: To estimate risk of depression, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt in patients with psoriasis, PsA and AS, respectively......, compared with the general population. METHODS: This population-based cohort study analysed 36 214 psoriasis patients, 5138 PsA patients and 1878 AS patients who were frequency-matched with a general population cohort. Annual incidence rate of depression, suicidal ideation and suicide attempt was calculated...... separately for psoriasis, PsA and AS. RESULTS: There was an increased risk of depression in the three cohorts; adjusted IRR: psoriasis, 1.14 (95% CI, 1.11, 1.17); PsA, 1.22 (95% CI, 1.16, 1.29); AS, 1.34 (95% CI, 1.23, 1.47). There was no significantly increased risk for suicidal ideations or suicide attempt...

  20. Effectiveness and Feasibility Associated with Switching to a Second or Third TNF Inhibitor in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Erik; Lie, Elisabeth; Jacobsson, Lennart T H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because new modes of action for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are emerging, it is important to understand the use of switching to a second or third antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agent. This study investigated drug survival and treatment response rates of patients...... with PsA undergoing second- and third-line anti-TNF therapy. METHODS: Patients with PsA were monitored in a prospective, observational study. Patients who switched anti-TNF therapy once (first-time switchers, n = 217) or twice (second-time switchers, n = 57) between January 2003 and March 2012 were...... rates were 26% and 10%, respectively. Median drug survival time for patients switching anti-TNF for the first time was 64 months (95% CI 31-97) compared with 14 months (95% CI 5-23) for second-time switchers. Identified baseline predictor of ACR20 response to second-line treatment was the 28-joint...

  1. Disease activity in and quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans: the Nordic PAM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, U; Gudbjornsson, B; Iversen, L; Laasonen, L; Ejstrup, L; Ternowitz, T; Ståhle, M

    2017-11-01

    To describe the social status and health-related quality of life of patients with psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries. Patients with at least one mutilated joint confirmed by radiology were studied. Disease activity involving joints and skin, physician-assessed disease activity, and patient's education and work status were recorded. Data from the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, Health Assessment Questionnaire and Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire were gathered and correlated with disease duration, pain, and general well-being (visual analogue scale). The controls were 58 Swedish patients with long-standing psoriatic arthritis sine PAM. Sixty-seven patients were included. Patients with PAM had a protracted disease history (33 ± 14 years) and disease onset at a relatively early age (30 ± 12 years). Overall inflammatory activity at inclusion was mild to moderate. The mean number of mutilated joints was 8.2 and gross deformity was found in 16% of patients. Forty per cent were treated with biological and 32% with conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Forty-two per cent had retired early or were on sick leave. Impaired functional capacity with little or no ability to perform self-care or everyday tasks was reported by 21% of the patients. Patients between 45 and 60 years of age reported the most impaired quality of life in comparison to the control group. PAM seriously affects social functioning. Whether early recognition of PAM and new forms of therapy can improve disease outcome and quality of life remains to be studied.

  2. Prevalence of psoriatic arthritis and comorbidities in patients with severe psoriasis: Data of a retrospective analysis of a hospital cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Batkaeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA and comorbidities in a hospital cohort of patients with severe psoriasis (PsO.Patients and methods. Case history data were retrospectively analyzed in 592 patients with PsO (348 men and 244 women; mean age, 49.2±0.6 years; mean PsO duration, 11.8±0.6 years; mean Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI, 49.4±0.5 scores who had been treated at the Branch of the V.G. Korolenko Clinic, Moscow Research and Practical Center of Dermatovenereology and Cosmetology, in 2010 to 2011. The diagnosis of comorbidities was confirmed by medical specialists in accordance with the ICD-10 code; the rate and pattern (% of comorbidities were analyzed.Results. Out of the 592 patients with PsO, 503 (85.1% were found to have comorbidities. Diseases of the cardiovascular system (CVS(I00–I199 were recorded in the majority (61.6% of the patients. PsA (L40.5, M07.0–M07.3 was detected in 39.4% of the examinees. Other diseases of the skeletomuscular system unassociated with psoriasis (M00–M99 were present in 27.6% of the patients. Diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT and hepatobiliary system (K00–K93, B15–B19 were found in 47.5% of the patients. Endocrine diseases, nutritional and metabolic disorders (E00–E90, particularly diabetes mellitus, thyroid diseases, and obesity, were diagnosed in 12.2, 24, and 88% of the patients with PsO, respectively. 13.9% of the patients with PsO had urinary tract diseases, among them there was chronic pyelonephritis (N20, kidney cysts (N28.1, urolithiasis (Q61, prostate diseases (N11 in 73, 71, 47, and 27% of cases, respectively.Conclusion. Most patients with severe PsO were observed to have comorbidity, primarily diseases of the locomotor apparatus, CVS, and GIT. PsA was recorded in more than one third of patients. Comorbidity was identified in 36% of the patients with PsO.

  3. Enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis and healthy subjects assessed by ‘head-to-toe’ whole-body MRI and clinical examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Eshed, Iris; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the ability of whole-body MRI (WBMRI) to detect axial and peripheral enthesitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), and in healthy subjects (HS). Furthermore, to develop MRI enthesitis indices based on WBMRI and validate...... and patient global (ρ=0.29-0.31, pimaging modality for evaluation of enthesitis in patients with PsA and axSpA, but requires further investigation before clinical use....

  4. MRI bone oedema scores are higher in the arthritis mutilans form of psoriatic arthritis and correlate with high radiographic scores for joint damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu M; Østergaard, Mikkel; Doyle, Anthony; Dalbeth, Nicola; Lobo, Maria; Reeves, Quentin; Robinson, Elizabeth; Taylor, William J; Jones, Peter B; Pui, Karen; Lee, Jamie; McQueen, Fiona M

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of bone disease in the arthritis mutilans (AM) form of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods Twenty-eight patients with erosive PsA were enrolled (median disease duration of 14 years). Using x-rays of both hands and feet, 11 patients were classified as AM and 17 as non-AM (erosive psoriatic arthritis without bone lysis)by two observers. MRI scans (1.5T) of the dominant hand (wrist and fingers scanned separately) were obtained using standard contrast-enhanced T1-weighted and fat-saturated T2-weighted sequences. Scans were scored separately by two readers for bone erosion, oedema and proliferation using a PsA MRI scoring system. X-rays were scored for erosions and joint space narrowing. Results On MRI, 1013 bones were scored by both readers. Reliability for scoring erosions and bone oedema was high (intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.80 and 0.77 respectively) but only fair for bone proliferation (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.42). MRI erosion scores were higher in AM patients (53.0 versus 15.0, p = 0.004) as were bone oedema and proliferation scores (14.7 versus 10.0, p = 0.056 and 3.6 versus 0.7, p = 0.003 respectively). MRI bone oedema scores correlated with MRI erosion scores and X-ray erosion and joint space narrowing scores (r = 0.65, p = 0.0002 for all) but not the disease activity score 28-C reactive protein (DAS28CRP) or pain scores. Conclusions In this patient group with PsA, MRI bone oedema, erosion and proliferation were all more severe in the AM-form. Bone oedema scores did not correlate with disease activity measures but were closely associated with X-ray joint damage scores. These results suggest that MRI bone oedema may be a pre-erosive feature and that bone damage may not be coupled with joint inflammation in PsA. PMID:19126234

  5. Discriminant validity, responsiveness and reliability of the arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey assessing workplace and household productivity in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The novel arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS) was developed to estimate patient productivity limitations associated with arthritis within and outside the home, which is an unmet need in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The WPS has been validated in rheumatoid arthritis. This report assesses the discriminant validity, responsiveness and reliability of the WPS in adult-onset PsA. Methods Psychometric properties were assessed using data from the RAPID-PsA trial (NCT01087788) investigating certolizumab pegol (CZP) efficacy and safety in PsA. WPS was completed at baseline and every 4 weeks until Week 24. Validity was evaluated at baseline via known-groups defined using first and third quartiles of patients’ Disease Activity Score 28 based on C-reactive protein (DAS28(CRP)), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Short Form-36 (SF-36) items and PsA Quality of Life (PsAQoL) scores. Responsiveness and reliability were assessed by comparing WPS mean changes at Week 12 in American College of Rheumatology 20% improvement criteria (ACR20) or HAQ-DI Minimal Clinically Important Difference (MCID) 0.3 responders versus non-responders, as well as using standardized response means (SRM). All comparisons were conducted on the observed cases in the Randomized Set, regardless of the randomization group, using a non-parametric bootstrap-t method. Results Compared with patients with a better health state, patients with a worse health state had on average 2 to 6 times more household work days lost, more days with reduced household productivity, more days missed of family/social/leisure activities, more days with outside help hired and a significantly higher interference of arthritis per month. Among employed patients, those with a worse health state had 2 to 4 times more workplace days lost, more days with patient workplace productivity reduced, and a significantly higher interference of arthritis on patient workplace productivity versus

  6. Assessment of influence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammation on arterial wall structural characteristics in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Korotaeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of influence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammation on arterial wall structural characteristics in psoriatic arthritis. Objective. To assess possibility of traditional cardiovascular risk (CVR factors application as markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA. Material and methods. 130 pts with PA (51 male and 79 female without clinical signs of coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke. were included. Mean age was 43 years (39-48 years, mean PA duration – 7 years (2 months-42 years, mean psoriasis duration – 15 years (5,5 – 26 years. PA activity was assessed with DAS4. Age, total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoprotein (HDLP, low density lipoprotein (LDLP, C-reactive protein (CRP, fibrinogen, systolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI, atherogenity coefficient (AC, relative risk of CHD development, presence of diabetes and smoking were evaluated. Mean and maximal intima-media complex thickness (IMCT of common carotid arteries was examined with duplex scanning. Results. TC, LDLP and AC elevation was revealed in all and BMI elevation – in one third of pts. In 55% of pts CVR was mean and higher, in 23,5% CVR was absent and in 21,5% CVR was below mean. CVR significantly correlated with mean and maximal carotid arteries IMCT (R=0,48, p<0,00001 and R=0,41, p<0,00001 and fibrinogen (R=0,22, p<0,011. In women CVR correlated with fibrinogen (R=0,27, p<0,16, BMI (R=0,35, p<0,16, mean and maximal carotid arteries IMCT (R=0,50, p<0,00001 and R=0,38, p<0,0005 respectively and psoriasis duration (R=0,30, p<0,006. In men CVR did not correlated with fibrinogen. CVR did not correlated with DAS4 and CRP. Conclusion. CVR in PA is not connected with traditional markers of inflammation andindex of clinical disease activity.

  7. Minimal disease activity and impact of disease in psoriatic arthritis: a Spanish cross-sectional multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiro, Rubén; Cañete, Juan D; Montilla, Carlos; Abad, Miguel; Montoro, María; Gómez, Susana; Cábez, Ana

    2017-03-29

    Patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) experience functional impairment and reduced quality of life, and thus patient global assessment in PsA is explained mainly by the physical, but also by the psychological, aspect of the disease. To assess the prevalence of minimal disease activity (MDA) in Spanish patients with PsA, we examined their characteristics and the association between MDA and the impact of the disease as assessed by the PsA Impact of Disease (PsAID) questionnaire. A cross-sectional multicenter study was carried out in patients who fulfilled the Classification for Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR) criteria with at least 1 year of disease duration, and who were treated with biological or conventional synthetic (cs) disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) according to routine clinical practice in Spain. Patients were considered in MDA if they met at least 5/7 of the MDA criteria. The association between MDA and the recently developed PsAID questionnaire was also recorded. Of 227 patients included, 133 (58.6%) were in the MDA state (52% with antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF)α monotherapy, 24% with csDMARD monotherapy, and 24% with anti-TNFα in combination with csDMARD). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, male gender (odds ratio (OR) 2.74, p = 0.001), a sedentary lifestyle (OR 3.13, p = 0.002), familial history of PsA (OR 0.38, p = 0.036), C-reactive protein (CRP) level (OR 0.92, p = 0.010), and use of corticoids (OR 0.33, p = 0.007) were considered features related to MDA. MDA patients had a significantly lower impact of the disease according to PsAID (mean total score (SD): MDA 3.3 (3.1) vs. non-MDA 7.1 (5.2); p < 0.001). Nearly 60% of Spanish PsA patients achieve MDA in routine clinical practice. MDA remains one of the most useful therapeutic targets for PsA since patients who reached this state also had a significantly lower impact of disease according to PsAID.

  8. Do depression and anxiety reduce the likelihood of remission in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis? Data from the prospective multicentre NOR-DMARD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Brigitte; Kristianslund, Eirik Klami; Sexton, Joseph; Hammer, Hilde Berner; Fagerli, Karen Minde; Lie, Elisabeth; Wierød, Ada; Kalstad, Synøve; Rødevand, Erik; Krøll, Frode; Haugeberg, Glenn; Kvien, Tore K

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the predictive value of baseline depression/anxiety on the likelihood of achieving joint remission in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) as well as the associations between baseline depression/anxiety and the components of the remission criteria at follow-up. We included 1326 patients with RA and 728 patients with PsA from the prospective observational NOR-DMARD study starting first-time tumour necrosis factor inhibitors or methotrexate. The predictive value of depression/anxiety on remission was explored in prespecified logistic regression models and the associations between baseline depression/anxiety and the components of the remission criteria in prespecified multiple linear regression models. Baseline depression/anxiety according to EuroQoL-5D-3L, Short Form-36 (SF-36) Mental Health subscale ≤56 and SF-36 Mental Component Summary ≤38 negatively predicted 28-joint Disease Activity Score Arthritis ≤4 remission after 3 and 6 months treatment in RA (p≤0.008) and partly in PsA (p from 0.001 to 0.73). Baseline depression/anxiety was associated with increased patient's and evaluator's global assessment, tender joint count and joint pain in RA at follow-up, but not with swollen joint count and acute phase reactants. Depression and anxiety may reduce likelihood of joint remission based on composite scores in RA and PsA and should be taken into account in individual patients when making a shared decision on a treatment target. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Recommendations for the Use of Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance in Patients With Spondyloarthritis, Including Psoriatic Arthritis, and Patients With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uson, Jacqueline; Loza, Estibaliz; Möller, Ingrid; Acebes, Carlos; Andreu, Jose Luis; Batlle, Enrique; Bueno, Ángel; Collado, Paz; Fernández-Gallardo, Juan Manuel; González, Carlos; Jiménez Palop, Mercedes; Lisbona, María Pilar; Macarrón, Pilar; Maymó, Joan; Narváez, Jose Antonio; Navarro-Compán, Victoria; Sanz, Jesús; Rosario, M Piedad; Vicente, Esther; Naredo, Esperanza

    2016-10-27

    To develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with spondyloarthritis, including psoriatic arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Recommendations were generated following a nominal group technique. A panel of experts (15 rheumatologists and 3 radiologists) was established in the first panel meeting to define the scope and purpose of the consensus document, as well as chapters, potential recommendations and systematic literature reviews (we used and updated those from previous EULAR documents). A first draft of recommendations and text was generated. Then, an electronic Delphi process (2 rounds) was carried out. Recommendations were voted from 1 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). We defined agreement if at least 70% of participants voted≥7. The level of evidence and grade or recommendation was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine levels of evidence. The full text was circulated and reviewed by the panel. The consensus was coordinated by an expert methodologist. A total of 12 recommendations were proposed for each disease. They include, along with explanations of the validity of US and magnetic resonance imaging regarding inflammation and damage detection, diagnosis, prediction (structural damage progression, flare, treatment response, etc.), monitoring and the use of US guided injections/biopsies. These recommendations will help clinicians use US and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with spondyloarthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety profiles and efficacy of infliximab therapy in Japanese patients with plaque psoriasis with or without psoriatic arthritis, pustular psoriasis or psoriatic erythroderma: Results from the prospective post-marketing surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Hideshi; Terui, Tadashi; Matsukawa, Miyuki; Takesaki, Kazumi; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2016-07-01

    A large-scale prospective post-marketing surveillance was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of infliximab in Japanese patients with plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, pustular psoriasis and psoriatic erythroderma. This study was conducted in all psoriasis patients treated with infliximab after its Japanese regulatory approval. Infliximab was administrated at 5 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2 and 6, and every 8 weeks thereafter. Patients were serially enrolled and observed for 6 months to evaluate the safety and efficacy. The safety and efficacy were evaluated in 764 and 746 patients, respectively. Incidences of any and serious adverse drug reactions were 22.51% and 6.94%, respectively, and those of any and serious infusion reactions were 6.15% and 1.31%, respectively, which were comparable with the results in the post-marketing surveillance with 5000 rheumatoid arthritis patients in Japan. Major adverse drug reactions during the follow-up period were infections (5.10%) including pneumonia, cellulitis and herpes zoster, however, no tuberculosis was observed. The safety profiles were equivalent, regardless of the psoriasis types. No new safety problems were identified. The response rates on global improvement and median improvement rate of Psoriasis Area and Severity Index in all patients were 88.0% and 85.0%, respectively. Of note, the efficacy was equivalent for each psoriasis type as well as for each body region. Infliximab was also effective in pustular psoriasis symptoms, joint symptoms and nail psoriasis, as well as improvement of quality of life. Infliximab was confirmed to be highly effective and well tolerated in treating refractory psoriasis, including pustular psoriasis and psoriatic erythroderma. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  11. Tuberculosis risk in ankylosing spondylitis, other spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis in Sweden: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Mirjam K; Arkema, Elizabeth V; Jonsson, Jerker; Bruchfeld, Judith; Jacobsson, Lennart Th; Askling, Johan

    2017-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a risk factor for tuberculosis (TB), particularly following treatment with biologicals. Since these therapies are increasingly used in ankylosing spondylitis (AS), other types of spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we investigated the corresponding TB risks in these patients. We identified individuals with AS/SpA/PsA, and non-AS/SpA/PsA comparators by linking Swedish national Patient, Population, TB and Rheumatology registers, and followed them for TB occurrence. Incidence rates were estimated for biological-naïve and biological-exposed patients, and the comparators. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for age, sex and country of birth. 38,702 patients with AS/SpA/PsA, and 200,417 general population persons were included. Among patients, 11 active TB cases were identified, with an incidence rate (per 105 ) of 22 (95%CI 8.3 to 59.2) for biological-exposed patients, 2.7 (95%CI 1.3 to 5.6) for biological-naïve patients and 2.4 (95%CI 1.8 to 3.3) for non-AS/SpA/PsA comparators. The adjusted HR comparing biological-naïve patients to the general population was 1.2 (95%CI 0.5 to 2.7), and 7.5 (95%CI 1.9 to 29) comparing biological-exposed to biological-naïve patients. Biological-naïve AS/PsA /SpA are not at an increased TB risk in Sweden. Following treatment with biologicals, risks increased but the absolute TB risk was low. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Involvement of the inconstant bursa of the fifth metatarsophalangeal joint in psoriatic arthritis: a clinical and ultrasonographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancio, Giovanni; Volpinari, Stefania; Fotinidi, Maria; Furini, Federica; Farina, Ilaria; Bortoluzzi, Alessandra; Ferracin, Manuela; Bandinelli, Francesca; Orzincolo, Carlo; Trotta, Francesco; Govoni, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the involvement of the bursa located next to the head of the 5th metatarsal bone in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in comparison with the other seronegative spondyloarthritis (SpA). All patients with PsA seen during a period of 24 months were enrolled. The control group included healthy subjects and patients with the other SpA. All subjects underwent clinical and ultrasound (US) examination of the lateral surface of the 5th metatarsal. 150 PsA patients (88 M; 62 F), 172 SpA (107 M; 65 F), and 95 healthy controls (58 M; 37 F) were evaluated. Based on clinical and US evaluation, bursitis was diagnosed in 17/150 (11.3%) PsA patients but in none of the SpA (P bursa of the 5th metatarsophalangeal joint appears to be involved in PsA more frequently than by chance. If confirmed by other studies, this finding could be considered as a distinctive clinical sign of PsA, useful for differential diagnosis with the other SpA. In asymptomatic patients, US proved to be more sensitive in the detection of bursitis.

  13. Peculiarities of dyslipidemia in patients with psoriatic arthritis: connection with atherosclerosis, cardiovascular risk factors and inflammation activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebrov A.P.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to found the dyslipidemia in patients with psoriatic arthritis and to study the connection between dyslipidemia and cardiovascular risk factors, atherosclerosis and inflammation activity. 40 persons with PsA without cardiovascular diseases were involved in the study, 25 healthy people were examined like controls. Activity of PsA was learned by DAS, Likert index, Ritchie Arthicular Index, Number of swelling joints (NSJ, ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, low and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension, body mass index, individual cardiac history were performed like cardiovascular risk markers. The ultrasound measuring the thickness of intima-media layer (IML in carotid arteries was performed to subclinical atherosclerosis study. Increase of total cholesterol, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein cholesterol level was found in patients with PsA comparative with controls. There was prevalence of high and moderate increase of total cholesterol in patients with PsA, and in controls only low increase was measured. Correlation between total cholesterol and NSJ, fibrinogen, hypertension and IML was found. Low density lipoproteins were tingly interrelated with ESR, hypertension and IML. Very low density lipoproteins were connected with age of disease beginning, hypertension and IML, and triglycerides-with hypertension, enthesitis and dactilitis. Dyslipidemia in patients with PsA characterizes by total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol increase, but not high density lipoprotein decrease. There is the connection between dyslipidemia in PsA and inflammation activity, arterial hypertension and IML

  14. Impact of treatment with TNF antagonists on total cholesterol in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneiro, Jose Ramon; Souto, Alejandro; Gomez-Reino, Juan J

    2017-05-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the impact of TNF antagonists (TNFa) on the total cholesterol and triglycerides on ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). In this single-centre observational study of AS and PsA patients, differences in triglyceride and total cholesterol levels and frequency of hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia at 3 and 6 months were analysed in patients treated and not treated with TNFa. General estimation equations and linear regression analysis were used to investigate associations between disease activity and lipid levels and to identify predictors of change. One hundred fifty-seven patients treated, and 157 not treated with TNFa, were included in the study. A transient increase in cholesterol level from baseline to 3 months in TNFa-treated patients was the only statistically significant effect (P Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (P = 0.011) and CRP (P < 0.001), but not Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints (P = 0.095) were found in the whole group. In AS and PsA patients treated with TNFa, mild and transient changes in cholesterol but not in triglyceride levels were associated with changes in disease activity.

  15. Cardiovascular effects of Etanercept in patients with psoriatic arthritis: evidence from the cardiovascular risk in rheumatic diseases database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Iervolino, Salvatore; Zincarelli, Carmela; Lupoli, Roberta; Ambrosino, Pasquale; Pizzicato, Paolo; Di Minno, Alessandro; Pappone, Nicola; Peluso, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Many literature data support the possibility of an increased cardiovascular (CV) risk in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients compared with the general population. This cannot be entirely explained by the presence of traditional vascular risk factors. It has been suggested that inflammation may act synergistically with traditional vascular risk factors, thus contributing to the atherosclerotic process and to the increased CV risk. In order to evaluate the CV effects of the control of systemic inflammation by Etanercept, in the present study we analyze data recorded in the Cardiovascular Risk in Rheumatic Diseases study group database to perform a further analysis on the effects of Etanercept on primary hemostasis, secondary hemostasis and carotid subclinical atherosclerosis. Platelet reactivity is increased in patients with poorly controlled PsA. Among patients receiving Etanercept, those achieving minimal disease activity show a platelet reactivity comparable to healthy controls. Similarly, the anti-inflammatory effect of Etanercept is associated with a significant improvement of hemostatic and fibrinolytic parameters in PsA subjects, maximal changes being documented in patients achieving minimal disease activity. In addition, the treatment with Etanercept seems to be associated with a carotid intima-media thickness significantly lower as compared with matched patients receiving traditional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Our data can be suggestive of the reduction of the CV risk in patients with PsA treated with Etanercept.

  16. Development of a checklist for patients with axial spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis in daily practice: ONLY TOOLS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almodovar, Raquel; Torre Alonso, Juan C; Batlle, Enrique; Castillo, Concepción; Collantes-Estevez, Eduardo; de Miguel, Eugenio; González, Senén; Gratacós, Jordi; Hernández, Azucena; Juanola, Xavier; Linares, Luis F; Moreno, Manuel J; Moreno, Mireia; Navarro-Compán, Victoria; Rodríguez Lozano, Carlos; Sanz, Jesus; Sellas, Agustí; Loza, Estíbaliz; Zarco, Pedro

    2017-03-09

    To standardize clinical evaluation of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) using a checklist. Qualitative study that included: 1) nominal group (18 experts); 2) literature reviews of measures used in the assessment of patients with axial SpA or PsA; and 3) focus groups, one with rheumatologists and another with patients, organized to become familiar with their opinion on medical assistance. Taking this into account, the experts selected the measures to be included in the checklist based on their relevance, feasibility, and the outcome type. The checklist includes measures for the evaluation of personal history, physical examination, activity and function, laboratory tests, imaging studies and treatments. It also defines risk factors of radiographic progression, predictors of the response to biological therapies, and comprises measures of excellence. This checklist for patients with axial SpA and PsA could help standardize daily clinical practice and improve clinical management and patient prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  17. Socioeconomic burden of psoriatic arthritis in Hong Kong: direct and indirect costs and the influence of disease pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tracy Y; Tam, Lai-Shan; Leung, Ying-Ying; Kwok, Lai-Wa; Wong, Kong-Chiu; Yu, Tracy; Kun, Emily W; Li, Edmund K

    2010-06-01

    To estimate the direct costs and indirect costs of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in Hong Kong. A retrospective cost-of-illness study was performed on 125 patients with PsA. Participants completed questionnaires on demographics, employment status, and out of pocket expenses. Health resources consumption was recorded by chart review and patient self-report questionnaire. Patients were grouped according to disease pattern, i.e., peripheral and axial disease. Multiple regression was used to determine the predictors of the costs. The average annual direct costs were $4,141 (2006 US dollars) per patient. Costs of inpatient care accounted for 27% of direct costs, followed by costs of visits to healthcare providers (25%). The estimated average indirect costs were $3,127 per patient-year. Forty-eight (42%) patients had no indirect costs. Sixty percent of patients with peripheral disease were still employed, compared to 39% of patients with axial disease. Patients with axial disease had almost twice the indirect costs compared to those with peripheral disease (p = 0.005). Increased pain and poor function were independently associated with increased direct costs. Worse physical health status, determined by indirect costs borne by the patient, and poor function and old age predicted high costs. PsA imposes substantial economic burden. Pain and function are significantly associated with costs. Improvements in treatments to reduce pain and restore function are likely to reduce the costs incurred by these patients.

  18. Identification and management of comorbidity in psoriatic arthritis: evidence- and expert-based recommendations from a multidisciplinary panel from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Carmona, Loreto; Moreno, Mireia; Galíndez, Eva; Babío, Jesús; Zarco, Pedro; Linares, Luis; Collantes-Estevez, Eduardo; Barrial, Manuel Fernández; Hermosa, Juan Carlos; Coto, Pablo; Suárez, Carmen; Almodóvar, Raquel; Luelmo, Jesús; Castañeda, Santos; Gratacós, Jordi

    2017-08-01

    The objective is to establish recommendations, based on evidence and expert opinion, for the identification and management of comorbidities in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The following techniques were applied: discussion group, systematic review, and Delphi survey for agreement. A panel of professionals from four specialties defined the users, the sections of the document, possible recommendations, and what systematic reviews should be performed. A second discussion was held with the results of the systematic reviews. Recommendations were formulated in the second meeting and voted online from 1 (total disagreement) to 10 (total agreement). Agreement was considered if at least 70% voted ≥7. The level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine guidance. The full document was critically appraised by the experts, and the project was supervised at all times by a methodologist. In a final step, the document was reviewed and commented by a patient and a health management specialist. Fourteen recommendations were produced, together with a checklist to facilitate the implementation. The items with the largest support from evidence were those related to cardiovascular disease and risk factors. The panel recommends paying special attention to obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption, as they are all modifiable factors with an impact on treatment response or complications of PsA. Psychological and organizational aspects were also deemed important. We herein suggest practical recommendations for the management of comorbidities in PsA based on evidence and expert opinion.

  19. Golimumab therapy-induced indicators of X-ray inflammation progression and magnitude according to magnetic resonance imaging evidence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Viktorovich Smirnov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the progression of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging changes in the hand and foot joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthropathy and in the axial skeleton of those with ankylosing spondylitis when golimumab is used. Golimumab therapy is shown to retard the progression of structural changes in the peripheral joints and vertebral column. There is a significant correlation between magnetic resonance imaging evidence and blood C-reactive protein concentrations.

  20. Low prescription rate for systemic treatments in the management of severe psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis in dermatological practices in Berlin and Brandenburg, Germany: results from a patient registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, A; Reytan, N; Rosumeck, S; Erdmann, R; Rzany, B

    2008-11-01

    Many treatment options are available for the management of psoriasis vulgaris. However, detailed data on prescription behaviour in Germany, especially with regard to the use of new treatment options (e.g. biologics) in private practices, are lacking. To assess the treatment choices being made in the management of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis in private dermatological practices. We established a patient registry that documented the treatment decisions taken during 4797 patient visits between January 2006 and September 2006 with regard to disease activity and concomitant psoriatic arthritis. Corticosteroids were the most frequently prescribed topical treatment, and methotrexate and fumaric acid esters were the most frequently prescribed systemic treatments. Biologics were prescribed in only 2% of patient visits. Systemic treatments were prescribed in only 31% of visits made by patients suffering from moderate to severe psoriasis (which was diagnosed in 48% of all patient visits) and in only 58% of visits made by patients suffering from psoriatic arthritis (which was diagnosed in 12% of all patient visits). Anti-psoriatic treatment was too often limited to topical agents. The rather small percentage of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis who received systemic therapy indicates that the use of systemic treatments in our sample was too restrictive. Novel therapeutic options such as biologics were rarely used in private practices. New strategies to improve the quality of care provided to patients suffering from severe psoriasis are needed.

  1. Incidence of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and polymyalgia rheumatica in an inland area of central Italy: results of the CAMPO-RHE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Socio, Antonia; Perrotta, Fabio Massimo; Grasso, Guido Maria; Lubrano, Ennio

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the CAMPO-RHE study was to determine the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) in patients attending a rheumatologic outpatient's clinic of a new institution in Campobasso, Italy. Campobasso is a small town of approximately 50,000 inhabitants located in the inland territory of central Italy (Molise), and Public Health is managed from a single health authority. In Italy, all citizens are registered with a National Health System of General Practitioner (GP) Physicians. Between the 1 st of June 2014 and the 31 st of May 2016, all consecutive adult patients, sent by a GP, of Campobasso with any diagnosis of musculoskeletal symptoms/signs/complaints were evaluated in a single rheumatology outpatient clinic of our Academic Unit. The clinic represents the first and unique reference for GPs about rheumatic diseases in the territory. Subjects were classified using the 2010 EULAR criteria for RA, the CASPAR criteria for PsA and the 2012 ACR classification criteria for PMR. 1003 adult patients, sent by GPs, with articular or musculoskeletal complaints visited our clinic. Of these, 409 inhabitants of the municipality of Campobasso were evaluated for the study. During the 2-year study period we diagnosed 18, 19 and 12 new cases of RA, PsA and PMR respectively, with a new incident cases rate of 21.4, 22.59 and 27.43/100,000/year on the population at risk. The results of our study could contribute to better define the incidence of these rheumatic diseases classified with the new classification criteria.

  2. High 3-year golimumab survival in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis: real world data from 328 patients.

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    Thomas, Konstantinos; Flouri, Irini; Repa, Argiro; Fragiadaki, Kalliopi; Sfikakis, Petros P; Koutsianas, Christos; Kaltsonoudis, Evripidis; Voulgari, Paraskevi V; Drosos, Alexandros A; Petrikkou, Evangelia; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2017-11-09

    Our primary objective was to study the long-term survival on drug (SOD) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) treated with golimumab (GLM) in real life settings. This was a retrospective, observational study of all patients treated with GLM in 4 Academic Centres in Greece during a 4-year period (09/2010-06/2014). SOD was analysed using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, while Cox regression analysis estimating hazard ratios (HRs) for different baseline variables associated with drug discontinuation was performed for each disease. 328 patients (RA: 166, PsA: 82, AS: 80) were included. The estimated SOD at 2 and 3 years was 68% and 62% overall and was better for AS (79% and 76%) compared to RA (69% and 60%, p=0.067) and PsA (58% and 53%, p=0.001) patients; no difference was noted between RA and PsA patients (p=0.204). There was no difference in SOD between biologic-naïve and experienced nor between non-biologic co-treated or GLM monotherapy treated patients. Seropositivity (rheumatoid factor and/or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies) was associated with a lower risk for GLM discontinuation by multivariate analysis (HR=0.5, 95% CI=0.0.25-1.1, p=0.05) in RA patients. During 606 patient-years of follow-up, 11 (3.3%) patients discontinued GLM due to adverse events (AE), accounting for 11% of treatment discontinuations. The rates of serious AEs and serious infections were 2.3 and 1.0/100-patient-years, respectively. In this real-life study, GLM showed a high 3-year SOD in patients with inflammatory arthritides with a low rate of discontinuation due to AEs.

  3. C5a and C5aR are elevated in joints of rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis patients, and C5aR blockade attenuates leukocyte migration to synovial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Lars; Hansen, Anker Jon; Tornehave, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    synovial fluid was significantly inhibited by anti-C5aR. The data support that the C5a-C5aR axis may be driving the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the synovial fluid and synovium in both rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and suggest that C5a or C5aR may be a promising treatment target in both......Complement activation correlates to rheumatoid arthritis disease activity, and increased amounts of the complement split product C5a is observed in synovial fluids from rheumatoid arthritis patients. Blockade of C5a or its receptor (C5aR) is efficacious in several arthritis models. The aim...... of this study was to investigate the role of C5a and C5aR in human rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis-both with respect to expression and function. Synovial fluid, blood and synovial samples were obtained from rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and osteoarthritis patients as a less inflammatory...

  4. Validation of the OMERACT Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) for the Hand and Foot in a Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess changes following treatment and the reliability and responsiveness to change of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) in a randomized controlled trial. Methods. Forty patients with PsA randomized to either......). Results. Inflammatory features improved numerically but statistically nonsignificantly in the ABA group but not the placebo group. Baseline intrareader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were good (≥ 0.50) to very good (≥ 0.80) for all features in both hand and foot. Baseline interreader ICC were......AMRIS may be a valid tool for MRI assessment of hands and feet in PsA clinical trials....

  5. Association between use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and diabetes in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis: a nationwide, population-based cohort study of 84,989 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HH

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hsin-Hua Chen,1–7 Der-Yuan Chen,1–6 Chi-Chen Lin,1,2 Yi-Ming Chen,1–4 Kuo-Lung Lai,3,4 Ching-Heng Lin1 1Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 2Institute of Biomedical Science and Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, 3School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 4Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 5School of Medicine, Chung-Shan Medical University, 6Department of Medical Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, 7Institute of Public Health and Community Medicine Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and diabetes mellitus (DM in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, or psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis (PS/PSA.Patients and methods: This retrospective cohort study used a nationwide, population-based administrative database to enroll 84,989 cases with AS, RA, or PS/PSA who initiated treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF drugs or nonbiologic DMARDs. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the effect of different therapies on the risk of DM.Results: The incidence rates of DM per 1,000 person-years were 8.3 for users of anti-TNF drugs, 13.3 for users of cyclosporine (CSA, 8.4 for users of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ, and 8.1 for users of other nonbiologic DMARDs. Compared with the users of nonbiologic DMARDs, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs for DM were significantly lower for those who used anti-TNF drugs with HCQ (aHR: 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.36–0.66 and those who used HCQ alone (aHR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.63–0.78, but not for those who used anti-TNFs without HCQ (aHR: 1.23, 95% CI: 0.94–1.60 or CSA (aHR: 1.14, 95% CI: 0.77–1

  6. Decreased bacterial diversity characterizes the altered gut microbiota in patients with psoriatic arthritis, resembling dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel disease.

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    Scher, Jose U; Ubeda, Carles; Artacho, Alejandro; Attur, Mukundan; Isaac, Sandrine; Reddy, Soumya M; Marmon, Shoshana; Neimann, Andrea; Brusca, Samuel; Patel, Tejas; Manasson, Julia; Pamer, Eric G; Littman, Dan R; Abramson, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the diversity and taxonomic relative abundance of the gut microbiota in patients with never-treated, recent-onset psoriatic arthritis (PsA). High-throughput 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing was utilized to compare the community composition of gut microbiota in patients with PsA (n = 16), patients with psoriasis of the skin (n = 15), and healthy, matched control subjects (n = 17). Samples were further assessed for the presence and levels of fecal and serum secretory IgA (sIgA), proinflammatory proteins, and fatty acids. The gut microbiota observed in patients with PsA and patients with skin psoriasis was less diverse when compared to that in healthy controls. This could be attributed to the reduced presence of several taxa. Samples from both patient groups showed a relative decrease in abundance of Coprococcus species, while samples from PsA patients were also characterized by a significant reduction in Akkermansia, Ruminococcus, and Pseudobutyrivibrio. Supernatants of fecal samples from PsA patients revealed an increase in sIgA levels and decrease in RANKL levels. Analysis of fatty acids revealed low fecal quantities of hexanoate and heptanoate in both patients with PsA and patients with psoriasis. Patients with PsA and patients with skin psoriasis had a lower relative abundance of multiple intestinal bacteria. Although some genera were concomitantly decreased in both conditions, PsA samples had a lower abundance of reportedly beneficial taxa. This gut microbiota profile in PsA was similar to that previously described in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and was associated with changes in specific inflammatory proteins unique to this group, and distinct from that in patients with skin psoriasis and healthy controls. Thus, the role of the gut microbiome in the continuum of psoriasis-PsA pathogenesis and the associated immune response merits further study. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  7. The risk of post-operative complications in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis patients on biologic therapy undergoing surgical procedures.

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    Bakkour, W; Purssell, H; Chinoy, H; Griffiths, C E M; Warren, R B

    2016-01-01

    There is limited evidence as to whether biologic therapy should be stopped or continued in patients with psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who are undergoing surgical procedures. Current guidelines of care recommend a planned break from biologic therapy in those undergoing major surgical procedures. To audit current practice of managing biologic therapy peri-operatively in a tertiary referral psoriasis clinic against guidelines of care and to investigate the effects of continuing/stopping biologic therapy in psoriasis and PsA patients. A retrospective audit of psoriasis and PsA patients who had a surgical procedure whilst on biologic therapy. A proforma was used to collect information on the biologics used, whether they were stopped peri-operatively and whether patients developed post-operative complications and/or disease flare. A total of 42 patients who had 77 procedures were identified. Procedures ranged from skin surgery to orthopaedic and cardiothoracic surgery. Biologic therapy was continued in the majority of procedures (76%). There was no significant difference in post-operative risk of infection and delayed wound healing between those patients who continued and those who stopped biologic therapy, including those undergoing major surgery. Interrupting biologic therapy peri-operatively was associated with a significant (P = 0.003) risk of flare of psoriasis or PsA. Continuing biologic therapy in psoriasis and PsA patients peri-operatively did not increase the risk of post-operative complications. Interrupting biologic therapy peri-operatively significantly increased the risk of disease flare. This study is limited by cohort size and requires replication, ideally in a prospective randomized controlled manner. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  8. Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set: A Report from the PsA Workshop at OMERACT 2016.

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    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip J; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Elmamoun, Musaab; Tillett, William; Campbell, Willemina; FitzGerald, Oliver; Gladman, Dafna D; Goel, Niti; Gossec, Laure; Hoejgaard, Pil; Leung, Ying Ying; Lindsay, Chris; Strand, Vibeke; van der Heijde, Désirée M; Shea, Bev; Christensen, Robin; Coates, Laura; Eder, Lihi; McHugh, Neil; Kalyoncu, Umut; Steinkoenig, Ingrid; Ogdie, Alexis

    2017-10-01

    To include the patient perspective in accordance with the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 in the updated Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS). At OMERACT 2016, research conducted to update the PsA Core Domain Set was presented and discussed in breakout groups. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was voted on and endorsed by OMERACT participants. We conducted a systematic literature review of domains measured in PsA RCT and LOS, and identified 24 domains. We conducted 24 focus groups with 130 patients from 7 countries representing 5 continents to identify patient domains. We achieved consensus through 2 rounds of separate surveys with 50 patients and 75 physicians, and a nominal group technique meeting with 12 patients and 12 physicians. We conducted a workshop and breakout groups at OMERACT 2016 in which findings were presented and discussed. The updated PsA Core Domain Set endorsed with 90% agreement by OMERACT 2016 participants included musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, fatigue, pain, patient's global assessment, physical function, health-related quality of life, and systemic inflammation, which were recommended for all RCT and LOS. These were important, but not required in all RCT and LOS: economic cost, emotional well-being, participation, and structural damage. Independence, sleep, stiffness, and treatment burden were on the research agenda. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was endorsed at OMERACT 2016. Next steps for the PsA working group include evaluation of PsA outcome measures and development of a PsA Core Outcome Measurement Set.

  9. The OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group - Update on Status and Future Research Priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update on the status and future research priorities of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in arthritis working group. METHODS: A summary is provided of the activities of the group within rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic...... arthritis (PsA), and osteoarthritis (OA), and its research priorities. RESULTS: The OMERACT RA MRI score (RAMRIS) evaluating bone erosion, bone edema (osteitis), and synovitis is now the standard method of quantifying articular pathology in RA trials. Cartilage loss is another important part of joint damage......, and at the OMERACT 12 conference, we provided longitudinal data demonstrating reliability and sensitivity to change of the RAMRIS JSN component score, supporting its use in future clinical trials. The MRI group has previously developed a PsA MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 12, PsAMRIS was evaluated in a randomized...

  10. Association of Psoriatic Disease With Uveitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Khalid, Usman; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and uveitis are inflammatory disorders with significant overlap in their inflammatory pathways. Limited evidence is available about the relationship between psoriatic disease and uveitis. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential bidirectional relationship...... between psoriatic disease, including psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and uveitis. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We performed a nationwide cohort study of the Danish population from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2011. We included 74,129 Danish patients with psoriasis who were 18 years...... association between psoriatic disease and uveitis. Increased focus on eye symptoms in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and on skin and joint symptoms in patients with prior or current uveitis may be appropriate....

  11. Disease Activity in Psoriatic Arthritis: Comparison of the Discriminative Capacity and Construct Validity of Six Composite Indices in a Real World

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    Fausto Salaffi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare, “in a real world,” the performance of the most common composite activity indices in a cohort of PsA patients. Methods. A total of 171 PsA patients were involved. The following variables were evaluated: peripheral joint assessment, patient reported of pain, physician and patient assessments of disease activity, patient general health status, dactylitis digit count, Leeds Enthesitis Index, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ, physical and mental component summary score of the Medical Outcome Survey (SF-36, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI, Dermatology Life Quality Index, C-reactive protein (CRP, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR. To measure the disease activity, the Disease Activity Score (DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP, Simple Disease Activity Index (SDAI, Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI, disease activity in psoriatic arthritis (DAPSA, and Psoriatic Arthritis Disease Activity Score (PASDAS have been calculated. The criteria for minimal disease activity (MDA and remission were applied as external criterion. Results. The ROC were similar in all the composite measures. Only the CPDAI showed less discriminative ability. There was a high degree of correlation between all the indices (P<0.0001. The highest correlations were between DAPSA and SDAI (rho = 0.996 and between DAPSA and DAS28-CRP (rho = 0.957. CPDAI, DAPSA, and PASDAS had the most stringent definitions of remission and MDA category. DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP had the highest proportions in remission and MDA. Conclusions. Although a good concurrent validity and discriminant capacity of six disease activity indices were observed, the proportions of patients classified in the disease activity levels differed. In particular, the rate of patients in remission was clearly different among the respective indices.

  12. Patients' perspectives in the management of psoriasis: the Italian results of the Multinational Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (MAPP) survey.

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    Gisondi, Paolo; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2017-08-01

    The perspective of patients with psoriasis about medical care treatment goals and strategies is receiving increasing attention. Here, we performed a country-based analysis of the Multinational Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (MAPP) survey, in order to provide specific information on patients' perspective of treatment of psoriasis in Italy. This was a systematic household telephone survey recruiting subjects by random digit dialing. Household members ≥18 years were included if they had ever been diagnosed with psoriasis. About 12,785 households were screened in Italy. 132 patients were ineligible for the analysis, including patients with psoriatic arthritis. 359 patients were surveyed. About half of the patients had very mild disease with less than 1 palm skin involvement, and 38% had 1-10 palm skin disease. It is noteworthy that 48% of patients with widespread disease were not taking any medication. Patients indicated the relief of symptoms, including itching (54.9%), as the main goal for their current therapy, whereas 14.2% reported no specific expectation from their medication. Overall, 70% of patients declared to be satisfied by their therapy, in terms of primary goal reached. Our findings suggest that most psoriasis patients have mild/moderate disease in Italy, and that a portion of patients with severe disease does not receive an adequate treatment.

  13. Recurrent erythema nodosum and pulmonary lymph node tuberculosis in a patient treated for psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis with TNF inhibitors

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    Piotr Parcheta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting approximately 2% of the population. Biologic agents are the new treatment options for patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who have failed traditional systemic therapies. The therapy with tumor necrosis factor antagonists significantly increases the risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis; therefore, screening is important before the introduction of biological treatment. Objective. Presentation of diagnostic difficulties in establishing an etiological factor of recurrent erythema nodosum in a 46-year-old woman treated with anti-TNF-α agents (etanercept and adalimumab for plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Case report. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman, treated with etanercept and adalimumab for plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Despite prophylactic antituberculosis treatment before introduction of biological therapy, the patient developed erythema nodosum most likely caused by lymph node tuberculosis. Conclusions . The development of erythema nodosum, especially the recurrent form, in a patient with a positive tuberculin skin test and negative IGRA test treated with anti-TNF should always prompt increased vigilance and exclusion of active tuberculosis, which may develop even in patients who have undergone prophylactic antituberculosis treatment.

  14. The OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group: advances and future research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Bird, Paul; McQueen, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    The OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis group previously developed the rheumatoid arthritis MRI score (RAMRIS) for use in clinical studies, evaluated the use of extremity MRI, and initiated development of a psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 9...

  15. Evidence-based recommendations on the role of dermatologists in the diagnosis and management of psoriatic arthritis: systematic review and expert opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, M-A; Barnetche, T; Rouzaud, M; Sevrain, M; Villani, A P; Aractingi, S; Aubin, F; Beylot-Barry, M; Joly, P; Jullien, D; Le Maître, M; Misery, L; Ortonne, J-P; Cantagrel, A; Paul, C

    2014-08-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) can develop at any time during the course of psoriasis. The aims of these practical recommendations are to help dermatologists identify patients at risk of PsA, to diagnose PsA in collaboration with rheumatologists and to gain a better understanding of initial PsA management. A scientific committee consisting of 10 dermatologists and a rheumatologist selected clinically relevant questions to be addressed by evidence-based recommendations using the DELPHI method. For each question, a systematic literature review was performed in Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library databases. The levels of evidence of all selected and reviewed articles were appraised according to the Oxford levels of evidence. An expert board of 30 dermatologists reviewed and analysed the evidence and developed recommendations for the selected questions. Agreement among participants was assessed on a 10-point scale, and the potential impact of the recommendations on clinical practice was evaluated. Among the 6960 references identified, 190 relevant articles were included in the reviews. Three recommendations regarding risk factors for PsA and one regarding PsA prevalence were issued. The mean agreement score between participants varied from 7.8 to 9.6. Three recommendations on PsA screening tools that can be used by dermatologists were issued. The mean agreement score between participants varied from 7.7 to 9.4. Initial PsA treatment options according to published guidelines were critically appraised for axial and peripheral involvement and enthesitis/dactylitis. Three recommendations were issued. The mean agreement score between participants varied from 7.6 to 8.7. The systematic literature research and meta-analyses did not provide high-quality evidence to support recommendations regarding PsA screening. Conversely, PsA treatment options were supported by strong evidence. Cooperation between dermatologists and rheumatologists should be emphasized to better identify

  16. Associations Between Five Important Domains of Health and the Patient Acceptable Symptom State in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Psoriatic Arthritis: A Cross-Sectional Study of 977 Patients.

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    Puyraimond-Zemmour, Déborah; Etcheto, Adrien; Fautrel, Bruno; Balanescu, Andra; de Wit, Maarten; Heiberg, Turid; Otsa, Kati; Kvien, Tore K; Dougados, Maxime; Gossec, Laure

    2017-10-01

    To explore the link between a patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) and patient-perceived impact in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). This was a cross-sectional study of unselected patients with definite RA or PsA. Pain, functional capacity, fatigue, coping, and sleep disturbance were assessed using a numeric rating scale (0-10) and compared between patients in PASS or not (Cohen's effect sizes). The domains of health associated with PASS status were assessed by multivariate forward logistic regression, and PASS thresholds were determined using the 75th percentile method and receiver operating characteristic analyses. Among 977 patients (531 with RA, 446 with PsA), the mean ± SD age was 53.4 ± 13.2 years, mean ± SD disease duration was 11.2 ± 10.0 years, and 637 (65.8%) were women. In all, 595 patients (60.9%) were in PASS; they had lower symptom levels, and all domains of health except sleep disturbance discriminated clearly between patients in PASS or not (effect sizes 0.73-1.45 in RA and 0.82-1.52 in PsA). In multivariate analysis, less pain and better coping were predictive of being in PASS. Odds ratios were: RA pain 0.80 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.67-0.96), PsA pain 0.63 (95% CI 0.52-0.75), RA coping 0.84 (95% CI 0.74-0.96), and PsA coping 0.83 (95% CI 0.71-0.97). The cutoffs of symptom intensity (range 0-10), corresponding to PASS for the 5 domains of health and the 2 diseases were similar, i.e., approximately 4-5. In RA and PsA, PASS was associated with the 5 domains of health analyzed, and in particular with less pain and better coping. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Th17 Inhibitors in Active Psoriatic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Girish S; Ming, Wai K; Magodoro, Itai M; Akinwunmi, Babatunde; Dar, Sara; Poulsen, Henrik E; Kristensen, Lars E; Ellervik, Christina

    2017-12-20

    Several biologics targeting the Th17 pathway have been developed for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a disabling disease with moderate response and an increased incidence of serious infections to first-line biologics (TNF-α antagonists). Th17 inhibitors could replace TNF-α antagonists as first-line biologic agents. We determined the overall treatment effect of Th17 pathway inhibitors compared to placebo or active control on American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 response at week 12 (primary objective), risk of infections, discontinuation of treatment due to adverse events, and serious adverse events during the placebo-controlled period (12-24 weeks) in adults with active PsA in published randomized controlled trials. The SCOPUS database was searched. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used for assessing quality. The pooled relative risk (RR) was derived from random effects models. Seven randomized controlled trials were included which randomized 1,718 patients to Th17 inhibitors and 840 to placebo. Patients treated with Th17 inhibitors had an RR of 2.04 (95% CI: 1.79-2.33; p < 0.001) for achieving an ACR20 response at week 12 (I2 = 0%; p = 0.89) compared to placebo-treated patients. There was no evidence of publication bias. The result was consistent for study phase and outcome (ACR50/70), mechanism of action and TNF-α naivety. RR of infections was 1.06 (0.91-1.23), that of candida infections was 3.35 (0.75-14.95), that of serious adverse events was 0.82 (0.42-1.59) and that of discontinuation of treatment was 0.54 (0.31-0.93) among treated versus placebo subjects. No incident cases of tuberculosis were reported. In patients with active PsA, biologics targeting the Th17 axis produce a clinically significant improvement in joint disease activity with acceptable safety and tolerability for short-term treatment compared to placebo. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Smoking paradox in the development of psoriatic arthritis among patients with psoriasis: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen-Sa D T; Zhang, Yuqing; Lu, Na; Louie-Gao, Qiong; Niu, Jingbo; Ogdie, Alexis; Gelfand, Joel M; LaValley, Michael P; Dubreuil, Maureen; Sparks, Jeffrey A; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Choi, Hyon K

    2018-01-01

    Smoking is associated with an increased risk of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in the general population, but not among patients with psoriasis. We sought to clarify the possible methodological mechanisms behind this paradox. Using 1995-2015 data from The Health Improvement Network, we performed survival analysis to examine the association between smoking and incident PsA in the general population and among patients with psoriasis. We clarified the paradox using mediation analysis and conducted bias sensitivity analyses to evaluate the potential impact of index event bias and quantify its magnitude from uncontrolled/unmeasured confounders. Of 6.65 million subjects without PsA at baseline, 225 213 participants had psoriasis and 7057 developed incident PsA. Smoking was associated with an increased risk of PsA in the general population (HR 1.27; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.36), but with a decreased risk among patients with psoriasis (HR 0.91; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.99). Mediation analysis showed that the effect of smoking on the risk of PsA was mediated almost entirely through its effect on psoriasis. Bias-sensitivity analyses indicated that even when the relation of uncontrolled confounders to either smoking or PsA was modest (both HRs=~1.5), it could reverse the biased effect of smoking among patients with psoriasis (HR=0.9). In this large cohort representative of the UK general population, smoking was positively associated with PsA risk in the general population, but negatively associated among patients with psoriasis. Conditioning on a causal intermediate variable (psoriasis) may even reverse the association between smoking and PsA, potentially explaining the smoking paradox for the risk of PsA among patients with psoriasis. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of psoriatic arthritis with pharmacological therapies: 2015 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossec, L; Smolen, J S; Ramiro, S; de Wit, M; Cutolo, M; Dougados, M; Emery, P; Landewé, R; Oliver, S; Aletaha, D; Betteridge, N; Braun, J; Burmester, G; Cañete, J D; Damjanov, N; FitzGerald, O; Haglund, E; Helliwell, P; Kvien, T K; Lories, R; Luger, T; Maccarone, M; Marzo-Ortega, H; McGonagle, D; McInnes, I B; Olivieri, I; Pavelka, K; Schett, G; Sieper, J; van den Bosch, F; Veale, D J; Wollenhaupt, J; Zink, A; van der Heijde, D

    2016-03-01

    Since the publication of the European League Against Rheumatism recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in 2012, new evidence and new therapeutic agents have emerged. The objective was to update these recommendations. A systematic literature review was performed regarding pharmacological treatment in PsA. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and the expert opinion of the 34 Task Force members. Levels of evidence and strengths of recommendations were allocated. The updated recommendations comprise 5 overarching principles and 10 recommendations, covering pharmacological therapies for PsA from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), to conventional synthetic (csDMARD) and biological (bDMARD) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, whatever their mode of action, taking articular and extra-articular manifestations of PsA into account, but focusing on musculoskeletal involvement. The overarching principles address the need for shared decision-making and treatment objectives. The recommendations address csDMARDs as an initial therapy after failure of NSAIDs and local therapy for active disease, followed, if necessary, by a bDMARD or a targeted synthetic DMARD (tsDMARD). The first bDMARD would usually be a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. bDMARDs targeting interleukin (IL)12/23 (ustekinumab) or IL-17 pathways (secukinumab) may be used in patients for whom TNF inhibitors are inappropriate and a tsDMARD such as a phosphodiesterase 4-inhibitor (apremilast) if bDMARDs are inappropriate. If the first bDMARD strategy fails, any other bDMARD or tsDMARD may be used. These recommendations provide stakeholders with an updated consensus on the pharmacological treatment of PsA and strategies to reach optimal outcomes in PsA, based on a combination of evidence and expert opinion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  20. Psoriatic onycho-pachydermo periostitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Monika; Solomon, Gary; Strober, Bruce

    2007-01-27

    A 46-year-old woman presented with onycholysis and swollen, painful digits. No other stigmata of psoriasis were present. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hands showed an extensive periosteal reaction of the phalangeal tuft. Psoriatic onycho-pachydermo periostitis (POPP) is a rare subset of psoriatic arthritis that is characterized by psoriatic onychodystrophy, connective-tissue thickening above the distal phalanx, and a periosteal reaction. Treatment of POPP is difficult; however, low-dose methotrexate and anti-TNF-alpha agents may be beneficial. In patients who are unresponsive or intolerant of these medications, other biologic and non-biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs need to be considered.

  1. New treatment paradigms in psoriatic arthritis: an update on new therapeutics approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felquer, Maria L Acosta; Soriano, Enrique R

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to give an overview of the new treatments approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). FDA has approved three new drugs for PsA: Certolizumab-pegol: a PEGylated Fc-free tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi); ustekinumab: an anti interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23 mAb; and apremilast and oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor. On well designed and extensive developing programmes, all three drugs proved to be effective for the treatment of most PsA manifestations, including peripheral arthritis, skin involvement, enthesitis, dactylitis, quality of life and radiographic progression in patients failing traditional disease modifying drugs (DMARDs) and TNFi. Safety profile of all three drugs seems to be reassuring until now, although long-term data are still not available. Although Certolizumab-pegol is likely to be placed among the other TNFi, ustekinumab and apremilast, due to lower efficacy on arthritis, are being more frequently used as second-line therapy after TNFi failure, especially among rheumatologists. There are new therapeutic options approved for the treatment of PsA. For the first time, well proved effective therapies with a different mechanism of action than the inhibition of TNF alpha are available for the treatment of this progressive disease.

  2. A Patient with Psoriatic Arthritis Imaged with FDG PET/CT Demonstrated an Unusual Imaging Pattern with Muscle and Fascia Involvement: A Case Report

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    Bains, Sukharn; Khan, Sana; Aparici, Carina Mari [Univ. of California, San Francisco (United States); Win, Aung Zaw; Reimert, Matthew [San Fracisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We describe the case of a patient with known history of psoriasis that presented with 1 year of unexplained fever, muscle weakness and marked weight loss, suspicious for B symptoms of a malignant origin. [{sup 18}F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scans demonstrated an unusual serpiginous pattern of uptake in the fascia and muscles as well as lymph node activity. Multiple histological samples, including a final PET-probe guided lymph node surgical resection, excluded malignancy and confirmed the diagnosis of reactive inflammatory changes, with a plausible diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with associated lymphadenitis, fasciitis and myositis, possibly mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. To our knowledge, there is no evidence of a previously reported FDG uptake pattern of fascia and muscle involvement in psoriatic arthritis.

  3. A Patient with Psoriatic Arthritis Imaged with FDG-PET/CT Demonstrated an Unusual Imaging Pattern with Muscle and Fascia Involvement: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Sukhkarn; Reimert, Matthew; Win, Aung Zaw; Khan, Sana; Aparici, Carina Mari

    2012-06-01

    We describe the case of a patient with known history of psoriasis that presented with 1 year of unexplained fever, muscle weakness and marked weight loss, suspicious for B symptoms of a malignant origin. [(18)F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scans demonstrated an unusual serpiginous pattern of uptake in the fascia and muscles as well as lymph node activity. Multiple histological samples, including a final PET-probe guided lymph node surgical resection, excluded malignancy and confirmed the diagnosis of reactive inflammatory changes, with a plausible diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with associated lymphadenitis, fasciitis and myositis, possibly mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. To our knowledge, there is no evidence of a previously reported FDG uptake pattern of fascia and muscle involvement in psoriatic arthritis.

  4. The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging Inflammatory Arthritis Group - advances and priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Bird, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This article updates the work and research priorities of the OMERACT working group on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis, as presented to the OMERACT 8 meeting in Malta in May 2006. This work focused on testing the reliability of dedicated extremity MRI in rheumatoid...... arthritis and on the initial steps in the development of an MRI score for peripheral psoriatic arthritis....

  5. Symptoms dermatologists should look for in daily practice to improve detection of psoriatic arthritis in psoriasis patients: an expert group consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, A P; Rouzaud, M; Sevrain, M; Barnetche, T; Paul, C; Richard, M-A; Beylot-Barry, M; Misery, L; Joly, P; Aractingi, S; Aubin, F; Le Maître, M; Cantagrel, A; Ortonne, J-P; Jullien, D

    2014-08-01

    Up to 29% of patients with psoriasis seen by dermatologists have undiagnosed psoriatic arthritis (PsA). As early detection of PsA may be associated with improved joint and skin outcomes, it is essential for dermatologists to improve their ability to diagnose PsA. Skin and nail features of psoriasis associated with PsA are well known to dermatologists but they may feel less confortable assessing other symptoms and they rarely use PsA screening questionnaires. To develop a limited list of clinical signs and symptoms that a dermatologist should be looking for in a psoriasis patient in addition to specific skin features and nail involvement, to improve PsA detection. A systematic search was performed in Pubmed, Cochrane and Embase databases to identify clinical key symptoms associated with PsA. It yielded 27 studies in which we extracted a list of clinical signs and symptoms observed in PsA and submitted it to a panel of dermatology experts through a DELPHI selection process. The experts had to determine which minimal set of signs and symptoms dermatologists should look for in daily practice to improve detection of PsA in patients with psoriasis. The four items that received a score higher than 90% in the DELPHI process were finally selected. Those items were as follows: peripheral inflammatory pain (100%), axial inflammatory pain (95.3%), dactylitis (93%), buttock and sciatic pain (90.7%). The remaining items: distal interphalangeal joints (DIPs) involvement (83.7%), Talalgia (79.1%), swollen Achille's tendon (41.9%), costo-chondral involvement (32.6%), uveitis (7%), mouth ulcerations (2.3%), were not retained. We propose a set of four items to screen psoriasis patients for psoriatic arthritis for routine clinical use by dermatologists. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. Review of the treatment of psoriatic arthritis with biological agents: choice of drug for initial therapy and switch therapy for non-responders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Angelo S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore D’Angelo,1 Giuseppina Tramontano,1 Michele Gilio,1 Pietro Leccese,1 Ignazio Olivieri1,2 1Rheumatology Institute of Lucania (IRel - Rheumatology Department of Lucania, San Carlo Hospital of Potenza and Madonna delle Grazie Hospital of Matera, Potenza and Matera, 2Basilicata Ricerca Biomedica (BRB Foundation, Potenza, Italy Abstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a heterogeneous chronic inflammatory disease with a broad clinical spectrum and variable course. It can involve musculoskeletal structures as well as skin, nails, eyes, and gut. The management of PsA has changed tremendously in the last decade, thanks to an earlier diagnosis, an advancement in pharmacological therapies, and a wider application of a multidisciplinary approach. The commercialization of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab as well as interleukin (IL-12/23 (ustekinumab and IL-17 (secukinumab inhibitors is representative of a revolution in the treatment of PsA. No evidence-based strategies are currently available for guiding the rheumatologist to prescribe biological drugs. Several international and national recommendation sets are currently available with the aim to help rheumatologists in everyday clinical practice management of PsA patients treated with biological therapy. Since no specific biological agent has been demonstrated to be more effective than others, the drug choice should be made according to the available safety data, the presence of extra-articular manifestations, the patient’s preferences (e.g., administration route, and the drug price. However, future studies directly comparing different biological drugs and assessing the efficacy of treatment strategies specific for PsA are urgently needed. Keywords: psoriatic arthritis, treatment, biological drugs, TNF inhibitors, ustekinumab, secukinumab

  7. A patient-initiated DMARD self-monitoring service for people with rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis on methotrexate: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBain, Hayley; Shipley, Michael; Olaleye, Abigail; Moore, Samantha; Newman, Stanton

    2016-07-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a patient-initiated disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) self-monitoring service for people with rheumatoid (RA) or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) on methotrexate. A two-arm, single-centre, randomised controlled trial assessing superiority in relation to healthcare use, clinical and psychosocial outcomes. Participants were 100 adults with either RA or PsA on a stable dose of methotrexate, randomly assigned to usual care or the patient-initiated service. Intervention participants were trained how to understand and interpret their blood tests and use this information to initiate care from their clinical nurse specialist (CNS). The primary outcome was the number of outpatient visits to the CNS during the trial period. Differences between groups were analysed using Poisson regression models. Secondary outcomes were collected at baseline and after the third and sixth blood tests. Disease activity was measured using either the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints or Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC), pain and fatigue using a visual numeric scale and the Health Assessment Question-II, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and SF12 were completed to assess disability, mood and quality of life, respectively. Differences between groups over time on secondary outcomes were analysed using multilevel models. The patient-initiated DMARD self-monitoring service was associated with 54.55% fewer visits to the CNS (pself-monitoring DMARD therapy can lead to significant reductions in healthcare use, while maintaining clinical and psychosocial well-being. ISRCTN21613721. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Natural Compounds for the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis: A Proposal Based on Multi-Targeted Osteoclastic Regulation and on a Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shiqiang; Cheng, Jianwen; Zhao, Jinmin; Yao, Felix; Xu, Jiake

    2017-07-11

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis affecting approximately 2% to 3% of the population globally, and is characterized by both peripheral articular manifestations and axial skeletal involvement. Conventional therapies for PsA have not been fully satisfactory, though natural products (NPs) have been shown to be highly effective and represent important treatment options for psoriasis. PsA is a multigenic autoimmune disease with both environmental and genetic factors contributing to its pathogenesis. Accordingly, it is likely that the use of natural compounds with a multi-targeted approach will enable us to develop better therapies for PsA and related disorders. PsA, either on joint damage or on bone erosion, has been shown to respond to anti-psoriatic pharmacotherapy (APP), APP-like NPs, and their natural compounds. This study aims to uncover specific natural compounds for improved PsA remedies. Specifically, by targeting bone erosion caused by increased osteoclastic bone resorption, we aim to predict the key signaling pathways affected by natural compounds. Further, the study will explore their anti-arthritis effects using an in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach. Following the signaling pathway prediction, a preclinical efficacy study on animal models will be undertaken. Collectively, this work will discover lead compounds with improved therapeutic effects on PsA. We hypothesize that 9 potential APP-like NPs will have therapeutic effects on arthritis via the modulation of osteoclast bone resorption and signaling pathways. For in silico identification, the Latin name of each NP will be identified using the Encyclopedia of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Encyclopedia of TCM). The biological targets of NPs will be predicted or screened using the Herbal Ingredients' Targets (HIT) database. With the designed search terms, DrugBank will be used to further filter the above biological targets. Protein ANnotation THrough Evolutionary Relationship

  9. RESULTS OF EVALUATING THE EFFICACY OF SECUKINUMAB VERSUS ADALIMUMAB IN TREATING PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS BY USING THE MATCHING-ADJUSTED INDIRECT COMPARISON METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Korotaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To date there have been no results of a direct comparison of the efficiency of using tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, secukinumab (SCM and adalimumab (ADA in particular, to treat psoriatic arthritis (PsA. This suggests that there is a need to apply the Matching-Adjusted Indirect Comparison (MAIC method that will be able to choose a treatment option for PsA. Objective: to compare the efficacy of SCM andADAby using the MAIC method in patients with active PsA.Patients and methods. The results of usingADAin the Adalimumab Effectiveness in Psoriatic Trial (ADEPT, a randomized clinical trial (RCT, and SCM in the FUTURE 2 RCT were compared according to theAmericanCollegeof Rheumatology (ACR and Psoriatic Area and Severity Index (PASI criteria. The analysis based on the MAIC principles included aggregated data on 151 patients with active PsA from the ADEPT RCT and 189 patients from the FUTURE 2 RCT.Results. At 16 weeks, ACR20/50/70 responses were observed in 74.4/50.1/18.5% of the patients treated with SCM 150 mg, in 65.5/50.1/50.1% of those treated with SCM 300 mg, and in 55.6/32.5/20.5% of those receivingADA, respectively. Both doses of SCM had a significant advantage over the dose ofADAaccording to ACR20 and ACR50 responses. A PASI75 response forADAand SCM 150/300 mg was observed in 60.9 and 59.5/64.1% of the patients; and a PASI90 response was seen in 39.1 and 47.7/40.8% of the patients, respectively. At 24 weeks of treatment, ACR20, ACR50, and HAQ-DI responses in patients receiving SCM 150 and 300 mg were significantly higher than in PsA patients takingADA. No statistically significant differences were observed in ACR70 response rates. The ratio of ACR20 and ACR50 indicators was similar after 48 weeks of treatment initiation. Assessment of the dynamics of psoriasis yielded similar results.Conclusion. Patients with active PsA demonstrated the advantage of therapy with SCM 150 and 300 mg over that withADA. There was a greater improvement in

  10. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo D

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Delia Colombo,1 Sergio Chimenti,2 Paolo Antonio Grossi,3 Antonio Marchesoni,4 Federico Bardazzi,5 Fabio Ayala,6 Lucia Simoni,7 Donatella Vassellatti,1 Gilberto Bellia1 On behalf of SYNERGY Study Group 1Novartis Farma Italia, Origgio (VA, 2Tor Vergata Polyclinic Rome, 3Macchi Hospital and Foundation, Varese, 4Orthopaedic Institute Pini, Milan, 5S Orsola-Malpighi Polyclinic, Bologna, 6University Federico II Naples, 7MediData srl, Modena, Italy Background: Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections.Methods: SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients' demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes.Results: A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54% were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males, mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease

  11. The effect of smartphone addiction on hand joints in psoriatic patients: an ultrasound-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megna, M; Gisonni, P; Napolitano, M; Orabona, G Dell'Aversano; Patruno, C; Ayala, F; Balato, N

    2018-01-01

    Distal interphalangeal (DIP) arthritis is a frequent form of psoriatic arthritis being often linked to nail psoriasis. Modern society is characterized by overuse of smartphones. Indeed, literature has recently focalized on research into smartphone addiction and health-related problems. As smartphone addiction is able to determine overuse and repeated movements of DIP joints and nails, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of smartphone use on hand joints of young psoriatic patients. An observational study involving four different groups such as non-smartphone-addicted (SA) psoriatic patients, SA psoriatic patients, non-SA controls and SA controls was performed. Each subject underwent an ultrasound examination of both hands by three independent and blinded to group assignment radiologists. A specific score was used to evaluate the inflammatory state of the analysed joints. The total ultrasound score was statistically significantly higher in SA controls respect to non-SA controls (3.4 vs. 1.4; P < 0.05) as well as in SA psoriasis patients compared to non-SA psoriatic subjects (15.2 vs. 6.7; P < 0.01). Higher mean of ultrasound score was found for left hand in controls (both SA or not) and for right hand in psoriatic subjects (both SA or not), however without reaching statistical significance. Smartphone overuse was found to be linked with higher signs of inflammation of musculoskeletal structures of hands joints in both psoriasis and controls through ultrasound examination. Therefore, smartphone overuse may be a factor which facilitate or speed up the possible development of psoriatic arthritis. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. Density, structure, and strength of the distal radius in patients with psoriatic arthritis: the role of inflammation and cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T Y; Griffith, J F; Qin, L; Hung, V W Y; Fong, T-N; Au, S-K; Kwok, A W; Leung, P-C; Li, E K; Tam, L-S

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the densitometric and microstructural features of the distal radius in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography. PsA patients have unique bone microstructural deficits, manifested as lower cortical bone density and higher cortical porosity, which are associated with a propensity to bone fragility. The aim of this study was to investigate the densitometric, geometric, microstructural, and biomechanical features of the distal radius in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. This study cohort consisted of 53 PsA patients (24 males and 29 females), with an average age of 53.1 years and 53 gender- and age-matched controls. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) of the hip, lumbar spine, and ultradistal radius was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) was performed at the distal radius to obtain measures of volumetric BMD (vBMD), microstructure, and derived biomechanical indices. There were no significant between-group differences in aBMD at the femoral neck, total hip, and ultradistal radius, while aBMD at the lumbar spine was significantly higher in patients. The only indices indicating compromised bone quality in PsA patients were related to cortical bone quality. Cortical vBMD were -3.8% significantly lower, while cortical pore volume, porosity index, and pore diameter were 108, 79.5, and 8.6%, respectively, significantly higher in patients. Cortical stress was marginally lower (-1.3%, p = 0.077) in patients with stress significantly more unevenly distributed (4.9%, p = 0.035). Endocortical perimeter and cortical pore volume were significantly higher in patients with vertebral fracture. Deficits in cortical bone quality were associated with indices of disease activity/severity and were more prominent in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or hypertension. There is an intertwined relationship between chronic

  13. THE RISK OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE DEVELOPMENT IN PATIENTS WITH ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS (BECHTEREW’S DISEASE AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: A 10-YEAR PROSPECTIVE FOLLOW-UP STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Z. Gaidukova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD incidence among patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS and psoriatic arthritis (PsA without manifestation of cardiovascular diseases.Materials and methods. We analyzed the data of 10-year prospective follow-up of the patient with AS (n = 278, psoriatic arthritis (n = 85 and healthy controls (n = 150 without any cardiovascular diseases. All groups were comparable in regard to cardiovascular risk factors. During these 10 years all new cases of CAD (verified by cardiologist in the study population were tracked.Results. New cases of CAD were fixed in 64 out of 278 patietns with AS and in 16 out of 150 controls (p = 0.0017. Using log-rank MantelCox test and logrank test for trend we demonstrated statistically significant differences in CAD incidence between patients without spondyloarthritis (SpA and patients with AS and PsA (p < 0,0001. The risk of CAD development was higher in PsA group than in the control group; relative risk was 4.16 (95 % confidence interval (CI 2.36–7.33, RR 6.1 (95 % CI 3.05–12.44 (p < 0.05. Increased risk of myocardial infarction was observed both in patients with AS (RR 4.98; 95 % CI 1.54–6.12 and patients with PsA (RR 5.2; 95 % CI 2.4–7.8 comparing to healthy controls. There was no significant difference between the AS-group and the control group in terms of risk of stenocardia development (p > 0.05.Conclusion. The risk of exertional stenocardia in patients with AS was not higher than that in individuals without SpA. However, patients with AS have higher risk of myocardial infarction than those without SpA. PsA patients have increased risk of CAD development comparing to healthy controls and individuals with AS.

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here. Will You Support the Education of Arthritis Patients? Each year, over 1 million people visit this ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  16. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Delia; Chimenti, Sergio; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Bardazzi, Federico; Ayala, Fabio; Simoni, Lucia; Vassellatti, Donatella; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY) study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections. SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients' demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes. A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54%) were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males), mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease assessed by patients (all higher in females). The percentage of patients with at least one seropositivity detected at baseline, indicative of concomitant or former viral infection, was significantly higher among women than among men. No between-sex differences were detected in other measures, at other time points, and in treatments. Patients developed no hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus reactivation during cyclosporine treatment. Our post hoc sex analysis suggests that women with

  17. Uso do abatacepte em uma paciente com artrite psoriásica Use of the abatacept in a patient with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ewerton Maia Rodrigues

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Artrite psoriásica (AP é uma artrite inflamatória soronegativa de causa desconhecida. Classicamente, a AP apresenta cinco formas clínicas, sendo a oligoartrite assimétrica a mais comum. Descrevemos o caso de uma paciente com AP refratária às drogas modificadoras da doença, que evoluiu com hepatite medicamentosa após quimioprofilaxia com isoniazida, administrada previamente ao tratamento com anti-TNFα. Em virtude do risco de ativação de tuberculose (TB latente pela administração de anti-TNFα, da hepatotoxicidade decorrente do tratamento da TB, e baseado no fato de o tratamento da AP se assemelhar ao da artrite reumatoide, optou-se pelo tratamento empírico com abatacepte. Aproximadamente vinte dias após a segunda dose do biológico, a paciente evoluiu com importante melhora clínica, resolução da artrite, regressão das lesões de pele e melhora da anemia e das provas de atividade inflamatória.Psoriatic arthritis (PA is an inflammatory seronegative arthritis of unknown origin. Classically, PA has five clinical forms, and asymmetric oligoarthritis is the most common type. We describe the case of a patient with PA refractory to disease-modifying drugs, who developed drug-induced hepatitis after chemoprophylaxis with isoniazid, administered prior to the treatment with an anti-TNFα agent. Due to the risk of activating latent tuberculosis with the administration of anti-TNFα and hepatotoxicity onset caused by the TB treatment and based on the fact that the treatment of PA is similar to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, a decision was made to use the empirical treatment with abatacept. Approximately twenty days after the second infusion of the drug, the patient showed clinical improvement, resolution of the arthritis, almost complete disappearance of the skin lesions and improvement of anemia and inflammatory tests.

  18. Interleukin-17+CD8+ T cells are enriched in the joints of patients with psoriatic arthritis and correlate with disease activity and joint damage progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Bina; Gullick, Nicola J; Walter, Gina J; Rajasekhar, Megha; Garrood, Toby; Evans, Hayley G; Taams, Leonie S; Kirkham, Bruce W

    2014-05-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is associated with HLA class I genes, in contrast to the association with HLA class II in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Since IL-17+ cells are considered important mediators of synovial inflammation, we sought to determine whether IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells may be found in the joints of patients with PsA and whether these cells might contribute to the disease process. Mononuclear cells from paired samples of synovial fluid (SF) and peripheral blood (PB) from patients with PsA or patients with RA were stimulated ex vivo, and CD4- T cells were examined by flow cytometry for cytokine expression, cytotoxic markers, and frequencies of γ/δ or mucosal-associated invariant T cells. Clinical measures of arthritis activity (C-reactive protein [CRP] level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], Disease Activity Score in 28 joints [DAS28]) and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) scores for the presence of active synovitis in the aspirated knee were recorded and assessed for correlations with immunologic markers. Within the CD3+ T cell compartment, both IL-17+CD4- (predominantly CD8+) and IL-17+CD4+ T cells were significantly enhanced in the SF compared to the PB of patients with PsA (P = 0.0003 and P = 0.002, respectively; n = 21), whereas in patients with RA, only IL-17+CD4+ T cells were increased in the SF compared to the PB (P = 0.008; n = 14). The frequency of IL-17+CD4- T cells in PsA SF was positively correlated with the CRP level (r = 0.52, P = 0.01), ESR (r = 0.59, P = 0.004), and DAS28 (r = 0.52, P = 0.01), and was increased in patients with erosive disease (P joint, but not the RA joint, is enriched for IL-17+CD8+ T cells. Moreover, the findings reveal that the levels of this T cell subset are correlated with disease activity measures and the radiographic erosion status after 2 years, suggesting a previously unrecognized contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of PsA. © 2014 The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology is published by Wiley

  19. Bone mineral density status and frequency of osteoporosis and clinical fractures in 155 patients with psoriatic arthritis followed in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, Noemi; Vaquero, Carmen Gómez; Moreno, Jesús Rodríguez; Vilaseca, Daniel Roig; Narváez, Javier; Carmona, Loreto; Nolla, Joan M

    2014-01-01

    To assess the bone mineral density (BMD) and the frequency of osteoporosis and clinical fractures in a large group of Spanish patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). BMD was determined by DXA in all the patients who were willing to participate and had peripheral PsA regularly evaluated in a tertiary university hospital. All patients underwent a physical examination and general laboratory analysis. We gathered demographic and clinical variables related with BMD and risk of fractures. We also recorded the history of clinical low impact fractures. The population of reference to calculate T-score and Z-score came from a Spanish database. One hundred and fifty-five patients were included (64 postmenopausal women, 26 premenopausal women and 65 men). The clinical forms of PsA were: 46% oligoarticular and 54% polyarticular. Mean disease duration was 13.7±9.4 years and mean ESR was 21.8±13.9mm/h; 66% of patients had received glucocorticoid treatment. We found no differences in BMD status between the patients and the Spanish general population, neither in the whole series nor in each defined subgroup. Frequency of osteoporosis was 16%; it was higher in postmenopausal women (28%) than in men (9%) or premenopausal women (4%). Frequency of clinical fractures was 13%; it accounted specially in postmenopausal women. The magnitude of the problem of osteoporosis in PsA seems to be mild. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2015-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to induce or exacerbate psoriasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between several widely used analgesics, including aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, and acetaminophen (paracetamol), and risk of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in a large cohort of US women, the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2005). Information on regular use of aspirin, NSAIDs, and acetaminophen was collected for 95,540 participants during the follow-up. During 1,321,280 person-years of follow-up, we documented 646 incident psoriasis cases and 165 concomitant PsA cases. Compared to women who reported no use, regular acetaminophen and NSAIDs users with more than 10 years of use had multivariate hazard ratios of 3.60 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02-6.41] and 2.10 (95% CI: 1.11-3.96) for PsA, respectively. There was no clear association between aspirin and risk of psoriasis or PsA. In conclusion, long-term acetaminophen and NSAIDs use may be associated with an increased risk of PsA. Special attention on psoriasis and PsA screening may be needed for those who are prescribed for acetaminophen and NSAIDs for long-term periods.

  1. Points to Consider in the Foundation of Multidisciplinary Units for Psoriatic Arthritis: A Delphi Study and a Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratacos-Masmitja, Jordi; Luelmo-Aguilar, Jesus; Zarco-Montejo, Pedro; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Carrizosa-Esquivel, Ana Maria; Garcia-Vivar, Maria Luz; Perez-Barrio, Silvia; Roman-Ivorra, Jose Antonio; Ruiz-Montesino, Maria Dolores; Lopez-Estebaranz, Jose Luis

    2017-01-01

    In numerous clinical practice guidelines, emphasis is placed on the need for coordinated care of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) between rheumatologists and the objective was to develop experience-based points to consider facilitating the implementation of multidisciplinary units (Dermatology/Rheumatology) for the management of patients with PsA. A scientific committee of rheumatology and dermatology experts in the management of PsA, and with experience in joint care, discussed the critical aspects of multidisciplinary PsA Units. The discussion became the basis for a Delphi survey in two rounds submitted to a panel of 24 specialists in rheumatology and dermatology not involved in PsA units. The statements and practices that reached a consensus were summarized and further elaborated. After two Delphi rounds, agreement was reached for 49 of the 50 proposed statements. These included a justification of the units, objectives, and utilities, as well as operational aspects of the units, such as the minimal and ideal premises, referral criteria, and necessary resources. The statements were compiled in 11 points to consider. This consensus offers some points to consider, including premises and recommendations, for the development of specialized Units in the management of PsA based on expert opinion. We trust these guidelines may facilitate their implementation in the future. Pfizer.

  2. Type I and III collagen turnover is increased in axial spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Associations with disease activity and diagnostic capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmann, Natasja Staehr; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the turnover of type I and III collagen by neo-epitope markers in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Patients with PsA (n=101) or axSpA (n=110) and healthy subjects (n=120) were included. Demographic and clinical data...... were recorded. Markers of type I and III collagen were quantified by RIA (ICTP) or ELISA (C1M and C3M). Non-parametric statistics were applied for intergroup comparisons and correlation studies. The diagnostic potential of these marker molecules was assessed by ROC analysis. RESULTS: C1M and C3M, which...... positive than in HLA-B27 negative patients with axSpA. There was no association between bone and soft connective tissue collagen I markers (ICTP and C1M), while C1M and C3M were highly correlated (pdiscriminated between healthy and diseased with AUCs of 0.83 for PsA and 0.79 for axSpA. C3M...

  3. Proposal for levels of evidence schema for validation of a soluble biomarker reflecting damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, and recommendations for study design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Fitzgerald, Oliver; Wells, George A

    2009-01-01

    and discussed various models for association and prediction related to the statistical strength domain. In addition, 3 Delphi exercises addressing longitudinal study design for RA, PsA, and AS were conducted within the working group and members of the Assessments in SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS...

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene promoter region alter the risk of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junqing; Qu, Hongda; Chen, Xiaoguang; Wang, Hao; Li, Juan

    2013-01-01

    It has been confirmed that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), a macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokine, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis (PsV&PsA). In contrast, the reported association of TNFα gene promoter region single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and PsV&PsA has remained controversial. Accordingly, we performed a meta-analysis to provide new evidence that SNPs in the TNFα gene promoter region alter not only the risk of psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) but also of PsV&PsA. Interrelated literature dated to October 2012 was acquired from the PubMed, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink databases. The number of the genotypes and/or alleles for the TNFα promoter in the PsV and PsA and control subjects was obtained. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to calculate the risk of PsV and/or PsA with TNFα promoter SNPs. A total of 26 papers of 2159 for PsV (2129 normal controls) and 2360 for PsA (2997 normal controls) were included in our meta-analysis. The results showed that the variant genotype and allele of TNFα -308A/G was protective in pooled groups of patients with PsV&PsA (OR = 0.682, 0.750; 95% CI, 0.596-0.779, 0.653-0.861). However, the variant genotypes and alleles of TNFα -238A/G and -857T/C had an increased risk of PsV&PsA (OR = 2.493, 2.228, 1.536, 1.486, 95% CI, 1.777-3.498, 1.628-3.049, 1.336-1.767, 1.309-1.685). Moreover, the meta-analysis revealed a significant association between TNFα -238A/G and -857T/C polymorphism and PsA susceptibility (OR = 2.242, 2.052, 1.419, 1.465; 95% CI, 1.710-2.941, 1.614-2.610, 1.214-1.658, 1.277-1.681). In contrast, the variant genotypes and alleles of TNFα -308A/G proved to be protective against PsV (OR = 0.574, 0.650, 95% CI, 0.478-0.690, 0.556-0.759), whereas TNFα -238A/G was found to have a risk association (OR = 2.636, 2.223, 95% CI, 1.523-4.561, 1.317-3.751). SNPs in the TNFα gene promoter region

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene promoter region alter the risk of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junqing Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been confirmed that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα, a macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokine, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis (PsV&PsA. In contrast, the reported association of TNFα gene promoter region single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and PsV&PsA has remained controversial. Accordingly, we performed a meta-analysis to provide new evidence that SNPs in the TNFα gene promoter region alter not only the risk of psoriasis vulgaris (PsV or psoriatic arthritis (PsA but also of PsV&PsA. METHODS: Interrelated literature dated to October 2012 was acquired from the PubMed, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink databases. The number of the genotypes and/or alleles for the TNFα promoter in the PsV and PsA and control subjects was obtained. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to calculate the risk of PsV and/or PsA with TNFα promoter SNPs. RESULTS: A total of 26 papers of 2159 for PsV (2129 normal controls and 2360 for PsA (2997 normal controls were included in our meta-analysis. The results showed that the variant genotype and allele of TNFα -308A/G was protective in pooled groups of patients with PsV&PsA (OR = 0.682, 0.750; 95% CI, 0.596-0.779, 0.653-0.861. However, the variant genotypes and alleles of TNFα -238A/G and -857T/C had an increased risk of PsV&PsA (OR = 2.493, 2.228, 1.536, 1.486, 95% CI, 1.777-3.498, 1.628-3.049, 1.336-1.767, 1.309-1.685. Moreover, the meta-analysis revealed a significant association between TNFα -238A/G and -857T/C polymorphism and PsA susceptibility (OR = 2.242, 2.052, 1.419, 1.465; 95% CI, 1.710-2.941, 1.614-2.610, 1.214-1.658, 1.277-1.681. In contrast, the variant genotypes and alleles of TNFα -308A/G proved to be protective against PsV (OR = 0.574, 0.650, 95% CI, 0.478-0.690, 0.556-0.759, whereas TNFα -238A/G was found to have a risk association (OR = 2.636, 2.223, 95% CI, 1.523-4.561, 1

  6. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Gene Promoter Region Alter the Risk of Psoriasis Vulgaris and Psoriatic Arthritis: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junqing; Qu, Hongda; Chen, Xiaoguang; Wang, Hao; Li, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been confirmed that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), a macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokine, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis (PsV&PsA). In contrast, the reported association of TNFα gene promoter region single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and PsV&PsA has remained controversial. Accordingly, we performed a meta-analysis to provide new evidence that SNPs in the TNFα gene promoter region alter not only the risk of psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) but also of PsV&PsA. Methods Interrelated literature dated to October 2012 was acquired from the PubMed, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink databases. The number of the genotypes and/or alleles for the TNFα promoter in the PsV and PsA and control subjects was obtained. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to calculate the risk of PsV and/or PsA with TNFα promoter SNPs. Results A total of 26 papers of 2159 for PsV (2129 normal controls) and 2360 for PsA (2997 normal controls) were included in our meta-analysis. The results showed that the variant genotype and allele of TNFα -308A/G was protective in pooled groups of patients with PsV&PsA (OR = 0.682, 0.750; 95% CI, 0.596-0.779, 0.653-0.861). However, the variant genotypes and alleles of TNFα -238A/G and -857T/C had an increased risk of PsV&PsA (OR = 2.493, 2.228, 1.536, 1.486, 95% CI, 1.777-3.498, 1.628-3.049, 1.336-1.767, 1.309-1.685). Moreover, the meta-analysis revealed a significant association between TNFα -238A/G and -857T/C polymorphism and PsA susceptibility (OR = 2.242, 2.052, 1.419, 1.465; 95% CI, 1.710-2.941, 1.614-2.610, 1.214-1.658, 1.277-1.681). In contrast, the variant genotypes and alleles of TNFα -308A/G proved to be protective against PsV (OR = 0.574, 0.650, 95% CI, 0.478-0.690, 0.556-0.759), whereas TNFα -238A/G was found to have a risk association (OR = 2.636, 2.223, 95% CI, 1.523-4.561, 1

  7. Subjective Health Complaints in Individuals with Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis: Associations with the Severity of the Skin Condition and Illness Perceptions - A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbø, Emma Charlott Andersson; Aamodt, Geir; Ihlebæk, Camilla Martha

    2017-06-01

    High comorbidity has been reported among persons with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), but the occurrence of subjective health complaints (SHCs) in these patient groups is poorly understood. The study aimed to describe the prevalence of SHCs among individuals with psoriasis and PsA in Norway, and investigate whether the severity of their skin condition and their illness perceptions were associated with the number and severity of health complaints. Participants were recruited through the Psoriasis and Eczema Association of Norway (PEF) (n = 942). The participants answered a self-administered questionnaire covering subjective health complaints, the severity of their skin condition, and their illness perceptions measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ-R). The prevalence and severity of SHCs were high. Participants with PsA reported more complaints and higher severity of complaints compared with participants with psoriasis. In both groups, the severity of the skin condition was associated with the number and severity of SHCs. Cognitive illness perceptions (consequences) and emotional illness perceptions (emotional affect) were associated with SHCs in participants with psoriasis, whereas only cognitive illness perceptions (consequences and identity) were associated with SHCs in participants with PsA. The high prevalence and severity of SHCs among individuals with psoriasis and PsA were associated with the severity of the skin condition and illness perceptions. Somatic and cognitive sensitizations are proposed as possible mechanisms. The findings suggest that holistic approaches are essential when managing these patient groups in health care institutions and clinical practice.

  8. Beneficial effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on inflammation and analgesic use in psoriatic arthritis: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, S; Schmidt, E B; Schlemmer, A; Rasmussen, C; Johansen, M B; Christensen, J H

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on disease activity, use of analgesics, and inflammatory biomarkers in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Patients with established PsA (n = 145) were investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The participants received a supplement of 3 g n-3 PUFA/day or 3 g olive oil/day (control) for 24 weeks. Outcome measures for disease activity, use of analgesics, and leukotriene formation from activated granulocytes were assessed at baseline and at study end. In total, 145 patients were included and 133 completed the study. After 24 weeks, the n-3 PUFA group showed a decrease in Disease Activity Score (DAS28-CRP), 68 tender joint count, enthesitis score, and psoriasis area and severity index, although not significantly different from the controls. There was a significant reduction in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and paracetamol use compared with controls (p = 0.04). In addition, the participants in the n-3 PUFA group had significantly lower formation of leukotriene B4 (p = 0.004) from stimulated granulocytes and significantly higher formation of leukotriene B5 (p < 0.001) compared with controls. The n-3 PUFA-supplemented group showed improvement in outcome measures for disease activity, although the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. However, use of NSAIDs and paracetamol was significantly reduced in the n-3 PUFA group compared to the control group. Finally, there was a significant decrease in leukotriene B4 formation in the n-3 PUFA group compared with controls.

  9. Is obesity in psoriatic arthritis associated with a poorer therapeutic response and more adverse effects of treatment with an anchor drug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galíndez, Eva; Carmona, Loreto

    To assess the association between obesity, control of inflammatory activity and increased adverse effects in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) with disease-modifying anti-inflammatory drugs (DMARD). A systematic literature review was performed using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases following the guidelines of the Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) consensus statement. Studies were selected if they included patients with PsA, obesity was studied as a predictive factor, and the outcome was adverse effects, including efficacy failure. Quality was assessed using an ad hoc risk of bias tool. A qualitative analysis was carried out by type of study and study population, quality and specific results. We found 1043 articles, discarding most of them on the basis of title and abstract. Ten articles were studied in detail and finally excluded three. The majority concluded, with statistically significant results, that in patients with PsA and treated with TNFα inhibitors (TNFαi), obesity is associated with poorer chances of achieving and maintaining a minimal disease activity, higher treatment discontinuation rates, and lower skin response. Regarding conventional synthetic DMARD, a trend toward a moderate increase in transaminases with methotrexate (MTX) was observed in obese patients with PsA. Obesity is a negative predictor of clinical response in patients with PsA being treated with TNFαi. Except MTX hepatotoxicity, no other adverse effects, either with TNFαi or other drugs, were found in relation to obesity in PsA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. Soluble biomarkers of cartilage and bone metabolism in early proof of concept trials in psoriatic arthritis: effects of adalimumab versus placebo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno W R van Kuijk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in soluble biomarkers that could be used on the group level for screening purposes in small proof of principle studies during early drug development. We investigated early changes in serum levels of several candidate biomarkers involved in cartilage and bone metabolism following the initiation of adalimumab as a prototypic active treatment in psoriatic arthritis (PsA compared to placebo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-four PsA patients were randomized to receive either adalimumab 40 mg s.c. every other week or placebo for 4 weeks, followed by an open label extension phase. Serum samples were obtained at baseline and after 4 and 12 weeks of treatment and analyzed for levels of CPII and PINP (synthesis of type II and type I procollagen, melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA (chondrocyte anabolism, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3, C2C and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP (type II collagen degradation, osteocalcin (OC (bone formation, NTX-I and ICTP (both type I collagen degradation. RESULTS: After 4 weeks, there was a significant decrease in serum MMP-3 levels in adalimumab-treated patients (P<0.005, while no change was observed in the placebo group. A significant increase in serum MIA was noted after adalimumab therapy (P<0.005 but not after placebo treatment. After 12 weeks, there was a marked reduction in serum MMP-3 in both groups (P<0.005, whereas other markers did not show significant changes compared to baseline. CONCLUSION: MMP-3 and MIA could serve as soluble biomarkers associated with inflammation as well as joint remodelling and destruction and may, together with clinical evaluation and in combination with other biomarkers, assist in distinguishing between effective and ineffective therapy in small, proof-of-principle studies of short duration in PsA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN23328456.

  11. The comparison of efficacy of different imaging techniques (conventional radiography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance) in assessment of wrist joints and metacarpophalangeal joints in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankowski, Artur Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula Maria; Ćwikła, Jarosław; Walecka, Irena; Walecki, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. The rheumatoid factor is characteristically absent in the serum of PsA patients. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also quite complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to a release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Material/Methods: PsA typically involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical patern. The spectrum of symptoms includes inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have a diverse clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Results: Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years however many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluating rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. Conclusions: As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided. PMID:23494635

  12. Evaluation of the novel ultrasound score for large joints in psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis: six month experience in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Valentin S; Fleck, Martin; Kellner, Herbert; Strunk, Johannes; Sattler, Horst; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Ehrenstein, Boris; Backhaus, Marina; Hartung, Wolfgang

    2013-12-19

    To evaluate the utility of the recently introduced SOLAR score (sonography of large joints in Rheumatology), which has been validated in RA patients, in a cohort of patients with Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) and Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) presenting with involvement of large peripheral joints. The recently established SOLAR score has been designed to determine the degree of inflammation in the shoulder, the elbow, the hip and the knee joint in patients suffering from RA. Since large joints are frequently involved in PsA and AS, synovitis and synovial vascularity were scored semiquantitatively (grade 0-3) by grey scale (GSUS) and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) utilizing the validated scoring system. Each joint was scanned from different angles, the knee joint for example was divided into four areas to score for synovitis: the suprapatellar longitudinal, the medial longitudinal, the lateral longitudinal, and the posterior region. Each area was scored from 0-3, so a maximum score of 12 could be achieved. PsA and AS patients presenting with peripheral joint disease involving large joints were examined at baseline, 3 and 6 months after initiation of local or systemic therapy (DMARDs/Biologics). For evaluation of the inflammatory status, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was determined. A cohort of 126 patients were enclosed, and 83 of these were followed for 6 months. At baseline before modification of the therapy, patients received DMARDs (n = 83), DMARDs plus biologics (n = 30), or biologic monotherapy (n = 29). Following intervention, all US scores demonstrated a marked improvement. The GSUS and the PDUS scores for all joint areas, except the PDUS score of the hip, exhibited a significant improvement (p joint involvement in PsA and AS patients and allows for treatment monitoring.

  13. Recommendations of the Spanish Society of Rheumatology on treatment and use of systemic biological and non-biological therapies in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre Alonso, Juan Carlos; Díaz Del Campo Fontecha, Petra; Almodóvar, Raquel; Cañete, Juan D; Montilla Morales, Carlos; Moreno, Mireia; Plasencia-Rodríguez, Chamaida; Ramírez García, Julio; Queiro, Rubén

    2017-10-27

    The main purpose of this recommendation statement is to provide clinicians with the best available evidence and the best opinion agreed upon by the panelists for a rational use of synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biologicals in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. The present document also focuses on important aspects in the management of PsA, such as early diagnosis, therapeutic objectives, comorbidities and optimization of treatment. The recommendations were agreed by consensus by a panel of 8 expert rheumatologists, previously selected by the Spanish Society of Rheumatology (SER) through an open call. The phases of the work were: identification of key areas for updating the previous consensus, analysis and synthesis of scientific evidence (modified Oxford system, Centre for Evidence-based Medicine, 2009) and formulation of recommendations based on this evidence and by consensus techniques. Seventeen recommendations were issued for the treatment of PsA patients. Six of them were of general nature, ranging from the early diagnosis and treatment to the importance of assessing comorbidities. The other 11 were focused on the indications for DMARDs and biological therapy in the distinct clinical forms of the disease. Likewise, the situation of failure of the first biological is addressed and treatment algorithms and a table with the different biological therapies are also included. We present the update of SER recommendations for the treatment of PsA with DMARDs and biologics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. Original Research: Different imiquimod creams resulting in differential effects for imiquimod-induced psoriatic mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Di-Qing; Wu, Hui-Hui; Zhao, Yu-Kun; Liu, Juan-Hua; Wang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    Imiquimod (IMQ)-induced mouse psoriatic model is one of the useful models displaying most of psoriatic features. To compare the modeling efficacy of different IMQ creams, we induced the psoriatic models by topically applying two different brands of IMQ 5% creams to the shaved Balb/c mice skin and assessed the results. Balb/c female mice (n = 24) 8-12 weeks of age were randomly divided into experimental groups A (Likejie), B (Aldara), and control group C (Vaseline); Likejie, Aldara, or Vaseline was topically applied to the back skin for mice in groups A, B, and C, respectively, for six consecutive days. The total psoriasis area and severity index scores of groups A, B, and C were 3.25 ± 1.56, 9.81 ± 0.84, and 0, respectively; the Baker's scores were 2.93 ± 1.07, 6.47 ± 1.50, and 0, respectively; and the epidermis thickness was 49.79 ± 14.16, 85.62 ± 17.55, and 20.04 ± 3.68 µm, respectively. The differences between the three groups in dual were statistically significant (P creams may result in differential efficacy when performing the IMQ-induced psoriasis mouse models. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  15. Effect of certolizumab pegol over 96 weeks in patients with psoriatic arthritis with and without prior antitumour necrosis factor exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, P; Deodhar, A; Fleischmann, R; Wollenhaupt, J; Gladman, D; Leszczyński, P; Vitek, P; Turkiewicz, A; Khraishi, M; FitzGerald, O; Landewé, R; de Longueville, M; Hoepken, B; Peterson, L; van der Heijde, D

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous reports of RAPID-PsA (NCT01087788) demonstrated efficacy and safety of certolizumab pegol (CZP) over 24 weeks in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), including patients with prior antitumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy. We report efficacy and safety data from a 96-week data cut of RAPID-PsA. Methods RAPID-PsA was placebo-controlled to week 24, dose-blind to week 48 and open-label to week 216. We present efficacy data including American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) responses, HAQ-DI, pain, minimal disease activity (MDA), modified total Sharp score (mTSS) and ACR responses in patients with/without prior anti-TNF exposure, in addition to safety data. Results Of 409 patients randomised, 273 received CZP from week 0. 54 (19.8%) CZP patients had prior anti-TNF exposure. Of patients randomised to CZP, 91% completed week 24, 87% week 48 and 80% week 96. ACR responses were maintained to week 96: 60% of patients achieved ACR20 at week 24, and 64% at week 96. Improvements were observed with both CZP dose regimens. ACR20 responses were similar in patients with (week 24: 59%; week 96: 63%) and without (week 24: 60%; week 96: 64%) prior anti-TNF exposure. Placebo patients switching to CZP displayed rapid clinical improvements, maintained to week 96. In patients with ≥3% baseline skin involvement (60.8% week 0 CZP patients), PASI responses were maintained to week 96. No progression of structural damage was observed over the 96-week period. In the Safety Set (n=393), adverse events occurred in 345 patients (87.8%) and serious adverse events in 67 (17.0%), including 6 fatal events. Conclusions CZP efficacy was maintained to week 96 with both dose regimens and in patients with/without prior anti-TNF exposure. The safety profile was in line with that previously reported from RAPID-PsA, with no new safety signals observed with increased exposure. Trial registration number NCT01087788. PMID:26509074

  16. [The psoriatic great toe or the psoriatic onycho-pachydermo-periostitis of great toe (OP3gt)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonda, R; Zucchetta, P; Contessa, C; Punzi, L

    2004-01-01

    The onycho-pachydermo-periostitis of the great toe is a characteristic feature of psoriatic arthritis first described by Fournié in 1980. In the affected patients, the great toe involvement is characterised by a relevant osteo-periostitis of the distal phalanx, a thickening of the distal soft tissues associated with a psoriatic onychopathy. In most cases, the distal interphalangeal joint is spared. Radiographic and scintigraphic osteo-periostitis of distal phalanx of the great toe are frequent, being found in about 44% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. However, clinical manifestations, with inflammatory inflammation of the great toe, are rare.

  17. The psoriatic great toe or the psoriatic onycho-pachydermo-periostitis of great toe (OP3gt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Contessa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The onycho-pachydermo-periostitis of the great toe is a characteristic feature of psoriatic arthritis first described by Fournié in 1980. In the affected patients, the great toe involvement is characterised by a relevant osteo-periostitis of the distal phalanx, a thickening of the distal soft tissues associated with a psoriatic onychopathy. In most cases, the distal interphalangeal joint is spared. Radiographic and scintigraphic osteo-periostitis of distal phalanx of the great toe are frequent, being found in about 44% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. However, clinical manifestations, with inflammatory inflammation of the great toe, are rare.

  18. Synovial features of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in clinical and ultrasound remission differ under anti-TNF therapy: a clue to interpret different chances of relapse after clinical remission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivernini, Stefano; Tolusso, Barbara; Petricca, Luca; Bui, Laura; Di Sante, Gabriele; Peluso, Giusy; Benvenuto, Roberta; Fedele, Anna Laura; Federico, Franco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Gremese, Elisa

    2017-07-01

    To define the synovial characteristics of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in clinical and ultrasound remission achieved by combination therapy with methotrexate (MTX) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. Patients with RA in remission (n=25) (disease activity score (DAS)<1.6 for at least 6 months), patients with RA in low disease activity (LDA) (n=10) (1.6

  19. Safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including aspirin and paracetamol (acetaminophen) in people receiving methotrexate for inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthritis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebatch, Alexandra N; Marks, Jonathan L; Edwards, Christopher J

    2011-11-09

    Methotrexate is routinely used in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis. There have been concerns regarding the safety of using concurrent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, or paracetamol (acetaminophen), or both, in these people. To systematically appraise and summarise the scientific evidence on the safety of using NSAIDs, including aspirin, or paracetamol, or both, with methotrexate in inflammatory arthritis; and to identify gaps in the current evidence, assess the implications of those gaps and to make recommendations for future research to address these deficiencies. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, second quarter 2010); MEDLINE (from 1950); EMBASE (from 1980); the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE). We also handsearched the conference proceedings for the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) (2008 to 2009) and checked the websites of regulatory agencies for reported adverse events, labels and warnings. Randomised controlled trials and non-randomised studies comparing the safety of methotrexate alone to methotrexate with concurrent NSAIDs, including aspirin, or paracetamol, or both, in people with inflammatory arthritis. Two authors independently assessed the search results, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. Seventeen publications out of 8681 identified studies were included in the review, all of which included people with rheumatoid arthritis using various NSAIDs, including aspirin. There were no identified studies for other forms of inflammatory arthritis.For NSAIDs, 13 studies were included that used concurrent NSAIDs, of which nine studies examined unspecified NSAIDs. The mean number of participants was 150.4 (range 19 to 315), mean duration 2182.9 (range 183 to 5490) days, although the study duration was

  20. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy--a single centre, open-label study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-01

    With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent.

  1. Influence of physical treatment on disease activity and health status of patients with chronic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustur Dušan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This is an open uncontrolled study about effects of physical treatment on disease activity parameters of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Objective The aim of the study was to establish if there was any improvement of disease activity parameters after four weeks of physical and spa treatment. METHOD We compared morning stiffness, tender and swollen joint count, body pain level and Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS-28 in patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and assessed the effect of physical and spa treatment on those parameters. The research encompassed 109 patients: 69 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA group and 40 with psoriatic arthritis (PA group. They were from Norway, staying for four weeks in June-September 2003. The groups served as their own controls - "one group pre-test post test" study. Disease activity measurement was made twice: at the beginning and at the end of treatment. The therapeutic set consisted of mud applications, kinesitherapy, mineral water pool and electrotherapy. Results At the beginning there was no significant difference in observed disease activity parameters between patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis (p>0.05. After four weeks of physical and spa treatment disease activity was significantly reduced in all observed parameters in both groups: morning stiffness (p<0.001 RA+PA, tender joint count (p<0.01 RA+PA, swollen joint count (p<0.01 RA; p<0.05 PA, body pain (p<0.01 RA+PA and DAS-28 score (p<0.01 RA+PA. Conclusion Physical and spa treatment, together with climatic factors in Igalo, lead to a significant reduction of disease activity parameters of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. .

  2. Epigenetics of psoriatic disease: A systematic review and critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Remy A; Abji, Fatima; Gladman, Dafna D

    2017-03-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease of the skin that is sometimes accompanied by an auto-inflammatory arthritis called psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Psoriasis and PsA are multifactorial diseases that result from complex interactions of environmental and genetic risk factors. Epigenetic marks, which are labile chemical marks with diverse functions, form a layer of biological information that sits at the interface of genetics and the environment. Aberrant epigenetic regulation has been previously implicated in other rheumatological disorders. The purpose of this review is to summarize and critically evaluate the nascent literature on epigenetics in psoriasis and PsA. A systematic review yielded 52 primary articles after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted using a standardized template and study quality assessed using a methodological quality checklist. Studies reflect a broad range of epigenetic sub-disciplines, the most common being DNA methylation, followed by the parent of origin effect or genomic imprinting, expression or activity of epigenetic modifying enzymes, and histone modifications. Epidemiological studies demonstrating excessive paternal transmission provided the earliest evidence of epigenetic deregulation in psoriatic disease, however few studies have examined its molecular mechanisms. Methylation studies evolved rapidly from low resolution global to targeted analyses of known psoriatic disease susceptibility loci such as HLA-C*0602. The recent explosion of epigenome-wide association studies has provided us with novel insights into psoriasis pathogenesis, and the mechanism of action of UVB, methotrexate, and anti-TNF therapies, as well as molecular signatures of psoriasis that may have clinical relevance. Finally, recent studies of pharmacological inhibitors of epigenetic modifier enzymes demonstrate their potential applicability as novel treatment modalities for psoriasis. Challenges of epigenetics research in psoriasis and Ps

  3. Social media for arthritis-related comparative effectiveness and safety research and the impact of direct-to-consumer advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Chen, Lang; Higginbotham, Phillip; Nowell, W Benjamin; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Willig, James; Safford, Monika; Coe, Joseph; O'Hara, Kaitlin; Sa'adon, Roee

    2017-03-07

    Social media may complement traditional data sources to answer comparative effectiveness/safety questions after medication licensure. The Treato platform was used to analyze all publicly available social media data including Facebook, blogs, and discussion boards for posts mentioning inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid, psoriatic). Safety events were self-reported by patients and mapped to medical ontologies, resolving synonyms. Disease and symptom-related treatment indications were manually redacted. The units of analysis were unique terms in posts. Pre-specified conditions (e.g. herpes zoster (HZ)) were selected based upon safety signals from clinical trials and reported as pairwise odds ratios (ORs); drugs were compared with Fisher's exact test. Empirically identified events were analyzed using disproportionality analysis and reported as relative reporting ratios (RRRs). The accuracy of a natural language processing (NLP) classifier to identify cases of shingles associated with arthritis medications was assessed. As of October 2015, there were 785,656 arthritis-related posts. Posts were predominantly US posts (75%) from patient authors (87%) under 40 years of age (61%). For HZ posts (n = 1815), ORs were significantly increased with tofacitinib versus other rheumatoid arthritis therapies. ORs for mentions of perforated bowel (n = 13) were higher with tocilizumab versus other therapies. RRRs associated with tofacitinib were highest in conditions related to baldness and hair regrowth, infections and cancer. The NLP classifier had a positive predictive value of 91% to identify HZ. There was a threefold increase in posts following television direct-to-consumer advertisement (p = 0.04); posts expressing medication safety concerns were significantly more frequent than favorable posts. Social media is a challenging yet promising data source that may complement traditional approaches for comparative effectiveness research for new medications.

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of articular and extraarticular synovial structures of the hands in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Barbieri, Francesca; Boesen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), the quantification of enhancement within the synovial membrane and bone by extracting curves using fast T1-weighted sequences during intravenous administration of contrast agent, evaluates synovitis and bone marrow edema in psoriati...... arthritis (PsA). In this pilot study, we looked at possible differences between joint synovitis and tenosynovitis in PsA as compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  5. Clinical Differences between Men and Women with Psoriatic Arthritis: Relevance of the Analysis of Genes and Polymorphisms in the Major Histocompatibility Complex Region and of the Age at Onset of Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Queiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that males with spondyloarthritis tend to suffer from more severe spinal disease while females are more likely to have peripheral joint involvement. Nevertheless, gender-related differences have not been thoroughly explored in psoriatic arthritis (PsA. In PsA, males accumulate more peripheral and axial joint damage compared to women. However, it is not clear whether these findings are secondary to differences in occupational physical activity, hormonal changes, or other factors. The present study analyzed the differences in clinical expression of PsA between men and women. We have also evaluated the possible existence of gender-linked differences in the distribution of genes and polymorphisms within the major histocompatibility complex and whether patients’ age at the onset of psoriasis established any differences in these aspects. Women suffered more polyarthritis, greater functional impairment, and a larger number of swollen joints during followup. We appreciated a differential expression of certain MHC genes according to gender and age at onset of psoriasis. Our results point to the need to include patient’s age at the onset of psoriasis and gender as key stratification elements in future studies of genetic associations in PsA.

  6. Psoriatic onycho-pachydermo-periostitis successfully treated with low-dose methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Toyoko; Washio, Hisayo; Shiraiwa, Hidetaka; Takei, Masami; Sawada, Shigemasa

    2006-04-01

    Psoriatic onycho-pachydermo-periostitis (POPP) is a rare manifestation of psoriatic arthritis that is often misdiagnosed as a nail infection. The treatment for POPP has not yet been established. We present a case of a 67-year-old man who had no psoriatic skin lesions with POPP, characterized by psoriatic nail changes, painful swelling of the distal soft tissues on the great toes and fingers, and enthesopathies of the involved terminal phalanges. The clinical nail and arthritic changes were improved with methotrexate treatment 4 mg weekly for 6 months. Methotrexate can be recommended as the first-choice therapeutic agent for patients with POPP.

  7. Update on research and future directions of the OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul

    2011-01-01

    of this score will require more PsA imaging datasets. As well, due to improved image resolution since the development of the original rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (RAMRIS), the Task Force has worked on semiquantitative assessment of joint space narrowing, and developed a reliable method...... as a potential RAMRIS addendum, although responsiveness will need to be evaluated. One of the strengths of MRI is the ability to detect subclinical synovitis, so the group worked on obtaining low disease activity/clinical remission datasets from a number of international centers and presented cross......The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Task Force has developed and evolved the psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS) over the last few years, and at OMERACT 10, presented longitudinal evaluation by multiple readers, using PsA datasets obtained from extremity MRI magnets. Further evaluation...

  8. The sesamoid index in psoriatic arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehouse, Richard W.; Aslam, Rizwan [Manchester Royal Infirmary, Department of Clinical Radiology, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bukhari, Marwan [Manchester Royal Infirmary, Department of Rheumatology, Manchester (United Kingdom); Groves, Clare; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor [Agnes Hunt and Robert Jones Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    The sesamoid index was originally described as an aid to the diagnosis of acromegaly. We performed this study to assess the value of the thumb sesamoid index in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthropathy. Retrospective measurement of the sesamoid index (length x width of the medial thumb sesamoid), along with the age and sex were recorded for patients as described below. Patients with psoriasis were subdivided into those with or without radiographic evidence of hand arthropathy. Fifty-nine consecutive patients attending rheumatology clinics with arthralgia and psoriasis were studied. Comparison groups with radiographic evidence of rheumatoid arthritis (52 patients), osteoarthritis (44) or normal hands (55) were also recorded. Twenty-one of 59 patients with psoriasis and arthropathy had a sesamoid index >40, compared with two of 52 with rheumatoid arthritis, none of 44 with osteoarthritis and none of 55 normals. Psoriatic arthropathy is a recognised cause of bone enlargement, usually in the phalanges due to periostitis and proliferative enthesopathy. We have confirmed that psoriatic hand arthropathy can cause significant enlargement of the thumb sesamoids, a feature which is easily quantified and may assist diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. Arthritis, Foot Pain & Shoe Wear: Current Musculoskeletal Research on Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Jody; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Both arthritis and foot pain are major public health problems. Approximately 24% of adults have foot ailments, and the prevalence increases with age. Foot pain, particularly related to shoes, footwear and rheumatic disorders, may be an important modifiable factor. Surprisingly, this topic has received little attention in the rheumatology community. Recent findings Despite the major focus of structure and alignment in arthritis, remarkably little work has focused on the foot and non-surgical foot interventions that might affect lower extremity joint alignment, structure and pain in rheumatic diseases. Emerging research suggests that there may be a significant role for foot orthotics and footwear in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and foot. This review highlights the current understanding on the topic of foot orthotics and footwear in adults with rheumatic diseases. Summary Biomechanical evidence indicates that foot orthotics and specialized footwear may change muscle activation and gait patterns to reduce joint loading. Emerging evidence suggests that orthotics, specific shoe types and footwear interventions may provide an effective non-surgical intervention in rheumatic diseases. Yet good data are sparse, and it is premature to recommend guidelines. As there are a limited number of studies that underpin the foot’s role in arthritis etiology and progression, clinical trials and prospective studies are of utmost importance to unravel the links between foot pain, foot conditions and interventions that lessen the impact of rheumatic diseases. PMID:21150623

  10. Arthritis Research and Education in Nursing and Allied Health: A Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    A summary of proceedings of the Forum on Arthritis Research and Education in Nursing and Allied Health is presented. The keynote address, "The Burden of Arthritis," by Dorothy P. Rice, provides data collected by the National Center for Health Statistics on the prevalence of arthritis, the burden it imposes, and the volume, type, and cost…

  11. Ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, radiography, and clinical assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in fingers and toes of patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria

    2007-01-01

    (x-ray), and clinical findings. Fifteen patients with PsA, 5 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 5 healthy control persons were examined by means of US, contrast-enhanced MRI, x-ray, and clinical assessment. Each joint of the 2nd-5th finger (metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal interphalangeal [PIP...... tendons of the fingers were assessed for the presence of insertional changes and tenosynovitis. One hand was assessed by means of MRI for the aforementioned changes. X-rays of both hands and feet were assessed for bone erosions and proliferations. US was repeated in 8 persons by another ultrasonographer....... US and MRI were more sensitive to inflammatory and destructive changes than x-ray and clinical examination, and US showed a good interobserver agreement for bone changes (median 96% absolute agreement) and lower interobserver agreement for inflammatory changes (median 92% absolute agreement). A high...

  12. Successful treatment of psoriatic onycho-pachydermo periostitis (POPP) with adalimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongartz, T; Härle, P; Friedrich, S; Karrer, S; Vogt, T; Seitz, A; Müller-Ladner, U

    2005-01-01

    Psoriatic onycho-pachydermo periostitis (POPP) is recognized as a rare subset of psoriatic arthritis, characterized by psoriatic onychodystrophy, connective tissue thickening above the distal phalanx, and a periosteal reaction. Therapy for this rare disease is based on treatments used for psoriatic arthritis, but traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate, have shown inconsistent and unsatisfactory results. We report herein a successful therapeutic approach for POPP using the fully human anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody adalimumab in a 42-year-old male patient. After 4 months of anti-TNF treatment, a remarkable normalization of the clinical appearance was achieved and magnetic resonance imaging showed complete resolution of the initial inflammatory lesions. Therefore, we consider a TNF-blocking strategy as promising for treatment of POPP.

  13. Dual IL-17A and IL-17F neutralisation by bimekizumab in psoriatic arthritis: evidence from preclinical experiments and a randomised placebo-controlled clinical trial that IL-17F contributes to human chronic tissue inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatt, Sophie; Baeten, Dominique; Baker, Terry; Griffiths, Meryn; Ionescu, Lucian; Lawson, Alastair D G; Maroof, Ash; Oliver, Ruth; Popa, Serghei; Strimenopoulou, Foteini; Vajjah, Pavan; Watling, Mark I L; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Miossec, Pierre; Shaw, Stevan

    2017-12-23

    Interleukin (IL)-17A has emerged as pivotal in driving tissue pathology in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. The role of IL-17F, sharing 50% sequence homology and overlapping biological function, remains less clear. We hypothesised that IL-17F, together with IL-17A, contributes to chronic tissue inflammation, and that dual neutralisation may lead to more profound suppression of inflammation than inhibition of IL-17A alone. Preclinical experiments assessed the role of IL-17A and IL-17F in tissue inflammation using disease-relevant human cells. A placebo-controlled proof-of-concept (PoC) clinical trial randomised patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) to bimekizumab (n=39) or placebo (n=14). Safety, pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of multiple doses (weeks 0, 3, 6 (240 mg/160 mg/160 mg; 80 mg/40 mg/40 mg; 160 mg/80 mg/80 mg and 560 mg/320 mg/320 mg)) of bimekizumab, a humanised monoclonal IgG1 antibody neutralising both IL-17A and IL-17F, were investigated. IL-17F induced qualitatively similar inflammatory responses to IL-17A in skin and joint cells. Neutralisation of IL-17A and IL-17F with bimekizumab more effectively suppressed in vitro cytokine responses and neutrophil chemotaxis than inhibition of IL-17A or IL-17F alone. The PoC trial met both prespecified efficacy success criteria and showed rapid, profound responses in both joint and skin (pooled top three doses vs placebo at week 8: American College of Rheumatology 20% response criteria 80.0% vs 16.7% (posterior probability >99%); Psoriasis Area and Severity Index 100% response criteria 86.7% vs 0%), sustained to week 20, without unexpected safety signals. These data support IL-17F as a key driver of human chronic tissue inflammation and the rationale for dual neutralisation of IL-17A and IL-17F in PsA and related conditions. NCT02141763; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No

  14. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy - a single centre, open-label study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-27

    Abstract Introduction With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with PsA underwent arthroscopic synovial biopsies and MRI scans of an inflamed knee joint at baseline and 12 weeks after starting treatment with either anakinra (first 10 patients) or etanercept (subsequent 15 patients) in two sequential studies of identical design. DAS28 scores were measured at both time points. Immunohistochemical staining for CD3, CD68 and Factor VIII (FVIII) was performed on synovial samples and scored by digital image analysis (DIA). MRI scans performed at baseline and at 12 weeks were scored for synovitis semi-quantitatively. The ΔDAS28 of the European League Against Rheumatism good response definition (>1.2) was chosen to divide patients into responder and non-responder groups. Differences between groups (Mann Whitney U test) and correlations between ΔDAS28 with change in immunohistochemical and MRI synovitis scores (Spearman\\'s rho test) were calculated. Results Paired synovial samples and MRI scans were available for 21 patients (8 anakinra, 13 etanercept) and 23 patients (8 anakinra, 15 etanercept) respectively. Change in CD3 (ΔCD3) and CD68 expression in the synovial sublining layer (ΔCD68sl) was significantly greater in

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ... Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome Center ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis ... Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s ...

  18. Standards of therapy of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Korotaeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Псориатический артрит (ПсА – хроническое воспалительное заболевание суставов, позвоночника и энтезисов из группы серонегативных спондилоартритов, обычно ассоциированное с псориазом [1]. Считают, что заболевание возникает в результате сложных взаимодействий между генетическими, иммунологическими и внешнесредовыми факторами.

  19. Temporomandibular Joint Involvement in Psoriatic Arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by synovial‑lining, cell hyperplasia, and mononuclear infiltration that indicates the presence of autoimmunity, perhaps mediated by complement activation.[9]. This paper aims to describe different epidemiological, clinical, and radiological characteristics of PA, with a significance on the involvement of TMJs in the general.

  20. Arthritis mutilans due to chronic tophaceous gout | Akintayo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Arthritis mutilans is a form of destructive arthritis which is often characterized with severe osteolysis. It is more commonly described in association with the most severe forms of psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis. Case presentation: A 69-year old man presented with a fifteen-year history of recurrent inflammatory ...

  1. Disfunção sexual em pacientes com psoríase e artrite psoriásica - uma revisão sistemática Sexual dysfunction in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Shu Kurizky

    2012-12-01

    of its lesions. Several psychological disorders can be associated with psoriasis, and feelings such as rage, depression, shame, and anxiety have been commonly reported, which can culminate in social isolation and sexual dysfunction. Despite being a common complaint among patients with psoriasis, sexual dysfunction has been rarely reported in the literature. This study aimed at performing a systematic review of the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, assessing the role played by factors such as depression and severity of disease in this relation. This systematic review showed that data on the sexual difficulties of patients with psoriasis are scarce. The hypotheses to explain sexual dysfunction in that group of patients include the severity of skin findings, the psychological effects of the condition on the patient, concerns of the sexual partner, and side effects of the medical treatments for psoriasis. Those data emphasize that this type of symptomatology is frequently neglected in medical practice, and stress the importance of assessing the impact of psoriasis regarding not only cutaneous and joint involvements, but also psychosocial and sexual impairments. Considering the sociocultural diversities of each population, a specific study of the Brazilian population to provide more information about our patients is required.

  2. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...

  4. Coinfection of Chlamydiae and other Bacteria in Reactive Arthritis and Spondyloarthritis: Need for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Zeidler

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive (inflammatory arthritis has been known for many years to follow genital infection with the intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis in some individuals. Recent studies from several groups have demonstrated that a related bacterium, the respiratory pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae, can elicit a similar arthritis. Studies of these organisms, and of a set of gastrointestinal pathogens also associated with engendering inflammatory arthritis, have been relatively extensive. However, reports focusing on coinfections with these and/or other organisms, and the effects of such coinfections on the host immune and other systems, have been rare. In this article, we review the extant data regarding infections by multiple pathogens in the joint as they relate to engendering arthritis, and we suggest a number of research areas that must be given a high priority if we are to understand, and therefore to treat in an effective manner, such arthritides.

  5. Systemic abnormalities of psoriatic patients: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Li Yin,1,* Jia-Li Xu,2,* Ying-Ying Hu,1 Andrew Johnston,3 Zhi-Qiang Yin,1 1Department of Dermatology, 2Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated inflammatory disease related to the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and other comorbidities. However, so far there has been no specific research concerning systemic abnormalities in psoriatic patients. Objective: A retrospective study was conducted focusing on the detailed systemic abnormalities in psoriatic patients. Methods: Psoriatic inpatients data was collected from July 2009 to September 2015. The inclusion criteria were first-time hospitalization and without administration of systemic drug therapy or exposure to phototherapy for psoriasis for at least 1 month. Detailed systemic indexes were mainly evaluated. Results: The abnormality rates of blood routine examination, urine examination, blood biochemical examination and chest X-ray of 43 psoriatic patients were significantly higher than those of 44 non-psoriasis controls, and psoriasis patients significantly had higher absolute values of leukocytes and neutrophils, and significantly lower values of lymphocytes. Compared with psoriasis vulgaris, erythrodermic psoriasis had significantly higher abnormality rates of blood biochemical examination and serum electrolyte analysis. Erythrodermic psoriasis had significantly higher absolute values of blood leukocytes, neutrophils, and lower serum calcium compared with those of psoriasis vulgaris. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio of controls was significantly lower than that of psoriatic patients, and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio of ­erythrodermic psoriasis was significantly higher in comparison with psoriasis vulgaris. Conclusion: This study

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Yoga for Arthritis ... Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  8. Improvements in productivity at paid work and within the household, and increased participation in daily activities after 24 weeks of certolizumab pegol treatment of patients with psoriatic arthritis: results of a phase 3 double-blind randomised placebo-controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, A; Gladman, D; van der Heijde, D; Purcaru, O; Mease, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of certolizumab pegol (CZP) on productivity outside and within the home, and on participation in family, social and leisure activities in adult patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods RAPID-PsA (NCT01087788) is a phase 3, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. 409 patients with active PsA were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo, CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks (Q2W) or CZP 400 mg every 4 weeks (Q4W). The arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS) assessed the impact of PsA on paid work and household productivity, and participation in social activities during the preceding month. WPS responses were compared between treatment arms using a non-parametric bootstrap-t method. Results At baseline, 56.6%, 60.1% and 61.5% of placebo, CZP 200 mg Q2W and CZP 400 mg Q4W patients were employed. By week 24, employed CZP patients reported an average of 1.0–1.8 and 3.0–3.9 fewer days of absenteeism and presenteeism, respectively, per month compared with 1.0 and 0.3 fewer days for placebo patients (pproductivity or days lost for participation in family, social and leisure activities. Improvements with CZP were seen as early as week 4 and continued to week 24. Conclusions CZP treatment significantly improved productivity at paid work and within the home, and resulted in greater participation in social activities for PsA patients. Trial registration number NCT01087788. PMID:24942382

  9. Psoriatic arthropathy in a 17th century archaeological protestant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriatic arthropathy in a 17th century archaeological protestant population belonging to Saint-Maurice cemetery in France. Djillali Hadjouis. Djillali Hadjouis is a research archaeologist at laboratoire d'Archéologie du Val de Marne, France. Specialized in research paleontology, paleoanthropology and paleopathology ...

  10. The role of TNF inhibitors in psoriatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Brian F; Sobell, Jeffrey M

    2014-06-01

    In contrast to many other diseases, modern psoriasis therapy has a fairly brief history. Until about 15 years ago, clinicians and their patients had few options, with limited ability to rein in the disease process.The success of antifolate methotrexate in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) led to clinical evaluation and adoption of the agent, a principal form of treatment for psoriasis, which, like RA, has its origin based in inflammation. The introduction of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors marked the beginning of the biologic era of psoriasis therapy. Also borrowed from the field of rheumatology, biologic therapy has evolved from improved understanding of the molecular basis of the disease process. An increased recognition of comorbid conditions that often accompany psoriasis, particularly psoriatic arthritis, can complicate clinical management. Dermatologists and other clinicians who treat psoriasis continue to benefit from insights gained in the field of rheumatology. 2014 by Frontline Medical Communications Inc.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...... developed and validated by several groups. The OMERACT criteria require that outcome measures demonstrate adequate validity, discriminative power, and feasibility if they are to be useful in clinical trials. Specific performance targets for these criteria depend on the scientific, regulatory, logistical......, and financial context of the study in question. We review the extent to which MRI assessments of joint erosion, bone edema, and synovitis fulfil these criteria, particularly as they relate to proof-of-concept RA clinical trials....

  12. Treatment patterns with etanercept and adalimumab for psoriatic diseases in a real-world setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barbara H.; Fox, Kathleen M.; Watson, Crystal; Gandra, Shravanthi R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study examined real-world etanercept and adalimumab treatment patterns in patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, or both. Methods: This retrospective analysis utilized data from patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, or both from a large, US claims database. Outcome measures included persistence on index therapy; pauses (7–59 days) and gaps (≥60 days) in therapy; and rates of discontinuing, switching and restarting index therapy in nonpersistent patients. Results: Of 4,453 patients, 2,534 initiated etanercept and 1,919 initiated adalimumab. In psoriasis patients (n = 2,775), 46.4% and 56.8% on etanercept and adalimumab, respectively, were persistent for ≥12 months, 49.0% and 56.3% discontinued, 23.8% and 22.4% restarted and 14.9% and 11.3% switched index therapy within 12 months. In psoriatic arthritis patients (n = 1,197), 60.7% and 63.3% on etanercept and adalimumab, respectively, were persistent for ≥12 months, 48.3% and 51.6% discontinued, 25.8% and 20.0% restarted and 16.5% and 17.9% switched index therapy. In patients with both (n = 481), 58.1% and 59.6% on etanercept and adalimumab, respectively, were persistent for ≥12 months, 42.7% and 63.2% discontinued, 24.3% and 12.6% restarted and 21.4% and 15.8% switched index therapy. Conclusions: Treatment modifications were common in patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, or both within 12 months of initiating etanercept or adalimumab. PMID:23441722

  13. Arthritis, foot pain and shoe wear: current musculoskeletal research on feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riskowski, Jody; Dufour, Alyssa B; Hannan, Marian T

    2011-03-01

    Both arthritis and foot pain are major public health problems. Approximately 24% of adults have foot ailments, and the prevalence increases with age. Foot pain, particularly related to shoes, footwear and rheumatic disorders, may be an important modifiable factor. Surprisingly, this topic has received little attention in the rheumatology community. Despite the major focus of structure and alignment in arthritis, remarkably little work has focused on the foot and nonsurgical foot interventions that might affect lower extremity joint alignment, structure and pain in rheumatic diseases. Emerging research suggests that there may be a significant role for foot orthotics and footwear in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis of the hip, knee and foot. This review highlights the current understanding on the topic of foot orthotics and footwear in adults with rheumatic diseases. Biomechanical evidence indicates that foot orthotics and specialized footwear may change muscle activation and gait patterns to reduce joint loading. Emerging evidence suggests that orthotics, specific shoe types and footwear interventions may provide an effective nonsurgical intervention in rheumatic diseases. Yet good data are sparse, and it is premature to recommend guidelines. As there are a limited number of studies that underpin the foot's role in arthritis cause and progression, clinical trials and prospective studies are of utmost importance to unravel the links between foot pain, foot conditions and interventions that lessen the impact of rheumatic diseases.

  14. Ixekizumab, an interleukin-17A specific monoclonal antibody, for the treatment of biologic-naive patients with active psoriatic arthritis: results from the 24-week randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled and active (adalimumab)-controlled period of the phase III trial SPIRIT-P1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, Philip J; Ritchlin, Christopher T; Okada, Masato; Cuchacovich, Raquel S; Shuler, Catherine L; Lin, Chen-Yen; Braun, Daniel K; Lee, Chin H; Gladman, Dafna D

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of ixekizumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits interleukin-17A, in a double-blind phase III trial enrolling patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods Patients naive to biologic therapy with active PsA were randomised to subcutaneous injections of placebo (N=106), adalimumab 40 mg once every 2 weeks (active reference; N=101), ixekizumab 80 mg once every 2 weeks (IXEQ2W) (N=103), or ixekizumab 80 mg once every 4 weeks (IXEQ4W) (N=107). Both ixekizumab regimens included a 160-mg starting dose. The primary objective was to assess the superiority of IXEQ2W or IXEQ4W versus placebo as measured by the proportion of patients achieving an American College of Rheumatology 20 (ACR20) response at week 24. Results Significantly more patients treated with ixekizumab achieved an ACR20 response with IXEQ2W (62.1%) or IXEQ4W (57.9%) than placebo (30.2%) (p≤0.001; non-responder imputation method). Disease activity and functional disability were significantly improved with both ixekizumab doses versus placebo at weeks 12 and 24, and there was significantly less progression of structural damage at week 24 (p≤0.01). Clearance of plaque psoriasis was greater with ixekizumab than placebo (p≤0.001). Efficacy results with adalimumab, the active reference arm, showed significant improvements versus placebo. Treatment-emergent adverse events were more frequent with ixekizumab (65.7–66.4%) and adalimumab (64.4%) than placebo (47.2%) (pfunction, as well as in the inhibition of structural damage progression. Overall, adverse events were more frequent in all active groups compared with placebo. Trial registration number NCT01695239; EudraCT2011-002326-49; Results. PMID:27553214

  15. Quantitative imaging by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound reveals a linear relationship between synovial vascular perfusion and the recruitment of pathogenic IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD161+ CD4+ T helper cells in psoriatic arthritis joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Ugo; Stramare, Roberto; Martini, Veronica; Coran, Alessandro; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Felicetti, Mara; Rizzo, Gaia; Tonietto, Matteo; Scanu, Anna; Oliviero, Francesca; Raffeiner, Bernd; Vezzù, Maristella; Lunardi, Francesca; Scarpa, Raffaele; Sacerdoti, David; Rubaltelli, Leopoldo; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea; Grisan, Enrico

    2017-02-01

    To develop quantitative imaging biomarkers of synovial tissue perfusion by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), we studied the relationship between CEUS synovial vascular perfusion and the frequencies of pathogenic T helper (Th)-17 cells in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) joints. Eight consecutive patients with PsA were enrolled in this study. Gray scale CEUS evaluation was performed on the same joint immediately after joint aspiration, by automatic assessment perfusion data, using a new quantification approach of pixel-based analysis and the gamma-variate model. The set of perfusional parameters considered by the time intensity curve includes the maximum value (peak) of the signal intensity curve, the blood volume index or area under the curve, (BVI, AUC) and the contrast mean transit time (MTT). The direct ex vivo analysis of the frequencies of SF IL17A-F+CD161+IL23+ CD4+ T cells subsets were quantified by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). In cross-sectional analyses, when tested for multiple comparison setting, a false discovery rate at 10%, a common pattern of correlations between CEUS Peak, AUC (BVI) and MTT parameters with the IL17A-F+IL23+ - IL17A-F+CD161+ - and IL17A-F+CD161+IL23+ CD4+ T cells subsets, as well as lack of correlation between both peak and AUC values and both CD4+T and CD4+IL23+ T cells, was observed. The pixel-based CEUS assessment is a truly measure synovial inflammation, as a useful tool to develop quantitative imaging biomarker for monitoring target therapeutics in PsA.

  16. EULAR recommendations for terminology and research in individuals at risk of rheumatoid arthritis: report from the Study Group for Risk Factors for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlag, Danielle M; Raza, Karim; van Baarsen, Lisa G M; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Buckley, Christopher D; Burmester, Gerd R; Gabay, Cem; Catrina, Anca I; Cope, Andrew P; Cornelis, François; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää; Emery, Paul; Eyre, Stephen; Finckh, Axel; Gay, Steffen; Hazes, Johanna M; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette; Huizinga, Tom W J; Klareskog, Lars; Kvien, Tore K; Lewis, Cathryn; Machold, Klaus P; Rönnelid, Johan; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Schett, Georg; Smolen, Josef S; Thomas, Sue; Worthington, Jane; Tak, Paul P

    2012-01-01

    The Study Group for Risk Factors for Rheumatoid Arthritis was established by the EULAR Standing Committee on Investigative Rheumatology to facilitate research into the preclinical and earliest clinically apparent phases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This report describes the recommendation for terminology to be used to define specific subgroups during different phases of disease, and defines the priorities for research in this area. Terminology was discussed by way of a three-stage structured process: A provisional list of descriptors for each of the possible phases preceding the diagnosis of RA were circulated to members of the study group for review and feedback. Anonymised comments from the members on this list were fed back to participants before a 2-day meeting. 18 participants met to discuss these data, agree terminologies and prioritise important research questions. The study group recommended that, in prospective studies, individuals without RA are described as having: genetic risk factors for RA; environmental risk factors for RA; systemic autoimmunity associated with RA; symptoms without clinical arthritis; unclassified arthritis; which may be used in a combinatorial manner. It was recommended that the prefix ‘pre-RA with:’ could be used before any/any combination of the five points above but only to describe retrospectively a phase that an individual had progressed through once it was known that they have developed RA. An approach to dating disease onset was recommended. In addition, important areas for research were proposed, including research of other tissues in which an adaptive immune response may be initiated, and the identification of additional risk factors and biomarkers for the development of RA, its progression and the development of extra-articular features. These recommendations provide guidance on approaches to describe phases before the development of RA that will facilitate communication between researchers and comparisons between

  17. Blogging as a viable research methodology for young people with arthritis: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie; Gray, Nicola J; Smith, Felicity J; McDonagh, Janet E

    2015-03-05

    The development of services that are responsive to the needs of users is a health policy priority. Finding ways of engaging young people in research to gain insights into their particular experiences, perspectives, and needs is vital but challenging. These data are critical to improving services in ways that meet the needs of young people. Our aim was to evaluate Web-based blogging as a viable method for understanding the daily experiences and condition management strategies of young people with juvenile arthritis. To meet the objectives of the study, a qualitative approach was required to gather information on the experiences and perspectives of young people regarding the management of their condition and its daily impact. In collaboration with a group of young people with arthritis, a custom website was developed. This website provided the opportunity for young people (aged 11-19) with arthritis from a United Kingdom pediatric hospital to contribute blogs. It was designed so that young people were free to write about whatever was important to them, but the site also included some structure and prompts to facilitate the writing of blogs. Qualitative analytical procedures were employed, supported by NVivo software. Engagement in the study by young people was variable in terms of their participation rates, frequency of website visits, and the length of their blogs. Young people used the site in different ways, some responding to the website categories and prompts that the team created, while others used it as a diary to record their experiences and thoughts. In line with principles of qualitative inquiry, the data collection was participant-led. Young people were in control of what, how much, and how often they wrote. However, some young people expressed difficulty regarding knowing what they should blog about. For a number of reasons, discussed here, the blogs may also not be fully reflective of experiences and perspectives of the participants. However, the data

  18. A 3D-psoriatic skin model for dermatological testing: The impact of culture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Duque-Fernandez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate representation of the human tissue environment during a preclinical screen can result in inaccurate predictions of compound effects. Consequently, pharmaceutical investigators are searching for preclinical models that closely resemble original tissue for predicting clinical outcomes.The current research aims to compare the impact of using serum-free medium instead of complete culture medium during the last step of psoriatic skin substitute reconstruction. Skin substitutes were produced according to the self-assembly approach.Serum-free conditions have no negative impact on the reconstruction of healthy or psoriatic skin substitutes presented in this study regarding their macroscopic or histological appearances. ATR-FTIR results showed no significant differences in the CH2 bands between psoriatic substitutes cultured with or without serum, thus suggesting that serum deprivation did not have a negative impact on the lipid organization of their stratum corneum. Serum deprivation could even lead to a better organization of healthy skin substitute lipids. Percutaneous analyses demonstrated that psoriatic substitutes cultured in serum-free conditions showed a higher permeability to hydrocortisone compared to controls, while no significant differences in benzoic acid and caffeine penetration profiles were observed.Results obtained with this 3D-psoriatic skin substitute demonstrate the potential and versatility of the model. It could offer good prediction of drug related toxicities at preclinical stages performed in order to avoid unexpected and costly findings in the clinic.Together, these findings offer a new approach for one of the most important challenges of the 21st century, namely, prediction of drug toxicity.•Impact of serum-free conditions during psoriatic skin substitutes reconstruction.•Lipids disorganization of healthy and psoriatic skin substitutes.•Permeation profiles of healthy skin substitutes.•Permeation profiles of

  19. Orbital Cellulitis in a Psoriatic Patient Treated With Adalimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katana, Vienna G; Carpenter, Robert J; Trafeli, John P; Kwan, Julia M

    2017-03-01

    Psoriatic patients on tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFi) may be at increased risk for upper respiratory tract infections, including chronic rhino-sinusitis (CRS). Rarely, CRS can progress to orbital cellulitis (OC), an emergent ophthalmic complication wherein respiratory flora from paranasal sinus disease intrude the retro-orbital space. Single case report. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of an invasive sinusitis that rapidly evolved into OC in a patient receiving adalimumab treatment for plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. After TNFi withdrawal and appropriate medical and surgical intervention, the patient fully recovered. However, on resumption of TNFi therapy, symptoms of recalcitrant CRS returned. More investigation is needed to explore how TNFi might predispose to chronic, refractory rhino-sinusitis and subsequent progression to OC. Military physicians and other medical providers should be aware of this proposed new disease entity and the potential for rapidly evolving and invasive infections in immunocompromised patients. Screening and monitoring for chronic infectious disease, such as CRS before initiating and during TNFi therapy is warranted. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF ALOPECIA DURING TREATMENT WITH A TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA INHIBITOR IN A FEMALE PATIENT WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITS: A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Mukhina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe a case of the total development of alopecia in a female patient with psoriatic arthritis during treatment with a tumor necrosis factor-αlpha (TNF-α inhibitor. Materials and methods. Patient I., aged 36 years has been followed up at the Kazan’ Center of Rheumatic Diseases and Osteoporosis since 1998. At approximately the same time, the patient noted the appearance of skin eruptions behind the ears, on the skin of the scalp. She was examined by a dermatologist who diagnosed psoriasis. In 2005, she was admitted to Kazan’ Rheumatology Center, City Clinical Hospital Seven, for the development of obvious synovitis of the knee joint and for the inefficiency of therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis. During the prescribed therapy with methotrexate 10 mg/week, evident menstrual irregularities were observed in the patient who stopped using the drug herself. The second pregnancy occurred in 2008. Articular syndrome progression and eruptive psoriasis were recorded in the lactation period. After lactation cessation in 2009, she was hospitalized again. Her examination revealed high laboratory activity (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, as high as 40 mm/hr; magnetic resonance imaging of the knee joints showed the signs of bilateral synovitis; lumbar spine radiography exhibited grade II sacroiliitis. Leflunomide 20 mg/day was recommended as a basic drug. In 2012, the patient used leflunomide, her condition worsened; joint pain progressed; new joints were involved into the process, and cutaneous manifestations were aggravated. To verify a diagnosis and to choose therapy, the patient was referred to a consultation at the Moscow Research Institute of Rheumatology. Results. In connection with the high activity of the disease and with no response to the performed therapy, it was recommended to initiate therapy with biologics, such as infliximab, the drug of choice. Seven infliximab

  1. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education ... Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an ...

  3. Development of bullous pemphigoid during treatment of psoriatic onycho-pachydermo periostitis with ustekinumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Chihiro; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Mika; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    Ustekinumab is a human monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to the p40 subunit of interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23, inhibiting the activity of both cytokines, thereby blocking the T-helper (Th)1 and Th17 inflammatory pathways. While biologic agents have dramatically changed the strategies of psoriasis treatment, increasing cases of autoimmune diseases during the use of such agents have been reported. We experienced a case of bullous pemphigoid occurring during treatment of a rare variant of psoriatic arthritis, psoriatic onycho-pachydermo periostitis with ustekinumab. Only six cases of autoimmune blistering diseases during treatment with biologic agents have ever been reported including our case, and we herein review the published work of these cases. Dermatologists must be attentive to the possibility of autoimmune blistering diseases during ustekinumab treatment. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  4. Skin Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, and Spondyloarthritides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua-Aguilera, Carolyn Jean; Möller, Burkhard; Yawalkar, Nikhil

    2017-12-01

    Extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and various spondyloarthritides including psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease-associated spondyloarthritis often involve the skin and may occur before or after diagnosis of these rheumatic diseases. Cutaneous manifestations encompass a wide range of reactions that may have a notable negative impact not only on the physical but especially on the emotional and psychosocial well-being of these patients. Several cutaneous manifestations have been related to rheumatoid arthritis such as subcutaneous nodules including classical rheumatoid nodules, accelerated rheumatoid nodulosis, and rheumatoid nodulosis; vascular disorders like rheumatoid vasculitis, livedo racemosa, and Raynaud's phenomenon; and neutrophilic and/or granulomatous diseases like pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet's syndrome, rheumatoid neutrophilic dermatitis, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis, as well as palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the main cutaneous manifestations include an evanescent rash, rheumatoid nodules, as well as plaque and guttate psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis is also the main skin disease involved in spondyloarthritides. Furthermore, other forms of psoriasis including guttate, inverse, erythrodermic, pustular, and particularly nail psoriasis may also occur. In addition, a variety of drug-induced skin reactions may also appear in these diseases. Early recognition and understanding of these different dermatologic manifestations together with an interdisciplinary approach are often needed to optimize management of these diseases.

  5. Stress coping mechanisms in smoking psoriatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Altunay

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Smoking and nonsmoking psoriatic patients had similar stress coping strategies, except the subgroup seeking social support, and usually used positive ways of coping with stress. Psoriatic patients who smoke might employ smoking to avoid stressful situations. They would benefit from education on adopting healthy stress management and, in turn, developing mature stress coping mechanisms. Future prospective studies are required to address the exact causal link between smoking, psoriasis and psychiatric comorbidity, including stress coping mechanisms.

  6. Sexual dysfunctions in psoriatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabela Sarbu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder with a worldwide occurrence characterized by well-defined infiltrated erythematous papules and plaques, covered by silvery white or yellowish scales. It is a physically, socially and emotionally invalidating disorder that affects 1-2% of the population. Sexual health is an important part of general health and sexual dysfunctions can negatively affect self-esteem, confidence, interpersonal relationships and the quality of life. Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI and the Impact of Psoriasis on Quality of Life (IPSO questionnaire are all questionnaires used to assess the quality of life of patients with psoriasis and each has one question regarding sexual dysfunction. Several scales were also designed to particularly assess sexual satisfaction in men and women. The aim of this paper is to perform an overview of the existing studies on sexual dysfunction in psoriatic patients.

  7. Septic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop symptoms of septic arthritis. Prevention Preventive (prophylactic) antibiotics may be helpful for people at high risk. Alternative Names Bacterial arthritis; Non-gonococcal bacterial arthritis References ...

  8. Relationship between self-efficacy, beliefs, and physical activity in inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Larkin, Louise; Gallagher, Stephen; Fraser, Alexander D.; Kennedy, Norelee

    2016-01-01

    Background: The benefits of physical activity (PA) in inflammatory arthritis (IA) patients are well-established. However, levels of PA in the IA population are suboptimal and the psychological determinants of PA are poorly understood. Objective: The study aimed to examine the self-reported PA levels and psychological determinants of PA for the IA population. Methods: A cross-sectional study of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) was conducted to explore t...

  9. A 3D-psoriatic skin model for dermatological testing: The impact of culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque-Fernandez, Alexandra; Gauthier, Lydia; Simard, Mélissa; Jean, Jessica; Gendreau, Isabelle; Morin, Alexandre; Soucy, Jacques; Auger, Michèle; Pouliot, Roxane

    2016-12-01

    Inadequate representation of the human tissue environment during a preclinical screen can result in inaccurate predictions of compound effects. Consequently, pharmaceutical investigators are searching for preclinical models that closely resemble original tissue for predicting clinical outcomes. The current research aims to compare the impact of using serum-free medium instead of complete culture medium during the last step of psoriatic skin substitute reconstruction. Skin substitutes were produced according to the self-assembly approach. Serum-free conditions have no negative impact on the reconstruction of healthy or psoriatic skin substitutes presented in this study regarding their macroscopic or histological appearances. ATR-FTIR results showed no significant differences in the CH2 bands between psoriatic substitutes cultured with or without serum, thus suggesting that serum deprivation did not have a negative impact on the lipid organization of their stratum corneum. Serum deprivation could even lead to a better organization of healthy skin substitute lipids. Percutaneous analyses demonstrated that psoriatic substitutes cultured in serum-free conditions showed a higher permeability to hydrocortisone compared to controls, while no significant differences in benzoic acid and caffeine penetration profiles were observed. Results obtained with this 3D-psoriatic skin substitute demonstrate the potential and versatility of the model. It could offer good prediction of drug related toxicities at preclinical stages performed in order to avoid unexpected and costly findings in the clinic. Together, these findings offer a new approach for one of the most important challenges of the 21st century, namely, prediction of drug toxicity.

  10. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funded Arthritis Programs Arthritis Basics FAQs Arthritis Types Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Fibromyalgia Gout Childhood Arthritis Management Risk Factors Physical Activity for Arthritis Data and Statistics National ...

  11. Pathogenic role of IL-17 in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiricozzi, A

    2014-10-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder resulting from a complex network of cytokines and chemokines produced by various immune cell types and tissue cells. Emerging evidence suggests a central role of IL-17 and IL-23/T17 axis in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, giving a rationale for using IL-17-blocking agents as therapeutics. Three agents targeting IL-17 signaling are being studied in Phase III clinical trials: secukinumab and ixekizumab (IL-17 neutralizing agents), and brodalumab (IL-17 receptor antagonist). Preliminary results are highly promising for all anti-IL17 agents, creating fair expectations on this class of agents as the new effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of psoriasis.

  12. Etanercept (Enbrel in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Korotaeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Псориатический артрит (ПсА – хроническое воспалительное заболевание суставов из группы серонегативных спондилоартритов, отличное от ревматоидного артрита (РА, тесно ассоциированное с псориазом. [1,2]. У большинства пациентов с ПсА развивается эрозивный олиго-полиартрит, нередко с признаками костной резорбции, спондилит, теносиновит, энтезит, у трети – дактилит (синоним – воспаление пальца, отсутствует ревматоидный фактор [3,4]. Дактилит обычно возникает в результате одновременного воспаления сухожилий и суставов пальца, клинически проявляется болью, гиперемией, плотным отеком всего пальца, считается прогностически неблагоприятным фактором в плане развития эрозий и остеолиза [5,6]. Кроме деструктивного артрита, другими аспектами неблагоприятного влияния ПсА является снижение качества жизни больных, а также повышение риска смерти от кардиоваскулярных заболеваний в 1,3 раза по сравнению с популяцией. Не исключено, что это связано с системным воспалением, которое возникает в результате дисбаланса про – и противовоспалительных цитокинов [7,8].

  13. Development of Eosinophilic Fasciitis during Infliximab Therapy for Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hariman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic fasciitis (EF is a rare disorder involving chronic inflammation of the fascia and connective tissue surrounding muscles, nerves, and blood vessels. While its pathogenesis is not entirely understood, this disorder is thought to be autoimmune or allergic in nature. We present here a case of a 59-year-old male who developed peripheral eosinophilia and subsequent eosinophilic fasciitis during treatment with infliximab. To our knowledge, eosinophilic fasciitis has not been previously described in patients during treatment with an inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor α.

  14. Incidence and prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Kristensen, Lars Erik; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2017-01-01

    of systemic non-biologic agents, that is, methotrexate, leflunomide, ciclosporin or sulfasalazine increased over the 15-year study course and were used in 66.3% of all patients. Biologic agents (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, certolizumab pegol, golimumab or ustekinumab) were used in 17.7% of patients...

  15. Chondrocyte activity is increased in psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Munk, Heidi Lausten; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard

    2016-01-01

    and clinical disease measures were recorded. Pro-C2 and C-Col10 were quantified in serum by using newly developed and specific competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays based on monoclonal antibodies. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple comparison tests were performed on log-transformed data...

  16. Psoriatic arthritis: An assessment of clinical, biochemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based on a modified Schober test, fingertip-to-floor distance and lateral flexion of the lumbar spine. Thoracic spine movement was assessed based on chest expansion. The sacroiliac joints were examined using Patrick's FABER (Flexion, ABduction, and. External Rotation) test, anterior posterior pelvic pressure over.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact ...

  18. Formative research in clinical trial development: attitudes of patients with arthritis in enhancing prevention trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Holly A; Sugarman, Jeremy; Pisetsky, David S; Bathon, Joan

    2007-01-01

    In preparation for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with early inflammatory arthritis (EIA), formative research was conducted to enhance the design of such trials. The objectives of this research were to (1) determine patients' educational needs as they relate to the necessary elements of informed consent; and (2) assess patients' interest in enrolling in a hypothetical prevention trial. In‐depth interviews were conducted with nine patients. Seven patients were women and all but one white. The mean age was 48 years. During the 4‐month enrolment period, only three patients with EIA were identified; six patients with longer duration of symptoms were also interviewed. Most patients were able to express the primary aim of a hypothetical prevention trial presented. Factors cited by patients favouring enrolment were potential for direct medical benefit and knowledge that they would be withdrawn from the trial if they developed symptoms. Factors cited by patients against enrolment were the inclusion of a placebo and general uncertainty regarding treatment required by the RCT design. Pending larger‐scale empirical projects to explore patients' attitudes about prevention trials, small‐scale formative research in advance of such trials ought to be conducted. PMID:16984939

  19. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  20. An examination of self-report physical activity and its relationship with psychological factors in inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Larkin, Louise

    2012-01-01

    peer-reviewed Background: In???ammatory arthritis (IA) is the term given to a group of chronic in???ammatory rheumatic diseases that primarily include rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Physical activity (PA), defined as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that results in energy expenditure (EE), is important for everyone, including people with RA and PsA. Despite the importance of including PA in the management of these two inflammatory conditions decrea...

  1. Discomfort and adaptation in psoriatic patients: an inchoate supportive care trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, A M; Verrusio, G; Iurassich, S

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis produces functional and aesthetic damages which cause psychosocial discomfort and require new adjustment factors. We describe the correlation among discomfort and personality factors as traits, coping, defense mechanism (DM) and resilience in Ps (skin psoriasis) and PsA (psoriatic arthritis) patients. A random sample, age between 45-60, with 1:1 female/male, includes 3 groups each of 90 subjects: - single psoriasis (Ps, average 50.11, SD 4.9928) - Ps and psoriatic arthritis (PsA, average 50.61, SD 4.8765) - controls (C, average 50.0 and SD 4.8019). We evaluated traits by the 16PF-5, coping by Cope Scale, defence mechanism (DM) by DMRS, dysmorphophobia by BDDE and resilience by CR-RISC scales. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 14 version, p 0.50 in comparison patients-C and η2 = 1.4 in comparison Ps-PsA. In all patients- controls OR, PAR and NNT registered very high values. Reduction in autonomy and imperfections cause an internal damage. The adaptation process searches coping factors (to integrate traits) when lesions appear. It selects DM when stressful dynamics require a further adaptation. Finally it results in adequate resilience when damages and dysmorphophobia are offset by traits, coping and DM. Clinical signs increase more then traits in severity, coping decrease in resources, resilience and DM grow in use and dismorphophobia just increases in intensity.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our Faculty Our Staff Rheumatology Specialty Centers You are here: Home / Patient Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spondylitis News Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information ... Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center ...

  4. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI); Disseminated gonococcemia; Septic arthritis - gonococcal arthritis ... Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea , which is caused by ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  6. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your thumb joint, such as fractures and sprains. Diseases that change the normal structure and function of cartilage, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Although osteoarthritis is the most common cause of thumb arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis can also affect ...

  7. Clinical characteristics of children with juvenile dermatomyositis: the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Angela Byun; Hoeltzel, Mark F; Wahezi, Dawn M; Becker, Mara L; Kessler, Elizabeth A; Schmeling, Heinrike; Carrasco, Ruy; Huber, Adam M; Feldman, Brian M; Reed, Ann M

    2014-03-01

    To investigate aspects of juvenile dermatomyositis (DM), including disease characteristics and treatment, through a national multicenter registry. Subjects meeting the modified Bohan and Peter criteria for definite juvenile DM were analyzed from the cross-sectional Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Registry between 2010 and 2012 from 55 US pediatric rheumatology centers. Demographics, disease characteristics, diagnostic assessments, and medication exposure data were collected at enrollment. A total of 384 subjects met the criteria for analysis. At enrollment, the median Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale score was 51 (interquartile range [IQR] 46-52), the median Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire score was 0 (IQR 0-0.5), and the median physician and subject global assessment scores were 1 (IQR 0-2) and 1 (IQR 0-3), respectively, out of a maximum of 10. Of the diagnostic assessments, magnetic resonance imaging was more likely than electromyography or muscle biopsy to show abnormalities. A total of 329 subjects had ≥2 diagnostic studies performed, and >34% of these subjects reported ≥1 negative study. Ninety-five percent had been treated with corticosteroids and 92% with methotrexate, suggesting that these medications were almost universally prescribed for juvenile DM in the US. In 2 years, the ongoing CARRA Registry has collected clinical data on 384 children with juvenile DM and has the potential to become one of the largest juvenile DM cohorts in the world. More research is needed about prognostic factors in juvenile DM, and differences in therapy based on manifestations of disease need to be explored by practitioners. This registry provides the infrastructure needed to advance clinical and translational research and represents a major step toward improving outcomes of children with juvenile DM. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  9. Update on research and future directions of the OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul

    2011-01-01

    of this score will require more PsA imaging datasets. As well, due to improved image resolution since the development of the original rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (RAMRIS), the Task Force has worked on semiquantitative assessment of joint space narrowing, and developed a reliable method...

  10. Safety of pain therapy during pregnancy and lactation in patients with inflammatory arthritis: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen; Bombardier, Claire; van der Heijde, Désirée M

    2012-09-01

    To systematically review the safety of various pain therapies used during pregnancy and lactation in patients with inflammatory arthritis. A systematic literature review was performed in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism 2008-2009 meeting abstracts, as part of the multinational 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative for generating practical recommendations about Pain Management by Pharmacotherapy in Inflammatory Arthritis. Articles fulfilling predefined inclusion criteria were reviewed, and quality appraisal was performed. The search yielded a total of 3974 articles and 7 abstracts. The only study that fulfilled the criteria for pain therapies in pregnancy was a systematic review published in 2008, evaluating the effects of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) use during pregnancy in patients with rheumatic conditions. Two of the 3 studies reviewed in the 2008 publication could be included in our current review. No studies were included in the review in relation to lactation. A total of 204 malformations were identified among infants exposed to NSAID, with an OR of 1.04. The number of identified cardiac defects was higher than expected, with an OR of 1.86. There seemed to be no specificity for the type of NSAID used. Among the 6 infants with orofacial clefts, 5 occurred with naproxen use and 1 with ibuprofen. Only 2 studies evaluating the risk of NSAID use in patients with inflammatory arthritis were identified, with results suggesting a higher rate of cardiac malformations in infants exposed to NSAID during the first trimester. No studies evaluating the effects of other treatments, such as paracetamol, corticosteroids, muscle relaxants, neuromodulators, antidepressants, opioids, or opioid-like therapy in the specific context of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or spondyloarthritis, and no studies with respect to lactation were identified

  11. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  12. Importância do raio X e exame físico no diagnóstico da artrite psoriática e sua prevalência no Hospital Universitário Evangélico de Curitiba (HUEC The importance of radiologic evaluation and physical examination in diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis and its prevalance in the Hospital Universitário Evangélico de Curitiba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Bächtold Machado

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: A artrite psoriática (AP é doença inflamatória associada com a psoríase da pele ou das unhas, com fator reumatóide (FR negativo e ausência de nódulos reumatóides. Pode ser extremamente agressiva, deixando o paciente incapacitado para realizar funções do dia-a-dia. A prevalência populacional é muito variável; historicamente oscila entre 2,6% e 7%, mas estudos recentes demonstram porcentagem variável de 23 a 69% na população com psoríase. O diagnóstico é de exclusão e, se realizado na fase inicial, oferece possibilidade de tratamento mais adequado, evitando complicações. O que define a presença da artrite é o exame físico adequado das articulações, já que o raio X pode estar normal. OBJETIVO: Este estudo tem a finalidade de avaliar a importância do raio X e do exame físico no diagnóstico da AP e sua prevalência nos pacientes com psoríase cutânea e ungueal do Hospital Universitário Evangélico de Curitiba. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Trinta pacientes com psoríase em acompanhamento nesse serviço foram submetidos a anamnese e exame físico minuciosos. Eles foram questionados quanto a alterações articulares, tempo e severidade de doença e comprometimento ungueal. Os que apresentavam queixas articulares foram encaminhados para investigação por exames complementares: hemograma, FR, VHS, e raio X da articulação comprometida. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos pacientes (56,5% referiu atralgia; contudo apenas três apresentavam artrite. Dos indivíduos com AP, um mostrou raio X normal, mas o exame físico estava alterado. CONCLUSÃO: O exame físico é fundamental para diagnóstico da AP; o raio X não. A prevalência de AP foi de 10%.BACKGROUND: Psoriatic arthritis (PA is an inflammatory disorder associated with skin and nail disease, negative rheumatoid factor (RF and absence of rheumatoid nodules. It can be a devastating and incapacitating condition. Its prevalence is highly variable, ranging from 2,6 to 7

  13. The proteins in psoriatic scales : Nonexistence of a metachromatic glycoprotein reported in extracts of psoriatic scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1964-01-01

    A description is given of attempts to isolate a metachromatic glycoprotein from alkaline extracts of psoriatic scales. Salt fractionation and isoelectric precipitation of the proteins in these scales produces a number of complex mixtures which are contaminated with serum proteins. Electrophoretic

  14. Biologics in inflammatory and immunomediated arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Michele Maria; Benfaremo, Devis; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-12-26

    Biologic drugs, introduced in clinical practice almost twenty years ago, represent nowadays a prominent treatment option in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic Arthritis and Spondyloarthritis, that include ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis. Several compounds targeting different pathways have been marketed and approved for the treatment of inflammatory arthritis, with a significant impact on the clinical outcomes and the natural history of the diseases. There are currently seven classes of biologics that are available for the treatment of inflammatory arthritis, each inhibiting a different aspect of the immune-driven inflammatory pathway. They include: • Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) inhibitors (infliximab, adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab and certolizumab pegol); • Interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonists (anakinra); • Interleukin-6 (IL-6) inhibition (tocilizumab); • Interleukin-12/23 (IL23) inhibition (ustekinumab); • Interleukin-17 (IL-17) inhibition (secukinumab); • B-cell inhibition (anti-CD20, rituximab); • T-cell costimulation inhibition (anti-CTLA-4, abatacept). In this review, we will focus on the role of biologic drugs in the treatment strategies for inflammatory arthritis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. One year survey of hospitalized psoriatic patients and their treatment in Razi Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaghi F

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available During one year survey, 77 psoriatic patients were hospitalized in the dermatology department of Razi Hospital. This comprised 19% of admitted patients in this period. 29% (n=22 of psoriatic patients had previous history of hospitalization. On admission, the mean age of patients was 32.8 years, the mean and peak age of disease onset were 26.46 and between 11-20 years, respectively. 14% (n=10 of the patients had a family history of psoriasis and 70% (n=7 of those with a positive family history had their age of onset under 20 years. Involvement of different regions was as follows: Scalp: 88% (n=68, nails: 53% (n=41 and joints (arthritis: 10% (n=8. Psoriasis was associated with scrotal tongue in 19% (n=13 and with geographic tongue in 10% (n=8 of patients. Regarding the medical treatment, the drugs which were used most frequently were tigason in 34% (n=41 and ditranol in 22% (n=26 of the cases. The mean duration of hospitalization was 39.29 days and most patients were discharged from the hospital in a good condition without any serious complication. During this period 9% of patients had a relapse of their disease.

  16. Efficacy and safety of infliximab in psoriatic patients over the age of 65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiricozzi, Andrea; Pavlidis, Athanasios; Dattola, Annunziata; Bianchi, Luca; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Fida, Monika; Saraceno, Rosita

    2016-11-01

    Clinical data on the long-term safety and efficacy of infliximab on psoriatic patients who are older than 65 years are limited. The aim is to report the long-term efficacy, safety and tolerance of infliximab in geriatric patients. This was a retrospective study conducted at the Department of Dermatology of the University of Rome Tor Vergata. Clinical data were reported at week 12, 52, 104, 208. 151 charts were evaluated. A total of 27 patients were included. Range of the age was between 65 and 85 years; mean age was 73 years ±5.4; female to male ratio was 1:2; mean age of onset of psoriasis was 43 years±17. The average of treatment duration was 39 months ±27 (range 1-100). Fourteen patients suffered from plaque type psoriasis and 13 from psoriatic arthritis. At the baseline the mean PASI score was 15.6 ± 10.2. At week 12, 52, 104, and 208 the mean PASI was 2, 2.3, 1.9 and 1.8 respectively. A reduction in the mean PASI was maintained in the long-term treatment in 12 patients (p infliximab is effective and safe in patients over 65 years old and that IV therapy is also associated with a high compliance.

  17. Arthritis and the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Using drugs, both prescription drugs and illegal street drugs, can induce arthritis. As part of a congenital autoimmune disease syndrome of undetermined origin. Recent research has suggested, for instance, that a ...

  18. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  19. Septic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the joint — contributes to the damage. Risk factors Risk factors for septic arthritis include: Existing joint problems. Chronic diseases and conditions that affect your joints — such as osteoarthritis, gout, rheumatoid arthritis or lupus — can increase your ...

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arthritis. Prevention There is no known prevention. Smoking cigarettes appears to worsen RA, so it is important to avoid tobacco. Proper early treatment can help prevent further joint damage. Alternative Names RA; Arthritis - rheumatoid Patient Instructions ACL reconstruction - ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Patients with Rheumatoid ... Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome ...

  2. Aortitis in patients with psoriatic arthropathy: report of two cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Slobodin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aortitis, which is well described in patients with other spondyloarthritides, has been rarely cited in relation to psoriatic arthropathy (PsA. Two patients with known PsA, who developed aortitis, are reported herein. The PubMed database was searched using the following keywords: aortitis, Takaysu arteritis, PsA, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease. The relevant articles were critically reviewed and pertinent data organized. Analysis of 5 cases of aortitis in patients with PsA, including the 2 cases reported herein, revealed no specific pattern of PsA joint involvement in the patients who developed aortitis. All aortic segments can be involved and complications, such as insufficiency of the aortic valve and stenosis of the major aortic branches, have been described. The genetic association involving the IL12B locus may be involved in the clinical association of aortitis and spondyloarthritis.

  3. The 'psoriatic march': a concept of how severe psoriasis may drive cardiovascular comorbidity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2011-04-01

    There is increasing awareness that psoriasis is more than \\'skin deep\\'. Several recent reviews focussed on biomarkers indicating the systemic dimension of psoriasis and the aspect of comorbidity psoriasis shares with other chronic inflammatory diseases, such as Crohn\\'s disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Of emerging significance is the relationship to cardiovascular disease, as this contributes substantially to the patients\\' increased mortality. In this viewpoint, we examine currently available evidence favouring the concept of a causal link between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease: systemic inflammation may cause insulin resistance, which in turn triggers endothelial cell dysfunction, leading to atherosclerosis and finally myocardial infarction or stroke. While this \\'psoriatic march\\' is not yet formally proven, it raises clinically and academically relevant questions, and gains support by recent observations of numerous investigators.

  4. Major cost savings associated with biologic dose reduction in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, C L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether patients with Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) (Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) or Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)) would remain in remission following a reduction in biologic dosing frequency and to calculate the cost savings associated with dose reduction. This prospective non-blinded non-randomised study commenced in 2010. Patients with Inflammatory Arthritis being treated with a biologic agent were screened for disease activity. A cohort of those in remission according to standardized disease activity indices (DAS28 < 2.6, BASDAI < 4) was offered a reduction in dosing frequency of two commonly used biologic therapies (etanercept 50 mg once per fortnight instead of weekly, adalimumab 40 mg once per month instead of fortnightly). Patients were assessed for disease activity at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following reduction in dosing frequency. Cost saving was calculated. 79 patients with inflammatory arthritis in remission were recruited. 57% had rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), 13% psoriatic arthritis (n = 10) and 30% ankylosing spondylitis (n = 24). 57% (n = 45) were taking etanercept and 43% (n = 34) adalimumab. The percentage of patients in remission at 24 months was 56% (n = 44). This resulted in an actual saving to the state of approximately 600,000 euro over two years. This study demonstrates the reduction in biologic dosing frequency is feasible in Inflammatory Arthritis. There was a considerable cost saving at two years. The potential for major cost savings in biologic usage should be pursued further.

  5. The Effect of Triptolide in Rheumatoid Arthritis: From Basic Research towards Clinical Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danping Fan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Triptolide (TP, a major extract of the herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TWHF, has been shown to exert potent pharmacological effects, especially an immunosuppressive effect in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, its multiorgan toxicity prevents it from being widely used in clinical practice. Recently, several attempts are being performed to reduce TP toxicity. In this review, recent progress in the use of TP for RA, including its pharmacological effects and toxicity, is summarized. Meanwhile, strategies relying on chemical structural modifications, innovative delivery systems, and drug combinations to alleviate the disadvantages of TP are also reviewed. Furthermore, we also discuss the challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation.

  6. Anti-psoriatic potential of Solanum xanthocarpum stem in Imiquimod-induced psoriatic mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Komal M; Itankar, Prakash R; Joshi, Apurva; Prasad, Satyendra K

    2017-02-23

    The plant Solanum xanthocarpum Schrad. & Wendl. (Solanaceae) is one of the members of the dashamula (ten roots) in Ayurvedic system of medicine. The stem and fruits are used as an antipyretic, antiasthmatic and is prescribed in skin infections and for relief in burning sensation in the feet accompanied by vesicular eruptions. To scientifically validate the anti-psoriatic potential of Solanum xanthocarpum stem in Imiquimod-induced psoriatic mice model. Ethanolic stems extract of Solanum xanthocarpum (ESX) was first subjected to phytochemical screening and quantification of identified phytoconstituents, which was further standardized with the help of HPTLC using chlorogenic acid as a marker. The extract was then subjected to acute oral toxicity and skin irritability study for determining the safety profile of the extract. Imiquimod-induced psoriatic mouse model was then performed to check the efficacy of extract against psoriasis, where treatment was carried out for 15 days both topically (Gel at 2.5%, 5% and 10%) as well as orally (at 100, 200 and 400mg/kg p.o.) and their Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) was calculated. The study also included determination of levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17 in the animal tissues, which further included biochemical evaluations such as total collagen, hexosamine, hyaluronic acid DNA, protein antioxidant profiles such as lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, superoxide dismutase and catalase along with histopathological studies of the tissues. ESX showed the presence of mainly phenols, tannins, flavonoids, alkaloids and carbohydrates, while chlorogenic acid was reported to be 3.49% w/w. The Imiquimod-induced psoriatic mouse model, depicted a potent anti-psoriatic activity of the extract both topical (10%) and oral (200 and 400mg/kg p.o., as evident through PASI grading The effect was found to be more prominent in case of topically treated as compared to orally treated mice. The results also showed a significant inhibition in

  7. Keratinocyte Apoptosis is Decreased in Psoriatic Epidermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Eskioğlu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Abnormal differentiation and hyperproliferation of keratinocytes are the hallmarks of psoriasis vulgaris. Although psoriasis vulgaris is generally accepted as a disease of decreased keratinocyte apoptosis, the results are contradictory. The aim of the current study is to investigate whether decreased keratinocyte apoptosis contributes to the formation of a thickened epidermis as increased keratinocyte proliferation. Material and Method: Forty-three untreated psoriasis vulgaris patients and 20 healthy control subjects were included into the study. Biopsy specimens taken from the enrollee were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining for Ki-67 expressions to show the proliferation of keratinocytes and by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL method to show the apoptotic keratinocytes. Results: Apoptotic index (percentage of the TUNEL positive cells was significantly lower in psoriatic epidermis (0.33±0.64 than in normal epidermis (0.75±0.85; whereas Ki-67 index (percentage of positively staining cells for Ki-67 was significantly higher in psoriatic epidermis (30.86±10.49 than in normal epidermis (11.65±2.98, (p=0.021 and p=0.00; respectively. Conclusion: Decreased keratinocyte apoptosis also contribute to increased epidermal thickness in psoriasis as well as increased keratinocyte proliferation.

  8. Diagnostic delay in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2015-01-01

    ) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) changed from year 2000 to 2011. METHODS: Month and year of initial symptoms and diagnosis, gender, hospital, year of birth and date of first data entry were obtained for 13,721 patients with RA, PSA or AS who had been registered in the DANBIO registry. Time between symptom onset...

  9. Diagnostic delay in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2014-01-01

    ) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) changed from year 2000 to 2011. METHODS: Month and year of initial symptoms and diagnosis, gender, hospital, year of birth and date of first data entry were obtained for 13 721 patients with RA, PSA or AS who had been registered in the DANBIO registry. Time between symptom onset...

  10. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of human leukocyte proteins from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Thorsrud, A.K.; Munthe, E.; Jellum, E.

    1982-04-01

    Human leukocyte proteins from more than 150 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, together with age- and sex-matched controls, were analyzed by use of the ISO-DALT technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, psoriatic arthritis, calcium tendinitis, post-infectious arthritis, and asymmetrical seronegative arthritis were also included as positive controls. Synthesis of several proteins, referred to by number as members of the Rheuma set, is shown to increase in the leukocyte preparations from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Several of these proteins are specific to monocytes or granulocytes; others are of unknown cellular origin, but appear to be unique to rheumatoid arthritis. The Rheuma proteins appear to be indicators of disease activity, because their increased synthesis can be correlated with sedimentation rate and other clinical indices of rheumatoid disease activity.

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... a Question Physician Corner Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Research Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education ...

  12. A non-innovator version of etanercept for treatment of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Sunit; Ullanat, Rajesh; Lahiri, Subhra; Shekar, Sunil; Sodhan, Geetha; Vyas, Ashutosh; Dyaga, Gopal; Ireni, Srinivas; Nair, Nirmala; Sotsios, Yannis; Maria, Denis C; Morawala-Patell, Villoo

    2011-11-01

    Etanercept is a soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor originally approved for treatment of moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. We have developed a non-innovator version of the recombinant protein etanercept, with the investigational name AVG01 (trade name AVENT™), using a novel expression vector-based technology. Here we show, by extensive analytical characterization, that AVG01 is highly similar to the reference product Enbrel® and demonstrates similar efficacy in pre-clinical studies. Copyright © 2011 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory joint disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; Rollefstad, S

    2017-01-01

    was discussed and summarised by the experts in the course of a consensus finding and voting process. Three overarching principles were defined. First, there is a higher risk for CVD in patients with RA, and this may also apply to ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Second, the rheumatologist...

  14. Comparison of lumiracoxib with naproxen and ibuprofen in the Therapeutic Arthritis Research and Gastrointestinal Event Trial (TARGET), cardiovascular outcomes: randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farkouh, M.E.; Kirshner, H.; Harrington, R.A.; Ruland, S.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Schnitzer, T.J.; Burmester, G.R.; Mysler, E.; Hochberg, M.C.; Doherty, M.; Ehrsam, E.; Gitton, X.; Krammer, G.; Mellein, B.; Gimona, A.; Matchaba, P.; Hawkey, C.J.; Chesebro, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential for cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2)-selective inhibitors to increase the risk for myocardial infarction is controversial. The Therapeutic Arthritis Research and Gastrointestinal Event Trial (TARGET) aimed to assess gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety of the COX2 inhibitor

  15. Interleukins and interleukin receptors in rheumatoid arthritis: Research, diagnostics and clinical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyari, Lili; Varszegi, Dalma; Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Sarlos, Patricia; Farago, Bernadett; Javorhazy, Andras; Sumegi, Katalin; Banfai, Zsolt; Melegh, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, resulting in a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder. It may affect many tissues and organs, but it primarily affects the flexible joints. In clinical practice patient care generates many questions about diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. It is challenging for health care specialists to keep up to date with the medical literature. This review summarizes the pathogenesis, the polymorphisms of interleukin and interleukin genes and the standard available and possible future immunologic targets for RA treatment. The identification of disease-associated interleukin and interleukin receptor genes can provide precious insight into the genetic variations prior to disease onset in order to identify the pathways important for RA pathogenesis. The knowledge of the complex genetic background may prove useful for developing novel therapies and making personalized medicine based on the individual’s genetics. PMID:25232528

  16. Interleukins and interleukin receptors in rheumatoid arthritis: Research, diagnostics and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyari, Lili; Varszegi, Dalma; Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Sarlos, Patricia; Farago, Bernadett; Javorhazy, Andras; Sumegi, Katalin; Banfai, Zsolt; Melegh, Bela

    2014-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease, resulting in a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder. It may affect many tissues and organs, but it primarily affects the flexible joints. In clinical practice patient care generates many questions about diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. It is challenging for health care specialists to keep up to date with the medical literature. This review summarizes the pathogenesis, the polymorphisms of interleukin and interleukin genes and the standard available and possible future immunologic targets for RA treatment. The identification of disease-associated interleukin and interleukin receptor genes can provide precious insight into the genetic variations prior to disease onset in order to identify the pathways important for RA pathogenesis. The knowledge of the complex genetic background may prove useful for developing novel therapies and making personalized medicine based on the individual's genetics.

  17. Childhood trauma and resilience in psoriatic patients: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Maria Luigia; De Simone, Clara; Di Pietro, Salvatore; Acanfora, Mariateresa; Caldarola, Giacomo; Moccia, Lorenzo; Callea, Antonino; Panaccione, Isabella; Peris, Ketty; Rinaldi, Lucio; Janiri, Luigi; Di Nicola, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex etiology, involving the immune system, genetic factors, and external/internal triggers, with psychosomatic aspects. The aim of the study was to investigate childhood trauma and resilience in a psoriatic sample compared with healthy controls. Correlations between childhood trauma, resilience, quality of life, clinical data and psoriatic features were also evaluated. Seventy-seven psoriatic patients and seventy-six homogeneous healthy controls were enrolled. We used the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) to assess the severity of psoriasis and the Skindex-29 to measure health-related quality of life. The psychometric battery included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-Risc) to assess trauma exposure and resilience, respectively. Psoriatic patients showed a significant prevalence of childhood trauma and a lower resilience level compared to healthy controls. Associations between traumatic experiences, low resilience and reduced quality of life in psoriatic subjects were also observed. A multidisciplinary approach is helpful to investigate clinical aspects, trigger factors and psychophysiological stress response in psoriatic subjects. Improving resilience with an early psychological intervention focused on self-motivation and strengthening of self-efficacy could facilitate the management of psoriasis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Monoarticular Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Vogelgesang, Scott A

    2017-05-01

    Monoarticular arthritis is inflammation characterized by joint pain, swelling, and sometimes periarticular erythema. Although chronic causes are seen, the onset is often acute. An infected joint can quickly lead to permanent damage, making it a medical emergency. However, acute gout presenting as monoarticular arthritis is often so uncomfortable it requires urgent attention. Monoarticular crystalline arthritis is common and a septic joint is a medical emergency so it is no surprise that these diagnoses come to mind with complaint of inflammation in 1 joint. However, there are many causes of monoarticular arthritis that clinicians must consider. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Reactive arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloni, V; Fantini, F

    1990-01-01

    The term reactive arthritis was introduced to describe an acute non-purulent arthritis complicating an infection elsewhere in the body. Reactive arthritis can also be classified into HLA-B27 associated and non-associated forms. Rheumatic fever is an example of the HLA-B27 non-associated forms with genetic factors other than HLA-B27 involved. HLA-B27 associated reactive arthritis includes enteric, urogenic and idiopathic arthritides. The bacteria known to trigger post-enteritic reactive arthritis are: Yersinia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Clostridium difficile and Brucella; those known to trigger post-urethritic reactive arthritis are Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum, but often the germ remains unidentified. Mechanisms through which susceptibility to reactive arthritis is linked to HLA-B27 antigen are still incompletely understood, but a clue could be cross-reactivity between B27 and a surface antigen of pathogenic germs. The clinical profile of the disease is characterized by an asymmetrical oligoarthritis with involvement particularly of the peripheral joints of the lower limbs. The arthritis generally recovers without sequelae within a few weeks or months. Accompanying features can be the involvement of enthesis and tendon sheets in form of a talalgia or dactylitis. In some cases the arthritis can relapse and chronicize. In some cases, in addition, involvement of the axial skeleton can occur (spondylitis and/or sacroiliitis). Another feature of the disease is the frequent association with typical extra-articular manifestations such as uveitis and muco-cutaneous lesions.

  20. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Yu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The incidence and prevalence of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA vary widely across the world but data in East Asia is lacking. Uveitis is a serious cause of morbidity in JIA. This study aimed to analyze the incidence and prevalence of JIA, and the characteristics of JIA-associated uveitis in Taiwan. METHODS: A population-based cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Each patient was individually tracked from 1999 to 2009 to identify the diagnosis of JIA and uveitis using the International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the risk factors and complications of uveitis in patients with JIA. RESULTS: The study cohort had 2636 cases of JIA and included juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (57.7%, enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA (39.2%, and psoriatic arthritis (3.1%. The average annual incidence of JIA and JIA-associated uveitis were 4.93 (range, 3.93-6.23 and 0.25 (range, 0.12-0.37 cases per 100,000 population, respectively. The average period prevalence of JIA was 33.8 cases per 100,000 population. Uveitis occurred in 4.7% of patients with JIA, while JIA-associated uveitis was complicated by cataract (11.2% and glaucoma (24.8%. Enthesitis-related arthritis was significantly associated with uveitis (OR: 3.47; 95% CI: 2.24-5.37 (p<0.0001. Uveitis diagnosed before JIA was the most significant risk factor for complications of glaucoma or cataract (OR: 3.54; 95% CI: 1.44-8.72 (p = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of JIA is low but that of JIA-associated uveitis is increasing. Higher percentage of males in patients with ERA and the strong association between ERA and uveitis are unique for children with JIA in Taiwan. Uveitis diagnosed before arthritis is an important risk factor for complications. Continuous ophthalmologic follow-up is needed for children with JIA or uveitis of unknown etiology.

  1. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Associated Uveitis: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hsin-Hui; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Li-Chieh; Lee, Jyh-Hong; Lin, Yu-Tsan; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lin, Chang-Ping; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2013-01-01

    Objective The incidence and prevalence of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) vary widely across the world but data in East Asia is lacking. Uveitis is a serious cause of morbidity in JIA. This study aimed to analyze the incidence and prevalence of JIA, and the characteristics of JIA-associated uveitis in Taiwan. Methods A population-based cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Each patient was individually tracked from 1999 to 2009 to identify the diagnosis of JIA and uveitis using the International Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the risk factors and complications of uveitis in patients with JIA. Results The study cohort had 2636 cases of JIA and included juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (57.7%), enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) (39.2%), and psoriatic arthritis (3.1%). The average annual incidence of JIA and JIA-associated uveitis were 4.93 (range, 3.93–6.23) and 0.25 (range, 0.12–0.37) cases per 100,000 population, respectively. The average period prevalence of JIA was 33.8 cases per 100,000 population. Uveitis occurred in 4.7% of patients with JIA, while JIA-associated uveitis was complicated by cataract (11.2%) and glaucoma (24.8%). Enthesitis-related arthritis was significantly associated with uveitis (OR: 3.47; 95% CI: 2.24–5.37) (pUveitis diagnosed before JIA was the most significant risk factor for complications of glaucoma or cataract (OR: 3.54; 95% CI: 1.44–8.72) (p = 0.006). Conclusions The incidence of JIA is low but that of JIA-associated uveitis is increasing. Higher percentage of males in patients with ERA and the strong association between ERA and uveitis are unique for children with JIA in Taiwan. Uveitis diagnosed before arthritis is an important risk factor for complications. Continuous ophthalmologic follow-up is needed for children with JIA or uveitis of unknown etiology. PMID:23940609

  2. Gait characteristics associated with the foot and ankle in inflammatory arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Matthew; Parmar, Priya; Dalbeth, Nicola; Boocock, Mark; Rome, Keith

    2015-06-05

    Gait analysis is increasingly being used to characterise dysfunction of the lower limb and foot in people with inflammatory arthritis (IA). The aim of the systematic review was to evaluate the spatiotemporal, foot and ankle kinematic, kinetic, peak plantar pressure and muscle activity parameters between patients with inflammatory arthritis and healthy controls. An electronic literature search was performed on Medline, CINAHL, SportsDiscus and The Cochrane Library. Methodological quality was assessed using a modified Quality Index. Effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated as the standardised mean difference (SMD). Meta-analysis was conducted if studies were homogenous. Thirty six studies with quality ranging from high to low met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies reported gait parameters in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The gait pattern in RA was characterised by decreased walking speed (SMD 95% CI -1.57, -2.25 to -0.89), decreased cadence (SMD -0.97, -1.49 to -0.45), decreased stride length (SMD -1.66, -1.84 to -1.49), decreased ankle power (SMD -1.36, -1.70 to -1.02), increased double limb support time (SMD 1.03, 0.84 to 1.22), and peak plantar pressures at the forefoot (SMD 1.11, 0.76 to 1.45). Walking velocity was reduced in psoriatic arthritis and gout with no differences in ankylosing spondylitis. No studies have been conducted in polymyalgia rheumatica, systemic sclerosis or systemic lupus erythematosus. The review identified the majority of studies reporting gait adaptations in RA, but limited evidence relating to other IA conditions. Poor data reporting, small sample sizes and heterogeneity across IA conditions limit the interpretation of the findings. Future studies may consider a standardised analytical approach to gait analysis that will provide clinicians and researchers with objective evidence of foot function in people with IA.

  3. Reactive arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  4. Increased sensitivity to interferon-alpha in psoriatic T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten Wessel; Lovato, Paola; Skov, Lone

    2005-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by abnormal epidermal proliferation. Several studies have shown that skin-infiltrating activated T cells and cytokines play a pivotal role during the initiation and maintenance of the disease. Interferon (IFN)-alpha plays an important...... disease characterized by CD8(+)-infiltrating T cells. In this study, we therefore investigate IFN-alpha signaling in T cells isolated from involved skin of psoriatic patients. We show that psoriatic T cells have increased and prolonged responses to IFN-alpha, on the level of signal transducers...... and activators of transcription (STAT) activation, compared with infiltrating T cells from skin of non-psoriatic donors. Functionally, the increased IFN-alpha signaling leads to an increased binding of STAT4 to the IFN-gamma promotor, IFN-gamma production, and inhibition of T cell growth. In contrast, to STAT...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health- ... Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine ...

  8. Quality of life of psoriatic patients – modulatory variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Maria Gawlik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the quality of life (QoL of patients with dermatological conditions. The problem of the stigma associated with some dermatological conditions has been discerned, as patients suffering from chronic dermatoses tend to perceive themselves in a specific way and to assess their QoL as very low. Objectives. Identification of factors that influence the QoL of patients with psoriasis. Material and methods . This survey-based quantitative research was carried out at the dermatology ward of the Voivodeship Specialist Hospital, Research and Development Centre in Wroclaw, Poland. The study involved 130 adult patients with a diagnosis of psoriasis, of whom 56.92% (74 were women. The research instruments used were the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, and a questionnaire of the authors’ own design. Results . The median for disappearance of psoriatic patches after hospitalization was 5 (range: 0–10. The median for the remission duration was 3 months (range: 0.25 to 24. 61.54% (80 of those surveyed reported improvement in their psoriasis treatment as a result of regular check-ups at the outpatient dermatology clinic. Disease-related anxiety and QoL were determined by marital status and the level of education. Older patients more often had symptoms of depression, according to HADS. Higher DLQI scores correlated with higher HADS-A and HADS-D scores. Conclusions . Psoriasis has significant effects on patients’ mental states and social functioning. The most serious and unpleasant symptoms are pruritus and skin lesions on the uncovered parts of the body. The patients with the highest risk of a lower QoL are the elderly; those living alone (single or widowed; those with secondary, vocational, or no education; and those with symptoms of anxiety or depression.

  9. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center Scleroderma Center Sjogren’s Syndrome Center Vasculitis Center All information contained within the ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Studies The Camille Julia Morgan Arthritis Research and Education Fund About Us Appointment Information Contact Us Our ... the mission to bring current and accurate disease education to health care professionals and patients alike. Content ...

  16. Chronic arthritis and cardiovascular disease: altered blood parameters give rise to a prothrombotic propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinsberger, Jilke; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Cosemans, Judith M E M

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, and to a lesser extent ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, associates with increased morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular complications. We hypothesized that the increased risk of cardiovascular disease is reflected by changes in blood parameters that are compatible with a prothrombotic propensity. To substantiate this notion, we performed an extensive literature search identifying such parameters. A search through PubMed (1970-2013) was done to find primary articles with the following search terms: rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis or synovial fluid. These were combined with keywords reflecting processes of atherothrombosis: atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, coagulation, endothelial, fibrinolysis, mean platelet volume, microparticle, platelet, platelet count and mass, thrombosis, and thrombus. The published studies point to a multitude of blood-related processes that can contribute to a prothrombotic propensity in chronic inflammatory diseases. These include an increase in platelet mass; low-level platelet activation, enforced by interaction with leukocytes and the formation of proinflammatory cytokines; a locally activated endothelium; and an increased coagulant activity. Patient treatment with methotrexate or TNF-α blockers appears to result in normalization of several of these prothrombotic parameters. This analysis provides a first identification of the mechanisms by which inflammatory arthritis can aggravate cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Closing the Gap Between Bench and Bedside Research for Early Arthritis Therapies (EARTH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Constance R.; Beynnon, Bruce D.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Garrett, William E.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Rodeo, Scott A.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Stanton, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the 2010 AOSSM/NIH (American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine/National Institutes of Health) U13 Post–Joint Injury Osteoarthritis II Conference to include the discussion concerning potential study cohorts, assessment considerations, and research priorities. There was strong consensus and enthusiasm for approaching the development of disease-modifying treatments for osteoarthritis through study of “pre-osteoarthritic” cohorts, particularly human subjects under 30 years of age following acute anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Clinical study of acute treatment strategies initiated within a few days after injury will need development of recruitment pathways and short-term proof-of-concept outcome measures that are specific to the intervention being studied. For example, measures of joint inflammation can be used in short-term prospective randomized controlled trials to determine whether an anti-inflammatory intervention was effective in decreasing early inflammation. These short-term clinical trials will need to be followed by longer-term evaluation of the clinical cohorts for joint and cartilage degeneration to determine if the acute intervention affected later development of osteoarthritis. Research priorities were identified in several disciplines, particularly regarding development and validation of quantitative imaging, biomechanics, and biomarker measures of joint structure, composition, and function that predict the accelerated development of osteoarthritis. Systematic study of posttraumatic osteoarthritis is anticipated to advance understanding and treatment of all forms of osteoarthritis. PMID:21730208

  18. Gouty arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelemy, C.R.; Nakayama, D.A.; Lightfoot, R.W. Jr.; Wortmann, R.L.; Carrera, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective analysis of 60 patients with gout was undertaken to evaluate the radiographic spectrum of gouty arthritis in patients treated in the era of hypouricemic therapy. Twenty-two of these patients were clinically tophaceous; 36 were considered to have radiographic findings diagnostic of gouty arthritis by strict radiographic criteria. Up to 24% of the patients denied symptoms in joints with radiographic changes of gout; 42% with no evidence of tophi on clinical examination had radiographic changes characteristic of gout. Radiographic assessment can be extremely helpful in the management of gout by documenting the degree and extent of bony involvement, particularly in patients with limited symptoms or without clinical tophi.

  19. Heel pain in psoriatic arthropathy: Analysis of a series of 291 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Ivorra, Isabel; Juárez López, Pablo; López de Recalde, Mercè; Carvalho, Pedro David; Rodriguez Moreno, Jesus

    2017-05-30

    To determine the prevalence of heel pain in a series of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Cross-sectional, observational and retrospective study of a series of 347 patients. All patients fulfilled the CASPAR criteria for PsA and 291 had a clinically significant history of heel pain. The statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test, ANOVA and binary logistic regression. Thirty-five percent of the patients had clinically significant heel pain. A significant association was established between an early onset of skin and joint involvement in the disease and the development of heel pain. However, no significant correlation was found between disease duration and the presence of heel pain. History of dactylitis and PsA in first-degree family members was also statistically associated with this complication. Clinically significant heel pain was recorded in one third of the patients in this series. There was a statistically significant association with dactylitis, PsA in first-degree family members and an earlier onset of joint and skin disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  20. OSTEOARTICULAR INJURY IN PSORIATIC PATIENTS ACCORDING TO THE DATA OF PEST (PSORIASIS EPIDEMIOLOGY SCREENING TOOL QUESTIONNAIRE AND RHEUMATOLOGICAL CLINICOINSTRUMENTAL EXAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Chamurlieva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA and the pattern of osteoarticular injury in psoriatic patients according to the data of the PEST (Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool questionnaire.Subjects and methods. The trial included 80 psoriatic patients who had sought for dermatological and rheumatological advice (35 men and 45 women; mean age 43.06±1.71 years; psoriatic skin damage area (PSDA 9.83±2.63%; and psoriasis area severity index (PASI 12.05±3.23; dermatology life quality index (DQLI 8.57±0.94. Answers to 6 questions about nail psoriasis in the PEST questionnaire were rated; each positive answer corresponded to 1; PEST ≥3 or <3 is indicative of the presence or absence of psoriasis, respectively. All patients, irrespectively of PEST value, were examined by a rheumatologist and underwent a standard clinicoinstrumental examination. The CASPAR criteria were considered to be a gold standard of PsA diagnosis.Results. 53 (66.2% patients had PEST≥3; the CASPAR criteria confirmed PsA in 40 (75.4% of them. 27 (33.8% patients had PEST<3; in 13 (48% of them, fulfilled CASPAR criteria. PsA was first diagnosed in 30 (56.6% of the 53 patients. Thus, PsA was identified in 53 (66.2% of the 80 patients; another rheumatic disease (RD, such as dermatomyositis, rheumatic polymyalgia, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, gout, etc., was found in 10 (12.5%; a concurrence of RDs (RA and gout in 3 (3.7%; RD was absent in 14 (17.5% cases. The disease duration was <1 year in 17 (34% of the 53 patients with PsA, 1 to 2 years in 16 (32%, 2 to 3 years in 11 (22%, and ≥3 years in 9 (18%. Nail psoriasis was detected in 55 (70% patients. It was found in 38 (71.7% patients with PsA and in 17 without this disease. In patients with PsA, PSDA averaged 7.23±2.24%; PASI 11.69±1.94; DQLI 7.71±0.17, respectively; in those without PsA 11.44±2.78%, 14.94±4.29, and 8.96±1

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mahmood Ally

    inflammatory response are being used successfully to treat a diverse group of other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis, spondyloarthropathy, inflammatory bowel disease and connective-tissue disease (CTD).1. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. A normal immune response requires the innate ...

  2. Periodontal Disease as a Risk Factor for Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sushil; White, Sarahlouise; Bartold, Mark

    2012-01-01

    sacroiliac and the lumbar spine joints are rarely involved, which is peculiar because these are some of the most typical targets of seronegative spondylarthropathies, such as psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. The clinical manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis vary, depending on the involved joints and the disease stage. The clinical features of synovitis are particularly apparent in the morning. Morning stiffness in and around the joints, lasting at least 1 hour before maximal improvement is a typical sign of rheumatoid arthritis. It is a subjective sign and the patient needs to be carefully informed as to the difference between pain and stiffness. Morning stiffness duration is related to disease activity. Progression of rheumatoid arthritis can be measured by laboratory tests and clinical evaluation (questionnaires of disease activity and physical examination). Laboratory tests include blood tests for Rheumatoid factor (RF) and Acute-phase reaction tests while clinical evaluation can be measured by the Disease activity using the Disease Activity Score (DAS). Periodontitis is a destructive inflammatory disease of the dental supporting tissues which leads to erosion of bone around teeth resulting in tooth loss. Severe periodontitis affects about 5-15% of the adult population. In periodontitis, the clinical findings of bone resorption and loss of clinical attachment level around tooth are a result of inflammatory mediated alterations to the bone remodelling balance. The inflammatory infiltrate present between the plaque biofilm, bone and connective tissues regulate the host immune response to the bacteria. The host produces proteases and substances that degrade the extracellular matrix, and lead to resorption of the alveolar bone, resulting in irreversible loss of tissue attachment.Bone is a dynamic tissue and bone homeostasis involves the opposing events of resorption and apposition; dissolution of the existing bone mineral, resorption of the extracellular

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet: Can Certain Foods Reduce Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can diet affect symptoms? Can certain diets affect rheumatoid arthritis symptoms? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. ... processed foods might help reduce symptoms associated with rheumatoid arthritis. But the research studies supporting this benefit have ...

  4. The hand in systemic diseases other than rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, C; Staumont-Sallé, D; Hatron, P-Y; Cotten, A; Couturier, C

    2014-06-01

    This review outlines the skin, vascular and musculoskeletal symptoms affecting the hand during systemic inflammatory diseases other than rheumatoid arthritis. Skin lesions are diagnosed clinically and their symptomatology is documented through an extensive series of photographs. These conditions may require specific care before a surgical procedure can be performed. Vascular lesions are also diagnosed clinically and their symptomatology is described in detail. It is important to recognize that acrocyanosis is always benign. The surgeon should be able to distinguish between primary, but benign Raynaud's disease and secondary Raynaud's syndrome, which has a high risk of finger necrosis. Current preventative and curative treatments for finger necrosis are described. The clinical, radiological, progressive and therapeutic features of musculoskeletal lesions are reviewed, namely those associated with psoriatic arthritis, systemic sclerosis and lupus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Arthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Arthritis of the Hand Page ( 1 ) The hand and wrist have multiple small joints that work together to ... a shoelace. When the joints are affected by arthritis, activities of daily living can be difficult. Arthritis ...

  6. Objective Quantification of Immune Cell Infiltrates and Epidermal Proliferation in Psoriatic Skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soendergaard, Christoffer; Nielsen, Ole H; Skak, Kresten

    2015-01-01

    Digital pathology and image analysis have developed extensively during the last couple of years. Especially the advance in whole-slide scanning, software, and computer processing makes it possible to apply these methods in tissue-based research. Today this task is dominated by tedious manual...... research. Published data of manual cell counts in psoriatic skin samples were in this study reevaluated using the digital image analysis (DIA) software. Whole slides immunohistochemically stained for CD3, CD4, CD8, CD45R0, and Ki-67 were scanned and quantitatively evaluated using simple threshold analysis....... Regression analysis with R values in the range of 0.85 to 0.95 indicates a good correlation between the manual count of cell numbers and the staining density obtained by automated DIA. Moreover, we show that the automated image analysis is reliable over a broad range of thresholds and that it is robust...

  7. Evaluation of some psychological factors in psoriatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormohammadpour, Pedram; Fakour, Yousef; Nazemei, Mohammad Javad; Ehsani, Amirhooshang; Gholamali, Fatemeh; Morteza, Afsaneh; Mokhtari, Leila; Khosrovanmehr, Najmeh

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a disease which may have a direct impact on the psychological and social aspects of the patient, particularly due to its visibility. To date, we are unaware of any study showing a relationship between psoriasis and psychological parameters such as psychological vulnerability and coping strategies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of psoriasis on some psychological parameters in an Iranian population. Patients having histopathologically confirmed psoriasis for at least 6 months attending the Dermatology Clinic of Razi Hospital were included if they agreed to participate in the study. Patients with history of schizophrenia, major depression or other psychological disorders were excluded. All patients were at least 18 years old. The patients were then referred to the researchers for filling out the appropriate questionnaires under the guidance of an involved psychologist. To evaluate skin involvement, Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) score was calculated and used for all patients. All data were stored in files for further analysis. There were 101 females and 99 males with the mean age of 43.2(±16.32). The mean PASI Score was 6.58 ± 6.04. Diffuse skin involvement was the commonest form of disease (133 patients, 66.5%). The highest score for Illness perception belonged to those with genitalia involvement (185.2, worst illness perception), and the lowest score for Illness perception belonged to those with nail involvement (168.2). Consistently, the lowest score of facing the problems (CISS: approach strategy to disease) belonged to those with hand involvement (50.5) whereas the highest score belonged to those with genitalia involvement (60.4). There was a significant correlation between psychological vulnerability vs. Illness perception score as well as psychological vulnerability vs. coping strategies score. Surprisingly, PASI score had an insignificant relationship with illness perception, coping strategies or psychological

  8. Evaluation of some psychological factors in psoriatic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Noormohammadpour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a disease which may have a direct impact on the psychological and social aspects of the patient, particularly due to its visibility. To date, we are unaware of any study showing a relationship between psoriasis and psychological parameters such as psychological vulnerability and coping strategies.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of psoriasis on some psychological parameters in an Iranian population.Patients having histopathologically confirmed psoriasis for at least 6 months attending the Dermatology Clinic of Razi Hospital were included if they agreed to participate in the study. Patients with history of schizophrenia, major depression or other psychological disorders were excluded. All patients were at least 18 years old. The patients were then referred to the researchers for filling out the appropriate questionnaires under the guidance of an involved psychologist. To evaluate skin involvement, Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI score was calculated and used for all patients. All data were stored in files for further analysis.There were 101 females and 99 males with the mean age of 43.2(±16.32. The mean PASI Score was 6.58 ± 6.04. Diffuse skin involvement was the commonest form of disease (133 patients, 66.5%. The highest score for Illness perception belonged to those with genitalia involvement (185.2, worst illness perception, and the lowest score for Illness perception belonged to those with nail involvement (168.2. Consistently, the lowest score of facing the problems (CISS: approach strategy to disease belonged to those with hand involvement (50.5 whereas the highest score belonged to those with genitalia involvement (60.4. There was a significant correlation between psychological vulnerability vs. Illness perception score as well as psychological vulnerability vs. coping strategies score. Surprisingly, PASI score had an insignificant relationship with illness perception, coping strategies or psychological

  9. Programmed death-ligand 1, 2 expressions are decreased in the psoriatic epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Suk; Je, Jung Hwan; Kim, Sung Hee; Shin, Dongyun; Kim, Tae-Gyun; Kim, Do Young; Kim, Soo Min; Lee, Min-Geol

    2015-08-01

    Psoriatic keratinocytes are one of the key components that amplify and maintain chronic inflammation. We hypothesized that lack of proper regulatory functions of keratinocytes can be responsible for chronic inflammation in psoriasis. Programmed death-ligands (PD-L) 1, 2 are expressed on keratinocytes, and expressions by nonlymphoid cells are important for mediating peripheral T cell tolerance. In our study, we investigated whether PD-L1, 2 expressions are altered in keratinocytes of psoriatic epidermis compared to normal epidermis. Epidermis was separated and analyzed for PD-L1, 2 expressions in mRNA and protein levels. Immunohistochemical stainings were done in skin biopsy samples from psoriasis, normal skin, allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), pityriasis rosea (PR) and lichen planus (LP). Expressions of PD-L1, 2 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in psoriatic epidermis compared to normal epidermis. In protein levels, PD-L1 expression was significantly decreased in psoriatic epidermis. However, PD-L2 expression was not detected in both normal and psoriatic epidermis. Immunohistochemical stainings revealed significantly less PD-L1 expression in psoriatic epidermis compared to normal epidermis. Even compared to other cutaneous inflammatory diseases, psoriatic epidermis showed less expression than ACD, PR and LP. PD-L2 expression was minimally detected in normal epidermis and not in psoriatic epidermis, but its expression was increased in ACD, PR and LP. In conclusion, we demonstrated that PD-L1, 2 are decreased in psoriatic epidermis in mRNA and protein levels. In addition, we showed that their expression was significantly lower than other inflammatory skin diseases. We suggest that decreased expression of PD-L1, 2 on psoriatic epidermis can contribute to its chronic unregulated inflammatory characteristics.

  10. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ivy Y; Karpus, Olga N; Turner, Jason D; Hardie, Debbie; Marshall, Jennifer L; de Hair, Maria J H; Maijer, Karen I; Tak, Paul P; Raza, Karim; Hamann, Jörg; Buckley, Christopher D; Gerlag, Danielle M; Filer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST) of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied. ST from 56 patients included in two different early arthritis cohorts and 7 non-inflammatory controls was analysed using immunofluorescence to detect stromal markers CD55, CD248, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and podoplanin. Diagnostic classification (gout, psoriatic arthritis, unclassified arthritis (UA), parvovirus associated arthritis, reactive arthritis and RA), disease outcome (resolving vs persistent) and clinical variables were determined at baseline and after follow-up, and related to the expression of stromal markers. We observed expression of all stromal markers in ST of early arthritis patients, independent of diagnosis or prognostic outcome. Synovial expression of FAP was significantly higher in patients developing early RA compared to other diagnostic groups and non-inflammatory controls. In RA FAP protein was expressed in both lining and sublining layers. Podoplanin expression was higher in all early inflammatory arthritis patients than controls, but did not differentiate diagnostic outcomes. Stromal marker expression was not associated with prognostic outcomes of disease persistence or resolution. There was no association with clinical or sonographic variables. Stromal cell markers CD55, CD248, FAP and podoplanin are expressed in ST in the earliest stage of arthritis. Baseline expression of FAP is higher in early synovitis patients who fulfil classification criteria for RA over time. These results suggest that significant fibroblast activation occurs in RA in the early window of disease.

  11. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Y Choi

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied.ST from 56 patients included in two different early arthritis cohorts and 7 non-inflammatory controls was analysed using immunofluorescence to detect stromal markers CD55, CD248, fibroblast activation protein (FAP and podoplanin. Diagnostic classification (gout, psoriatic arthritis, unclassified arthritis (UA, parvovirus associated arthritis, reactive arthritis and RA, disease outcome (resolving vs persistent and clinical variables were determined at baseline and after follow-up, and related to the expression of stromal markers.We observed expression of all stromal markers in ST of early arthritis patients, independent of diagnosis or prognostic outcome. Synovial expression of FAP was significantly higher in patients developing early RA compared to other diagnostic groups and non-inflammatory controls. In RA FAP protein was expressed in both lining and sublining layers. Podoplanin expression was higher in all early inflammatory arthritis patients than controls, but did not differentiate diagnostic outcomes. Stromal marker expression was not associated with prognostic outcomes of disease persistence or resolution. There was no association with clinical or sonographic variables.Stromal cell markers CD55, CD248, FAP and podoplanin are expressed in ST in the earliest stage of arthritis. Baseline expression of FAP is higher in early synovitis patients who fulfil classification criteria for RA over time. These results suggest that significant fibroblast activation occurs in RA in the early window of disease.

  12. The impact of comorbidities on tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Christine; Højgaard, Pil; Dreyer, Lene

    2017-01-01

    . Kaplan-Meier curves showed shorter persistence with treatment for patients with ≥ 2 CCI (log-rank: p anxiety (p = 0.027) compared to patients without comorbidities. In multivariate analysis a CCI score ≥ 2 was associated with reduced TNFi persistence...... regression analyses were performed. Percentages of patients achieving relevant clinical responses were calculated. RESULTS: We identified 1750 patients eligible for analyses. Patients with higher CCI had higher disease activity measures at baseline and increased occurrence of depression and/or anxiety...... without comorbidities. CONCLUSION: Presence of comorbidities was associated with higher baseline disease activity, shorter TNFi persistence and reduced clinical response rates in a cohort of Danish patients with PsA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  13. Cytokine profile in psoriatic arthritis: search for relationships with inflammation and blood rheological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat'yana Viktorovna Korotaeva

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion. The enhanced clinical and laboratory activity of PSA is attended by the systemic activation of immunological mediators of inflammation and neoangiogenesis and by impaired blood rheological properties, which supports the interaction of these factors in the immunopathogenesis of the diseases.

  14. International patient and physician consensus on a psoriatic arthritis core outcome set for clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip

    2017-01-01

    rated domain importance. During the March 2016 consensus meeting, 12 patients and 12 physicians agreed on 10 candidate domains. Then, 49 patients and 71 physicians rated these domains' importance. Five were important to >70% of both groups: musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity...

  15. No overall damage progression despite persistent inflammation in adalimumab-treated psoriatic arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Wiell, Charlotte; Bøyesen, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    of inflammation remained present (week 48 total inflammation score median = 9). Several DCE-MRI parameters also decreased (P correlated (ρ = 0.62) with conventional MRI total inflammation score. No statistically significant changes in bone erosion or proliferation scores were observed. With CT...... to subsequent erosive progression detected by CT. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, http://clinicaltrials.gov/, NCT01465438....

  16. Pain mechanisms and ultrasonic inflammatory activity as prognostic factors in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Christensen, Robin; Dreyer, Lene

    2016-01-01

    )) will be prospectively recruited from outpatient clinics in Copenhagen. All data (demographics, clinical, imaging, blood samples and patient-reported outcomes) will be collected at baseline and after 4 months. Pain is assessed by the PainDETECT Questionnaire, Visual Analogue Scale for pain, Swollen to Tender Joint Count...... Ratio, Widespread Pain Index and tender point examination. The association between pain variables and clinical/US characteristics will be described by correlation analyses. The predictive value of pain measures and baseline US scores on treatment response will be analysed with regression models...... NCT02572700). Results will be disseminated through publication in international peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02572700, Pre-results....

  17. Severe glandular tularemia in a patient treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor for psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Calin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of severe glandular tularemia in a patient receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF therapy is reported here. The patient required prolonged treatment with doxycycline–ciprofloxacin due to early relapse after ciprofloxacin was stopped. Tularemia may have a more severe course in patients receiving anti-TNF. This may thus be an indication for more aggressive treatment.

  18. Head-to-toe whole-body MRI in psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Eshed, Iris

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: By whole-body MRI (WBMRI), we aimed to examine the frequency and distribution of inflammatory and structural lesions in PsA patients, SpA patients and healthy subjects (HSs), to introduce global WBMRI inflammation/damage scores, and to assess WBMRI's reproducibility and correlation...... of inflammation and structural damage were constructed, and WBMRI findings were compared with clinical measures and convMRI (SpA/HS: spine and SI joints; PsA/HS: hand). RESULTS: The readability (92-100%) and reproducibility (intrareader intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.62-1.0) were high in spine/SI joint......-15]} and SpA [8 (IQR 2-14)] than in HSs [2.5 (IQR 1-4.5)], both P structural damage scores (erosion, fat infiltration and ankylosis) were higher in SpA [7 (IQR 3-12)] than HSs [1.5 (IQR 0-4.5)], P = 0.012. Correlations between WBMRI and convMRI spine and SI joint scores were ρ = 0...

  19. The Psoriatic Arthritis Registry of Turkey: results of a multicentre registry on 1081 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyoncu, Umut; Bayindir, Özün; Ferhat Öksüz, Mustafa; Doğru, Atalay; Kimyon, Gezmiş; Tarhan, Emine Figen; Erden, Abdulsamet; Yavuz, Şule; Can, Meryem; Çetin, Gözde Yıldırım; Kılıç, Levent; Küçükşahin, Orhan; Omma, Ahmet; Ozisler, Cem; Solmaz, Dilek; Bozkirli, Emine Duygu Ersözlü; Akyol, Lütfi; Pehlevan, Seval Masatlıoğlu; Gunal, Esen Kasapoglu; Arslan, Fatos; Yılmazer, Barış; Atakan, Nilgun; Aydın, Sibel Zehra

    2017-02-01

    The aim was to assess the characteristics of PsA, find out how well the disease is controlled in real life, demonstrate the treatments and identify the unmet needs. The PsA registry of Turkey is a multicentre Web-based registry established in 2014 and including 32 rheumatology centres. Detailed data regarding demographics for skin and joint disease, disease activity assessments and treatment choices were collected. One thousand and eighty-one patients (64.7% women) with a mean (sd) PsA duration of 5.8 (6.7) years were enrolled. The most frequent type of PsA was polyarticular [437 (40.5%)], followed by oligoarticular [407 (37.7%)] and axial disease [372 (34.4%)]. The mean (sd) swollen and tender joint counts were 1.7 (3) and 3.6 (4.8), respectively. Of these patients, 38.6% were on conventional synthetic DMARD monotherapy, 7.1% were on anti-TNF monotherapy, and 22.5% were using anti-TNF plus conventional synthetic DMARD combinations. According to DAS28, 86 (12.4%) patients had high and 105 (15.2%) had moderate disease activity. Low disease activity was achieved in 317 (45.7%) patients, and 185 (26.7%) were in remission. Minimal disease activity data could be calculated in 247 patients, 105 of whom (42.5%) had minimal disease activity. The major differences among sexes were that women were older and had less frequent axial disease, more fatigue, higher HAQ scores and less remission. The PsA registry of Turkey had similarities with previously published registries, supporting its external validity. The finding that women had more fatigue and worse functioning as well as the high percentage of active disease state highlight the unmet need in treatment of PsA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Pattern of bone erosion and bone proliferation in psoriatic arthritis hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Bird, P; Boonen, A

    2014-01-01

    are described and the imaging modalities compared. RESULTS: Ninety percent of bone erosions detected by CT were located in the metacarpal heads, and most frequently in the 2nd-3rd MCP joints. Radial (37%) and ulnar (31%) surfaces were more frequently eroded than dorsal (10%) and palmar (22%) sites. Using CT...

  1. Employment is maintained and sick days decreased in psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis patients with etanercept treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boggs, Robert L; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Li, Wenzhi

    2014-01-01

    at baseline, week 12 and week 24 of treatment. The questionnaire included employment status and changing job responsibilities and sick time taken due to psoriasis or PsA. The statistical methods included analysis of covariance, t-test, Fisher's exact test and McNemar's test. Last-observation-carried...

  2. Impact of pharmacogenomics upon the therapeutic response to etanercept in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Negrini, Simone; Magnani, Ottavia; Penza, Elena; Pellecchio, Marco; Puppo, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    TNF-α inhibitors have demonstrated efficacy both as monotherapy and in combination with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in the treatment of chronic inflammatory immune-mediated diseases. Etanercept is a decoy receptor" for TNF-α and it is composed of two p75 TNF-α receptors fused to human IgG1. Areas covered: We discuss the potential role of pharmacogenetics in predicting the response to etanercept in patients with Ps and PsA. Expert opinion: Pharmacogenetics represents the new frontier for the discovery of potential genetic markers of biological response to TNF-α inhibitors. Clinical studies showed that TNF-α -308 G/G, +489 GG and the +489 GA, TNF-α -857C (rs1799724), TNFRSF1B 676T (rs1061622), TNFAIP3 G SNP (rs610604), FcγRIIIA-V158F, HLA-C*06, IL-17 A (rs2275913 and rs10484879), IL-17F (rs763780) and IL17RA (rs4819554) SNPs favor the response to etanercept. However, most of these studies are often small and not sufficiently powered to detect an effect and markers tend to be more prognostic than predictive of therapeutic response. Furthermore, studies often examines only the effects of a single SNP, while it would be more useful to analyze more haplotypes in contemporary in the same patients. Appropriately designed clinical trials are needed before a pharmacogenetic approach may be applicable in daily clinical therapeutic practice.

  3. The influence of obesity on response to tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Glintborg, Bente; Kristensen, Lars Erik

    2016-01-01

    and logistic regression analyses were performed to study the impact of obesity (BMI ⩾30 kg/m(2)) on TNFI adherence and response after 6 months (according to 20/50/70% improvement in ACR criteria and EULAR criteria). Subanalyses studied the impact of obesity according to gender, TNFI type and nationality......% CI 1.3, 2.0)] and reduced odds for EGOM response [odds ratio 0.47 (95% CI 0.29, 0.72)]. The impact of obesity was significant across genders, TNFI types and nationality. CONCLUSION: Obesity was associated with higher disease activity and seemed to diminish response and adherence to TNFIs in PsA.......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the impact of obesity on response to the first TNF-α inhibitor (TNFI) treatment course in patients with PsA followed in routine care. METHODS: We performed an observational cohort study based on the Danish and Icelandic biologics registries. Kaplan-Meier plots, Cox...

  4. Analysis of 4-year Dutch reimbursement application data of biological therapies for psoriatic arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, R.J.B.; Jong, E.M.G.J. de; Salemink, G.W.; Burer, J.H.G.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To get the approval for reimbursement of biological therapies for PsA, patients need to fulfil specific criteria in many countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the 4-year Dutch reimbursement application data, including the diagnostic, disease activity and response criteria that

  5. The effect of psoriasis treatment on body composition, components of metabolic syndrome and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Tamer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory immun mediated skin disorder with unknown etiology. The chronic inflammation in psoriasis have role in the development of metabolic and vascular disorders related with associating comorbidities. Recent studies have suggested a strong association exists between metabolic syndrome, obesity and complexity of the association between psoriasis, body mass index (BMI and psoriasis tratment. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of psoriasis treatment with methotrexate, cyclosporine and biological agents on body composition, comorbidities and associated laboratory findings. Materials and Methods: Seventy-nine patients treated with methotrexate, cyclosporin and biological agents were included in our study. Demographic characteristics, body composition analysis, psoriasis related comorbidities and laboratory examinations were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of systemic treatment. Results: Comorbidities and metabolic syndrome tended to be more frequent in the anti tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α treated group. Increase in body fat and weight detected in patiens receiving biologic drug therapy. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that severe psoriasis patients with longer disease duration were more likely to have metabolic syndrome because of severe and long term inflammation in pathogenesis of comorbidities.

  6. Screening of Patients with Psoriasis for Psoriatic Arthritis in the Slovak Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbancek S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Global prevalence of psoriasis is ranging from 0.91 % to 8.5 % [1]. Exact numbers are missing for Slovakia. 1-5% range is the most probable while 2 % is also mentioned as an average prevalence for the European population. There is approximately 110 thousand patients suffering from psoriasis when extrapolating from total population of 5.5 million [2]. Extracutaneous manifestation is observed in 11–30 % of patients after years of solely skin symptoms presentation [3, 4, 5, 6].

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this site to learn about Arthritis. Unlike many health education websites, we produce our own content. Additionally, ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and what other conditions are associated with RA. Learning more about your condition will allow you to ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  11. Investigation of Serum Leptin Levels in Psoriatic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Türkan Gönül

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is a chronic, T cell mediated hyperproliferative skin disease. Leptin is an adipokine that stimulates Th1 immune response while suppressing Th2 immune response. Because that leptin plays an important role in the T cell immunity, it is aimed to investigate the relation between psoriasis and leptin and whether leptin plays a role in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis in the present study. Mateiral and Method: Serum leptin, interleukin (IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a and nitric oxide (NO levels were measured in 54 psoriatic patients and age, sex and body mass index matched 50 healthy control subjects. Results: The mean serum leptin concentration was not statistically different in psoriatic patients compared with the controls (p=0.568. Serum leptin levels were not correlated with PASI score, duration and clinical type of the disease as well as IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a and NO levels. IL-8 and TNF-a levels were significantly higher in patients with psoriasis than healthy control subjects (p=0.002 and p=0,020 respectively. The mean serum IL-1b, IL-6 and NO levels were not statistically different in patients when compared with control subjects. Conclusion: These results showed that leptin may not play a significant role in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis and leptin could not be accepted as a marker to assess severity of the disease.

  12. The new Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) registry: design, rationale, and characteristics of patients enrolled in the first 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukelman, Timothy; Kimura, Yukiko; Ilowite, Norman T; Mieszkalski, Kelly; Natter, Marc D; Burrell, Grendel; Best, Brian; Jones, Jason; Schanberg, Laura E

    2017-04-17

    Herein we describe the history, design, and rationale of the new Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Registry and present the characteristics of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) enrolled in the first 12 months of operation. The CARRA Registry began prospectively collecting data in the United States and Canada in July 2015 to evaluate the safety of therapeutic agents in persons with childhood-onset rheumatic disease, initially restricted to JIA. Secondary objectives include the evaluation of disease outcomes and their associations with medication use and other factors. Data are collected every 6 months and include clinical assessments, detailed medication use, patient-reported outcomes, and safety events. Follow-up is planned for at least 10 years for each participant and is facilitated by a telephone call center. As of July 2016, 1192 patients with JIA were enrolled in the CARRA Registry at 49 clinical sites. At enrollment, their median age was 12.4 years old and median disease duration was 2.6 years. Owing to preferential enrollment, patients with systemic JIA (13%) and with a polyarticular course (75%) were over-represented compared to patients in typical clinical practice. Approximately 49% were currently using biologic agents and ever use of oral glucocorticoids was common (47%). The CARRA Registry provides safety surveillance data to pharmaceutical companies to satisfy their regulatory requirements, and several independently-funded sub-studies that use the Registry infrastructure are underway. The new CARRA Registry successfully enrolled nearly 1200 participants with JIA in the first 12 months of its operation. Sustainable funding has been secured from multiple sources. The CARRA Registry may serve as a model for the study of other uncommon diseases.

  13. Intravenous Laser Blood Irradiation Increases Efficacy of Etanercept in Selected Subtypes of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: An Innovative Clinical Research Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos Andrei Chiran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This single-blind, placebo-controlled study assesses the efficacy of synergic administration of intravenous laser blood irradiation (ILBI and etanercept in selected subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Etanercept is a tumor necrosis factor alpha blocking agent with recognized importance in JIA. Laser radiation has immunomodulatory effects in animal and human studies. Fourteen patients (Group I received ILBI and 9 patients (Group II received placebo laser. ILBI was performed in addition to ongoing JIA medication, including etanercept. ILBI was administrated in 3 sets of 5 consecutive daily sessions, with a 7-week interval between every set of sessions. Evaluation was performed using ACR (American College of Rheumatology Pediatric Criteria (ACR Pedi at study enrollment and at 10 and 20 weeks, respectively. After 10 weeks, 85.7% of the patients in Group I fulfilled Pedi 30 criteria, compared to only 55.6% of the patients in Group II. After 20 weeks, all patients in both groups had a Pedi 30 response. In Group I, 92.8% of the subjects met the Pedi 50 response, compared to only 55.6% in the placebo group. One patient in Group I responded best, fulfilling Pedi 70 criteria. If applied synergistically, ILBI and etanercept would have an increased efficacy in promoting JIA remission.

  14. Multiparameter analysis of biomarkers in the laboratory diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Novikov; E N Aleksandrova; A N Gerasimov; M V Cherkasova; D E Karateev; E L Luchikhina; E L Nasonov

    2013-01-01

    Subjects and methods. 102 patients with early RA (79 women and 23 men; median age 51 years [41 to 62, 25th to 75th percentile]; disease duration 4 months [2.5 to 6.0]; DAS28 5.4 [4.1 to 5.9]) were examined. A comparison group consisted of 616 patients including 27 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 15 with Sjö gren’s syndrome, 25 with ankylosing spondyloarthritis; 33 with osteoarthritis, 20 with overlap syndrome, 9, 22, and 168 patients with gouty, psoriatic, and undifferentiated arthritis, r...

  15. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  16. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve 5 or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  18. Arthritis in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... those without arthritis. Arthritis makes it harder to manage heart disease, diabetes or obesity. About half of ... a healthcare provider’s care. State officials and community leaders can Promote physical activity and disease management educational ...

  19. Arthritis - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  20. Cardiogoniometry in psoriatic patients and its comparison with a control group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoorak Poorzand

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Abnormalities in resting ECG and CGM and their correlation with disease severity raises concerns about the need for cardiovascular follow-ups of psoriatic patients, especially those with severe disease.

  1. Expression of PADI4 during rheumatoid arthritis development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuirong Bian

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptidyl deiminase 4 (PADI4 catalyzes peptidylarginine to citrulline. The gene encoding PADI4 is associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA in some populations. The levels of PADI4, anti-CCP, and RF were measured in the blood of patients suffering from RA and osteoarthritis (OA for less than six months using ELISA. The levels were also measured in the blood of patients that have been diagnosed with RA for more than three years. As controls, samples from healthy subjects or patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, epidemic pleurodynia (EP, OA, psoriatic arthritis (PA, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, gouty arthritis (GA, or Still’s disease (ST were also assayed. Of patients with early RA, 68.7% had significantly higher levels of PADI4 than patients with early OA. Patients with RA for a longer period of time had a higher expression of PADI4 than patients with SLE, ST, and GA, but they were similar to healthy subjects or patients with AS, EP, OA, or PA. The level of PADI4 was significantly correlated to the levels of RF and anti-CCP in blood samples of RA, but not in the samples of other diseases and those of healthy subjects. The level of PADI4 relates to the disease activity and clinical performance.

  2. Long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with adalimumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murdaca G

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Murdaca, Francesca Spanò, Francesco PuppoDepartment of Internal Medicine, Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Genoa, Genoa, ItalyAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease that is associated with joint damage and progressive disability, an increased risk of morbidity related to comorbid conditions and substantial socioeconomic costs. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine known to have a central role in the initial host response to infection and in the pathogenesis of various immune-mediated diseases, such as RA, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Five TNF-α inhibitors are available for the clinical use: infliximab; adalimumab; etanercept; golimumab; and certolizumab pegol. Infliximab is a chimeric human/murine IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb; adalimumab, and golimumab are human mAbs; certolizumab pegol is composed of the fragment antigen-binding anti-binding domain of a humanized anti-TNF-α mAb, combined with polyethylene glycol to increase its half-life in the body; etanercept is a fusion protein that acts as a “decoy receptor” for TNF-α. In this paper, we will briefly review the current data on efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with RA, its potential beneficial effects upon comorbid conditions, such as endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in RA, and the immunogenicity.Keywords: adalimumab, efficacy, safety, rheumatoid arthritis, VEGF, immunogenicity, infections

  3. Liver biopsy in methotrexate-treated psoriatics-a re-evalution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariae, H; Grunnet, E; Sogaard, H

    1975-01-01

    Two-hundred and eighty-six liver biopsies were performed in 139 psoriatics on treatment or considered for treatment with methotrexate. In 56 psoriatics included in this study both pre- and post-methotrexate biopsies were performed, the average methotrexate dose being 936 mg. None of the data showed statistically significant differences between pre- and post-methotrexate biopsies, with the exception of an increase in fattly infiltration, found when comparing all pre-methotrexate biopsies with the total number of latest post-methotrexate samples. As expected, alcohol seemed to be significantly associated with liver fibrosis in pre-methotrexate biopsies. An patients, although potassium arsenite alone has not been proved to be the cause of liver damage among psoriatics included in this study. While only 1 of 22 psoriatics with a total normal biopsy had been on arsenite, 6 of 18 of the same group of psoriatics who had fibrosis had been on this drug earlier. Although no statistically significant differences related to fibrosis and cirrhosis could that in three cases liver cirrhosis did appear in a biopsy from a methotrexate-treated psoriatic who had signs of fibrosis of cirrhosis in a pre-methotrexate biopsy. This incidence is low in relation to the total number of patients treated. The relatively low incidence of cirrhosis found in the present study, as in earlier studies by our group is believed to be due to the use of an intermittent dosage schedule. The study showed that early fibrosis and cirrhosis seem to appear, with very minor abnormalities in laboratory results. This finding indicates the necessity of performing liver biopsies in the control of psoriatics on long-term methotrexate therapy. The difference between biopsies from psoriatics and liver biopsies from control patients may indicate that severity of disease may be a complicating factor in the pathogenesis of the liver damage.

  4. Using infrared and Raman microspectroscopies to compare ex vivo involved psoriatic skin with normal human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Marie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Pouliot, Roxane; Auger, Michèle; Laroche, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic dermatosis that affects around 3% of the world's population. The etiology of this autoimmune pathology is not completely understood. The barrier function of psoriatic skin is known to be strongly altered, but the structural modifications at the origin of this dysfunction are not clear. To develop strategies to reduce symptoms of psoriasis or adequate substitutes for modeling, a deep understanding of the organization of psoriatic skin at a molecular level is required. Infrared and Raman microspectroscopies have been used to obtain direct molecular-level information on psoriatic and healthy human skin biopsies. From the intensities and positions of specific vibrational bands, the lipid and protein distribution and the lipid order have been mapped in the different layers of the skin. Results showed a similar distribution of lipids and collagen for normal and psoriatic human skin. However, psoriatic skin is characterized by heterogeneity in lipid/protein composition at the micrometer scale, a reduction in the definition of skin layer boundaries and a decrease in lipid chain order in the stratum corneum as compared to normal skin. A global decrease of the structural organization is exhibited in psoriatic skin that is compatible with an alteration of its barrier properties.

  5. Characterization of a psoriatic skin model produced with involved or uninvolved cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Jessica; Leroy, Marie; Duque-Fernandez, Alexandra; Bernard, Geneviève; Soucy, Jacques; Pouliot, Roxane

    2015-07-01

    Current knowledge suggests that uninvolved psoriatic skin could demonstrate characteristics associated with both normal and involved psoriatic skins. However, the triggering factor allowing the conversion of uninvolved skin into a psoriatic plaque is not fully understood. To counter this lack of information, we decided to develop pathological skin substitutes produced with uninvolved psoriatic cells, in order to better characterize the uninvolved psoriatic skin. Substitutes were produced using the self-assembly approach. Macroscopic, immunohistochemical, permeability and physicochemical results showed that involved substitutes had a thicker epidermis, higher cell proliferation, abnormal cell differentiation and a more permeable and disorganized stratum corneum compared with normal substitutes. Various results were observed using uninvolved cells, leading to two proposed profiles: profile 1 was suggested for uninvolved skin substitutes mimicking the results obtained with normal skin substitutes; and profile 2 was dedicated to those mimicking involved skin substitutes in all aspects that were analysed. In summary, uninvolved substitutes of profile 1 had a thin, well-organized epidermis with normal cell proliferation and differentiation, such as observed with normal substitutes, while uninvolved substitutes of profile 2 showed an inverse trend, i.e. a thicker epidermis, higher cell proliferation, abnormal cell differentiation and a more disorganized and more permeable stratum corneum, such as seen with involved substitutes. The results suggest that uninvolved substitutes could demonstrate characteristics associated with both normal or involved psoriatic skins. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Development of an in vitro psoriatic skin model by tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Jessica; Lapointe, Marc; Soucy, Jacques; Pouliot, Roxane

    2009-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease characterized by a thickening and disorganization of the skin's protective barrier. This study aims to develop and characterize a novel in vitro psoriatic human skin model produced by tissue engineering. The self-assembly method, a tissue engineering approach based on the capacity of mesenchymal cells, such as fibroblasts, to create their own extracellular matrix in vitro, was used to create our substitutes. Manipulatable sheets of fibroblasts were superimposed creating a new dermis upon which keratinocytes are seeded, leading to a complete bilayered skin substitute. The characterization of the psoriatic substitutes was performed by macroscopic, histological and immunohistochemical analyses and contrasted to those constructed from healthy cells. Macroscopically, the psoriatic substitutes were more white and thicker than the healthy substitutes. The histological analysis of psoriatic substitutes stained with Masson's trichrome revealed a characteristic thickening of the epidermal layer seen in psoriatic skin in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis of the psoriatic substitutes showed, among other things, an overexpression of involucrin and an underexpression of filaggrin and loricrin. These data suggest that the macroscopic, histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of psoriasis are partially retained in the substitutes, thus providing a good model to investigate the mechanisms of abnormal keratinocyte growth and to study cell-cell interactions.

  7. NOD-like receptor signaling and inflammasome-related pathways are highlighted in psoriatic epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaniemi, Mari H; Katayama, Shintaro; Skoog, Tiina; Siitonen, H Annika; Vuola, Jyrki; Nuutila, Kristo; Sormunen, Raija; Johnsson, Anna; Linnarsson, Sten; Suomela, Sari; Kankuri, Esko; Kere, Juha; Elomaa, Outi

    2016-03-15

    Psoriatic skin differs distinctly from normal skin by its thickened epidermis. Most gene expression comparisons utilize full-thickness biopsies, with substantial amount of dermis. We assayed the transcriptomes of normal, lesional, and non-lesional psoriatic epidermis, sampled as split-thickness skin grafts, with 5'-end RNA sequencing. We found that psoriatic epidermis contains more mRNA per total RNA than controls, and took this into account in the bioinformatic analysis. The approach highlighted innate immunity-related pathways in psoriasis, including NOD-like receptor (NLR) signaling and inflammasome activation. We demonstrated that the NLR signaling genes NOD2, PYCARD, CARD6, and IFI16 are upregulated in psoriatic epidermis, and strengthened these findings by protein expression. Interestingly, PYCARD, the key component of the inflammasome, showed an altered expression pattern in the lesional epidermis. The profiling of non-lesional skin highlighted PSORS4 and mitochondrially encoded transcripts, suggesting that their gene expression is altered already before the development of lesions. Our data suggest that all components needed for the active inflammasome are present in the keratinocytes of psoriatic skin. The characterization of inflammasome pathways provides further opportunities for therapy. Complementing previous transcriptome studies, our approach gives deeper insight into the gene regulation in psoriatic epidermis.

  8. A review of employability and worksite interventions for persons with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalik, John; Shigaki, Cheryl L; Baldwin, Diana; Johnstone, Brick

    2006-01-01

    Arthritis has a significant effect on the US workforce. Significant economic effects and racial disparities have been found in treatment and health outcomes for persons with arthritis. This literature review focuses on the most commonly studied forms of arthritis, osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), summarizing literature on employability trends, risk factors, and worksite health interventions for these conditions. Recommendations and future implications for research are given in relation to goals from Healthy People 2010. A brief description is provided of a worksite comparative study at the Missouri Arthritis Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (MARRTC), seeking to improve long-term employability and functional outcomes for persons with arthritis.

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Alternative Medicine for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Yoga for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies ... Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis ... website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and other health care professionals are encouraged to consult other sources ...

  10. A survey of the images used on the Arthritis Research UK (ARUK) Osteomalacia Mind-Map in relation to cultural background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David; Robinson, Sandra; Jagatsinh, Yogen; Adebajo, Ade; Helliwell, Philip; Rahman, Anisur

    2011-06-01

    To explore the appropriateness of the images in the Arthritis Research UK Mind-Map for Osteomalacia with people for whom it was intended (Bengali; Gujarati; Hindi; Punjabi and Urdu). Participants were identified in a convenient sample from contacts within their communities. They were asked to comment on the images for meaning, suitability and offence to people from their culture. A total of 56 people were surveyed. Appropriateness responses were either generic: Images of bone metabolism were confusing [31/56]; muscle weakness "looked like knee pain" [16/56]; a bending and cracking bone "looked like a dog's bone" [22/56] and that the bone pain man "looked like he had toothache" [21/56]; or culture-specific the depiction of food and the Burqa as below. Only 3 images caused any offence, phrased as "may offend someone". The Burqa was described as stereotyping. The images on the current Osteomalacia Mind-Map are largely appropriate and have little capacity to offend. Some may be improved upon in terms of conveying meaning. One set of images can suit all of the cultures. Images can cross cultural barriers. The revised Mind-Map should be more useful in conveying meaning to a wider selection of patients.

  11. Consensus treatments for moderate juvenile dermatomyositis: beyond the first two months. Results of the second Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Adam M; Robinson, Angela B; Reed, Ann M; Abramson, Leslie; Bout-Tabaku, Sharon; Carrasco, Ruy; Curran, Megan; Feldman, Brian M; Gewanter, Harry; Griffin, Thomas; Haines, Kathleen; Hoeltzel, Mark F; Isgro, Josephine; Kahn, Philip; Lang, Bianca; Lawler, Patti; Shaham, Bracha; Schmeling, Heinrike; Scuccimarri, Rosie; Shishov, Michael; Stringer, Elizabeth; Wohrley, Julie; Ilowite, Norman T; Wallace, Carol

    2012-04-01

    To use consensus methods and the considerable expertise contained within the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) organization to extend the 3 previously developed treatment plans for moderate juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) to span the full course of treatment. A consensus meeting was held in Chicago on April 23-24, 2010, involving 30 pediatric rheumatologists and 4 lay participants. Nominal group technique was used to achieve consensus on treatment plans that represented typical management of moderate juvenile DM. A preconference survey of CARRA, completed by 151 (56%) of 272 members, was used to provide additional guidance to the discussion. Consensus was reached on timing and rate of steroid tapering, duration of steroid therapy, and actions to be taken if patients were unchanged, worsening, or experiencing medication side effects or disease complications. Of particular importance, a single consensus steroid taper was developed. We were able to develop consensus treatment plans that describe therapy for moderate juvenile DM throughout the treatment course. These treatment plans can now be used clinically, and data collected prospectively regarding treatment effectiveness and toxicity. This will allow comparison of these treatment plans and facilitate the development of evidence-based treatment recommendations for moderate juvenile DM. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  12. A Bayesian model that jointly considers comparative effectiveness research and patients' preferences may help inform GRADE recommendations: An application to rheumatoid arthritis treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlewood, Glen S; Bombardier, Claire; Tomlinson, George; Marshall, Deborah

    2017-10-16

    To estimate the preferred treatment for early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) using a novel Bayesian approach that jointly considers patients' preferences and comparative effectiveness research STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We estimated the preferred treatment by using patients' preferences measured in a discrete-choice experiment to apply weights to benefit and harm outcomes from a network meta-analysis, and other considerations (dosing, rare adverse events). Using Bayesian analyses, we considered the variability in patients' preferences and the imprecision in both patients' preferences and the treatment effects; all key considerations in the GRADE approach. We estimated that most patients in our population would prefer triple therapy as initial treatment (78%) or after an inadequate response to methotrexate (62%) The probability of choosing triple therapy as initial treatment was further from 50% (the point of indifference) for more patients, making our prediction more confident, and suggesting a stronger recommendation could be made. After an inadequate response to methotrexate, the choice was more split, suggesting a decision aid may be helpful. Using a novel approach, we estimated that many patients with ERA may prefer triple therapy to other treatment options, in contrast to existing guidelines. This offers an approach that may help inform GRADE treatment recommendations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. sup 111 Indium-labelled Leukocytes for measurement of inflammatory activity in Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydgren, L.; Hultquist, R. (Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Rheumatology); Wollmer, P. (Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Physiology); Gustafson, T. (Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    Mononuclear leukocytes and granulocytes have been separated and labelled with {sup 111}In-oxine. We show that granulocytes have been separated and labelled with {sup 111}In without serious adverse effects on the viability of the cells. The separated and {sup 111}In-labelled cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis were reinfused into the patients and detection was made with a gamma camera over the inflamed joints. The study shows that images and semi-quantitative indices of leukocyte accumulation in the joints could be obtained in these patients. We suggest that the method may be a sensitive indicator of non exsudative synovitis and allow assessment of inflammation in joints not amenable to physical examination. This method also opens new possibilities to measure the migration of different leukocytes over the synovial membrane. (au).

  14. Comparing cutaneous research funded by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases with 2010 Global Burden of Disease results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chante Karimkhani

    Full Text Available Disease burden data helps guide research prioritization.To determine the extent to which grants issued by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS reflect disease burden, measured by disability-adjusted life years (DALYs from Global Burden of Disease (GBD 2010 project.Two investigators independently assessed 15 skin conditions studied by GBD 2010 in the NIAMS database for grants issued in 2013. The 15 skin diseases were matched to their respective DALYs from GBD 2010.The United States NIAMS database and GBD 2010 skin condition disability data.Relationship of NIAMS grant database topic funding with percent total GBD 2010 DALY and DALY rank for 15 skin conditions.During fiscal year 2013, 1,443 NIAMS grants were issued at a total value of $424 million. Of these grants, 17.7% covered skin topics. Of the total skin disease funding, 82% (91 grants were categorized as "general cutaneous research." Psoriasis, leprosy, and "other skin and subcutaneous diseases" (ie; immunobullous disorders, vitiligo, and hidradenitis suppurativa were over-represented when funding was compared with disability. Conversely, cellulitis, decubitus ulcer, urticaria, acne vulgaris, viral skin diseases, fungal skin diseases, scabies, and melanoma were under-represented. Conditions for which disability and funding appeared well-matched were dermatitis, squamous and basal cell carcinoma, pruritus, bacterial skin diseases, and alopecia areata.Degree of representation in NIAMS is partly correlated with DALY metrics. Grant funding was well-matched with disability metrics for five of the 15 studied skin diseases, while two skin diseases were over-represented and seven were under-represented. Global burden estimates provide increasingly transparent and important information for investigating and prioritizing national research funding allocations.

  15. Expression and localization of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and nuclear factor kappaB in normal and lesional psoriatic skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Majken; Henningsen, Jeanette; Johansen, Claus

    2003-01-01

    Abnormal epidermal proliferation and differentiation characterize the inflammatory skin disease psoriasis. Here we demonstrate that expression of PPARdelta mRNA and protein is markedly upregulated in psoriatic lesions and that lipoxygenase products accumulating in psoriatic lesions are potent...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Rheumatology Course ...

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    Full Text Available ... for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical ... to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease ...

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    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management ... Arthritis Center website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and other health care professionals are ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. A ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five ... was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ... Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Yoga for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid ...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... SilverLight? Get it here. Will You Support the Education of Arthritis Patients? Each year, over 1 million ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  11. Management of the temporomandibular joint in inflammatory arthritis: Involvement of surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Rory C; Fawthrop, Fiona; Salha, Rami; Sidebottom, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Many conditions may affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), but its incidence in individual joint diseases is low. However, inflammatory arthropathies, particularly rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, appear to have a propensity for affecting the joint. Symptoms include pain, restriction in mouth opening, locking, and noises, which together can lead to significant impairment. Jaw rest, a soft diet, a bite splint, and medical therapy, including disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and simple analgesia, are the bedrock of initial treatment and will improve most symptoms in most patients. Symptom deterioration does not necessarily follow disease progression, but when it does, TMJ arthroscopy and arthrocentesis can help modulate pain, increase mouth opening, and relieve locking. These minimally invasive procedures have few complications and can be repeated. Operations to repair or remove a damaged intra-articular disc or to refine joint anatomy are used in select cases. Total TMJ replacement is reserved for patients where joint collapse or fusion has occurred or in whom other treatments have failed to provide adequate symptomatic control. It yields excellent outcomes and is approved by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE), UK. Knowledge of the assessment and treatment of the TMJ, which differs from other joints affected by inflammatory arthritis due to its unique anatomy and function, is not widespread outside of the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this article is to highlight the peculiarities of TMJ disease secondary to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis and how to best manage these ailments, which should help guide when referral to a specialist TMJ surgeon is appropriate. PMID:28638693

  12. Can the weather influence arthritis symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Chin Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By reviewing twelve previous studies on the relationship between the weather and arthritis symptoms, this article summarized the major findings on this controversial topic. It has been supported by most of the studies that arthritis symptoms are associated with weather conditions. Factors such as barometric pressure and temperature were generally believed to be related to arthritis symptoms. However, controversies arose at minor levels. Whether the weather-symptom relationship depends on the specific type of arthritis, weather variables, demographic and pathological heterogeneity of the patients is still a matter of debate. This article calls for standardization in future research design, and hope the mechanism underlying the weather-symptom association will be found.

  13. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding Funding Opportunities (NIH Guide) Forms and Deadlines Electronic Research Admin (eRA) Grants Policy OER News About OER Research Contracts Loan Repayment News News Releases News Feed RSS NIH Events Calendar NIH Record For the Press Radio Podcast Videocast Multimedia News in Health Newsletter ...

  15. Emerging immunotherapies for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gary; Cooles, Faye AH; Isaacs, John D; Hilkens, Catharien MU

    2014-01-01

    Novel treatments in development for rheumatoid arthritis target 3 broad areas: cytokines, cells, and signaling pathways. Therapies from each domain share common advantages (for example previously demonstrated efficacy, potential long-term immunomodulation, and oral administration respectively) that have stimulated research in each area but also common obstacles to their development. In this review recent progress in each area will be discussed alongside the factors that have impeded their path to clinical use. PMID:24535556

  16. Short-term low-magnesium diet reduces autoimmune arthritis severity and synovial tissue gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Max; Laragione, Teresina; Gulko, Pércio S

    2017-04-01

    Magnesium has been suggested to have anti-inflammatory properties in short-term, mostly in vitro studies. To examine the effect of dietary magnesium modifications in arthritis severity and joint damage DA rats were placed on one of three diet regimens before the induction of autoimmune pristane-induced arthritis (PIA): a 4 wk low-magnesium diet, normal diet, and a magnesium-supplemented diet. The diets were switched to a normal diet 14 days after the induction of PIA (typical time of disease onset). Arthritis severity was scored for 38 days, and joints were examined by histology and quantitative PCR for proinflammatory genes. Rats on the low-magnesium diet were significantly and reproducibly protected and had 70% lower median arthritis severity score, with preservation of normal joint histology without erosive changes. Rats on the normal or magnesium-supplemented diets were not protected and developed equally severe and erosive disease. While the dietary modifications were at disease onset (day 14 postinduction), the protective effect of the short-term low-magnesium diet persisted, suggesting a lasting effect on a critical pathogenic pathway. Rats on the low-magnesium diet had significant reduction in synovial tissue expression of IL-6, RORA, and RORC, which are genes required for the development of Th17 T cells. This study revealed a novel role for dietary magnesium in the regulation of autoimmune arthritis and opens new possibilities for the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis with short courses of dietary or drug-induced modulations of magnesium levels. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. A systematic critical appraisal of non-pharmacological management of rheumatoid arthritis with Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Brosseau

    Full Text Available Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs have been developed to summarize evidence about the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and facilitate the uptake of evidence-based knowledge by consumers, health professionals, health administrators and policy makers. The objectives of this review was to assess the quality of CPGS on non-pharmacological management of RA with a standardized and validated instrument--the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II tool and summarize the key recommendations from these CPGs. Scientific literature databases from 2001 to 2013 were systematically searched and a total of 13 CPGs for RA was identified. Only a minority of AGREE II domains were effectively addressed by the CPGS. Scope and purpose was effectively addressed in 10 out of 13 CPGs, stakeholder involvement in 11 CPGs, rigor of development in 6 CPGs, clarity/presentation in 9 CPGs, editorial independence in 1 CPGs, and applicability in none of the CPGs. The overall quality of the included CPGs according to the 7-point AGREE II scoring system was 4.8 ± 1.04. Patient education/self-management, aerobic, dynamic and stretching exercises were the commonly recommended for the non-pharmacological management of RA by the high-quality CPGs. The general clinical management recommendations tended to be similar among high-quality CPGs. Non-pharmacological management interventions were superficially addressed in more than half of the selected CPGs. CPGs creators should use the AGREE II criteria when developing guidelines. Innovative and effective methods of CPGs implementation to users are needed to ultimately enhance the quality of life of arthritic individuals. In addition, it was difficult to establish between strongly recommended, recommended and weakly recommended, as there is no consensus between the strength of the recommendations between the appraised CPGs.

  18. Dimethyl fumarate - only an anti-psoriatic medication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Markus; Valesky, Eva Maria; Kippenberger, Stefan; Kaufmann, Roland

    2012-11-01

    Fumaric acid esters have been used successfully in the therapy of psoriasis vulgaris since 1959. In the last 17 years, many of the underlying mechanisms of anti-psoriatic action, such as a Th1/Th2 shift, a suppression of important leukocyte adhesion molecules, the induction of pro-apoptotic pathways in T-cells and recently anti-angiogenic action, have been discovered. Based on the knowledge of these immunomodulatory characteristics, fumaric acid esters have been shown to be effective or potentially effective in a multitude of dermatological as well as non-dermatological diseases. The range of new therapeutic targets reaches from multiple sclerosis to illnesses such as necrobiosis lipoidica, granuloma annulare and sarcoidosis. Experimental approaches offer promising, although preliminary, results on the treatment of cancer, malaria, chronic inflammatory lung diseases, and Huntington disease, to name but a few. This valued and well-known drug mainly prescribed by dermatologists is now experiencing a renaissance far beyond dermatologic applications. © The Authors • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  19. Deficient SOCS3 and SHP-1 Expression in Psoriatic T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten W; Woetmann, Anders; Skov, Lone

    2010-01-01

    IFN-alpha and skin-infiltrating activated T lymphocytes have important roles in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. T cells from psoriatic patients display an increased sensitivity to IFN-alpha, but the pathological mechanisms behind the hyperresponsiveness to IFN-alpha remained unknown. In this study......, we show that psoriatic T cells display deficient expression of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)3 in response to IFN-alpha and a low baseline expression of the SH2-domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 when compared with skin T cells from nonpsoriatic donors. Moreover, IFN......-alpha-stimulated psoriatic T cells show enhanced activation of JAKs (JAK1 and TYK2) and signal transducers and activators of transcription. Increased expression of SOCS3 proteins resulting from proteasomal blockade partially inhibits IFN-alpha response. Similarly, forced expression of SOCS3 and SHP-1 inhibits IFN...

  20. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  1. Arthritis in Down's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacre, J E; Huskisson, E C

    1988-03-01

    A 31 year old man with Down's syndrome presented with a 10 year history of an inflammatory polyarthritis resembling juvenile chronic arthritis. This case was similar to those already reported of an arthropathy associated with Down's syndrome but was eventually found to be gout. This emphasised the importance of serum uric acid estimation in patients with Down's syndrome and coexistent arthritis.

  2. Arthritis in Down's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Dacre, J. E.; Huskisson, E C

    1988-01-01

    A 31 year old man with Down's syndrome presented with a 10 year history of an inflammatory polyarthritis resembling juvenile chronic arthritis. This case was similar to those already reported of an arthropathy associated with Down's syndrome but was eventually found to be gout. This emphasised the importance of serum uric acid estimation in patients with Down's syndrome and coexistent arthritis.

  3. DMARD use in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can we Predict Treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review the current and emerging predictors of treatment response by DMARDS in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients. Data source: Published original research work and reviews were searched in English related to determinants of treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis on DMARDS. Study design: Only ...

  4. Insights into methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis: a clinical review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review the efficacy and safety profile of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis. Data source: Published original research work and reviews were searched in English related to efficacy and safety profile of methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis. Study design: Only articles that emphasis on efficacy and safety profile of ...

  5. Interleukin-1 Receptors Are Differentially Expressed in Normal and Psoriatic T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Bebes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1 in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4+CD25− effector and CD4+CD25+CD127low regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2 was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1 mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2 upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  6. Cell kinetic characterization of cultured human keratinocytes from normal and psoriatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ruissen, F; de Jongh, G J; van Erp, P E; Boezeman, J B; Schalkwijk, J

    1996-09-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease characterized by epidermal hyperproliferation, disturbed differentiation, and inflammation. It is still a matter of debate whether the pathogenesis of psoriasis is based on immunological mechanisms, on defective growth control mechanisms, or possibly on a combination of both. Several in vivo cell biological differences between psoriatic lesional epidermis and normal epidermis have been reported. However, it is not clear whether these changes are causal or consequential. In case that keratinocytes from psoriatic patients have genetically determined deficiencies or polymorphisms with respect to autocrine growth regulation and the response to inflammatory cytokines, we hypothesize that these differences should be maintained in culture. Here we have started a systematic comparison of first passage keratinocytes cultured from normal skin and uninvolved psoriatic skin to address the question whether there are intrinsic differences in basic cell cycle parameters. In an established, defined culture system using keratinocyte growth medium (KGM) we have determined: (i) cell cycle parameters of exponentially growing keratinocytes, (ii) induction of quiescence by transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and (iii) restimulation from the G0-phase of the cell cycle. Bivariate analysis of lodo-deoxyuridine incorporation and relative DNA content was performed by flow cytometry. Within the limitations of this model no gross differences were found between normal and psoriatic keratinocytes with respect to S-phase duration (Ts), total cell cycle duration (Tc), responsiveness to TGF-beta 1 and the kinetics for recruitment from G0. In psoriatic keratinocytes we found a lower amount of cell in S-phase and a shorter duration of G1, compared to normal keratinocytes. The methodology developed here provides us with a model for further studies on differences between normal and psoriatic keratinocytes in their response to immunological and inflammatory

  7. The proteasome maturation protein POMP increases proteasome assembly and activity in psoriatic lesional skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieba, Barbara A; Henry, Laurent; Lacroix, Matthieu; Jemaà, Mohamed; Lavabre-Bertrand, Thierry; Meunier, Laurent; Coux, Olivier; Stoebner, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2017-10-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and proteasome subunits are increased in lesional psoriatic skin. Recent works have highlighted that proteasome levels can be regulated through modulation of proteasome assembly notably by the proteasome maturation protein POMP. To investigate whether proteasome assembly and POMP expression are modified in psoriatic skin. Proteasome assembly as well as expression of proteasome regulators were assessed in non-lesional and lesional psoriatic skin using native gel electrophoresis and western blots respectively. The protein and mRNA expression levels of POMP were compared by western blots, immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The role of POMP in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation was assessed by silencing POMP gene expression by RNA interference in human immortalized keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Both 20S and 26S proteasomes (and their respective proteolytic activities) as well as the main proteasome regulators are increased in lesional psoriatic skin. POMP binds to 20S precursor complexes and is overexpressed in lesional epidermal psoriatic skin, supporting that POMP-mediated proteasome assembly is increased in psoriatic skin. POMP silencing inhibited HaCaT cell proliferation and induced apoptosis through the inhibition of the proteasome assembly. Moreover POMP partial depletion decreased the expression of the differentiation markers keratin 10 and involucrin during the [Ca2+]-induced HaCaT cells differentiation. Altogether these results establish a potential role for POMP and proteasome assembly in psoriasis pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Arthritis of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibilia, J

    1999-09-01

    Diagnosis of shoulder arthritis should situate the precise location (glenohumeral, acromioclavicular, scapulothoracic) and rapidly determine the cause in order to eliminate the possibility of septic arthritis which requires urgent treatment. Good knowledge of shoulder symptomatology is essential. When there is joint effusion, the fluid should be sampled for rapid analysis (cells, crystals, germs), and the work-up for diagnosis must include clinical and laboratory analyses as well as imaging. Causes are especially microcrystallin arthritis (hydroxyapatite rheumatism, chondrocalcinosis, etc.) and inflammatory rheumatism (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosis spondylitis, etc.). Septic arthritis is much less common but more rapidly destructive, which justifies their consideration whenever suspected. Treatment should be rapidly initiated in acute, particularly septic forms. In other forms, diagnosis guides treatment. Steps should be taken rapidly, both medically and sometimes surgically, to avoid destructive articular and periarticular lesions (rotator cuff).

  9. [Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Bouhamidi, Bahia; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis is rare. It is associated with poor prognosis in terms of mortality and morbidity. We report the case of a 61-year old patient with spontaneous Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis. He suffered from complicated diabetes associated with positive blood cultures and synovial fluid cultures. Patient's evolution was favorable thanks to early diagnosis and initiation of adequate antibiotic therapy. Proteus mirabilis septic arthritis is rare. On that basis we conducted a literature review of cases of Proteus mirabilis pyogenic arthritis to highlight the risk factors, pathogenesis, treatment and evolution of these diseases. Diagnosis is commonly based on microbiological analysis, early articular puncture biopsy is performed before the initiation of antibiotic treatment, direct examination, culture and antibiogram which are useful as guidance for antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis is a diagnostic and therapeutic emergency; early management of this disease allows total healing without after-effects.

  10. Comparison of microRNA expression using different preservation methods of matched psoriatic skin samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvendorf, Marianne B; Zibert, John R; Hagedorn, Peter H

    2012-01-01

    -frozen (FS) and Tissue-Tek-embedding (OCT). We found a strong correlation of the microRNA expression levels between all preservation methods of matched psoriatic skin samples (r(s) ranging from 0.91 to 0.95 (P ... contains high levels of RNases. As microRNAs are 19-23 nucleotides long and lack a poly-A tail, they may be less prone to RNA degradation than mRNAs. We investigated whether microRNAs in psoriatic (FFPE) samples reliably reflect microRNA expression in samples less prone to RNA degradation such as fresh...

  11. Prevalence of Co-existing Autoimmune Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Teresa A; Kawabata, Hugh; Ray, Nitesh; Baheti, Anagha; Suissa, Samy; Esdaile, John M

    2017-10-24

    Many autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), share common mechanisms; however, population-based studies of the magnitude of multiple autoimmune diseases in patients with RA have not been performed. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a US administrative healthcare thcare claims database to screen for prevalence of multiple autoimmune diseases in patients with RA and osteoarthritis (OA). Each patient diagnosed with RA between January 1, 2006 and September 30, 2014 was age- and sex-matched with five patients with OA. The prevalence of 37 pre-specified autoimmune diseases during the 24-month period before and after RA or OA diagnosis was compared. Overall, 286,601 patients with RA and 992,838 matched patients (from 1,421,624 records) with OA were evaluated. During the baseline period, at least one and more than one autoimmune diseases were identified in 24.3% and 6.0% of patients with RA compared with 10.5% and 1.4% of patients with OA, respectively. Highest prevalence rates for patients with RA were for systemic lupus erythematosus (3.8% versus 0.7% for OA) and psoriatic arthritis (3.2% versus 0.4%). Highest odds ratios (ORs) comparing RA with OA were for the prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis (OR 8.0; 95% CI 7.6, 8.5) and psoriatic arthritis (OR 7.8; 95% CI 7.6, 8.1). Patients with RA have more concurrent autoimmune diseases than patients with OA. These data suggest that the interrelationship between RA and other autoimmune diseases, and outcomes associated with the occurrence of multiple autoimmune diseases, may play an important role in disease understanding, management, and treatment decisions. Bristol-Myers Squibb.

  12. Improving healthcare consumer effectiveness: An Animated, Self-serve, Web-based Research Tool (ANSWER for people with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Susan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA should use DMARDs (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs within the first three months of symptoms in order to prevent irreversible joint damage. However, recent studies report the delay in DMARD use ranges from 6.5 months to 11.5 months in Canada. While most health service delivery interventions are designed to improve the family physician's ability to refer to a rheumatologist and prescribe treatments, relatively little has been done to improve the delivery of credible, relevant, and user-friendly information for individuals to make treatment decisions. To address this care gap, the Animated, Self-serve, Web-based Research Tool (ANSWER will be developed and evaluated to assist people in making decisions about the use of methotrexate, a type of DMARD. The objectives of this project are: 1 to develop ANSWER for people with early RA; and 2 to assess the extent to which ANSWER reduces people's decisional conflict about the use of methotrexate, improves their knowledge about RA, and improves their skills of being 'effective healthcare consumers'. Methods/design Consistent with the International Patient Decision Aid Standards, the development process of ANSWER will involve: 1. creating a storyline and scripts based on the best evidence on the use of methotrexate and other management options in RA, and the contextual factors that affect a patient's decision to use a treatment as found in ERAHSE; 2. using an interactive design methodology to create, test, analyze and refine the ANSWER prototype; 3. testing the content and user interface with health professionals and patients; and 4. conducting a pilot study with 51 patients, who are diagnosed with RA in the past 12 months, to assess the extent to which ANSWER improves the quality of their decisions, knowledge and skills in being effective consumers. Discussion We envision that the ANSWER will help accelerate the dissemination of knowledge and

  13. A comparison of region-based and pixel-based CEUS kinetics parameters in the assessment of arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisan, E.; Raffeiner, B.; Coran, A.; Rizzo, G.; Ciprian, L.; Stramare, R.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are leading causes of disability and constitute a frequent medical disorder, leading to inability to work, high comorbidity and increased mortality. The gold-standard for diagnosing and differentiating arthritis is based on patient conditions and radiographic findings, as joint erosions or decalcification. However, early signs of arthritis are joint effusion, hypervascularization and synovial hypertrophy. In particular, vascularization has been shown to correlate with arthritis' destructive behavior, more than clinical assessment. Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) examination of the small joints is emerging as a sensitive tool for assessing vascularization and disease activity. The evaluation of perfusion pattern rely on subjective semi-quantitative scales, that are able to capture the macroscopic degree of vascularization, but are unable to detect the subtler differences in kinetics perfusion parameters that might lead to a deeper understanding of disease progression and a better management of patients. Quantitative assessment is mostly performed by means of the Qontrast software package, that requires the user to define a region of interest, whose mean intensity curve is fitted with an exponential function. We show that using a more physiologically motivated perfusion curve, and by estimating the kinetics parameters separately pixel per pixel, the quantitative information gathered is able to differentiate more effectively different perfusion patterns. In particular, we will show that a pixel-based analysis is able to provide significant markers differentiating rheumatoid arthritis from simil-rheumatoid psoriatic arthritis, that have non-significant differences in clinical evaluation (DAS28), serological markers, or region-based parameters.

  14. Identification of Mycoplasma fermentans in synovial fluid samples from arthritis patients with inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S; Sidebottom, D; Bruckner, F; Collins, D

    2000-01-01

    Since 1970 Mycoplasma fermentans has been suspected of being associated with rheumatoid arthritis. However, this association has been difficult to prove, and this has been our goal. The distribution of M. fermentans was studied in the synovial fluid of patients suffering from different arthritides. Samples of synovial fluid were taken from patients with well-defined disease and a clear diagnosis. After removal of the inflammatory cells and hyaluran, they were treated with proteinase K and tested by a single or fully nested PCR with primers directed against part of the two 16S rRNA genes of M. fermentans. The product was sequenced automatically, by using an ALF Express automatic sequencer, to confirm the mycoplasma species and to identify the strain since the two genes were usually found to be polymorphic. This was also true of the type strain, strain PG18. M. fermentans was detected in 23 of 26 (88%) rheumatoid arthritis patients, and four different strains were found. It was also found in 7 of 8 (88%) of the nonrheumatoid inflammatory arthritis patient group, which consisted of one patient with reactive arthritis, one patient with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis, two patients with gout, two patients with ankylosing spondylitis, and two patients with psoriatic arthritis, only one of whom was infected with M. fermentans. It was not detected in any of the 10 osteoarthritis patients. M. fermentans was therefore found to be a variable and very common organism in arthritic patients with inflammatory joint exudates and may well prove to be important in the etiology of the diseases.

  15. Preclinical characterisation of the GM-CSF receptor as a therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greven, D E A; Cohen, E S; Gerlag, D M; Campbell, J; Woods, J; Davis, N; van Nieuwenhuijze, A; Lewis, A; Heasmen, S; McCourt, M; Corkill, D; Dodd, A; Elvin, J; Statache, G; Wicks, I P; Anderson, I K; Nash, A; Sleeman, M A; Tak, P P

    2015-10-01

    Previous work has suggested that the granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-GM-CSF receptor α axis (GM-CSFRα) may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, we investigated the cellular expression of GM-CSFRα in RA synovial tissue and investigated the effects of anti-GM-CSFRα antibody treatment in vitro and in vivo in a preclinical model of RA. We compared GM-CSFRα expression on macrophages positive for CD68 or CD163 on synovial biopsy samples from patients with RA or psoriatic arthritis (PsA) to disease controls. In addition, we studied the effects of CAM-3003, an anti-GM-CSFR antibody in a collagen induced arthritis model of RA in DBA/1 mice. The pharmacokinetic profile of CAM-3003 was studied in naïve CD1(ICR) mice (see online supplement) and used to interpret the results of the pharmacodynamic studies in BALB/c mice. GM-CSFRα was expressed by CD68 positive and CD163 positive macrophages in the synovium, and there was a significant increase in GM-CSFRα positive cells in patients in patients with RA as well as patients with PsA compared with patients with osteoarthritis and healthy controls. In the collagen induced arthritis model there was a dose dependent reduction of clinical arthritis scores and the number of F4/80 positive macrophages in the inflamed synovium after CAM-3003 treatment. In BALB/c mice CAM-3003 inhibited recombinant GM-CSF mediated margination of peripheral blood monocytes and neutrophils. The findings support the ongoing development of therapies aimed at interfering with GM-CSF or its receptor in various forms of arthritis, such as RA and PsA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Septic arthritis: what is the role for the rheumatologist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Carraro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Septic arthritis (SA is a clinical emergency with considerable morbidity and mortality that can lead to rapid joint destruction and irreversible loss of function. The reported incidence varies from 2-5 cases per 100.000 individuals per year in the general populations to 70 cases per 100.000 individuals annually among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Predisposing factors are immunosuppressive and corticosteroids therapy and RA “itself”. The expected decrease in incidence of SA was not seen over the last 20 years period but we can, on the contrary, expect an increase in the frequency of its appearance because of the population ageing, the increasingly prosthetic joint replacement, the ability of the bacteria to evade clearance by the host immune response and the rapidly growing number of patients with RA, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis treated with tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα antagonists. Up to now there have been conflicting reports regarding joint infections in patients under anti-TNF therapy but according to data from Deutsch as well as the British register there might be an increase in the incidence of joint infections in anti TNF treated patients. Microscopic analysis and culture of synovial fluid are fundamental diagnostic tools in the evaluation of possible joint sepsis. Sonographic guidance of arthrocentesis led to successful aspiration of difficultto- access joints as shoulder and hip. There is controversy over which mode of drainage of septic synovial fluid should be employed but needle aspiration appear to be preferable to surgical treatment as an initial mode of treatment of SA. Rheumatologists should have a central role in the diagnosis and management of SA.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  19. Living with Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quality of life. The following tips are from occupational therapy practitioners working with people with arthritis. If you want to: Consider these activity tips: Reduce pressure and discomfort in your hands when holding or working with objects. Wrap foam, ...

  20. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Artritis reactiva: Esenciales: hojas informativas de fácil lectura View/Download/Order Publications Reactive Arthritis, Easy-to- ... Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy Open Source Data Public Data Listing NIH... ...