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Sample records for psoralen-treated donor t-lymphocytes

  1. Reference range for T lymphocytes populations in blood donors from two different regions in Brazil

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    A.J.L. Torres

    Full Text Available This study defined the normal variation range for different subsets of T-lymphocyte cells count in two different Brazilian regions. We analysed the T-lymphocytes subpopulations (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ in blood donors of two Brazilian cities, located in North (Belem, capital state of Para, indian background and Northeast (Salvador, capital state od Bahia, African background regions of Brazil. Results were compared according to gender, stress level (sleep time lower than 8 hours/day, smoking, and alcohol intake. Lymphocytes subpopulations were measured by flow cytometry. Five hundred twenty-six blood donors from two Brazilians cities participated in the study: 450 samples from Bahia and 76 samples from Pará. Most (60% were men, 59% reported alcohol intake, 12% were smokers, and 80% slept at least 8 h/day. Donors from Bahia presented with significantly higher counts for all parameters, compared with Para. Women had higher lymphocytes levels, in both states, but only CD4+ cells count was significantly higher than men's values. Smokers had higher CD4+ counts, but sleep time had effect on lymphocytes levels only for Para's donors (higher CD3+ and CD4+ counts. That state had also, a higher proportion of donors reporting sleep time <8 h/day. The values for CD3, CD4 and CD8+ cells count were significantly higher in blood donors from Bahia than among those from Pará. Female gender, alcohol intake, stress level, and smoking were associated with higher lymphocyte counts. The use of a single reference range for normal lymphocytes count is not appropriate for a country with such diversity, like Brazil is.

  2. CD4 T lymphocyte counts in patients undergoing splenectomy during living donor liver transplantation.

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    Natsuda, Koji; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mistuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Hara, Takanobu; Kugiyama, Tota; Baimakhanov, Zhassulan; Ono, Shinichiro; Kitasato, Amane; Fujita, Fumihiko; Kanetaka, Kengo; Kuroki, Tamotsu

    2016-02-01

    The role of splenectomy in increasing the CD4-positive T lymphocyte counts (hereafter: CD4 counts) and the CD4 to CD8 ratio have not yet been fully investigated, especially in the case of HIV-positive patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The change in the total lymphocyte counts of 32 patients who underwent one-stage splenectomy with living donor (LD) LT with (n=13) or without rituximab (RTX, n=19) therapy were examined to validate our cohort of ABO-incompatible LDLT with RTX. Subsequently, perioperative changes in CD4 counts and the CD 4 to CD8 ratio were measured in 13 patients who underwent ABO-incompatible LDLT/RTX with splenectomy. (1) The administration of RTX did not significantly affect the total lymphocyte counts of patients after LDLT/splenectomy in any of the observation periods. (2) The CD4 counts were significantly higher at 2years after LDLT in comparison to the perioperative CD4 counts but not within the 3-month period (p=0.039). The CD4/CD8 ratio gradually decreased after LDLT/splenectomy under RTX treatment. An immediate increase in the CD4 counts therefore cannot be expected after LDLT with splenectomy. The total lymphocyte and CD4 counts were rather stable in the peritransplant period even in ABO incompatible LDLT with RTX. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. γδ T lymphocytes from cystic fibrosis patients and healthy donors are high TNF-α and IFN-γ-producers in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Natalia

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background γδ T cells have an important immunoregulatory and effector function through cytokine release. They are involved in the responses to Gram-negative bacterium and in protection of lung epithelium integrity. On the other hand, they have been implicated in airway inflammation. Methods The aim of the present work was to study intracytoplasmic IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ and TNF-α production by γδ and αβ T lymphocytes from cystic fibrosis patients and healthy donors in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA. Flow cytometric detection was performed after peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC culture with a cytosolic extract from PA and restimulation with phorbol ester plus ionomycine. Proliferative responses, activation markers and receptor usage of γδ T cells were also evaluated. Results The highest production of cytokine was of TNF-α and IFN-γ, γδ being better producers than αβ. No differences were found between patients and controls. The Vγ9δ2 subset of γδ T cells was preferentially expanded. CD25 and CD45RO expression by the αβ T subset and PBMC proliferative response to PA were defective in cystic fibrosis lymphocytes. Conclusion Our results support the hypothesis that γδ T lymphocytes play an important role in the immune response to PA and in the chronic inflammatory lung reaction in cystic fibrosis patients. They do not confirm the involvement of a supressed Th1 cytokine response in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  4. Correlation of UVC and UVB cytotoxicity with the induction of specific photoproducts in T-lymphocytes and fibroblasts from normal human donors.

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    Clingen, P H; Arlett, C F; Cole, J; Waugh, A P; Lowe, J E; Harcourt, S A; Hermanova, N; Roza, L; Mori, T; Nikaido, O

    1995-02-01

    By using specific monoclonal antibodies in situ and a computer-assisted image analysis system we have determined the relative induction of cyclobutane dimers, (6-4) photoproducts and Dewar isomers in human mononuclear cells and fibroblasts following irradiation with UVC, broad-spectrum UVB and narrow-spectrum UVB. The lamps produced these lesions in different proportions, with broad-spectrum UVB inducing a greater combined yield of (6-4) photoproducts and Dewar isomers per cyclobutane dimer than UVC or narrow-spectrum UVB. The relative induction ratios of (6-4) photoproducts compared to cyclobutane dimers were 0.15, 0.21 and 0.10 following irradiation with UVC, broad- or narrow-spectrum UVB, respectively. Although Dewar isomers were induced by UVC, their relative rate of formation compared to cyclobutane dimers was significantly greater after irradiation with either broad-spectrum or narrow-spectrum UVB. These values were 0.001, 0.07 and 0.07, respectively. With each lamp source, we have determined the survival of normal human T-lymphocytes and fibroblasts at fluences, which induce equivalent yields of cyclobutane dimers, (6-4) photoproducts or (6-4) photoproducts plus Dewar isomers. Killing of fibroblasts appears to be associated with (6-4) photoproduct formation, whereas killing of T-lymphocytes seems to be mediated by combined (6-4) plus Dewar yields. These results emphasize the need to study the biological effects of UVB because cellular responses may be different from those following UVC irradiation.

  5. Psychosocial factors and T lymphocyte counts in Brazilian peacekeepers.

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    Silva, Angela M Monteiro da; Speranza, Francisco A B; Ishii, Solange Kiyoko; Hirata, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza; Milagres, Lucimar Gonçalves

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the associations between psychosocial factors and peripheral blood CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte numbers in Brazilian peacekeepers. Venous blood was collected from 759 peacekeepers who had just returned from a peace mission in Haiti. Among the 759 soldiers, 642 individuals completed the psychosocial measures. CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte counts were measured by flow cytometry using a commercially available kit. Psychosocial factors, including military peace force stressors, clinical stress, anxiety and depression, were recorded. As a reference for T lymphocyte numbers, we measured T lymphocyte counts in 75 blood donors from the Instituto de Biologia do Exército, Rio de Janeiro. The median numbers of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes in the blood donors were 819 cells/µl and 496 cells/µl, respectively, with a CD4:CD8 ratio of 1.6. Significantly (p<0.05) lower CD4 T cell counts (759 cells/µl) were recorded for peacekeepers, with similar CD8 levels (548 cells/µl) and smaller CD4:CD8 ratios (1.3, p<0.001) compared to blood donors. These differences were due to a group of 14 military personnel with CD4 and CD8 medians of 308 and 266 cells/µl, respectively. Only one (7.1%) of these 14 individuals was diagnosed with clinical stress compared with 13.5% of the individuals with normal levels of CD4 T lymphocytes. One individual out of 628 (0.16%) had a Lipp's Stress Symptom Inventory score of 3, indicating near exhaustion. The prevalence of psychological disorders was low and there were no associations with CD4 or CD8 T cell numbers.

  6. Role of T lymphocytes in hypertension.

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    Zhang, Jiandong; Crowley, Steven D

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the immune system plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension. Mice lacking T lymphocytes are resistant to blood pressure elevation, suggesting a key contribution of T lymphocytes to hypertension. However, the individual T cell subsets, including CD8(+), Th1, Th17, and T regulatory T cells have shown widely discrepant effects on blood pressure and target organ damage in this disorder. Moreover, the activation state of a T lymphocyte population exerts considerable influence over its role in hypertension. In turn, activated T cells regulate blood pressure through the elaboration of reactive oxygen species and vasoactive cytokines, altering the inflammatory milieu in the vascular wall and the kidney. Recent GWAS studies similarly point to a role for T lymphocytes in human hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. How T lymphocytes recognize lipid antigens.

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    De Libero, Gennaro; Mori, Lucia

    2006-10-09

    Recognition of lipid antigens by T lymphocytes is well established. Lipids are recognized by T cells when presented in association with CD1 antigen-presenting molecules. Both microbial and self lipids stimulate specific T lymphocytes, thus participating in immune reactions during infections and autoimmune diseases. The immune system uses a variety of strategies to solubilise lipid antigens, to facilitate their internalization, processing, and loading on CD1 molecules. Recent studies in the field of lipid antigen presentation have revealed new mechanisms which allow the immune system to sense lipids as stimulatory antigens.

  8. GABA, a natural immunomodulator of T lymphocytes

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    Bjurstöm, Helen; Wang, Junyang; Ericsson, Ida

    2008-01-01

    gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain. Here we show that GABA in the extracellular space may affect the fate of pathogenic T lymphocytes entering the brain. We examined in encephalitogenic T cells if they expressed functional GABA channels that could......M and higher GABA concentrations decreased T cell proliferation. The results are consistent with GABA being immunomodulatory....

  9. IL-7 Restores T Lymphocyte Immunometabolic Failure in Septic Shock Patients through mTOR Activation.

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    Venet, Fabienne; Demaret, Julie; Blaise, Benjamin J; Rouget, Christelle; Girardot, Thibaut; Idealisoa, Estellie; Rimmelé, Thomas; Mallet, François; Lepape, Alain; Textoris, Julien; Monneret, Guillaume

    2017-09-01

    T lymphocyte alterations are central to sepsis pathophysiology, whereas related mechanisms remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that metabolic alterations could play a role in sepsis-induced T lymphocyte dysfunction. Samples from septic shock patients were obtained at day 3 and compared with those from healthy donors. T cell metabolic status was evaluated in the basal condition and after T cell stimulation. We observed that basal metabolic content measured in lymphocytes by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was altered in septic patients. Basal ATP concentration, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and glycolysis pathways in T cells were decreased as well. After stimulation, T lymphocytes from patients failed to induce glycolysis, OXPHOS, ATP production, GLUT1 expression, glucose entry, and proliferation to similar levels as controls. This was associated with significantly altered mTOR, but not Akt or HIF-1α, activation and only minor AMPKα phosphorylation dysfunction. IL-7 treatment improved mTOR activation, GLUT1 expression, and glucose entry in septic patients' T lymphocytes, leading to their enhanced proliferation. mTOR activation was central to this process, because rapamycin systematically inhibited the beneficial effect of recombinant human IL-7. We demonstrate the central role of immunometabolism and, in particular, mTOR alterations in the pathophysiology of sepsis-induced T cell alterations. Our results support the rationale for targeting metabolism in sepsis with recombinant human IL-7 as a treatment option. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Nancy Y; Wasserfall, Clive H; Meacham, Amy M; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2015-06-11

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) can be curative for certain hematologic malignancies, but the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major limitation for wider application. Ideally, strategies to improve allo-HCT would involve suppression of T lymphocytes that drive GVHD while sparing those that mediate graft-versus-malignancy (GVM). Recently, using a xenograft model, we serendipitously discovered that myxoma virus (MYXV) prevented GVHD while permitting GVM. In this study, we show that MYXV binds to resting, primary human T lymphocytes but will only proceed into active virus infection after the T cells receive activation signals. MYXV-infected T lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation after activation with reduced expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and soluble IL-2Rα, but did not affect expression of IL-4 and IL-10. MYXV suppressed T-cell proliferation in 2 patterns (full vs partial) depending on the donor. In terms of GVM, we show that MYXV-infected activated human T lymphocytes effectively deliver live oncolytic virus to human multiple myeloma cells, thus augmenting GVM by transfer of active oncolytic virus to residual cancer cells. Given this dual capacity of reducing GVHD plus increasing the antineoplastic effectiveness of GVM, ex vivo virotherapy with MYXV may be a promising clinical adjunct to allo-HCT regimens. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Immunophenotypic enumeration of CD4 + T-lymphocyte values in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The distribution of mean absolute CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts among different age groups showed that individuals within 18 to 27 years of age group had significantly higher CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts of 893.3±43.4) cells/μl. Conclusions: Our findings of CD4+ Tlymphocyte counts among HIV-seronegative adults in east ...

  12. Recombinant adenoviral vector-lipofectAMINE complex for gene transduction into human T lymphocytes.

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    Di Nicola, M; Milanesi, M; Magni, M; Bregni, M; Carlo-Stella, C; Longoni, P; Tomanin, R; Ravagnani, F; Scarpa, M; Jordan, C; Gianni, A M

    1999-07-20

    We have evaluated, as a vector for gene transfer into human T lymphocytes, a recombinant adenovirus (rAd-MFG-AP) carrying a modified, membrane-exposed, alkaline phosphatase (AP) as reporter gene. CD3+ cells were selected from the buffy coat of healthy donors by the immunomagnetic technique. The positive cell population, comprising 96+/-2% CD3+ cells, was cultured with clinical-grade cytokine(s) for 3-7 days prior to rAd-MFG-AP transduction and the transgene expression was evaluated 48 hr later by indirect immunofluorescence flow cytometry assay with an anti-alkaline phosphatase antibody. The best efficiency of transduction was achieved on incubation of CD3+ cells with IL-2 plus either IL-12 (AP+ cells, 12+/-3%) or IL-7 (AP+ cells, 11+/-3%). To increase further the efficiency of transduction, we have combined LipofectAMINE and rAd-MFG-AP with the aim to enhance the uptake of viral particles into the target cells. The percentage of CD3+ cells transduced by rAd-MFG-AP-LipofectAMINE complex was 24+/-4% (range, 20-35%) after incubation with IL-2 plus IL-7 and 22+/-4% (range, 18-32%) after incubation with II-2 plus IL-12. Forty-eight hours after the incubation with rAd-MFG-AP, the transduced T lymphocytes were subjected to fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fractionated into AP+ and AP- cell subpopulations. The AP+ cell fraction, comprising 96.8% of AP+ cells, was evaluated by FACScan analysis for T lymphocyte surface antigens. The immunophenotyping of the transduced T lymphocytes has shown that there was not a particular subtype of T lymphocytes more susceptible to rAd-MFG-AP transduction. In addition, the transgene expression did not modify T lymphocyte functions, as demonstrated by results obtained by cytotoxicity assay before and after rAd-MFG-AP-LipofectAMINE complex transduction. In conclusion, human T lymphocytes can be efficiently transduced, under clinically applicable conditions, by adenovirus-LipofectAMINE complex after 7 days of culture with IL-2 and IL

  13. State of T-lymphocytes at different stages of anthracosis

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    Tlegenova, A.N.; Baimanova, A.M. (Institut Fiziologii i Gigieny Truda AN Kazakhskoi SSR, Karaganda (USSR))

    1990-04-01

    Recommends analysis of T-rosette formation in blood samples as a method of diagnosing anthracosis in its early stages in coal miners. Tests were performed on a total of 134 miners aged 38-49, with at least 10 years employment in coal mining. Particularly indicative of developing anthracosis was the ratio of theophylline resistant to theophylline sensitive T-lymphocytes, which increased in sufferers in comparison with the control (although the overall number of T-lymphocytes showed little change). When the anthracosis was complicated by chronic bronchitis, this ratio decreased, with an overall fall in numbers of all T-lymphocytes. 7 refs.

  14. Herpes simplex virus antigens directly activate NK cells via TLR2, thus facilitating their presentation to CD4 T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min; Osborne, Naomi R; Zeng, Weiguang; Donaghy, Heather; McKinnon, Kay; Jackson, David C; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2012-05-01

    NK cells infiltrate human herpetic lesions, but their role has been underexplored. HSV can stimulate innate immune responses via surface TLR2, which is expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and NK cells. In this study, UV-inactivated HSV1/2 and immunodominant HSV2 glycoprotein D peptides conjugated to the TLR2 agonist dipalmitoyl-S-glyceryl cysteine stimulated CD4 T lymphocyte IFN-γ responses within PBMCs or in coculture with monocyte-derived DCs. NK cells contributed markedly to the PBMC responses. Furthermore, NK cells alone were activated directly by both Ags, also upregulating HLA-DR and HLA-DQ and then they activated autologous CD4 T lymphocytes. Using Transwells, Ag-stimulated NK cells and CD4 T lymphocytes were shown to interact through both cell-to-cell contact and cytokines, differing in relative importance in different donors. A distinct immunological synapse between Ag-stimulated NK cells and CD4 T lymphocytes was observed, indicating the significance of their cell-to-cell contact. A large proportion (57%) of NK cells was also in contact with CD4 T lymphocytes in the dermal infiltrate of human recurrent herpetic lesions. Thus, NK cells stimulated by TLR2-activating HSV Ags can present Ag alone or augment the role of DCs in vitro and perhaps in herpetic lesions or draining lymph nodes. In addition to DCs, NK cells should be considered as targets for adjuvants during HSV vaccine development.

  15. T-lymphocyte subsets in recurrent aphthous ulceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A; Klausen, B; Hougen, H P

    1989-01-01

    Peripheral T-lymphocyte subsets: T-helper (OKT4) and T-suppressor (OKT8) cells were studied quantitatively in 20 patients with recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) in ulcerative, as well as inactive, stages of the disease. The figures were compared with T-lymphocyte subsets from matched control...... in either stage compared with controls. The study support the hypothesis of recurrent aphthous ulceration being a disorder of immunodeficiency....

  16. Gamma/delta T lymphocytes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Baliko, Z.; Szereday, L.; Szekeres-Bartho, J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on the percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis are few and contradictory. The percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of tuberculin positive and tuberculin negative patients with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and healthy controls was compared. METHODS: Thirty six patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 11 healthy controls were studied. Lymphocytes we...

  17. C1-esterase inhibitor blocks T lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte generation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Bregenholt, S; Nording, J A

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that activated C1s complement and activated T cells cleave beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) in vitro leading to the formation of desLys58 beta2m. This process can specifically be inhibited by C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh). Furthermore we showed that exogenously added desLys58...... beta2m in nanomolar amounts to a one-way allogenic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) increased the endogenous production of IL-2 and the generation of allo-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. C1-inh was purified from fresh human plasma and added to human or murine MLC and mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte...... cultures grown in the presence of complement-inactivated serum. Read-outs were cell proliferation, lymphokine production and development of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that addition of C1-inh to MLC and mitogen-exposed murine and human lymphocyte cultures inhibited proliferation, the development...

  18. Infection of primary CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus enhances human immunodeficiency virus expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, M; Zhang, R D; Wu, B; Henderson, E E

    1996-01-01

    CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes purified from normal adult donors by flow cytometry could be infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) as measured by the accumulation of components of the EBV replicative cycle, viral DNA and viral transcripts encoding EBER1 and BRLF1. EBV infection resulted in enhanced replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IIIB in CD4+ lymphocytes as measured by accumulation of reverse transcriptase and formation of syncytia. Furthermore, a small percentage of C...

  19. Correlation between radiculalgia and counts of T lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of patients with lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Peng; Ma, Xin-long; Wang, Tao; Ma, Jian-xiong; Yang, Xue

    2009-11-01

    To determine the correlation between the degree of radiculalgia and counts of T lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of patients with lumbar disc herniation. Forty-nine patients with lumbar disc herniation (group A) were divided into three subgroups according to Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain scores (group A(1): n= 12, VAS 0-4.0; A(2): n= 24, VAS 4.1-7.0; A(3): n= 13, VAS 7.1-10.0. Twenty health blood donors who volunteered to be involved in the study comprised the control group (group B). Peripheral blood counts of various T lymphocyte subsets were measured in each group. (i) The counts of CD4+ T and CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytes were higher in group A than in group B, and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P 0.05). A strong significant correlation was observed between the VAS scores and counts of CD4+ T lymphocytes (r= 0.542, P prolapse of lumbar intervertebral discs. The current results may provide support for involvement of immunologic mechanisms in low back pain secondary to herniation of the lumbar disc. T lymphocytes may play an important role in the development of symptoms in patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. © 2009 Tianjin Hospital and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Gamma/delta T lymphocytes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balikó, Z; Szereday, L; Szekeres-Bartho, J

    1997-04-01

    Data on the percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis are few and contradictory. The percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of tuberculin positive and tuberculin negative patients with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and healthy controls was compared. Thirty six patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 11 healthy controls were studied. Lymphocytes were separated, cytocentrifuged onto glass microscope slides, and reacted with anti-gamma/delta monoclonal antibody. The percentage of gamma/delta positive cells was determined by microscopic counting of 300 lymphocytes. No difference was found in the percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes between patients and controls. However, when the patients were divided into two groups according to reactivity or non-reactivity in the Mantoux skin reaction a higher percentage of gamma/delta T lymphocytes was found in the peripheral blood of patients with tuberculin anergy than in tuberculin positive patients or controls. Higher gamma/delta T cell counts are found in tuberculin negative patients with tuberculosis than in tuberculin positive patients or tuberculin positive controls. The high gamma/delta T cell counts in tuberculin anergic patients may reflect a shift in the immune response in a Th2 direction characterised by increased antibody production and decreased cell mediated responses.

  1. Specific depletion of mature T lymphocytes from human bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Møller, J; Plesner, T

    1989-01-01

    An effective method for specific depletion of mature T lymphocytes from human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) with preservation of prethymic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells is presented. The BMMC were incubated with F101.01, a monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope of the T...

  2. T lymphocyte subsets in prostate cancer subjects in south eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Humoral and cellular mechanisms play roles in immune response to foreign antigens. The present study was designed to determine the T lymphocyte subsets (CD4 + T cells, CD8 + T cells and CD4/CD8 ratio) in the prostate cancer subjects and control subjects. CD4 + T cells (`l/count) and CD8 + T cells (`l/count) were ...

  3. Clonal expansion of renal cell carcinoma-infiltrating T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sittig, S.P.; Kollgaard, T.; Gronbaek, K.; Idorn, M.; Hennenlotter, J.; Stenzl, A.; Gouttefangeas, C.; Straten, P. Thor

    2013-01-01

    T lymphocytes can mediate the destruction of cancer cells by virtue of their ability to recognize tumor-derived antigenic peptides that are presented on the cell surface in complex with HLA molecules and expand. Thus, the presence of clonally expanded T cells within neoplastic lesions is an

  4. T-lymphocyte subsets, thymic size and breastfeeding in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Hasselbalch, Helle; Lisse, Ida M

    2004-01-01

    We followed the changes in concentration of T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ cells) in peripheral blood and thymus size during infancy. Previous studies have found increased thymus size in breastfed infants. The present study analyzed the association between breastfeeding and the number of CD4...

  5. Immunophenotypic enumeration of CD4 T-lymphocyte values in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    T-lymphocytes are defined by the expression of. CD3+ T cell subpopulations by the co-expression of CD4+ or CD8+ or ... and has been attributed to biological, ethnic group influences as well as differences in the methodologies ... InStat statistical software. Statistical significance was defined when P-value < 0.05. RESULTS.

  6. Immunophenotypic enumeration of CD4 + T-lymphocyte values in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The enumeration of CD4+ T-lymphocytes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected individuals is an essential tool for staging HIV disease, to make decisions for initiation of anti-retroviral therapy (ART), for monitoring response to ART and to initiate chemoprophylaxis against opportunistic infections.

  7. Th1 lymphokine production profiles of nickel-specific CD4+T-lymphocyte clones from nickel contact allergic and non-allergic individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapsenberg, M. L.; Wierenga, E. A.; Stiekema, F. E.; Tiggelman, A. M.; Bos, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Panels of nickel-specific T-lymphocyte clones (TLC) were prepared from nickel-allergic and non-allergic donors. TLC from both panels showed similar levels of expression of TCR alpha/beta, CD4, CD2, CD25, and CD29 and recognized nickel in association with class II HLA molecules with restriction

  8. Antigen processing influences HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte immunodominance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenzer, Stefan; Wee, Edmund; Burgevin, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Although cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in people infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 can potentially target multiple virus epitopes, the same few are recognized repeatedly. We show here that CTL immunodominance in regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group-associated ......Although cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in people infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 can potentially target multiple virus epitopes, the same few are recognized repeatedly. We show here that CTL immunodominance in regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 group...... and functional analyses demonstrated that proteasomal cleavage 'preferences' modulated the number and length of epitope-containing peptides, thereby affecting the response avidity and clonality of T cells. Cleavage patterns were affected by both flanking and intraepitope CTL-escape mutations. Our analyses show...

  9. Myxoma virus suppresses proliferation of activated T lymphocytes yet permits oncolytic virus transfer to cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Villa, Nancy Y.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Meacham, Amy M.; Wise, Elizabeth; Chan, Winnie; Wingard, John R; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    MYXV binds human T lymphocytes but does not enter and infect T cells until after activation.MYXV-infected T lymphocytes proliferate less and secrete less inflammatory cytokines but deliver oncolytic virus to augment GVM.

  10. A study of peripheral T-Lymphocytes in alopecia areata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma R

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of peripheral T-lymphocytes (active and total was carried out in 100 cases of alopecia areata as per method described by Boyam (1977 and West et al (1978. Clinically patients were divided in two groups, alopecia areata circumscribed (group I and severe alopecia areata (group II. Thirty healthy subjects served as controls. Decrease in percentage of both active and total E-RFC was observed in 70% cases. The decrease was more significant in group II.

  11. Early activation of gammadelta T lymphocytes in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, G C; Potestio, M; Scialabba, G; Mazzola, A; Candore, G; Lio, D; Caruso, C

    2000-12-20

    T cell function is altered in vivo and in vitro in elderly compared with young subjects, and this alteration is believed to contribute to morbidity and mortality in man due to the greater incidence of infection, as well as autoimmunity and cancer in elderly. The majority of T cells express TCRalphabeta whereas TCRgammadelta is expressed on a minority of T cells. Moreover, it is known that gammadelta T lymphocytes display major histocompatibility complex (MHC)- unrestricted cytotoxicity that is reminiscent of natural killer (NK) activity. In view of earlier findings on both T cells and NK cells in the elderly, we hypothesised a different behaviour of gammadelta T lymphocytes from old subjects when compared with gammadelta T lymphocytes obtained from young people. Therefore, to gain further insight into mechanisms of immunosenescence in this little-studied population, we studied immunofluorescence analysis gammadelta T cells from the elderly. Our preliminary results show that the percentage of blood gammadelta T cells in lymphocytes from old subjects is decreased when compared with the young. Interestingly, these cells are more activated in the elderly than in young subjects; expression of CD69, an early activation marker, is increased in gammadelta T lymphocytes from old subjects after three hours of in vitro culture both with and without lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Thus, our findings, which need confirmation, strongly suggest that, in humans, gammadelta T cells are early responders when compared with alphabeta T cells. They may act as 'first aid' cells to replace the described deficit of the specific and aspecific immunity in elderly. In this view, the proinflammatory status, observable in the elderly, renders them ready to be stimulated by exogenous agents.

  12. IAN family critically regulates survival and development of T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nitta

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The IAN (immune-associated nucleotide-binding protein family is a family of functionally uncharacterized GTP-binding proteins expressed in vertebrate immune cells and in plant cells during antibacterial responses. Here we show that all eight IAN family genes encoded in a single cluster of mouse genome are predominantly expressed in lymphocytes, and that the expression of IAN1, IAN4, and IAN5 is significantly elevated upon thymic selection of T lymphocytes. Gain-of-function experiments show that the premature overexpression of IAN1 kills immature thymocytes, whereas short hairpin RNA-mediated loss-of-function studies show that IAN4 supports positive selection. The knockdown of IAN5 perturbs the optimal generation of CD4/CD8 double-positive thymocytes and reduces the survival of mature T lymphocytes. We also show evidence suggesting that IAN4 and IAN5 are associated with anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, whereas IAN1 is associated with pro-apoptotic Bax. Thus, the IAN family is a novel family of T cell-receptor-responsive proteins that critically regulate thymic development and survival of T lymphocytes and that potentially exert regulatory functions through the association with Bcl-2 family proteins.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. Reference values of T lymphocyte subsets among health adults in Inner Mongolia Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Wu, Yumei; Li, Haoxue; Gao, Yongming; Qu, Lin; Yang, Jingyuan; Tao, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of T-lymphocyte subsets continues to be an important aspect for monitoring HIV disease progression and response to antiretroviral therapy. Most of the diagnostic laboratories often rely on studies from western for CD4+T-lymphocyte reference values, which could, often be unreliable for usage in local settings. To establish the normal reference values of T lymphocyte subsets from healthy people of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, flow cytometry was performed to determine the reference ranges for lymphocyte subsets (CD3 and CD4 cells) in 400 healthy multiracial adult population from 12 League Cities in Inner Mongolia Region, China. The basic information including age, gender, nationality and history was collected. There were significant differences in the absolute counting, percentage of CD3+T lymphocytes, and CD4+T lymphocyte percentage counting among different age groups. There were significant differences in CD3+, CD4+T lymphocyte percentage in the groups with different genders. There were significant differences in CD3+T lymphocyte percentage count, absolute count of CD4+T lymphocytes and CD4+T lymphocyte percentage counting in the group with ages of 16-20. There were dramatic differences in CD3+T lymphocyte percentage count and CD4+T lymphocyte percentage counting in the group with ages of 31-40. There were significant differences in CD4+T lymphocyte percentage counting. By this study, age, gender and ethnic specific lymphocyte subset reference ranges have been locally established in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

  15. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  16. T lymphocyte subset imbalances in patients contribute to ankylosing spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, CHENGGONG; LIAO, QIANDE; HU, YIHE; ZHONG, DA

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. To date, the disease etiology remains unclear. In the present study, the correlation of T lymphocyte subset changes with the progression of ankylosing spondylitis was investigated. A total of 55 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (22 severe and 23 mild cases) and 20 healthy individuals were selected. Firstly, the punctured cells in the lesions and the serum were collected, and the lymphocytes and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prepared. Secondly, quantitative PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry analyses were carried out to detect the levels of a series of immunoglobulins, complements, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory cells and cytokines. The expression levels of α-globulin, γ-globulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, serum complement C3, and complement C4 were found to be significantly increased in ankylosing spondylitis patients. In addition, the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells was found to be significantly higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups (mild and severe) compared with the healthy individuals. As a result, the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios were significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In addition, T lymphocyte subset ratio imbalances contributed to an increased expression of immune mediators, including interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A were found to be higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups compared with the control group. The present study provided further evidence on the function and underlying mechanism of T lymphocyte subsets, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25452811

  17. Direct Microbicidal Activity of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Oykhman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL are famous for their ability to kill tumor, allogeneic and virus-infected cells. However, an emerging literature has now demonstrated that CTL also possess the ability to directly recognize and kill bacteria, parasites, and fungi. Here, we review past and recent findings demonstrating the direct microbicidal activity of both CD4+ and CD8+ CTL against various microbial pathogens. Further, this review will outline what is known regarding the mechanisms of direct killing and their underlying signalling pathways.

  18. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte immune synapse at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, Nele M G; Frazer, Gordon L; Asano, Yukako; Stinchcombe, Jane C; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2016-08-01

    The immune synapse provides an important structure for communication with immune cells. Studies on immune synapses formed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) highlight the dynamic changes and specialised mechanisms required to facilitate focal signalling and polarised secretion in immune cells. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we illustrate the different steps that reveal the specialised mechanisms used to focus secretion at the CTL immune synapse and allow CTLs to be such efficient and precise serial killers. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Depletion of alloreactive T cells via CD69: implications on antiviral, antileukemic and immunoregulatory T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, U F; Nonn, M; Khan, S; Meyer, R G; Huber, C; Herr, W

    2006-02-01

    Selective depletion of alloreactive T cells from stem-cell allografts should abrogate graft-versus-host disease while preserving beneficial T cell specificities to facilitate engraftment and immune reconstitution. We therefore explored a refined immunomagnetic separation strategy to effectively deplete alloreactive donor lymphocytes expressing the activation antigen CD69 upon stimulation, and examined the retainment of antiviral, antileukemic, and immunoregulatory T cells. In addition to the CD69high T cell fraction, our studies retrieved two T cell subsets based on residual CD69 expression. Whereas, truly CD69(neg) cells were devoid of detectable alloresponses to original stimulators, CD69-low (CD69low)-expressing T cells elicited significant residual alloreactivity upon restimulation. In interferon-gamma enzyme linked immunospot assays, anti-cytomegalovirus and anti-Epstein-Barr virus responses were preserved at significant numbers among CD69neg T lymphocytes. Accordingly, T cells recognizing the leukemia-associated Wilm's tumor-1 antigen were still detectable in the CD69neg subset. However, antiviral and antileukemic specificities were also consistently found within CD69low T cells, suggesting that memory-type donor T cells were partially captured due to residual CD69 expression. Finally, CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+ immunoregulatory T cells did not upregulate CD69 upon allogeneic stimulation. Our data suggest that CD69-mediated removal of alloreactivity can result in efficient allodepletion, but may partially affect the persistence of antiviral and antileukemic donor memory specificities captured among CD69low-expressing lymphocytes.

  20. Effects of microgravity and cosmic radiations on human T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pippia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In space living organisms, including cells, are affected by two new environmental conditions: microgravity and cosmic radiations. Several experiments in dedicated space missions and in simulated microgravity have shown that low gravity causes a dramatic depression of the mitogenic in vitro activation of T lymphocytes. The goal of this reserch was to determine in space (on board the International Space Station the ability of adherent monocytes to migrate, as well as to interact with T-cells. A reduced motility of the J-111 cells and changes in the structures of actin, tubulin and vinculin were observed. Moreover, we demonstrated that LFA-I/ICAM-I interactions occur in space and are dependent on activation time but show differences in number, arrangement and fluorescence intensity, depending on time and experimental conditions. In order to evaluate the effects of cosmic radiations on the gene expression in human T lymphocytes we exposed these cells to high quote cosmic radiation during two stratospheric balloon trans-mediterranean flights (BIRBA missions. The gene expression was analized by cDNA microarray hybridization technology. Activated T cells react to the ionizing stress by activating genes involved in cell cycle check-point, oxidative stress response, heat shock proteins production or by repressing denes involved in antigen recognition.

  1. Long-term survival and concomitant gene expression of ribozyme-transduced CD4+ T-lymphocytes in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Janet L; Boyd, Maureen P; Arndt, Allison J; Todd, Alison V; Fanning, Gregory C; Ely, Julie A; Elliott, Fiona; Knop, Alison; Raponi, Mitch; Murray, John; Gerlach, Wayne; Sun, Lun-Quan; Penny, Ronald; Symonds, Geoff P; Carr, Andrew; Cooper, David A

    2005-05-01

    An anti-HIV-1 tat ribozyme, termed Rz2, has been shown to inhibit HIV-1 infection/replication and to decrease HIV-1-induced pathogenicity in T-lymphocyte cell lines and normal peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. We report here the results of a phase I gene transfer clinical trial using Rz2. Apheresis was used to obtain a peripheral blood cell population from each of four HIV-negative donors. After enrichment for CD4+ T-lymphocytes, ex vivo expansion and genetic manipulation (approximately equal aliquots of the cells were transduced with the ribozyme-containing (RRz2) and the control (LNL6) retroviral vector), these cells were infused into the corresponding HIV-1-positive twin recipient. Marking was assessed over an initial 24-week period and in total over an approximate 4-year period. The gene transfer procedure was shown to be safe, and technically feasible. Both RRz2- and LNL6-gene-containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were detected at all time points examined to 4 years. There was concomitant gene construct expression in the absence of the need for ex vivo peripheral blood cell stimulation and there was no evidence of immune elimination of the neoR T-lymphocytes nor of silencing of the Moloney murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat. The proof of principle results reported here demonstrate safety and feasibility of this type of gene transfer approach. While not specifically tested, T-lymphocytes containing an anti-HIV gene construct may impact on HIV-1 viral load and CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, potentially representing a new therapeutic modality for HIV-1 infection. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Dendritic cells can turn CD4+ T lymphocytes into vascular endothelial growth factor-carrying cells by intercellular neuropilin-1 transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbié-Vaudaine, Sarah; Blanchard, Nicolas; Hivroz, Claire; Roméo, Paul-Henri

    2006-08-01

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a transmembrane protein expressed on neuronal and endothelial cells where it plays a crucial role in guiding axons and regulating angiogenesis. We have recently shown that NRP1 also is expressed on dendritic cells (DC) in the human immune system and have proposed a role for NRP1 in the first stages of the immune response. In these studies, we show that NRP1 can be transferred with a high efficiency from human DC to T lymphocytes by trogocytosis. The NRP1 transfer can occur independently of T lymphocyte activation; the amount of NRP1 transferred depends on the NRP1 expression level on APC and is enhanced when T cells are activated through the TCR. Moreover, the NRP1 transfer occurs between specific donor and recipient cells, because no NRP1 transfer is observed between endothelial cells and T lymphocytes or between APCs and CD34(+) hemopoietic cells. Finally, we show that a major NRP1 ligand, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)(165), is secreted by mature human DCs and binds to NRP1 captured by T lymphocytes. These results show that NRP1 transfer to T lymphocytes during the immune synapse can convert T lymphocytes into VEGF(165)-carrying cells. Together with the enhanced signaling of VEGF-R2 on endothelial cells in the presence, in trans, of the NRP1-VEGF(165) complex, our results suggest that the intercellular transfer of NRP1 might participate in the Ag-independent remodelling of the endothelial vessels in secondary lymphoid organs during inflammation.

  3. In vitro T lymphocyte adherence capabilities under the influence of lower induction values (0.1 - 0.01 mT) of 50 Hz external magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čoček, A.; Jandová, A.; Hahn, A.; Mártonová, J.; Ambruš, M.; Dohnalová, A.; Nedbalová, M.; Pokorný, J.

    2011-12-01

    Our research thus far has concerned the impact of external magnetic fields (50 Hz) and low (0.01-10 mT) induction on adherence capabilities of T lymphocytes obtained from the blood of patients with head and neck tumors. We know that the in vitro adherence capability of T lymphocytes towards surfaces in cancer patients is less than that of control. Previously, we have found that exposure to magnetic fields (50 Hz / 0.01-10 mT) increases the capability of T lymphocytes, in larynx/pharynx cancer patients, to adhere in vitro to surfaces, achieving almost physiological values, in not only pre-treatment patients but also those receiving treatment in the course of follow-up. The capability of T lymphocytes in controls (voluntary blood donors) to adhere to surfaces was also increased (50 Hz / 0.01-0.5 mT). The present study concentrates on the significance of the level of magnetic field induction in order to determine whether low induction values can restore T lymphocytes adherence capabilities. Testing a set of 20 patients showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) in the in vitro adherence capacity of T lymphocytes between both 0.01 and 0.05, and 0.1 mT induction levels. In the control group (patients diagnosed with chronic sensorineural hearing loss) there was even a statistically significant difference between induction values of 0.05 and 0.01 mT. Therefore, we concluded that lower induction values resulted in a more biologically significant response.

  4. T-lymphocyte subsets, thymic size and breastfeeding in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Hasselbalch, Helle; Lisse, Ida M

    2004-01-01

    We followed the changes in concentration of T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ cells) in peripheral blood and thymus size during infancy. Previous studies have found increased thymus size in breastfed infants. The present study analyzed the association between breastfeeding and the number of CD4......+ and CD8+ cells. Two different populations of infants between birth and 1 year of age were examined. Study Group I: infants with a variable duration of breastfeeding. Study Group II: long-term breastfed infants. In both groups a correlation was found between CD8+ cells and the thymic index at 10 months...... to 10 months of age; and a positive correlation between the number of breastfeedings per day at 8 months of age, and an increase in CD4+ cells from 8 to 10 months of age (p Breastfeeding might have both a current and long...

  5. Stress-dependent hypertension and the role of T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvar, Paul J; Harrison, David G

    2012-11-01

    Hypertension is a significant global health burden that is associated with an increased risk of stroke, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. Several risk factors, including high dietary salt, obesity, genetics and race, as well as behavioural and psychological factors, contribute to development of this complex disease. Various hypertensive stimuli enhance sympathetic drive and promote autonomic dysfunction leading to elevated blood pressure. As our understanding of the pathogenesis and end-organ damage associated with hypertension increases, mounting evidence also highlights the role of inflammation in this process and, in particular, the role of the adaptive immune system and T cells. This review discusses recent findings regarding the role of the central nervous system, T lymphocytes and the impact of cardiovascular risk factors, such as psychological stress, in hypertension.

  6. Lighting Up T Lymphocyte Signaling with Quantitative Phosphoproteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candelas Álvarez-Salamero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation is the most abundant post-translational modification, regulating several aspects of protein and cell function. Quantitative phosphoproteomics approaches have expanded the scope of phosphorylation analysis enabling the quantification of changes in thousands of phosphorylation sites simultaneously in two or more conditions. These approaches offer a global view of the impact of cellular perturbations such as extracellular stimuli or gene ablation in intracellular signaling networks. Such great potential also brings on a new challenge: to identify, among the thousands of phosphorylations found in global phosphoproteomics studies, the small subset of site-specific phosphorylations expected to be functionally relevant. This review focus on updating and integrating findings on T lymphocyte signaling generated using global phosphoproteomics approaches, drawing attention on the biological relevance of the obtained data.

  7. Derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Brown

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs hold enormous potential for the development of personalized in vitro disease models, genomic health analyses, and autologous cell therapy. Here we describe the generation of T lymphocyte-derived iPSCs from small, clinically advantageous volumes of non-mobilized peripheral blood. These T-cell derived iPSCs ("TiPS" retain a normal karyotype and genetic identity to the donor. They share common characteristics with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs with respect to morphology, pluripotency-associated marker expression and capacity to generate neurons, cardiomyocytes, and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Additionally, they retain their characteristic T-cell receptor (TCR gene rearrangements, a property which could be exploited for iPSC clone tracking and T-cell development studies. Reprogramming T-cells procured in a minimally invasive manner can be used to characterize and expand donor specific iPSCs, and control their differentiation into specific lineages.

  8. Dominant CD8+ T-Lymphocyte Responses Suppress Expansion of Vaccine-Elicited Subdominant T Lymphocytes in Rhesus Monkeys Challenged with Pathogenic Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Edwin R.; Yeh, Wendy W.; Seaman, Michael S.; Furr, Kathryn; Lifton, Michelle A.; Hulot, Sandrine L.; Autissier, Patrick; Letvin, Norman L.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against a diversity of epitopes confers greater protection against a human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus infection than does a more focused response. To facilitate the creation of vaccine strategies that will generate cellular immune responses with the greatest breadth, it will be important to understand the mechanisms employed by the immune response to regulate the relative magnitudes of dominant and nondominant epitope-specific cellular immune responses. In this study, we generated dominant Gag p11C- and subdominant Env p41A-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses in Mamu-A*01+ rhesus monkeys through vaccination with plasmid DNA and recombinant adenovirus encoding simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) proteins. Infection of vaccinated Mamu-A*01+ rhesus monkeys with a SHIV Gag Δp11C mutant virus generated a significantly increased expansion of the Env p41A-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte response in the absence of secondary Gag p11C-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses. These results indicate that the presence of the Gag p11C-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte response following virus challenge may exert suppressive effects on primed Env p41A-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses. These findings suggest that immunodomination exerted by dominant responses during SHIV infection may diminish the breadth of recall responses primed during vaccination. PMID:19641002

  9. Dominant CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses suppress expansion of vaccine-elicited subdominant T lymphocytes in rhesus monkeys challenged with pathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Edwin R; Yeh, Wendy W; Seaman, Michael S; Furr, Kathryn; Lifton, Michelle A; Hulot, Sandrine L; Autissier, Patrick; Letvin, Norman L

    2009-10-01

    Emerging data suggest that a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against a diversity of epitopes confers greater protection against a human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus infection than does a more focused response. To facilitate the creation of vaccine strategies that will generate cellular immune responses with the greatest breadth, it will be important to understand the mechanisms employed by the immune response to regulate the relative magnitudes of dominant and nondominant epitope-specific cellular immune responses. In this study, we generated dominant Gag p11C- and subdominant Env p41A-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses in Mamu-A*01(+) rhesus monkeys through vaccination with plasmid DNA and recombinant adenovirus encoding simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) proteins. Infection of vaccinated Mamu-A*01(+) rhesus monkeys with a SHIV Gag Deltap11C mutant virus generated a significantly increased expansion of the Env p41A-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte response in the absence of secondary Gag p11C-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses. These results indicate that the presence of the Gag p11C-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte response following virus challenge may exert suppressive effects on primed Env p41A-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses. These findings suggest that immunodomination exerted by dominant responses during SHIV infection may diminish the breadth of recall responses primed during vaccination.

  10. T-lymphocyte subsets in West African children: impact of age, sex, and season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I M; Aaby, P; Whittle, H

    1997-01-01

    determinants of T-lymphocyte subset levels. METHODS: A total of 803 healthy West African children younger than 6 years were included in the three community studies of T-lymphocyte subsets among twins and singletons, after measles infection and after measles immunization. We used the immunoalkaline phosphatase...... is particularly high in Africa....

  11. T-lymphocyte subsets in West African children: impact of age, sex, and season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I M; Aaby, P; Whittle, H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There has been no reference material for T-lymphocyte subsets for normal children in developing countries. We therefore used T-lymphocyte subset determinations among children in three different studies in Guinea-Bissau to construct age-related reference material and to examine possible...

  12. Products from mast cells influence T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production--relevant to allergic asthma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pater-Huijsen, F. L.; Pompen, M.; Jansen, H. M.; Out, T. A.

    1997-01-01

    In IgE allergic diseases both mast cells and T lymphocytes play an important role. Whereas mast cels have been implicated in immediate allergic responses, T lymphocytes mediate subsequent late phase responses and chronic inflammation. Here we review possible links between the early mast cell

  13. Carbamate Pesticide-Induced Apoptosis in Human T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that carbamate pesticides induced significant apoptosis in human natural killer cells. To investigate whether carbamate pesticides also induce apoptosis in human T lymphocytes, in the present study Jurkat human T cells were treated in vitro with thiram, maneb, carbaryl or ziram. Apoptosis was determined by FITC-Annexin-V/PI staining. To explore the mechanism of apoptosis, intracellular levels of active caspase 3 and mitochondrial cytochrome-c release were determined by flow cytometry. We found that thiram, ziram, maneb and carbaryl also induced apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner in the human T cells. However, the strength of the apoptosis-inducing effect differed among the pesticides, with the: thiram > ziram > maneb > carbaryl. Moreover, thiram significantly increased the intracellular level of active caspase 3 and caspase inhibitors significantly inhibited apoptosis. Thiram also significantly caused mitochondrial cytochrome-c release. These findings indicate that carbamate pesticides can induce apoptosis in human T cells, and the apoptosis is mediated by the activation of caspases and the release of mitochondrial cytochrome-c.

  14. Dysregulation of T lymphocyte proliferative responses in autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney K Elizer

    Full Text Available T cells are critically dependent on cellular proliferation in order to carry out their effector functions. Autoimmune strains are commonly thought to have uncontrolled T cell proliferation; however, in the murine model of autoimmune diabetes, hypo-proliferation of T cells leading to defective AICD was previously uncovered. We now determine whether lupus prone murine strains are similarly hyporesponsive. Upon extensive characterization of T lymphocyte activation, we have observed a common feature of CD4 T cell activation shared among three autoimmune strains-NOD, MRL, and NZBxNZW F1s. When stimulated with a polyclonal mitogen, CD4 T cells demonstrate arrested cell division and diminished dose responsiveness as compared to the non-autoimmune strain C57BL/6, a phenotype we further traced to a reliance on B cell mediated costimulation, which underscores the success of B cell directed immune therapies in preventing T cell mediated tissue injury. In turn, the diminished proliferative capacity of these CD4 T cells lead to a decreased, but activation appropriate, susceptibility to activation induced cell death. A similar decrement in stimulation response was observed in the CD8 compartment of NOD mice; NOD CD8 T cells were distinguished from lupus prone strains by a diminished dose-responsiveness to anti-CD3 mediated stimulation. This distinction may explain the differential pathogenetic pathways activated in diabetes and lupus prone murine strains.

  15. Carbamate pesticide-induced apoptosis in human T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Kobayashi, Maiko; Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2015-04-01

    We previously found that carbamate pesticides induced significant apoptosis in human natural killer cells. To investigate whether carbamate pesticides also induce apoptosis in human T lymphocytes, in the present study Jurkat human T cells were treated in vitro with thiram, maneb, carbaryl or ziram. Apoptosis was determined by FITC-Annexin-V/PI staining. To explore the mechanism of apoptosis, intracellular levels of active caspase 3 and mitochondrial cytochrome-c release were determined by flow cytometry. We found that thiram, ziram, maneb and carbaryl also induced apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner in the human T cells. However, the strength of the apoptosis-inducing effect differed among the pesticides, with the: thiram > ziram > maneb > carbaryl. Moreover, thiram significantly increased the intracellular level of active caspase 3 and caspase inhibitors significantly inhibited apoptosis. Thiram also significantly caused mitochondrial cytochrome-c release. These findings indicate that carbamate pesticides can induce apoptosis in human T cells, and the apoptosis is mediated by the activation of caspases and the release of mitochondrial cytochrome-c.

  16. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses against melanocytes and melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz Erich J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitiligo is a common toxicity associated with immunotherapy for melanoma. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs against melanoma commonly target melanoma-associated antigens (MAAs which are also expressed by melanocytes. To uncouple vitiligo from melanoma destruction, it is important to understand if CTLs can respond against melanoma and melanocytes at different levels. Methods To understand the dichotomous role of MAA-specific CTL, we characterized the functional reactivities of established CTL clones directed to MAAs against melanoma and melanocyte cell lines. Results CTL clones generated from melanoma patients were capable of eliciting MHC-restricted, MAA-specific lysis against melanocyte cell lines as well as melanoma cells. Among the tested HLA-A*0201-restricted CTL clones, melanocytes evoked equal to slightly higher degranulation and cytolytic responses as compared to melanoma cells. Moreover, MAA-specific T cells from vaccinated patients responded directly ex vivo to melanoma and melanocytes. Melanoma cells express slightly higher levels of MART-1 and gp100 than melanocytes as measured by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Conclusions Our data suggest that CTLs respond to melanoma and melanocytes equally in vitro and directly ex vivo.

  17. Correlation of Circulating T Lymphocytes and Intracranial Hypertension in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wanqiang; Gao, Chuang; Wang, Peng; Huang, Jinhao; Qian, Yu; Guo, Linyue; Zhang, Jianning; Jiang, Rongcai

    2017-11-01

    The close correlation between intracerebral pressure (ICP) and immunologic responses has been well described, but the role of T lymphocytes in this process remains unknown. This study targeted the relationship of circulating T lymphocytes and ICP in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Between October 2015 and October 2016, consecutive patients age 18-65 years with ICH were enrolled. ICP values were recorded hourly for 5 days, and the screened patients were divided into 2 groups based on ICP: the elevated ICP group (ICP >20 mmHg) and normal ICP group (ICP ≤20 mmHg). Peripheral blood was collected on admission and T lymphocyte subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score at 30 days after ICH were analyzed. A total of 44 patients were enrolled, including 18 patients in the elevated ICP group and 26 in the normal ICP group. Both CD3+ and CD4+ T lymphocyte counts were higher in the elevated ICP group (P = 0.004 and 0.000, respectively). The CD8+ T lymphocyte count was not significantly different between the 2 groups (P = 0.751). There were correlation trends between the maximum ICP value and CD3+ lymphocyte count (P = 0.003), CD4+ T lymphocyte count (P = 0.000), and the CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio (P = 0.000). The area under the curve (AUC) of CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio was the largest among them (P = 0.011 and 0.033), with a significant cutoff value and good specificity and sensitivity. There was a close correlation between the CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio and the 30-day GOS score (P = 0.003, AUC = 0.812). The CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocyte ratio may be a valuable indicator for predicting postoperative ICP and the short-term prognosis after ICH. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. CD4+ T-lymphocyte count/CD8+ T-lymphocyte count ratio: surrogate for HIV infection in infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneethapandian, Poorana Ganga Devi; Karunaianantham, Ramesh; Subramanyan, Sudha; Chinnayan, Ponnuraja; Chandrasekaran, Padmapriyadarsini; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2012-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment is necessary to prevent HIV-infected infants progressing to AIDS. Antibody testing is not confirmatory before the age of 18 months and PCR not widely available in resource-poor settings. We studied the accuracy of CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count, CD4% and CD4/CD8 ratio as surrogate markers of infant HIV infection. Two hundred and fifty-eight HIV-exposed Indian infants at a median age of 5 months (range 1-18) had DNA PCR and CD4, CD8 counts performed. Fifty five infants tested positive by HIV-1 DNA PCR whereas 203 were negative. Median CD4 count, CD4% and CD4/CD8 ratio were significantly lower in DNA PCR+ infants. Overall sensitivity and specificity of CD4/CD8 ratio <1.0 in predicting HIV was 91 and 92% with a negative predicted value (NPV) and positive predicted value (PPV) of 97 and 76%, respectively. CD4/CD8 ratio <1.0 is a more sensitive surrogate marker of HIV infection in Indian infants than a CD4 count <1500 cells/µl or CD4% <25%.

  19. Anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 antibodies in melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosti G

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Giulio Tosti, Emilia Cocorocchio, Elisabetta PennacchioliDivisione Melanomi e Sarcomi, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milano, ItalyAbstract: Approaches aimed at enhancement of the tumor specific response have provided proof for the rationale of immunotherapy in cancer, both in animal models and in humans. Ipilimumab, an anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 antibody, is a new generation immunotherapeutic agent that has shown activity in terms of disease free and overall survival in metastatic melanoma patients. Its use was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in March 2011 to treat patients with late stage melanoma that has spread or that cannot be removed by surgery. The mechanism of action of CTLA-4 antibodies in the activation of an antitumor immune response and selected clinical studies of ipilimumab in advanced melanoma patients are discussed. Ipilimumab treatment has been associated with immune related adverse events due to T-cell activation and proliferation. Most of these serious adverse effects are associated with the gastrointestinal tract and include severe diarrhea and colitis. The relationship between immune related adverse events and antitumor activity associated with ipilimumab was explored in clinical studies. Potential biomarkers predictive for clinical response and survival in patients treated with anti-CTLA-4 therapy are presently under investigation. Besides the conventional patterns of response and stable disease as defined by standard Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, in subsets of patients, ipilimumab has shown patterns of delayed clinical activity which were associated with an improved overall survival. For this reason a new set of response criteria for tumor immunotherapy has been proposed, which was termed immune related response criteria. These new criteria are presently used to better analyze clinical activity of immunotherapeutic regimens. Ipilimumab is currently under

  20. Titanium uptake, induction of RANK-L expression, and enhanced proliferation of human T-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadosch, Dieter; Sutanto, Michael; Chan, Erwin; Mhawi, Amir; Gautschi, Oliver P; von Katterfeld, Brilliana; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Filgueira, Luis

    2010-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that titanium ions are released from orthopedic implants by biocorrosion. The aim of this study was to investigate titanium uptake by human T-lymphocytes and its effects on phenotype and proliferation. Freshly isolated human nonadherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (NA-PBMC), were exposed to TiCl4 [Ti(IV)]. Bioavailability and distribution of Ti(IV) in T-lymphocytes was determined by energy-filtered electron microscopy (EFTEM). The effects of Ti(IV) challenge on nonactivated and PHA-activated cells were assessed by flow cytometric analysis of surface markers, RANK-L production, and proliferation assays. EFTEM colocalized Ti(IV) with phosphorus in the nucleus, ribosomes, cytoplasmic membranes, and the surface membrane of T-lymphocytes. Ti(IV) increased significantly the expression of CD69, CCR4, and RANK-L in a concentration-dependent manner. Titanium enters T-lymphocytes through a currently unknown mechanism and binds to phosphorus-rich cell structures. Titanium influences phenotype and function of T-lymphocytes, resulting in activation of a CD69+ and CCR4+ T-lymphocyte population and secretion of RANK-L. These results strongly suggest the involvement of titanium ions challenged T-lymphocytes in the complex pathophysiological mechanisms of aseptic loosening of orthopedic implants.

  1. Ultrasound molecular imaging of acute cardiac transplantation rejection using nanobubbles targeted to T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Chen, Yihan; Wang, Guohua; Lv, Qing; Yang, Yali; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Pingyu; Liu, Jie; Xie, Yu; Zhang, Li; Xie, Mingxing

    2018-02-08

    Clinical surveillance of acute heart transplantation rejection requires repeated invasive endomyocardial biopsies and noninvasive diagnostic techniques are desperately needed. It is acknowledged that T lymphocyte infiltration is the central process of acute rejection. We hypothesized that ultrasound molecular imaging with T lymphocyte-targeted nanobubbles could be used to detect acute rejection in heart transplantation. In this study, nanobubbles bearing anti-CD3 antibody (NB CD3 ) or isotype antibody (NB con ) were prepared and characterized. There was significant adhesion of NB CD3 to T lymphocytes compared with NB con in vitro. The signal intensity of the adherent NB CD3 was significantly higher than that of the NB con in allograft rats, but not significantly different in isograft rats. Furthermore, the signal intensity of NB CD3 in allograft rats was significantly higher than that in isograft rats, indicating more T lymphocyte infiltration in allograft rats compared with isograft rats. These results were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry examination, and the signal intensity of NB CD3 was positively correlated with the number of T lymphocytes in allograft rats. In summary, ultrasound molecular imaging with T lymphocyte-targeted nanobubbles can detect T lymphocyte infiltration in acute rejection and could be used as a noninvasive method in acute rejection detection after cardiac transplantation. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of HIV on metabolic and biological pathways of CD4+T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanli; Zhao, Wenge; Shi, Changhe; Wang, Ning; Fan, Tianli

    2018-03-01

    The effects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on the metabolic and biological pathways of cluster of differentiation (CD)4 + T lymphocytes were investigated. A total of 150 patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and 50 healthy individuals who were admitted to hospital for physical examination during the period of June 2016 to January 2017, were selected as subjects in the present study. According to the virus load, 150 AIDS patients were divided into three groups: i) Viral load >10 6 copies/ml (group A, n=39), ii) 10 4 copies/ml T lymphocyte counts was assessed. Active lymphocytes were isolated from T lymphocytes in the subjects, and the ratio of Th1 to Th2 was measured by flow cytometry. Effects of HIV on human T-lymphocyte differentiation were observed. Differences in T-lymphocyte metabolites were detected by proton nuclear magnetic resonance and their biological pathways analyzed. The results showed that CD4 + T-cell counts were decreased with the increase of the viral loads of patients. The viral loads of AIDS patients differentiated T lymphocytes. In other words, high viral loads accelerated the differentiation of T lymphocytes into Th1 cells. In the high HIV viral load group, the levels of glycerol phosphodiesterase, 7-dehydrocholesterol, p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, cholesterol and deoxyuridine were increased, but the levels of 3-methoxytyramine, cytidine deaminase, deoxycorticosterone and 3-hydroxybutyric acid were decreased. The viral loads of AIDS patients are associated with CD4 + T-cell counts and the ratio of CD4 + T to CD8 + T cells. At the same time, HIV viral loads can affect the lipid biosynthesis of T-lymphocyte membranes, thus affecting the differentiation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and finally intervening its mediated immune responses.

  3. File list: NoD.Bld.50.AllAg.T-Lymphocytes,_Regulatory [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. DMPD: Induction of proliferation and cytokine production in human T lymphocytes bylipopolysaccharide (LPS). [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11090938 Induction of proliferation and cytokine production in human T lymphocytes ... (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Induction of proliferation and cytokine production in human T lymphocyte...and cytokine production in human T lymphocytes bylipopolysaccharide (LPS). Authors Ulmer AJ, Flad H, Rietsch

  17. Prognostic significance of tumor-infiltrating T-lymphocytes in primary and metastatic lesions of advanced stage ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, Ninke; Gooden, Marloes J. M.; de Jong, Renske A.; Hoogeboom, Baukje-Nynke; ten Hoor, Klaske A.; Hollema, Harry; Boezen, H. Marieke; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Daemen, Toos; Nijman, Hans W.

    PURPOSE: Ovarian cancer patients with intra-tumoral CD3(+) T-lymphocytes in primary tumor tissue have a better prognosis. This study aims to analyze the presence and relative influence of three important T-lymphocyte subsets, tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL), CD45R0(+) memory

  18. [Effector function of CLA(+) T lymphocytes on autologous keratinocytes in psoriasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, M; Giménez-Arnau, A M; Bellosillo, B; Pujol, R M; Santamaría-Babi, L F

    2008-11-01

    Cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA) is expressed by a subgroup of memory T cells that exhibit skin homing and are implicated in cutaneous T-cell-mediated diseases. Expression of genes associated with psoriasis was analyzed in keratinocytes taken from patients and healthy individuals and cultured under different conditions, including activation using supernatants from CLA(+) T lymphocytes activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. Keratinocytes from psoriasis patients activated by CLA(+)T lymphocytes expressed higher levels of interferon-inducible protein 10, HLA-DR, intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Our results suggest that we have developed an in vitro model that will allow analysis of the effector role of CLA(+) T lymphocytes on keratinocytes in psoriasis. This model may allow the identification of genes involved in the pathology of psoriasis through induction by CLA(+) T lymphocytes.

  19. Clinical Trials Using Adenovirus/Cytomegalovirus/Epstein-Barr Virus-specific Allogeneic Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI supports clinical trials that test new and more effective ways to treat cancer. Find clinical trials studying adenovirus/cytomegalovirus/epstein-barr virus-specific allogeneic cytotoxic t lymphocytes.

  20. Antibodies Against Membrane Interleukin 1α Activate Accessory Cells to Stimulate Proliferation of T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugui, Elsie M.; Almquist, Susan J.

    1990-02-01

    Some monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against interleukin (IL) 1α have been found to activate antigen-presenting cells (APC, human peripheral blood monocytes and B lymphocytes), so that unstimulated T lymphocytes cultured with them are induced to proliferate and secrete IL-2. Control mAbs of the same isotypes and mAbs against IL-11β do not activate APC. In the absence of APC, mAbs against IL-1α do not induce proliferation of T lymphocytes. Mitomycin C-treated activated APC still induce T-cell proliferation. Proliferation of T lymphocytes cannot be induced by culture supernatants and requires contact with APC activated by mAbs against IL-1α. The observations imply that surface membrane IL-1α can function as a triggering molecule on APC, which could play an important role in the initiation of immune responses by T lymphocytes.

  1. Defective HIV-1 Proviruses Are Expressed and Can Be Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes, which Shape the Proviral Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Ross A; Jones, R Brad; Pertea, Mihaela; Bruner, Katherine M; Martin, Alyssa R; Thomas, Allison S; Capoferri, Adam A; Beg, Subul A; Huang, Szu-Han; Karandish, Sara; Hao, Haiping; Halper-Stromberg, Eitan; Yong, Patrick C; Kovacs, Colin; Benko, Erika; Siliciano, Robert F; Ho, Ya-Chi

    2017-04-12

    Despite antiretroviral therapy, HIV-1 persists in memory CD4(+) T cells, creating a barrier to cure. The majority of HIV-1 proviruses are defective and considered clinically irrelevant. Using cells from HIV-1-infected individuals and reconstructed patient-derived defective proviruses, we show that defective proviruses can be transcribed into RNAs that are spliced and translated. Proviruses with defective major splice donors (MSDs) can activate novel splice sites to produce HIV-1 transcripts, and cells with these proviruses can be recognized by HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Further, cells with proviruses containing lethal mutations upstream of CTL epitopes can also be recognized by CTLs, potentially through aberrant translation. Thus, CTLs may change the landscape of HIV-1 proviruses by preferentially targeting cells with specific types of defective proviruses. Additionally, the expression of defective proviruses will need to be considered in the measurement of HIV-1 latency reversal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Selective reconstitution of T lymphocyte subsets in scid mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, J; Rudolphi, A; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1991-01-01

    The 'empty' splenic T-cell compartment of young scid mice was partially and selectively reconstituted by low numbers of adoptively transferred congenic (C.B-17, BALB/c) or semi-allogeneic (dm2), but not completely allogeneic (C57BL/6) CD4+ T cells from adult donor mice. Under the same experimenta...

  3. Mechanisms of T-Lymphocyte Accumulation during Experimental Pleural Infection Induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Mariana C.; Penido, Carmen; Costa, Maria F. S.; Henriques, Maria Graças

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculous pleurisy is a frequent extrapulmonary manifestation characterized by accumulation of fluid and inflammatory cells in the pleural space. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of T-lymphocyte accumulation in the pleural space by using a murine model of pleurisy induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Intrathoracic (i.t.) injection of BCG (4.5 × 105 bacteria/cavity) induced accumulation of T lymphocytes in the pleural cavities of C57BL/6 mice. We observed the presence of CFU in pleural washes conducted 1, 2, 3, 7, and 15 days after pleurisy induction. Pretreatment with fucoidan inhibited T-lymphocyte accumulation at 1 day, but not at 15 days, after BCG-induced pleurisy. Accordingly, adoptive transfer of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled blood mononuclear cells to infected mice showed that T lymphocytes migrated into the pleural cavity 1 day (but not 15 days) after BCG injection. Cell-free pleural wash fluids recovered from mice 1 day after BCG i.t. stimulation (day 1 BCG-PW), but not day 7 or day 15 BCG-PW, induced in vitro T-cell transmigration, which was dependent on L-, P-, and E-selectins. In contrast, day 7 BCG-PW (but not day 1 BCG-PW) induced in vitro T-lymphocyte proliferation via interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Accordingly, in vivo IL-2 or IFN-γ neutralization abolished T-lymphocyte accumulation 7 days after pleurisy induction. Our results demonstrate that pleural infection induced by BCG leads to T-lymphocyte accumulation in two waves. The acute phase depends on selectin-mediated migration, while the second wave of T-lymphocyte accumulation seems to depend on a local proliferation induced by cytokines produced in situ. PMID:18809659

  4. Piperine from black pepper inhibits activation-induced proliferation and effector function of T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Carolyn D; Rodgers, Gemma; Liwski, Robert S; Hoskin, David W

    2015-11-01

    Piperine is a major alkaloid component of black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn), which is a widely consumed spice. Here, we investigated the effect of piperine on mouse T lymphocyte activation. Piperine inhibited polyclonal and antigen-specific T lymphocyte proliferation without affecting cell viability. Piperine also suppressed T lymphocyte entry into the S and G2 /M phases of the cell cycle, and decreased expression of G1 -associated cyclin D3, CDK4, and CDK6. In addition, piperine inhibited CD25 expression, synthesis of interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and IL-17A, and the generation of cytotoxic effector cells. The inhibitory effect of piperine on T lymphocytes was associated with hypophosphorylation of Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and inhibitor of κBα, but not ZAP-70. The ability of piperine to inhibit several key signaling pathways involved in T lymphocyte activation and the acquisition of effector function suggests that piperine might be useful in the management of T lymphocyte-mediated autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Transforming growth factor-β increases interleukin-13 synthesis via GATA-3 transcription factor in T-lymphocytes from patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraut, Julie; Farge, Dominique; Jean-Louis, Francette; Masse, Ingrid; Grigore, Elena Ivan; Arruda, Lucas C M; Lamartine, Jérôme; Verrecchia, Franck; Michel, Laurence

    2015-07-31

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and interleukin (IL)-13 play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc), partly through activation of collagen production that leads to fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TFG-β alters IL-13 production in T lymphocytes from patients with SSc from that seen in those of healthy donors. IL-13 mRNA and protein synthesis under TFG-β exposure was measured in circulating T lymphocytes from healthy donors and patients with SSc and also in the Jurkat Th2 T-cell line, using quantitative real-time PCR and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, respectively. The involvement of Smad and GATA-3 transcription factors was assessed by using specific inhibitors and small interfering RNA, and the binding capacity of GATA-3 to the IL-13 gene promoter was evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. TGF-β induced a significant decrease in IL-13 mRNA and protein levels in lymphocytes from healthy donors (mean [±SD] inhibition of 30% ± 10% and 20% ± 7%, respectively; p T-cell subtypes from patients with SSc, with respective increases of 2.4 ± 0.3-fold, 1.6 ± 0.05-fold and 2.7 ± 0.02-fold. The involvement of the Smad signaling pathway and upregulation of GATA-3 binding capacity on the IL-13 promoter in lymphocytes from patients with SSc contributed to the effect of TGF-β on IL-13 production. These results demonstrate that TGF-β upregulates IL-13 synthesis through GATA-3 expression in the T lymphocytes of patients with SSc, confirming that the GATA-3 transcription factor can be regarded as a novel therapeutic target in patients with SSc.

  6. Suppressor T cells, distinct from "veto cells," are induced by alloantigen priming and mediate transferable suppression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Crispe, I N

    1985-01-01

    Primary and secondary cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to minor alloantigens can be suppressed by priming host mice with a high dose (10(8) cells) of alloantigenic donor spleen cells (SC). Such suppression is antigen specific and transferable into secondary hosts with T cells. One interpretation...... described here exclude veto T cell participation in transferable alloantigen-specific suppression, and demonstrate the operation of an alloantigen-specific host-derived T suppressor (Ts) cell. The origin of the Ts has been studied directly by using Thy-1-disparate BALB/c mice. The cell responsible...

  7. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  8. The Importance of the Nurse Cells and Regulatory Cells in the Control of T Lymphocyte Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Guadalupe Reyes García

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes from the immune system are bone marrow-derived cells whose development and activities are carefully supervised by two sets of accessory cells. In the thymus, the immature young T lymphocytes are engulfed by epithelial “nurse cells” and retained in vacuoles, where most of them (95% are negatively selected and removed when they have an incomplete development or express high affinity autoreactive receptors. The mature T lymphocytes that survive to this selection process leave the thymus and are controlled in the periphery by another subpopulation of accessory cells called “regulatory cells,” which reduce any excessive immune response and the risk of collateral injuries to healthy tissues. By different times and procedures, nurse cells and regulatory cells control both the development and the functions of T lymphocyte subpopulations. Disorders in the T lymphocytes development and migration have been observed in some parasitic diseases, which disrupt the thymic microenvironment of nurse cells. In other cases, parasites stimulate rather than depress the functions of regulatory T cells decreasing T-mediated host damages. This paper is a short review regarding some features of these accessory cells and their main interactions with T immature and mature lymphocytes. The modulatory role that neurotransmitters and hormones play in these interactions is also revised.

  9. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Arctium lappa (Niubang), a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC), isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Methods Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. Conclusion AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT. PMID:21435270

  10. T lymphocyte migration: an action movie starring the actin and associated actors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc eDupré

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton is composed of a dynamic filament meshwork that builds the architecture of the cell to sustain its fundamental properties. This physical structure is characterized by a continuous remodeling, which allows cells to accomplish complex motility steps such as directed migration, crossing of biological barriers and interaction with other cells. T lymphocytes excel in these motility steps to ensure their immune surveillance duties. In particular, actin cytoskeleton remodeling is key to facilitate the journey of T lymphocytes through distinct tissue environments and to tune their stop and go behavior during the scanning of antigen-presenting cells. The molecular mechanisms controlling actin cytoskeleton remodeling during T lymphocyte motility have been only partially unraveled, since the function of many actin regulators has not yet been assessed in these cells. Our review aims to integrate the current knowledge into a comprehensive picture of how the actin cytoskeleton drives T lymphocyte migration. We will present the molecular actors that control actin cytoskeleton remodeling, as well as their role in the different T lymphocyte motile steps. We will also highlight which challenges remain to be addressed experimentally and which approaches appear promising to tackle them.

  11. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Jern; Chang, Chu-Ting; Wang, Guei-Jane; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Lu, Shao-Chun; Kuo, Yuh-Chi

    2011-03-25

    Arctium lappa (Niubang), a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC), isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT.

  12. Arctigenin from Arctium lappa inhibits interleukin-2 and interferon gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Shwu-Fen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arctium lappa (Niubang, a Chinese herbal medicine, is used to treat tissue inflammation. This study investigates the effects of arctigenin (AC, isolated from A. lappa, on anti-CD3/CD28 Ab-stimulated cell proliferation and cytokine gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes. Methods Cell proliferation was determined with enzyme immunoassays and the tritiated thymidine uptake method. Cytokine production and gene expression were analyzed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results AC inhibited primary human T lymphocytes proliferation activated by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Cell viability test indicated that the inhibitory effects of AC on primary human T lymphocyte proliferation were not due to direct cytotoxicity. AC suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, AC decreased the IL-2 and IFN-γ gene expression in primary human T lymphocytes induced by anti-CD3/CD28 Ab. Reporter gene analyses revealed that AC decreased NF-AT-mediated reporter gene expression. Conclusion AC inhibited T lymphocyte proliferation and decreased the gene expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and NF-AT.

  13. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington's Disease T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James R C; Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington's disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington's disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington's disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington's disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington's disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system.

  14. A mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics derived from single transmembrane protein properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Dorothee Schmeitz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fate decision processes of T lymphocytes are crucial for health and disease. Whether a T lymphocyte is activated, divides, gets anergic or initiates apoptosis depends on extracellular triggers and intracellular signalling. Free cytosolic calcium dynamics plays an important role in this context. The relative contributions of store-derived calcium entry and calcium entry from extracellular space to T lymphocyte activation are still a matter of debate. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of T lymphocyte calcium dynamics in order to establish a tool which allows to disentangle cause-effect relationships between ion fluxes and observed calcium time courses. The model is based on single transmembrane protein characteristics which have been determined in independent experiments. This reduces the number of unknown parameters in the model to a minimum and ensures the predictive power of the model. Simulation results are subsequently used for an analysis of whole cell calcium dynamics measured under various experimental conditions. The model accounts for a variety of these conditions, which supports the suitability of the modelling approach. The simulation results suggest a model in which calcium dynamics dominantly relies on the opening of channels in calcium stores while calcium entry through calcium-release activated channels (CRAC is more associated with the maintenance of the T lymphocyte calcium levels and prevents the cell from calcium depletion. Our findings indicate that CRAC guarantees a long-term stable calcium level which is required for cell survival and sustained calcium enhancement.

  15. Intrinsic antiproliferative activity of the innate sensor STING in T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerboni, Silvia; Jeremiah, Nadia; Gentili, Matteo; Gehrmann, Ulf; Conrad, Cécile; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Picard, Capucine; Neven, Bénédicte; Fischer, Alain; Amigorena, Sébastian; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Manel, Nicolas

    2017-06-05

    Activation of the cyclic dinucleotide sensor stimulator of interferon (IFN) genes (STING) is critical for IFN and inflammatory gene expression during innate immune responses. However, the role of STING in adaptive immunity is still unknown. In this study, we show that STING activation reduces the proliferation of T lymphocytes. This activity was independent of TBK1 and IRF3 recruitment and of type I IFN but required a distinct C-terminal domain of STING that activates NF-κB. Inhibition of cell proliferation by STING required its relocalization to the Golgi apparatus and caused mitotic errors. T lymphocytes from patients carrying constitutive active mutations in TMEM173 encoding STING showed impaired proliferation and reduced numbers of memory cells. Endogenous STING inhibited proliferation of mouse T lymphocytes. Therefore, STING, a critical innate sensor, also functions intrinsically in cells of the adaptive immune system to inhibit proliferation. © 2017 Cerboni et al.

  16. Intrinsic antiproliferative activity of the innate sensor STING in T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerboni, Silvia; Jeremiah, Nadia; Gehrmann, Ulf; Conrad, Cécile; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Neven, Bénédicte; Fischer, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the cyclic dinucleotide sensor stimulator of interferon (IFN) genes (STING) is critical for IFN and inflammatory gene expression during innate immune responses. However, the role of STING in adaptive immunity is still unknown. In this study, we show that STING activation reduces the proliferation of T lymphocytes. This activity was independent of TBK1 and IRF3 recruitment and of type I IFN but required a distinct C-terminal domain of STING that activates NF-κB. Inhibition of cell proliferation by STING required its relocalization to the Golgi apparatus and caused mitotic errors. T lymphocytes from patients carrying constitutive active mutations in TMEM173 encoding STING showed impaired proliferation and reduced numbers of memory cells. Endogenous STING inhibited proliferation of mouse T lymphocytes. Therefore, STING, a critical innate sensor, also functions intrinsically in cells of the adaptive immune system to inhibit proliferation. PMID:28484079

  17. In vitro culture of skin-homing T lymphocytes from inflammatory skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Karen; C Mogensen, Søren; Thestrup-Pedersen, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    was for AD 1.20, MF 0.65 and psoriasis 0.85. Patients with AD treated with cyclosporin-A had almost no growth of CD8+ cells in vitro. Our findings indicate a changed homeostasis among skin-homing lymphocytes for in vitro culture. Our culture system of skin-homing T lymphocytes leads to a prominent cellular......We, in this study, describe how T lymphocytes in a skin biopsy can proliferate in vitro for up to 3 months by using T-cell growth factors - interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 yielding approximately 100-160 million T lymphocytes within 1 month. We established cell lines from three tuberculin skin tests...

  18. Increased program cell death-1 expression on T lymphocytes of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chen Sabrina; Bord, Evelyn; Broge, Thomas A; Glotzbecker, Brett; Mills, Heidi; Gheuens, Sarah; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn; Avigan, David; Koralnik, Igor J

    2012-07-01

    The cellullar immune response is important in the containment of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). We examined program cell death-1 (PD-1) expression, a marker of cellular immune exhaustion, on T lymphocytes in PML. PD-1 expression was elevated on total CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells (medians 36% and 24%) in PML patients compared with healthy control subjects (medians 14% and 18%; P = 0.0015 and P = 0.033). In PML patients, JC virus (JCV)-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes expressed PD-1 more frequently than total CD8 T lymphocytes (means 39% and 78%, P = 0.0004). Blocking the PD-1 receptor increased JCV-specific T-cell immune response in a subgroup of PML patients.

  19. CC chemokine receptor 7 required for T lymphocyte exit from peripheral tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debes, Gudrun F.; Arnold, Carrie N.; Young, Alan J.; Krautwald, Stefan; Lipp, Martin; Hay, John B.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2006-01-01

    Lymphocytes travel throughout the body to carry out immune surveillance and participate in inflammatory reactions. Their path takes them from blood through tissues into lymph and back to blood. Molecules that control lymphocyte recruitment into extralymphoid tissues are well characterized, but exit is assumed to be random. Here, we showed that lymphocyte emigration from the skin was regulated and pertussis toxin-sensitive. CD4+ lymphocytes emigrated more efficiently than CD8+ or B lymphocytes. T lymphocytes in the afferent lymph expressed functional CCR7, and CCR7 was required for T lymphocyte exit from the skin. The regulated expression of CCR7 by tissue T lymphocytes may control their exit, acting with recruitment mechanisms to regulate lymphocyte transit and accumulation during immune surveillance and inflammation. PMID:16116468

  20. Distribution of naive and memory/effector CD4+ T lymphocytes and expression of CD38 on CD8+ T lymphocytes in AIDS patients with tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Denise do Socorro S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts, naive and memory/effector CD4+ T subpopulations, and the expression of CD38 on CD8+ T lymphocytes were evaluated in four groups: AIDS patients with tuberculosis (HIV/TB, n=14, HIV-1 infected patients (HIV, n=10, HIV-1 negative patients with tuberculosis (TB, n=20 and healthy controls (CTL, n=17. TB and HIV had fewer CD4+ T cells than CTL, with the lowest values observed in TB/HIV (p<0.001. No difference between groups was observed in the percentage of naive and memory/effector subpopulations in CD4+ T lymphocytes. TB (355 cells/mL and HIV (517 cells/mL had diverging effects on CD8+ T cell counts, with a marked depletion observed in HIV/TB (196 cells/mL. TB and HIV up-regulated CD38 expression on CD8+ T cells, a finding also present in TB/HIV. While the decrease of CD4+ T cell counts in HIV/TB may be attributed to HIV and tuberculosis, the decrease of CD8+ T cell counts is likely to be due to tuberculosis.

  1. Distribution of naive and memory/effector CD4+ T lymphocytes and expression of CD38 on CD8+ T lymphocytes in AIDS patients with tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise do Socorro S. Rodrigues

    Full Text Available CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte counts, naive and memory/effector CD4+ T subpopulations, and the expression of CD38 on CD8+ T lymphocytes were evaluated in four groups: AIDS patients with tuberculosis (HIV/TB, n=14, HIV-1 infected patients (HIV, n=10, HIV-1 negative patients with tuberculosis (TB, n=20 and healthy controls (CTL, n=17. TB and HIV had fewer CD4+ T cells than CTL, with the lowest values observed in TB/HIV (p<0.001. No difference between groups was observed in the percentage of naive and memory/effector subpopulations in CD4+ T lymphocytes. TB (355 cells/mL and HIV (517 cells/mL had diverging effects on CD8+ T cell counts, with a marked depletion observed in HIV/TB (196 cells/mL. TB and HIV up-regulated CD38 expression on CD8+ T cells, a finding also present in TB/HIV. While the decrease of CD4+ T cell counts in HIV/TB may be attributed to HIV and tuberculosis, the decrease of CD8+ T cell counts is likely to be due to tuberculosis.

  2. An Act of Balance Between Adaptive and Maladaptive Immunity in Depression: a Role for T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toben, Catherine; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-12-01

    Historically the monoaminergic neurotransmitter system, in particular the serotonergic system, was seen as being responsible for the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). With the advent of psychoneuroimmunology an important role of the immune system in the interface between the central nervous systems (CNS) and peripheral organ systems has emerged. In addition to the well-characterised neurobiological activities of cytokines, T cell function in the context of depression has been neglected so far. In this review we will investigate the biological roles of T cells in depression. Originally it was thought that the adaptive immune arm including T lymphocytes was excluded from the CNS. It is now clear that peripheral naïve T cells not only carry out continuous surveillance within the brain but also maintain neural plasticity. Furthermore animal studies demonstrate that regulatory T lymphocytes can provide protection against maladaptive behavioural responses associated with depression. Psychogenic stress as a major inducer of depression can lead to transient trafficking of T lymphocytes into the brain stimulating the secretion of certain neurotrophic factors and cytokines. The separate and combined mechanism of CD4 and CD8 T cell activation is likely to determine the response pattern of CNS specific neurokines and neurotrophins. Under chronic stress-induced neuroinflammatory conditions associated with depression, T cell responses may become maladaptive and can be involved in neurodegeneration. Additionally, intracellular adhesion and MHC molecule expression as well as glucocorticoid receptor expression within the brain may play a role in determining T lymphocyte functionality in depression. Taken together, T lymphocyte mechanisms, which confer susceptibility or resilience to MDD, are not yet fully understood. Further insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms which balance the adaptive and maladaptive roles of T lymphocytes may provide a better

  3. A novel method for producing target cells and assessing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in outbred hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendinelli Mauro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytotoxic T lymphocytes play a crucial role in the immunological control of microbial infections and in the design of vaccines and immunotherapies. Measurement of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity requires that the test antigen is presented by target cells having the same or compatible class I major hystocompatibility complex antigens as the effector cells. Conventional assays use target cells labeled with 51chromium and infer cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity by measuring the isotope released by the target cells lysed following incubation with antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This assay is sensitive but needs manipulation and disposal of hazardous radioactive reagents and provides a bulk estimate of the reporter released, which may be influenced by spontaneous release of the label and other poorly controllable variables. Here we describe a novel method for producing target in outbred hosts and assessing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity by flow cytometry. Results The method consists of culturing skin fibroblasts, immortalizing them with a replication defective clone of simian virus 40, and finally transducing them with a bicistronic vector encoding the target antigen and the reporter green fluorescent protein. When used in a flow cytometry-based assay, the target cells obtained with this method proved valuable for assessing the viral envelope protein specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity in domestic cats acutely or chronically infected with feline immunodeficiency virus, a lentivirus similar to human immunodeficiency virus and used as animal model for AIDS studies. Conclusion Given the versatility of the bicistronic vector used, its ability to deliver multiple and large transgenes in target cells, and its extremely wide cell specificity when pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope protein, the method is potentially exploitable in many animal species.

  4. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.10.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes hg19 Input control Blood CD8-Positive T...-Lymphocytes SRX183914,SRX1142249,SRX183915,SRX1142310,SRX1142246,SRX1142313 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.10.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.05.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes hg19 Input control Blood CD8-Positive T...-Lymphocytes SRX1142249,SRX183914,SRX1142246,SRX183915,SRX1142310,SRX1142313 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.05.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes hg19 Input control Blood CD8-Positive T...-Lymphocytes SRX183915,SRX183914,SRX1142249,SRX1142310,SRX1142246,SRX1142313 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Bld.20.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes hg19 Input control Blood CD8-Positive T...-Lymphocytes SRX183915,SRX183914,SRX1142246,SRX1142249,SRX1142310,SRX1142313 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Bld.20.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes.bed ...

  8. Evidence for compartmentalization of functional subsets of CD2+ T lymphocytes in atopic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, E. A.; Snoek, M.; de Groot, C.; Chrétien, I.; Bos, J. D.; Jansen, H. M.; Kapsenberg, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    Lymphokine secretion profiles were studied of human allergen-specific CD4+ T lymphocyte clones (TLC). To this aim, panels of house dust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp)-specific TLC were generated from two atopic Dp-allergic patients, suffering from severe atopic dermatitis (AD1) and

  9. [Immune regulatory effect of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on T lymphocyte].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Xi; Liu, Ting; Meng, Wen-Tong; Zhu, Huan-Ling; Xi, Ya-Ming; Liu, Yong-Mei

    2005-08-01

    To investigate the immune regulatory effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on alloantigen T lymphocyte in vitro, human MSCs were isolated and expanded from bone marrow cells, and identified with cell morphology, and the phenotypes were assessed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. As the stimulation factor of T lymphocytes proliferation, either PHA or dendritic cells isolated from cord blood were cocultured with CD2(+) T lymphocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by magnetic beads with or without MSC in 96-well plats for seven days. T cell proliferation was assessed by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation using a liquid scintillation counter. T cell subsets, Th1, Th2, Tc1 and Tc2 were analyzed by flow cytometry after co-culture of CD2(+) T cells with MSCs for 10 days. The results showed that a significant decrease of CD2(+) T cell proliferation was evident when MSC were added back to T cells stimulated by DC or PHA, and an increase of Th2 and Tc2 subsets were observed after co-culture of MSC with T lymphocytes. It is suggested that allogeneic MSC can suppress T cell proliferation in vitro and the cause of that was partly depend on interaction of cells and the alteration of T cell subsets.

  10. T Lymphocyte Maturation Is Impaired in Healthy Young Individuals Carrying Trisomy 21 (Down Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzarotti, Laura; Trabattoni, Daria; Castelletti, Eleonora; Boldrighini, Benedetta; Piacentini, Luca; Duca, Piergiorgio; Beretta, Silvia; Pacei, Michela; Caprio, Cristiana; Vigano, Alessandra; di Natale, Berardo; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Clerici, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Cytokine production, immune activation, T lymphocytes maturation, and serum IL-7 concentration were examined in 24 youngsters with Down syndrome and no acquired diseases (healthy Down syndrome [12 prepubertal, 13 pubertal]) and 42 age- and gender-matched controls (20 prepubertal, 22 pubertal). Results showed that a complex immune and impairment is…

  11. The CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count is an important predictor for the prognosis of cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Y; Li, P; He, Q; Wei, H; Wu, T; Xia, D; Tan, M; Shi, Y; Su, X

    2017-05-01

    There is great heterogeneity of immunity among patients with cryptococcosis, and severe immunodeficiency can lead to negative clinical outcomes. Underlying disease is a poor surrogate for immune status and inferior in predicting an individual's prognosis. This study was intended to determine whether T-lymphocyte subgroups would be more suitable indicators regarding the severity of infection and clinical outcomes of such patients. We retrieved clinical data on 101 patients with cryptococcosis and compared the validity of multiple parameters (underlying disease and T-lymphocyte subgroups) in predicting the severity of infection and clinical outcome in these patients. For patients with CD4(+) T-lymphocyte counts lower than 400/μL, the odds ratio of disseminated cryptococcosis was 23.3 (P = 0.005). There was a moderate negative correlation between CD4(+) T-cell count and Apache II score (-0.609, P lymphocytes was significantly higher than among those with normal levels (23.8% vs 5.3%, P = 0.016). However, the difference was not significant if the patients were grouped by underlying disease (P = 0.067). The CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count in peripheral blood is a simple and more accurate biomarker for predicting severity of infection and clinical outcome in patients with cryptococcosis.

  12. Summary of workshop findings for porcine T-lymphocyte-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saalmuller, A.; Kuebart, G.; Hollemweguer, E.

    2001-01-01

    blood mononuclear cells, nylon-wool enriched T-lymphocytes, thymocytes, splenocytes, and lymphocytes derived from Peyer's patches. These second round analyses revealed 15 different data sets. Together with 22 pre-selected data sets from the first round analyses with the whole panel of monoclonal...

  13. Activation Effects of Polysaccharides of Flammulina velutipes Mycorrhizae on the T Lymphocyte Immune Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Fei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flammulina velutipes mycorrhizae have increasingly been produced with increasing of F. velutipes production. A mouse model was thus used to examine potential effect of F. velutipes mycorrhizae on the immune function. Fifty female Wistar mice (5-weeks-old weighed 15–20 g were randomly allocated into five groups. Polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae were treated with mice and mice spleen lymphocytes. The levels of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ T lymphocyte, interleukin-2 (IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α were determined. The results showed that the proportions of CD3+, and CD4+ T lymphocyte, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+, and the levels of IL-2 and TNF-a were significantly increased in polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae, while the proportion of CD8+ T lymphocyte was decreased in polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae-dose dependent manner. Our findings indicated that a long term exposure of polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae could activate the T lymphocyte immune function. Polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae was expected to develop into the immune health products.

  14. Lamprey buccal gland secretory protein-2 (BGSP-2 inhibits human T lymphocyte proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing SUN, Shuiyan YU, Zhuang XUE, Cenjie LIU, Yu WU, Xin LIU, Qingwei LI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Lamprey is a representative of the agnathans, the most ancient class of vertebrates. Parasitic lampreys secrete anticoagulant from their buccal glands and prevent blood coagulation of host fishes. We identified a buccal gland secretory protein-2 (BGSP-2 from a buccal gland cDNA library of Lampetra japonica. The full-length BGSP-2 gene was cloned and the recombinant BGSP-2 protein was generated. The role of BGSP-2 on lymphocyte proliferation was studied by examining its effects on human T lymphocytes. We found that lamprey BGSP-2 was able to effectively block the proliferation of T cells in vitro by inducing G1/S cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, it inhibited the proliferation of human T lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA at a minimum concentration of 0.1μg/ml. Our data suggest that lamprey BGSP-2 is able to block the mitosis of human T lymphocytes at the G1/S point, and has the potential of anti-proliferative effect on PHA-activated T lymphocytes [Current Zoology 56 (2: 252–258, 2010].

  15. Expression of CD80 and CD86 on T lymphocytes and monocytes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 on T lymphocytes and monocytes were statistically higher in asthmatic children whether in acute or in between attacks compared to the control group (p<0.05). This up regulation suggests their critical role in pathogenesis of bronchial allergic inflammation in asthma.

  16. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte Antigen-4 Binding to SHP2 Interacting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate potential cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) binding partners and ... CTLA-4 interaction with SHP2 interacting transmembrane adapter protein (SIT) in the down-regulation of the transcription of Interulin-2 required CTLA-4 binding to SIT ..... Chambers CA, Kuhns MS, Egen JG, Allison JP.

  17. CD4 T-Lymphocytes cell counts in adults with human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... at the time of presentation. Majority (75.8%) of the patients had a hemogram of 10 g%. Discussion. Current treatment guidelines recommend that therapy should be initiated when CD4. T-lymphocyte count is 350 cells/L.[12,13] It had been reported that HIV-infected persons with lower CD4 cell counts have ...

  18. ALS patients’ regulatory T lymphocytes are dysfunctional, and correlate with disease progression rate and severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, David R.; Zhao, Weihua; Wang, Jinghong; Zhang, Xiujun; Wen, Shixiang; Neal, Dan; Thonhoff, Jason R.; Alsuliman, Abdullah S.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Rezvani, Katy

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a pathological hallmark of ALS in both transgenic rodent models and patients, and is characterized by proinflammatory T lymphocytes and activated macrophages/microglia. In ALS mouse models, decreased regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) exacerbate the neuroinflammatory process, leading to accelerated motoneuron death and shortened survival; passive transfer of Tregs suppresses the neuroinflammation and prolongs survival. Treg numbers and FOXP3 expression are also decreased in rapidly progressing ALS patients. A key question is whether the marked neuroinflammation in ALS can be attributed to the impaired suppressive function of ALS Tregs in addition to their decreased numbers. To address this question, T lymphocyte proliferation assays were performed. Compared with control Tregs, ALS Tregs were less effective in suppressing responder T lymphocyte proliferation. Although both slowly and rapidly progressing ALS patients had dysfunctional Tregs, the greater the clinically assessed disease burden or the more rapidly progressing the patient, the greater the Treg dysfunction. Epigenetically, the percentage methylation of the Treg-specific demethylated region was greater in ALS Tregs. After in vitro expansion, ALS Tregs regained suppressive abilities to the levels of control Tregs, suggesting that autologous passive transfer of expanded Tregs might offer a novel cellular therapy to slow disease progression. PMID:28289705

  19. ALS patients' regulatory T lymphocytes are dysfunctional, and correlate with disease progression rate and severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, David R; Zhao, Weihua; Wang, Jinghong; Zhang, Xiujun; Wen, Shixiang; Neal, Dan; Thonhoff, Jason R; Alsuliman, Abdullah S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katy; Appel, Stanley H

    2017-03-09

    Neuroinflammation is a pathological hallmark of ALS in both transgenic rodent models and patients, and is characterized by proinflammatory T lymphocytes and activated macrophages/microglia. In ALS mouse models, decreased regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) exacerbate the neuroinflammatory process, leading to accelerated motoneuron death and shortened survival; passive transfer of Tregs suppresses the neuroinflammation and prolongs survival. Treg numbers and FOXP3 expression are also decreased in rapidly progressing ALS patients. A key question is whether the marked neuroinflammation in ALS can be attributed to the impaired suppressive function of ALS Tregs in addition to their decreased numbers. To address this question, T lymphocyte proliferation assays were performed. Compared with control Tregs, ALS Tregs were less effective in suppressing responder T lymphocyte proliferation. Although both slowly and rapidly progressing ALS patients had dysfunctional Tregs, the greater the clinically assessed disease burden or the more rapidly progressing the patient, the greater the Treg dysfunction. Epigenetically, the percentage methylation of the Treg-specific demethylated region was greater in ALS Tregs. After in vitro expansion, ALS Tregs regained suppressive abilities to the levels of control Tregs, suggesting that autologous passive transfer of expanded Tregs might offer a novel cellular therapy to slow disease progression.

  20. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte Antigen-4 Binding to SHP2 Interacting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This phenomenon may lead to the development of new treatment strategies for autoimmune diseases and graft rejection. Keywords: Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, Interleukin-2, Nuclear factor of activated T-cells/Activator protein-1, SHP2 interacting transmembrane adapter protein, Autoimmune diseases, Graft rejection.

  1. Two monoclonal anti-CD3 antibodies can induce different events in human T lymphocyte activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosnek, E. E.; van Lier, R. A.; Aarden, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies, WT32 and CLB-T3/4.2a, directed against the CD3 complex were used to study the mechanism of activation of human peripheral T lymphocytes. WT32, a mouse monoclonal IgG2a antibody with a low avidity (much less than OKT3) for the CD3 complex, effectively induces mitogenesis of

  2. N-(4-F-18-Fluorobenzoyl)Interleukin-2 for PET of Human-Activated T Lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; De Vries, Erik F. J.

    Interleukin-2 (IL2) binds with high affinity to the IL2 receptors overexpressed on activated T lymphocytes in various pathologic conditions. Radiolabeling of IL2 with a positron-emitting isotope could provide a tool for noninvasive PET of activated T cells in immune-mediated diseases. We report the

  3. Expression of CD45RB functionally distinguishes intestinal T lymphocytes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove, T. ten; The Olle, F.; Berkhout, M.; Bruggeman, J.P.; Vyth-Dreese, F.A.; Slors, J.F.M.; Deventer, S.J.H. van; Velde, A.A. te

    2004-01-01

    The importance of CD45RB expression on T cells was already shown in mice where CD45RB(high) expression determines pathogenic potential. In this study, we analyzed the expression of CD45RA, CD45RB, and CD45RO on CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the intestinal mucosa and in the circulation of patients with

  4. Expression of CD45RB functionally distinguishes intestinal T lymphocytes in inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hove, Tessa; The Olle, F.; Berkhout, Marloes; Bruggeman, Joost P.; Vyth-Dreese, Florry A.; Slors, J. Frederik M.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; te Velde, Anje A.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of CD45RB expression on T cells was already shown in mice where CD45RB(high) expression determines pathogenic potential. In this study, we analyzed the expression of CD45RA, CD45RB, and CD45RO on CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the intestinal mucosa and in the circulation of patients with

  5. A three-dimensional organotypic assay to measure target cell killing by cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weigelin, B.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) mediate antigen- and cell-cell contact dependent killing of target cells, such as cancer cells and virus-infected cells. In vivo, this process requires the active migration of CTL towards and away from target cells. We here describe an organotypic 3D collagen matrix

  6. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte Antigen-4 Binding to SHP2 Interacting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This phenomenon may lead to the development of new treatment strategies for autoimmune diseases and graft rejection. Keywords: Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, Interleukin-2, Nuclear factor of activated T-cells/Activator protein-1, SHP2 interacting transmembrane adapter protein, Autoimmune diseases, Graft rejection ...

  7. Activation effects of polysaccharides of Flammulina velutipes mycorrhizae on the T lymphocyte immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng-Fei; Liu, Nai-Xu; Mao, Xin-Xin; Li, Yu; Li, Chang-Tian

    2014-01-01

    Flammulina velutipes mycorrhizae have increasingly been produced with increasing of F. velutipes production. A mouse model was thus used to examine potential effect of F. velutipes mycorrhizae on the immune function. Fifty female Wistar mice (5-weeks-old) weighed 15-20 g were randomly allocated into five groups. Polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae were treated with mice and mice spleen lymphocytes. The levels of CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) T lymphocyte, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) were determined. The results showed that the proportions of CD3(+), and CD4(+) T lymphocyte, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+), and the levels of IL-2 and TNF-a were significantly increased in polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae, while the proportion of CD8(+) T lymphocyte was decreased in polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae-dose dependent manner. Our findings indicated that a long term exposure of polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae could activate the T lymphocyte immune function. Polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae was expected to develop into the immune health products.

  8. Viral load, CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts and antibody titres in HIV-1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are limited reports on HIV-1 RNA load, CD4+ T-lymphocytes and antibody responses in relation to disease progression in HIV-1 infected untreated children in Africa. Methods: To describe the relationships between these parameters, we conducted a longitudinal cohort study involving 51 perinatally HIV-1 ...

  9. Antigen presentation pathways to class I and class II MHC-restricted T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braciale, T J; Morrison, L A; Sweetser, M T; Sambrook, J; Gething, M J; Braciale, V L

    1987-08-01

    Our observations on the cellular immune response to type-A influenza suggest the existence of two distinct pathways of protein antigen presentation to T lymphocytes. One of these pathways is involved with presentation of antigens introduced into the presenting cell from without. This exogenous presentation pathway is the well-recognized route of presentation of soluble and particulate antigens to T lymphocytes. This pathway probably involves uptake of antigen into endocytic vesicles, alteration of antigen within an intracellular compartment, and subsequent display of antigen on the presenting cell surface (Unanue 1984). The second pathway is one which we have tentatively designated as an endogenous presentation pathway. The constraints on this pathway have yet to be fully defined. At a minimum, this pathway appears to involve the presentation of antigens which are synthesized de novo in the presenting cell utilizing the cell's biosynthetic machinery. This pathway may also handle preformed antigens located within the cytosolic compartment of the presenting cell. Perhaps the most striking feature of these two antigen presentation pathways is the close association between the MHC restriction of an antigen-specific T lymphocyte and the pathway of antigen presentation to that T lymphocyte. Our data suggest that this association holds both at the effector level and at the level of induction of T lymphocytes. Thus, presentation of a given antigen by the endogenous pathway preferentially triggers a response from class I MHC-restricted T lymphocytes directed to that antigen. The molecular basis for this link of class I MHC-restriction to the endogenous pathway and MHC class II restriction to the exogenous pathway is unknown. It seems likely that interactions between MHC molecules and antigen within the presenting cell may be critical for the demarcation of these pathways. Thus, for example, antigen presented by the endogenous route may only be able to associate

  10. Distinct human T-lymphocyte responses triggered by Porphyromonas gingivalis capsular serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernal, Rolando; Diaz-Guerra, Eva; Silva, Augusto; Sanz, Mariano; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis can synthesize an extracellular capsule and different serotypes have been described based on capsular antigenicity. On dendritic cells (DCs), the type of capsule present plays a role on the strength of the developed immune response. This study aimed to investigate the T-lymphocyte responses when stimulated with autologous mature DCs exposed to different P. gingivalis K-serotypes. Naïve CD4(+) T-lymphocytes were obtained from healthy subjects and stimulated with autologous DCs primed with increasing multiplicity of infections of the different P. gingivalis K-serotypes. The Th1, Th2, Th17 and T-regulatory cytokines and transcription factor levels were quantified. Distinct types of response were detected when T-lymphocytes were stimulated by DCs primed with the different P. gingivalis K-serotypes. T-lymphocytes stimulated by K1 or K2-primed DCs elicited higher levels of Th1 and Th17-associated cytokines, T-bet and RORC2 than T-lymphocytes stimulated with DCs primed with the other serotypes. Conversely, the serotypes K3-K5 induced higher levels of Th2-associated cytokines and GATA-3 than the others. These results demonstrate that DCs primed with the different P. gingivalis K-serotypes elicited distinct T-cell responses. Strains K1 (W83) and K2 (HG184) induced a Th1/Th17 pattern of immune response and K3 (A7A1-28), K4 (ATCC(®49417™) ), and K5 (HG1690) a Th2 response. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Differential Inhibition of T Lymphocyte Proliferation and Cytokine Synthesis by [6]-Gingerol, [8]-Gingerol, and [10]-Gingerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Megan; Furlong, Suzanne J; Power Coombs, Melanie R; Hoskin, David W

    2015-11-01

    [6]-Gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [10]-gingerol are pungent components of fresh ginger, extracts of which inhibit various components of the inflammatory response. Because little is known regarding the effect of gingerols with different unbranched alkyl side chain lengths on the activation and effector function of T lymphocytes, we compared the effects of [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [10]-gingerol on murine T lymphocyte proliferation, expression of CD25 and CD69 activation markers, cytokine synthesis, and interleukin (IL)-2 receptor signaling. All three gingerols inhibited DNA synthesis by T lymphocytes, as well as interferon-γ synthesis. In contrast, only [8]-gingerol and [10]-gingerol inhibited CD25 and CD69 expression, and IL-2 synthesis. None of the gingerols affected IL-4 synthesis. Exogenous IL-2 enhanced T lymphocyte proliferation in the presence of [6]-gingerol but did not significantly increase T lymphocyte proliferation in the presence of [8]-gingerol or [10]-gingerol. In line with this finding, [8]-gingerol and [10]-gingerol impaired IL-2-induced proliferation of CTLL-2 cells, but constitutive CD25 expression was unaffected, indicating inhibition of IL-2 receptor signaling. In general, [10]-gingerol and [8]-gingerol were more potent inhibitors of T lymphocytes than [6]-gingerol. Suppression of T lymphocyte responses by gingerols suggests that these phytochemicals may be beneficial in chronic inflammatory conditions associated with excessive or inappropriate T lymphocyte activation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  12. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: NoD.Bld.50.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: NoD.Bld.10.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes mm9 Histone Blood CD4-Positive T-Lympho...hive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes.bed ...

  2. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes mm9 Histone Blood CD8-Positive T-Lympho...,SRX994939,SRX994935 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.CD8-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: NoD.Bld.05.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: InP.Bld.10.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: InP.Bld.20.AllAg.CD4-Positive_T-Lymphocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. CD4+ T lymphocytes contribute to protective immunity induced in sheep and goats by Haemonchus contortus gut antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanu, F N; McGuire, T C; Davis, W C; Besser, T E; Jasmer, D P

    1997-10-01

    Immunization with parasite antigens derived from the gut of adult Haemonchus contortus induces significant levels of protection against the parasite in sheep and goats. However, the mechanisms of immunity involved in this protection are not clear. Here, we investigate the requirement for CD4+ T lymphocytes in gut antigen-induced immunity against H. contortus. Gut antigen immunized animals were depleted (> 98%) of their CD4+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood by intravenous injection of an anti-CD4 MoAb. Depletion in peripheral blood persisted for at least eight days, after which there was gradual recovery of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Serum antibody levels in gut antigen-immunized animals correlated significantly with worm parameters, suggesting a contribution by antibody to the immunity observed. By covariate analysis, using ELISA OD as the covariate, CD4+ T lymphocyte depletion was shown to partially abrogate immunity induced by gut antigen immunization, against challenge infection with H. contortus. The greatest effect of CD4+ T lymphocyte depletion was observed at 14 days post-infection with differences between CD4+ T lymphocyte depleted and intact animals less apparent between days 21 and 25. Collectively, our data indicate that CD4+ T lymphocytes contribute to immunity induced by gut antigens. Our results also suggest that antibody works synergistically with CD4+ T lymphocytes to confer this immunity.

  4. Effects of smoking, aromatic amines, and chromates on CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes in male workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, Takeshi; Araki, Shunichi; Sata, Fumihiro; Nakata, Akinori [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Araki, Takaharu [Tokyo Rosai Hospital (Japan). Center of Occupational Medicine

    1998-07-01

    To investigate effects of smoking, aromatic amines (AAs), and chromates (CRs) on Tlymphocyte subpopulations, the authors measured CD3{sup +}, CD4{sup +}, and CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of 33 nonexposed workers, 25 AA-use workers, 27 AA-production workers, and 19 CR workers (all subjects were males). The number of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes in smokers of nonexposed workers was significantly larger than that of the nonsmokers; also, the numbers of CD4{sup +} and CD3{sup +} T lymphocytes in smokers of each group of AA-production and AA-use workers were significantly larger than those in nonsmokers. Numbers of CD4{sup +} and CD3{sup +} T lymphocytes in nonsmokers of AA-production and CR workers were significantly smaller than those in nonsmokers of nonexposed workers; the number of CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes in nonsmokers of CR workers was significantly smaller than that in nonsmokers of nonexposed workers.

  5. Learning from panel boards: T-lymphocyte and B-lymphocyte self-tolerance game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Gabriela Unchalo; Da Rosa, Ana Cecília Michel; Busnello, Renné Gusmão; Melchior, Raquel; Masiero, Paulo Ricardo; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia

    2004-09-01

    Immunology is a vast, complex and challenging subject. To facilitate students' understanding, the authors have created a T-lymphocyte and B-lymphocyte self-tolerance game. The T-lymphocyte self-tolerance game consisted of 24 cardboard pieces with illustrations and statements about self-tolerance mechanisms and one large panel board. The B-lymphocyte panel board consisted of 11 cardboard pieces with illustrations and statements about self-tolerance mechanisms, and two large panels. Students had to associate mechanisms of self-tolerance with the corresponding cardboard pieces. In total, 120 students attended the session. Of these, 95.8% considered that the panel board facilitated their understanding; 95% affirmed they understood how T- and B-lymphocyte self-tolerance worked. Students' grades improved significantly. The good results obtained show the value of using a panel board when approaching a subject that is vast and complex.

  6. Dynamic T-lymphocyte chemokine receptor expression induced by interferon-beta therapy in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, M; Sorensen, P S; Khademi, M

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with interferon (IFN)-beta reduces clinical disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Using flow cytometry, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a real-time polymerase chain reaction, we studied in vivo IFN-beta-induced effects on CD4(+) T-lymphocyte chemokine receptor expression...... and immunoregulatory genes. In conclusion, IFN-beta treatment caused 'steady-state' increases of several chemokine receptors relevant for CD4(+) T-lymphocyte trafficking and function, possibly facilitating lymphocyte migration into the CNS. An important therapeutic effect of IFN-beta treatment may be the normalization...... as these influence central nervous system (CNS) transmigration and inflammation. At 'steady state' (>/=1 day after the most recent IFN-beta injection), IFN-beta treatment increased CD4(+) T-cell surface expression of CC chemokine receptor (CCR)4, CCR5 and CCR7 after 3 months of treatment, whereas that of CXC...

  7. Silencing the expression of Cbl-b enhances the immune activation of T lymphocytes against RM-1 prostate cancer cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kui Zhou

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Silencing Cbl-b significantly enhanced T lymphocyte function and T lymphocyte cytotoxicity activity against a model prostate cancer cell line in vitro. This study suggests a potentially novel immunotherapeutic strategy against prostate cancer.

  8. Influence of metal ions on human lymphocytes and the generation of titanium-specific T-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Erwin; Cadosch, Dieter; Gautschi, Oliver P; Sprengel, Kai; Filgueira, Luis

    2011-01-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest the involvement of the immune system by means of activation by metal ions released via biocorrosion, in the pathophysiologic mechanisms of aseptic loosening of orthopedic implants. However, the detailed mechanisms of how metal ions become antigenic and are presented to T-lymphocytes, in addition to how the local inflammatory response is driven, remain to be investigated. Human T-lymphocytes were cultured in the presence of a variety of metal ions before investigating functional and phenotypic changes using flow cytometric analysis. Additionally, human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mDC) loaded with metal ions were used as antigen-presenting cells and incubated with naive T-lymphocytes with the aim of generating titanium-specific T-lymphocytes. Using an autologous in vitro model, with mDC treated with Titanium (IV), we were able to induce Titanium (IV)-specific T-lymphocytes. These T-lymphocytes responded in a dose-related manner to Titanium (IV), while they did not cross-react with Titanium (III) or other metal ions, indicating that the new antigenic peptide complexes formed by Titanium (IV) are highly specific. This study showed that mDC exposed to Titanium (IV) are able to induce the generation of Titanium (IV)-specific T-lymphocytes, demonstrating the strong and specific antigenicity of Titanium (IV) ions released by biocorrosion.

  9. Inhibition of T-lymphocyte proliferation by cucurbitacins from Picrorhiza scrophulariaeflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, H F; van den Berg, A J; Kroes, B H; Beukelman, C J; Quarles van Ufford, H C; van Dijk, H; Labadie, R P

    2000-09-01

    Two cucurbitacin aglycons were isolated from the dried rhizomes of Picrorhiza scrophulariaeflora and were identified as 25-acetoxy-2,3, 16,20-tetrahydroxy-9-methyl-19-norlanosta-5,23-dien-22-one (picracin, 1) and 2,3,16,20,25-pentahydroxy-9-methyl-19-norlanosta-5, 23-dien-22-one (deacetylpicracin, 2). Both compounds inhibit mitogen-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation at an IC(50) value of 1 microM.

  10. Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Chimpanzees

    OpenAIRE

    Santra, Sampa; Fultz, Patricia N.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1999-01-01

    Chimpanzees have been important in studies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis and in evaluation of HIV-1 candidate vaccines. However, little information is available about HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in these animals. In the present study, in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from infected chimpanzees with HIV-1 Gag peptides was shown to be a sensitive, reproducible method of expanding HIV-1-specific CD8+ effector CTL. Of ...

  11. The development of in vitro mutagenicity testing systems using T-lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertini, R.J.

    1992-05-01

    This work has focused on the development of in vitro T-cell mutation assays. Conditions have been defined to measure the in vitro induction of mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in human T-lymphocytes. This assay is a parallel to our in vivo hprt assay, in that the same cells are utilized. However, the in vitro assay allows for carefully controlled dose response studies. 21 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  12. BRCA1 function in T lymphocytes: a cellular specificity of a different kind

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Kevin; Liu, Edison T

    2000-01-01

    Recent work by Mak et al demonstrates that mice carrying a T-cell-specific disruption of the brca1 gene display markedly impaired T-lymphocyte development and proliferation in the absence of any increased tendency for the formation of tumors. Interestingly, the extent of these defects was found to be highly dependent on cellular context. Contrasting the rather broad tissue expression pattern of brca1 against its exquisitely selective etiologic role in cancers of the breast and ovary, many of ...

  13. Accelerated arteriosclerosis in heart transplant recipients is associated with a T-lymphocyte-mediated endothelialitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruban, R. H.; Beschorner, W. E.; Baumgartner, W. A.; Augustine, S. M.; Ren, H.; Reitz, B. A.; Hutchins, G. M.

    1990-01-01

    Accelerated arteriosclerosis has emerged as a major life-threatening complication in long-term survivors of heart transplantation. It has been proposed that accelerated arteriosclerosis is an immune-mediated complication of rejection. We observed a striking endothelialitis in the coronary arteries of two explanted hearts obtained from patients with severe transplant-related accelerated arteriosclerosis. This finding prompted us to review the pathologic changes in the coronary arteries of 23 autopsied patients who had received heart transplants. The infiltrate in these vessels was characterized using immunohistochemical stains for lymphocytes (CD45), macrophages (MAC-387), T lymphocytes (CD45RO), B lymphocytes (L-26), and smooth muscle cells (actin). In addition, a full panel of monoclonal antibodies was used on the fresh-frozen tissue available from one of the two explanted hearts. Ten of the eleven recipients with accelerated arteriosclerosis had a moderate to marked lymphocytic endothelialitis compared to 3 of 14 without transplant-related arteriosclerosis (P less than 0.005). Immunohistochemical staining of the paraffin-embedded material demonstrated that most of the lymphocytes in the subendothelial space of these vessels were T lymphocytes and that this infiltrate was associated with an accumulation of macrophages and a proliferation of smooth muscle cells in the intima. In the explanted heart from which fresh-frozen tissue was available for more detailed cell typing, the T cells marked predominantly as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CD8+, CD2+). These results suggest that accelerated arteriosclerosis may be mediated, in part, by a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-directed endothelialitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1699422

  14. [The effect of myosin from the human myocardium on quantitative T-lymphocyte values--active rosettes in patients with myocardial infarct and stenocardia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manev, V; Penkova, K; Ivanov, G; Ivanova, I; Grigorov, M; Nedialkova, V

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to study the influence of human myocardium myosin on the quantitative values of T-lymphocytes examined as active rosettes [correction of rosellae] in patients with ischemic heart disease. The study included 99 patients with ischemic heart disease, 49 of them with myocardial infarction and 50--with stenocardia. The controls were 61 clinically healthy donors. It was established that the active rosettes [correction of rosellae] in the patients with myocardial infarction were significantly less than in the controls (p less than 0.05). A significant inhibiting action of the human myocardium myosin on the active rosettes [correction of rosellae] was manifested (p less than 0.002). This action in the patients with stenocardia was less expressed (p less than 0.05). Myosin from a striated muscle did not exert an inhibiting action (p greater than 0.1). The results prove the participation of human myocardium myosin in the pathogenetic mechanism of T-lymphocytes suppression in patients with ischemic heart disease.

  15. Increase in CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes in patients with vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, A P; Aguas, A P; Grande, N R; Monteiro, E; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Some workers employed by the aviation industry are exposed to large pressure amplitude and low frequency (LPALF) noise (> or =90 dB SPL, vibroacoustic disease (VAD), a whole-body noise-induced pathology. Since VAD patients have an increased prevalence of respiratory and skin infections, we investigated whether these individuals had any quantitative changes in the number of peripheral blood cell populations. Also, we investigated whether different types of noise environments are related to cell quantification. Quantification of peripheral blood cell populations was performed in venous blood samples of 34 VAD-diagnosed patients, and 41 controls. Leukocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and surface phenotypes of CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes were considered. We found that VAD patients showed a statistically significant elevation in the number of circulating CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes when compared with the control population, but not when compared among different noise-environments. Monocyte and granulocyte populations did not register significant differences. VAD patients present enhancement in the number of circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CD8+ and CD4+ T cells) thus indicating that this environmental disease is associated with quantitative changes in immune cells.

  16. Fluoxetine suppresses calcium signaling in human T lymphocytes through depletion of intracellular calcium stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, V; De Bock, M; Broeckx, B J G; Kiselinova, M; De Spiegelaere, W; Vandekerckhove, L; Van Steendam, K; Leybaert, L; Deforce, D

    2015-09-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, have recently been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Although the effects on cytokine secretion, proliferation and viability of T lymphocytes have been extensively characterized, little is known about the mechanism behind these effects. It is well known that Ca(2+) signaling is an important step in the signaling transduction pathway following T cell receptor activation. Therefore, we investigated if fluoxetine interferes with Ca(2+) signaling in Jurkat T lymphocytes. Fluoxetine was found to suppress Ca(2+) signaling in response to T cell receptor activation. Moreover, fluoxetine was found to deplete intracellular Ca(2+) stores, thereby leaving less Ca(2+) available for release upon IP3- and ryanodine-receptor activation. The Ca(2+)-modifying effects of fluoxetine are not related to its capability to block the serotonin transporter, as even a large excess of 5HT did not abolish the effects. In conclusion, these data show that fluoxetine decreases IP3- and ryanodine-receptor mediated Ca(2+) release in Jurkat T lymphocytes, an effect likely to be at the basis of the observed immunosuppression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Visualization of antigen-specific human cytotoxic T lymphocytes labeled with superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Ambros J. [Technical University of Munich (TUM), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Holzapfel, Konstantin; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Neudorfer, Juliana; Kroenig, Holger; Peschel, Christian; Bernhard, Helga [TUM, Munich, Department of Hematology/Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [TUM, Munich, Division of Neuropathology, Institute of Pathology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    New technologies are needed to characterize the migration and survival of antigen-specific T cells in vivo. In this study, we developed a novel technique for the labeling of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes with superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles and the subsequent depiction with a conventional 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. Antigen-specific CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes were labeled with ferucarbotran by lipofection. The uptake of ferucarbotran was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy using a dextran-specific antibody, and the intracellular enrichment of iron was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. The imaging of T cells was performed by magnetic resonance on day 0, 2, 7 and 14 after the labeling procedure. On day 0 and 2 post labeling, a pronounced shortening of T2*-relaxation times was observed, which diminished after 7 days and was not detectable anymore after 14 days, probably due to the retained mitotic activity of the labeled T cells. Of importance, the antigen-specific cytolytic activity of the T cells was preserved following ferucarbotran labeling. Efficient ferucarbotran labeling of functionally active T lymphocytes and their detection by magnetic resonance imaging allows the in vivo monitoring of T cells and, subsequently, will impact the further development of T cell-based therapies. (orig.)

  18. A Role for T-Lymphocytes in Human Breast Cancer and in Canine Mammary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Isabel Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment has a prominent role in carcinogenesis and benefits the proliferation and survival of malignant cells, promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Mammary tumors are frequently infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of immune cells where T-lymphocytes have a great importance. Interestingly, similar inflammatory cell infiltrates, cytokine and chemokine expression in humans and canine mammary tumors were recently described. However, in both species, despite all the scientific evidences that appoint for a significant role of T-lymphocytes, a definitive conclusion concerning the effectiveness of T-cell dependent immune mechanisms has not been achieved yet. In the present review, we describe similarities between human breast cancer and canine mammary tumors regarding tumor T-lymphocyte infiltration, such as relationship of TILs and mammary tumors malignancy, association of ratio CD4+/ CD8+ T-cells with low survival rates, promotion of tumor progression by Th2 cells actions, and association of great amounts of Treg cells with poor prognostic factors. This apparent parallelism together with the fact that dogs develop spontaneous tumors in the context of a natural immune system highlight the dog as a possible useful biological model for studies in human breast cancer immunology.

  19. T-lymphocyte subset dynamics in well-treated HIV-infected men during a bout of exhausting exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, Carsten; Hansen, Birgitte R; Kolte, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals the substantial lymphocytosis during a bout of exhausting exercise constitutes primarily mature T cells from the peripheral lymphoid organs but naïve T cells are also recruited. This study investigated whether the defective CD4 + T-lymphocyte count in peripheral blood during...... rest in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients would also be observed following a maximal output ergometer bicycle test. At rest, in 45 well-treated HIV-infected patients, mature and naïve CD4 + T-lymphocyte counts were decreased whereas the less immune active CD8 + T lymphocytes were...

  20. Genipin attenuates sepsis-induced immunosuppression through inhibition of T lymphocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, So-Jin; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2015-07-01

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, initiates a complex immune response consisting of an early hyperinflammatory response and a subsequent hypoinflammatory response that impairs the removal of infectious organisms. The importance of sepsis-induced immunosuppression and its contribution to mortality has recently emerged. Apoptotic depletion of T lymphocytes is a critical cause of immunosuppression in the late phase of sepsis. Genipin is a major active compound of gardenia fruit that has anti-apoptotic and anti-microbial properties. This study investigated the mechanisms of action of genipin on immunosuppression in the late phase of sepsis. Mice received genipin (1, 2.5 and 5mg/kg, i.v.) at 0 (immediately) and 24h after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Twenty-six hours after CLP, the spleen and blood were collected. Genipin improved the survival rate compared to controls. CLP increased the levels of FADD, caspase-8 and caspase-3 protein expression, which were attenuated by genipin. Genipin increased the level of anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 protein expression, while it decreased the level of pro-apoptotic phosphorylated-Bim protein expression in CLP. CLP decreased the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell population, while it increased the regulatory T cell (Treg) population and the level of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 protein expression on Treg. These changes were attenuated by genipin. The splenic levels of interferon-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 were reduced, while the levels of IL-4 and IL-10 increased after CLP. Genipin attenuated these alterations. These findings suggest that genipin reduces immunosuppression by inhibiting T lymphocyte apoptosis in the late phase of sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. T lymphocytes facilitate brain metastasis of breast cancer by inducing Guanylate-Binding Protein 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Dana A M; Pedrosa, Rute M S M; Smid, Marcel; van der Weiden, Marcel; de Weerd, Vanja; Nigg, Alex L; Berrevoets, Cor; Zeneyedpour, Lona; Priego, Neibla; Valiente, Manuel; Luider, Theo M; Debets, Reno; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Kros, Johan M

    2018-01-19

    The discovery of genes and molecular pathways involved in the formation of brain metastasis would direct the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent this deadly complication of cancer. By comparing gene expression profiles of Estrogen Receptor negative (ER-) primary breast tumors between patients who developed metastasis to brain and to organs other than brain, we found that T lymphocytes promote the formation of brain metastases. To functionally test the ability of T cells to promote brain metastasis, we used an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model. By co-culturing T lymphocytes with breast cancer cells, we confirmed that T cells increase the ability of breast cancer cells to cross the BBB. Proteomics analysis of the tumor cells revealed Guanylate-Binding Protein 1 (GBP1) as a key T lymphocyte-induced protein that enables breast cancer cells to cross the BBB. The GBP1 gene appeared to be up-regulated in breast cancer of patients who developed brain metastasis. Silencing of GBP1 reduced the ability of breast cancer cells to cross the in vitro BBB model. In addition, the findings were confirmed in vivo in an immunocompetent syngeneic mouse model. Co-culturing of ErbB2 tumor cells with activated T cells induced a significant increase in Gbp1 expression by the cancer cells. Intracardial inoculation of the co-cultured tumor cells resulted in preferential seeding to brain. Moreover, intracerebral outgrowth of the tumor cells was demonstrated. The findings point to a role of T cells in the formation of brain metastases in ER- breast cancers, and provide potential targets for intervention to prevent the development of cerebral metastases.

  2. Necroptosis takes place in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Pan

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is characterized by progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes and dysfunction of the immune system. The numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the human body are maintained constantly by homeostatic mechanisms that failed during HIV-1 infection, resulting in progressive loss of CD4+ T cells mainly via apoptosis. Recently, a non-apoptotic form of necrotic programmed cell death, named necroptosis, has been investigated in many biological and pathological processes. We then determine whether HIV-1-infected cells also undergo necroptosis. In this report, we demonstrate that HIV-1 not only induces apoptosis, but also mediates necroptosis in the infected primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD4+ T-cell lines. Necroptosis-dependent cytopathic effects are significantly increased in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells that is lack of Fas-associated protein-containing death domain (FADD, indicating that necroptosis occurs as an alternative cell death mechanism in the absence of apoptosis. Unlike apoptosis, necroptosis mainly occurs in HIV-infected cells and spares bystander damage. Treatment with necrostatin-1(Nec-1, a RIP1 inhibitor that specifically blocks the necroptosis pathway, potently restrains HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect and interestingly, inhibits the formation of HIV-induced syncytia in CD4+ T-cell lines. This suggests that syncytia formation is mediated, at least partially, by necroptosis-related processes. Furthermore, we also found that the HIV-1 infection-augmented tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α plays a key role in inducing necroptosis and HIV-1 Envelope and Tat proteins function as its co-factors. Taken together,necroptosis can function as an alternative cell death pathway in lieu of apoptosis during HIV-1 infection, thereby also contributing to HIV-1-induced cytopathic effects. Our results reveal that in addition to apoptosis, necroptosis also plays an important role in HIV-1-induced pathogenesis.

  3. Surface biotinylation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes for in vivo tracking of tumor immunotherapy in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anning; Wu, Yue; Linnoila, Jenny; Pulli, Benjamin; Wang, Cuihua; Zeller, Matthias; Ali, Muhammad; Lewandrowski, Grant K; Li, Jinghui; Tricot, Benoit; Keliher, Edmund; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Fulci, Giulia; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Tannous, Bakhos A; Yao, Zhenwei; Chen, John W

    2016-12-01

    Currently, there is no stable and flexible method to label and track cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in vivo in CTL immunotherapy. We aimed to evaluate whether the sulfo-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-biotin-streptavidin (SA) platform could chemically modify the cell surface of CTLs for in vivo tracking. CD8+ T lymphocytes were labeled with sulfo-NHS-biotin under different conditions and then incubated with SA-Alexa647. Labeling efficiency was proportional to sulfo-NHS-biotin concentration. CD8+ T lymphocytes could be labeled with higher efficiency with sulfo-NHS-biotin in DPBS than in RPMI (P < 0.05). Incubation temperature was not a key factor. CTLs maintained sufficient labeling for at least 72 h (P < 0.05), without altering cell viability. After co-culturing labeled CTLs with mouse glioma stem cells (GSCs) engineered to present biotin on their surface, targeting CTLs could specifically target biotin-presenting GSCs and inhibited cell proliferation (P < 0.01) and tumor spheres formation. In a biotin-presenting GSC brain tumor model, targeting CTLs could be detected in biotin-presenting gliomas in mouse brains but not in the non-tumor-bearing contralateral hemispheres (P < 0.05). In vivo fluorescent molecular tomography imaging in a subcutaneous U87 mouse model confirmed that targeting CTLs homed in on the biotin-presenting U87 tumors but not the control U87 tumors. PET imaging with 89Zr-deferoxamine-biotin and SA showed a rapid clearance of the PET signal over 24 h in the control tumor, while only minimally decreased in the targeted tumor. Thus, sulfo-NHS-biotin-SA labeling is an efficient method to noninvasively track the migration of adoptive transferred CTLs and does not alter CTL viability or interfere with CTL-mediated cytotoxic activity.

  4. T-lymphocyte-expressing inflammatory cytokines underlie persistence of proteinuria in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.

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    Guimarães, Fábio Tadeu Lourenço; Melo, Gustavo Eustáquio Brito Alvim de; Cordeiro, Thiago Macedo; Feracin, Victor; Vieira, Etel Rocha; Pereira, Wagner de Fátima; Pinheiro, Sérgio Veloso Brant; Miranda, Aline Silva; Simões-E-Silva, Ana Cristina

    2017-09-28

    There is evidence of an important role of immune system changes in the triggering and maintenance of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of cytokines in lymphocyte populations of patients with INS in comparison to healthy individuals, according to proteinuria. This cross-sectional study included 44 patients with INS and eight healthy children, matched for age and sex (controls). Patients were subdivided according to proteinuria: persistent proteinuria or partial remission (PP≥300mg/24h, n=17) and low proteinuria or complete remission (LP<300mg/24h, n=27). Ex vivo analysis of peripheral blood leukocytes by flow cytometry was performed using surface markers for T-lymphocytes, TCD4, TCD8, natural killer (NK) cells, NKT, and B-lymphocytes. Frequencies of intracellular cytokines were analyzed in these cells. The frequencies of B-lymphocytes, NK cells, and NKT cells were lower in INS than in controls, whereas INS patients had a higher frequency of CD4 + tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α + cells than controls. Cytotoxic-T-lymphocytes expressing IFN-γ were lower in INS than in controls. Patients with PP showed higher frequencies of CD4-T-lymphocytes expressing IFN-γ and TNF-α than controls. CD8-lymphocytes expressing TNF-α were increased in PP group when compared with LP and controls, while CD8 + interferon (IFN)-γ + cells were lower than in LP and in controls. Regardless the level of proteinuria, INS patients had increased expression of TNF-α in CD4-lymphocytes and reduced expression of IFN-γ in CD8-lymphocytes. Persistence of proteinuria was associated with higher levels of inflammatory markers. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Immortalized myeloid suppressor cells trigger apoptosis in antigen-activated T lymphocytes.

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    Apolloni, E; Bronte, V; Mazzoni, A; Serafini, P; Cabrelle, A; Segal, D M; Young, H A; Zanovello, P

    2000-12-15

    We described a generalized suppression of CTL anamnestic responses that occurred in mice bearing large tumor nodules or immunized with powerful recombinant viral immunogens. Immune suppression entirely depended on GM-CSF-driven accumulation of CD11b(+)/Gr-1(+) myeloid suppressor cells (MSC) in secondary lymphoid organs. To further investigate the nature and properties of MSC, we immortalized CD11b(+)/Gr-1(+) cells isolated from the spleens of immunosuppressed mice, using a retrovirus encoding the v-myc and v-raf oncogenes. Immortalized cells expressed monocyte/macrophage markers (CD11b, F4/80, CD86, CD11c), but they differed from previously characterized macrophage lines in their capacities to inhibit T lymphocyte activation. Two MSC lines, MSC-1 and MSC-2, were selected based upon their abilities to inhibit Ag-specific proliferative and functional CTL responses. MSC-1 line was constitutively inhibitory, while suppressive functions of MSC-2 line were stimulated by exposure to the cytokine IL-4. Both MSC lines triggered the apoptotic cascade in Ag-activated T lymphocytes by a mechanism requiring cell-cell contact. Some well-known membrane molecules involved in the activation of apoptotic pathways (e.g., TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, Fas ligand, TNF-alpha) were ruled out as candidate effectors for the suppression mechanism. The immortalized myeloid lines represent a novel, useful tool to shed light on the molecules involved in the differentiation of myeloid-related suppressors as well as in the inhibitory pathway they use to control T lymphocyte activation.

  6. Metabolic reprogramming in the tumour microenvironment: a hallmark shared by cancer cells and T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Katrina E; Coomber, Brenda L; Bridle, Byram W

    2017-10-01

    Altered metabolism is a hallmark of cancers, including shifting oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and up-regulating glutaminolysis to divert carbon sources into biosynthetic pathways that promote proliferation and survival. Therefore, metabolic inhibitors represent promising anti-cancer drugs. However, T cells must rapidly divide and survive in harsh microenvironments to mediate anti-cancer effects. Metabolic profiles of cancer cells and activated T lymphocytes are similar, raising the risk of metabolic inhibitors impairing the immune system. Immune checkpoint blockade provides an example of how metabolism can be differentially impacted to impair cancer cells but support T cells. Implications for research with metabolic inhibitors are discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Large-scale validation of methods for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lundegaard, Claus; Lamberth, K.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reliable predictions of Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes are essential for rational vaccine design. Most importantly, they can minimize the experimental effort needed to identify epitopes. NetCTL is a web-based tool designed for predicting human CTL epitopes in any given protein....... of the other methods achieved a sensitivity of 0.64. The NetCTL-1.2 method is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetCTL.All used datasets are available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/suppl/immunology/CTL-1.2.php....

  8. Activation Effects of Polysaccharides of Flammulina velutipes Mycorrhizae on the T Lymphocyte Immune Function

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Zheng-Fei; Liu, Nai-Xu; Mao, Xin-Xin; Li, Yu; Li, Chang-Tian

    2014-01-01

    Flammulina velutipes mycorrhizae have increasingly been produced with increasing of F. velutipes production. A mouse model was thus used to examine potential effect of F. velutipes mycorrhizae on the immune function. Fifty female Wistar mice (5-weeks-old) weighed 15–20 g were randomly allocated into five groups. Polysaccharide of F. velutipes mycorrhizae were treated with mice and mice spleen lymphocytes. The levels of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ T lymphocyte, interleukin-2 (IL-2), and tumor necros...

  9. Methotrexate preferentially affects Tc1 and Tc17 subset of CD8 T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Amit; Ahmad, Shabeer; Kaur, Prabhdeep; Bhatnagar, Archana; Dhawan, Veena; Dhir, Varun

    2018-02-20

    Rheumatoid arthritis is considered a T-lymphocyte-mediated disease. However, studies have focussed on CD4 T-lymphocytes, ignoring CD8 T-lymphocytes despite the latter being found abundantly in the synovium. Specifically, there is little data of the effect of methotrexate, the gold-standard DMARD, on various CD8 cytokine T-lymphocyte subsets and conflicting data on CD4 subsets. In this prospective study, patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, who were 18 to 65 years of age, were treated with methotrexate (up to 25 mg per week) for 24 weeks. At baseline and 24 weeks, frequencies of CD8 + IFNγ + , CD8 + IL17 + , CD8 + IL4 + , corresponding CD4 subsets and plasma levels of IFNγ, IL-12, IL-10, IL-4 and IL-17 were determined by flow cytometry. These are summarised as median (IQR = interquartile range, 25th-75th percentile) and paired data compared using Wilcoxon signed rank test. This study included 67 patients (F/M = 4:1) with rheumatoid arthritis, 57 (85%) being RF positive and 20 receiving prednisolone at baseline. Mean (± SD) dose of methotrexate at 24 weeks was 22.9 ± 3.0 mg per week. On treatment with methotrexate, there was a significant (p = 0.04) decline in CD8 + IFNγ + cells from 37.2 (IQR 19.4-60.2) to 22.7% (IQR 8.5-49.7) and a marginal increase in CD8 + IL17 + cells from 0.3 (IQR 0.1-0.6) to 0.4 (IQR 0.2-1.2), p = 0.006. There was no significant change in the other subsets. There was also a significant decline in circulating levels of IL-12, IL-10 and IL-17 and marginal increase in IL-4. On evaluating by response, non-responders but not responders had a significant increase in CD8 + IL17 + (p = 0.01). There is a significant decline of CD8 + IFNγ + T cells and marginal increase in CD8 + IL17 + T cells after methotrexate. Change in Tc1 subset may be mediated through reduction in IL-12 levels.

  10. Piperine blocks interleukin-2-driven cell cycle progression in CTLL-2 T lymphocytes by inhibiting multiple signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Carolyn D; Greenshields, Anna L; Liwski, Robert S; Hoskin, David W

    2015-04-02

    Piperine, a pungent alkaloid found in the fruits of black pepper plants, has diverse physiological effects, including the ability to inhibit immune cell-mediated inflammation. Since the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) is essential for the clonal expansion and differentiation of T lymphocytes, we investigated the effect of piperine on IL-2 signaling in IL-2-dependent mouse CTLL-2 T lymphocytes. Tritiated-thymidine incorporation assays and flow cytometric analysis of Oregon Green 488-stained cells showed that piperine inhibited IL-2-driven T lymphocyte proliferation; however, piperine did not cause T lymphocytes to die or decrease their expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor, as determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis showed that piperine blocked the IL-2-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 and STAT5 without affecting the upstream phosphorylation of Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and JAK3. In addition, piperine inhibited the IL-2-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Akt, which are signaling molecules that regulate cell cycle progression. Piperine also suppressed the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 1, Cdk4, Cdk6, cyclin B, cyclin D2, and Cdc25c protein phosphatase by IL-2-stimulated T lymphocytes, indicating G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Piperine-mediated inhibition of IL-2 signaling and cell cycle progression in CTLL-2 T lymphocytes suggests that piperine should be further investigated in animal models as a possible natural source treatment for T lymphocyte-mediated transplant rejection and autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of telmisartan on the nuclear factor of activated T lymphocytes signalling pathway in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sha-Sha; He, Si-Li; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies provide links between the nuclear factor of activated T lymphocytes (NFAT) signalling pathway and the development of hypertension. Our preliminary studies indicate that telmisartan can block Kv1.3 potassium channels and effectively inhibit potassium current densities, along with Kv1.3 mRNA and protein expression levels. This paper aims to investigate whether telmisartan has an inhibitory effect on the NFAT signalling pathway after activation and proliferation of peripheral blood T lymphocytes in Kazakh patients with essential hypertension (EH) from Xinjiang, China. T lymphocytes were isolated using the immunomagnetic cell sorting method (MACS). The mRNA expression of NFATc1, IL-6 and TNF-α was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and relative protein levels were evaluated by Western blot. T cell samples from 50 hypertensive Kazakh patients from Xinjiang were randomly divided into control, telmisartan, cyclosporin A (CsA), VIVIT, and 4-aminopytidine (4-AP) groups. Peripheral blood T lymphocytes were first activated and proliferated in vitro, then incubated for 48 h under different treatment conditions before determination of protein and mRNA expression of NFATc1, IL-6, and TNF-α by Western blot and qRT-PCR analyses, respectively. There were no significant differences in cardiovascular risk factors among the patients with samples assigned to the five groups (p > 0.05). Expression of NFATc1, IL-6, and TNF-α mRNA and protein was significantly reduced in T lymphocytes in all treatment groups (telmisartan, CsA, VIVIT, and 4-AP) compared with controls. Antihypertensive function and inhibitory effects of telmisartan on the T lymphocyte NFAT signalling pathway are unlikely to affect the normal immune function of hypertensive patients. Telmisartan may exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibition of the NFAT signalling pathway in the T lymphocytes of hypertensive patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. CD8+ T Lymphocyte Expansion, Proliferation and Activation in Dengue Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Andréia Manso; Carvalho, Karina Inacio; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Villas-Boas, Lucy Santos; da Silva, Wanessa Cardoso; Rodrigues, Célia Luiza de Lima; Oliveira, Olímpia Massae Nakasone Peel Furtado; Levi, José Eduardo; Araújo, Evaldo Stanislau Affonso; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio; Luna, Expedito José Albuquerque; Kallas, Esper George

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever induces a robust immune response, including massive T cell activation. The level of T cell activation may, however, be associated with more severe disease. In this study, we explored the level of CD8+ T lymphocyte activation in the first six days after onset of symptoms during a DENV2 outbreak in early 2010 on the coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. Using flow cytometry we detected a progressive increase in the percentage of CD8+ T cells in 74 dengue fever cases. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 30 cases were thawed and evaluated using expanded phenotyping. The expansion of the CD8+ T cells was coupled with increased Ki67 expression. Cell activation was observed later in the course of disease, as determined by the expression of the activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR. This increased CD8+ T lymphocyte activation was observed in all memory subsets, but was more pronounced in the effector memory subset, as defined by higher CD38 expression. Our results show that most CD8+ T cell subsets are expanded during DENV2 infection and that the effector memory subset is the predominantly affected sub population. PMID:25675375

  13. Measuring activity of endocytosis-regulating factors in T-lymphocytes by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Sastre, Violeta; Navarro, Estanislau

    2015-05-01

    Elucidation of the mechanisms regulating membrane traffic of lymphocyte receptors is of great interest to manipulate the immune response, as well as for accurately delivering drugs and nanoprobes to cells. Aiming to detect and characterize regulators of endocytosis and intracellular traffic, we have modified the FACS-based endocytosis assay to measure and quantify the activity of putative endocytic regulators as EGFP chimeras. To study the activity of putative endocytosis regulators, we transfected Jurkat T-lymphocytes with EGFP-tagged constructs of the regulators to be tested. Cells were then incubated with a αCD3(APC) antibody, and were allowed to internalize the label. After acid-washing the cells, APC fluorescence was measured by flow cytometry in cells gated for EGFP(+), as well as in their EGFP(-) (transfection-resistant) counterparts that were taken as internal controls. This approach facilitated intra- and inter-assay normalization of endocytic rates/loads by comparison with the internal control. We have used this assay to test the regulatory activity of polarity kinase EMK1, and here we substantiate a role for EMK1 in the control of receptor internalization in T-lymphocytes. The method here presented gives quantitative measures of internalization, and will facilitate the development of tools to modulate endocytic rates or the intracellular fate of internalized materials.

  14. Effects of Rehmannia glutinosa polysaccharide b on T-lymphocytes in mice bearing sarcoma 180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L Z; Feng, X W; Zhou, J H

    1995-07-01

    To study immuno-antitumor action mechanism of RGP-b. RGP-b (Rehmannia glutinosa polysaccaride b) is a new component isolated from the herb, had an average molecular mass of 160 kDa and 5 kinds of monosaccharides as acid-splitting products. Its HPLC showed a main sharp peak at 162 kDa. The kinetic effects of RGP-b on IL-2 secretion, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activities and L3T4+, lyt-2+ T-lymphocyte subset in mice bearing S180 were observed. RGP-b 10 or 20 mg kg-1 ip obviously attenuated the decrease of CTL cytotoxity caused by excessive tumor growth on d 9 after the administration, but only partly ameliorated the descent of IL-2. Its effect on lyt-2+ subset was quite parallel with that on CTL cytotoxity. RGP-b kept the ratio of L3T4+ to lyt-2+ subset lower than that of control. Improving the production of lyt-2+ CTL and its cytotoxity were an essential immuno-antitumor mechanisms of RGP-b.

  15. Cytokine Pattern of T Lymphocytes in Acute Schistosomiasis mansoni Patients following Treated Praziquantel Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Fernandes Costa-Silva, Matheus; Cardoso de Oliveira Silveira, Amanda; Azevedo Batista, Mauricio; Alves Oliveira-Fraga, Lúcia; Soares Silveira, Alda Maria; Barbosa Alvarez, Maria Carolina; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Gazzinelli, Giovanni; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa

    2013-01-01

    Acute schistosomiasis is associated with a primary exposure and is more commonly seen in nonimmune individuals traveling through endemic regions. In this study, we have focused on the cytokine profile of T lymphocytes evaluated in circulating leukocytes of acute Schistosomiasis mansoni-infected patients (ACT group) before and after praziquantel treatment (ACT-TR group). Our data demonstrated increased values of total leukocytes, eosinophils, and monocytes in both groups. Interestingly, we have observed that patients treated with praziquantel showed increased values of lymphocytes as compared with noninfected group (NI) or ACT groups. Furthermore, a decrease of neutrophils in ACT-TR was observed when compared to ACT group. Analyses of short-term in vitro whole blood stimulation demonstrated that, regardless of the presence of soluble Schistosoma mansoni eggs antigen (SEA), increased synthesis of IFN-γ and IL-4 by T-cells was observed in the ACT group. Analyses of cytokine profile in CD8 T cells demonstrated higher percentage of IFN-γ and IL-4 cells in both ACT and ACT-TR groups apart from increased percentage of IL-10 cells only in the ACT group. This study is the first one to point out the relevance of CD8 T lymphocytes in the immune response induced during the acute phase of schistosomiasis. PMID:23401741

  16. Solid tumor-targeted infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes retained by a superantigen fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialin Sun

    Full Text Available Successful immune-mediated regression of solid tumors is difficult because of the small number of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs that were traffic to the tumor site. Here, the targeting of tumor-specific infiltrating CTLs was dependent on a fusion protein consisting of human epidermal growth factor (EGF and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA with the D227A mutation. EGF-SEA strongly restrained the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180 tumors (control versus EGF-SEA, mean tumor weight: 1.013 versus 0.197 g, difference  = 0.816 g. In mice treated with EGF-SEA, CD4+, CD8+ and SEA-reactive T lymphocytes were enriched around the EGFR expressing tumor cells. The EGF receptors were potentially phosphorylated by EGF-SEA stimulation and the fusion protein promoted T cells to release the tumoricidal cytokines interferon-γ (IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforins and granzyme B proteins near the surface of carcinomas, causing the death of many tumor cells. We additionally show that labeled EGF-SEA was directly targeted to the tumor tissue after intravenous (i.v. injection. The findings demonstrate that antibody-like EGF-SEA plays an important role in arresting CTLs in the solid tumor site and has therapeutic potential as a tumor-targeting agent.

  17. Exhaustion of T lymphocytes in the tumor microenvironment: Significance and effective mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodzadeh Gholami, Mohammad; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Saeedi, Yousef; Heydari, Sahel; Garssen, Johan; Falak, Reza

    2017-12-01

    T lymphocytes play crucial roles in adaptive immune responses to tumors. However, due to different tolerance mechanisms and inhibitory effects of the tumor microenvironment (TME) on T cells, responses to tumors are insufficient. In fact, cellular and molecular suppressive mechanisms repress T cell responses in the TME, resulting in senescent, anergic and exhausted lymphocytes. Exhaustion is a poor responsive status of T cells, with up-regulated expression of inhibitory receptors, decreased production of effective cytokines, and reduced cytotoxic activity. Low immunogenicity of tumor antigens and inadequate presentation of tumor-specific antigens results in inappropriate activation of naive T lymphocytes against tumor antigens. Moreover, when effector cytotoxic T cells enter TME, they encounter a complicated network of cells and cytokines that suppress their effectiveness and turn them into exhausted T cells. Thus, the mechanism of T cell exhaustion in cancer is different from that in chronic infections. In this review we will discuss the main components such as inhibitory receptors, inflammatory cells, stromal cells, cytokine milieu as well as environmental and metabolic conditions in TME which play role in development of exhaustion. Furthermore, recent therapeutic methods available to overcome exhaustion will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumor-infiltrating CD45RO(+) Memory T Lymphocytes Predict Favorable Clinical Outcome in Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoming; Wang, Shimin

    2017-09-04

    The prognostic role of tumor-infiltrating CD45RO(+) memory T lymphocytes (CD45RO(+) T cells) in human solid tumors remains controversial. Herein, we conducted a meta-analysis including 25 published studies with 4720 patients identified from PubMed and EBSCO to assess the prognostic impact of tumor-infiltrating CD45RO(+) T cells in human solid tumors. We found that CD45RO(+) T cell infiltration was significantly associated with improved overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in all types of solid tumors. In stratified analyses, CD45RO(+) T cell infiltration significantly improved 1-year, 3-year and 5-year OS in colorectal, gastric and esophageal cancer, but only 5-year OS in hepatocellular carcinoma. And these cells were positively associated with 1-year, 3-year and 5-year DFS in hepatocellular, colorectal and esophageal cancer. In addition, high density of intratumoral CD45RO(+) T cells inversely correlated with TNM stage of solid tumor. In conclusion, CD45RO(+) memory T lymphocyte infiltration leads to a favorable clinical outcome in solid tumors, implicating that it is a valuable biomarker for prognostic prediction for human solid malignances.

  19. Antitumor activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes engineered to target vascular endothelial growth factor receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, Thomas M. J.; Ghogawala, Zoher; Carter, Bob S.; Tompkins, Hillary S.; Russell, Margaret M.; Mulligan, Richard C.

    2002-05-01

    The demonstration that angiogenesis is required for the growth of solid tumors has fueled an intense interest in the development of new therapeutic strategies that target the tumor vasculature. Here we report the development of an immune-based antiangiogenic strategy that is based on the generation of T lymphocytes that possess a killing specificity for cells expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs). To target VEGFR-expressing cells, recombinant retroviral vectors were generated that encoded a chimeric T cell receptor comprised of VEGF sequences linked to intracellular signaling sequences derived from the chain of the T cell receptor. After transduction of primary murine CD8 lymphocytes by such vectors, the transduced cells were shown to possess an efficient killing specificity for cells expressing the VEGF receptor, Flk-1, as measured by in vitro cytotoxicity assays. After adoptive transfer into tumor-bearing mice, the genetically modified cytotoxic T lymphocytes strongly inhibited the growth of a variety of syngeneic murine tumors and human tumor xenografts. An increased effect on in vivo tumor growth inhibition was seen when this therapy was combined with the systemic administration of TNP-470, a conventional angiogenesis inhibitor. The utilization of the immune system to target angiogenic markers expressed on tumor vasculature may prove to be a powerful means for controlling tumor growth.

  20. Development of T Lymphocytes in the Nasal-associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT from Growing Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Sosa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present report was to study the development of several T-lymphocyte subsets in the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT of growing Wistar rats. CD5+ and CD4+ lymphocytes gradually increased with age. A predominance of CD8α+ over CD4+ T cells was found from 7 to 45 days but from 45 to 60 days of age T helper cells outnumbered the cytotoxic subpopulation. The majority of CD8+ T lymphocytes expressed the heterodimeric isoform. The most relevant findings by immunohistochemistry are: (1 the predominance of TCRγδ+ and CD8α+ cells at 7 days postpartum over all the other T-cell subpopulations; and (2 that TCRγβ+ outnumbered TCRαβ+ T cells from 7 to 45 days postpartum whereas αβ T cells predominated in 45- and 60-day-old rats. Besides, cytometric studies have shown that the percentages of TCRγ+, CD8+, as well as the population coexpressing both phenotypes (TCRγδ+CD8α+, were significantly higher in rats at 7 days postpartum when compared to 60 day-old rats. In the present study, the finding of a high number of γδ+ and CD8+ T cells early in NALT development may indicate the importance of these subpopulations in the protection of the nasal mucosa in suckling and weaning Wistar rats.

  1. Role of vitamin D in cytotoxic T lymphocyte immunity to pathogens and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Surojit; Hewison, Martin; Studzinski, George P; Li, Yan Chun; Kalia, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression in immune cells has opened up a new area of research into immunoregulation by vitamin D, a niche that is distinct from its classical role in skeletal health. Today, about three decades since this discovery, numerous cellular and molecular targets of vitamin D in the immune system have been delineated. Moreover, strong clinical associations between vitamin D status and the incidence/severity of many immune-regulated disorders (e.g. infectious diseases, cancers and autoimmunity) have prompted the idea of using vitamin D supplementation to manipulate disease outcome. While much is known about the effects of vitamin D on innate immune responses and helper T (T(H)) cell immunity, there has been relatively limited progress on the frontier of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity--an arm of host cellular adaptive immunity that is crucial for the control of such intracellular pathogens as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), tuberculosis (TB), malaria, and hepatitis C virus (HCV). In this review, we discuss the strong historical and clinical link between vitamin D and infectious diseases that involves cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immunity, present our current understanding as well as critical knowledge gaps in the realm of vitamin D regulation of host CTL responses, and highlight potential regulatory connections between vitamin D and effector and memory CD8 T cell differentiation events during infections.

  2. Chronic overexpression of membrane-bound flt3 ligand by T lymphocytes in severe aplastic anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, O; Chklovskaia, E; Jansen, W; Mészáros, K; Nissen, C; Rahner, C; Hurwitz, N; Bogatcheva, N; Lyman, S D; Wodnar-Filipowicz, A

    2000-04-01

    Aplastic anaemia (AA) is an immune-mediated bone marrow failure associated with high serum levels of flt3 ligand (FL). We examined expression of the membrane-bound isoform of FL in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells from AA patients at diagnosis (n = 16) and after immunosuppressive (IS) treatment (n = 36). Flow cytometry demonstrated strongly increased FL levels on the cell surface of T lymphocytes in AA relative to normal controls (P < 0.0001). T-cell-specific expression of membrane-bound FL was confirmed by confocal microscopy. FL mRNA and total cellular FL protein levels were increased about threefold. Overexpression of FL in AA was observed for up to 20 years after IS treatment. FL levels correlated inversely with CD34+ cell numbers and the colony-forming ability of AA bone marrow (R = -0.68 and -0.85 respectively). Histological examination of spleen specimens and bone marrow biopsies gave no evidence of degeneration or fibrosis due to prolonged exposure to high FL. Levels of membrane-bound FL were not increased in autoimmune diseases (n = 23), including rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematosus, nor in graft-versus-host disease (n = 8). Chronic overexpression of FL on the surface of T lymphocytes in AA, but not in other T-cell-mediated disorders, suggests that membrane-bound FL plays a role in cell-cell interactions in bone marrow failure and may be important for long-term haemopoietic recovery.

  3. Persistent and selective upregulation of renin-angiotensin system in circulating T lymphocytes in unstable angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, Mirella; Bandinelli, Manuela; Chiostri, Marco; Poggesi, Loredana; Boddi, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Unstable angina is associated with an acute systemic inflammatory reaction and circulating T lymphocytes are activated. We investigated whether in unstable angina with marked immune system activation a selective upregulation of the circulating T-cell renin-angiotensin system, modulated by angiotensin II, could occur. We studied 13 unstable angina patients, 10 patients with stable angina and 10 healthy subjects. After T-lymphocyte isolation, mRNAs for angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1-R) were quantified at baseline and after angiotensin II stimulation. ACE activity in cell pellet and supernatant and angiotensin II cell content were measured. Plasma renin activity was similar in controls, stable and unstable angina patients. At baseline ACE and AT1-R mRNA levels were higher ( Prenin-angiotensin system from unstable angina patients was selectively upregulated. In vivo unstable angina T cells could locally increase angiotensin II concentration in tissues where they migrate independently of the circulating renin-angiotensin system.

  4. Use of TIRF to Monitor T-Lymphocyte Membrane Dynamics with Submicrometer and Subsecond Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodovitch, Alexandre; Limozin, Laurent; Bongrand, Pierre; Pierres, Anne

    A key step of adaptive immune responses is the T lymphocyte capacity to detect the presence of foreign antigens on specialized cells with high speed and specificity during contacts lasting a few minutes. Much evidence suggests that there is a deep link between the lifetime of molecular interactions between T cell receptors and ligands and T cell activation, but the precise mechanisms of bond formation and dissociation remain incompletely understood. Previous experiments done with interference reflection microscopy/reflection interference contrast microscopy disclosed transverse motions with several nanometer average amplitude of micrometer size membrane zones. More recently, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy was used to show that the initial interaction between primary T lymphocytes and model surfaces involved the tip of microvilli (typically 0.2 µm2 area) generating apparent contacts of a few seconds that allowed cells to detect ligands of their membrane receptors. Here we show that these microvilli displayed minimal lateral displacements but quantitative fluorescence measurement suggested the occurrence of spontaneous transverse fluctuations of order of 67 nm amplitude during 1-s observation periods. This may play a major role in membrane receptor engagement and ensuing signal generation.

  5. Impact of iron deficiency anaemia on T lymphocytes & their subsets in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullick, Shalini; Rusia, Usha; Sikka, Meera; Faridi, M A

    2006-12-01

    While there is evidence of an altered immune profile in iron deficiency, the precise immunoregulatory role of iron is not known. Information particular in children who are vulnerable to iron deficiency and infection, is lacking. We undertook this study with the aim of documenting the changes in T cell subsets in children in the age group of 1 to 5 yr with iron deficiency. The levels of T lymphocytes, their CD4+ and CD8+ subsets and the CD4 : CD8 ratio were evaluated in 40 iron deficient and 30 healthy children. The impact of oral iron supplementation for three months on the same parameters was also noted in 30 children. Significantly lower levels of T lymphocytes as well as CD4+ cells was observed in the iron deficient children (P<0.01 and 0.002 respectively). The CD4 : CD8 ratio was also significantly lower in this group (P<0.05). Iron supplementation improved the CD4 counts significantly. Our study demonstrated quantitatively altered T cell subsets in iron deficiency in children, and a relationship between the severity of haematological and immunological compromise. The clinical and epidemiological implications of this relationship have topical relevance since ID is the most common micronutrient deficiency worldwide.

  6. Course of mitogen-stimulated T lymphocytes in cancer patients treated with Viscum album extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büssing, A; Stumpf, C; Tröger, W; Schietzel, M

    2007-01-01

    In a prospective observational study, the impact of two different dose regimes of a commercially available fermented Viscum album L. extract (VA-E, Iscador) on the function of T lymphocytes from cancer patients was investigated. A total of 71 cancer patients were enrolled. These patients attended two different sections of a tumor outpatient clinic which are used to apply different VA-E escalation schemes. Our hypothesis was that a rapid dose escalation of subcutaneously applied VA-E may induce strong local reactions at the injection side (>3 cm diameter) and may have an effect on the functional competence of T lymphocytes (mitogen-activated interleukin-2 receptor alpha chain), which was recorded over an observation period of six month. Within this observation period, a decline of stimulated T cell function was observed, particularly in patients with colorectal or prostate cancer; this decline was not seen in patients with breast cancer (who received lower mean concentrations per month) nor in patients with dose adaptation in response to too strong local reactions. With respect to T-cell function, our results indicate that in patients without local reactions, a long lasting mistletoe extract application should be withheld periodically to allow T-cell reactivity to recover.

  7. A novel regulatory mechanism of naringenin through inhibition of T lymphocyte function in contact hypersensitivity suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Feng; Tang, Yijun; Gao, Zhe [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu, Qiang, E-mail: molpharm@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-06-25

    Naringenin, a flavonoid in grapefruits and citrus fruits, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a T cell-mediated immune reaction, and the factors released from macrophages also contribute to this response. Previous studies showed that naringenin suppressed CHS by inhibiting activation and migration of macrophages. However, little is known about naringenin's effects on T lymphocytes. Our study indicated that naringenin potently suppressed picryl chloride (PCl)-induced contact hypersensitivity by inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes. In vitro, both of the activated hapten-specific T cells and the T cells stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 showed growth arrest after naringenin treatment. Furthermore, naringenin reduced CD69 (the protein level) and cytokines such as IL-2, TNF-{alpha}, and IFN-{gamma} (the mRNA level) expressions which highly expressed by activated T cells. Meanwhile, naringenin also induced T cell apoptosis by upregulation of Bax, Bad, PARP, cleaved-caspase 3 and downregulation of phosphorylated Akt, Bcl-2. These findings suggest that, besides its anti-inflammatory activities in macrophages, naringenin also showed inhibitory effects on the activation and proliferation of T cells to alleviate symptoms of contact hypersensitivity.

  8. Reduced Histone H3 Acetylation in CD4+ T Lymphocytes: Potential Mechanism of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-yu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA is the result of gene-environment interactions. Histone acetylation regulates gene expression and maybe interpret how environmental factors modify LADA. Hence, we studied the histone acetylation patterns in CD4+ T lymphocytes from LADA patients. Methods. Blood CD4+ T lymphocytes from 28 patients with LADA and 28 healthy controls were obtained to detect histone H3 acetylation and H4 acetylation. The gene expression of histone acetyltransferases (P300 and CREBBP and histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC7 was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results. Compared to healthy controls, reduced global H3 acetylation was observed in LADA patients’ CD4+ T lymphocytes (P<0.05. Global level of H4 acetylation was not statistically different. Among LADA, CD4+ T lymphocytes H3 acetylation was associated with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c and GADA titer. Compared to healthy controls, the expression of histone acetyltransferases CREBBP in LADA patients was downregulated, and the expression of histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC7 was upregulated. Conclusion. A concerted downregulation of histone H3 acetylation was found in CD4+ T lymphocytes of LADA patients, and this might provide evidence of a novel epigenetic explanation for the pathogenesis of LADA and its complications.

  9. Mindfulness meditation training effects on CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1 infected adults: a small randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, J David; Myers, Hector F; Cole, Steven W; Irwin, Michael R

    2009-02-01

    Mindfulness meditation training has stress reduction benefits in various patient populations, but its effects on biological markers of HIV-1 progression are unknown. The present study tested the efficacy of an 8-week Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) meditation program compared to a 1-day control seminar on CD4+ T lymphocyte counts in stressed HIV infected adults. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with enrollment and follow-up occurring between November 2005 and December 2007. A diverse community sample of 48 HIV-1 infected adults was randomized and entered treatment in either an 8-week MBSR or a 1-day control stress reduction education seminar. The primary outcome was circulating counts of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Participants in the 1-day control seminar showed declines in CD4+ T lymphocyte counts whereas counts among participants in the 8-week MBSR program were unchanged from baseline to post-intervention (time x treatment condition interaction, p=.02). This effect was independent of antiretroviral (ARV) medication use. Additional analyses indicated that treatment adherence to the mindfulness meditation program, as measured by class attendance, mediated the effects of mindfulness meditation training on buffering CD4+ T lymphocyte declines. These findings provide an initial indication that mindfulness meditation training can buffer CD4+ T lymphocyte declines in HIV-1 infected adults. clinicaltrials.gov, Identifier: NCT00600561.

  10. Determinants in HIV-1 Nef for enhancement of virus replication and depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes in human lymphoid tissue ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertel Serkan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef critically contributes to AIDS in part by augmenting virus titers in infected individuals. Analyzing which of Nef's activities contribute to HIV pathogenesis has been hampered by the lack of a cell culture model in which Nef exerts pronounced effects on HIV replication. The human lymphoid aggregate culture (HLAC from tonsil maintains the cell populations and cytokine milieu found in vivo, supports a productive infection without exogenous stimulation, and Nef contributes to efficient HIV-1 replication as well as CD4+ T cell depletion in this experimental ex vivo-model. Results To identify determinants in Nef that mediate these activities, we infected HLAC with a panel of isogenic HIV-1NL4-3 strains that encode for well-characterized mutants of HIV-1SF2 Nef. Determination of HIV-1 replication revealed that enhancement of the virus spread by Nef is governed by a complex set of protein interaction surfaces. In contrast, increased CD4+ T lymphocyte depletion depended on only two protein interaction surfaces in Nef that mediate either downregulation of cell surface CD4 or interaction with the NAKC signalosome. Consistently, in HLAC from 9 out of 14 donors, Nef enhanced CD4+ T cell depletion in the absence of a significant effect on virus replication. Moreover, our results suggest that this Nef-dependent enhancement in depletion occurred predominately in uninfected bystander CD4+ T cells. Conclusion Our findings suggest that Nef facilitates depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1-infected lymphoid tissue ex vivo by increasing the pool of productively infected cells and by sensitizing bystander cells for killing. This ability might contribute to Nef's pathogenic potential in vivo.

  11. Frequencies of circulating B- and T-lymphocytes as indicators for stroke outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Yanling Wang,1 Jihong Liu,1 Xuemei Wang,1 Zongjian Liu,2 Fengwu Li,1 Fenghua Chen,3 Xiaokun Geng,1 Zhili Ji,2 Huishan Du,1 Xiaoming Hu1,3 1Department of Neurology, China-America Institute of Neuroscience, 2Central Laboratory, Beijing Luhe Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Neurology, Pittsburgh Institute of Brain Disorders and Recovery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Background: Stroke has high mortality and morbidity. Biomarkers are required for to predict stroke outcomes, which could help clinicians to provide rationale approaches for patient management. The dynamic changes in circulating immune cells have been reported in stroke patients and animal models of stroke.Aim: The aim of this study was to explore biomarkers to predict stroke outcomes by investigating the relationship between the frequencies of circulating immune cells and stroke outcomes.Methods: In all, 50 acute ischemic stroke (AIS patients were enrolled. Their blood samples were collected upon hospital admission and on day 1 and day 7 after stroke, and the leukocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. The dynamic changes in some types of immune cells in the AIS course and their correlation with clinical parameters were analyzed. Blood samples from 123 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects were used as controls.Results: The proportions of T-lymphocytes and NK cells in stroke patients were significantly lower than in healthy controls. The frequencies of B- and T-lymphocytes were negatively correlated with stroke severity at onset, including neurological deficits as assessed by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS, and infarct volume as measured by the diffusion-weighted images (DWIs of magnetic resonance (MR. Logistic regression analysis showed that modified Rankin scale (mRs scores, a score system for the long-term neurological dysfunctions, were negatively correlated

  12. Induction of Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes as a Basis for the Development of Broadly Protective Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine L. B. Hillaire

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in the development of broadly protective influenza vaccines because of the continuous emergence of antigenic drift variants of seasonal influenza viruses and the threat posed by the emergence of antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. It has been recognized more than three decades ago that influenza A virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize epitopes located in the relatively conserved proteins like the nucleoprotein and that they cross-react with various subtypes of influenza A viruses. This implies that these CD8+ T lymphocytes may contribute to protective heterosubtypic immunity induced by antecedent influenza A virus infections. In the present paper, we review the evidence for the role of virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes in protective immunity against influenza virus infections and discuss vaccination strategies that aim at the induction of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cell responses.

  13. Increased Program Cell Death - 1 (PD-1) Expression on T Lymphocytes of Patients with Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chen Sabrina; Bord, Evelyn; Broge, Thomas A; Glotzbecker, Brett; Mills, Heidi; Gheuens, Sarah; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn; Avigan, David; Koralnik, Igor J

    2012-01-01

    The cellullar immune response is important in the containment of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). We examined program cell death-1 (PD-1) expression, a marker of cellular immune exhaustion, on T-lymphocytes in PML. PD-1 expression was elevated on total CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells (medians 36% and 24%) in PML patients compared to healthy control subjects (medians 14% and 18%; p=0.0015 and p=0.033). In PML patients, JCV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes expressed PD-1 more frequently than total CD8+ T-lymphocytes (means 39% and 78%, p=0.0004). Blocking the PD-1 receptor increased JCV-specific T-cell immune response in a subgroup of PML patients. PMID:22549384

  14. High circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in centenarians are not associated with increased production in T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandmand, Marie; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Kemp, Kåre

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aging is characterized by increased inflammatory activity reflected by increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines, concomitant with an altered cytokine profile of T lymphocytes. High plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha are strongly associated with morbidity...... and mortality in elderly humans. However, the cellular source and mechanisms for the increased circulating TNF-alpha levels are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate if high plasma levels of TNF-alpha are associated with increased production of TNF-alpha by T lymphocytes in elderly...... humans. METHODS: TNF-alpha production by CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometry following stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin in 28 young controls, 14, 81-year-olds and 25 centenarians. RESULTS: Plasma levels of TNF-alpha increased with increasing age...

  15. Functional discrepancies in HIV-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte populations are related to plasma virus load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxenius, Annetie; Sewell, Andrew K; Dawson, Sara J; Günthard, Huldrych F; Fischer, Marek; Gillespie, Geraldine M; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L; Fagard, Catherine; Hirschel, Bernard; Phillips, Rodney E; Price, David A

    2002-11-01

    The potent ability of current antiretroviral drug regimens to control human immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) replication, in conjunction with the clinical practice of structured therapeutic interruptions, provides a system in which virus levels are manipulated during a persistent infection in humans. Here, we exploit this system to examine the impact of variable plasma virus load (pVL) on the functionality of HIV-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte populations. Using both ELISpot methodology and intracellular cytokine staining for interferon (IFN)-gamma to assess functional status, together with fluorochrome-labeled peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) class I tetramer analysis to detect the physical presence of CD8+ T lymphocytes expressing cognate T-cell receptors (TCRs), we observed that the proportion of HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes capable of mounting an effector response to antigen challenge directly ex vivo is related to the kinetics of virus exposure. Specifically, (a) after prolonged suppression of pVL with antiretroviral therapy (ART), physical and functional measures of HIV-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte frequencies approximated; and (b) the percentage of functionally responsive cells in the HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte populations declined substantially when therapy was discontinued and pVL recrudesced in the same patients. These results corroborate and extend observations in animal models that describe nonresponsive CD8+ T lymphocytes in the presence of high levels of antigen load and have implications for the interpretation of quantitative data generated by methods that rely on functional readouts.

  16. NETMHCSTAB - predicting stability of peptide-MHC-I complexes; impacts for cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kasper W.; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules play an essential role in the cellular immune response, presenting peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) allowing the immune system to scrutinize ongoing intracellular production of proteins. In the early 1990s, immunogenicity...... and stability of the peptide-MHC-I (pMHC-I) complex were shown to be correlated. At that time, measuring stability was cumbersome and time consuming and only small data sets were analysed. Here, we investigate this fairly unexplored area on a large scale compared with earlier studies. A recent small-scale study...... demonstrated that pMHC-I complex stability was a better correlate of CTL immunogenicity than peptide-MHC-I affinity. We here extended this study and analysed a total of 5509 distinct peptide stability measurements covering 10 different HLA class I molecules. Artificial neural networks were used to construct...

  17. T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma and myasthenia gravis in a Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, K; Masters, N; Rivers, S; Berry, K; Routh, A; Lamm, C

    2014-01-01

    A 10-year-old captive male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with acute onset collapse, vomiting and dyspnoea, preceded by a 6-month period of progressive muscle wasting. Following humane destruction, post-mortem examination revealed a large multilobulated mass in the cranial mediastinum, which was diagnosed as a T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Retrospective serology for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (titre 3.90 nmol/l) confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are reported rarely in wild carnivores, but when detected they appear to be similar in morphology to those seen in domestic carnivores and may also be accompanied by paraneoplastic syndromes. The clinical signs of myasthenia gravis in the tiger were consistent with those reported in cats and dogs and the condition is proposed as an important differential diagnosis for generalized weakness in captive Felidae. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. GIMAP5 Deficiency Is Associated with Increased AKT Activity in T Lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Lin Chen

    Full Text Available Long-term survival of T lymphocytes in quiescent state is essential to maintain their cell numbers in secondary lymphoid organs. In mice and in rats, the loss of functional GTPase of the immune associated nucleotide binding protein 5 (GIMAP5 causes peripheral T lymphopenia due to spontaneous death of T cells. The underlying mechanism responsible for the disruption of quiescence in Gimap5 deficient T cells remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that loss of functional Gimap5 results in increased basal activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, independent of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A or AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Our results suggest that the constitutive activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway may be one of the consequences of the absence of functional GIMAP5.

  19. Aloe QDM complex enhances specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing in vivo in metabolic disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjoo; Kim, Jiyeon; An, Jinho; Lee, Heetae; Kong, Hyunseok; Song, Youngcheon; Shin, Eunju; Do, Seon-Gil; Lee, Chong-Kil; Kim, Kyungjae

    2017-03-01

    We developed spontaneous diet-induced metabolic disease in mice by feeding them a high-fat diet for 23 weeks and administered Aloe QDM complex for 16 weeks to examine its restorative effect on immune disorders and metabolic syndrome. A series of immune functional assays indicated Aloe QDM complex enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and antigen-specific immunity as determined by the restored functions of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and IgG production. The elevated serum TNF-α level was also regulated by Aloe QDM complex treatment, which suggested its complex therapeutic potential. As for metabolic phenotypes, oral administration of Aloe QDM complex significantly improved diabetic symptoms, including high fasting glucose levels and glucose tolerance, and distinctly alleviated lipid accumulation in adipose and hepatic tissue. The simultaneous restoration of Aloe QDM complex on metabolic syndrome and host immune dysfunction, especially on the specific CTL killing was first elucidated in our study.

  20. T lymphocyte subsets in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buschard, K; Röpke, C; Madsbad, S

    1983-01-01

    T lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood from 11 newly diagnosed Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients were studied prospectively at three time intervals: as soon as possible after diagnosis, 3 weeks and 5 months later. Lymphocytes were marked with monoclonal OKT antibodies and examined....../inducer T cells and/or the low percentage of suppressor/cytotoxic T cells at diagnosis favour immune reactions involved in the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes......./cytotoxic T cells (OKT8) was low at diagnosis but increased at 3 weeks (p less than 0.02) and 5 months (p less than 0.01). The ratio OKT4/OKT8 lymphocytes was 2.28 at diagnosis, decreasing to 1.77 at 3 weeks and 1.87 at 5 months, compared with 1.46 for 16 age-matched control subjects. There was no significant...

  1. CD152 (CTLA-4) regulates effector functions of CD8+ T lymphocytes by repressing Eomesodermin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Johannes K; Knieke, Karin; Kolar, Paula; Reiner, Steven L; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2009-03-01

    CD8(+) T lymphocytes are required for effective host defense against pathogens and also for mediating effector responses against uncontrolled proliferating self-tissues. In this study, we determine that individual CD8(+) T cells are tightly controlled in their effector functions by CD152 (CTLA-4). We demonstrate that signals induced by CD152 reduce the frequency of IFN-gamma and granzyme B expressing CD8(+) T cells independently of the transcription factors T-bet or cKrox by selectively inhibiting accumulation of Eomesodermin mRNA and protein. Ectopic expression of Eomesodermin reversed the CD152-mediated inhibition of effector molecule production. Additionally, enhanced cytotoxicity of individual CD8(+) T cells differentiated in the absence of CD152 signaling was determined in vivo. These novel insights extend our understanding of how immune responses of CD8(+) T cells are selectively modulated.

  2. High Prevalence of Infectious Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Indicative of T Lymphocytes as Sites of AAV Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüser, Daniela; Khalid, Dina; Lutter, Timo; Hammer, Eva-Maria; Weger, Stefan; Heßler, Melanie; Kalus, Ulrich; Tauchmann, Yvonne; Hensel-Wiegel, Karin; Lassner, Dirk; Heilbronn, Regine

    2017-02-15

    Seroepidemiology shows that infections with adeno-associated virus (AAV) are widespread, but diverse AAV serotypes isolated from humans or nonhuman primates have so far not been proven to be causes of human disease. In view of the increasing success of AAV-derived vectors in human gene therapy, definition of the in vivo sites of wild-type AAV persistence and the clinical consequences of its reactivation is becoming increasingly urgent. Here, we identify the presumed cell type for AAV persistence in the human host by highly sensitive AAV PCRs developed for the full spectrum of human AAV serotypes. In genomic-DNA samples from leukocytes of 243 healthy blood donors, 34% were found to be AAV positive, predominantly AAV type 2 (AAV2) (77%), AAV5 (19%), and additional serotypes. Roughly 11% of the blood donors had mixed AAV infections. AAV prevalence was dramatically increased in immunosuppressed patients, 76% of whom were AAV positive. Of these, at least 45% displayed mixed infections. Follow-up of single blood donors over 2 years allowed repeated detection of the initial and/or additional AAV serotypes, suggestive of fluctuating, persistent infection. Leukocyte separation revealed that AAV resided in CD3+ T lymphocytes, perceived as the putative in vivo site of AAV persistence. Moreover, infectious AAVs of various serotypes could be rescued and propagated from numerous samples. The high prevalence and broad spectrum of human AAVs in leukocytes closely follow AAV seroepidemiology. Immunosuppression obviously enhances AAV replication in parallel with activation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), reminiscent of herpesvirus-induced AAV activation. Adeno-associated virus is viewed as apathogenic and replication defective, requiring coinfection with adenovirus or herpesvirus for productive infection. In vivo persistence of a defective virus requires latency in specialized cell types to escape the host immune response until viral spread becomes

  3. Activation of gold-reactive T lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwilghen, J; Kingsley, G H; Gambling, L; Panayi, G S

    1992-12-01

    To assess the role of T lymphocyte sensitization in the etiology of side effects of gold therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Lymphocyte proliferation induced by gold(III) and gold(I) salts was measured in 53 subjects: 30 RA patients with gold-induced side effects (17 with dermatitis, 9 with proteinuria, 3 with hematologic complications, and 1 with colitis), 9 RA patients without side effects despite prolonged chrysotherapy, 4 RA patients who had never received gold, and 10 healthy controls. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured with the different gold salts and proliferation was measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation. Thirteen of the 17 RA patients who developed gold-induced dermatitis showed significant T lymphocyte proliferation in response to gold(III) salts, and this proliferation could be completely blocked by monoclonal antibodies directed at the HLA-DR molecule. Such proliferative responses were not seen in patients with other gold-induced side effects, in patients who had never received gold, or in healthy controls. Only 1 of 9 patients who had not developed side effects despite long-term maintenance chrysotherapy showed significant lymphocyte activation with gold(III) salts. Lymphocyte proliferation could not be induced with gold(I) salts or with other metal salts. Patients with RA who develop dermatitis following treatment with sodium aurothiomalate [gold(I)] have T cells which proliferate in an HLA-DR-restricted manner in response to HAuCl4 [gold(III)]. We believe this observation can lead to more accurate diagnosis and treatment of side effects, which currently limit the use of one of the most effective antirheumatic drugs.

  4. T lymphocytes and vascular inflammation contribute to stress-dependent hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvar, Paul J; Vinh, Antony; Thabet, Salim; Lob, Heinrich E; Geem, Duke; Ressler, Kerry J; Harrison, David G

    2012-05-01

    Psychological stress is a significant risk factor for hypertension and also directly affects the immune system. We have previously reported that T lymphocytes are essential for development of hypertension and that the central nervous system contributes to peripheral T-lymphocyte activation and vascular inflammation in this disease; however, the role of T-cell activation in stress-related hypertension remains unclear. Wild-type and T-cell-deficient (RAG-1(-/-)) mice were subjected to daily episodes of stress and blood pressure was measured. Circulating T-cell activation markers and vascular infiltration of immune cells were analyzed, as were stress hormone levels and gene expression changes in the brain. The effects angiotensin II infusion in the presence of chronic stress was also studied. Repeated daily stress contributed to acute elevations in blood pressure that were associated with increased activation of circulating T cells and increased vascular infiltration of T cells. Repeated stress increased blood pressure in wild-type but not RAG-1(-/-) mice. Adoptive transfer of T cells to RAG-1(-/-) mice restored blood pressure elevation in response to stress. Stress-related hypertension and vascular infiltration of T cells was markedly enhanced by angiotensin II. Moreover, angiotensin II-infused mice exposed to chronic stress exhibited greater blood pressure reactivity to an episode of acute stress. These data demonstrate that stress-dependent hypertension triggers an inflammatory response that raises blood pressure at baseline and augments the hypertension caused by angiotensin II. These data provide insight as to how psychological stress contributes to hypertension. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. T lymphocyte immunophenotypes in the cerebrospinal fluid of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grano, Fernanda G; Silva, José Eduardo Dos S; Melo, Guilherme D; Perosso, Juliana; Lima, Valéria M F; Machado, Gisele F

    2016-12-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a disease causing several clinical manifestations in dogs, including neurological disorders. Nevertheless, there are few studies related to the evaluation of the brain alterations during VL. Evidences of the involvement of cerebral barriers in infected dogs was reported, including the presence of brain inflammatory infiltrate, with a predominance of CD3+ T cells. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the immunophenotypes of T lymphocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as well as in peripheral blood, and to correlate with brain alterations in dogs with VL. We detected elevated percentages of double negative (DN) and double positive (DP) T cells in the CSF, with a predominance of TCRαb. In the histopathological analysis, we observed a predominance of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, mainly in leptomeninges, ranging from mild to intense, and we observed a positive correlation between the intensity of inflammation in the subependymal area and the DN T cells of the CSF. Thus, the DN T cells seem be acting as villains of the immune system through pro-inflammatory mechanisms. Further, the proportion of the different population of CSF T cells did not differ from those observed in the blood, which provides us with more evidence of blood-CSF barrier breakdown. Together, the results provide more explanation to the inflammation observed in the brain of dogs with VL, which the DN T cells contribute to the origin and progression of the neurological disease. This study provides insight into the immunophenotypes of T lymphocytes in the CSF during canine visceral leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased Circulating T Lymphocytes Expressing HLA-DR in Kidney Transplant Recipients with Microcirculation Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hee Yeon; Kim, Yong Jin; Choi, Ji Young; Cho, Jang Hee; Park, Sun Hee; Kim, Yong Lim; Kim, Hyung Kee; Huh, Seung; Won, Dong Il; Kim, Chan Duck

    2017-06-01

    We consecutively enrolled 82 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) with stable renal function and 24 KTRs who underwent indication biopsy to compare the histological grading of renal allografts with the activity of circulating T lymphocyte subsets and monocytes determined by flow cytometry, which were obtained at 2 weeks after kidney transplantation (KT) and at the time of indication biopsy, respectively. The sum of the scores of glomerulitis (g) + peritubular capillaritis (ptc), inflammation (i) + tubulitis (t), interstitial fibrosis (ci) + tubular atrophy (ct), and fibrointimal thickening (cv) + arteriolar hyaline thickening (ah) was used to assign a histological grade to the renal allograft samples. The frequencies of CD4⁺HLA-DR⁺/CD4⁺ T cells and CD8⁺HLA-DR⁺/CD8⁺ T cells were significantly increased in KTRs with a microcirculation inflammation (MI) sum score ≥ 1 when compared with KTRs with an MI sum score = 0 as well as stable KTRs. In these 2 subsets, only CD4⁺HLA-DR⁺/CD4⁺ T cells were positively correlated with MI sum scores. Analysis using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve showed that antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) could be predicted with a sensitivity of 80.0% and a specificity of 94.7%, using a cutoff value of 29.6% frequency of CD4⁺HLA-DR⁺/CD4⁺ T cells. MI was significantly associated with an increased frequency of activated T lymphocytes expressing human leukocyte antigen-antigen D related (HLA-DR). Further studies should focus on validating the utility of circulating CD4⁺HLA-DR⁺/CD4⁺ T cells as a noninvasive, immunologic monitoring tool for the prediction of AMR. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  7. [Roles of interleukin-10 differentiated dendritic cell of allergic asthma patients in T-lymphocyte proliferation in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian-feng; Guan, Shu-hong; Wang, Zhi-gang

    2012-10-30

    To explore the roles of interleukin (IL)-10 differentiated peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC-10) of allergic asthma patients in T-lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. From January to June 2011, 10 subjects with dust mite allergic asthma treated at Third Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University were enrolled. Their peripheral blood monocytes were isolated by Ficoll-Hypaque solution density gradient centrifugation and adherent method. And the adherent monocytes were routinely cultured with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)+interleukin-4 (IL-4)+tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), stimulated with/without interleukin-10 (IL-10), pulsed with dust mite allergen and finally harvested. The cell surface molecules including CD80, CD83, CD86, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and immunoglobulin-like transcript 2 (ILT2) were detected by immunofluorescent labeling and flow cytometry. And cellular functions were estimated by detecting the capacities of DC uptake antigens with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran capturing assay. The IL-10 differentiation DC (DC-10) were cultured with autologous peripheral T cells (DC-10 group), either alone (DC-TNF group) or together (combined group) with autologous immunostimulatory DC (DC-TNF). And the impact of this treatment on T-cell responses was assessed for each donor by 3-(4, 5)-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1)-3, 5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay. The production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-4, interleukin-5 (IL-5) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) were measured with the quantification of enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. In DC-10, the levels of some mature DC's markers (CD80, CD83, CD86 & HLA-DR) decreased, ILT2 increased and there were the higher capacities of up-taking FITC-dextran particle (72.32%±2.93% vs 54.41%±2.95%, PDC-10 group (1.06±0.18) and that of the combined group (1.34±0.16) were significantly inhibited (PDC-10 group versus (3223±203), (149±19), (2465±183) and

  8. An Increased Proportion of Apoptosis in CD4⁺ T Lymphocytes Isolated from the Peripheral Blood in Patients with Stable Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jinyung

    2018-01-24

    The pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) includes inflammation, oxidative stress, an imbalance of proteases and antiproteases and apoptosis which has been focused on lately. Abnormal apoptotic events have been demonstrated in both epithelial and endothelial cells, as well as in inflammatory cells including neutrophils and lymphocytes in the lungs of COPD patients. An increased propensity of activated T lymphocytes to undergo apoptosis has been observed in the peripheral blood of COPD patients. Therefore, the apoptosis of T lymphocytes without activating them was investigated in this study. Twelve control subjects, 21 stable COPD patients and 15 exacerbated COPD patients were recruited in the study. The T lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood using magnetically activated cell sorting. Apoptosis of the T lymphocytes was assessed with flow cytometry using Annexin V and 7-aminoactinomycin D. Apoptosis of T lymphocytes at 24 hours after the cell culture was measured so that the T lymphocyte apoptosis among the control and the COPD patients could be compared. Stable COPD patients had increased rates of CD4⁺ T lymphocyte apoptosis at 24 hours after the cell culture, more than the CD4⁺ T lymphocyte apoptosis which appeared in the control group, while the COPD patients with acute exacerbation had an amplified response of CD4⁺ T lymphocyte apoptosis as well as of CD8⁺ T lymphocyte apoptosis at 24 hours after the cell culture. Stable COPD patients have more apoptosis of CD4⁺ T lymphocytes, which can be associated with the pathophysiology of COPD in stable conditions.

  9. Induction of abortive and productive proliferation in resting human T lymphocytes via CD3 and CD28

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Y.; Wolf, H.; Wierenga, E.; Jung, G.

    1999-01-01

    How the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex mediates positive as well as negative signals for T-cell regulation is not fully understood. We have previously described the induction of anergy in resting human T lymphocytes after mitogenic, high-dose CD3 triggering with monoclonal antibodies. Here we

  10. Peptide specificity and HLA restriction do not dictate lymphokine production by allergen-specific T-lymphocyte clones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Neerven, R. J.; van de Pol, M. M.; Wierenga, E. A.; Aalberse, R. C.; Jansen, H. M.; Kapsenberg, M. L.

    1994-01-01

    Human and murine CD4+ T lymphocytes can be subdivided into distinct subsets [T-helper type 0 (Th0), Th1 or Th2], based on their lymphokine production profiles. Not much is known about the factors that determine these restricted lymphokine secretion profiles. Peptide specificity and human leucocyte

  11. Perforin-dependent apoptosis functionally compensates Fas deficiency in activation-induced cell death of human T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Véronique; Ménager, Michael; de Saint-Basile, Geneviève; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Roquelaure, Bertrand; André, Nicolas; Florkin, Benoit; le Deist, Françoise; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2007-12-15

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD) is involved in peripheral tolerance by controlling the expansion of repeatedly stimulated T cells via an apoptotic Fas (CD95; APO-1)-dependent pathway. The TNFRSF-6 gene encoding Fas is mutated in children suffering from autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is characterized by lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity. We examined AICD in Fas-deficient T cells from ALPS patients. We showed that primary activated Fas-deficient T cells die by apoptosis after repeated T cell antigen receptor (TCR) stimulation despite resistance to Fas-mediated cell death. This Fas-independent AICD was found to be mediated through a cytotoxic granules-dependent pathway. Cytotoxic granules-mediated AICD was also detected in normal T lymphocytes though to a lesser extent. As expected, the cytotoxic granules-dependent AICD was abolished in T cells from Rab27a- or perforin-deficient patients who exhibited defective granules-dependent cytotoxicity. Supporting an in vivo relevance of the cytotoxic granules-dependent AICD in ALPS patients, we detected an increased number of circulating T lymphocytes expressing granzymes A and B. Altogether, these data indicated that the cytotoxic granules-dependent cell death in ALPS may compensate for Fas deficiency in T lymphocytes. Furthermore, they identified a novel AICD pathway as a unique alternative to Fas apoptosis in human peripheral T lymphocytes.

  12. Atopic dermatitis may be a genetically determined dysmaturation of ectodermal tissue, resulting in disturbed T-lymphocyte maturation. A hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup-Pedersen, K; Ellingsen, A R; Olesen, A B

    1997-01-01

    is disturbed due to a faulty selection of T-lymphocytes in the thymus. "Dys"-matured T-cells leave the thymus as a consequence of faulty selection and continue their growth in the skin. The cells are eventually eradicated by the immune surveillance conducted by the normal part of the patients' immune system...

  13. Interleukin-15 differentially enhances the expression of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 in activated human (CD4(+))T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borger, P; Kauffman, HF; Postma, DS; Esselink, MT; Vellenga, E

    In this study interleukin (IL)-15 was examined for its ability to modulate the expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-4 in activated human T lymphocytes. The effect of IL-15 was compared with IL-2 and IL-7, cytokines all known to use the IL-2 receptor gamma(C) chain. The results

  14. Solar-simulated ultraviolet irradiation induces selective influx of CD4+ T lymphocytes in normal human skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nuzzo, S.; de Rie, M. A.; van der Loos, C. M.; Bos, J. D.; Teunissen, M. B.

    1996-01-01

    The proportion and composition of the human cutaneous CD3+ T lymphocyte population was determined in situ following a single exposure to physiological, erythema-inducing doses of simulated solar radiation, mainly consisting of UV radiation. Biopsies were taken 1, 2 and 7 days after local irradiation

  15. Noninvasive Imaging of Acute Renal Allograft Rejection by Ultrasound Detection of Microbubbles Targeted to T-lymphocytes in Rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabner, A.; Kentrup, D.; Mühlmeister, M.; Pawelski, H.; Biermann, C.; Bettinger, T.; Pavenstadt, H.; Schlatter, E.; Tiemann, K.; Reuter, S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: We propose CD3-antibody-mediated contrast-enhanced ultrasonography using human T-lymphocytes for image-based diagnosis of acute allograft rejection (AR) established in a rat renal transplantation model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 15 minutes after tail vein injection of 30 x 10(6) human

  16. 1α,25(OH2 Vitamin D3 Modulates Avian T Lymphocyte Functions without Inducing CTL Unresponsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish Boodhoo

    Full Text Available 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (Vitamin D is a naturally synthesized fat soluble vitamin shown to have immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and cancer prevention properties in human and murine models. Here, we studied the effects of Vitamin D on the functional abilities of avian T lymphocytes using chicken Interferon (IFN-γ ELISPOT assay, BrdU proliferation assay, Annexin V apoptosis assay and PhosFlow for detecting phosphorylated signalling molecules. The results demonstrate that Vitamin D significantly inhibited the abilities of T lymphocytes to produce IFN-γ and proliferate in vitro (P≤0.05, but retained their ability to undergo degranulation, which is a maker for cytotoxicity of these cells. Similarly, Vitamin D did not inhibit Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, a key mediator in T cell signalling, in the stimulated T lymphocytes population, while reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation levels in the unstimulated cells. Our data provide evidence that Vitamin D has immuno-modulatory properties on chicken T lymphocytes without inducing unresponsiveness and by limiting immuno-pathology can promote protective immunity against infectious diseases of poultry.

  17. The effect of pre-existing immunity on the capacity of influenza virosomes to induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mare, Arjan; Bungener, Laura B.; Regts, Joke; de Vries-Idema, Jacqueline; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Witschut, Jan; Daemen, Toos

    2008-01-01

    Protein antigens encapsulated in virosomes generated from influenza virus can induce antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. In the present study we determined, in a murine model system, whether pre-existing immunity against influenza virus hampers the induction of a CTL response.

  18. EXPRESSION OF SURFACE MARKERS ON CD4+T-LYMPHOCYTES IN NORMAL PREGNANCY AND PRE-ECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Mikhailova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. In course of physiological pregnancy, peripheral blood CD4+T-lymphocytes normally migrate to the uterine decidual tissue. Hence, this study aimed to compare expression profiles of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors on the surface of CD4+T-lymphocytes from peripheral blood in healthy pregnancy and in pre-eclampsia. The amounts of CD4+T-lymphocytes expressing CD184, CD119, CD192, CD197, β7 integrin, CD29, CD49d, CD11b were elevated in healthy pregnant women, as compared with non-pregnant women. The amounts of CD4+T-lymphocytes expressing CD49d, CD44, CD47, as well as intensity of CD47, CD29, CD49d, CD44, Integrin β7, CD54 expression proved to be decreased in cases of preeclampsia when compared with healthy pregnancy. This work was supported by grants ГК N 02.740.11.0711 from Russian Ministry of Education and Science, and Presidential grants НШ-3594.2010.7, МД-150.2011.7.

  19. CD40 stimulation leads to effective therapy of CD40(-) tumors through induction of strong systemic cytotoxic T lymphocyte immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mierlo, Geertje J. D.; den Boer, Annemieke Th; Medema, Jan Paul; van der Voort, Ellen I. H.; Fransen, Marieke F.; Offringa, Rienk; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Toes, Rene E. M.

    2002-01-01

    Adequate spontaneous activation of tumor-specific T lymphocytes in tumor-bearing hosts is rare, despite the expression of tumor antigens that are potentially highly immunogenic. For example, failure of the immune system to raise competent responses against established tumors expressing the human

  20. An unanticipated lack of consensus cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in HIV-1 databases : the contribution of prediction programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheliens, Ingrid M. M.; Kesmir, Can; Miedema, Frank; Van Raarle, Debbie; Borghans, Jose A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Most consensus HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes epitopes presented via intensively studied HLA molecules are thought to be known. Objective: To identify possible novel HIV-1 epitopes for HLA-B27 and HLA-B57; two HLA types which are abundantly studied because of their correlation

  1. The Magnitude and Specificity of Influenza A Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses in Humans Is Related to HLA-A and -B Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, A. C. M.; de Mutsert, G.; Graus, Y. M. F.; Fouchier, R. A. M.; Sintnicolaas, K.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Rimmelzwaan, G. F.

    2002-01-01

    The repertoire of human cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) in response to influenza A viruses has been shown to be directed towards multiple epitopes, with a dominant response to the HLA-A2-restricted M158–66 epitope. These studies, however, were performed with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of individuals selected randomly with respect to HLA phenotype or selected for the expression of one HLA allele without considering an influence of other HLA molecules. In addition, little information is available on the influence of HLA makeup on the overall CTL response against influenza viruses. Here, the influenza A virus-specific CTL response was investigated in groups of HLA-A and -B identical individuals. Between groups the individuals shared two or three of the four HLA-A and -B alleles. After in vitro stimulation of PBMC with influenza virus, the highest CTL activity was found in HLA-A2+ donors. A similar pattern was observed for the precursor frequency of virus-specific CTL (CTLp) ex vivo, with a higher CTLp frequency in HLA-A2-positive donors than in HLA-A2-negative donors, which were unable to recognize the immunodominant M158–66 epitope. In addition, CTL activity and frequency of CTLp for the individual influenza virus epitopes were determined. The frequency of CTLp specific for the HLA-B8-restricted epitope NP380–388 was threefold lower in HLA-B27-positive donors than in HLA-B27-negative donors. In addition, the frequency of CTLp specific for the HLA-A1-restricted epitope NP44–52 was threefold higher in HLA-A1-, -A2-, -B8-, and -B35-positive donors than in other donors, which was confirmed by measuring the CTL activity in vitro. These findings indicate that the epitope specificity of the CTL response is related to the phenotype of the other HLA molecules. Furthermore, the magnitude of the influenza virus-specific CTL response seems dependent on the HLA-A and -B phenotypes. PMID:11752149

  2. Clinical Significance of T Lymphocyte Subset Changes After First Line Chemotherapy in Peripheral Blood from Patients with Advanced Stage Adenocarcinoma Cell Lung Cancer

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    Xiang YAN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The immune function disorder relates closely to the occurrence, metastasis, and prognosis of cancer. T lymphocyte subsets take an important role in immune function. We identified the dynamic changes of the immune system by investigating the levels of T lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood of lung cancer patients with advanced stage adenocarcinoma undergoing first line chemotherapy. The results aided the search for rational chemo-immunotherapy strategies in lung cancer treatment. Methods Samples from 49 patients with pathologically demonstrated advanced stage adenocarcinoma cell lung cancer were compared with those from 33 healthy donors. Subsequently, the patients were separately treated with Docetaxol-based or Pemetrexed-based therapy. Peripheral blood samples at different time points after therapy were analyzed by flowcytometry. The lymphocyte subsets of the total lymphocytes were compared. Independent sample t test was used for the quantitative data analysis. Results The percentage of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD4+CD25+ cells of the lung cancer patients significantly varied from those of the healthy donors, the P values are 0.012, 0.034 and 0.006 separately. The CD3+ and CD3+CD4+ levels increased significantly on the 4th and 7th-10th day post-chemotherapy, which return to normal levels on the 21th day. The CD3+ level increased significantly both in the treatment group on all time points, while the CD3+, CD3+CD4+, CD4+/CD8+ levels significantly increased and the CD3+CD8+, CD8+CD28- levels significantly decreased on the 4th day in Pemetrexed group. The CD3+CD4+ levels increased significantly on the 4th and 7th-10th day and the CD3+CD8+, CD8+CD28- levels decreased on the 4th day in partial response group. Conclusion The immune function of advanced stage adenocarcinoma cell lung cancer patients was evidently suppressed, and was restored at the 4th day, followed by a reduction at the 21st day after chemotherapy. On the 4th day

  3. PPARgamma activation attenuates T-lymphocyte-dependent inflammation of adipose tissue and development of insulin resistance in obese mice

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    Unger Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation of adipose tissue (AT has been recently accepted as a first step towards obesity-mediated insulin resistance. We could previously show that mice fed with high fat diet (HFD develop systemic insulin resistance (IR and glucose intolerance (GI associated with CD4-positive T-lymphocyte infiltration into visceral AT. These T-lymphocytes, when enriched in AT, participate in the development of fat tissue inflammation and subsequent recruitment of proinflammatory macrophages. The aim of this work was to elucidate the action of the insulin sensitizing PPARgamma on T-lymphocyte infiltration during development of IR, and comparison of the PPARgamma-mediated anti-inflammatory effects of rosiglitazone and telmisartan in diet-induced obesity model (DIO-model in mice. Methods In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying early development of systemic insulin resistance and glucose intolerance male C57BL/6J mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD for 10-weeks in parallel to the pharmacological intervention with rosiglitazone, telmisartan, or vehicle. Results Both rosiglitazone and telmisartan were able to reduce T-lymphocyte infiltration into AT analyzed by quantitative analysis of the T-cell marker CD3gamma and the chemokine SDF1alpha. Subsequently, both PPARgamma agonists were able to attenuate macrophage infiltration into AT, measured by the reduction of MCP1 and F4/80 expression. In parallel to the reduction of AT-inflammation, ligand-activated PPARgamma improved diet-induced IR and GI. Conclusion Together the present study demonstrates a close connection between PPARgamma-mediated anti-inflammation in AT and systemic improvement of glucose metabolism identifying T-lymphocytes as one cellular mediator of PPARgamma´s action.

  4. Modulation of human T-lymphocyte functions by the consumption of carotenoid-rich vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzl, B; Bub, A; Brandstetter, B R; Rechkemmer, G

    1999-11-01

    A human intervention study was conducted to determine the effect of the consumption of carotenoid-rich vegetables on the immune system. Subjects, (twenty-three men), who were non-smokers, were not restricted in their daily diet, except that they had to abstain from fruit and vegetables high in carotenoids throughout the whole study period. The study was divided into four periods, each lasting 2 weeks: weeks 1-2: low-carotenoid period; throughout weeks 3-8: daily consumption of 330 ml tomato juice (40 mg lycopene/d, 1.5 mg beta-carotene/d) (weeks 3-4), 330 ml carrot juice (21.6 mg beta-carotene/d, 15.7 mg alpha-carotene/d, 0.5 mg lutein/d) (weeks 5-6), 10 g dried spinach powder (11.3 mg lutein/d, 3.1 mg beta-carotene/d) (weeks 7-8). Blood was collected weekly from subjects after a 12 h fast. T-lymphocyte functions were assessed by measuring proliferation and secretion of immunoreactive cytokines. The consumption of a low-carotenoid diet resulted in a significantly reduced proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultured with concanavalin A. After 2 weeks of tomato juice consumption and until the end of the intervention period lymphocyte proliferation was not significantly changed compared with proliferation at the end of the depletion period. Secretion of cytokines by T-helper-1-like lymphocytes (interleukin (IL)-2) and by T-helper-2-like lymphocytes (IL-4) was influenced by the dietary intervention. IL-2 and IL-4 secretion values were significantly suppressed after the low-carotenoid diet (P Tomato juice consumption significantly enhanced IL-2 (P powder consumption the cytokine secretion capacity of PBMC was not significantly different from that at the end of the depletion period. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that a low-carotenoid diet reduces T-lymphocyte functions and addition of tomato juice restores these functions. This modulation could not be explained by changes in the plasma carotenoid concentrations. The

  5. Kefir induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in HTLV-1-negative malignant T-lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Maalouf

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Katia Maalouf1, Elias Baydoun2, Sandra Rizk11Department of Natural Sciences, Lebanese American University, Beirut, Lebanon; 2Department of Biology, American University of Beirut, Beirut, LebanonBackground: Adult lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a malignancy that occurs in white blood cells. The overall cure rate in children is 85%, whereas it is only 40% in adults. Kefir is an important probiotic that contains many bioactive ingredients, which give it unique health benefits. It has been shown to control several cellular types of cancer.Purpose: The present study investigates the effect of a cell-free fraction of kefir on CEM and Jurkat cells, which are human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1-negative malignant T-lymphocytes.Methods: Cells were incubated with different kefir concentrations. The cytotoxicity of the compound was evaluated by determining the percentage viability of cells. The effect of all the noncytotoxic concentrations of kefir on the proliferation of CEM and Jurkat cells was then assessed. The levels of transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α, transforming growth factor- beta1 (TGF-β1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, and MMP-9 mRNA upon kefir treatment were then analyzed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Finally, the growth inhibitory effects of kefir on cell-cycle progression/apoptosis were assessed by Cell Death Detection (ELISA and flow cytometry.Results: The maximum cytotoxicity recorded after 48-hours treatment with 80 µg/µL kefir was only 42% and 39% in CEM and Jurkat cells, respectively. The percent reduction in proliferation was very significant, and was dose-, and time-dependent. In both cell lines, kefir exhibited its antiproliferative effect by downregulating TGF-α and upregulating TGF- β1 mRNA expression. Upon kefir treatment, a marked increase in cell-cycle distribution was noted in the preG1 phase of CEM and Jurkat cells, indicating the proapoptotic effect of kefir, which was

  6. Time to and Predictors of CD4+ T-Lymphocytes Recovery in HIV-Infected Children Initiating Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Ghana

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    Lorna Renner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. CD4+ T-lymphocyte monitoring is not routinely available in most resource-limited settings. We investigated predictors of time to CD4+ T-lymphocyte recovery in HIV-infected children on highly active antiretroviral (HAART at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana. Methods. Time to CD4+ T-lymphocyte recovery was defined as achieving percent CD4+ T-lymphocytes of 25%. We used Cox proportional hazard models for identifying significant predictor variables. Results. Of the 233 children with complete CD4+ T-lymphocyte data, the mean age at HAART initiation was 5.5 (SD=3.1 years. The median recovery time was 60 weeks (95% CL: 55–65. Evidence at baseline of severe suppression in CD4+ T-lymphocyte count adjusted for age, age at HAART initiation, gender, and having parents alive were statistically significant in predicting time to CD4+ T-lymphocyte recovery. Conclusions. A targeted approach based on predictors of CD4+ T-lymphocyte recovery can be a viable and cost-effective way of monitoring HAART in HIV-infected children in resource-limited settings.

  7. Correlation of Increases in 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D During Vitamin D Therapy With Activation of CD4+ T Lymphocytes in HIV-1-Infected Males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich; Kolte, Lilian; Hitz, Mette

    2012-01-01

    = .01) in adjusted models. Changes in parathyroid hormone correlated inversely with Tregs (P = .02). Smokers had higher levels of naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes (37% vs 25%;P = .01), naïve CD8+ T lymphocytes (28% vs 19%; P = .03), and Tregs (9% vs 7%; P = .03). Conclusion: Cholecalciferol and calcitriol...

  8. Early recovery of CD4 T lymphocytes in children on highly active antiretroviral therapy. Dutch study group for children with HIV infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen Stuart, J.W.; Slieker, W.A.; Rijkers, G.T.; Noest, A.J.; Boucher, C.A.B.; Suur, M.H.; Boer, R.J. de; Geelen, S.P.; Scherpbier, H.J.; Hartwig, N.G.; Hooijkaas, H.; Roos, M.T.; Graeff-Meeder, B. de; Groot, R. de

    1998-01-01

    Regeneration of CD4+ T lymphocytes has been shown to be thymus-dependent in bone marrow transplant recipients and after intensive chemotherapy. The rate of CD4+ T cell regeneration is correlated positively with enlargement of the thymus, as shown on radiographs, and higher rates of CD4+ T lymphocyte

  9. Changing Trend of T lymphocytes in Mouse Spleen after Japanese Encephalitis Virus Infection

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    Yan-fang Sun§, Chang-qin Gu§, Rong Jiang , Jing Ye, Yong-mao Li, Hua-zhen Liu , Hui Song and Ke-mei Peng*

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis is caused by Japanese encephalitis viruses (JEV with neurotropism. As one of the most important immune organ, spleen is directly involved in immune response against JEV. However, little research about JEV infection process in spleen has been reported. In this study, immunopathological changes in mouse spleen were analyzed every other day after subcutaneous injection of mice with JEV wild-type strain P3 by immunohistochemistry assay. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that the number of T lymphocytes was reduced from 0 to 3 DPI, increased from 3 to 7 DPI, and reduced again from 7 to 10 DPI. In addition, neurological dysfunction appeared at 6 DPI. These results suggested that spleen of mice suffered incontrovertible damages in influence of JEV infection. It can also be deduced that the cellular immunity took the crucial part in the first phase of transient viremia against JEV. Moreover, immune response was activated after the immune-depressed period in the first phase of viremia and neurological dysfunction appeared when cellular immunity was activated. Taking together, our research showed distinct immunopathological changes in mice after JEV infection, which enriched our understanding of Japanese encephalitis immunopathogenesis.

  10. Raman spectrum reveals the cell cycle arrest of Triptolide-induced leukemic T-lymphocytes apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daosen; Feng, Yanyan; Zhang, Qinnan; Su, Xin; Lu, Xiaoxu; Liu, Shengde; Zhong, Liyun

    2015-04-01

    Triptolide (TPL), a traditional Chinese medicine extract, possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties. Though some research results have implicated that Triptolide (TPL) can be utilized in the treatment of leukemia, it remains controversial about the mechanism of TPL-induced leukemic T-lymphocytes apoptosis. In this study, combining Raman spectroscopic data, principal component analysis (PCA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, both the biochemical changes and morphological changes during TPL-induced cell apoptosis were presented. In contrast, the corresponding data during Daunorubicin (DNR)-induced cell apoptosis was also exhibited. The obtained results showed that Raman spectral changes during TPL-induced cell apoptosis were greatly different from DNR-induced cell apoptosis in the early stage of apoptosis but revealed the high similarity in the late stage of apoptosis. Moreover, above Raman spectral changes were respectively consistent with the morphological changes of different stages during TPL-induced apoptosis or DNR-induced apoptosis, including membrane shrinkage and blebbing, chromatin condensation and the formation of apoptotic bodies. Importantly, it was found that Raman spectral changes with TPL-induced apoptosis or DNR-induced apoptosis were respectively related with the cell cycle G1 phase arrest or G1 and S phase arrest.

  11. Epitope Prediction Assays Combined with Validation Assays Strongly Narrows down Putative Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Peng Peng; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2015-03-24

    Tumor vaccine design requires prediction and validation of immunogenic MHC class I epitopes expressed by target cells as well as MHC class II epitopes expressed by antigen-presenting cells essential for the induction of optimal immune responses. Epitope prediction methods are based on different algorithms and are instrumental for a first screening of possible epitopes. However, their results do not reflect a one-to-one correlation with experimental data. We combined several in silico prediction methods to unravel the most promising C57BL/6 mouse-restricted Hepatitis C virus (HCV) MHC class I epitopes and validated these epitopes in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes within the HCV non-structural proteins were identified, and proteasomal cleavage sites and helper T cell (Th) epitopes at close proximity to these CTL epitopes were analyzed using multiple prediction algorithms. This combined in silico analysis enhances the precision of identification of functional HCV-specific CTL epitopes. This approach will be applicable to the design of human vaccines not only for HCV, but also for other antigens in which T-cell responses play a crucial role.

  12. CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) T Lymphocytes in Patients with Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żabińska, Marcelina; Krajewska, Magdalena; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Klinger, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The results of studies on the CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells in SLE are inconsistent since several analyses describe CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) as either immunosuppressive or cytotoxic. The aim of this study is to inquire whether the quantitative changes of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocytes subpopulation are related to the clinical status of patients with lupus nephritis. Evaluation of Foxp3 expression on CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells may shed some light on functional properties of these cells. 54 adult SLE patients and 19 sex and age matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. There were 15 patients in inactive (SLEDAI ≤ 5) and 39 in active (SLEDAI > 5) phase of disease. We determined absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) and CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-)Foxp3(+) subpopulations by flow cytometry. We observed a statistically significant increase in absolute count and percentage of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) in SLE patients compared to HC (p CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells and disease activity measured by SLEDAI (rs = 0.281, p = 0.038). Active LN patients had increased absolute count of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) cells compared to HC. Positive correlation of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) number with disease activity, and lack of Foxp3 expression on these cells, suggests that CD3(+)CD8(+)CD28(-) lymphocytes might be responsible for an increased proinflammatory response in the exacerbation of SLE.

  13. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate ameliorates photodynamic therapy responses in an in vitro T lymphocyte model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hang; Abe, Naomi; Zhu, Beiwei; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yoshimasa

    2014-10-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant polyphenolic constituent in green tea, is known as a powerful antioxidant but concomitantly possesses a prooxidant property. We investigated the effect of EGCG on phloxine B (PhB)-induced photocytotoxicity in human T lymphocytic leukemia Jurkat cells. EGCG significantly potentiated PhB-induced photocytotoxic effects, including the inhibition of cell proliferation, DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3 activity induction in Jurkat cells. Catalase attenuated the enhanced cytotoxicity by EGCG, suggesting the involvement of extracellularly produced hydrogen peroxide. Indeed, EGCG significantly enhanced extracellular hydrogen peroxide formation induced by photo-irradiated PhB. The EGCG also enhanced intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) gene expression, all of which are involved in PhB-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest that EGCG is capable of potentiating photodynamic therapy responses, presumably through the intracellular oxidative stress-sensitive JNK/IFN-γ pathway by exogenous hydrogen peroxide formation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Expression of the rat prothymosin alpha gene during T-lymphocyte proliferation and liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustelo, X R; Otero, A; Gómez-Márquez, J; Freire, M

    1991-01-25

    Prothymosin alpha (ProT alpha) is a widely distributed acidic protein whose function has been related to cell proliferation. We have analyzed the expression of the rat ProT alpha gene in several proliferative systems: concanavalin A (ConA)/interleukin-2-stimulated thymocytes, ConA-stimulated splenic T-lymphocytes, and hepatocytes proliferating during liver regeneration. In these systems, ProT alpha mRNA was detected in all stages of the cell cycle, with maximal increments (2-4-fold) at the beginning of the S phase. By contrast, the mRNAs for proliferating cell nuclear antigen/cyclin and histone H3, two cell-cycle-regulated proteins, were hardly detected in resting cells but increased notably at the G1/S boundary and in the S phase, respectively. Treatment of T-cells with the calcium ionophore A23187 increased ProT alpha mRNA levels 2.5-fold, whereas phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a protein kinase C activator, had no effect on ProT alpha gene expression. Incubation of ConA-stimulated T-cells with hydroxyurea, a DNA synthesis inhibitor, did not decrease the levels of ProT alpha mRNA, indicating that its expression is independent of DNA synthesis. These findings suggest that ProT alpha is required throughout all the stages of the cell cycle, resembling a constitutively expressed gene rather than one strictly involved in cell proliferation.

  15. The Role of Lipid Metabolism in T Lymphocyte Differentiation and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Howie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation and effector functions of both the innate and adaptive immune system are inextricably linked to cellular metabolism. The features of metabolism which affect both arms of the immune system include metabolic substrate availability, expression of enzymes, transport proteins, and transcription factors which control catabolism of these substrates, and the ability to perform anabolic metabolism. The control of lipid metabolism is central to the appropriate differentiation and functions of T lymphocytes, and ultimately to the maintenance of immune tolerance. This review will focus on the role of fatty acid (FA metabolism in T cell differentiation, effector function, and survival. FAs are important sources of cellular energy, stored as triglycerides. They are also used as precursors to produce complex lipids such as cholesterol and membrane phospholipids. FA residues also become incorporated into hormones and signaling moieties. FAs signal via nuclear receptors and their channeling, between storage as triacyl glycerides or oxidation as fuel, may play a role in survival or death of the cell. In recent years, progress in the field of immunometabolism has highlighted diverse roles for FA metabolism in CD4 and CD8 T cell differentiation and function. This review will firstly describe the sensing and modulation of the environmental FAs and lipid intracellular signaling and will then explore the key role of lipid metabolism in regulating the balance between potentially damaging pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory regulatory responses. Finally the complex role of extracellular FAs in determining cell survival will be discussed.

  16. Characterization of protein kinase C and its isoforms in human T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyers, A D; Hanekom, C; Rheeder, A; Strachan, A F; Wooten, M W; Nel, A E

    1988-11-15

    Protein kinase C (PKC) regulates numerous T cell functions and is present in abundance in normal human T cells and certain T cell lines. Although crude Triton X-100 soluble material obtained from T cell pellets contains minimal PKC activity, DEAE chromatography revealed that 12 to 37% of cellular PKC was membrane associated, probably due to removal of an inhibitor through column chromatography. As in other tissues, PKC from lymphoid tissue was phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent and diolein reduced the Ca2+ requirements for enzyme activity. Hydroxylapatite chromatography revealed that T cells possess two major peaks of PKC activity. Although, the enzyme in these peaks had similar m.w. and identical iso-electric mobility, the proteins differed with respect to their autophosphorylation sites and immunoreactivity toward an isoform specific antibody. Furthermore, differences in their activities in the presence of phospholipid, diolein, and limiting amounts of Ca2+ imply that these isoforms may be differentially activated. We discuss optimal conditions for activation of PKC and its isoforms for study of T lymphocyte cellular function.

  17. Engineered cytotoxic T lymphocytes with AFP-specific TCR gene for adoptive immunotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Longhao; Guo, Hao; Jiang, Ruoyu; Lu, Li; Liu, Tong; He, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and could serve as a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) and potential target for adoptive immunotherapy. However, low frequency and severe functional impairment of AFP-specific T cells in vivo hamper adoptive infusion. TAA-specific T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer could be an efficient and reliable alternation to generate AFP-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Autologous dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with AFP158-166 peptides were used to stimulate AFP-specific CTLs. TCR α/β chain genes of AFP-specific CTLs were cloned and linked by 2A peptide to form full-length TCR coding sequence synthesized into a lentiviral vector. Nonspecific activated T cells were engineered by lentivirus infection. Transgenetic CTLs were evaluated for transfection efficiency, expression of AFP158-166-specific TCR, interferon (IFN)-γ secretion, and specific cytotoxicity toward AFP+ HCC cells in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry revealed the AFP158-166-MHC-Pentamer positive transgenetic CTLs was 9.86 %. The number of IFN-γ secretion T cells and the specific cytotoxicity toward HpeG2 in vitro and in tumor-bearing NOD/SCID mice were significantly raised in transgenetic CTLs than that of AFP158-166-specific CTLs obtained by peptide-pulsed DCs or control group. TCR gene transfer is a promising strategy to generate AFP158-166-specific CTLs for the treatment of HCC.

  18. DR3 regulation of apoptosis of naive T-lymphocytes in children with acute infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, Elena Nikolaevna; Anisenkova, Elena Viktorovna; Presnyakova, Nataliya Borisovna; Utkin, Oleg Vladimirovich

    2016-09-01

    Acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM) is a widespread viral disease that mostly affects children. Development of AIM is accompanied by a change in the ratio of immune cells. This is provided by means of different biological processes including the regulation of apoptosis of naive T-cells. One of the potential regulators of apoptosis of T-lymphocytes is a death receptor 3 (DR3). We have studied the role of DR3 in the regulation of apoptosis of naive CD4+ (nTh) and CD8+ (nCTL) T-cells in healthy children and children with AIM. In healthy children as well as in children with AIM, the activation of DR3 is accompanied by inhibition of apoptosis of nTh. In healthy children, the stimulation of DR3 resulted in the increase in apoptosis of nCTL. On the contrary, in children with AIM, the level of apoptosis of nCTL decreased after DR3 activation, which is a positive contribution to the antiviral immune response. In children with AIM, nCTL are characterized by reduced level of apoptosis as compared with healthy children. These results indicate that DR3 can be involved in the reduction of sensitivity of nCTL to apoptosis in children with AIM.

  19. MULTI-COLOUR CYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS. IDENTIFICATION OF T LYMPHOCYTES AND THEIR SUBSETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Khaidukov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. T-lymphocytes play an important role in elimination of tumor cells, in reactions of a transplant against graft and graft versus host disease, in slow-type hypersensitivity, and other reactions directed for maintenance of homeostasis. Along with CD3, an antigen-specific T-cellular receptor (TCR is another common marker of T-cells. There are two types of TcR – αβ-TcR and γδ-TcR that differ in ontogenetic and functional properties. γδ-T-cells play a significant role in protection of organism against various types of infections, and determination of their amounts should be an integral part of the analysis of patients’ immune status. To these purposes, a multi-colour analysis shuld be used, applying the following combinations of monoclonal antibodies: CD3/CD4/CD8/CD45 and αβ-TcR/γδ-TcR/CD3/CD45. Multi-colour staining and multi-step gating allow of carrying out multiparametric analysis of peripheral blood with high accuracy and reliability. The proposed approach considerably facilitates interpretation of results obtained, and it allows of judging about immune system functioning in various pathological conditions.

  20. Rigid-body ligand recognition drives cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) receptor triggering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; George, Roger; Dessailly, Benoit H; Stagg, Loren J; Evans, Edward J; Orengo, Christine A; Stuart, David I; Ladbury, John E; Ikemizu, Shinji; Gilbert, Robert J C; Davis, Simon J

    2011-02-25

    The inhibitory T-cell surface-expressed receptor, cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), which belongs to the class of cell surface proteins phosphorylated by extrinsic tyrosine kinases that also includes antigen receptors, binds the related ligands, B7-1 and B7-2, expressed on antigen-presenting cells. Conformational changes are commonly invoked to explain ligand-induced "triggering" of this class of receptors. Crystal structures of ligand-bound CTLA-4 have been reported, but not the apo form, precluding analysis of the structural changes accompanying ligand binding. The 1.8-Å resolution structure of an apo human CTLA-4 homodimer emphasizes the shared evolutionary history of the CTLA-4/CD28 subgroup of the immunoglobulin superfamily and the antigen receptors. The ligand-bound and unbound forms of both CTLA-4 and B7-1 are remarkably similar, in marked contrast to B7-2, whose binding to CTLA-4 has elements of induced fit. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that ligand binding by CTLA-4 is enthalpically driven and accompanied by unfavorable entropic changes. The similarity of the thermodynamic parameters determined for the interactions of CTLA-4 with B7-1 and B7-2 suggests that the binding is not highly specific, but the conformational changes observed for B7-2 binding suggest some level of selectivity. The new structure establishes that rigid-body ligand interactions are capable of triggering CTLA-4 phosphorylation by extrinsic kinase(s).

  1. Multiple HIV-1 infection of cells and the evolutionary dynamics of cytotoxic T lymphocyte escape mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Levy, David N

    2009-09-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are an important branch of the immune system, killing virus-infected cells. Many viruses can mutate so that infected cells are not killed by CTL anymore. This escape can contribute to virus persistence and disease. A prominent example is HIV-1. The evolutionary dynamics of CTL escape mutants in vivo have been studied experimentally and mathematically, assuming that a cell can only be infected with one HIV particle at a time. However, according to data, multiple virus particles frequently infect the same cell, a process called coinfection. Here, we study the evolutionary dynamics of CTL escape mutants in the context of coinfection. A mathematical model suggests that an intermediate strength of the CTL response against the wild-type is most detrimental for an escape mutant, minimizing overall virus load and even leading to its extinction. A weaker or, paradoxically, stronger CTL response against the wild-type both lead to the persistence of the escape mutant and higher virus load. It is hypothesized that an intermediate strength of the CTL response, and thus the suboptimal virus suppression observed in HIV-1 infection, might be adaptive to minimize the impact of existing CTL escape mutants on overall virus load.

  2. Increased presence of T lymphocytes in central nervous system of EPM affected horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Patricia; Witonsky, Sharon; Robertson, John; Daft, Barbara

    2005-12-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), caused by Sarcocystis neurona infection in the central nervous system (CNS), affects up to 1% of all horses during their lifetimes. Neither the protective immune response nor the immunopathology associated with the disease is well understood. To begin to clarify the pathogenesis of the disease, immunohistochemical staining for B and T lymphocytes was performed on spinal cord sections obtained from 17 horses, all of which were all positive for S. neurona based on immunohistochemical staining. Fifteen of the 17 horses included in the study were killed due to neurologic dysfunction; 2 of the 17 horses were killed because of fractures. All 17 horses had histologic changes consistent with S. neurona infection. A significantly greater number of T cells were seen in sections from S. neurona-infected versus control horses. Because this was a small descriptive study, we were not able to determine the mechanisms of enhanced T-cell recruitment in the sections from the S. neurona-infected horses.

  3. Human malignant melanoma-derived progestagen-associated endometrial protein immunosuppresses T lymphocytes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suping Ren

    Full Text Available Progestagen-associated endometrial protein (PAEP is a glycoprotein of the lipocalin family that acts as a negative regulator of T cell receptor-mediated activation. However, the function of tumor-derived PAEP on the human immune system in the tumor microenvironment is unknown. PAEP is highly expressed in intermediate and thick primary melanomas (Breslow's 2.5mm or greater and metastatic melanomas, correlating with its expression in daughter cell lines established in vitro. The current study investigates the role of melanoma cell-secreted PAEP protein in regulating T cell function. Upon the enrichment of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, each subset was then mixed with either melanoma-derived PAEP protein or PAEP-poor supernatant of gene-silenced tumor cells. IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion of CD4+ T cells significantly decreased with the addition of PAEP-rich supernatant. And the addition of PAEP-positive cell supernatant to activated lymphocytes significantly inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic T cell activity, while increasing lymphocyte apoptosis. Our result suggests that melanoma cell-secreted PAEP protein immunosuppresses the activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity of T lymphocytes, which might partially explain the mechanism of immune tolerance induced by melanoma cells within the tumor microenvironment.

  4. Early T cell signalling is reversibly altered in PD-1+ T lymphocytes infiltrating human tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Fang Wang

    Full Text Available To improve cancer immunotherapy, a better understanding of the weak efficiency of tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL is necessary. We have analyzed the functional state of human TIL immediately after resection of three types of tumors (NSCLC, melanoma and RCC. Several signalling pathways (calcium, phosphorylation of ERK and Akt and cytokine secretion are affected to different extents in TIL, and show a partial spontaneous recovery within a few hours in culture. The global result is an anergy that is quite distinct from clonal anergy induced in vitro, and closer to adaptive tolerance in mice. PD-1 (programmed death -1 is systematically expressed by TIL and may contribute to their anergy by its mere expression, and not only when it interacts with its ligands PD-L1 or PD-L2, which are not expressed by every tumor. Indeed, the TCR-induced calcium and ERK responses were reduced in peripheral blood T cells transfected with PD-1. Inhibition by sodium stibogluconate of the SHP-1 and SHP-2 phosphatases that associate with several inhibitory receptors including PD-1, relieves part of the anergy apparent in TIL or in PD-1-transfected T cells. This work highlights some of the molecular modifications contributing to functional defects of human TIL.

  5. Gammadelta (γδ) T lymphocytes do not impact the development of early atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsin-Yuan; Wu, Runpei; Hedrick, Catherine C

    2014-06-01

    Gammadelta (γδ) T cells are a subset of pro-inflammatory innate-like T lymphocytes that serve as a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. γδ T cells are highly enriched in cholesterol compared to αβ T cells. In this study, we aimed to identify the role of γδ T cells in atherosclerosis, a cholesterol and inflammation-driven disease. We found that the percentages of γδ T cells are increased in ApoE(-/-) mice fed a Western diet. We generated TCRδ(-/-)ApoE(-/-) mice and fed them either rodent chow or a Western diet for ten weeks for the assessment of atherosclerosis. The atherosclerotic lesion size in diet-fed TCRδ(-/-)ApoE(-/-) mice was similar to that of diet-fed ApoE(-/-) mice. There were no differences in cytokine production or numbers of αβ T cells in aorta of TCRδ(-/-)ApoE(-/-) mice. Plasma lipoprotein profiles were unchanged by the absence of γδ T cells. Our data suggest that γδ T cells do not contribute to early atherosclerotic plaque development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Numbers and cytotoxicities of CD3+CD56+ T lymphocytes in peripheral blood of patients with acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenjian; Xing, Chao; Dong, Aishu; Lin, Xiaoji; Lin, Ying; Zhu, Baoling; He, Muqing; Yao, Rongxing

    2013-10-01

    Recent reports have highlighted the role of cellular immunity in anti-tumor defenses. T lymphocytes are known to play important part in anti-cancer immunity. The number and function of T lymphocytes are altered in chronic leukemia patients. CD3(+)CD56(+) T lymphocytes have also been found to be abnormal in cancer patients. We therefore investigated changes in the number and cytotoxicity of CD3(+)CD56(+) T lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of acute leukemia (AL) patients (excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia), to improve our understanding of the role of this T lymphocyte subset. We analyzed CD3(+)CD56(+) T lymphocyte numbers and cytotoxicities in healthy controls, AL patients, and AL patients with complete remission. Lymphocyte counts were performed in peripheral blood and flow cytometry was used to determine cell numbers and cytotoxicities. The absolute number of CD3(+)CD56(+) T lymphocytes was increased in AL patients (including acute myeloid [AML] and acute lymphocytic leukemia [ALL]) compared with healthy controls (PCD3(+)CD56(+) T lymphocytes in AML and ALL patients who achieved remission following chemotherapy was close to healthy controls (P>0.05), but their functioning was still significantly reduced (PCD3(+)CD56(+) T lymphocytes increased significantly in AML patients with increased peripheral blood white blood cell (WBC) counts, and in ALL patients without increased WBCs. These results suggest that cellular immunity may respond to AML and ALL, but that lymphocyte cytotoxicity remains impaired. Dysfunction of CD3(+)CD56(+) T lymphocytes in AML and ALL patients may contribute to the failure of the host immune response against leukemic blasts.

  7. Deciphering the Role of CD1e Protein in Mycobacterial Phosphatidyl-myo-inositol Mannosides (PIM) Processing for Presentation by CD1b to T Lymphocytes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cala-De Paepe, Diane; Layre, Emilie; Giacometti, Gaëlle; Garcia-Alles, Luis F.; Mori, Lucia; Hanau, Daniel; de Libero, Gennaro; de la Salle, Henri; Puzo, Germain; Gilleron, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Lipids are important antigens that induce T cell-mediated specific immune responses. They are presented to T lymphocytes by a specific class of MHC-I like proteins, termed CD1. The majority of the described CD1-presented mycobacterial antigens are presented by the CD1b isoform. We previously demonstrated that the stimulation of CD1b-restricted T cells by the hexamannosylated phosphatidyl-myo-inositol (PIM6), a family of mycobacterial antigens, requires a prior partial digestion of the antigen oligomannoside moiety by α-mannosidase and that CD1e is an accessory protein absolutely required for the generation of the lipid immunogenic form. Here, we show that CD1e behaves as a lipid transfer protein influencing lipid immunoediting and membrane transfer of PIM lipids. CD1e selectively assists the α-mannosidase-dependent digestion of PIM6 species according to their degree of acylation. Moreover, CD1e transfers only diacylated PIM from donor to acceptor liposomes and also from membranes to CD1b. This study provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms by which CD1e contributes to lipid immunoediting and CD1-restricted presentation to T cells. PMID:22782895

  8. [Novel therapy for malignant lymphoma: adoptive immuno-gene therapy using chimeric antigen receptor(CAR)-expressing T lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Keiya

    2014-03-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) technology is a novel approach to cancer immuno-gene therapy. CARs are hybrid proteins consisting of target-antigen-specific single-chain antibody fragment fused to intracellular T-cell activation domains (CD28 or CD137/CD3 zeta receptor). CAR-expressing engineered T lymphocytes can directly recognize and kill tumor cells in an HLA independent manner. In the United States, promising results have been obtained in the clinical trials of adoptive immuno-gene therapy using CD19-CAR-T lymphocytes for the treatment of refractory B-cell malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this review article, CD19-CAR-T gene therapy for refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma is discussed.

  9. Nuclear Phosphoproteomic Screen Uncovers ACLY as Mediator of IL-2-induced Proliferation of CD4+ T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osinalde, Nerea; Mitxelena, Jone; Sánchez-Quiles, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Anti-cancer immunotherapies commonly rely on the use of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to promote the expansion of T lymphocytes. IL-2- dependent proliferation is the culmination of a complex network of phosphorylation-driven signaling events that impact on gene transcription through mechanisms...... that are not clearly understood. To study the role of IL-2 in the regulation of nuclear protein function we have performed an unbiased mass spectrometry-based study of the nuclear phosphoproteome of resting and IL-2-treated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. We detected 8521distinct phosphosites including many that are not yet...... reported in curated phosphorylation databases. Although most phosphorylation sites remained unaffected upon IL-2 treatment, 391 sites corresponding to 288 gene products showed robust IL-2-dependent regulation. Importantly, we show that ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY) is a key phosphoprotein effector of IL-2...

  10. Ebola virus glycoprotein directly triggers T lymphocyte death despite of the lack of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iampietro, Mathieu; Younan, Patrick; Nishida, Andrew; Dutta, Mukta; Lubaki, Ndongala Michel; Santos, Rodrigo I; Koup, Richard A; Katze, Michael G; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2017-05-01

    Fatal outcomes of Ebola virus (EBOV) infections are typically preceded by a 'sepsis-like' syndrome and lymphopenia despite T cells being resistant to Ebola infection. The mechanisms that lead to T lymphocytes death remain largely unknown; however, the degree of lymphopenia is highly correlative with fatalities. Here we investigated whether the addition of EBOV or its envelope glycoprotein (GP) to isolated primary human CD4+ T cells induced cell death. We observed a significant decrease in cell viability in a GP-dependent manner, which is suggestive of a direct role of GP in T cell death. Using immunoprecipitation assays and flow cytometry, we demonstrate that EBOV directly binds to CD4+ T cells through interaction of GP with TLR4. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the addition of EBOV to CD4+ T cells results in the significant upregulation of pathways associated with interferon signaling, pattern recognition receptors and intracellular activation of NFκB signaling pathway. Both transcriptome analysis and specific inhibitors allowed identification of apoptosis and necrosis as mechanisms associated with the observed T cell death following exposure to EBOV. The addition of the TLR4 inhibitor CLI-095 significantly reduced CD4+ T cell death induced by GP. EBOV stimulation of primary CD4+ T cells resulted in a significant increase in secreted TNFα; inhibition of TNFα-mediated signaling events significantly reduced T cell death while inhibitors of both necrosis and apoptosis similarly reduced EBOV-induced T cell death. Lastly, we show that stimulation with EBOV or GP augments monocyte maturation as determined by an overall increase in expression levels of markers of differentiation. Subsequently, the increased rates of cellular differentiation resulted in higher rates of infection further contributing to T cell death. These results demonstrate that GP directly subverts the host's immune response by increasing the susceptibility of monocytes to EBOV infection and

  11. Genetic engineering of cytolytic T lymphocytes for adoptive T-cell therapy of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Naranjo, Araceli; Serrano, Lisa M; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Christine L; Jensen, Michael C

    2004-06-01

    Disease relapse is the leading cause of mortality for children diagnosed with disseminated neuroblastoma. The adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T cells is an attractive approach to target minimal residual disease following conventional therapies. We describe here the genetic engineering of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to express a chimeric immunoreceptor for re-directed HLA-independent recognition of neuroblastoma. The CE7R chimeric immunoreceptor was constructed by PCR splice overlap extension and is composed of a single-chain antibody extracellular domain (scFv) derived from the L1-CAM-specific murine CE7 hybridoma fused to human IgG1 hinge-Fc, the transmembrane portion of human CD4, and the cytoplasmic tail of huCD3-zeta chain (scFvFc:zeta). Primary human T cells were genetically modified by naked DNA electrotransfer of plasmid expression vector CE7R-pMG then analyzed by Western blotting, flow cytometry for CE7R expression and cell surface trafficking, 4-h chromium release assay for re-directed neuroblastoma lysis, and ELISA for tumor-specific activation of cytokine production. CE7R is expressed as an intact chimeric protein that trafficks to the cell surface as a type I transmembrane protein. Primary human CE7R-expressing CD8(+) CTL clones specifically recognize human neuroblastoma tumor cells and are activated for tumor cell lysis and T(c)1 cytokine production. These data demonstrate the utility of CE7R for re-directing the effector function of CTL to neuroblastoma and have provided the rationale to initiate a FDA-authorized (BB-IND#9149) pilot clinical trial to establish the feasibility and safety of adoptive transfer of autologous CE7R(+)CD8(+) CTL clones to children with recurrent/refractory neuroblastoma. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The Role of Multiscale Protein Dynamics in Antigen Presentation and T Lymphocyte Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Charlotte Eccleston

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes are stimulated when they recognize short peptides bound to class I proteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC protein, as peptide–MHC complexes. Due to the diversity in T-cell receptor (TCR molecules together with both the peptides and MHC proteins they bind to, it has been difficult to design vaccines and treatments based on these interactions. Machine learning has made some progress in trying to predict the immunogenicity of peptide sequences in the context of specific MHC class I alleles but, as such approaches cannot integrate temporal information and lack explanatory power, their scope will always be limited. Here, we advocate a mechanistic description of antigen presentation and TCR activation which is explanatory, predictive, and quantitative, drawing on modeling approaches that collectively span several length and time scales, being capable of furnishing reliable biological descriptions that are difficult for experimentalists to provide. It is a form of multiscale systems biology. We propose the use of chemical rate equations to describe the time evolution of the foreign and host proteins to explain how the original proteins end up being presented on the cell surface as peptide fragments, while we invoke molecular dynamics to describe the key binding processes on the molecular level, including those of peptide–MHC complexes with TCRs which lie at the heart of the immune response. On each level, complementary methods based on machine learning are available, and we discuss the relationship between these divergent approaches. The pursuit of predictive mechanistic modeling approaches requires experimentalists to adapt their work so as to acquire, store, and expose data that can be used to verify and validate such models.

  13. Effects of Xenoestrogens on T Lymphocytes: Modulation of bcl-2, p53, and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. McMurray

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Endogenous estrogens have significant immunomodulatory effects characterized as suppression of cell mediated immunity and stimulation of humoral immunity. Xenoestrogens are environmental estrogens that have endocrine impact, acting as estrogen agonists and antagonists but whose immune effects are not well characterized. Using CD4+ Jurkat T cells as a model, the effects of representative xenoestrogens on T proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were examined. Coumestrol (CM, a phytoestrogen, and tetrachlorodioxin (TCDD in concentrations of 10-4 to 10-6M significantly inhibited Jurkat T cell lymphoproliferation, whereas bisphenol A (BPA and DDT had minimal effect, but did antagonize 17-β-estrtadiol induced effects. Xenoestrogens, especially CM, produced accumulation of Jurkat T cells in G2/M phase, and subsequently induced apoptosis, particularly CM (% apoptotic cells = 30 ± 12 vs. control = 5 ± 2. These changes were associated with DNA fragmentation. BPA and DDT also induced DNA fragmentation but not significant DNA hypoploidy. Xenoestrogen – CM, BPA, DDT, and TCDD - exposure suppressed bcl-2 protein and mRNA transcript levels but augmented p53 protein and mRNA transcripts. Human purified peripheral blood lymphocytes responded with similar significant cell cycle changes (G0/G1 exodus and G2/M accumulation for CM, BPA, and DDT exposure. These preliminary data, taken together, suggest that xenoestrogens have direct, compound-specific T lymphocyte effects that enhance our understanding of environmental modulation of immune and autoimmune responses.

  14. Histological analysis of gamma delta T lymphocytes infiltrating human triple-negative breast carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Villacorta Hidalgo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women and the second most common cancer worldwide after lung cancer. The remarkable heterogeneity of breast cancers influences numerous diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic factors. Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs lack expression of HER2 and the estrogen and progesterone receptors and often contain lymphocytic infiltrates. Most of TNBCs are invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs with poor prognosis, whereas prognostically more favorable subtypes such as medullary breast carcinomas (MBCs are somewhat less frequent. Infiltrating T cells have been associated with an improved clinical outcome in TNBCs. The prognostic role of γδ T cells within CD3+ tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes remains unclear. We analyzed 26 TNBCs, 14 IDCs and 12 MBCs, using immunohistochemistry for the quantity and patterns of γδ T-cell infitrates within the tumor microenvironment. In both types of TNBCs, we found higher numbers of γδ T cells in comparison with normal breast tissues and fibroadenomas. The numbers of infiltrating γδ T cells were higher in MBCs than in IDCs. γδ T cells in MBCs were frequently located in direct contact with tumor cells, within the tumor and at its invasive border. In contrast, most γδ T cells in IDCs were found in clusters within the tumor stroma. These findings could be associated with the fact that the patient’s prognosis in MBCs is better than that in IDCs. Further studies to characterize these γδ T cells at the molecular and functional level are in progress.

  15. Hepatosplenic gammadelta T-cell lymphoma: ultrastructural, immunophenotypic, and functional evidence for cytotoxic T lymphocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhany, K E; Feldman, M; Kahn, M J; Peritt, D; Schretzenmair, R D; Wilson, D M; DiPaola, R S; Glick, A D; Kant, J A; Nowell, P C; Kamoun, M

    1997-06-01

    Hepatosplenic gammadelta T cell lymphoma (TCL) is a rare, aggressive subset of peripheral TCL that presents with hepatosplenomegaly and cytopenias. Detailed clinicopathological, ultrastructural, and cytogenetic analyses of these lymphomas are limited; functional characteristics of these lymphomas are unknown. We have undertaken a clinicopathological, immunophenotypic, ultrastructural, cytogenetic, and functional analysis of three hepatosplenic gammadelta TCLs. All patients presented with massive hepatosplenomegaly and anemia, thrombocytopenia, or severe neutropenia; terminal blastlike transformation occurred in one patient. Combination chemotherapy had no response in two patients, but induced complete remission in one. gammadelta T cell receptor (TCR) expression and clonal TCRdelta gene rearrangements were documented in each case. Two different subsets of gammadelta TCL were identified based on delta chain variable region usage; two lymphomas were Vdelta1+, whereas the third was negative for both Vdelta1 and Vdelta2. Cytogenetic analysis was performed on two lymphomas; isochromosome 7q and probable trisomy 8 was shown in one of the Vdelta1+ lymphomas, whereas the Vdelta1 negative lymphoma had 14p+ with t(1;14)(q21;p13). NK cell-associated antigens (CD11c, CD16, or CD56) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) effector proteins (perforin, granzyme B, TIA-1, and Fas ligand) were expressed by each lymphoma; dense core cytolytic granules were observed by electron microscopy in both lymphomas studied. Functional studies performed in two cases showed TCR-mediated cytolysis of P815 x 2 FcR+ cells induced by anti-CD3 in a redirected cytolysis assay in one of the CD56+, Vdelta1+ lymphomas, whereas IFNgamma secretion was induced by anti-CD3 in the CD56-, Vdelta1 negative lymphoma. These studies show that hepatosplenic gammadelta TCLs have CTL differentiation, retain functional activity in vitro, and are derived from at least two gammadelta T cell subsets.

  16. Involvement of PIT-1-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes in anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Hironori; Iguchi, Genzo; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Hidaka-Takeno, Ryoko; Okimura, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Ryusaku; Suda, Kentaro; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    Anti-pituitary-specific transcriptional factor 1 (PIT-1) antibody syndrome is characterized by acquired growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiencies associated with circulating anti-PIT-1 antibodies. Although autoimmunity to PIT-1 has been suggested as a pathogenesis, the precise mechanism of the syndrome remains unclarified. To elucidate the involvement of antibody- or cell-mediated immunity in anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome. To investigate a direct effect of anti-PIT-1 antibody on pituitary cells, cell proliferation, and cytotoxicity detection assays were performed using patient serum. Enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay was performed to evaluate the involvement of PIT-1-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). An immunohistochemical analysis using anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 antibody was performed to examine tissue infiltration by CTLs. Patient serum did not exhibit any inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and secretion of GH and PRL in GH3 cells. In addition, complement-dependent cytotoxicity was not detected in patient serum on GH3 cells or primary pituitary cells. The ELISpot assay revealed the presence of CTLs that specifically reacted to the recombinant PIT-1 protein in the patient's peripheral lymphocytes. CD8(+) cell infiltrations, which is the characteristic of CTLs, were observed in the pituitary gland, adrenal gland, stomach, thyroid gland, liver, and pancreas of the patient with anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome. These results suggest that the anti-PIT-1 antibody is not a cause but a marker of anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome, in which CTLs play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis.

  17. Extended interferon-alpha therapy accelerates telomere length loss in human peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M O'Bryan

    Full Text Available Type I interferons have pleiotropic effects on host cells, including inhibiting telomerase in lymphocytes and antiviral activity. We tested the hypothesis that long-term interferon treatment would result in significant reduction in average telomere length in peripheral blood T lymphocytes.Using a flow cytometry-based telomere length assay on peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from the Hepatitis-C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C study, we measured T cell telomere lengths at screening and at months 21 and 45 in 29 Hepatitis-C virus infected subjects. These subjects had failed to achieve a sustained virologic response following 24 weeks of pegylated-interferon-alpha plus ribavirin treatment and were subsequently randomized to either a no additional therapy group or a maintenance dose pegylated-IFNα group for an additional 3.5 years. Significant telomere loss in naïve T cells occurred in the first 21 months in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere losses were similar in both groups during the final two years. Expansion of CD8(+CD45RA(+CD57(+ memory T cells and an inverse correlation of alanine aminotransferase levels with naïve CD8(+ T cell telomere loss were observed in the control group but not in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere length at screening inversely correlated with Hepatitis-C viral load and body mass index.Sustained interferon-alpha treatment increased telomere loss in naïve T cells, and inhibited the accumulation of T cell memory expansions. The durability of this effect and consequences for immune senescence need to be defined.

  18. Influence of DC-CIK in advanced colorectal cancer patients on T lymphocyte subsets and cytokines

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    Rong Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effects of dendritic cells (DC-cytokine induced killer cells (CIK treatment on T lymphocyte subsets and cytokines in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Methods: A total of 84 cases patients with advanced colorectal cancer were divided into two groups according to random number table method, each 42 cases, both two groups were given FOLFOX scheme chemotherapy, on the basis, the observation group were given supplementary DC-CIK treatment, compared the T lymphocy te subgroup: CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+, Th1 cytokines, interleukin-2 (IL-2 and interferon gamma-γ (FN-γ, Th2 cytokines: interleukin 6 (IL-6, interleukin 4 (IL-4 of the two groups before and after treatment. Results: Compared with before treatment, the CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+, Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ in observation group were significantly higher than after treatment , the CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+, Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ in control group were significantly lower than after treatment, and the differences were all statistically significant; The CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+/CD8+, Th1 cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ in observation group after treatment were significantly higher than those in control group after treatment with statistical difference; CD8+, Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-6 in two groups had no statistical significance before and after treatment. Conclusion: Chemotherapy can cause the immune function restrained in patients with advanced colorectal cancer, and DC-CIK supplementary therapy can significantly improve the immune function, enhance the anti tumor immune responses.

  19. Behavior and Properties of Mature Lytic Granules at the Immunological Synapse of Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes.

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    Min Ming

    Full Text Available Killing of virally infected cells or tumor cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes requires targeting of lytic granules to the junction between the CTL and its target. We used whole-cell patch clamp to measure the cell capacitance at fixed intracellular [Ca2+] to study fusion of lytic granules in human CTLs. Expression of a fluorescently labeled human granzyme B construct allowed identification of lytic granule fusion using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In this way capacitance steps due to lytic granule fusion were identified. Our goal was to determine the size of fusing lytic granules and to describe their behavior at the plasma membrane. On average, 5.02 ± 3.09 (mean ± s.d. lytic granules were released per CTL. The amplitude of lytic granule fusion events was ~ 3.3 fF consistent with a diameter of about 325 nm. Fusion latency was biphasic with time constants of 15.9 and 106 seconds. The dwell time of fusing lytic granules was exponentially distributed with a mean dwell time of 28.5 seconds. Fusion ended in spite of the continued presence of granules at the immune synapse. The mobility of fusing granules at the membrane was indistinguishable from that of lytic granules which failed to fuse. While dwelling at the plasma membrane lytic granules exhibit mobility consistent with docking interspersed with short periods of greater mobility. The failure of lytic granules to fuse when visible in TIRF at the membrane may indicate that a membrane-confined reaction is rate limiting.

  20. Behavior and Properties of Mature Lytic Granules at the Immunological Synapse of Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Min; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Stevens, David R.; Rettig, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Killing of virally infected cells or tumor cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes requires targeting of lytic granules to the junction between the CTL and its target. We used whole-cell patch clamp to measure the cell capacitance at fixed intracellular [Ca2+] to study fusion of lytic granules in human CTLs. Expression of a fluorescently labeled human granzyme B construct allowed identification of lytic granule fusion using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. In this way capacitance steps due to lytic granule fusion were identified. Our goal was to determine the size of fusing lytic granules and to describe their behavior at the plasma membrane. On average, 5.02 ± 3.09 (mean ± s.d.) lytic granules were released per CTL. The amplitude of lytic granule fusion events was ~ 3.3 fF consistent with a diameter of about 325 nm. Fusion latency was biphasic with time constants of 15.9 and 106 seconds. The dwell time of fusing lytic granules was exponentially distributed with a mean dwell time of 28.5 seconds. Fusion ended in spite of the continued presence of granules at the immune synapse. The mobility of fusing granules at the membrane was indistinguishable from that of lytic granules which failed to fuse. While dwelling at the plasma membrane lytic granules exhibit mobility consistent with docking interspersed with short periods of greater mobility. The failure of lytic granules to fuse when visible in TIRF at the membrane may indicate that a membrane-confined reaction is rate limiting. PMID:26296096

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitors impair the elimination of HIV-infected cells by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

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    Richard Brad Jones

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Resting memory CD4+ T-cells harboring latent HIV proviruses represent a critical barrier to viral eradication. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis, such as suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA, romidepsin, and panobinostat have been shown to induce HIV expression in these resting cells. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the low levels of viral gene expression induced by a candidate HDACi may be insufficient to cause the death of infected cells by viral cytopathic effects, necessitating their elimination by immune effectors, such as cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL. Here, we study the impact of three HDACis in clinical development on T-cell effector functions. We report two modes of HDACi-induced functional impairment: i the rapid suppression of cytokine production from viable T-cells induced by all three HDACis ii the selective death of activated T-cells occurring at later time-points following transient exposures to romidepsin or, to a lesser extent, panobinostat. As a net result of these factors, HDACis impaired CTL-mediated IFN-γ production, as well as the elimination of HIV-infected or peptide-pulsed target cells, both in liquid culture and in collagen matrices. Romidepsin exerted greater inhibition of antiviral function than SAHA or panobinostat over the dose ranges tested. These data suggest that treatment with HDACis to mobilize the latent reservoir could have unintended negative impacts on the effector functions of CTL. This could influence the effectiveness of HDACi-based eradication strategies, by impairing elimination of infected cells, and is a critical consideration for trials where therapeutic interruptions are being contemplated, given the importance of CTL in containing rebound viremia.

  2. Induction of Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes as a Basis for the Development of Broadly Protective Influenza Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Hillaire, Marine L. B.; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Guus F Rimmelzwaan

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of broadly protective influenza vaccines because of the continuous emergence of antigenic drift variants of seasonal influenza viruses and the threat posed by the emergence of antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. It has been recognized more than three decades ago that influenza A virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize epitopes located in the relatively conserved proteins like the nucleoprotein and that they cross-react ...

  3. The Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen-4 +49A/G Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Association With Visceral Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Hajilooi, Mehrdad; Lotfi, Pegah; Seif, Farhad; Bazmani, Ahad; Momeni, Mohammad; Ravary, Ali; Kazemi Arababadi, Mohammad; Khalilian, Ali Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several lines of evidence approve that innate and adaptive immunity play key roles in the defense against visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The polymorphism within the cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) gene alters its expression. Objectives: The main aim of this study was to evaluate the polymorphism within the +49 position of the CTLA-4 gene of Iranian patients with VL in comparison with healthy controls. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 88 patients with c...

  4. Analysis of CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes : A comparison between EPICS XL and Celldyn Sapphire

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdan Panah, Haleh

    2006-01-01

    Flowcytometric technology has been widely used for measurement of the absolute numbers of T-lymphocytes subsets in Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), defining the disease state, monitoring antiviral treatment, and identifying any risk for opportunistic infections. A manual preparing of the samples is required. More recently an automated and enclosed blood cell counting, Celldyn Sapphire has been introduced. In this study the performance of the Flow cytometer EPICS XL as a reference method fo...

  5. Estimation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients in Manipur

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    Singh H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To estimate and stratify CD4 + and CD8 + T-lymphocyte levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected (asymptomatic and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS patients (symptomatic and correlate the clinical features of the patients with CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte level. Methods : Between April 2002 and September 2003, a total of 415 HIV seropositive adult patients (297 males and 118 females attending Regional Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS hospitals were tested for CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes by fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS counter (Becton Dickinson. Symptomatic patients were diagnosed as per NACO clinical case definition. Results : Ranges of 0-50, 51-100, 101-200, 201-300, 301-400, 401-500 and above 500 CD4+ T-lymphocyte per microlitre were seen in 68, 52, 101, 73, 47, 31 and 43 patients respectively whereas CD8+ T-lymphocyte ranges of 0-300, 301-600, 601-900, 901-1500, 1501-2000, 2001-3500 per microlitre were seen in 29, 84, 92, 145, 40 and 25 patients respectively. One hundred and fifty patients were asymptomatic and 265 were symptomatic. CD4/CD8 ratio in asymptomatics and symptomatics were 0.13-1.69 and 0.01-0.93 respectively. Tuberculosis and candidiasis occurred in CD4+ T-lymphocyte categories between 0-400 cells per mL in symptomatics. However, cryptosporidiosis, toxoplasmosis, herpes zoster, cryptococcal meningitis, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, penicilliosis and cytomegalovirus retinitis were seen in patients having CD4+ T-lymphocyte less than 200 per mL. Conclusions : CD4+ T-lymphocyte was decreased in both asymptomatic and symptomatic HIV patients, The decrease was greater in symptomatics while CD8+ T-lymphocyte was increased in both except advanced stage symptomatics. CD4:CD8 ratio was reversed in both groups. Opportunistic infections correlated with different CD4+ T-lymphocyte categories.

  6. Regulation of gap junctions in melanoma and their impact on Melan-A/MART-1-specific CD8⁺ T lymphocyte emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlalam, Houssem; Carré, Thibault; Jalil, Abdelali; Noman, Zaeem; Caillou, Bernard; Vielh, Philippe; Tittarelli, Andrés; Robert, Caroline; Chouaib, Salem

    2013-10-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) enable intercellular communication between adjacent cells through channels of connexins. Using a three-dimensional construct, we previously showed that endothelial and tumor cells formed GJs, allowing melanoma-specific T lymphocytes to recognize and kill melanoma-derived endothelial cells. We demonstrate here on histological sections of melanoma biopsies that GJ formation occurs in vivo between tumor and endothelial cells and between T lymphocytes and target cells. We also show an in vitro increase of GJ formation in melanoma and endothelial cells following dacarbazin and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) treatment or hypoxic stress induction. Our data indicate that although connexin 43 (Cx43), the main GJ protein of the immune system, was localized at the immunological synapse between T lymphocyte and autologous melanoma cells, its over-expression or inhibition of GJs does not interfere with cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone lytic function. In contrast, we showed that inhibition of GJs by oleamide during stimulation of resting PBMCs with Melan-A natural and analog peptides resulted in a decrease in antigen (Ag) specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte induction. These Ag-specific CD8(+) cells displayed paradoxically stronger reactivity as revealed by CD107a degranulation and IFN-γ secretion. These findings indicate that Cx43 does not affect lytic function of differentiated CTL, but reveal a major role for GJs in the regulation of antigen CD8(+)-naïve T lymphocyte activation. GJ formation occurs in vivo between T lymphocytes and tumor cells Cx43 localized at the immunological synapse between T and autologous melanoma cells Inhibition of GJs resulted in a decrease in Ag-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte induction A role for GJs in the regulation of antigen CD8(+)-naïve T lymphocyte activation.

  7. Broad T-cell receptor repertoire in T-lymphocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Chia-Wei Chang

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have enormous potential for the treatment of inherited and acquired disorders. Recently, antigen-specific T lymphocytes derived from hiPSCs have been reported. However, T lymphocyte populations with broad T cell receptor (TCR diversity have not been generated. We report that hiPSCs derived from skin biopsy are capable of producing T lymphocyte populations with a broad TCR repertoire. In vitro T cell differentiation follows a similar developmental program as observed in vivo, indicated by sequential expression of CD7, intracellular CD3 and surface CD3. The γδ TCR locus is rearranged first and is followed by rearrangement of the αβ locus. Both γδ and αβ T cells display a diverse TCR repertoire. Upon activation, the cells express CD25, CD69, cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2 and cytolytic proteins (Perforin and Granzyme-B. These results suggest that most, if not all, mechanisms required to generate functional T cells with a broad TCR repertoire are intact in our in vitro differentiation protocol. These data provide a foundation for production of patient-specific T cells for the treatment of acquired or inherited immune disorders and for cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Mucosal trafficking of vector-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes following vaccination of rhesus monkeys with adenovirus serotype 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek-Hammerman, Katherine; Li, Hualin; Liu, Jinyan; Abbink, Peter; La Porte, Annalena; O'Brien, Kara L; Whitney, James B; Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G; Barouch, Dan H

    2010-10-01

    Post hoc analysis of the phase 2b Step study evaluating a recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5)-based HIV-1 vaccine candidate suggested a potential increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition in subjects who were baseline Ad5 seropositive and uncircumcised. These concerns had a profound impact on the HIV-1 vaccine development field, although the mechanism underlying this observation remains unknown. It has been hypothesized that rAd5 vaccination of baseline Ad5-seropositive individuals may have resulted in anamnestic, vector-specific CD4(+) T lymphocytes that could have trafficked to mucosal sites and served as increased targets for HIV-1 infection. Here we show that Ad5-specific CD4(+) T lymphocyte responses at mucosal sites following rAd5-Gag/Pol/Nef vaccination were comparable in rhesus monkeys with and without baseline Ad5 immunity. Moreover, the total cellular inflammatory infiltrates and the CD3(+), CD4(+), HLA-DR(+), Ki67(+), and langerin(+) cellular subpopulations in colorectal and foreskin mucosa were similar in both groups. Thus, no greater trafficking of Ad5-specific CD4(+) T lymphocytes to mucosal target sites was observed following rAd5 vaccination of rhesus monkeys with baseline Ad5 immunity. These findings from this nonhuman primate model provide evidence against the hypothesis that recruitment of vector-specific target cells to mucosal sites led to increased HIV-1 acquisition in Ad5-seropositive, uncircumcised vaccinees in the Step study.

  9. Positive Interplay Between CD3+ T-lymphocytes and Concurrent COX-2/EGFR Expression in Canine Malignant Mammary Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Ferreira, Adriano Fernandes; Queiroga, Felisbina L

    2015-05-01

    The ability of tumors to evade the immune system is one of cancer hallmarks. In breast cancer, it has been demonstrated that the cyclooxygenase-2(+)/ epidermal growth factor receptor(+) (COX-2(+)/EGFR(+)) status might influence tumor microenvironment allowing escape of cancer cells to the immune system. This topic is unknown in canine mammary tumors (CMT). Therefore, the potential relationship between CD3(+) T-lymphocytes and concurrent COX-2/EGFR expression was investigated. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded malignant CMT samples (n=63) were submitted to immunohistochemical staining to detect CD3, COX-2 and EGFR. Tumoral CD3(+) T-lymphocytes were significantly associated with tubular differentiation grade (p=0.006), tumor necrosis (p=0.025), histological grade of malignancy (p=0.027) and presence of lymph node metastasis (p=0.009). A correlation between COX-2 and EGFR was observed (r=0.741, pCD3(+) T-lymphocytes and COX-2/EGFR groups were significantly associated (p=0.025) and positively correlated (r=0.399; p=0.003). The present results suggest that the COX-2(+)/EGFR(+) status may be part of a strategy adopted by tumor cells to evade the cytotoxic tumor-specific immune responses. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. IL-2 Expression and T lymphocyte Phenotyping in Young Children Suffering from Upper Respiratory Tract Infection with Streptococcus Pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe Ramirez-Valles, Eda; Dayali Gutierrez-Martinez, Verónica; Cervantes-Flores, Maribel; Ruiz-Baca, Estela; Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme

    2016-06-01

    T cells are components of adaptive immunity and are involved in the resolution of respiratory infections, which are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in young children worldwide. Activation and differentiation of T cells is given mostly by the cytokine IL-2. This study aimed to determine the phenotype of T cells and IL-2 expression in children suffering from upper respiratory tract infection with Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes). For this purpose, IL-2 expression at its gene and protein levels and quantitation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were assessed in children aged 0-5 years old suffering from upper respiratory tract infection with S. pyogenes and healthy children of the same age. Children with S. pyogenes infection had a higher expression of IL-2 gene and a lower level of this cytokine expression at protein level than healthy children. The numbers of CD4(+) T lymphocytes were similar among the groups. In contrast, difference in the numbers of CD8(+) T lymphocytes among the groups was found. We conclude that infections by S. pyogenes in young children lead to an increased expression of IL-2 mRNA.

  11. Divergent effect of cobalt and beryllium salts on the fate of peripheral blood monocytes and T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, Fabiana; Cocco, Elisa; Potolicchio, Ilaria; Fazekasova, Henrieta; Lombardi, Giovanna; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa; Sorrentino, Rosa

    2011-02-01

    Occupational exposure to metals such as cobalt and beryllium represents a risk factor for respiratory health and can cause immune-mediated diseases. However, the way they act may be different. We show here that the two metals have a divergent effect on peripheral T lymphocytes and monocytes: BeSO(4) induces cell death in monocytes but not in T lymphocytes, which instead respond by producing Interferon gamma (IFN-γ); conversely, CoCl(2) induces apoptosis in T lymphocytes but not in monocytes. Interestingly, both metals induce p53 overexpression but with a dramatic different outcome. This is because the effect of p53 in CoCl(2)-treated monocytes is counteracted by the antiapoptotic activity of cytoplasmic p21(Cip1/WAF1), the activation of nuclear factor κB, and the inflammasome danger signaling pathway leading to the production of proinflammatory cytokines. However, CoCl(2)-treated monocytes do not fully differentiate into macrophage or dendritic cells, as inferred by the lack of expression of CD16 and CD83, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of HLA-class II molecules, as well as the capability of capturing and presenting the antigens, decreased with time. In conclusion, cobalt keeps monocytes in a partially activated, proinflammatory state that can contribute to some of the pathologies associated with the exposure to this metal.

  12. [Preparation of GSH capped CdSe/CdS core-shell QDs and labeling of human T-lymphocyte].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Ge, Xinz; Wang, Xuan-yi; Xu, Shu-kun

    2010-01-01

    Two kinds of L-glutathione capped highly fluorescent CdSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) emitting green and orange fluorescence at 350 nm excitation were firstly prepared by an aqueous approach and used as fluorescent labels, to link mouse anti-human CD3 which was expressed on human T-lymphocyte. UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of the as-prepared CdSe/CdS core-shell QDs were studied. Compared with the CdSe QDs, a remarkable enhancement in the emission intensity and a red shift of emission wavelength of CdSe/CdS core-shell QDs was observed for the two kinds of QDs emitting green and orange fluorescence. The TEM results showed that the as prepared CdSe and CdSe/CdS QDs dispersed well in aqueous solution, and their shape was approximately spherical, and the CdSe/CdS QDs nano particles emitting green fluorescence are of about 5 nm in diameter. The two kinds of CdSe/CdS QDs were linked with mouse anti-human CD3 to image human T-lymphocyte. The fluorescent microscopical images of human T-lymphocyte labeled with CdSe/CdS QDs-CD3 and FITC-CD3 demonstrated that the fluorescent CdSe/CdS QDs exhibited much better photo stability and brighter fluorescence than FITC, showing a good application potential in the immuno-labeling of cells.

  13. [The effects of acrylonitrile on T lymphocyte subsets and expression of toll-like receptor 4 in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caizhen; Huang, Jianshu; Wang, Peng; Li, Xiuju; Fan, Wei; Shi, Jimin; Li, Bing; Zhang, Jihong; Zhou, Yuanling

    2014-07-01

    To explore the effects of acrylonitrile on T lymphocyte subsets, expression of toll-like receptor 4 and related cytokines in rats. Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 female groups and 4 male groups, and there were 8 rats in each group. Rats in each group were respectively given a single dose of 0, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg acrylonitrile by gavage, once a day, 5 days a week, for 13 weeks. Blood and spleen T lymphocyte subsets was detected by flow cytometry, the mRNA expression of TLR4, IL-1β and TNF-α was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR, the protein expression of TLR4 was evaluated by Western blot. Compared with control group, the percentages of blood CD3, CD4 T cells in 20 mg/kg female group and CD4/CD8 ratio in 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg female groups was significantly decreased, CD8 T cells in 20 mg/kg group was significantly increased (P Acrylonitrile may lead to the changes of CD3, CD4, CD8 T lymphocyte percentages and CD4/CD8 ratio in rat blood and spleen, and also significantly effected the expression level of TLR4 mRNA and protein together with the secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α. This may cause effects on the cellular immune function.

  14. Evaluation of blood T-lymphocyte subpopulations involved in host cellular immunity in dogs with mammary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannopoulou, Maria; Anagnostou, Tilemachos; Margariti, Apostolia; Kostakis, Charalampos; Kritsepi-Konstantinou, Maria; Psalla, Dimitra; Savvas, Ioannis

    2017-04-01

    Cancer-bearing patients are often immunosuppressed. In dogs with mammary or other cancers, various alterations in blood cell populations involved in host cellular immunity have been reported; among these cell populations some T-lymphocyte subsets play an important role against cancer. The purpose of the present study was to investigate any alterations in circulating T-lymphocyte subpopulations involved in cellular immunity in bitches with mammary cancer, in comparison to age-matched healthy intact bitches. Twenty eight dogs with mammary cancer and 14 control dogs were included in this study. Twelve out of the 28 bitches had mammary cancer of clinical stage II and 16/28 of stage III. Histological examination revealed that 23/28 animals had carcinomas, 3/28 sarcomas and 2/28 carcinosarcomas. White blood cell, neutrophil and lymphocyte absolute numbers were measured by complete blood count. Furthermore, blood T-lymphocyte population (CD3(+)) and the subpopulations CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD5(low+) were assessed by flow cytometry. White blood cell and neutrophil but not lymphocyte absolute numbers were higher (P=0.003 and P=0.001, respectively) in cancer patients than controls. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the relative percentage of T-lymphocytes (CD3(+)) and of CD4(+), CD8(+) subpopulations was lower (the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio was higher), whereas the percentage of CD5(low+) T-cells was higher, in dogs with cancer compared to controls; however, a statistically significant difference was found only in the case of CD8(+) T-cells (P=0.014), whereas in the case of the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio the difference almost reached statistical significance (P=0.059). Based on these findings, it can be suggested that, although the absolute number of blood lymphocytes is unchanged, the relative percentages of T-lymphocyte subpopulations involved in host cell-mediated immunity are altered, but only cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cells are significantly suppressed, in dogs with mammary cancer of

  15. Up-regulation of gap junction in peripheral blood T lymphocytes contributes to the inflammatory response in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xin; Wang, Ai; Zhang, Liang; Shan, Li-Ya; Zhang, Hai-Chao; Li, Li; Si, Jun-Qiang; Luo, Jian; Li, Xin-Zhi; Ma, Ke-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation has been shown to play an important role in the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Connexins (Cxs)-based gap junction channels (GJCs) or hemichannels (HCs) are involved in the maintenance of homeostasis in the immune system. However, the role of Cx43-based channels in T-lymphocytes in mediating the immune response in essential hypertension is not fully understand. The present study was designed to investigate the role of Cxs-based channels in T lymphocytes in the regulation of hypertension-mediated inflammation. The surface expressions of T lymphocyte subtypes, Cx40/Cx43, and inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ (interferon-gamma) and TNF-ɑ (tumor necrosis factor alpha)) in T cells, as well as gap junction communication of peripheral blood lymphocytes from essential hypertensive patients (EHs) and normotensive healthy subjects (NTs) were detected by flow cytometry. Expression levels and phosphorylation of Cx43 protein in peripheral blood lymphocytes of EHs and NTs were analyzed by Western blot. The proliferation rate of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after treatment with a Cxs inhibitor was examined by a CCK-8 assay. The levels of inflammatory cytokines were detected using ELISA. Within the CD3+ T cell subsets, we found a significant trend toward an increase in the percentage of CD4+ T cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratio as well as in serum levels of IFN-γ and TNF-ɑ in the peripheral blood of EHs compared with those in NTs. Moreover, the peripheral blood lymphocytes of EH patients exhibited enhanced GJCs formation, increased Cx43 protein level and Cx43 phosphorylation at Ser368, and a significant increase in Cx40/Cx43 surface expressions levels in CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocytes. Cx43-based channel inhibition by a mimetic peptide greatly reduced the exchange of dye between lymphocytes, proliferation of stimulated lymphocytes and the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels of EHs and NTs. Our data suggest that Cx40/Cx43-based channels in

  16. Expression of JAK3 Sensitive Na+ Coupled Glucose Carrier SGLT1 in Activated Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

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    Shefalee K. Bhavsar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Similar to tumor cells, activated T-lymphocytes generate ATP mainly by glycolytic degradation of glucose. Lymphocyte glucose uptake involves non-concentrative glucose carriers of the GLUT family. In contrast to GLUT isoforms, Na+-coupled glucose-carrier SGLT1 accumulates glucose against glucose gradients and is effective at low extracellular glucose concentrations. The present study explored expression and regulation of SGLT1 in activated murine splenic cytotoxic T cells (CTLs and human Jurkat T cells. Methods: FACS analysis, immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, chemiluminescence and Western blotting were employed to estimate SGLT1 expression, function and regulation in lymphocytes, as well as dual electrode voltage clamp in SGLT1 ± JAK3 expressing Xenopus oocytes to quantify the effect of janus kinase3 (JAK3 on SGLT1 function. Results: SGLT1 is expressed in murine CTLs and also in human Jurkat T cells. 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino-2-deoxyglucose uptake was significantly decreased by SGLT1-blocker phloridzin (0.2 mM and by pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 with WHI-P131 (156 µM, WHI-P154 (11.2 µM and JAK3 inhibitor VI (0.5 µM. Electrogenic glucose transport (Iglucose in Xenopus oocytes expressing human SGLT1 was increased by additional expression of human wild type JAK3, active A568VJAK3 but not inactive K851AJAK3. Coexpression of JAK3 enhanced the maximal transport rate without significantly modifying affinity of the carrier. Iglucose in SGLT1+JAK3 expressing oocytes was significantly decreased by WHI-P154 (11.2 µM. JAK3 increased the SGLT1 protein abundance in the cell membrane. Inhibition of carrier insertion by brefeldin A (5 µM in SGLT1+JAK3 expressing oocytes resulted in a decline of Iglucose, which was similar in presence and absence of JAK3. Conclusions: SGLT1 is expressed in murine cytotoxic T cells and human Jurkat T cells and significantly contributes to glucose uptake in those cells post

  17. Ex Vivo Signaling Protein Mapping in T Lymphocytes in the Psoriatic Arthritis Joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Ugo; Martini, Veronica; Accordi, Benedetta; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Felicetti, Mara; Frallonardo, Paola; Facco, Monica; Boso, Daniele; Molena, Beatrice; Zambello, Renato; Ramonda, Roberta; Cozzi, Franco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Basso, Giuseppe; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Doria, Andrea; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    We assessed signaling protein mapping in total T cells, to analyze the proportions of T regulatory (Treg) and TCD4+ effector (Teff) cell phenotypes, and the respective interleukin 6Rα (IL-6Rα) expression in the inflammatory microenvironment of synovial fluid (SF) of patients with sustained psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Our approach was to measure the IL-6 level in SF using a multiplex bead immunoassay. Reverse-phase protein array was used to assess Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and JAK2, extra-cellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), signal transducer and activator and transcription (STAT) 1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins in total T cell lysates from SF of patients with PsA. Frequencies of CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD4+ Th cells producing IL-17A and IL-17F (Th17) and CD4+CD25high intracellular forkhead box transcription factor+ (FOXP3+) phenotypes, and the percentage of Treg- and Teff- cells were quantified in SF and matched peripheral blood (PB) of patients with PsA and PB of healthy controls (HC) by flow cytometry. Our results were the following: In PsA SF samples, a coordinate increase of JAK1, ERK1/2, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 phosphoproteins was found in total T cells in SF of PsA; where IL-6 levels were higher than in PB from HC. Expanded CD4+IL-17A-F+IL-23+ Th17, CD4+ CD25- Teff- and CD4+CD25(high) FoxP3+Treg subsets, showing similar levels of enhanced IL-6Rδ expression, were confined to PsA joints. In our studies, the transcriptional network profile identified by ex vivo signaling protein mapping in T lymphocytes in PsA joints revealed the complex interplay between IL-1, IL-6, and IL-23 signaling and differentiation of Th17 cells and CD4+Tregs in sustained joint inflammation in PsA.

  18. Activation of human T lymphocytes by Leishmania lipophosphoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Theander, T G; Handman, E

    1991-01-01

    This study describes Leishmania antigen-induced activation of lymphocytes isolated from Kenyan donors, previously treated for visceral leishmaniasis, and from Danish and Kenyan controls. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from cured Kala-Azar patients proliferated and produced Interferon...... 63 failed to activate PBMC from any of the donors tested. These results show that the individuals cured from visceral leishmaniasis had expanded T-cell clones recognizing LPG, conceivably as a result of Leishmania infection. The LPG preparation was without detectable protein contamination. Thus...

  19. Clinical Trials Using Anti-CD19/CD28/CD3zeta CAR Gammaretroviral Vector-transduced Autologous T Lymphocytes KTE-C19

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI supports clinical trials that test new and more effective ways to treat cancer. Find clinical trials studying anti-cd19/cd28/cd3zeta car gammaretroviral vector-transduced autologous t lymphocytes kte-c19.

  20. Functional roles of Phe12 of deacetyl-thymosin β4 in the impaired blastogenic response of uraemic T-lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Abiko

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Phe12 of deacetyl-thymosin β4 is one of the structural essentials for restorative effect on the impaired blastogenic response of uraemic T-lymphocytes. In order to evaluate the functional roles of this phenyl group in the restorative effect on impaired T-lymphocytes, two analogues, [1- Nal12]deacetyl-thymosin β4 and [Cha12]deacetyl4 thymosin β4, were synthesized by a solid-phase method and evaluated for restorative effect on the impaired blastogenic response of uraemic T-lymphocytes. The results indicated that [1-Nal12]deacetyl-thymosin β4 which had a bulky naphthyl ring showed a stronger restorative effect than that of deacetyl-thymosin β4, but it was slightly weaker than that of [Phe(4F12]deacetyl-thymosin β4. However, [Cha12]deacetyl-thymosin β4 showed no restorative effect on the impaired blastogenic response of uraemic T-lymphocytes.

  1. Impact of Donation Mode on the Proportion and Function of T Lymphocytes in the Liver.

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    Emmanuel Xystrakis

    Full Text Available Liver T-cells respond to the inflammatory insult generated during organ procurement and contribute to the injury following reperfusion. The mode of liver donation alters various metabolic and inflammatory pathways but the way it affects intrahepatic T-cells is still unclear.We investigated the modifications occurring in the proportion and function of T-cells during liver procurement for transplantation. We isolated hepatic mononuclear cells (HMC from liver perfusate of living donors (LD and donors after brain death (DBD or cardiac death (DCD and assessed the frequency of T-cell subsets, their cytokine secretion profile and CD8 T-cell cytotoxicity function, responsiveness to a danger associated molecular pattern (High Mobility Group Box1, HMGB1 and association with donor and recipient clinical parameters and immediate graft outcome.We found that T-cells in healthy human livers were enriched in memory CD8 T-cells exhibiting a phenotype of non-circulating tissue-associated lymphocytes, functionally dominated by more cytotoxicity and IFN-γ-production in DBD donors, including upon activation by HMGB1 and correlating with peak of post-transplant AST. This liver-specific pattern of CD8 T-cell was prominent in DBD livers compared to DCD and LD livers suggesting that it was influenced by events surrounding brain death, prior to retrieval.Mode of liver donation can affect liver T-cells with increased liver damage in DBD donors. These findings may be relevant in designing therapeutic strategies aimed at organ optimization prior to transplantation.

  2. Epstein–Barr virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes from diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients are functionally impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, D; Vélez, G; Orfao, A; Herrera, M V; Solano, J; Olaya, M; Uribe, A M; Saavedra, C; Duarte, M; Rodríguez, M; López, M; Fiorentino, S; Quijano, S

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is a persistent virus with oncogenic capacity that has been implicated in the development of aggressive B cell lymphomas, primarily in immunosuppressed individuals, although it can be present in immunocompetent individuals. Changes in the function and clonal diversity of T lymphocytes might be implied by viral persistence and lymphoma development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency, phenotype, function and clonotypical distribution of EBV-specific T cells after peripheral blood stimulation with a virus lysate in newly diagnosed patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) aged more than 50 years without prior histories of clinical immunosuppression compared with healthy controls. Our results showed impaired EBV-specific immune responses among DLBCL patients that were associated primarily with decreased numbers of central and effector memory CD8+ T lymphocytes. In contrast to healthy controls, only a minority of the patients showed CD4+/tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α+ T cells expressing T cell receptor (TCR)-Vβ17 and CD8+/TNF-α+ T cells with TCR-Vβ5·2, Vβ9 and Vβ18 in response to EBV. Notably, the production of TNF-α was undetectable among TCR-Vβ5·3+, Vβ11+, Vβ12+, Vβ16+ and Vβ23+ CD8+ T cells. In addition, we observed decreased numbers of CD4+/TNF-α+ and CD8+/TNF-α+, CD8+/interleukin (IL)-2+ and CD8+/TNF-α+/IL-2+ T lymphocytes in the absence of T cells capable of producing TNF-α, IL-2 and IFN-γ after EBV stimulation simultaneously. Moreover, DLBCL patients displayed higher IL-10 levels both under baseline conditions and after EBV stimulation. These findings were also observed in patients with positive EBV viral loads. Prospective studies including a large number of patients are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26174440

  3. Surface biotinylation of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes for in vivo tracking of tumor immunotherapy in murine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anning; Wu, Yue; Linnoila, Jenny; Pulli, Benjamin; Wang, Cuihua; Zeller, Matthias; Ali, Muhammad; Lewandrowski, Grant K.; Li, Jinghui; Tricot, Benoit; Keliher, Edmund; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Fulci, Giulia; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Tannous, Bakhos A.; Yao, Zhenwei; Chen, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no stable and flexible method to label and track cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in vivo in CTL immunotherapy. We aimed to evaluate whether the sulfo-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-biotin-streptavidin (SA) platform could chemically modify the cell surface of CTLs for in vivo tracking. CD8+ T lymphocytes were labeled with sulfo-NHS-biotin under different conditions and then incubated with SA-Alexa647. Labeling efficiency was proportional to sulfo-NHS-biotin concentration. CD8+ T lymphocytes could be labeled with higher efficiency with sulfo-NHS-biotin in DPBS than in RPMI (P<0.05). Incubation temperature was not a key factor. CTLs maintained sufficient labeling for at least 72 hours (P<0.05), without altering cell viability. After co-culturing labeled CTLs with mouse glioma stem cells (GSCs) engineered to present biotin on their surface, targeting CTLs could specifically target biotin-presenting GSCs and inhibited cell proliferation (P<0.01) and tumor spheres formation. In a biotin-presenting GSC brain tumor model, targeting CTLs could be detected in biotin-presenting gliomas in mouse brains but not in the non-tumor-bearing contralateral hemispheres (P<0.05). In vivo fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) imaging in a subcutaneous U87 mouse model confirmed that targeting CTLs homed in on the biotin-presenting U87 tumors but not the control U87 tumors. PET imaging with 89Zr-deferoximne-biotin and SA showed a rapid clearance of the PET signal over 24 hrs in the control tumor, while only minimally decreased in the targeted tumor. Thus, sulfo-NHS-biotin-SA labeling is an efficient method to noninvasively track the migration of adoptive transferred CTLs and does not alter CTL viability or interfere with CTL-mediated cytotoxic activity. PMID:27722909

  4. Functional analysis of the murine T lymphocyte immune response to a protozoan parasite, Leishmania tropica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. D. Engers

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available The results presented in this review summarize a seirs of experiments designed to characterize the murine T cell imune response to the protozoan parasite Leishmania tropica. Enriched T cell populations and T cell clones specific for L. tropica antigens were derived from lymph nodes of primed mice and maintained in continous culture in vitro. These T lymphocytes were shown (A to express the Lyt 1+ 3- cell surface phenotype, (B to proliferate specifically in vitro in response to parasite antigens, together with a source of irradiated syngeneic macrophages, (C to transfer antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH responses to normal syngeneic mice, (D to induce specific activation of parasitized macrophages in vitro resulting in the destruction of intracellular parasites, (E to provide specific helper activity for antibody responses in vitro in a hapten-carrier system. Protection studies using these defiened T cell populations should allow the characterization of parasite antigen(s implicated in the induction of cellular immune responses beneficial for the host.Os resultados apresentados nesta revisão, sumariam uma série de experimentos planejados no sentido de caracterizar a resposta imune de linfócitos T de camundongos, para o protozoário parasita Leishmania tropica. Populações enriquecidas de linfócitos T e clones de linfócitos T específicos para antígenos de L. tropica foram derivados de gânglios linfáticos de camundongos primados e a seguir mantidos em cultura contínua in vivo. Ficou demonstrado que estes linfócitos T eram capazes de: A Expressar o fenótipo de superfície celular Lyt 1+ 2-, B Proliferar en vitro especificamente em resposta aos antígenos parasitários quando em presença de macrófagos singênicos irradiados, C Transferir uma resposta tipo hipersensibilidade retardada antiígeno especifico à camundongos normais singênicos, D Induzir ativação específica de macrófagos parasitizados in vitro

  5. Expression and role of CR1 and CR2 on B and T lymphocytes under physiological and autoimmune conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Anna; Isaák, Andrea; Török, Katalin; Sándor, Noémi; Kremlitzka, Mariann; Prechl, József; Bajtay, Zsuzsa

    2009-09-01

    The involvement of complement in the development and regulation of antibody responses under both healthy and pathological conditions is known for long. Unravelling the molecular mechanisms underlying the events however is still in progress. This review focuses on the role of complement receptors CR1 (CD35) and CR2 (CD21) expressed on T and B cells. Alteration in the expression and function of these receptors may contribute to the initiation and maintenance of immune complex mediated autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Recent data regarding complement receptor expression on T lymphocytes and on memory B cells are also discussed.

  6. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte lysis of HTLV-1 infected cells is limited by weak HBZ protein expression, but non-specifically enhanced on induction of Tax expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Aileen G; Suemori, Koichiro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Yasukawa, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2014-12-14

    Immunogenetic evidence indicates that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for the weak CTL antigen HBZ limit HTLV-1 proviral load in vivo, whereas there is no clear relationship between the proviral load and the frequency of CTLs specific for the immunodominant antigen Tax. In vivo, circulating HTLV-1-infected cells express HBZ mRNA in contrast, Tax expression is typically low or undetectable. To elucidate the virus-suppressing potential of CTLs targeting HBZ, we compared the ability of HBZ- and Tax-specific CTLs to lyse naturally-infected cells, by co-incubating HBZ- and Tax-specific CTL clones with primary CD4(+) T cells from HLA-matched HTLV-1-infected donors. We quantified lysis of infected cells, and tested whether specific virus-induced host cell surface molecules determine the susceptibility of infected cells to CTL-mediated lysis. Primary infected cells upregulated HLA-A*02, ICAM-1, Fas and TRAIL-R1/2 in concert with Tax expression, forming efficient targets for both HTLV-1-specific CTLs and CTLs specific for an unrelated virus. We detected expression of HBZ mRNA (spliced isoform) in both Tax-expressing and non-expressing infected cells, and the HBZ26-34 epitope was processed and presented by cells transfected with an HBZ expression plasmid. However, when coincubated with primary cells, a high-avidity HBZ-specific CTL clone killed significantly fewer infected cells than were killed by a Tax-specific CTL clone. Finally, incubation with Tax- or HBZ-specific CTLs resulted in a significant decrease in the frequency of cells expressing high levels of HLA-A*02. HTLV-1 gene expression in primary CD4(+) T cells non-specifically increases susceptibility to CTL lysis. Despite the presence of HBZ spliced-isoform mRNA, HBZ epitope presentation by primary cells is significantly less efficient than that of Tax.

  7. Clonal focusing of epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes in rhesus monkeys following vaccination and simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Pritha; Charini, William A; Subbramanian, Ramu A; Manuel, Edwin R; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Autissier, Patrick A; Letvin, Norman L

    2008-01-01

    To afford the greatest possible immune protection, candidate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines must generate diverse and long-lasting CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses. In the present study, we evaluate T-cell receptor Vbeta (variable region beta) gene usage and a CDR3 (complementarity-determining region 3) sequence to assess the clonality of epitope-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes generated in rhesus monkeys following vaccination and simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. We found that vaccine-elicited epitope-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes have a clonal diversity comparable to those cells generated in response to SHIV infection. Moreover, we show that the clonal diversity of vaccine-elicited CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses is dictated by the epitope sequence and is not affected by the mode of antigen delivery to the immune system. Clonal CD8(+) T-lymphocyte populations persisted following boosting with different vectors, and these clonal cell populations could be detected for as long as 4 years after SHIV challenge. Finally, we show that the breadth of these epitope-specific T lymphocytes transiently focuses in response to intense SHIV replication. These observations demonstrate the importance of the initial immune response to SHIV, induced by vaccination or generated during primary infection, in determining the clonal diversity of cell-mediated immune responses and highlight the focusing of this clonal diversity in the setting of high viral loads. Circumventing this restricted CD8(+) T-lymphocyte clonal diversity may present a significant challenge in the development of an effective HIV vaccine strategy.

  8. Clonal Focusing of Epitope-Specific CD8+ T Lymphocytes in Rhesus Monkeys following Vaccination and Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Pritha; Charini, William A.; Subbramanian, Ramu A.; Manuel, Edwin R.; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Autissier, Patrick A.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2008-01-01

    To afford the greatest possible immune protection, candidate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines must generate diverse and long-lasting CD8+ T lymphocyte responses. In the present study, we evaluate T-cell receptor Vβ (variable region beta) gene usage and a CDR3 (complementarity-determining region 3) sequence to assess the clonality of epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes generated in rhesus monkeys following vaccination and simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. We found that vaccine-elicited epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes have a clonal diversity comparable to those cells generated in response to SHIV infection. Moreover, we show that the clonal diversity of vaccine-elicited CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses is dictated by the epitope sequence and is not affected by the mode of antigen delivery to the immune system. Clonal CD8+ T-lymphocyte populations persisted following boosting with different vectors, and these clonal cell populations could be detected for as long as 4 years after SHIV challenge. Finally, we show that the breadth of these epitope-specific T lymphocytes transiently focuses in response to intense SHIV replication. These observations demonstrate the importance of the initial immune response to SHIV, induced by vaccination or generated during primary infection, in determining the clonal diversity of cell-mediated immune responses and highlight the focusing of this clonal diversity in the setting of high viral loads. Circumventing this restricted CD8+ T-lymphocyte clonal diversity may present a significant challenge in the development of an effective HIV vaccine strategy. PMID:17977967

  9. Characterization of CD3(+) T lymphocytes of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and its response after immunization with formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoqian; Qin, Yinghui; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2017-04-01

    The CD3 complex is an important cell surface marker of T lymphocytes and essential for T lymphocytes activation in higher vertebrates. In the present work, the CD3ε of Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) was recombinantly expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and used as an immunogen to produce mouse anti-rCD3ε polyclonal antibodies, which could specifically recognize a 20 kDa protein in the membrane proteins of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of Japanese flounder by co-immunoprecipitation assay. Mass spectrometric analysis showed the 20 kDa protein was the native CD3ε of Japanese flounder. Both the flow cytometric analysis and double immunofluorescence assay (DIFA) showed that the CD3(+) T lymphocytes could be identified specifically by the mouse anti-rCD3ε polyclonal antibodies, which didn't cross-react with the sIgM(+) lymphocytes. Immunohistochemistry showed that CD3(+) T lymphocytes could be detected in gill, skin, stomach, intestine, spleen, liver, head-kidney and mid-kidney. Flow cytometric analysis showed the percentages of CD3(+) T lymphocytes in the PBL, spleen lymphocytes (SL) and head-kidney lymphocytes (HKL) of Japanese flounder increased rapidly after immunization with formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda, and reached their peak levels at 5th day with 12.6%, 9.7% and 8.7%, respectively, and then decreased gradually. These results suggested that CD3(+) T lymphocytes play important roles in mucosal and cell-mediated immunity, and the results would deepen our understanding on the roles of teleost T lymphocytes in the immune response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. T lymphocytes in the lesional skin and the levels of peripheral blood cytokines in patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Kökçam

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, it was aimed to investigate the roles of tissue cellular immunity and serum levels of cytokines in the patients with plaque psoriasis treated with calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate.Materials and methods: The study included 20 patients with psoriasis. Peripheral blood and biopsy samples were collected from lesional and normal skins before and after treatment. The results were compared with each other.Results: Immunohistochemical examination revealed significant elevations of CD4+, CD8+ and CD25+ T lymphocytes in the lesional tissues when compared to that in the healthy tissues and post treatment tissue (p0.05. The levels of IL–4, IL–10, TNF-α, IFN-γ and TGF-β1 in serum were not significantly different between before and after treatment periods (p>0.05.Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that there were infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ cell in the lesional skin and CD8+ T-lymphocytes were the dominant cell types. The improvement of the lesions and significant decreases in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in accordance with the treatment strongly support the hypothesis that Th lymphocytes may have prominent roles in the immunopathogenesis of the disease. However, our findings showed that sufficient T-cells still remains in the tissue, which is consistent with the chronic characteristic of the disease, and the topical treatment could not be able to prevent the activation of the disease.

  11. Neuropeptide Y receptor 1 is expressed by B and T lymphocytes and mast cells in infantile haemangiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Elysia M S; Blackwell, Max G; Dunne, Jonathan C; Marsh, Reginald; Tan, Swee T; Itinteang, Tinte

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptor 1 (NPYR1) and NPY receptor 2 (NPYR2) in infantile haemangiomas (IHs). Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed on proliferating IHs from six patients aged 4-13 (mean 8.7) months and involuted IHs from six patients aged 5-59 (mean 18.7) years, for the expression of NPY, NPYR1 and NPYR2. Protein and messenger ribonucleic acid expression corresponding to these proteins was investigated by Western blotting and NanoString analysis, respectively. IHC staining, Western blotting and NanoString analysis demonstrated the presence of NPYR1, but not NPYR2, within proliferating and involuted IHs. IHC staining showed NPYR1 was expressed by B and T lymphocytes expressing CD45 and mast cells expressing tryptase. IHC staining demonstrated the presence of NPY on the NPYR1 + cells, but it was not detected by Western blotting or NanoString analysis. NPYR1, but not NPYR2, was present in IHs. The localisation of NPYR1 to B and T lymphocytes and mast cells suggests its role in the biology of IHs. The demonstration of NPY on the NPYR1 + cells, without active transcription, suggests that NPY was not being produced within IHs. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. CD28 biomarker quantification and expression level profiles in CD4+T-lymphocytes in solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, Francisco; Bolarín, José Miguel; Mrowiec, Anna; Eguía, Jorge; Gonzalez-Martinez, Gema; de la Peña, Jesús; Galian, José A; Alfaro, Rafael; Moya-Quiles, María R; Legaz, Isabel; Campillo, José A; Ramírez, Pablo; García-Alonso, Ana; Pons, Jose A; Sánchez-Bueno, Francisco; Minguela, Alfredo; Llorente, Santiago; Muro, Manuel

    2017-06-01

    The introduction of anti-calcineurin-based therapies has led to an increase in the one-year survival as well as graft function rates in patients undergoing solid organ transplantation (SOT). Nonetheless, early cellular acute rejection (EAR) incidence still remains a major challenge that irrevocably heads to poor outcomes. The mechanisms underlying CD4 T cell activation in SOT are still under research. In this sense, CD28 co-stimulatory molecule plays a pivotal role triggering CD4 T cell activation as well as survival maintenance. Previous own studies stated the role that CD4 + CD28 + circulating T lymphocytes plays before and during EAR episodes. We assessed the percentage as well as the absolute number of CD28 molecules on CD4 + T cells as predictive surrogate biomarker of EAR in a prospective cohort of liver and kidney transplant recipients. Quantitative analysis of CD28 was carried out on whole peripheral blood samples by flow cytometry. Decreased pre-transplant expression of CD28 was associated with EAR in both study groups. Furthermore, the expression of CD28 within the rejected group, experimented an up-regulation upon transplantation. These preliminary results suggest that patients undergoing liver or kidney transplant can be stratified at high risk of EAR according to their CD28 molecule expression on peripheral CD4 + T lymphocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevention of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to factor IX-expressing hepatocytes by gene transfer-induced regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzynski, Eric; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Cao, Ou; Mingozzi, Federico; Wang, Lixin; Herzog, Roland W

    2006-03-21

    Treatment of genetic disease such as the bleeding disorder hemophilia B [deficiency in blood coagulation factor IX (F.IX)] by gene replacement therapy is hampered by the risk of immune responses to the therapeutic gene product and to the gene transfer vector. Immune competent mice of two different strains were tolerized to human F.IX by hepatic gene transfer mediated by adenoassociated viral vector. These animals were subsequently challenged by systemic administration of an E1/E3-deleted adenoviral vector, which is known to induce a cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to the transgene product. Immune tolerance prevented cytotoxic T lymphocyte activation to F.IX and CD8(+) cellular infiltrates in the liver. Moreover, a sustained and substantial increase in hepatic F.IX expression from the adenoviral vector was achieved despite in vitro T cell responses to adenoviral antigens. Cytolytic responses to therapeutic and to viral vector-derived antigens had been prevented in vivo by activation of regulatory CD4(+) T cells, which mediated suppression of inflammatory lymphocyte responses to the liver. This result suggests that augmentation of regulatory T cell activation should provide new means to avoid destructive immune responses in gene transfer.

  14. Dendritic cells cross-present HIV antigens from live as well as apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón, Concepción; Desoutter, Jean-François; Hoeffel, Guillaume; Cohen, William; Hanau, Daniel; Hosmalin, Anne

    2004-04-20

    A better understanding of the antigen presentation pathways that lead to CD8(+) T cell recognition of HIV epitopes in vivo is needed to achieve better immune control of HIV replication. Here, we show that cross-presentation of very small amounts of HIV proteins from apoptotic infected CD4(+) T lymphocytes by dendritic cells to CD8(+) T cells is much more efficient than other known HIV presentation pathways, i.e., direct presentation of infectious virus or cross-presentation of defective virus. Unexpectedly, dendritic cells also take up actively antigens into endosomes from live infected CD4(+) T lymphocytes and cross-present them as efficiently as antigens derived from apoptotic infected cells. Moreover, live infected CD4(+) T cells costimulate cross-presenting dendritic cells in the process. Therefore, dendritic cells can present very small amounts of viral proteins from infected T cells either after apoptosis, which is frequent during HIV infection, or not. Thus, if HIV expression is transiently induced while costimulation is enhanced (for instance after IL-2 and IFNalpha immune therapy), this HIV antigen presentation pathway could be exploited to eradicate latently infected reservoirs, which are poorly recognized by patients' immune systems.

  15. Cytolytic T lymphocyte responses to metabolically inactivated stimulator cells. I. Metabolic inactivation impairs both CD and LD antigen signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelso, A.; Boyle, W.

    1982-03-01

    The effects of metabolic inactivation of spleen cells on antigen presentation to precursors of alloreactive cytolytic T lymphocytes (T/sub c/) were examined. By serological methods, populations inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation, glutaraldehyde fixation or plasma membrane isolation were found to retain normal levels of H-2K/D and Ia antigens. However, comparison of the antigen doses required to stimulate secondary T/sub c/ responses in mixed leukocyte culture showed that the inactivated preparations were approximately 10-fold less immunogenic than X-irradiated spleen cells. Their total inability to stimulate primary cytolytic responses pointed to at least a 100-fold impairment of immunogenicity for unprimed T/sub c/ precursors in the case of uv-irradiated and glutaraldehyde-treated stimulator cells, and at least a 10-fold impairment for membrane fragments. Experiments showing that the capacity of cell monolayers to absorb precursor T/sub c/ from unprimed spleen populations was reduced following uv-irradiation or glutaraldehyde treatment provided direct evidence that this loss of immunogenicity was due in part to suboptimal antigen presentation to precursor T/sub c/. It is concluded that, in addition to the traditional view that these treatments damage the ''LD'' signal to helper T lymphocytes, metabolic inactivation also impairs recognition of ''CD'' determinants by precursor T/sub c/.

  16. Association of the Porcine Cluster of Differentiation 4 Gene with T Lymphocyte Subpopulations and Its Expression in Immune Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingen Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4 is mainly expressed on CD4+ T cells, which plays an important role in immune response. The aim of this study was to detect the association between polymorphisms of the CD4 gene and T lymphocyte subpopulations in pigs, and to investigate the effects of genetic variation on the CD4 gene expression level in immune tissues. Five missense mutations in the CD4 gene were identified using DNA pooling sequencing assays, and two main haplotypes (CCTCC and AGCTG in strong linkage disequilibrium (with frequencies of 50.26% and 46.34%, respectively were detected in the population of Large White pigs. Our results indicated that the five SNPs and the two haplotypes were significantly associated with the proportions of CD4−CD8−, CD4+CD8+, CD4+CD8−, CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ in peripheral blood (p0.05. These results indicate that the CD4 gene may influence T lymphocyte subpopulations and can be considered as a candidate gene affecting immunity in pigs.

  17. Differential sensitivity of T lymphocytes and hematopoietic precursor cells to photochemotherapy with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabed, Mohamed; Coffe, Christian; Racadot, Evelyne; Angonin, Regis; Pavey, Jean-Jaques; Tiberghien, Pierre; Herve, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The combination of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and long wave ultraviolet radiation (UV-A) has immunomodulatory effects and might abolish both graft-vs-host and host-vs-graft reactions after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In the present study, we have confirmed the sensitivity of T lymphocytes to 8-MOP treatment plus UV-A exposure as evidenced by the abrogation of the alloreactivity in mixed lymphocyte cultures as well as the inhibition of the response to phytohemagglutinin A. However, the clonogenic capacity of the bone marrow hematopoietic progenitors was inhibited with UV-A doses lower than the doses needed to inhibit T-lymphocytes alloreactivity. Moreover, long-term bone marrow cultures showed that 8-MOP plus UV-A treatment had detrimental effects on the more immature bone marrow stem cells. These data were confirmed when murine bone marrow graft was treated with 8-MOP, exposed to UV-A, then transplanted into semiallogeneic recipient mice. The treated cells could not maintain their clonogenic capacity in vivo resulting in death of all animals. Taken together, these data show that ex vivo 8-MOP plus UV-A treatment of the marrow graft cannot be used to prevent post-bone marrow transplantation alloreactivity.

  18. Non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI uptake by T lymphocytes: evidence for the selective acquisition of oligomeric ferric citrate species.

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    Joao Arezes

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient in several biological processes such as oxygen transport, DNA replication and erythropoiesis. Plasma iron normally circulates bound to transferrin. In iron overload disorders, however, iron concentrations exceed transferrin binding capacity and iron appears complexed with low molecular weight molecules, known as non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI. NTBI is responsible for the toxicity associated with iron-overload pathologies but the mechanisms leading to NTBI uptake are not fully understood. Here we show for the first time that T lymphocytes are able to take up and accumulate NTBI in a manner that resembles that of hepatocytes. Moreover, we show that both hepatocytes and T lymphocytes take up the oligomeric Fe3Cit3 preferentially to other iron-citrate species, suggesting the existence of a selective NTBI carrier. These results provide a tool for the identification of the still elusive ferric-citrate cellular carrier and may also open a new pathway towards the design of more efficient iron chelators for the treatment of iron overload disorders.

  19. ROLE OF CD95 AND DR3 RECEPTORS IN NA VE T-LYMPHOCYTES APOPTOSIS IN CHILDREN WITH INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS DURING CONVALESCENCE

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    E. N. Filatova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious mononucleosis is a widespread disease caused by certain members of Herpesviridae family. Acute infectious mononucleosis develops predominantly in children and is accompanied by an increase of the number of circulating naive CD4+ and naive CD8+ T-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. The normalization of immunological parameters is achieved within 4–6 months after recovery and that is an indicator of a proper functioning of the immune system. CD95 and DR3 death receptors are involved in the initiation of apoptosis of naive T-lymphocytes in healthy people and in patients with infectious mononucleosis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of CD95 and DR3 receptors to initiate apoptosis of naive CD4+ and naive CD8+ T-lymphocytes in children with infectious mononucleosis during convalescence. The material for the study was the samples of the peripheral blood of children who previously had infectious mononucleosis. The blood sampling was carried out again after 4–6 months after the disease. At the time of the study, children did not display clinical and laboratory signs of infectious mononucleosis. Same children who were examined earlier in the period of the development of acute infectious mononucleosis, as well as relatively healthy children were used as the comparison groups. Isolation of naive CD4+ and naive CD8+ T-lymphocytes was performed by negative magnetic immunoseparation. For specific stimulation of CD95 and DR3 receptors monoclonal antibodies were used. The level of apoptosis and expression of death receptors were evaluated by flow cytometry. Freshly isolated cells were analyzed, as well as cells cultured with the addition of appropriate monoclonal antibodies. It was shown that the recovery period was accompanied by increased apoptosis of freshly isolated naive CD4+ and naive CD8+ T-lymphocytes compared with the acute phase of infectious mononucleosis. Thus in both populations of naive T-cells showed an increase of

  20. [Relationship between CD4(+) T lymphocyte cell count and the prognosis (including the healing of the incision wound) of HIV/AIDS patients who had undergone surgical operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di; Zhao, Hongxin; Gao, Guiju; Wei, Kai; Zhang, Li; Han, Ning; Xiao, Jiang; Li, Xin; Wang, Fang; Liang, Hongyuan; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Liang

    2014-12-01

    To explore the relationship between CD4(+) T lymphocyte cell count and prognosis as well as healing of the surgical incision in HIV/AIDS patients who had received operation. Data were collected and analysed retrospectively from 234 HIV/AIDS patients hospitalized at the Beijing Ditan hospital who underwent operation between January 2008 and December 2012. Following factors were taken into consideration that including:age, gender, time and where that anti-HIV(+) was diagnosed, CD4(+)T lymphocyte cell count at the time of operation, part of the body that being operated, typology of incision, different levels of healing on the surgical incision, infection at the incision site, post-operative complications and the prognosis, etc. Wilcoxon rank sum test, χ(2) test, Kruskal-Wallis H test and Spearman rank correlation were used for statistical analysis to compare the different levels on healing of the incision in relation to the different CD4(+)T lymphocyte cell counts. Rates of level A healing under different CD4(+)T cell counts were also compared. 1) Among the 234 patients including 125 males and 109 females, the average age was 36.17±11.56 years old. Time after discovery of anti-HIV(+)was between 0 and 204 months. The medium CD4(+)T cell count was 388.5 cell/µl; 23.93% of the patients having CD4(+)T lymphocyte cell counts as healing, 12.51% resulted in level B and 1.71% in level C. 4.27% of the patients developed post-operative complications. Differences between level A healing and level B or C healing in terms of CD4(+)T lymphocyte cell count were not significant (P > 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference on the CD4(+) T lymphocyte count in patients with or without postoperative complications. Difference of the HIV infection time was also not statistically significant between the two groups of patients. Rate of level A healing for the different CD4(+)T lymphocyte cell count was not significant (P > 0.05). Healing of the incision did not show

  1. T-cell receptor Vβ repertoire of CD8+ T-lymphocyte subpopulations in cutaneous leishmaniasis patients from the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Raquel; Cunha, Clarissa Ferreira; Pimentel, Maria Inês; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Schubach, Armando Oliveira; de Mendonça, Sérgio Coutinho Furtado; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bertho, Alvaro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    In human cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), the immune response is mainly mediated by T-cells. The role of CD8+ T-lymphocytes, which are related to healing or deleterious functions, in affecting clinical outcome is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate T-cell receptor diversity in late-differentiated effector (LDE) and memory CD8+ T-cell subsets in order to create a profile of specific clones engaged in deleterious or protective CL immune responses. Healthy subjects, patients with active disease (PAD) and clinically cured patients were enrolled in the study. Total CD8+ T-lymphocytes showed a disturbance in the expression of the Vβ2, Vβ9, Vβ13.2, Vβ18 and Vβ23 families. The analyses of CD8+T-lymphocyte subsets showed high frequencies of LDE CD8+T-lymphocytes expressing Vβ12 and Vβ22 in PAD, as well as effector-memory CD8+ T-cells expressing Vβ22. We also observed low frequencies of effector and central-memory CD8+ T-cells expressing Vβ2 in PAD, which correlated with a greater lesion size. Particular Vβ expansions point to CD8+ T-cell clones that are selected during CL immune responses, suggesting that CD8+ T-lymphocytes expressing Vβ12 or Vβ22 are involved in a LDE response and that Vβ2 contractions in memory CD8+T-cells are associated with larger lesions. PMID:26107186

  2. T-cell receptor Vβ repertoire of CD8+ T-lymphocyte subpopulations in cutaneous leishmaniasis patients from the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Ferraz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In human cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL, the immune response is mainly mediated by T-cells. The role of CD8+ T-lymphocytes, which are related to healing or deleterious functions, in affecting clinical outcome is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate T-cell receptor diversity in late-differentiated effector (LDE and memory CD8+ T-cell subsets in order to create a profile of specific clones engaged in deleterious or protective CL immune responses. Healthy subjects, patients with active disease (PAD and clinically cured patients were enrolled in the study. Total CD8+ T-lymphocytes showed a disturbance in the expression of the Vβ2, Vβ9, Vβ13.2, Vβ18 and Vβ23 families. The analyses of CD8+T-lymphocyte subsets showed high frequencies of LDE CD8+T-lymphocytes expressing Vβ12 and Vβ22 in PAD, as well as effector-memory CD8+ T-cells expressing Vβ22. We also observed low frequencies of effector and central-memory CD8+ T-cells expressing Vβ2 in PAD, which correlated with a greater lesion size. Particular Vβ expansions point to CD8+ T-cell clones that are selected during CL immune responses, suggesting that CD8+ T-lymphocytes expressing Vβ12 or Vβ22 are involved in a LDE response and that Vβ2 contractions in memory CD8+T-cells are associated with larger lesions.

  3. Level of CD8 T Lymphocytes Activation in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women: In the Context of CD38 and HLA-DR Activation Markers

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    Stanslaus Musyoki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To date the effect of pregnancy on the immune activation of CD8 T cells that may affect HIV disease progression has not been well studied and remains unclear. Objective. To determine the effect of pregnancy on CD8 T lymphocyte activation and its relationship with CD4 count in HIV infected pregnant women. Study Design. Case control. Study Site. AMPATH and MTRH in Eldoret, Kenya. Study Subjects. Newly diagnosed asymptomatic HIV positive pregnant and nonpregnant women with no prior receipt of antiretroviral medications. Study Methods. Blood samples were collected from the study participants and levels of activated CD8 T lymphocytes (CD38 and HLA-DR were determined using flow cytometer and correlated with CD4 counts of the study participants. The descriptive data focusing on frequencies, correlation, and cross-tabulations was statistically determined. Significance of the results was set at P<0.05. Results. HIV positive pregnant women had lower activated CD8 T lymphocyte counts than nonpregnant HIV positive women. Activated CD8 T lymphocyte counts were also noted to decrease in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Conclusion. Pregnancy has a significant suppression on CD8+ T lymphocyte immune activation during HIV infections. Follow-up studies with more control arms could confirm the present study results.

  4. Maintenance of AP-2 Dependent Functional Activities of Nef Restricts Pathways of Immune Escape from CD8 T Lymphocyte Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouest, Blake; Weiler, Andrea M; Janaka, Sanath Kumar; Myers, T Alix; Das, Arpita; Wilder, Sarah C; Furlott, Jessica; Baddoo, Melody; Flemington, Erik K; Rakasz, Eva G; Evans, David T; Friedrich, Thomas C; Maness, Nicholas J

    2017-12-13

    Nef-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes (CD8TL) are linked to extraordinary control of primate lentiviral replication, but the mechanisms underlying their efficacy remain largely unknown. The immunodominant, Mamu-B*017:01+ restricted Nef195-203MW9 epitope in SIVmac239 partially overlaps a sorting motif important for interactions with host AP-2 proteins and, hence, downmodulation of several host proteins including Tetherin (CD317/BST-2), CD28, CD4, SERINC3, and SERINC5. We reasoned that CD8TL-driven evolution in this epitope might compromise Nef's ability to modulate these important molecules. Here we used deep sequencing of SIV from nine B*017:01+ macaques throughout infection with SIVmac239 to characterize the patterns of viral escape in this epitope and then assayed impacts of these variants on Nef-mediated modulation of multiple host molecules. Acute variation in multiple Nef195-203MW9 residues significantly compromised Nef's ability to downregulate surface Tetherin, CD4, and CD28, and reduced its ability to prevent SERINC5-mediated reduction in viral infectivity but did not impact downregulation of CD3 or MHC-I, suggesting selective disruption of immunomodulatory pathways involving Nef AP-2 interactions. Together, our data illuminate a pattern of viral escape dictated by a selective balance to maintain AP-2 mediated downregulation while evading epitope-specific CD8TL responses. These data could shed light on mechanisms of both CD8TL-driven viral control generally and on Mamu-B*017:01-mediated viral control specifically.ImportanceA rare subset of humans infected with HIV-1 and macaques infected with SIV can control the virus without aid of antiviral medications. A common feature of these individuals is the ability to mount unusually effective CD8 T lymphocyte responses against the virus. One of the most formidable aspects of HIV is its ability to evolve to evade immune responses, particularly CD8 T lymphocytes. We show that macaques that target a specific peptide in the

  5. Disequilibrium in the CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28- T Lymphocyte Balance Is Related to Prognosis in Rats with Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid-Induced Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shixue; Gu, Hongxiang; Lin, Qianyi; Xing, Tiaosi; Chen, Minhua; Zhong, Tao; Wu, Gang; Feng, Yanling; Liu, Hongbo; Gao, Yong; Jian, Hongjian; Zhang, Minhai; Mo, Hongmei; Zhu, Huanjie; Chen, Dongsheng; Xu, Jun; Zou, Ying; Chi, Honggang; Zhu, Yuzhen

    2017-03-01

    The CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28- T lymphocyte balance is vital for human ulcerative colitis (UC) but has not been defined in experimental colitis. This investigation will try to identify the changes that occur in the CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28- T lymphocyte balance during the progression of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. The frequencies of blood CD8+CD28+ and CD8+CD28- T lymphocytes were detected in the rats belonging to the normal, model, and treated groups on five days using flow cytometry. The treated rats were administered with mesalazine and were euthanized after a 14-day treatment, as were the normal and model rats. The sensitivity and specificity of the CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28- T lymphocyte balance in diagnosing early colitis were analyzed by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. The frequencies of CD8+CD28+ and CD8+CD28- T lymphocytes in the colon tissue were tested via immunofluorescence. ELISA was used to measure the levels of the cytokines. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were used to detect the colonic expression of JAK3, STAT6, NFATc2, and GATA3. We found that the ratio of CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28- T lymphocytes decreased, as did the level of interleukin-7, but not IL-12p40, IL-13, or IL-15, in the blood; however, the ratio increased along with JAK3, STAT6, NFATc2, and GATA3 in the colon of the rats with colitis. The changes were effectively reversed through the administration of mesalazine for 13 days. Surprisingly, the balance in the blood could sensitively distinguish rats with early colitis from normal rats. These data show that increase in CD8+CD28+ T cells in blood and decrease in CD8+CD28- T cells in colon are associated with experimental colitis.

  6. The susceptibility to cytotoxic T lymphocyte mediated lysis of chemically induced sarcomas from immunodeficient and normal mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, I M; Engel, A M; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1997-01-01

    A panel of sarcomas induced with 3-methylcholanthrene in normal and immunodeficient mice was studied for their capacity to present antigen by the endogenous, MHC class I restricted pathway. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was used to infect cultured tumour cells, and the infected cells were...... tested for susceptibility to cytolysis by virus specific cytotoxic T cells. Tumour cells originating from tumours induced in immunocompetent C.B.-17 mice presented virus antigen more efficiently than tumour cells from immunodeficient SCID mice. No significant difference in virus antigen presentation...... was found between tumours from nude and nu/+ BALB/c mice. The sensitivity of target cells from the individual tumours to cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) mediated lysis correlated negatively with their sensitivity to natural killer (NK) cell mediated lysis. There was a positive correlation between...

  7. In vitro T lymphocyte proliferation by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester method is helpful in diagnosing and managing primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarsiz, Elif; Karaca, Neslihan; Ergun, Birgul; Durmuscan, Mehmet; Kutukculer, Necil; Aksu, Guzide

    2018-01-01

    Functional studies besides routine laboratory tests for the definitive diagnosis of T lymphocyte disorders with isolated T or combined T/B-cell immunodeficiencies are important. We hereby summarized our experience with a carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-based assay for the assessment of mitogenic T-cell proliferation responses in primary immunodeficiency (PID) patients who have not been diagnosed yet or genetically analyzed, but classified as probably having T-cell defects. Unclassified patients (n=46) and controls (n=25) were evaluated for T-cell disorders with CFSE-based assay. CD3+ blast cells after PHA-L stimulation were significantly lower in patients (31.1±28.8) than controls (67.9±8.79; PT lymphocyte responses in yet unclassified PID patients for targeting further genetical analyses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. T-lymphocyte-rich Thymoma and Myasthenia Gravis in a Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, K.; Masters, N.; Rivers, S.; Berry, K.; Routh, A.; Lamm, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 10-year-old captive male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with acute onset collapse, vomiting and dyspnoea, preceded by a 6-month period of progressive muscle wasting. Following humane destruction, post-mortem examination revealed a large multilobulated mass in the cranial mediastinum, which was diagnosed as a T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Retrospective serology for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (titre 3.90 nmol/l) confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are reported rarely in wild carnivores, but when detected they appear to be similar in morphology to those seen in domestic carnivores and may also be accompanied by paraneoplastic syndromes. The clinical signs of myasthenia gravis in the tiger were consistent with those reported in cats and dogs and the condition is proposed as an important differential diagnosis for generalized weakness in captive Felidae. PMID:24444818

  9. Immunomodulatory effects of Caulerpa racemosa var peltata polysaccharide and its selenizing product on T lymphocytes and NK cells in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A polysaccharide, CrvpPS, was isolated from Caulerpa racemosa var peltata. It was reacted with nano-selenium in distilled water containing ascorbic acid (Vit C) to form a stable CrvpPS-nano-Se complex. The immunomodulatory effects of CrvpPS and CrvpPS-nano-Se on T lymphocytes subgroups and NK cells in mice were investigated. After intragastric administration for 10 days separately, both CrvpPS and CrvpPS-nano-Se showed significant stimulatory functions to thymus gland of mice. Moreover, the CrvpPS-nano-Se induced the percentage of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, NK cells and the CD4+/CD8+ value to increase significantly (P<0.05) when analyzed by flow cytometry, which is better than the CrvpPS, sucrose-nano-Se, and even the positive drug levamisole.

  10. Maternal diet during pregnancy and micronuclei frequency in peripheral blood T lymphocytes in mothers and newborns (Rhea cohort, Crete)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Callaghan-Gordo, Cristina; Kogevinas, Manolis; Pedersen, Marie

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The study assessed whether diet and adherence to cancer prevention guidelines during pregnancy were associated with micronucleus (MN) frequency in mothers and newborns. MN is biomarkers of early genetic effects that have been associated with cancer risk in adults. METHODS: A total of 188...... mothers and 200 newborns from the Rhea cohort (Greece) were included in the study. At early-mid pregnancy, we conducted personal interviews and a validated food frequency questionnaire was completed. With this information, we constructed a score reflecting adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund....../American Institute for Cancer Research cancer prevention guidelines on diet, physical activity and body fatness. At delivery, maternal and/or cord blood was collected to measure DNA and hemoglobin adducts of dietary origin and frequencies of MN in binucleated and mononucleated T lymphocytes (MNBN and MNMONO...

  11. Calcium, cancer and killing: the role of calcium in killing cancer cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Eva C; Qu, Bin; Hoth, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Killing cancer cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and by natural killer (NK) cells is of vital importance. Cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis depend on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, and the expression of numerous ion channels with the ability to control intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations has been correlated with cancer. A rise of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations is also required for efficient CTL and NK cell function and thus for killing their targets, in this case cancer cells. Here, we review the data on Ca(2+)-dependent killing of cancer cells by CTL and NK cells. In addition, we discuss emerging ideas and present a model how Ca(2+) may be used by CTL and NK cells to optimize their cancer cell killing efficiency. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 12th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Stepwise isolation of human peripheral erythrocytes, T lymphocytes, and monocytes for blood cell proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseron, Frederic; May, Caroline; Schoenebeck, Bodo; Tippler, Bettina; Woitalla, Dirk; Kauth, Marion; Brockmann, Kathrin; Meyer, Helmut E; Berg, Daniela; Bufe, Albrecht; Marcus, Katrin

    2012-10-01

    Density gradient centrifugation and magnetic- or fluorescence-activated cell sorting are common and robust techniques for the isolation of different types of blood cells. In this article, we give detailed description of a stepwise application of these methods as one isolation strategy for enrichment of different cell types from one blood sample. The workflow targeted erythrocytes, monocytes, and T lymphocytes. Pancoll® density gradient centrifugation was used together with subsequent MACS™ isolation. Purity of monocytes and T lymphocytes was controlled by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, and cells were used for carrier-ampholine-based 2D-PAGE to confirm compatibility of the procedure to standard proteomic applications. Gradient centrifugation resulted in an average of 125 μL of packed erythrocytes per milliliter blood. MACS™ sorting reached purities of 90 ± 2% (monocytes) and 93 ± 2% (T lymphocytes), with an average yield of 12 × 10(4) monocytes or T lymphocytes. 2D-PAGE of isolated cells showed well-separated spot patterns. A combined isolation holds substantial advantages especially in clinical studies, as it allows for the comparison of findings not only between individuals, but also between different cell types derived from one donor. Our approach ensured high reproducibility, yields, and purities of cells as required for reliable proteome analysis. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. DC-SIGN on B lymphocytes is required for transmission of HIV-1 to T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Rappocciolo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Infection of T cells by HIV-1 can occur through binding of virus to dendritic cell (DC-specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN on dendritic cells and transfer of virus to CD4+ T cells. Here we show that a subset of B cells in the blood and tonsils of normal donors expressed DC-SIGN, and that this increased after stimulation in vitro with interleukin 4 and CD40 ligand, with enhanced expression of activation and co-stimulatory molecules CD23, CD58, CD80, and CD86, and CD22. The activated B cells captured and internalized X4 and R5 tropic strains of HIV-1, and mediated trans infection of T cells. Pretreatment of the B cells with anti-DC-SIGN monoclonal antibody blocked trans infection of T cells by both strains of HIV-1. These results indicate that DC-SIGN serves as a portal on B cells for HIV-1 infection of T cells in trans. Transmission of HIV-1 from B cells to T cells through this DC-SIGN pathway could be important in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  14. Intracellular CD3+ T Lymphocyte Teriflunomide Concentration Is Poorly Correlated with and Has Greater Variability Than Unbound Plasma Teriflunomide Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ashley M; Moghaddami, Mahin; Foster, David J R; Proudman, Susanna M; Upton, Richard N; Wiese, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Leflunomide's active metabolite teriflunomide inhibits dihydro-oroate dehydrogenase, an enzyme essential to proliferation of T lymphocytes. As teriflunomide must reach the target site to have this effect, this study assessed the distribution of teriflunomide into T lymphocytes, as intracellular concentrations may be a superior response biomarker to plasma concentrations. CD3 MicroBeads (Miltenyi Biotec, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany) were used to extract CD3+ T cells from the peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were taking a stable dose of leflunomide. Unbound plasma and intra-CD3+ T cell teriflunomide concentrations were quantified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration (log transformed) and partition differences were assessed through paired Student t tests. Sixteen patients provided plasma steady-state teriflunomide samples, and eight provided a sample 6-12 weeks later. At time-point one, the geometric mean teriflunomide concentration (range) in CD3+ T cells was 18.12 μg/L (6.15-42.26 μg/L) compared with 69.75 μg/L (32.89-263.1 μg/L) unbound in plasma (P teriflunomide into CD3+ T cells was 0.295 (0.092-0.632), which was significantly different from unity (P teriflunomide concentration between the two time points was 14% (-10% to 40%) in unbound plasma and -29% (-69 to 138%) for CD3+ T cells. Because teriflunomide concentrations in CD3+ T cells were lower and displayed a higher intraindividual variability than the unbound plasma concentrations, its applicability as a therapeutic drug-monitoring marker may be limited. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. The antiproliferative effect of kefir cell-free fraction on HuT-102 malignant T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Sandra; Maalouf, Katia; Baydoun, Elias

    2009-01-01

    Kefir is produced by adding kefir grains (a mass of proteins, polysaccharides, bacteria, and yeast) to pasteurized milk; it has been shown to control several cellular types of cancer, such as Sarcoma 180 in mice, Lewis lung carcinoma, and human mammary cancer. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia, which is a fatal disease with no effective treatment. The current study aims at investigating the effect of a cell-free fraction of kefir on HuT-102 cells, which are HTLV-1-positive malignant T-lymphocytes. Cells were incubated with different kefir concentrations: the cytotoxicity of the compound was evaluated by determining the percentage viability of cells. The effect of all the noncytotoxic concentrations of kefir cell-free fraction on the proliferation of HuT-102 cells was then assessed. The levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha mRNA upon kefir treatment were then analyzed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Finally, the growth inhibitory effects of kefir on cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. The maximum cytotoxicity recorded at 80 microg/microL for 48 hours was only 43%. The percent reduction in proliferation was very significant, dose and time dependent, and reached 98% upon 60-microg/microL treatment for 24 hours. Kefir cell-free fraction caused the downregulation of TGF-alpha, which is a cytokine that induces the proliferation and replication of cells. Finally, a marked increase in cell cycle distribution was noted in the pre-G1 phase. In conclusion, kefir is effective in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of HTLV-1-positive malignant T-lymphocytes. Therefore, further in vivo investigation is highly recommended.

  16. ADAM10-Interacting Tetraspanins Tspan5 and Tspan17 Regulate VE-Cadherin Expression and Promote T Lymphocyte Transmigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyat, Jasmeet S; Chimen, Myriam; Noy, Peter J; Szyroka, Justyna; Rainger, G Ed; Tomlinson, Michael G

    2017-07-15

    The recruitment of blood leukocytes across the endothelium to sites of tissue infection is central to inflammation, but also promotes chronic inflammatory diseases. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) is a ubiquitous transmembrane molecular scissor that is implicated in leukocyte transmigration by proteolytically cleaving its endothelial substrates. These include VE-cadherin, a homotypic adhesion molecule that regulates endothelial barrier function, and transmembrane chemokines CX3CL1 and CXCL16, which have receptors on leukocytes. However, a definitive role for endothelial ADAM10 in transmigration of freshly isolated primary leukocytes under flow has not been demonstrated, and the relative importance of distinct ADAM10 substrates is unknown. Emerging evidence suggests that ADAM10 can be regarded as six different molecular scissors with different substrate specificities, depending on which of six TspanC8 tetraspanins it is associated with, but TspanC8s remain unstudied in leukocyte transmigration. In the current study, ADAM10 knockdown on primary HUVECs was found to impair transmigration of freshly isolated human peripheral blood T lymphocytes, but not neutrophils or B lymphocytes, in an in vitro flow assay. This impairment was due to delayed transmigration rather than a complete block, and was overcome in the presence of neutrophils. Transmigration of purified lymphocytes was dependent on ADAM10 regulation of VE-cadherin, but not CX3CL1 and CXCL16. Tspan5 and Tspan17, the two most closely related TspanC8s by sequence, were the only TspanC8s that regulated VE-cadherin expression and were required for lymphocyte transmigration. Therefore endothelial Tspan5- and Tspan17-ADAM10 complexes may regulate inflammation by maintaining normal VE-cadherin expression and promoting T lymphocyte transmigration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors.

  17. Loss of effector and anti-inflammatory natural killer T lymphocyte function in pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

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    Namita Rout

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic immune activation is a key determinant of AIDS progression in HIV-infected humans and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected macaques but is singularly absent in SIV-infected natural hosts. To investigate whether natural killer T (NKT lymphocytes contribute to the differential modulation of immune activation in AIDS-susceptible and AIDS-resistant hosts, we compared NKT function in macaques and sooty mangabeys in the absence and presence of SIV infection. Cynomolgus macaques had significantly higher frequencies of circulating invariant NKT lymphocytes compared to both rhesus macaques and AIDS-resistant sooty mangabeys. Despite this difference, mangabey NKT lymphocytes were functionally distinct from both macaque species in their ability to secrete significantly more IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-17 in response to CD1d/α-galactosylceramide stimulation. While NKT number and function remained intact in SIV-infected mangabeys, there was a profound reduction in NKT activation-induced, but not mitogen-induced, secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-10, and TGF-β in SIV-infected macaques. SIV-infected macaques also showed a selective decline in CD4(+ NKT lymphocytes which correlated significantly with an increase in circulating activated memory CD4(+ T lymphocytes. Macaques with lower pre-infection NKT frequencies showed a significantly greater CD4(+ T lymphocyte decline post SIV infection. The disparate effect of SIV infection on NKT function in mangabeys and macaques could be a manifestation of their differential susceptibility to AIDS. Alternately, these data also raise the possibility that loss of anti-inflammatory NKT function promotes chronic immune activation in pathogenic SIV infection, while intact NKT function helps to protect natural hosts from developing immunodeficiency and aberrant immune activation.

  18. Low Dose Decitabine Treatment Induces CD80 Expression in Cancer Cells and Stimulates Tumor Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji-Hao; Yao, Yu-Shi; Li, Yong-Hui; Xu, Yi-Han; Li, Jing-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Min-Hang; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Gao, Li; Ding, Yi; Lu, Xue-Chun; Shi, Jin-Long; Luo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Li-Li; Qu, Chunfeng; Bai, Xue-Feng; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC), a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8+, but not CD4+ T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23671644

  19. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

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    Li-Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC, a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, acute myeloid leukemia (AML and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+, but not CD4(+ T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Targeted in vitro and in vivo gene transfer into T Lymphocytes: potential of direct inhibition of allo-immune activation

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    Mehra Mandeep R

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful inhibition of alloimmune activation in organ transplantation remains one of the key events in achieving a long-term graft survival. Since T lymphocytes are largely responsible for alloimmune activation, targeted gene transfer of gene of cyclin kinase inhibitor p21 into T cells might inhibit their aberrant proliferation. A number of strategies using either adenoviral or lentiviral vectors linked to mono or bispecific antibodies directed against T cell surface markers/cytokines did not yield the desired results. Therefore, this study was designed to test if a CD3promoter-p21 chimeric construct would in vitro and in vivo transfer p21 gene to T lymphocytes and result in inhibition of proliferation. CD3 promoter-p21 chimeric constructs were prepared with p21 in the sense and antisense orientation. For in vitro studies EL4-IL-2 thyoma cells were used and for in vivo studies CD3p21 sense and antisense plasmid DNA was injected intramuscularly in mice. Lymphocyte proliferation was quantified by 3H-thymidine uptake assay; IL-2 mRNA expression was studied by RT-PCR and using Real Time PCR assay, we monitored the CD3, p21, TNF-α and IFN-γ mRNA expression. Results Transfection of CD3p21 sense and antisense in mouse thyoma cell line (EL4-IL-2 resulted in modulation of mitogen-induced proliferation. The intramuscular injection of CD3p21 sense and antisense plasmid DNA into mice also modulated lymphocyte proliferation and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion These results demonstrate a novel strategy of in vitro and in vivo transfer of p21 gene to T cells using CD3-promoter to achieve targeted inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation and immune activation.

  1. Oligomannose-coated liposomes efficiently induce human T-cell leukemia virus-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes without adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozako, Tomohiro; Hirata, Shinya; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Satoh, Yuichiro; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; White, Yohann; Lemonnier, François; Shimeno, Hiroshi; Soeda, Shinji; Arima, Naomichi

    2011-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, which is an aggressive peripheral T-cell neoplasm. Insufficient T-cell response to HTLV-1 is a potential risk factor in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Efficient induction of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes is important for immunological suppression of virus-infected cell proliferation and oncogenesis, but efficient induction of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes has evaded strategies utilizing poorly immunogenic free synthetic peptides. Here, we examined the efficient induction of an HTLV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell response by oligomannose-coated liposomes (OMLs) encapsulating the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201-restricted HTLV-1 Tax-epitope (OML/Tax). Immunization of HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice with OML/Tax induced an HTLV-1-specific gamma-interferon reaction, whereas immunization with epitope peptide alone induced no reaction. Upon exposure of dendritic cells to OML/Tax, the levels of CD86, major histocompatibility complex class I, HLA-A02 and major histocompatibility complex class II expression were increased. In addition, our results showed that HTLV-1-specific CD8+ T cells can be efficiently induced by OML/Tax from HTLV-1 carriers compared with epitope peptide alone, and these HTLV-1-specific CD8+ T cells were able to lyse cells presenting the peptide. These results suggest that OML/Tax is capable of inducing antigen-specific cellular immune responses without adjuvants and may be useful as an effective vaccine carrier for prophylaxis in tumors and infectious diseases by substituting the epitope peptide. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  2. Effect of edaravone on T lymphocyte subsets and oxidative stress level in patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism

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    Li Guo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of edaravone on T lymphocyte subsets and oxidative stress level in patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism. Methods: A total of 100 patients with cardiogenic cerebral embolism who were admitted in our hospital from June, 2013 to June, 2015 were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group. The patients in the observation group were given edaravone, while the patients in the control group were given the conventional treatments. CD4, CD8, GSH-Px, and ROS levels, the occurrence of adverse reactions, and the clinical efficacy after treatment in the two groups were observed and compared. Results: The comparison of CD4 and CD8 levels before treatment between the two groups was not statistically significant (P>0.05. After treatment, CD4 level was significantly elevated, while CD8 level was significantly reduced when compared with before treatment (P0.05. After treatment, GSH-Px level was significantly elevated, while ROS level was significantly reduced when compared with before treatment (P<0.05. The improvement of GSH-Px and ROS levels after treatment in the observation group was significantly superior to that in the control group (P<0.05. The occurrence rate of adverse reactions in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group, while the treatment effective rate was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Edaravone in the treatment of cardiogenic cerebral embolism can effectively correct the imbalance of T lymphocyte subsets, and reduce the oxidative stress level, with less adverse reactions and significant therapeutic effect.

  3. A mouse model of clonal CD8+ T lymphocyte-mediated alopecia areata progressing to alopecia universalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alli, Rajshekhar; Nguyen, Phuong; Boyd, Kelli; Sundberg, John P.; Geiger, Terrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia areata is among the most prevalent autoimmune diseases, yet compared with other autoimmune conditions is not well studied. This in part results from limitations in the C3H/HeJ mouse and DEBR rat model systems most commonly used to study the disease, which display a low frequency and late onset. We describe a novel high incidence model for spontaneous alopecia areata. The 1MOG244 T cell expresses dual TCRA chains, one of which, when combined with the single TCRB present, promotes the development of CD8+ T cells with specificity for hair follicles. Retroviral transgenic mice expressing this TCR develop spontaneous alopecia areata at nearly 100% incidence. Disease initially follows a reticular pattern, with regionally cyclic episodes of hair loss and regrowth, and ultimately progresses to alopecia universalis. Alopecia development is associated with CD8+ T cell activation, migration into the intrafollicular region, and hair follicle destruction. The disease may be adoptively transferred with T lymphocytes, and is class I and not class II MHC-dependent. Pathologic T cells primarily express IFNG and IL17 early in disease, with dramatic increases in cytokine production and recruitment of IL4 and IL10 production with disease progression. Inhibition of individual cytokines did not significantly alter disease incidence, potentially indicating redundancy in cytokine responses. These results therefore characterize a new high incidence model for alopecia areata in C57BL/6J mice, the first to apply a monoclonal TCR, and indicate that class I MHC-restricted CD8+ T lymphocytes can independently mediate the pathologic response. PMID:22116824

  4. Colorectal Mucus Binds DC-SIGN and Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection of CD4+ T-Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Montfort, Thijs; Sanders, Rogier W.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Dekker, Henk L.; Herrera, Carolina; Speijer, Dave; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM) also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs) with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa), heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1–3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments) and its receptor (intelectin-1) as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa. PMID:25793526

  5. CYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE SPECTRUM SUBPOPULATION OF T LYMPHOCYTES IN THE EARLY FORMS OF CHRONIC BRAIN ISCHEMIA VETERANS OF MODERN WARS

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    A. V. Zurochka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of the earliest forms of chronic brain ischemia veterans of modern wars accompanied by an increase in the systemic circulation of the population of T lymphocytes and monocytes, reflecting the activation of central mechanisms lymphopoiesis. In step vascular encephalopathy is an increase in circulating pool of T lymphocytes expressing the activation markers early positive reflecting readiness cells to IL-2 dependent proliferation. When progessirovanii chronic brain ischemia decreased levels of circulating T-regulatory cells, which may reflect a violation of self-tolerance in relation to brain antigens.

  6. Low blood CD8+ T-lymphocytes and high circulating monocytes are predictors of HIV-1-associated progressive encephalopathy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Bellón, José Ma; Resino, Salvador; Cantó-Nogués, Carmen; Gurbindo, Dolores; Ramos, José-Tomás; Muñoz-Fernández, Ma Angeles

    2003-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-associated progressive encephalopathy (PE) is a common and devastating complication of HIV-1 infection in children, whose risk factors have not yet been clearly defined. Regardless of the age of presentation, PE shortens life expectancy. Paradoxically, as survival of patients has been prolonged as a result of the use of antiretroviral therapy, the prevalence of PE has increased. Therefore, a predictive marker of PE emergence is critical. The objective of this study was to determine in an observational study whether any immunologic (CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocyte counts, monocyte counts) or virologic (viral load [VL], biological characteristics of viral isolates) marker might be predictive of PE and whether any particular marker may be involved in the timing of clinical onset of PE. A total of 189 children who were vertically infected with HIV-1 were studied retrospectively, 58 of whom fulfilled criteria of the American Academy of Neurology for PE. T-lymphocyte subsets and monocytes in peripheral blood were quantified by flow cytometry. HIV-1 RNA was measured in plasma using a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay. Demographic, clinical, and viro-immunologic characteristics in infants were compared with control groups using logistic regression. Proportions were compared using the chi(2) test or Fisher exact test. For each child, immunologic and virologic markers were analyzed in parallel closely before clinical onset of PE and closely after PE onset and compared by using the Student t test for paired samples. Overall, mortality of 58 HIV-1-infected children who developed PE was significantly higher than of children who did not develop this complication. Blood CD8(+) T-lymphocytes 25% (95% confidence interval: 1.2-13.9) and remained statistically significant after adjustment for treatment. When we compared the PE-positive group with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)/PE-negative group

  7. Transgenic expression of human cytoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen4-immunoglobulin (hCTLA4Ig) by porcine skin for xenogeneic skin grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yang, Hua-Qiang; Jiang, Wen; Fan, Na-Na; Zhao, Ben-Tian; Ou-Yang, Zhen; Liu, Zhao-Ming; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Dong-Shan; Zhou, Xiao-Yang; Shang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Lu-Lu; Xiang, Peng-Ying; Ge, Liang-Peng; Wei, Hong; Lai, Liang-Xue

    2015-04-01

    Porcine skin is frequently used as a substitute of human skin to cover large wounds in clinic practice of wound care. In our previous work, we found that transgenic expression of human cytoxicT-lymphocyte associated antigen4-immunoglobulin (hCTLA4Ig) in murine skin graft remarkably prolonged its survival in xenogeneic wounds without extensive immunosuppression in recipients, suggesting that transgenic hCTLA4Ig expression in skin graft may be an effective and safe method to prolong xenogeneic skin graft survival. In this work, using a transgene construct containing hCTLA4Ig coding sequence under the drive of human Keratine 14 (k14) promoter, hCTLA4Ig transgenic pigs were generated by somatic nuclear transfer. The derived transgenic pigs were healthy and exhibited no signs of susceptibility to infection. The hCTLA4Ig transgene was stably transmitted through germline over generations, and thereby a transgenic pig colony was established. In the derived transgenic pigs, hCTLA4Ig expression in skin was shown to be genetically stable over generations, and detected in heart, kidney and corneal as well as in skin. Transgenic hCTLA4Ig protein in pigs exhibited expected biological activity as it suppressed human lymphocyte proliferation in human mixed lymphocyte culture to extents comparable to those of commercially purchased purified hCTLA4Ig protein. In skin grafting from pigs to rats, transgenic porcine skin grafts exhibited remarkably prolonged survival compared to the wild-type skin grafts derived from the same pig strain (13.33 ± 3.64 vs. 6.25 ± 2.49 days, P porcine skin graft survival in xenogeneic wounds. The transgenic pigs generated in this work can be used as a reproducible resource to provide porcine skin grafts with extended survival for wound coverage, and also as donors to investigate the impacts of hCTLA4Ig on xenotransplantation of other organs (heart, kidney and corneal) due to the ectopic transgenic hCTLA4Ig expression.

  8. Spontaneous human squamous cell carcinomas are killed by a human cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone recognizing a wild-type p53-derived peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röpke, M; Hald, J; Guldberg, Per

    1996-01-01

    A cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clone generated in vitro from the peripheral blood of a healthy HLA-A2-positive individual against a synthetic p53 protein-derived wild-type peptide (L9V) was shown to kill squamous carcinoma cell lines derived from two head and neck carcinomas, which expressed mutant...

  9. Molecular pathway profiling of T lymphocyte signal transduction pathways; Th1 and Th2 genomic fingerprints are defined by TCR and CD28-mediated signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Ruben L.; Fleuren, Wilco W. M.; He, Xuehui; Vink, Paul M.; Wijnands, Frank; Gorecka, Monika; Klop, Henri; Bauerschmidt, Sussane; Garritsen, Anja; Koenen, Hans J. P. M.; Joosten, Irma; Boots, Annemieke M. H.; Alkema, Wynand

    2012-01-01

    Background: T lymphocytes are orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Naive T cells may differentiate into Th1, Th2, Th17 or iTreg phenotypes, depending on environmental co-stimulatory signals. To identify genes and pathways involved in differentiation of Jurkat T cells towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes we

  10. Molecular pathway profiling of T lymphocyte signal transduction pathways; Th1 and Th2 genomic fingerprints are defined by TCR and CD28-mediated signaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, R.L.; Fleuren, W.W.M.; He, X.; Vink, P.M.; Wijnands, F.; Gorecka, M.; Klop, H.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Garritsen, A.; Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Joosten, I.; Boots, A.M.H.; Alkema, W.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: T lymphocytes are orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Naive T cells may differentiate into Th1, Th2, Th17 or iTreg phenotypes, depending on environmental co-stimulatory signals. To identify genes and pathways involved in differentiation of Jurkat T cells towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes we

  11. Physical discrimination between human T-lymphocyte subpopulations by means of light scattering, revealing two populations of T8-positive cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; de Grooth, B.G.; Nolten, G.M.J.; ten Napel, C.H.H.; van Berkel, W.; Greve, Jan

    1986-01-01

    Light-scattering properties of human T-lymphocyte subpopulations selected by immunofluorescence were studied. Based on differences in orthogonal light scattering, two subpopulations of T8-positive cells can be distinguished. The first population (T8a) has the same orthogonal light-scattering

  12. The peripheral blood compartment in patients with Graves' disease: Activated T lymphocytes and increased transitional and pre-naive mature B lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. van der Weerd (Kim); P.M. van Hagen (Martin); B. Schrijver (Benjamin); D.J. Kwekkeboom (Dirk Jan); W.W. de Herder (Wouter); M.R.J. ten Broek (M. R J); P.T.E. Postema (Pieter); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); F.J.T. Staal (Frank); W.A. Dik (Willem)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractGraves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease that involves aberrant B and T lymphocyte responses. Detailed knowledge about lymphocyte subpopulation composition will therefore enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of GD and might support the development of new immunomodulatory

  13. Induction of DNA repair synthesis in human monocytes/B-lymphocytes compared with T-lymphocytes after exposure to N-acetoxy-N-acetylaminofluorene and dimethylsulfate in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Ryder, L P; Wassermann, K

    1992-01-01

    We have explored the induction of DNA repair synthesis in monocyte/B- and T-lymphocyte enriched cell fractions from 12 different human mononuclear blood cell populations. Unscheduled DNA synthesis was measured in monocyte/B- and T-cells after exposure to the DNA-damaging agents dimethylsulfate (D...

  14. Use of "one-pot, mix-and-read" peptide-MHC class I tetramers and predictive algorithms to improve detection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svitek, Nicholas; Hansen, Andreas Martin; Steinaa, Lucilla

    2014-01-01

    Peptide-major histocompatibility complex (p-MHC) class I tetramer complexes have facilitated the early detection and functional characterisation of epitope specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Here, we report on the generation of seven recombinant bovine leukocyte antigens (BoLA) and re...

  15. Selective in vitro expansion of HLA class I-restricted HIV-1 gag-specific CD8+ T cells: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes and precursor frequencies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. van Baalen (Carel); M.R. Klein (Michèl); A.M. Geretti (Anna Maria); R.I.P.M. Keet; F. Miedema (Frank); C.A.C.M. van Els (Cécile); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To identify HIV-1 Gag cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes and HLA restriction of their recognition, and to define precursor frequencies of HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL in the blood of seropositive individuals. METHODS: B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) infected with recombinant

  16. The presence of protective cytotoxic T lymphocytes does not correlate with shorter lifespans of productively infected cells in HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, Hilde B; Mudrikova, Tania; Schellens, Ingrid M M; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Prins, Jan M; Feuth, Thijs; Spierings, Erik; Nijhuis, Monique; van Baarle, Debbie; Borghans, José A M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES AND DESIGN: CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are important in the control of HIV infection. Although CTL are thought to reduce the lifespan of productively infected cells, CD8+ T-cell depletion in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus-macaques showed no effect on the lifespan of

  17. The presence of protective cytotoxic T lymphocytes does not correlate with shorter lifespans of productively infected cells in HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, Hilde B.; Mudrikova, Tania; Schellens, Ingrid M. M.; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Prins, Jan M.; Feuth, Thijs; Spierings, Erik; Nijhuis, Monique; van Baarle, Debbie; Borghans, José A. M.

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are important in the control of HIV infection. Although CTL are thought to reduce the lifespan of productively infected cells, CD8+ T-cell depletion in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus-macaques showed no effect on the lifespan of productively infected

  18. The loss of immunodominant epitopes affects interferon-γ production and lytic activity of the human influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.M. Berkhoff (Eufemia); M.M. Geelhoed-Mieras (Martina); E.J. Verschuren (Esther); C.A. van Baalen (Carel); R.A. Gruters (Rob); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn the present study, we examined the effect of the loss of the human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B*3501-restricted nucleoprotein (NP)418-426epitope on interferon (IFN)-γ-production and lytic activity of the human cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in vitro. Extensive amino acid variation

  19. Identification and cloning of a prethymic precursor T lymphocyte from a population of common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA)-positive fetal bone marrow cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, P; Hokland, M; Daley, J

    1987-01-01

    irradiated autologous thymocytes as feeder cells) resulted in growth in 6-14% of the wells (mean, 11%) with cells with mature T lymphocyte phenotype. Two-color fluorescence analysis of outgrowing cultures furthermore ascertained that these cells had differentiated through a phase of simultaneous expression...

  20. CHANGING EXPRESSION OF SOME MOLECULES ON THE SURFACE OF HUMAN BLOOD T-LYMPHOCYTES UPON UV-IRRADIATION OF CELL SUSPENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Artuykhov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. We have studied effects of UV irradiation (240-390 nm at a dose range of 151 to 1359 J/m2 upon expression levels of different surface markers (CD2, CD11a, CD3, CD4, CD8 of human blood T lymphocytes by means of laser flow cytofluorimetry. It is revealed that UV-irradiation at the doses of 151 to 906 J/m2 caused increased expression of CD3, CD4, CD8 membrane markers of the T-lymphocytes. Meanwhile, it was shown that expression levels of CD2 and CD11a adhesion molecules on T-lymphocytes after exposure to UVirradiation (151 to 906 J/m2 remained similar to those for intact cells. UV-irradiation at a dose of 1359 J/ m2 was shown to reduce expression of CD2, CD11a and CD3 markers, along with increased expression level of CD4 and CD8 co-receptor molecules at the T-lymphocytes.