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Sample records for psii variable fluorescence

  1. Detection of herbicide effects on pigment composition and PSII photochemistry in Helianthus annuus by Raman spectroscopy and chlorophyll a fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítek, Petr; Novotná, Kateřina; Hodaňová, Petra; Rapantová, Barbora; Klem, Karel

    2017-01-01

    The effects of herbicides from three mode-of-action groups - inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (carfentrazone-ethyl), inhibitors of carotenoid biosynthesis (mesotrione, clomazone, and diflufenican), and inhibitors of acetolactate synthase (amidosulfuron) - were studied in sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus). Raman spectroscopy, chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) imaging, and UV screening of ChlF were combined to evaluate changes in pigment composition, photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry, and non-photochemical quenching in plant leaves 6 d after herbicide application. The Raman signals of phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and chlorophyll were evaluated and differences in their intensity ratios were observed. Strongly augmented relative content of phenolic compounds was observed in the case of amidosulfuron-treated plants, with a simultaneous decrease in the chlorophyll/carotenoid intensity ratio. The results were confirmed by in vivo measurement of flavonols using UV screening of ChlF. Herbicides from the group of carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitors significantly decreased both the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII and non-photochemical quenching as determined by ChlF. Resonance Raman imaging (mapping) data with high resolution (150,000-200,000 spectra) are presented, showing the distribution of carotenoids in H. annuus leaves treated by two of the herbicides acting as inhibitors of carotenoid biosynthesis (clomazone or diflufenican). Clear signs were observed that the treatment induced carotenoid depletion within sunflower leaves. The depletion spatial pattern registered differed depending on the type of herbicide applied.

  2. Spatial heterogeneity in active chlorophyll fluorescence and PSII activity of coral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralph, P.J.; Gademann, R.; Larkum, A.W.D.

    2002-01-01

    Chlorophyll-a fluorescence was measured in six species of coral, using pulse-amplitude-modulated fluorometers employing fibre-optic probes with diameters of 8 mm, 1 mm and 140 µm. The 8-mm probe integrated responses over a large area, giving more weight to coenosarc than polyp tissue for Acropora...... to down-regulation at higher irradiances. Coenosarc and polyp tissue (both containing zooxanthellae) showed a wide range of responses in the other corals. Down-regulation of photosynthesis in a single polyp of Pocillopora damicornis was followed after exposure to moderate irradiance, with recovery...... occurring over a further 4 h of shade conditions. All the corals (Acropora millepora, A. nobilis, Cyphastrea serailia, Montipora tuberculosa, Pocillopora damicornis and Porites cylindrica) showed evidence of strong down-regulation of photosynthesis under high irradiance, and little evidence...

  3. Estimating chlorophyll content and photochemical yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements at different growing stages of attached leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubuxin, Bayaer; Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran, Parinaz; Ginnan, Yusaku; Hosoi, Fumiki; Omasa, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    This paper illustrates the possibility of measuring chlorophyll (Chl) content and Chl fluorescence parameters by the solar-induced Chl fluorescence (SIF) method using the Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle, and compares the results with the standard measurement methods. A high-spectral resolution HR2000+ and an ordinary USB4000 spectrometer were used to measure leaf reflectance under solar and artificial light, respectively, to estimate Chl fluorescence. Using leaves of Capsicum annuum cv. 'Sven' (paprika), the relationships between the Chl content and the steady-state Chl fluorescence near oxygen absorption bands of O2B (686nm) and O2A (760nm), measured under artificial and solar light at different growing stages of leaves, were evaluated. The Chl fluorescence yields of ΦF 686nm/ΦF 760nm ratios obtained from both methods correlated well with the Chl content (steady-state solar light: R(2) = 0.73; artificial light: R(2) = 0.94). The SIF method was less accurate for Chl content estimation when Chl content was high. The steady-state solar-induced Chl fluorescence yield ratio correlated very well with the artificial-light-induced one (R(2) = 0.84). A new methodology is then presented to estimate photochemical yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) from the SIF measurements, which was verified against the standard Chl fluorescence measurement method (pulse-amplitude modulated method). The high coefficient of determination (R(2) = 0.74) between the ΦPSII of the two methods shows that photosynthesis process parameters can be successfully estimated using the presented methodology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Determination of microphytobenthos PSII quantum efficiency and photosynthetic activity by means of variable chlorophyll fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromkamp, J.C.; Barranguet, C.; Peene, J.

    1998-01-01

    A pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer (PAM) was used to investigate photosynthetic activity of microphytobenthos on an intertidal mudflat. Spectral irradiance measurements indicate that 75% of the signal detectable by the PAM originates in the upper 150 mu m of the sediment. From the

  5. Light dependence of quantum yields for PSII charge separation and oxygen evolution in eucaryotic algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flameling, I.A.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum yields of photosystem II (PSII) charge separation (Phi(P)) and oxygen production (Phi(O2)) were determined by simultaneous measurements of oxygen production and variable fluorescence in four different aquatic microalgae representing three different taxonomic groups: the freshwater alga

  6. Effects of acute O3 stress on PSII and PSI photochemistry of sensitive and resistant snap bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), probed by prompt chlorophyll "a" fluorescence and 820 nm modulated reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Elisabetta; Fusaro, Lina; Strasser, Reto J; Bussotti, Filippo; Manes, Fausto

    2015-12-01

    The response of PSII and PSI photochemistry to acute ozone (O3) stress was tested in a "model plant system", namely the O3 sensitive (S156) and O3 resistant (R123) genotype pairs of Phaseolus vulgaris L., during a phenological phase of higher O3 sensitivity (pod formation). The modulation of the photosynthetic activity during O3 stress was analysed by measuring gas exchanges, Prompt Fluorescence (PF, JIP-test) and 820 nm Modulated Reflectance (MR), a novel techniques which specifically detects the changes in the redox state of P700 and plastocyanin. The results showed that, coherently with genotypic-specific O3 sensitivity, the response of the two snap bean genotypes differed for the intensity and time of onset of the considered physiological changes. In fact, despite leaf injury and gas exchanges reduction appeared concurrently in both genotypes, S156 showed a PSII down regulation already after the first day of fumigation (DOF), and an enhancement of Cyclic Electron Flow of PSI after the second DOF, whereas R123 showed only slight adjustments until the third DOF, when the activity of both photosystems was down-regulated. Despite these differences, it is possible to distinguish in both genotypes an early O3 response of the photochemical apparatus, involving PSII only, and a following response, in which PSI activity and content are also modulated. The measurement of the MR signal, performed simultaneously with the PF measurements and the JIP-test analysis, has allowed a better understanding of the role that PSI plays in the O3 stress response of the S156/R123 model plant system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimating chlorophyll content and photochemical yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements at different growing stages of attached leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Tubuxin, Bayaer; Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran, Parinaz; Ginnan, Yusaku; Hosoi, Fumiki; Omasa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    This paper illustrates the possibility of measuring chlorophyll (Chl) content and Chl fluorescence parameters by the solar-induced Chl fluorescence (SIF) method using the Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle, and compares the results with the standard measurement methods. A high-spectral resolution HR2000+ and an ordinary USB4000 spectrometer were used to measure leaf reflectance under solar and artificial light, respectively, to estimate Chl fluorescence. Using leaves of Capsicum annuum cv....

  8. Variable color temperature fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, J.; Maya, J.

    2000-05-01

    Color temperature change in a mercury-rare gas low pressure discharge has been investigated. Different pulse waveforms have been employed to increase the ratio of mercury upper level transitions with respect to the resonant 254 nm radiation. Low pressure fluorescent light sources were made with coatings consisting of a blue phosphor, sensitive to 365 nm ultraviolet radiation, blended with the standard 254 nm excited red/green phosphors. With a fast rise excitation waveform, a color temperature rise of as much as 1700 K was realized although at a cost of 26% in relative luminous efficacy. An improved scheme for greater color temperature change is proposed based on a phosphor that is excitable by the mercury 185 nm ultraviolet radiation but which does not absorb 254 nm radiation.

  9. A new variable color fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Leon; Kroesen, Gerrit

    2000-10-01

    Recently, there’s a growing interest in variable colour fluorescent lamps. In the past, several options for changing the color of a fluorescent lamp were proposed. Most of these options use radio frequency or pulsed excitation of the gas discharge. By changing the electrical excitation, the electron energy distribution function changes. This causes the output spectrum of the lamp to change. A disadvantage of such a lamp is the expensive power sources that are required. We propose a new lamp with a variable color. The working principle of this lamp is based on mercury depletion in the positive column of a neon-mercury discharge. Under certain experimental conditions, this mercury depletion results in the addition of neon radiation to the emission spectrum of the lamp. We used several diagnostics to understand the mercury depletion process. We will present the results of Thomson scattering, UV absorption, spatially resolved absolute emission, and electrical measurements.

  10. On the polyphasic quenching kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence in algae after light pulses of variable length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredenberg, Wim; Prasil, Ondrej

    2013-11-01

    This study reports on kinetics of the fluorescence decay in a suspension of the alga Scenedesmus quadricauda after actinic illumination. These are monitored as the variable fluorescence signal in the dark following light pulses of variable intensity and duration. The decay reflects the restoration of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching of the photosystem II (PSII) antennas and shows a polyphasic pattern which suggests the involvement of different processes. The overall quenching curve after a fluorescence-saturating pulse (SP) of 250-ms duration, commonly used in pulse amplitude modulation applications as the tool for estimating the maximal fluorescence (F m), has been termed P-O, in which P and O have the same meaning as used in the OJIP induction curve in the light. Deconvolution of this signal shows at least three distinguishable exponential phases with reciprocal rate constants of the order of 10, 10(2), and 10(3) ms. The size of the long (>10(3) ms) and moderate (~10(2) ms) lasting components relative to the complete quenching signal after an SP increases with the duration of the actinic pulse concomitantly with an increase in the reciprocal rate constants of the fast (~10 ms) and moderate quenching phases. Fluorescence responses upon single turnover flashes of 30-μs duration (STFs) given at discrete times during the P-O quenching were used as tools for identifying the quencher involved in the P-O quenching phase preceding the STF excitation. Results are difficult to interpret in terms of a single-hit two-state trapping mechanism with distinguishable quenching properties of open and closed reaction centers only. They give support for an earlier hypothesis on a double-hit three-state trapping mechanism in which the so-called semi-closed reaction centers of PSII are considered. In these trapping-competent centers the single reduced acceptor pair [PheQ A](1-), depending on the size of photoelectrochemically induced pH effects on the Q B-binding site

  11. Genetic variability and heritability of chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čepl, Jaroslav; Holá, Dana; Stejskal, Jan; Korecký, Jiří; Kočová, Marie; Lhotáková, Zuzana; Tomášková, Ivana; Palovská, Markéta; Rothová, Olga; Whetten, Ross W; Kaňák, Jan; Albrechtová, Jana; Lstibůrek, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Current knowledge of the genetic mechanisms underlying the inheritance of photosynthetic activity in forest trees is generally limited, yet it is essential both for various practical forestry purposes and for better understanding of broader evolutionary mechanisms. In this study, we investigated genetic variation underlying selected chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF) parameters in structured populations of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) grown on two sites under non-stress conditions. These parameters were derived from the OJIP part of the ChlF kinetics curve and characterize individual parts of primary photosynthetic processes associated, for example, with the exciton trapping by light-harvesting antennae, energy utilization in photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers (RCs) and its transfer further down the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. An additive relationship matrix was estimated based on pedigree reconstruction, utilizing a set of highly polymorphic single sequence repeat markers. Variance decomposition was conducted using the animal genetic evaluation mixed-linear model. The majority of ChlF parameters in the analyzed pine populations showed significant additive genetic variation. Statistically significant heritability estimates were obtained for most ChlF indices, with the exception of DI0/RC, φD0 and φP0 (Fv/Fm) parameters. Estimated heritabilities varied around the value of 0.15 with the maximal value of 0.23 in the ET0/RC parameter, which indicates electron-transport flux from QA to QB per PSII RC. No significant correlation was found between these indices and selected growth traits. Moreover, no genotype × environment interaction (G × E) was detected, i.e., no differences in genotypes' performance between sites. The absence of significant G × E in our study is interesting, given the relatively low heritability found for the majority of parameters analyzed. Therefore, we infer that polygenic variability of these indices is

  12. In vivo assessment of effect of phytotoxin tenuazonic acid on PSII reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiguo; Strasser, Reto Jörg; Qiang, Sheng

    2014-11-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA), a phytotoxin produced by the fungus Alternaria alternata isolated from diseased croftonweed (Ageratina adenophora), exhibits a strong inhibition in photosystem II (PSII) activity. In vivo chlorophyll fluorescence transients of the host plant croftonweed, show that the dominant effect of TeA is not on the primary photochemical reaction but on the biochemical reaction after QA. The most important action site of TeA is the QB site on the PSII electron-acceptor side, blocking electron transport beyond QA(-) by occupying the QB site in the D1 protein. However, TeA does not affect the antenna pigments, the energy transfer from antenna pigment molecules to reaction centers (RCs), and the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) at the donor side of PSII. TeA severely inactivated PSII RCs. The fraction of non-QA reducing centers and non-QB reducing centers show a time- and concentration-dependent linear increase. Conversely, the amount of active QA or QB reducing centers declined sharply in a linear way. The fraction of non-QB reducing centers calculated from data of fluorescence transients is close to the number of PSII RCs with their QB site filled by TeA. An increase of the step-J level (VJ) in the OJIP fluorescence transients attributed to QA(-) accumulation due to TeA bound to the QB site is a typical characteristic response of the plants leaf with respect to TeA penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid effects of diverse toxic water pollutants on chlorophyll a fluorescence: variable responses among freshwater microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang Jae; Berges, John A; Young, Erica B

    2012-05-15

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence of microalgae is a compelling indicator of toxicity of dissolved water contaminants, because it is easily measured and responds rapidly. While different chl a fluorescence parameters have been examined, most studies have focused on single species and/or a narrow range of toxins. We assessed the utility of one chl a fluorescence parameter, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (F(v)/F(m)), for detecting effects of nine environmental pollutants from a range of toxin classes on 5 commonly found freshwater algal species, as well as the USEPA model species, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. F(v)/F(m) declined rapidly over glyphosate (glyphosate increased exponentially with concentration. F(v)/F(m) provides a sensitive and easily-measured parameter for rapid and cost-effective detection of effects of many dissolved toxins. Field-portable fluorometers will facilitate field testing, however distinct responses between different species may complicate net F(v)/F(m) signal from a community. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Solar UV-B effects on PSII performance in Betula nana are influenced by PAR level and reduced by EDU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    2012-01-01

    The long-term and diurnal responses of photosystem II (PSII) performance to near-ambient UV-B radiation were investigated in High Arctic Betula nana. We conducted an UV exclusion experiment with five replicated blocks consisting of open control (no filter), photosynthetic active radiation and UV...... the effects of UV-B. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction curves were used for analysis of OJIP test parameters. Near-ambient UV-B radiation reduced across season maximum quantum yield (TRo /ABS = Fv /Fm ), approximated number of active PSII reaction center (RC/ABS) and the performance index (PIABS ), despite...... in reduced UV-B compared to near-ambient UV-B. This demonstrates current solar UV-B to reduce the PSII performance both on a daily as well as a seasonal basis in this High Arctic species....

  15. A retrieval algorithm to evaluate the Photosystem I and Photosystem II spectral contributions to leaf chlorophyll fluorescence at physiological temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombi, Lorenzo; Cecchi, Giovanna; Lognoli, David; Raimondi, Valentina; Toci, Guido; Agati, Giovanni

    2011-09-01

    A new computational procedure to resolve the contribution of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) to the leaf chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra at room temperature has been developed. It is based on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the leaf fluorescence emission spectra measured during the OI photochemical phase of fluorescence induction kinetics. During this phase, we can assume that only two spectral components are present, one of which is constant (PSI) and the other variable in intensity (PSII). Application of the PCA method to the measured fluorescence emission spectra of Ficus benjamina L. evidences that the temporal variation in the spectra can be ascribed to a single spectral component (the first principal component extracted by PCA), which can be considered to be a good approximation of the PSII fluorescence emission spectrum. The PSI fluorescence emission spectrum was deduced by difference between measured spectra and the first principal component. A single-band spectrum for the PSI fluorescence emission, peaked at about 735 nm, and a 2-band spectrum with maxima at 685 and 740 nm for the PSII were obtained. A linear combination of only these two spectral shapes produced a good fit for any measured emission spectrum of the leaf under investigation and can be used to obtain the fluorescence emission contributions of photosystems under different conditions. With the use of our approach, the dynamics of energy distribution between the two photosystems, such as state transition, can be monitored in vivo, directly at physiological temperatures. Separation of the PSI and PSII emission components can improve the understanding of the fluorescence signal changes induced by environmental factors or stress conditions on plants.

  16. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiujun; Wang, Guangce; Pan, Guanghua; Gao, Shan; Xu, Pu; Zhu, Jianyi

    2010-04-28

    Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta). Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks). During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII) activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within the young germling, the hetero-distribution of PSII

  17. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Shan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta. Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. Results In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks. During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Conclusions Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within

  18. Isolation of novel PSII-LHCII megacomplexes from pea plants characterized by a combination of proteomics and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Pascal; Nield, Jon; Tabares, Jose Alejandro Muñoz; Chiodoni, Angelica; Manfredi, Marcello; Gosetti, Fabio; Marengo, Emilio; Saracco, Guido; Barber, James; Pagliano, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    In higher plants, photosystem II (PSII) is a multi-subunit pigment-protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts, where it is present mostly in dimeric form within the grana. Its light-harvesting antenna system, LHCII, is composed of trimeric and monomeric complexes, which can associate in variable number with the dimeric PSII core complex in order to form different types of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes. Moreover, PSII-LHCII supercomplexes can laterally associate within the thylakoid membrane plane, thus forming higher molecular mass complexes, termed PSII-LHCII megacomplexes (Boekema et al. 1999a, in Biochemistry 38:2233-2239; Boekema et al. 1999b, in Eur J Biochem 266:444-452). In this study, pure PSII-LHCII megacomplexes were directly isolated from stacked pea thylakoid membranes by a rapid single-step solubilization, using the detergent n-dodecyl-α-D-maltoside, followed by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. The megacomplexes were subjected to biochemical and structural analyses. Transmission electron microscopy on negatively stained samples, followed by single-particle analyses, revealed a novel form of PSII-LHCII megacomplexes, as compared to previous studies (Boekema et al.1999a, in Biochemistry 38:2233-2239; Boekema et al. 1999b, in Eur J Biochem 266:444-452), consisting of two PSII-LHCII supercomplexes sitting side-by-side in the membrane plane, sandwiched together with a second copy. This second copy of the megacomplex is most likely derived from the opposite membrane of a granal stack. Two predominant forms of intact sandwiched megacomplexes were observed and termed, according to (Dekker and Boekema 2005 Biochim Biophys Acta 1706:12-39), as (C2S2)4 and (C2S2 + C2S2M2)2 megacomplexes. By applying a gel-based proteomic approach, the protein composition of the isolated megacomplexes was fully characterized. In summary, the new structural forms of isolated megacomplexes and the related modeling performed provide novel insights into

  19. Ambient UV-B radiation reduces PSII performance and net photosynthesis in high Arctic Salix arctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2011-01-01

    Ambient ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation potentially impacts the photosynthetic performance of high Arctic plants. We conducted an UV-B exclusion experiment in a dwarf shrub heath in NE Greenland (74°N), with open control, filter control, UV-B filtering and UV-AB filtering, all in combination...... was characterized by simultaneous gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements and the PSII performance through the growing season was investigated with fluorescence measurements. Leaf harvest towards the end of the growing season was done to determine the specific leaf area and the content of carbon......, nitrogen and UV-B absorbing compounds. Compared to a 60% reduced UV-B irradiance, the ambient solar UV-B reduced net photosynthesis in Salix arctica leaves fixed in the 45° position which exposed leaves to maximum natural irradiance. Also a reduced Calvin Cycle capacity was found, i.e. the maximum rate...

  20. Rice Photosynthetic Productivity and PSII Photochemistry under Nonflooded Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibing He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM, furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN, and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI. Compared with the conventional flooding (CF treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN, lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm, and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII. And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC. Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation.

  1. Spatial variability of oceanic phycoerythrin spectral types derived from airborne laser-induced fluorescence emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wright, C. Wayne; Kana, Todd M.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.

    1998-07-01

    We report spatial variability of oceanic phycoerythrin spectral types detected by means of a blue spectral shift in airborne laser-induced fluorescence emission. The blue shift of the phycoerythrobilin fluorescence is known from laboratory studies to be induced by phycourobilin chromophore substitution at phycoerythrobilin chromophore sites in some strains of phycoerythrin-containing marine cyanobacteria. The airborne 532-nm laser-induced phycoerythrin fluorescence of the upper oceanic volume showed distinct segregation of cyanobacterial chromophore types in a flight transect from coastal water to the Sargasso Sea in the western North Atlantic. High phycourobilin levels were restricted to the oceanic (oligotrophic) end of the flight transect, in agreement with historical ship findings. These remotely observed phycoerythrin spectral fluorescence shifts have the potential to permit rapid, wide-area studies of the spatial variability of spectrally distinct cyanobacteria, especially across interfacial regions of coastal and oceanic water masses. Airborne laser-induced phytoplankton spectral fluorescence observations also further the development of satellite algorithms for passive detection of phytoplankton pigments. Optical modifications to the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar are briefly described that permitted observation of the fluorescence spectral shifts.

  2. Effects of water stress and light intensity on chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and pigments of Aloe vera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrati, Saeid; Tahmasebi-Sarvestani, Zeinolabedin; Modarres-Sanavy, Seyed Ali Mohammad; Mokhtassi-Bidgoli, Ali; Nicola, Silvana

    2016-09-01

    Aloe vera L. is one of the most important medicinal plants in the world. In order to determine the effects of light intensity and water deficit stress on chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence and pigments of A. vera, a split-plot in time experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with four replications in a research greenhouse. The factorial combination of three light intensities (50, 75 and 100% of sunlight) and four irrigation regimes (irrigation after depleting 20, 40, 60 and 80% of soil water content) were considered as main factors. Sampling time was considered as sub factor. The first, second and third samplings were performed 90, 180 and 270 days after imposing the treatments, respectively. The results demonstrated that the highest light intensity and the severe water stress decreased maximum fluorescence (Fm), variable fluorescence (Fv)/Fm, quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ФPSII), Chl and photochemical quenching (qP) but increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), minimum fluorescence (F0) and Anthocyanin (Anth). Additionally, the highest Fm, Fv/Fm, ФPSII and qP and the lowest NPQ and F0 were observed when 50% of sunlight was blocked and irrigation was done after 40% soil water depletion. Irradiance of full sunlight and water deficit stress let to the photoinhibition of photosynthesis, as indicated by a reduced quantum yield of PSII, ФPSII, and qP, as well as higher NPQ. Thus, chlorophyll florescence measurements provide valuable physiological data. Close to half of total solar radiation and irrigation after depleting 40% of soil water content were selected as the most efficient treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. On the polyphasic quenching kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence in algae after light pulses of variable length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.; Prasil, O.

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on kinetics of the fluorescence decay in a suspension of the alga Scenedesmus quadricauda after actinic illumination. These are monitored as the variable fluorescence signal in the dark following light pulses of variable intensity and duration. The decay reflects the restoration

  4. Toxic Effects of Ethyl Cinnamate on the Photosynthesis and Physiological Characteristics of Chlorella vulgaris Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Flow Cytometry Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Ouyang, Hui-Ling; Jiang, Yu-Jiao; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; He, Wei; Liu, Wen-Xiu; Yang, Bin; Xu, Fu-Liu

    2015-01-01

    The toxic effects of ethyl cinnamate on the photosynthetic and physiological characteristics of Chlorella vulgaris were studied based on chlorophyll fluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. Parameters, including biomass, F v/F m (maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII), ФPSII (actual photochemical efficiency of PSII in the light), FDA, and PI staining fluorescence, were measured. The results showed the following: (1) The inhibition on biomass increased as the exposure concentration increased. 1 mg/L ethyl cinnamate was sufficient to reduce the total biomass of C. vulgaris. The 48-h and 72-h EC50 values were 2.07 mg/L (1.94–2.20) and 1.89 mg/L (1.82–1.97). (2) After 24 h of exposure to 2–4 mg/L ethyl cinnamate, the photosynthesis of C. vulgaris almost ceased, manifesting in ФPSII being close to zero. After 72 h of exposure to 4 mg/L ethyl cinnamate, the F v/F m of C. vulgaris dropped to zero. (3) Ethyl cinnamate also affected the cellular physiology of C. vulgaris, but these effects resulted in the inhibition of cell yield rather than cell death. Exposure to ethyl cinnamate resulted in decreased esterase activities in C. vulgaris, increased average cell size, and altered intensities of chlorophyll a fluorescence. Overall, esterase activity was the most sensitive variable. PMID:26101784

  5. Toxic Effects of Ethyl Cinnamate on the Photosynthesis and Physiological Characteristics of Chlorella vulgaris Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Flow Cytometry Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The toxic effects of ethyl cinnamate on the photosynthetic and physiological characteristics of Chlorella vulgaris were studied based on chlorophyll fluorescence and flow cytometry analysis. Parameters, including biomass, Fv/Fm (maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII, ФPSII (actual photochemical efficiency of PSII in the light, FDA, and PI staining fluorescence, were measured. The results showed the following: (1 The inhibition on biomass increased as the exposure concentration increased. 1 mg/L ethyl cinnamate was sufficient to reduce the total biomass of C. vulgaris. The 48-h and 72-h EC50 values were 2.07 mg/L (1.94–2.20 and 1.89 mg/L (1.82–1.97. (2 After 24 h of exposure to 2–4 mg/L ethyl cinnamate, the photosynthesis of C. vulgaris almost ceased, manifesting in ФPSII being close to zero. After 72 h of exposure to 4 mg/L ethyl cinnamate, the Fv/Fm of C. vulgaris dropped to zero. (3 Ethyl cinnamate also affected the cellular physiology of C. vulgaris, but these effects resulted in the inhibition of cell yield rather than cell death. Exposure to ethyl cinnamate resulted in decreased esterase activities in C. vulgaris, increased average cell size, and altered intensities of chlorophyll a fluorescence. Overall, esterase activity was the most sensitive variable.

  6. Proteomic characterization and three-dimensional electron microscopy study of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes from higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliano, Cristina; Nield, Jon; Marsano, Francesco; Pape, Tillmann; Barera, Simone; Saracco, Guido; Barber, James

    2014-09-01

    In higher plants a variable number of peripheral LHCII trimers can strongly (S), moderately (M) or loosely (L) associate with the dimeric PSII core (C2) complex via monomeric Lhcb proteins to form PSII-LHCII supercomplexes with different structural organizations. By solubilizing isolated stacked pea thylakoid membranes either with the α or β isomeric forms of the detergent n-dodecyl-D-maltoside, followed by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, we previously showed that PSII-LHCII supercomplexes of types C2S2M2 and C2S2, respectively, can be isolated [S. Barera et al., Phil. Trans. R Soc. B 67 (2012) 3389-3399]. Here we analysed their protein composition by applying extensive bottom-up and top-down mass spectrometry on the two forms of the isolated supercomplexes. In this way, we revealed the presence of the antenna proteins Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 and of the extrinsic polypeptides PsbP, PsbQ and PsbR exclusively in the C2S2M2 supercomplex. Other proteins of the PSII core complex, common to the C2S2M2 and C2S2 supercomplexes, including the low molecular mass subunits, were also detected and characterized. To complement the proteomic study with structural information, we performed negative stain transmission electron microscopy and single particle analysis on the PSII-LHCII supercomplexes isolated from pea thylakoid membranes solubilized with n-dodecyl-α-D-maltoside. We observed the C2S2M2 supercomplex in its intact form as the largest PSII complex in our preparations. Its dataset was further analysed in silico, together with that of the second largest identified sub-population, corresponding to its C2S2 subcomplex. In this way, we calculated 3D electron density maps for the C2S2M2 and C2S2 supercomplexes, approaching respectively 30 and 28Å resolution, extended by molecular modelling towards the atomic level. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. Copyright © 2013. Published by

  7. Structural variability of plant photosystem II megacomplexes in thylakoid membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nosek, Lukáš; Semchonok, Dmitry; Boekema, Egbert J.; Ilík, Petr; Kouřil, Roman

    Plant photosystem II (PSII) is organized into large supercomplexes with variable amount of membrane-bound light-harvesting proteins (LHCII). The largest stable form of the PSII supercomplex involves four LHCII trimers, which are specifically connected to the PSII core dimer via monomeric antenna

  8. Modelling chlorophyll fluorescence of kiwi fruit (Actinidia deliciosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Johanna Mendes; Iriel, Analia; Lagorio, M Gabriela

    2012-04-01

    Kiwi fruit displays chlorophyll fluorescence. A physical model was developed to reproduce the observed original fluorescence for the whole fruit, from the emission of the different parts of the kiwi fruit. The spectral distribution of fluorescence in each part of the fruit, was corrected to eliminate distortions due to light re-absorption and it was analyzed in relation to photosystem II-photosystem I ratio. Kiwi fruit also displays variable chlorophyll-fluorescence, similar to that observed from leaves. The maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry (F(v)/F(m)), the quantum efficiency of photosystem II (Φ(PSII)), and the photochemical and non-photochemical quenching coefficients (q(P) and q(NP) respectively) were determined and discussed in terms of the model developed. The study was extended by determining the photosynthetic parameters as a function of the storage time, at both 4 °C and room temperature for 25 days.

  9. Topography of Cells Revealed by Variable-Angle Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Déturche, Régis; Vézy, Cyrille; Jaffiol, Rodolphe

    2016-09-20

    We propose an improved version of variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (vaTIRFM) adapted to modern TIRF setup. This technique involves the recording of a stack of TIRF images, by gradually increasing the incident angle of the light beam on the sample. A comprehensive theory was developed to extract the membrane/substrate separation distance from fluorescently labeled cell membranes. A straightforward image processing was then established to compute the topography of cells with a nanometric axial resolution, typically 10-20 nm. To highlight the new opportunities offered by vaTIRFM to quantify adhesion process of motile cells, adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cancer cells on glass substrate coated with fibronectin was examined. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Single cell adhesion strength assessed with variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelina Cardoso Dos Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new strategy to evaluate adhesion strength at the single cell level. This approach involves variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to monitor in real time the topography of cell membranes, i.e. a map of the membrane/substrate separation distance. According to the Boltzmann distribution, both potential energy profile and dissociation energy related to the interactions between the cell membrane and the substrate were determined from the membrane topography. We have highlighted on glass substrates coated with poly-L-lysine and fibronectin, that the dissociation energy is a reliable parameter to quantify the adhesion strength of MDA-MB-231 motile cells.

  11. Seasonal variability of phytoplankton fluorescence in relation to the Straits of Messina (Sicily tidal upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Azzaro

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Straits of Messina, large gradients of tidal displacements, as well as the topographic constrictions, determine the upwelling of deeper waters in the surface layer. This work describes the seasonal variability in the surface distribution of phytoplankton biomass depending on the upwelling phenomena. Temperature, salinity, nitrates and phytoplankton fluorescence were measured in 1994 and 1995 by continuous underway surface real-time measurements onboard dedicated research boats. Each survey was performed following the dynamic phases of flooding and ebbing tides. Tidal currents are essentially southward during high tide and northward during low tide.

    During the low water slack tide, large spatial gradients of physical-chemical and biological parameters were found, while at the high water slack tide, a diffused phytoplankton fluorescence was observed only in autumn due to a seasonal thermocline. Salinity, nitrate and chlorophyll-a fluorescence data revealed a significant positive intercorrelation, whereas they were inversely correlated with temperature. Generally, the upwelling distribution was limited to narrow zones during winter, while in summer it was found in the middle of the Straits and in the southern zones. During spring in the southern zone of the Straits, the maximum chlorophyll-a fluorescence was detected (May 1995, 0.32 μg-Chla l−1; in summer, when back and forth tidal movements between the Tyrrhenian and the Ionian seas intensify, decreased values were observed throughout the study area.

    The data set obtained through continuous and repeatable samplings has allowed the study of different time-space scales in the Straits of Messina, a very strong and dynamic environment.

    The Straits system could be compared to an "intermittent pump" which, during the different seasons, initially enriches itself and subsequently provides nutrients to the surrounding basins.

  12. Altered gene expression by sedaxane increases PSII efficiency, photosynthesis and growth and improves tolerance to drought in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajigboye, Olubukola O; Lu, Chungui; Murchie, Erik H; Schlatter, Christian; Swart, Gina; Ray, Rumiana V

    2017-04-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDHI) fungicides have been shown to increase PSII efficiency and photosynthesis under drought stress in the absence of disease to enhance the biomass and yield of winter wheat. However, the molecular mechanism of improved photosynthetic efficiency observed in SDHI-treated wheat has not been previously elucidated. Here we used a combination of chlorophyll fluorescence, gas exchange and gene expression analysis, to aid our understanding of the basis of the physiological responses of wheat seedlings under drought conditions to sedaxane, a novel SDHI seed treatment. We show that sedaxane increased the efficiency of PSII photochemistry, reduced non-photochemical quenching and improved the photosynthesis and biomass in wheat correlating with systemic changes in the expression of genes involved in defense, chlorophyll synthesis and cell wall modification. We applied a coexpression network-based approach using differentially expressed genes of leaves, roots and pregerminated seeds from our wheat array datasets to identify the most important hub genes, with top ranked correlation (higher gene association value and z-score) involved in cell wall expansion and strengthening, wax and pigment biosynthesis and defense. The results indicate that sedaxane confers tolerant responses of wheat plants grown under drought conditions by redirecting metabolites from defense/stress responses towards growth and adaptive development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural variability of plant photosystem II megacomplexes in thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosek, Lukáš; Semchonok, Dmitry; Boekema, Egbert J; Ilík, Petr; Kouřil, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Plant photosystem II (PSII) is organized into large supercomplexes with variable levels of membrane-bound light-harvesting proteins (LHCIIs). The largest stable form of the PSII supercomplex involves four LHCII trimers, which are specifically connected to the PSII core dimer via monomeric antenna proteins. The PSII supercomplexes can further interact in the thylakoid membrane, forming PSII megacomplexes. So far, only megacomplexes consisting of two PSII supercomplexes associated in parallel have been observed. Here we show that the forms of PSII megacomplexes can be much more variable. We performed single particle electron microscopy (EM) analysis of PSII megacomplexes isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana using clear-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Extensive image analysis of a large data set revealed that besides the known PSII megacomplexes, there are distinct groups of megacomplexes with non-parallel association of supercomplexes. In some of them, we have found additional LHCII trimers, which appear to stabilize the non-parallel assemblies. We also performed EM analysis of the PSII supercomplexes on the level of whole grana membranes and successfully identified several types of megacomplexes, including those with non-parallel supercomplexes, which strongly supports their natural origin. Our data demonstrate a remarkable ability of plant PSII to form various larger assemblies, which may control photochemical usage of absorbed light energy in plants in a changing environment. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Rapid assessment of different oxygenic phototrophs and single-cell photosynthesis with multicolour variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trampe, Erik Christian Løvbjerg; Kolbowski, J.; Schreiber, U.

    2011-01-01

    , red or white light. Automated sequential exposure of microscopic samples to the three excitation colours enables subsequent deconvolution of the resulting fluorescence signals and colour marking of cells with different photopigmentation, i.e., cyanobacteria, green algae, red algae and diatoms......We present a new system for microscopic multicolour variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of aquatic phototrophs. The system is compact and portable and enables microscopic imaging of photosynthetic performance of individual cells and chloroplasts using different combinations of blue, green...

  15. Cyclic electron flow may provide some protection against PSII photoinhibition in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essemine, Jemaa; Xiao, Yi; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2017-04-01

    Previously we have shown that a quick down-regulation in PSI activity compares to that of PSII following short-term heat stress for two rice groups including C4023 and Q4149, studied herein. These accessions were identified to have different natural capacities in driving cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI; i.e., low CEF (lcef) and high CEF (hcef) for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these two lines have different mechanisms of protecting photosystem II from photodamage under heat stress. We observed a stepwise alteration in the shape of Chl a fluorescence induction (OJIP) with increasing temperature treatment. The effect of 44°C treatment on the damping in Chl a fluorescence was more pronounced in C4023 than in Q4149. Likewise, we noted a disruption in the I-step, a decline in the Fv due to a strong damping in the Fm, and a slight increase in the F0. Normalized data demonstrated that the I-step seems more susceptible to 44°C in C4023 than in Q4149. We also measured the redox states of plastocyanin (PC) and P700 by monitoring the transmission changes at 820nm (I820), and observed a disturbance in the oxidation/reduction kinetics of PC and P700. The decline in the amplitude of their oxidation was shown to be about 29% and 13% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The electropotential component (Δφ) of ms-DLE appeared more sensitive to temperature stress than the chemical component (ΔpH), and the impact of heat was more evident and drastic in C4023 than in Q4149. Under heat stress, we noticed a concomitant decline in the primary photochemistry of PSII as well as in both the membrane energization process and the lumen protonation for both accessions, and it is evident that heat affects these parameters more in C4023 than in Q4149. All these data suggest that higher CET can confer higher photoprotection to PSII in rice lines, which can be a desirable trait during rice breeding, especially in the context of a "warming

  16. Sparse Reconstruction of Fluorescence Molecular Tomography Using Variable Splitting and Alternating Direction Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jinzuo; Du, Yang; An, Yu; Mao, Yamin; Jiang, Shixin; Shang, Wenting; He, Kunshan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Kun; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2017-06-05

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a novel imaging modality for three-dimensional preclinical research and has many potential applications for drug therapy evaluation and tumor diagnosis. However, FMT presents an ill-conditioned and ill-posed inverse problem, which is a challenge for its tomography reconstruction. Due to the importance of FMT reconstruction, it is valuable and necessary to develop further practical reconstruction methods for FMT. In this study, an efficient method using variable splitting strategy as well as alternating direction strategy (VSAD) was proposed for FMT reconstruction. In this method, the variable splitting strategy and the augmented Lagrangian function were first introduced to obtain an equivalent optimization formulation of the original problem. Then, the alternating direction scheme was used to solve the optimization problem and to accelerate its convergence. To examine the property of the VSAD method, three numerical simulation experiments (accuracy assessment experiment, robustness assessment experiment, and reconstruction speed assessment experiment) were performed and analyzed. The results indicated that the reconstruction accuracy, the reconstruction robustness, and the reconstruction speed of FMT were satisfactory by using the proposed VSAD method. Two in vivo studies, which were conducted by using two nude mouse models, further confirmed the advantages of the proposed method. The results indicated that the proposed VSAD algorithm is effective for FMT reconstruction. It was accurate, robust, and efficient for FMT imaging and was feasibly applied for in vivo FMT applications.

  17. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometry: variability of chlorophyll a fluorescence yields in colonies of the corals, Montastraea faveolata (w.) and Diploria labyrinthiformes (h.) recovering from bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi; Lesser; Gorbunov

    2000-09-05

    Recently, an underwater version of a fast repetition rate fluorometer (FRRF) was developed for the non-destructive study of fluorescence yields in benthic photoautotrophs. We used an FRRF to study bleached colonies of the corals, Montastraea faveolata and Diploria labyrinthiformes at sites surrounding Lee Stocking Island, Exuma, Bahamas, to assess their recovery from bleaching ( approximately 1 year after the initial bleaching event) induced by elevated temperatures. The steady state quantum yields of chlorophyll a fluorescence (DeltaF'/F'(m)) from photosystem II (PSII) within coral colonies were separated into three categories representing visibly distinct degrees of bleaching ranging from no bleaching to completely bleached areas. Differences in DeltaF'/F'(m) were significantly different from bleached to unbleached regions within colonies. Dark, unbleached regions within colonies exhibited significantly higher DeltaF'/F'(m) values (0.438+/-0.019; mean+/-S.D.) when compared to lighter regions, and occupied a majority of the colonies' surface area (46-73%). Bleached regions exhibited significantly lower DeltaF'/F'(m) (0.337+/-0.014) and covered only 7-25% of the colonies' surface area. The observations from this study suggest that zooxanthellae in bleached regions of a colony exhibit reduced photosynthetic activity as long as one year after a bleaching event and that in situ fluorescence techniques such as FRRF are an effective means of studying coral responses and recovery from natural or anthropogenic stress in a non-destructive manner.

  18. Temperature-sensitive PSII: a novel approach for sustained photosynthetic hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayro-Kaiser, Vinzenz; Nelson, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    The need for energy and the associated burden are ever growing. It is crucial to develop new technologies for generating clean and efficient energy for society to avoid upcoming energetic and environmental crises. Sunlight is the most abundant source of energy on the planet. Consequently, it has captured our interest. Certain microalgae possess the ability to capture solar energy and transfer it to the energy carrier, H2. H2 is a valuable fuel, because its combustion produces only one by-product: water. However, the establishment of an efficient biophotolytic H2 production system is hindered by three main obstacles: (1) the hydrogen-evolving enzyme, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, is highly sensitive to oxygen; (2) energy conversion efficiencies are not economically viable; and (3) hydrogen-producing organisms are sensitive to stressful conditions in large-scale production systems. This study aimed to circumvent the oxygen sensitivity of this process with a cyclic hydrogen production system. This approach required a mutant that responded to high temperatures by reducing oxygen evolution. To that end, we randomly mutagenized the green microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to generate mutants that exhibited temperature-sensitive photoautotrophic growth. The selected mutants were further characterized by their ability to evolve oxygen and hydrogen at 25 and 37 °C. We identified four candidate mutants for this project. We characterized these mutants with PSII fluorescence, P700 absorbance, and immunoblotting analyses. Finally, we demonstrated that these mutants could function in a prototype hydrogen-producing bioreactor. These mutant microalgae represent a novel approach for sustained hydrogen production.

  19. APPLICATION OF MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE AND MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING IN STUDYING ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guidi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll (Chl a fluorescence is a widely used tool to monitor the photosynthetic process in plants subjected to environmental stresses.this review reports the theoretical bases of Chl fluorescence, and the significance of the most important Chl fluorescence parameters. it also reportshow these parameters can be utilised to estimate changes in photosystem ii (PSII photochemistry, linear electron flux and energy dissipationmechanisms. the relation between actual PSII photochemistry and CO2 assimilation is discussed, as is the role of photochemical andnon-photochemical quenching in inducing changes in PSII activity. the application of Chl fluorescence imaging to study heterogeneity on leaflamina is also considered. this review summarises only some of the results obtained by this methodology to study the effects of differentenvironmental stresses, namely water and nutrients availability, pollutants, temperature and salinity.

  20. Modern stromatolite phototrophic communities: a comparative study of procaryote and eucaryote phototrophs using variable chlorophyll fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Rupert G; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Kromkamp, Jacco C; Stolz, John; Pamela Reid, R

    2012-12-01

    Stromatolites are laminated organosedimentary structures formed by microbial communities, principally cyanobacteria although eucaryote phototrophs may also be involved in the construction of modern stromatolites. In this study, productivity and photophysiology of communities from stromatolites (laminated) and thrombolites (nonlaminated) were analysed using fluorescence imaging. Sub-samples of mats were excised at Highborne Cay, Bahamas, and cross-sectioned to simultaneously analyse surface, near-surface (1-2 mm), and deeper (2-10 mm) communities. Rapid light curve parameters and nonphotochemical downregulation showed distinct differences between phototroph communities, consistent with the reported quasi-succession of classic stromatolite mat types. Greater productivity was shown by cyanobacteria in Type 1 and Type 3 mats (first and final stage of the succession, Schizothrix gebeleinii and Solentia sp. respectively) and lower productivity within Type 2 mats (intermediate mat type). Eucaryote mat types, dominated by stalked (Striatella sp. and Licmophora sp.) and tube-dwelling (e.g. Nitzschia and Navicula spp.) diatoms, showed greater productivity than cyanobacteria communities, with the exception of Striatella (low productivity) and an unidentified coccoid cyanobacterium (high productivity). Findings indicate comparative variability between photosynthetically active procaryote and eucaryote sub-communities within stromatolites, with a pattern logically following the succession of 'classic' mat types, and lower than the productivity of eucaryote dominated 'nonclassic' mat types. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lead induced changes in phosphorylation of PSII proteins in low light grown pea plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wioleta, Wasilewska; Anna, Drożak; Ilona, Bacławska; Kamila, Kąkol; Elżbieta, Romanowska

    2015-02-01

    Light-intensity and redox-state induced thylakoid proteins phosphorylation involved in structural changes and in regulation of protein turnover. The presence of heavy metal ions triggers a wide range of cellular responses including changes in plant growth and photosynthesis. Plants have evolved a number of mechanisms to protect photosynthetic apparatus. We have characterized the effect of lead on PSII protein phosphorylation in pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants grown in low light conditions. Pb ions affected only slightly photochemical efficiency of PSII and had no effect on organization of thylakoid complexes. Lead activated strongly phosphorylation of PSII core D1 protein and dephosphorylation of this protein did not proceed in far red light. D1 protein was also not degraded in this conditions. However, phosphorylation of LHCII proteins was not affected by lead. These results indicate that Pb(2+) stimulate the phosphorylation of PSII core proteins and by disturbing the disassembly of supercomplexes play a role in PSII repair mechanism. LHCII phosphorylation could control the distribution of energy between the photosystems in low light conditions. This demonstrates that plants may respond to heavy metals by induction different pathways responsible for protein protection under stress conditions.

  2. Chloroplast movement provides photoprotection to plants by redistributing PSII damage within leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Phillip A; Hangarter, Roger P

    2012-09-01

    Plants use light to fix carbon through the process of photosynthesis but light also causes photoinhibition, by damaging photosystem II (PSII). Plants can usually adjust their rate of PSII repair to equal the rate of damage, but under stress conditions or supersaturating light-intensities damage may exceed the rate of repair. Light-induced chloroplast movements are one of the many mechanisms plants have evolved to minimize photoinhibition. We found that chloroplast movements achieve a measure of photoprotection to PSII by altering the distribution of photoinhibition through depth in leaves. When chloroplasts are in the low-light accumulation arrangement a greater proportion of PSII damage occurs near the illuminated surface than for leaves where the chloroplasts are in the high-light avoidance arrangement. According to our findings chloroplast movements can increase the overall efficiency of leaf photosynthesis in at least two ways. The movements alter light profiles within leaves to maximize photosynthetic output and at the same time redistribute PSII damage throughout the leaf to reduce the amount of inhibition received by individual chloroplasts and prevent a decrease in photosynthetic potential.

  3. Study of the Many Fluorescent Lines and the Absorption Variability in GX 301-2 with XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuerst, F.; Suchy, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Barragan, L.; Wilms, J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Caballero, I.; Kretschmar, P.; Ferrigno, C.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present an in-depth study of the High Mass X-ray Binary (HMXB) GX 301-2 during its pre-periastron flare using data from the XMM-Newton satellite. The energy spectrum shows a power law continuum absorbed by a large equivalent hydrogen column on the order of 10(exp 24)/ sq cm and a prominent Fe K-alpha fluorescent emission line. Besides the Fe K-alpha line, evidence for Fe K-Beta, Ni K-alpha, Ni K-Beta, S K-alpha, Ar K-alpha, Ca K-alpha, and Cr K-alpha fluorescent lines is found. The observed line strengths are consistent with fluorescence in a cold absorber. This is the first time that Cr K-alpha is seen in emission in the X-ray spectrum of a HMXB. In addition to the modulation by the strong pulse period of approx 685 sec the source is highly variable and shows different states of activity. We perform time-resolved as well as pulse-to-pulse resolved spectroscopy to investigate differences between these states of activity. We find that fluorescent line fluxes are strongly variable and generally follow the overall flux. The N-H value is variable by a factor of 2, but not correlated to continuum normalization. We find an interval of low flux in the light curve in which the pulsations cease almost completely, without any indication of an increasing absorption column. We investigate this dip in detail and argue that it is most likely that during the dip the accretion ceased and the afterglow of the fluorescent iron accounted for the main portion of the X-ray flux. A similar dip was found earlier in RXTE data, and we compare our findings to these results.

  4. Oxyradicals and PSII activity in maize leaves in the absence of UV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... oxyradicals invoked higher activity of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and peroxidase under ambient UV, they also imposed limitation on the photosynthetic efficiency of PSII. Exclusion of UV components (UV-B 280–315 nm; UV-A 315–400 nm) translated to enhanced photosynthesis, growth and biomass.

  5. Miniaturized fiber-coupled confocal fluorescence microscope with an electrowetting variable focus lens using no moving parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, Baris N; Losacco, Justin T; Cormack, Robert; Weir, Richard; Bright, Victor M; Gopinath, Juliet T; Restrepo, Diego; Gibson, Emily A

    2015-06-01

    We report a miniature, lightweight fiber-coupled confocal fluorescence microscope that incorporates an electrowetting variable focus lens to provide axial scanning for full three-dimensional (3D) imaging. Lateral scanning is accomplished by coupling our device to a laser-scanning confocal microscope through a coherent imaging fiber-bundle. The optical components of the device are combined in a custom 3D-printed adapter with an assembled weight of <2  g that can be mounted onto the head of a mouse. Confocal sectioning provides an axial resolution of ∼12  μm and an axial scan range of ∼80  μm. The lateral field-of-view is 300 μm, and the lateral resolution is 1.8 μm. We determined these parameters by imaging fixed sections of mouse neuronal tissue labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and fluorescent bead samples in agarose gel. To demonstrate viability for imaging intact tissue, we resolved multiple optical sections of ex vivo mouse olfactory nerve fibers expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP).

  6. Overexpressed Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Act Synergistically to Protect the Repair of PSII during Photoinhibition in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Tang, Penporn; Hihara, Yukako; Yumoto, Isao; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2016-09-01

    The repair of PSII under strong light is particularly sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, and these ROS are efficiently scavenged by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. In the present study, we generated transformants of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 that overexpressed an iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803; a highly active catalase (VktA) from Vibrio rumoiensis; and both enzymes together. Then we examined the sensitivity of PSII to photoinhibition in the three strains. In cells that overexpressed either Fe-SOD or VktA, PSII was more tolerant to strong light than it was in wild-type cells. Moreover, in cells that overexpressed both Fe-SOD and VktA, PSII was even more tolerant to strong light. However, the rate of photodamage to PSII, as monitored in the presence of chloramphenicol, was similar in all three transformant strains and in wild-type cells, suggesting that the overexpression of these ROS-scavenging enzymes might not protect PSII from photodamage but might protect the repair of PSII. Under strong light, intracellular levels of ROS fell significantly, and the synthesis de novo of proteins that are required for the repair of PSII, such as the D1 protein, was enhanced. Our observations suggest that overexpressed Fe-SOD and VktA might act synergistically to alleviate the photoinhibition of PSII by reducing intracellular levels of ROS, with resultant protection of the repair of PSII from oxidative inhibition. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Whole-Cell Scan using Automatic Variable-Angle and Variable-Illumination-Depth Pseudo—Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei; Xu, Aoshuang; Marchuk, Kyle; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning

    2011-08-01

    An automatic calibration and angle-scanning prism-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM) was modified to function in both TIRFM and pseudo-TIRFM modes. When the incident angle of the excitation laser beam was controlled to be larger than the critical angle, the instrument served as a variable-angle TIRFM. A homemade computer program automatically calibrates the laser illumination spot in the sample to overlap with the center of the microscope's field of view. Then, by measuring the fluorescence intensities at different incident angles, the z-positions of fluorescent nanospheres close to the cell basolateral membrane can be extracted. When the incident angle is reduced to be in the subcritical range, the instrument works as a pseudo-TIRFM. The whole cell body from bottom to top can be imaged in a vertical scan process. Furthermore, the illumination field depth in the pseudo-TIRFM can be controlled by changing the incident angle or the horizontal position of the laser spot.

  8. Visualizing heterogeneity of photosynthetic properties of plant leaves with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iermak, Ievgeniia; Vink, Jochem; Bader, Arjen N; Wientjes, Emilie; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to analyse the distribution and properties of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) in palisade and spongy chloroplasts of leaves from the C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the C4 plant Miscanthus x giganteus. This was achieved by separating the time-resolved fluorescence of PSI and PSII in the leaf. It is found that the PSII antenna size is larger on the abaxial side of A. thaliana leaves, presumably because chloroplasts in the spongy mesophyll are "shaded" by the palisade cells. The number of chlorophylls in PSI on the adaxial side of the A. thaliana leaf is slightly higher. The C4 plant M. x giganteus contains both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which have a different PSI/PSII ratio. It is shown that the time-resolved fluorescence of bundle sheath and mesophyll cells can be analysed separately. The relative number of chlorophylls, which belong to PSI (as compared to PSII) in the bundle sheath cells is at least 2.5 times higher than in mesophyll cells. FLIM is thus demonstrated to be a useful technique to study the PSI/PSII ratio and PSII antenna size in well-defined regions of plant leaves without having to isolate pigment-protein complexes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved UV-B screening capacity does not prevent negative effects of ambient UV irradiance on PSII performance in High Arctic plants. Results from a six year UV exclusion study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term responses of ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation were investigated on Salix arctica and Vaccinium uliginosum in a High Arctic heath ecosystem in Zackenberg, northeast Greenland. Over a period of six years, UV exclusion was conducted in the growing season by means of filters: 60% UV......-B reduction, 90% UV-B + UV-A reduction, UV transparent filter control, and an open control without filter. Plant responses were evaluated using specific leaf area, leaf content of UV-B absorbing compounds and PSII performance parameters derived from chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction curves. Based...... increased TRo/ABS = FV/FM and REo/ETo. These results demonstrate the current level of ambient UV-B to decrease PSII performance significantly in these High Arctic plants. It appears that the two plant species both have improved their UV-screening capacity, but through different strategies, although this did...

  10. High temperature stress monitoring and detection using chlorophyll a fluorescence and infrared thermography in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakjera, Eshetu Janka; Körner, Oliver; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2013-01-01

    (PSII) and stomatal conductance (gs). A combination of chlorophyll a fluorescence, gas exchange measurements and infrared thermography was applied using Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev) cultivar ‘Coral Charm’ as a model species. Increasing temperature had a highly significant effect...

  11. Assessing the additive risks of PSII herbicide exposure to the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen E; Schaffelke, Britta; Shaw, Melanie; Bainbridge, Zoë T; Rohde, Ken W; Kennedy, Karen; Davis, Aaron M; Masters, Bronwyn L; Devlin, Michelle J; Mueller, Jochen F; Brodie, Jon E

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide residues have been measured in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon at concentrations which have the potential to harm marine plant communities. Monitoring on the Great Barrier Reef lagoon following wet season discharge show that 80% of the time when herbicides are detected, more than one are present. These herbicides have been shown to act in an additive manner with regards to photosystem-II inhibition. In this study, the area of the Great Barrier Reef considered to be at risk from herbicides is compared when exposures are considered for each herbicide individually and also for herbicide mixtures. Two normalisation indices for herbicide mixtures were calculated based on current guidelines and PSII inhibition thresholds. The results show that the area of risk for most regions is greatly increased under the proposed additive PSII inhibition threshold and that the resilience of this important ecosystem could be reduced by exposure to these herbicides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Detecting variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J gene segment recombination using a two-colour fluorescence system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Gina B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diversity of immunoglobulins and the T cell antigen receptors is achieved via the recombination activating gene (RAG-mediated rearrangement of variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J gene segments, and this underpins the efficient recognition of a seemingly limitless array of antigens. Analysis of V(DJ recombination activity is typically performed using extrachromosomal recombination substrates that are recovered from transfected cells and selected using bacterial transformation. We have developed a two-colour fluorescence-based system that simplifies detection of both deletion and inversion joining events mediated by RAG proteins. Results This system employs two fluorescent reporter genes that differentially mark unrearranged substrates and those that have undergone RAG-mediated deletion or inversion events. The recombination products bear the hallmarks of true V(DJ recombination and activity can be detected using fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. Recombination events can be detected without the need for cytotoxic selection of recombination products and the system allows analysis of recombination activity using substrates integrated into the genome. Conclusions This system will be useful in the analysis and exploitation of the V(DJ recombination machinery and suggests that similar approaches could be used to replace expression of one gene with another during lymphocyte development.

  13. Deletion of CGLD1 Impairs PSII and Increases Singlet Oxygen Tolerance of Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiale Xing

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a key model organism for studying photosynthesis and oxidative stress in unicellular eukaryotes. Using a forward genetics approach, we have identified and characterized a mutant x32, which lacks a predicted protein named CGLD1 (Conserved in Green Lineage and Diatom 1 in GreenCut2, under normal and stress conditions. We show that loss of CGLD1 resulted in minimal photoautotrophic growth and PSII activity in the organism. We observed reduced amount of PSII complex and core subunits in the x32 mutant based on blue-native (BN/PAGE and immunoblot analysis. Moreover, x32 exhibited increased sensitivity to high-light stress and altered tolerance to different reactive oxygenic species (ROS stress treatments, i.e., decreased resistance to H2O2/or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH and increased tolerance to neutral red (NR and rose bengal (RB that induce the formation of singlet oxygen, respectively. Further analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR indicated that the increased singlet-oxygen tolerance of x32 was largely correlated with up-regulated gene expression of glutathione-S-transferases (GST. The phenotypical and physiological implications revealed from our experiments highlight the important roles of CGLD1 in maintaining structure and function of PSII as well as in protection of Chlamydomonas under photo-oxidative stress conditions.

  14. Diurnal variability in turbidity and coral fluorescence on a fringing reef flat: Southern Molokai, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piniak, G.A.; Storlazzi, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Terrigenous sediment in the nearshore environment can pose both acute and chronic stresses to coral reefs. The reef flat off southern Molokai, Hawaii, typically experiences daily turbidity events, in which trade winds and tides combine to resuspend terrigenous sediment and transport it alongshore. These chronic turbidity events could play a role in restricting coral distribution on the reef flat by reducing the light available for photosynthesis. This study describes the effects of these turbidity events on the Hawaiian reef coral Montipora capitata using in situ diurnal measurements of turbidity, light levels, and chlorophyll fluorescence yield via pulse-amplitude-modulated (PAM) fluorometry. Average surface irradiance was similar in the morning and the afternoon, while increased afternoon turbidity resulted in lower subsurface irradiance, higher fluorescence yield (??F/Fm???), and lower relative electron transport rates (rETR). Model calculations based on observed light extinction coeffecients suggest that in the absence of turbidity events, afternoon subsurface irradiances would be 1.43 times higher than observed, resulting in rETR for M. capitata that are 1.40 times higher.

  15. Stoichiometric relationship between the (Mn){sub 4}-cluster and PSII Ca{sup 2+} necessary for O{sub 2}-evolution. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This report focuses on the following research accomplishments: Stoichiometric relationship between the (Mn){sub 4}-cluster and PSII Ca{sup 2+} necessary for O{sub 2}-evolution; Photodamage of Mn-depleted PSII membranes: Sites and mechanisms of photoinactivation of primary reactions; The photoassembly of the PSII (Mn){sub 4}cluster is modulated by Ca{sup 2+} and DCIP; The natural product sorgoleone inhibits electron transfer at the Q{sub A}/Q{sub B} site of PSII; and Photodamages of Ca{sup 2+}-depleted PSII membranes: Sites and mechanisms of inactivation of donor side reactions.

  16. Mechanisms of drought-induced dissipation of excitation energy in sun- and shade-adapted drought-tolerant mosses studied by fluorescence yield change and global and target analysis of fluorescence decay kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hisanori; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Heber, Ulrich; Itoh, Shigeru

    2017-11-18

    Some mosses stay green and survive long even under desiccation. Dissipation mechanisms of excess excitation energy were studied in two drought-tolerant moss species adapted to contrasting niches: shade-adapted Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus and sun-adapted Rhytidium rugosum in the same family. (1) Under wet conditions, a light-induced nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) mechanism decreased the yield of photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence in both species. The NPQ extent saturated at a lower illumination intensity in R. squarrosus, suggesting a larger PSII antenna size. (2) Desiccation reduced the fluorescence intensities giving significantly lower F 0 levels and shortened the overall fluorescence lifetimes in both R. squarrosus and R. rugosum, at room temperature. (3) At 77 K, desiccation strongly reduced the PSII fluorescence intensity. This reduction was smaller in R. squarrosus than in R. rugosum. (4) Global and target analysis indicated two different mechanisms of energy dissipation in PSII under desiccation: the energy dissipation to a desiccation-formed strong fluorescence quencher in the PSII core in sun-adapted R. rugosum (type-A quenching) and (5) the moderate energy dissipation in the light-harvesting complex/PSII in shade-adapted R. squarrosus (type-B quenching). The two mechanisms are consistent with the different ecological niches of the two mosses.

  17. Variable-Color Fluorescent Lamps with Both Internal and External Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Tatsushi; Ryoko, Masatoshi; Aono, Masaharu

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, the color control of xenon-mercury fluorescent lamps through the use of both internal (longitudinal direction) and external (radial direction) electrodes is described. The inner surface of the cylindrical lamp was fully or partially coated with a mixture of two kinds of color phosphors. One of the phosphors is excited by the resonance radiation of mercury, and the other is excited by the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation of xenon. The color of the lamp light can be changed from that of one phosphor to that of the other phosphor by varying the mixture ratio of longitudinal discharge (LD) by the internal electrodes to radial discharge (RD) by the external electrodes. The wide color range in the Commission Internationale de l’Élairage (CIE) chromaticity diagram is obtained as follows: (x,y)=(0.262,0.129){\\mathendash}(0.533,0.280) for a blue-red lamp, (x,y)=(0.513,0.390){\\mathendash}(0.285,0.625) for an orange-green lamp and (x,y)=(0.139,0.147){\\mathendash}(0.166,0.548) for a blue-green lamp. The luminances are about 1000 cd/m2 for these lamps.

  18. Antagonism between elevated CO2, nighttime warming, and summer drought reduces the robustness of PSII performance to freezing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Boesgaard, Kristine Stove; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    2013-01-01

    out in the CLIMAITE multifactor experiment, which includes the combined impact of elevated CO2 (free air carbon enrichment; CO2), warming (passive nighttime warming; T) and summer drought (rain-excluding curtains; D) in a temperate heath ecosystem. PSII performance was probed by the effective quantum...... in the wavy hair-grass, Deschampsia flexuosa, and in the evergreen dwarf shrub common heather, Calluna vulgaris, and following freezing events the PItotal and Fv′/Fm′ were reduced even more. Contrary to expected, indirect effects of the previous summer drought reduced PSII performance before freezing events......, particularly in Calluna. In combinations with elevated CO2 interactive effects with drought, D×CO2 and warming, T×D×CO2, were negatively skewed and caused the reduction of PSII performance in both species after occurrence of freezing events. Neither passive nighttime warming nor elevated CO2 as single factors...

  19. Changes in photosynthetic properties measured by oxygen evolution and variable chlorophyll fluorescence in a simulated entrainment experiment with the cyanobacterium Planktothrix rubescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromkamp, J.C.; Domin, A.; Dubinsky, Z.; Lehmann, C.; Schanz, F.

    2001-01-01

    The metalimnion of lake Zurich is dominated by the red coloured cyanobacterium Planktotrix rubescens, where it lives in an extremely low light environment. Photosynthesis of the organism was studied using oxygen evolution and variable fluorescence. After transfer to 2 in depth in the epilimnion.

  20. Kinetic models of photosystem II should accommodate the effect of donor side quenching on variable chlorophyll a fluorescence in the microseconds time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vredenberg, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative data on laser flash-induced variable fluorescence in the 100 ns to 1 ms time range (Belyaeva et al. in Photosynth Res 98:105–119, 2008) confirming those of others (Steffen et al. in Biochemistry 40:173–180, 2001, Biochemistry 44:3123–3132, 2005; Belyaeva et al. in Biophysics

  1. Structure of PSI, PSII and antennae complexes from yellow-green alga Xanthonema debile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardian, Zdenko; Tichý, Josef; Vácha, František

    2011-05-01

    Photosynthetic carbon fixation by Chromophytes is one of the significant components of a carbon cycle on the Earth. Their photosynthetic apparatus is different in pigment composition from that of green plants and algae. In this work we report structural maps of photosystem I, photosystem II and light harvesting antenna complexes isolated from a soil chromophytic alga Xanthonema debile (class Xanthophyceae). Electron microscopy of negatively stained preparations followed by single particle analysis revealed that the overall structure of Xanthophytes' PSI and PSII complexes is similar to that known from higher plants or algae. Averaged top-view projections of Xanthophytes' light harvesting antenna complexes (XLH) showed two groups of particles. Smaller ones that correspond to a trimeric form of XLH, bigger particles resemble higher oligomeric form of XLH.

  2. Effect of leaf dehydration duration and dehydration degree on PSII photochemical activity of papaya leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meijun; Zhang, Zishan; Gao, Huiyuan; Yang, Cheng; Fan, Xingli; Cheng, Dandan

    2014-09-01

    Although the effect of dehydration on photosynthetic apparatus has been widely studied, the respective effect of dehydration duration and dehydration degree was neglected. This study showed that, when leaves dehydrated in air, the PSII activities of leaves decreased with the decline of leaf relative water content (RWC). Unexpectedly, when leaves dehydrated to same RWC, the decreases in Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm were lower in leaves dehydrating at 43 °C than those at 25 °C. However, to reach the same RWC, leaves dehydrating at 43 °C experienced 1/6 of the dehydration duration for leaves dehydrating at 25 °C. To distinguish the respective effect of dehydration degree and dehydration duration on photosynthetic apparatus, we studied the PSII activities of leaves treated with different concentration of PEG solutions. Increasing dehydration degree aggravated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with the same dehydration duration, while prolonging the dehydration duration also exacerbated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with identical dehydration degree. With the same dehydration degree and duration, high temperature enhanced the decrease of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in the leaves. When leaves dehydrated in air, the effect of high temperature was underestimated due to reduction of dehydration duration. The results demonstrated that, dehydration degree and duration both play important roles in damage to photosynthetic apparatus. We suggest that, under combined stresses, the effects of dehydration degree and duration on plants should be considered comprehensively, otherwise, partial or incorrect results may be obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-working-distance fluorescence microscope with high-numerical-aperture objectives for variable-magnification imaging in live mice from macro- to subcellular.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroaki; Momiyama, Masashi; Tomita, Katsuro; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the development of a long-working-distance fluorescence microscope with high-numerical-aperture objectives for variable-magnification imaging in live mice from macro- to subcellular. To observe cytoplasmic and nuclear dynamics of cancer cells in the living mouse, 143B human osteosarcoma cells are labeled with green fluorescent protein in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein in the cytoplasm. These dual-color cells are injected by a vascular route in an abdominal skin flap in nude mice. The mice are then imaged with the Olympus MVX10 macroview fluorescence microscope. With the MVX10, the nuclear and cytoplasmic behavior of cancer cells trafficking in blood vessels of live mice is observed. We also image lung metastases in live mice from the macro- to the subcellular level by opening the chest wall and imaging the exposed lung in live mice. Injected splenocytes, expressing cyan fluorescent protein, could also be imaged on the lung of live mice. We demonstrate that the MVX10 microscope offers the possibility of full-range in vivo fluorescence imaging from macro- to subcellular and should enable widespread use of powerful imaging technologies enabled by genetic reporters and other fluorophores.

  4. Diurnal Variability in Chlorophyll-a, Carotenoids, CDOM and SO42− Intensity of Offshore Seawater Detected by an Underwater Fluorescence-Raman Spectral System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed integrated fluorescence-Raman spectral system (λex = 532 nm for detecting Chlorophyll-a (chl-a, Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM, carotenoids and SO42− in situ was used to successfully investigate the diurnal variability of all above. Simultaneously using the integration of fluorescence spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques provided comprehensive marine information due to the complementarity between the different excitation mechanisms and different selection rules. The investigation took place in offshore seawater of the Yellow Sea (36°05′40′′ N, 120°31′32′′ E in October 2014. To detect chl-a, CDOM, carotenoids and SO42−, the fluorescence-Raman spectral system was deployed. It was found that troughs of chl-a and CDOM fluorescence signal intensity were observed during high tides, while the signal intensity showed high values with larger fluctuations during ebb-tide. Chl-a and carotenoids were influenced by solar radiation within a day cycle by different detection techniques, as well as displaying similar and synchronous tendency. CDOM fluorescence cause interference to the measurement of SO42−. To avoid such interference, the backup Raman spectroscopy system with λex = 785 nm was employed to detect SO42− concentration on the following day. The results demonstrated that the fluorescence-Raman spectral system has great potential in detection of chl-a, carotenoids, CDOM and SO42− in the ocean.

  5. Effect of arsenic on reflectance spectra and chlorophyll fluorescence of aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriel, Analia; Dundas, Gavin; Fernández Cirelli, Alicia; Lagorio, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic pollution of groundwater is a serious problem in many regions of Latin America that causes severe risks to human health. As a consequence, non-destructive monitoring methodologies, sensitive to arsenic presence in the environment and able to perform a rapid screening of large polluted areas, are highly sought-after. Both chlorophyll - a fluorescence and reflectance of aquatic plants may be potential indicators to sense toxicity in water media. In this work, the effects of arsenic on the optical and photophysical properties of leaves of different aquatic plants (Vallisneria gigantea, Azolla filiculoides and Lemna minor) were evaluated. Reflectance spectra were recorded for the plant leaves from 300 to 2400 nm. The spectral distribution of the fluorescence was also studied and corrected for light re-absorption processes. Photosynthetic parameters (Fv/Fm and ΦPSII) were additionally calculated from the variable chlorophyll fluorescence recorded with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer. Fluorescence and reflectance properties for V. gigantea and A. filiculoides were sensitive to arsenic presence in contrast to the behaviour of L. minor. Observed changes in fluorescence spectra could be interpreted in terms of preferential damage in photosystem II. The quantum efficiency of photosystem II for the first two species was also affected, decreasing upon arsenic treatment. As a result of this research, V. gigantea and A. filiculoides were proposed as bioindicators of arsenic occurrence in aquatic media. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bias correction by use of errors-in-variables regression models in studies with K-X ray fluorescence bone lead measurements1

    OpenAIRE

    Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Téllez-Rojo, Martha M.; Ángeles, Gustavo; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Hu, Howard

    2010-01-01

    In-vivo measurement of bone lead by means of K-X ray fluorescence (KXRF) is the preferred biological marker of chronic exposure to lead. Unfortunately, considerable measurement error associated with KXRF estimations can introduce bias in estimates of the effect of bone lead when this variable is included as the exposure in a regression model. Estimates of uncertainty reported by the KXRF instrument reflect the variance of the measurement error and, although they can be used to correct the mea...

  7. Cold-acclimation limits low temperature induced photoinhibition by promoting a higher photochemical quantum yield and a more effective PSII restoration in darkness in the Antarctic rather than the Andean ecotype of Colobanthus quitensis Kunt Bartl (Cariophyllaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bascuñán-Godoy Luisa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecotypes of Colobanthus quitensis Kunt Bartl (Cariophyllaceae from Andes Mountains and Maritime Antarctic grow under contrasting photoinhibitory conditions, reaching differential cold tolerance upon cold acclimation. Photoinhibition depends on the extent of photodamage and recovery capability. We propose that cold acclimation increases resistance to low-temperature-induced photoinhibition, limiting photodamage and promoting recovery under cold. Therefore, the Antarctic ecotype (cold hardiest should be less photoinhibited and have better recovery from low-temperature-induced photoinhibition than the Andean ecotype. Both ecotypes were exposed to cold induced photoinhibitory treatment (PhT. Photoinhibition and recovery of photosystem II (PSII was followed by fluorescence, CO2 exchange, and immunoblotting analyses. Results The same reduction (25% in maximum PSII efficiency (Fv/Fm was observed in both cold-acclimated (CA and non-acclimated (NA plants under PhT. A full recovery was observed in CA plants of both ecotypes under dark conditions, but CA Antarctic plants recover faster than the Andean ecotype. Under PhT, CA plants maintain their quantum yield of PSII, while NA plants reduced it strongly (50% and 73% for Andean and Antarctic plants respectively. Cold acclimation induced the maintenance of PsaA and Cyt b6/f and reduced a 41% the excitation pressure in Antarctic plants, exhibiting the lowest level under PhT. xCold acclimation decreased significantly NPQs in both ecotypes, and reduced chlorophylls and D1 degradation in Andean plants under PhT. NA and CA plants were able to fully restore their normal photosynthesis, while CA Antarctic plants reached 50% higher photosynthetic rates after recovery, which was associated to electron fluxes maintenance under photoinhibitory conditions. Conclusions Cold acclimation has a greater importance on the recovery process than on limiting photodamage. Cold acclimation determined the

  8. An Excel tool for deriving key photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Combined photosynthetic gas exchange and modulated fluorometres are widely used to evaluate physiological characteristics associated with phenotypic and genotypic variation, whether in response to genetic manipulation or resource limitation in natural vegetation or crops. After describing relatively simple experimental procedures, we present the theoretical background to the derivation of photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel-based fitting tool (EFT) that will be of use to specialists and non-specialists alike. We use data acquired in concurrent variable fluorescence-gas exchange experiments, where A/Ci and light-response curves have been measured under ambient and low oxygen. From these data, the EFT derives light respiration, initial PSII (photosystem II) photochemical yield, initial quantum yield for CO2 fixation, fraction of incident light harvested by PSII, initial quantum yield for electron transport, electron transport rate, rate of photorespiration, stomatal limitation, Rubisco (ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) rate of carboxylation and oxygenation, Rubisco specificity factor, mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion, light and CO2 compensation point, Rubisco apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, and Rubisco CO2 -saturated carboxylation rate. As an example, a complete analysis of gas exchange data on tobacco plants is provided. We also discuss potential measurement problems and pitfalls, and suggest how such empirical data could subsequently be used to parameterize predictive photosynthetic models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Imaging of fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction curve (OJIP) parameters, applied in a screening study with wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) genotypes under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedmowski, Christoph; Brüggemann, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    We quantified the influence of heat stress (HS) on PSII by imaging of parameters of the fast chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) induction (OJIP) kinetic of 20 genotypes of wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) covering a broad geographical spectrum. We developed a standardised screening procedure, allowing a repetitive fluorescence measurement of leaf segments. The impact of HS was quantified by calculating a Heat Resistance Index (HRI), derived from the decrease of the Performance Index (PI) caused by HS treatment and following recovery. For the genotype showing the lowest HRI, reduced maximum quantum yield (φP0) and increased relative variable fluorescence of the O-J phase (K-Peak) were detected after HS, whereas the basal fluorescence (F0) remained stable. An additional feature was a lowered fraction of active (QA-reducing) reaction centres (RCs). The disturbances disappeared after one day of recovery. Spatial heterogeneities of fluorescence parameters were detected, as the negative effect of HS was stronger in the leaf areas close to the leaf tip. The results of this study prove that chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (CFI) is suitable for the detection of HS symptoms and that imaging of JIP-Test parameters should be considered in future screening and phenotyping studies aiming for the characterisation of plant genotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Variability of the specific fluorescence of chlorophyll in the ocean. Part 2. Fluorometric method of chlorophyll a determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miros³awa Ostrowska

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Two methods of determining the chlorophyll a concentration in the sea have been formulated on the basis of artificially induced fluorescence measured with the aid of submersible fluorometers. The method of statistical correlation is founded on the empirical relationship between fluorescence and chlorophyll concentration. The theoretical model of fluorescence described in Part 1 of this paper (see Ostrowska et al. 2000, this volume provides the basis of the other method, the physical method. This describes the dependence of the specific fluorescence of phytoplankton on the chlorophyll concentration, a diversity of photophysiological properties of phytoplankton and the optical characteristics of the fluorometer.     In order to assess their practicability, the methods were subjected to empirical verification. This showed that the physical method yielded chlorophyll concentrations of far greater accuracy. The respective error factors of the estimated chlorophyll concentration were x = 2.07 for the correlation method and x = 1.5 for the physical method. This means that the statistical logarithmic error varies from -52 to +107% in the case of the former method but only from -33 to +51% in the case of the latter. Thus, modifying the methodology has much improved the accuracy of chlorophyll determinations.

  11. Sulfide and pH effects on variable fluorescence of photosystem II in two strains of the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria amphigranulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, W K; Castenholz, R W

    1990-06-01

    Changes in fluorescence of photosystem II (PS II) chlorophyll were used to monitor the in vivo effects of sulfide and pH on photosynthesis by the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria amphigranulata. O. amphigranulata is capable of both oxygenic photosynthesis and sulfide dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis. A genetic variant of O. amphigranulata which photosynthesizes oxygenically at normal rates, but is incapable of anoxygenic photosynthesis and cannot tolerate sulfide, was also used to explore the mode of action of sulfide. In vivo fluorescence responses of PS II chlorophyll in the first few seconds of exposure to light (Kautsky transients) reflected the electrochemical states of PS II and associated electron donors and acceptors. Kautsky transients showed a distinct difference between PS II of the wild type and the variant, but sulfide lowered fluorescence in both. Kautsky transients with sulfide were similar to transients with addition of NH2OH, NH4 (+) or HCN, indicating sulfide interacts with a protein on the donor side of PS II. The fluorescence steady-state (after 2 min) was measured in the presence of sulfide, cyanide and ammonium with pH ranging from 7.2-8.7. Sulfide and cyanide had the most impact at pH 7.2, ammonium at pH 8.7. This suggests that the uncharged forms (HCN, NH3 and H2S) had the strongest effect on PS II, possibly because of increased membrane permeability.

  12. Spatio-temporal variability of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the Rhône River delta and the Fos-Marseille marine area (NW Mediterranean Sea, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretto, Nicolas; Tedetti, Marc; Guigue, Catherine; Mounier, Stéphane; Raimbault, Patrick; Goutx, Madeleine

    2017-02-01

    The spatio-temporal variability of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) and its relationships with physical (temperature, salinity) and chemical (nutrients, chlorophyll a, dissolved and particulate organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus) parameters were investigated in inland waters of the Rhône River delta and the Fos-Marseille marine area (northwestern Mediterranean, France). Samples were taken approximately twice per month in two inland sites and three marine sites from February 2011 to January 2012. FDOM was analysed using fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). In inland waters, humic-like components C1 (λEx/λEm: 250 (330)/394 nm) and C3 (λEx/λEm: 250 (350)/454 nm) dominated over one tryptophan-like component C2 (λEx/λEm: 230 (280)/340 nm), reflecting a background contribution of terrigenous material (~67% of total fluorescence intensity, in quinine sulphate unit (QSU)) throughout the year. In marine waters, protein-like material, with tyrosine-like C4 (λEx/λEm: sediment resuspension. In marine sites, intrusions of the Berre Lagoon and Rhône River waters had a significant impact on the local biogeochemistry, leading to higher fluorescence intensities of humic- and protein-like components in spring-summer. On average, the fluorescence intensities of FDOM components C4, C5 and C6 increased by 33-81% under lower salinity. This work highlights the complex dynamics of FDOM in coastal waters and confirms the link between marine FDOM and the Rhône River freshwater intrusions on larger spatial and temporal scales in the Fos-Marseille marine area.

  13. Toxic effects of amoxicillin on the photosystem II of Synechocystis sp. characterized by a variety of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Xiangliang [Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumuqi, 830011 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, 550002 (China); Deng Chunnuan [Northeast Institute of Geography and Agricultural Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130012 (China); Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China); Zhang Daoyong [Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumuqi, 830011 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, 550002 (China)], E-mail: zhangdaoyong@vip.gyig.ac.cn; Wang Jianlong [Institute of Nuclear Energy and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100083 (China); Mu Guijin [Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumuqi, 830011 (China); Chen Ying [Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China)

    2008-09-29

    Amoxicillin is one of the widely used antibiotics of environmental concern. This study shows that amoxicillin has toxic effects on the photosynthesis of Synechocystis sp. Its inhibitory effects on photosystem II (PSII) of Synechocystis sp. were investigated by using a variety of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence tests. The inhibitory effects of amoxicillin on PSII activity of Synechocystis sp. are concentration-dependent. Amoxicillin exposure leads to slowing down of electron transport on both donor side and acceptor side and causes accumulation of P680{sup +}. Q{sub A}{sup -} reoxidation test revealed that amoxicillin hinders electron transfer from Q{sub A}{sup -} to Q{sub B}/Q{sub B}{sup -} and more Q{sub A}{sup -} is oxidized through S{sub 2}(Q{sub A}Q{sub B}){sup -} charge recombination. Analysis of PSII heterogeneity demonstrated that an exposure to amoxicillin increases the proportion of inactive PSII (PSII{sub X}) centers and the proportion of PSII centers with small antenna (PSII{beta}). These changes finally result in deterioration of full photosynthesis performance.

  14. NIST/ISAC standardization study: variability in assignment of intensity values to fluorescence standard beads and in cross calibration of standard beads to hard dyed beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert A; Wang, Lili; Bigos, Martin; Nolan, John P

    2012-09-01

    Results from a standardization study cosponsored by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are reported. The study evaluated the variability of assigning intensity values to fluorophore standard beads by bead manufacturers and the variability of cross calibrating the standard beads to stained polymer beads (hard-dyed beads) using different flow cytometers. Hard dyed beads are generally not spectrally matched to the fluorophores used to stain cells, and spectral response varies among flow cytometers. Thus if hard dyed beads are used as fluorescence calibrators, one expects calibration for specific fluorophores (e.g., FITC or PE) to vary among different instruments. Using standard beads surface-stained with specific fluorophores (FITC, PE, APC, and Pacific Blue™), the study compared the measured intensity of fluorophore standard beads to that of hard dyed beads through cross calibration on 133 different flow cytometers. Using robust CV as a measure of variability, the variation of cross calibrated values was typically 20% or more for a particular hard dyed bead in a specific detection channel. The variation across different instrument models was often greater than the variation within a particular instrument model. As a separate part of the study, NIST and four bead manufacturers used a NIST supplied protocol and calibrated fluorophore solution standards to assign intensity values to the fluorophore beads. Values assigned to the reference beads by different groups varied by orders of magnitude in most cases, reflecting differences in instrumentation used to perform the calibration. The study concluded that the use of any spectrally unmatched hard dyed bead as a general fluorescence calibrator must be verified and characterized for every particular instrument model. Close interaction between bead manufacturers and NIST is recommended to have reliable and uniformly assigned

  15. Differential heat sensitivity index in barley cultivars (Hordeum vulgare L.) monitored by chlorophyll a fluorescence OKJIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; El Madidi, Saïd; Strasser, Reto J

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to differentiate the heat tolerance in ten varieties of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) originating from Morocco. Five modern varieties and five landraces (local varieties) collected at five different geographical localities in the south of Morocco were investigated in the present study. After two weeks of growth, detached leaves were short term exposure to various temperatures (25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C) for 10 min in the dark. Two chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters derived from chlorophyll a fluorescence transient (OKJIP) (performance index (PIABS) and relative variable fluorescence at the K-step (VK)) were analysed. Heat treatment had a significant effect on the PIABS and VK at 45 °C treatment and the analysis of variance for PIABS and VK is highly significant between all varieties. The slope of the relationship between logPIABS and VK named heat sensitivity index (HSI) was used to evaluate the thermotolerance of photosystem II (PSII) between the studied barley varieties. According to this approach, barley varieties were screened and ranked for improving heat tolerance. HSI was found to be a new indicator with regard to distinguishing heat tolerance of different barley cultivars. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Bias correction by use of errors-in-variables regression models in studies with K-X-ray fluorescence bone lead measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor; Téllez-Rojo, Martha M; Angeles, Gustavo; Hernández-Ávila, Mauricio; Hu, Howard

    2011-01-01

    In-vivo measurement of bone lead by means of K-X-ray fluorescence (KXRF) is the preferred biological marker of chronic exposure to lead. Unfortunately, considerable measurement error associated with KXRF estimations can introduce bias in estimates of the effect of bone lead when this variable is included as the exposure in a regression model. Estimates of uncertainty reported by the KXRF instrument reflect the variance of the measurement error and, although they can be used to correct the measurement error bias, they are seldom used in epidemiological statistical analyzes. Errors-in-variables regression (EIV) allows for correction of bias caused by measurement error in predictor variables, based on the knowledge of the reliability of such variables. The authors propose a way to obtain reliability coefficients for bone lead measurements from uncertainty data reported by the KXRF instrument and compare, by the use of Monte Carlo simulations, results obtained using EIV regression models vs. those obtained by the standard procedures. Results of the simulations show that Ordinary Least Square (OLS) regression models provide severely biased estimates of effect, and that EIV provides nearly unbiased estimates. Although EIV effect estimates are more imprecise, their mean squared error is much smaller than that of OLS estimates. In conclusion, EIV is a better alternative than OLS to estimate the effect of bone lead when measured by KXRF. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spatial variability analysis of within-field winter wheat nitrogen and grain quality using canopy fluorescence sensor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat grain protein content (GPC) is a key component when evaluating wheat nutrition. It is also important to determine wheat GPC before harvest for agricultural and food process enterprises in order to optimize the wheat grading process. Wheat GPC across a field is spatially variable due to the inh...

  18. ALA-PpIX variability quantitatively imaged in A431 epidermoid tumors using in vivo ultrasound fluorescence tomography and ex vivo assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Gunn, Jason R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Anand, Sanjay; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Treatment monitoring of Aminolevunilic-acid (ALA) - Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) of basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) calls for superficial and subsurface imaging techniques. While superficial imagers exist for this purpose, their ability to assess PpIX levels in thick lesions is poor; additionally few treatment centers have the capability to measure ALA-induced PpIX production. An area of active research is to improve treatments to deeper and nodular BCCs, because treatment is least effective in these. The goal of this work was to understand the logistics and technical capabilities to quantify PpIX at depths over 1mm, using a novel hybrid ultrasound-guided, fiber-based fluorescence molecular spectroscopictomography system. This system utilizes a 633nm excitation laser and detection using filtered spectrometers. Source and detection fibers are collinear so that their imaging plane matches that of ultrasound transducer. Validation with phantoms and tumor-simulating fluorescent inclusions in mice showed sensitivity to fluorophore concentrations as low as 0.025μg/ml at 4mm depth from surface, as presented in previous years. Image-guided quantification of ALA-induced PpIX production was completed in subcutaneous xenograft epidermoid cancer tumor model A431 in nude mice. A total of 32 animals were imaged in-vivo, using several time points, including pre-ALA, 4-hours post-ALA, and 24-hours post-ALA administration. On average, PpIX production in tumors increased by over 10-fold, 4-hours post-ALA. Statistical analysis of PpIX fluorescence showed significant difference among all groups; p<0.05. Results were validated by exvivo imaging of resected tumors. Details of imaging, analysis and results will be presented to illustrate variability and the potential for imaging these values at depth.

  19. An explanation for the inter-species variability of the photoprotective non-photochemical chlorophyll fluorescence quenching in diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaud, Johann; Lepetit, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Diatoms are a major group of microalgae whose photosynthetic productivity supports a substantial part of the aquatic primary production. In their natural environment they have to cope with strong fluctuations of the light climate which can be harmful for photosynthesis. In order to prevent the damage of their photosynthetic machinery, diatoms use fast regulatory processes among which the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll a fluorescence (NPQ) is one of the most important. In a previous work, we highlighted differences in the kinetics and extent of NPQ between diatom species/strains originating from different aquatic habitats. We proposed that the NPQ differences observed between strains/species could potentially participate to their ecophysiological adaptation to the light environment of their respective natural habitat. In order to better understand the molecular bases of such differences, we compared the NPQ features of four strains/species of diatoms known for their NPQ discrepancy. We could identify new spectroscopic fingerprints concomitant to NPQ and the related xanthophyll cycle. These fingerprints helped us propose a molecular explanation for the NPQ differences observed between the diatom species/strains examined. The present work further strengthens the potential role of NPQ in the ecophysiology of diatoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Basin-scale spatio-temporal variability and control of phytoplankton photosynthesis in the Baltic Sea: The first multiwavelength fast repetition rate fluorescence study operated on a ship-of-opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houliez, Emilie; Simis, Stefan; Nenonen, Susanna; Ylöstalo, Pasi; Seppälä, Jukka

    2017-05-01

    This study presents the results of the first field application of a flow-through multi-wavelength Fast Repetition Rate fluorometer (FRRF) equipped with two excitation channels (458 and 593 nm). This device aims to improve the measurement of mixed cyanobacteria and algae community's photosynthetic parameters and was designed to be easily incorporated into existing ferrybox systems. We present a spatiotemporal analysis of the maximum photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and functional absorption cross section (σPSII) recorded from April to August 2014 on a ship-of-opportunity commuting twice per week between Helsinki (Finland) and Travemünde (Germany). Temporal variations of Fv/Fm and σPSII differed between areas of the Baltic Sea. However, even though the Baltic Sea is characterized by several physico-chemical gradients, no gradient was observed in Fv/Fm and σPSII spatial distribution suggesting complex interactions between biotic and abiotic controls. σPSII was sensitive to phytoplankton seasonal succession and thus differed according to the wavelength used to excite photosystems II (PSII) pigments. This was particularly true in summer when high σPSII(593) values were observed later and longer than high σPSII(458) values, reflecting the role of cyanobacteria in photosynthetic light uptake measured at community scale. In contrast, Fv/Fm variations were similar after excitation at 458 nm or 593 nm suggesting that the adjustment of Fv/Fm in response to environmental factors was similar for the different groups (algae vs. cyanobacteria) present within the phytoplankton community.

  1. Fluorescent protein-mediated colour polymorphism in reef corals: multicopy genes extend the adaptation/acclimatization potential to variable light environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittins, John R; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Oswald, Franz; Edwards, Richard J; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The genomic framework that enables corals to adjust to unfavourable conditions is crucial for coral reef survival in a rapidly changing climate. We have explored the striking intraspecific variability in the expression of coral pigments from the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family to elucidate the genomic basis for the plasticity of stress responses among reef corals. We show that multicopy genes can greatly increase the dynamic range over which corals can modulate transcript levels in response to the light environment. Using the red fluorescent protein amilFP597 in the coral Acropora millepora as a model, we demonstrate that its expression increases with light intensity, but both the minimal and maximal gene transcript levels vary markedly among colour morphs. The pigment concentration in the tissue of different morphs is strongly correlated with the number of gene copies with a particular promoter type. These findings indicate that colour polymorphism in reef corals can be caused by the environmentally regulated expression of multicopy genes. High-level expression of amilFP597 is correlated with reduced photodamage of zooxanthellae under acute light stress, supporting a photoprotective function of this pigment. The cluster of light-regulated pigment genes can enable corals to invest either in expensive high-level pigmentation, offering benefits under light stress, or to rely on low tissue pigment concentrations and use the conserved resources for other purposes, which is preferable in less light-exposed environments. The genomic framework described here allows corals to pursue different strategies to succeed in habitats with highly variable light stress levels. In summary, our results suggest that the intraspecific plasticity of reef corals' stress responses is larger than previously thought. © 2014 The Authors Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Hyperspectral Reflectance and Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Scab Induced Stress in Apple Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Keulemans

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Apple scab causes significant losses in the production of this fruit. A timely and more site-specific monitoring and spraying of the disease could reduce the number of applications of fungicides in the fruit industry. The aim of this leaf-scale study therefore lies in the early detection of apple scab infections in a non-invasive and non-destructive way. In order to attain this objective, fluorescence- and hyperspectral imaging techniques were used. An experiment was conducted under controlled environmental conditions, linking hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging measurements to scab infection symptoms in a susceptible apple cultivar (Malus x domestica Borkh. cv. Braeburn. Plant stress was induced by inoculation of the apple plants with scab spores. The quantum efficiency of Photosystem II (PSII photochemistry was derived from fluorescence images of leaves under light adapted conditions. Leaves inoculated with scab spores were expected to have lower PSII quantum efficiency than control (mock leaves. However, besides scab-induced, also immature leaves exhibited low PSII quantum efficiency. Therefore, this study recommends the simultaneous use of fluorescence imaging and hyperspectral techniques. A shortwave infrared narrow-waveband ratio index (R1480/R2135 is presented in this paper as a promising tool to identify scab stress before symptoms become visible to the naked eye. Low PSII quantum efficiency attended by low narrow waveband R1480/R2135 index values points out scab stress in an early stage. Apparent high PSII quantum efficiency together with high overall reflectance in VIS and SWIR spectral domains indicate a severe, well-developed scab infection.

  3. Quantitative Estimation of Fluorescence Parameters for Crop Leaves with Bayesian Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, backward and forward fluorescence radiance within the emission spectrum of 640–850 nm were measured for leaves of soybean, cotton, peanut and wheat using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer coupled with an integration sphere. Fluorescence parameters of crop leaves were retrieved from the leaf hyperspectral measurements by inverting the FluorMODleaf model, a leaf-level fluorescence model able to simulate chlorophyll fluorescence spectra for both sides of leaves. This model is based on the widely used and validated PROSPECT (leaf optical properties model. Firstly, a sensitivity analysis of the FluorMODleaf model was performed to identify and quantify influential parameters to assist the strategy for the inversion. Implementation of the Extended Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (EFAST method showed that the leaf chlorophyll content and the fluorescence lifetimes of photosystem I (PSI and photosystem II (PSII were the most sensitive parameters among all eight inputs of the FluorMODleaf model. Based on results of sensitivity analysis, the FluorMODleaf model was inverted using the leaf fluorescence spectra measured from both sides of crop leaves. In order to achieve stable inversion results, the Bayesian inference theory was applied. The relative absorption cross section of PSI and PSII and the fluorescence lifetimes of PSI and PSII of the FluorMODleaf model were retrieved with the Bayesian inversion approach. Results showed that the coefficient of determination (R2 and root mean square error (RMSE between the fluorescence signal reconstructed from the inverted fluorescence parameters and measured in the experiment were 0.96 and 3.14 × 10−6 W·m−2·sr−1·nm−1, respectively, for backward fluorescence, and 0.92 and 3.84 × 10−6 W·m−2·sr−1·nm−1 for forward fluorescence. Based on results, the inverted values of the fluorescence parameters were analyzed, and the potential of this method was investigated.

  4. The Impact of Different Water Regime on Chlorophyll Fluorescence of Pyrus pyraster L. and Sorbus domestica L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Šajbidorová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The water deficit is considered to be significant cause of photosynthesis defects. Measuring of chlorophyll fluorescence is one of the methods revealing defects in the photosynthetic apparatus. The experiment was established with two woody plant (Pyrus pyraster L. and Sorbus domestica L. cultivated in two different regimes of the substrate saturation. The measurement of the modulated fluorescence of chlorophyll a was done by FMS1 fluorometer during three-week period between June and September (2012 and 2013. There were analysed selected parameters of chlorophyll fluorescence: Fv/Fm – maximum quantum efficiency of PSII, ΦPSII – effective quantum yield of PSII and RFD – chlorophyll fluorescence decrease ratio. According to the obtained results, Pyrus pyraster has probably higher potential for adaptation to water deficiency. There were recorded the significant decreases mainly in the values of parameter RFD and ΦPSII for Sorbus domestica within duration of experiment with different water regime in both growing seasons 2012 and 2013. The results document a weak sensitivity of the parameter Fv/Fm on changes in the amount of available water in the substrate in both taxa.

  5. Effects of salinity and nutrients on the growth and chlorophyll fluorescence of Caulerpa lentillifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui; Yao, Jianting; Sun, Zhongmin; Duan, Delin

    2015-03-01

    Caulerpa lentillifera is a green algae that distributes worldwide and is cultivated for food. We assessed vegetative propagation of C. lentillifera by measuring the specific growth rate (SGR) and chlorophyll fluorescence of the green algae cultured at different salinities and nutrient levels. The results indicated that C. lentillifera can survive in salinities ranging from 20 to 50, and can develop at salinities of 30 to 40. The maximum SGR for C. lentillifera occurred at a salinity of 35. Both chlorophyll content and the ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence ( F v/ F m) were also at a maximum at a salinity of 35. Photosynthesis was inhibited in salinities greater than 45 and less than 25. Both the maximum SGR and maximum chlorophyll content were found in algae treated with a concentration of 0.5 mmol/L of NO3-N and 0.1 mmol/L of PO4-P. The photosynthetic capacity of photosystem II (PSII) was inhibited in cultures of C. lentillifera at high nutrient levels. This occurred when NO3-N concentrations were greater than 1.0 mmol/L and when PO4-P concentrations were at 0.4 mmol/L. As there is strong need for large-scale cultivation of C. lentillifera, these data contribute important information to ensure optimal results.

  6. Establishment of integrated protocols for automated high throughput kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschiersch, Henning; Junker, Astrid; Meyer, Rhonda C; Altmann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Automated plant phenotyping has been established as a powerful new tool in studying plant growth, development and response to various types of biotic or abiotic stressors. Respective facilities mainly apply non-invasive imaging based methods, which enable the continuous quantification of the dynamics of plant growth and physiology during developmental progression. However, especially for plants of larger size, integrative, automated and high throughput measurements of complex physiological parameters such as photosystem II efficiency determined through kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence analysis remain a challenge. We present the technical installations and the establishment of experimental procedures that allow the integrated high throughput imaging of all commonly determined PSII parameters for small and large plants using kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence imaging systems (FluorCam, PSI) integrated into automated phenotyping facilities (Scanalyzer, LemnaTec). Besides determination of the maximum PSII efficiency, we focused on implementation of high throughput amenable protocols recording PSII operating efficiency (ΦPSII). Using the presented setup, this parameter is shown to be reproducibly measured in differently sized plants despite the corresponding variation in distance between plants and light source that caused small differences in incident light intensity. Values of ΦPSII obtained with the automated chlorophyll fluorescence imaging setup correlated very well with conventionally determined data using a spot-measuring chlorophyll fluorometer. The established high throughput operating protocols enable the screening of up to 1080 small and 184 large plants per hour, respectively. The application of the implemented high throughput protocols is demonstrated in screening experiments performed with large Arabidopsis and maize populations assessing natural variation in PSII efficiency. The incorporation of imaging systems suitable for kinetic chlorophyll

  7. Space-borne Chlorophyll Fluorescence, Greenness, Vegetation Models and Interannual Variability of Photosynthetic Activity: Spatio-temporal Patterns, Mechanisms, and Environmental Sensitivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, S.; Guanter, L.; Jung, M.; Frankenberg, C.; Sun, Y.; Forkel, M.; Zhang, Y.; Duveiller, G.; Cescatti, A.; Camps-Valls, G.; Köhler, P.

    2016-12-01

    It is much debated whether respiration or photosynthesis drive net ecosystem productivity andwhich regions contribute strongest to the observed interannual variability (IAV) of the strengthof the land sink. Several studies point to photosynthetic productivity in semi-arid regions as avery important factor influencing atmospheric CO2 variability globally (e.g. Jung et al., 2011;Poulter et al., 2014; Ahlstr ̈ om et al., 2015). Here, we aim at a comprehensive comparison ofthe strength, timing and spatial extent of anomalies of photosynthesis as they are indicated bysatellite observations of greenness, vegetation optical depth, and sun-induced chlorophyll fluo-rescence (SIF). We will compare them to the results of diagnostic, empirical and process-basedvegetation models. Except for the evergreen tropics, the spatio-temporal patterns of monthlydominant vegetation variability are generally consistently shown in semi-arid areas, albeit withdiffering magnitudes between greenness and photosynthesis globally. Relative anomalies (to themean seasonal cycle) are particularly widespread in high northern latitudes. Further researchsteps will include i) the repeated analysis at higher temporal resolution to better refine the dif-ferent time scales of reaction between light-use-efficiency and APAR and between forestedand non-forested ecosystems, ii) investigate on characteristic time scales at which the proxies(dis-)agree and why, iii) study the relative contributions of anomalies in peak and length of thegrowing season to IAV (similar to Xia et al., 2015; Zhou et al., 2016), iv) analyse the proxiesfor possibly differing hydrological sensitivities, and v) vegetation models have long been knownto have very diverse abilities to capture GPP IAV. Our preliminary results confirm this and wewill further study possible limitations and possible ways for improvement of the simulations.

  8. The Effect of Field Dodder (Cuscuta campestris Yunck. on Morphological and Fluorescence Parameters of Giant Ragweed (Ambrosia trifida L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sava Vrbničanin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the parasitic flowering plant known as field dodder (Cuscuta campestrisYunck. on morphological and fluorescence parameters of infested giant ragweed(Ambrosia trifida L. plants was examined under controlled conditions. The parameters ofchlorophyll fluorescence (Fo, Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, Fv, Fm, ETR and IF were measured on infested (Iand non-infested (N A. trifida plants over a period of seven days, beginning with the day ofinfestation. Morphological parameters (plant height, dry and fresh weight were measuredon the last day of fluorescence measurements. C. campestris was found to affect the height,fresh and dry weight of the infested A. trifida plants, causing significant reduction in plantheight and dry weight. Field dodder also affected several parameters of chlorophyll fluorescence(Fo, Fv/Fm, ΦPSII and Fv in infested A. trifida plants.

  9. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. "Batavia" (green) and cv. "Lollo Rossa" (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m(-2) s(-1) for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent.

  10. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theoharis eOuzounis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. ’Batavia’ (green and cv. ‘Lollo Rossa’ (red] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T lamps yielding 90 (±10 µmol m-2 s-1 for up to 20 hr, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED light treatments were Control (no blue addition, 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 µmol m-2 s-1 from 06:00 to 08:00, 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 µmol m-2 s-1 from 21:00 to 08:00, 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 µmol m-2 s-1 from 17:00 to 19:00, and (1B 17-19 Blue at 45 µmol m-2 s-1from 17:00 to 19:00. Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent.

  11. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. “Batavia” (green) and cv. “Lollo Rossa” (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m−2 s−1 for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m−2 s−1 from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent. PMID:25767473

  12. Merging Structural Information from X-ray Crystallography, Quantum Chemistry, and EXAFS Spectra: The Oxygen-Evolving Complex in PSII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Rossini, Emanuele; Galstyan, Artur; Dau, Holger; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2016-10-12

    Structural data of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II (PSII) determined by X-ray crystallography, quantum chemistry (QC), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses are presently inconsistent. Therefore, a detailed study of what information can be gained about the OEC through a comparison of QC and crystallographic structure information combined with the information from range-extended EXAFS spectra was undertaken. An analysis for determining the precision of the atomic coordinates of the OEC by QC is carried out. OEC model structures based on crystallographic data that are obtained by QC from different research groups are compared with one another and with structures obtained by high-resolution crystallography. The theory of EXAFS spectra is summarized, and the application of EXAFS spectra to the experimental determination of the structure of the OEC is detailed. We discriminate three types of parameters entering the formula for the EXAFS spectrum: (1) model-independent, predefined, and fixed; (2) model-dependent that can be computed or adjusted; and (3) model-dependent that must be adjusted. The information content of EXAFS spectra is estimated and is related to the precision of atomic coordinates and resolution power to discriminate different atom-pair distances of the OEC. It is demonstrated how a precise adjustment of atomic coordinates can yield a nearly perfect representation of the experimental OEC EXAFS spectrum, but at the expense of overfitting and losing the knowledge of the initial OEC model structure. Introducing a novel type of penalty function, it is shown that moderate adjustment of atomic coordinates to the EXAFS spectrum limited by constraints avoids overfitting and can be used to validate different OEC model structures. This technique is used to identify the OEC model structures whose computed OEC EXAFS spectra agree best with the measured spectrum. In this way, the most likely S-state and protonation pattern

  13. Relationships between PSII-independent hydrogen bioproduction and starch metabolism as evidenced from isolation of starch catabolism mutants in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochois, Vincent; Constans, Laure; Beyly, Audrey; Soliveres, Melanie; Peltier, Gilles; Cournac, Laurent [CEA, DSV, IBEB, Laboratoire de Bioenergetique et Biotechnologie des Bacteries and Microalgues, Saint Paul Lez Durance, F-13108 (France); CNRS, UMR Biologie Vegetale and Microbiologie Environnementales, Saint Paul lez Durance, F-13108 (France); Aix-Marseille Universite, Saint Paul lez Durance, F-13108 (France); Dauvillee, David; Ball, Steven [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); USTL, UGSF, F-59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); CNRS, UMR 8576, F-59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2010-10-15

    Sulfur deprivation, which is considered as an efficient way to trigger long-term hydrogen photoproduction in unicellular green algae has two major effects: a decrease in PSII which allows anaerobiosis to be reached and carbohydrate (starch) storage. Starch metabolism has been proposed as one of the major factors of hydrogen production, particularly during the PSII-independent (or indirect) pathway. While starch biosynthesis has been characterized in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, little remains known concerning starch degradation. In order to gain a better understanding of starch catabolism pathways and identify those steps likely to limit the starch-dependent hydrogen production, we have designed a genetic screening procedure aimed at isolating mutants of the green alga C. reinhardtii affected in starch mobilization. Using two different screening protocols, the first one based on aerobic starch degradation in the dark and the second one on anaerobic starch degradation in the light, eighteen mutants were isolated among a library of 15,000 insertion mutants, eight (std1-8) with the first screen and ten (sda1-10) with the second. Most of the mutant strains isolated in this study showed a reduction or a delay in the PSII-independent hydrogen production. Further characterization of these mutants should allow the identification of molecular determinants of starch-dependent hydrogen production and supply targets for future biotechnological improvements. (author)

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...... the foundations of the fluorescence phenomenon, introduces some general methodologies and provides selected examples on applications focused to disentangle structural and dynamical aspects of biological processes....

  15. Disentangling two non-photochemical quenching processes in Cyclotella meneghiniana by spectrally-resolved picosecond fluorescence at 77K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukhutsina, Volha U; Büchel, Claudia; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2014-06-01

    Diatoms, which are primary producers in the oceans, can rapidly switch on/off efficient photoprotection to respond to fast light-intensity changes in moving waters. The corresponding thermal dissipation of excess-absorbed-light energy can be observed as non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll a fluorescence. Fluorescence-induction measurements on Cyclotella meneghiniana diatoms show two NPQ processes: qE1 relaxes rapidly in the dark while qE2 remains present upon switching to darkness and is related to the presence of the xanthophyll-cycle pigment diatoxanthin (Dtx). We performed picosecond fluorescence measurements on cells locked in different (quenching) states, revealing the following sequence of events during full development of NPQ. At first, trimers of light-harvesting complexes (fucoxanthin-chlorophyll a/c proteins), or FCPa, become quenched, while being part of photosystem II (PSII), due to the induced pH gradient across the thylakoid membrane. This is followed by (partial) detachment of FCPa from PSII after which quenching persists. The pH gradient also causes the formation of Dtx which leads to further quenching of isolated PSII cores and some aggregated FCPa. In subsequent darkness, the pH gradient disappears but Dtx remains present and quenching partly pertains. Only in the presence of some light the system completely recovers to the unquenched state. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis: a guide to good practice and understanding some new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, E H; Lawson, T

    2013-10-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence is a non-invasive measurement of photosystem II (PSII) activity and is a commonly used technique in plant physiology. The sensitivity of PSII activity to abiotic and biotic factors has made this a key technique not only for understanding the photosynthetic mechanisms but also as a broader indicator of how plants respond to environmental change. This, along with low cost and ease of collecting data, has resulted in the appearance of a large array of instrument types for measurement and calculated parameters which can be bewildering for the new user. Moreover, its accessibility can lead to misuse and misinterpretation when the underlying photosynthetic processes are not fully appreciated. This review is timely because it sits at a point of renewed interest in chlorophyll fluorescence where fast measurements of photosynthetic performance are now required for crop improvement purposes. Here we help the researcher make choices in terms of protocols using the equipment and expertise available, especially for field measurements. We start with a basic overview of the principles of fluorescence analysis and provide advice on best practice for taking pulse amplitude-modulated measurements. We also discuss a number of emerging techniques for contemporary crop and ecology research, where we see continual development and application of analytical techniques to meet the new challenges that have arisen in recent years. We end the review by briefly discussing the emerging area of monitoring fluorescence, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, field phenotyping, and remote sensing of crops for yield and biomass enhancement.

  17. C lostridium difficile surface proteins are anchored to the cell wall using CWB2 motifs that recognise the anionic polymer PSII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willing, Stephanie E.; Candela, Thomas; Shaw, Helen Alexandra; Seager, Zoe; Mesnage, Stéphane; Fagan, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gram‐positive surface proteins can be covalently or non‐covalently anchored to the cell wall and can impart important properties on the bacterium in respect of cell envelope organisation and interaction with the environment. We describe here a mechanism of protein anchoring involving tandem CWB2 motifs found in a large number of cell wall proteins in the Firmicutes. In the Clostridium difficile cell wall protein family, we show the three tandem repeats of the CWB2 motif are essential for correct anchoring to the cell wall. CWB2 repeats are non‐identical and cannot substitute for each other, as shown by the secretion into the culture supernatant of proteins containing variations in the patterns of repeats. A conserved Ile Leu Leu sequence within the CWB2 repeats is essential for correct anchoring, although a preceding proline residue is dispensable. We propose a likely genetic locus encoding synthesis of the anionic polymer PSII and, using RNA knock‐down of key genes, reveal subtle effects on cell wall composition. We show that the anionic polymer PSII binds two cell wall proteins, SlpA and Cwp2, and these interactions require the CWB2 repeats, defining a new mechanism of protein anchoring in Gram‐positive bacteria. PMID:25649385

  18. Structured near-infrared Magnetic Circular Dichroism spectra of the Mn4CaO5 cluster of PSII in T. vulcanus are dominated by Mn(IV) d-d 'spin-flip' transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Jennifer; Chrysina, Maria; Craig, Vincent S J; Akita, Fusamichi; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cox, Nicholas; Shen, Jian-Ren; Krausz, Elmars

    2018-02-01

    Photosystem II passes through four metastable S-states in catalysing light-driven water oxidation. Variable temperature variable field (VTVH) Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) spectra in PSII of Thermosynochococcus (T.) vulcanus for each S-state are reported. These spectra, along with assignments, provide a new window into the electronic and magnetic structure of Mn4CaO5. VTVH MCD spectra taken in the S2 state provide a clear g=2, S=1/2 paramagnetic characteristic, which is entirely consistent with that known by EPR. The three features, seen as positive (+) at 749nm, negative (-) at 773nm and (+) at 808nm are assigned as 4A→2E spin-flips within the d3 configuration of the Mn(IV) centres present. This assignment is supported by comparison(s) to spin-flips seen in a range of Mn(IV) materials. S3 exhibits a more intense (-) MCD peak at 764nm and has a stronger MCD saturation characteristic. This S3 MCD saturation behaviour can be accurately modelled using parameters taken directly from analyses of EPR spectra. We see no evidence for Mn(III) d-d absorption in the near-IR of any S-state. We suggest that Mn(IV)-based absorption may be responsible for the well-known near-IR induced changes induced in S2 EPR spectra of T. vulcanus and not Mn(III)-based, as has been commonly assumed. Through an analysis of the nephelauxetic effect, the excitation energy of S-state dependent spin-flips seen may help identify coordination characteristics and changes at each Mn(IV). A prospectus as to what more detailed S-state dependent MCD studies promise to achieve is outlined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescence technique for on-line monitoring of state of hydrogen-producing microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Michael; Makarova, Valeriya; Tsygankov, Anatoly A.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2007-06-12

    In situ fluorescence method to monitor state of sulfur-deprived algal culture's ability to produce H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion, comprising: a) providing sulfur-deprived algal culture; b) illuminating culture; c) measuring onset of H.sub.2 percentage in produced gas phase at multiple times to ascertain point immediately after anerobiosis to obtain H.sub.2 data as function of time; and d) determining any abrupt change in three in situ fluorescence parameters; i) increase in F.sub.t (steady-state level of chlorophyll fluorescence in light adapted cells); ii) decrease in F.sub.m', (maximal saturating light induced fluorescence level in light adapted cells); and iii) decrease in .DELTA.F/F.sub.m'=(F.sub.m'-F.sub.t)/F.sub.m' (calculated photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) signaling full reduction of plastoquinone pool between PSII and PSI, which indicates start of anaerobic conditions that induces synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme for subsequent H.sub.2 production that signal oxidation of plastoquinone pool asmain factor to regulate H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion.

  20. Photosystem II-cyclic electron flow powers exceptional photoprotection and record growth in the microalga Chlorella ohadii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Kaplan, Aaron; Dismukes, G Charles

    2017-11-01

    The desert microalga Chlorella ohadii was reported to grow at extreme light intensities with minimal photoinhibition, tolerate frequent de/re-hydrations, yet minimally employs antenna-based non-photochemical quenching for photoprotection. Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms by measuring Photosystem II charge separation yield (chlorophyll variable fluorescence, Fv/Fm) and flash-induced O2 yield to measure the contributions from both linear (PSII-LEF) and cyclic (PSII-CEF) electron flow within PSII. Cells grow increasingly faster at higher light intensities (μE/m2/s) from low (20) to high (200) to extreme (2000) by escalating photoprotection via shifting from PSII-LEF to PSII-CEF. This shifts PSII charge separation from plastoquinone reduction (PSII-LEF) to plastoquinol oxidation (PSII-CEF), here postulated to enable proton gradient and ATP generation that powers photoprotection. Low light-grown cells have unusually small antennae (332 Chl/PSII), use mainly PSII-LEF (95%) and convert 40% of PSII charge separations into O2 (a high O2 quantum yield of 0.06mol/mol PSII/flash). High light-grown cells have smaller antenna and lower PSII-LEF (63%). Extreme light-grown cells have only 42 Chl/PSII (no LHCII antenna), minimal PSII-LEF (10%), and grow faster than any known phototroph (doubling time 1.3h). Adding a synthetic quinone in excess to supplement the PQ pool fully uncouples PSII-CEF from its natural regulation and produces maximum PSII-LEF. Upon dark adaptation PSII-LEF rapidly reverts to PSII-CEF, a transient protection mechanism to conserve water and minimize the cost of antenna biosynthesis. The capacity of the electron acceptor pool (plastoquinone pool), and the characteristic times for exchange of (PQH2)B with PQpool and reoxidation of (PQH2)pool were determined. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Influence of temperature on properties of nitrogen plasma source ion implantation (N-PSII) of Ti6A14V alloy

    CERN Document Server

    Geng Man; Zhao Qing

    2001-01-01

    Specimens of Ti6Al4V alloy were implanted with nitrogen plasma source ion implantation (N-PSII) at temperatures between 100 degree C and 600 degree C to a ion dose of 4 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was used to determine the nitrogen concentration depth profiles. Microhardness measurements and pin-on-disk wear test were performed to evaluate the improvements of the surface modification. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) was employed to determine the phases presented in the surface modified layer. The thickness of implanted layer increased by about an order of magnitude when the temperature was elevated from 100 degree C to 600 degree C. Higher surface hardness and wear resistance was also obtained at higher temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed distinct microstructural changes and the presence of titanium nitrides in the implanted surface

  2. Chlorophyll fluorescence emission as a reporter on cold tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Anamika; Mishra, Kumud B; Höermiller, Imke I; Heyer, Arnd G; Nedbal, Ladislav

    2011-02-01

    Non-invasive, high-throughput screening methods are valuable tools in breeding for abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Optical signals such as chlorophyll fluorescence emission can be instrumental in developing new screening techniques. In order to examine the potential of chlorophyll fluorescence to reveal plant tolerance to low temperatures, we used a collection of nine Arabidopsis thaliana accessions and compared their fluorescence features with cold tolerance quantified by the well established electrolyte leakage method on detached leaves. We found that, during progressive cooling, the minimal chlorophyll fluorescence emission rose strongly and that this rise was highly dependent on the cold tolerance of the accessions. Maximum quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and steady state fluorescence normalized to minimal fluorescence were also highly correlated to the cold tolerance measured by the electrolyte leakage method. In order to further increase the capacity of the fluorescence detection to reveal the low temperature tolerance, we applied combinatorial imaging that employs plant classification based on multiple fluorescence features. We found that this method, by including the resolving power of several fluorescence features, can be well employed to detect cold tolerance already at mild sub-zero temperatures. Therefore, there is no need to freeze the screened plants to the largely damaging temperatures of around -15°C. This, together with the method's easy applicability, represents a major advantage of the fluorescence technique over the conventional electrolyte leakage method. 

  3. On measuring the response of mesophyll conductance to carbon dioxide with the variable J method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Matthew Edmund; Pou, Alícia; Zwieniecki, Maciej Andrzej; Holbrook, N Michele

    2012-01-01

    The response of mesophyll conductance to CO(2) (g(m)) to environmental variation is a challenging parameter to measure with current methods. The 'variable J' technique, used in the majority of studies of g(m), assumes a one-to-one relationship between photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence and photosynthesis under non-photorespiratory conditions. When calibrating this relationship for Populus trichocarpa, it was found that calibration relationships produced using variation in light and CO(2) were not equivalent, and in all cases the relationships were non-linear-something not accounted for in previous studies. Detailed analyses were performed of whether different calibration procedures affect the observed g(m) response to CO(2). Past linear and assumed calibration methods resulted in systematic biases in the fluorescence estimates of electron transport. A sensitivity analysis on modelled data (where g(m) was held constant) demonstrated that biases in the estimation of electron transport as small as 2% (∼0.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) resulted in apparent changes in the relationship of g(m) to CO(2) of similar shape and magnitude to those observed with past calibration techniques. This sensitivity to biases introduced during calibrations leads to results where g(m) artefactually decreases with CO(2), assuming that g(m) is constant; if g(m) responds to CO(2), then biases associated with past calibration methods would lead to overestimates of the slope of the relationship. Non-linear calibrations were evaluated; these removed the bias present in past calibrations, but the method remained sensitive to measurement errors. Thus measurement errors, calibration non-linearities leading to bias, and the sensitivity of variable J g(m) hinders its use under conditions of varying CO(2) or light.

  4. Impact of Drought, Heat, and Their Combination on Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Yield of Wild Barley (Hordeum spontaneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Jedmowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of (long-term drought acclimation and (short-term heat stress and their combination on fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction curves (OJIP and grain yield was tested using pot-grown plants of wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum originating from Northern Egypt. Concerning agronomic traits, the main effect of drought was decreased biomass accumulation and grain yield, while heat specifically affected floral development. The treatments caused specific inhibitions of photosystem II (PSII functionality. While heat stressed plants showed a reduction of maximum quantum efficiency of PSII (φP0, an indication of effects on oxygen evolving complex (OEC functionality, and the connectivity of PSII units, these features were entirely missing in drought acclimated plants. Drought caused a reduction of the Performance Index (PIabs and of the relative amplitude of the IP-phase of the OJIP induction curve (ΔVIP. Individuals suffering from a combination of drought and heat showed a better ability to recover photosynthetic electron transport after the relief of stress in comparison to heat stressed plants. However, this improved capacity to recover was not accompanied by an increased grain yield. Thus, we conclude that chlorophyll fluorescence measurements provide valuable physiological data; however, their use in agronomic studies for the prediction of agronomic traits should be done with some precaution.

  5. Microspatial variability in community structure and photophysiology of calcified macroalgal microbiomes revealed by coupling of hyperspectral and high-resolution fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R. G.; Williamson, C. J.; Brodie, J.; Barillé, L.; Launeau, P.; Lavaud, J.; Yallop, M. L.; Jesus, B.

    2016-02-01

    Calcifying coralline macroalgae provide biogenic habitats colonised by epiphytic microalgae that contribute significantly to community productivity. Georeferenced hyperspectral and high-resolution fluorescence imaging were coupled to microspatially mapped community composition and relative biomass of macroalgal host and epiphyte microalgal groups, and their weighted contributions to productivity within host fronds of Corallina officinalis on upper and lower zones of a rocky shore were determined. Lower shore epiphytes were dominated by filamentous diatoms (Bacillariophyta), confined to the apex of the frond structure, which were low light acclimated but retained a high capacity for photoprotective down regulation and contributed up to 51% of total community productivity. Upper shore epiphytes were dominated by green algae (Chlorophyta) and single-celled diatoms (principally Cocconeis spp.), which were high light acclimated but present at far lower relative biomass and contributed negligibly to productivity. The host, C. officinalis was the main primary producer. Variation in light environment resulting from differences in shore height and shading within the host macroalga, likely play a large role in determining patterns in epiphyte community structure, biomass and productivity observed. Additionally, microspatial gradients in photophysiological parameters along the host macroalga likely resulted from age-dependent variation in pigments as well as the gradient in light environment.

  6. Characterization of thylakoid membrane in a heterocystous cyanobacterium and green alga with dual-detector fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy with a systematic change of incident laser power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozue, Shuho; Mukuno, Akira; Tsuda, Yumi; Shiina, Takashi; Terazima, Masahide; Kumazaki, Shigeichi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been applied to plants, algae and cyanobacteria, in which excitation laser conditions affect the chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime due to several mechanisms. However, the dependence of FLIM data on input laser power has not been quantitatively explained by absolute excitation probabilities under actual imaging conditions. In an effort to distinguish between photosystem I and photosystem II (PSI and PSII) in microscopic images, we have obtained dependence of FLIM data on input laser power from a filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis and single cellular green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Nitrogen-fixing cells in A. variabilis, heterocysts, are mostly visualized as cells in which short-lived fluorescence (≤0.1 ns) characteristic of PSI is predominant. The other cells in A. variabilis (vegetative cells) and P. kessleri cells show a transition in the status of PSII from an open state with the maximal charge separation rate at a weak excitation limit to a closed state in which charge separation is temporarily prohibited by previous excitation(s) at a relatively high laser power. This transition is successfully reproduced by a computer simulation with a high fidelity to the actual imaging conditions. More details in the fluorescence from heterocysts were examined to assess possible functions of PSII in the anaerobic environment inside the heterocysts for the nitrogen-fixing enzyme, nitrogenase. Photochemically active PSII:PSI ratio in heterocysts is tentatively estimated to be typically below our detection limit or at most about 5% in limited heterocysts in comparison with that in vegetative cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative study of the water oxidizing reactions and the millisecond delayed chlorophyll fluorescence in photosystem II at different pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, Ralphreed; Aliyeva, Samira; Arao, Sachiko; Ismailova, Aygun; Katsuta, Nobuhiro; Kitade, Hidetoshi; Yamada, Shuji; Kawamori, Asako; Mamedov, Fikret

    2007-02-01

    Water splitting activity, the multiline EPR signal associated with S(2)-state of the CaMn(4)-cluster and the fast and slow phases of the induction curve of the millisecond delayed chlorophyll fluorescence from photosystem II (PSII) in the pH range of 4.5-8.5 were studied in the thylakoid membranes and purified PSII particles. It has been found that O(2) evolution and the multiline EPR signal were inhibited at acidic (pK approximately 5.3) and alkaline (pK approximately 8.1) pH values, and were maximal at pH 6.0-7.0. Our results indicate that the loss of O(2) evolution and the S(2)-state multiline EPR signal associated with the decrease of the millisecond delayed chlorophyll fluorescence only in alkaline region (pH 7.0-8.5). Possible correlations of the millisecond delayed chlorophyll fluorescence components with the donor side reactions in PSII are discussed.

  8. Dissipation of excess excitation energy by drought-induced nonphotochemical quenching in two species of drought-tolerant moss: desiccation-induced acceleration of photosystem II fluorescence decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hisanori; Itoh, Shigeru

    2013-07-02

    Drought-tolerant mosses survive with their green color intact even after long periods of dehydration that would kill ordinary plants. The mechanism of dissipation of excitation energy under drought stress was studied in two species of drought-tolerant moss, Rhytidium rugosum and Ceratodon purpureus. They showed severe quenching of photosystem II chlorophyll fluorescence (PSII) after being dehydrated in the dark. Quenching was induced by the acceleration of the fluorescence decay rate. This drought-induced nonphotochemical quenching (designated d-NPQ) was fully reversed by rehydration. Global analysis of fluorescence decay at 77 K indicated rapid 46 ps transfer of excitation energy from the 680-690 nm PSII bands to a 710 nm band, and to 740-760 nm bands. The latter bands decayed to the ground state with the same time constant showing the rapid dissipation of excitation energy into heat. The quenching by d-NPQ in dry moss was stronger than that by PSII charge separation or nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ), which operates under hydrating conditions. Drought-tolerant mosses, thus, dissipate excess excitation energy into heat. The d-NPQ mechanism in moss resembles that reported in lichens, suggesting their common origin.

  9. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Arabidopsis plants lacking PsbQ and PsbR subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex show altered PSII super-complex organization and short-term adaptive mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Suorsa, Marjaana; Rossi, Fabio; Pavesi, Andrea; Kater, Martin M; Antonacci, Alessia; Tadini, Luca; Pribil, Mathias; Schneider, Anja; Wanner, Gerhard; Leister, Dario; Aro, Eva-Mari; Barbato, Roberto; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex of eukaryotic photosystem II (PSII) consists of four extrinsic subunits, PsbO (33 kDa), PsbP (23 kDa), PsbQ (17 kDa) and PsbR (10 kDa), encoded by seven nuclear genes, PsbO1 (At5g66570), PsbO2 (At3g50820), PsbP1 (At1g06680), PsbP2 (At2g30790), PsbQ1 (At4g21280), PsbQ2 (At4g05180) and PsbR (At1g79040). Using Arabidopsis insertion mutant lines, we show that PsbP1, but not PsbP2, is essential for photoautotrophic growth, whereas plants lacking both forms of PsbQ and/or PsbR show normal growth rates. Complete elimination of PsbQ has a minor effect on PSII function, but plants lacking PsbR or both PsbR and PsbQ are characterized by more pronounced defects in PSII activity. Gene expression and immunoblot analyses indicate that accumulation of each of these proteins is highly dependent on the presence of the others, and is controlled at the post-transcriptional level, whereas PsbO stability appears to be less sensitive to depletion of other subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex. In addition, comparison of levels of the PSII super-complex in wild-type and mutant leaves reveals the importance of the individual subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex for the supramolecular organization of PSII and their influence on the rate of state transitions. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. GAS EXCHANGE AND CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE OF CITRUS ROOTSTOCK VARIETIES UNDER SALT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCOS ERIC BARBOSA BRITO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT High salt concentration in water are common in Brazilian semirad region, being important to research alternatives for use this waters on crop, like use of tolerant genotypes to salinity. Thus, in order to evaluate the saline stress perception of citrus rootstocks varieties crop from gas exchange and fluorescence analysis, an experiment was realized in greenhouse at the Center for Science and Technology Agrifood, CCTA, of Federal University of Campina Grande, UFCG, Pombal, PB, Brazil. It was studied in a randomized block design with factorial scheme (2x4, two salinity levels (0.3 and 4.0 dSm-1 and four varieties of citrus rootstocks [1 -common Sunki mandarin (TSKC, 2 - Florida Rough lemon (LRF, 3 -Santa Cruz Rangpur lime (LCRSTC and 4-Volkamer lemon (LVK], with three replications. The citrus rootstocks varieties grown on hydroponic system and at 90 days after sowing the plants were evaluated by gas exchange and PSII fluorescence at 0, 24 and 48 hours after application of treatments to determine the times for the physiological establishment of salt stress. The first 48h under saline conditions promoted changes in gas exchange and PSII fluorescence in varieties TSKC, LRF and LCRSTC indicating the begin of physiological stress; the common ‘Sunki’ mandarin and the ‘Florida Rough’ lemon are the more sensitive genotypes to saline stress, in order hand the ‘Santa Cruz Rangpur’ lime and ‘Volkamer’ lemon are the genotypes more tolerant.

  12. Potential of chlorophyll fluorescence and VIS/NIR spectroscopy measurement use for the detection of nitrogen content and disease infection of apple leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václava Spáčilová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A possibility of using spectral methods for determining a nutritional status and detecting pathogens in apple-tree cvs. ’Jonagold’ and ’Idared’ was verified in an orchard and pot experiments in 2007–2010. Treatments differed in the fertilizer or fungicide dose. Leaf samples were collected from the experimental variants to determine nitrogen content and to measure spectral reflectance (spectrophotometer Avantes USB 2000 and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (FluorCam. Results of the measurements were correlated to leaf analyses for nitrogen content in dry matter. At the same time, a health status (the occurrence of fungal pathogens Venturia inaequalis and Podosphaera leucotricha was assessed and changes of photochemical efficiency of PSII of infected leaves were evaluated. The parameters providing the best description of differences in the photosynthetic activity of leaves depending on treatments (parameter Fv/Fm and parameter GENTY, known as ΦPSII – effective quantum yield of PSII were selected. The values of correlation coefficients of Fv/Fm and ΦPSII depending on fertilization treatments were as follows: Fv/Fm: r = −0.4735, p<0.000089, α = 0.05; ΦPSII: r = 0.755; p < 0.00038, α = 0.05. Data obtained from measuring with a spectrophotometer was used for the calculation to normalized difference vegetation indices NDVI; a significant relationship was found for the index GNDVI (r = 0.4691, p < 0,0002, α = 0.05. The significant difference between healthy leaves and leaves infected by the pathogens V. inaequalis and P. leucotricha was confirmed using the spectrophotometer, and the largest differences in reflectances were found in wavelengths around 400 nm. The values of indices GNDVI, RNDVI and NDVI 450 obtained from measuring reflectance of leaves with symptoms of V. inaequalis and P. leucotricha infections were significantly lower compared to the indices of healthy leaves. The values of indices NDVI were as follows: GNDVI 0

  13. Salt stress change chlorophyll fluorescence in mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicero Cartaxo de Lucena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the tolerance of mango cultivars 'Haden', 'Palmer', 'Tommy Atkins' and 'Uba' grafted on rootstock 'Imbú' to salt stress using chlorophyll fluorescence. Plants were grown in modified Hoagland solution containing 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmol L-1 NaCl. At 97 days the parameters of the chlorophyll fluorescence (F0, Fm, Fv, F0/Fm, Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', ΦPSII = [(Fm'-Fs/(Fm'], D = (1- Fv'/Fm' and ETR = (ΦPSII×PPF×0,84×0,5 were determined. At 100 days, the leaf emission and leaf area, toxicity and leaf abscission indexes were determined. In all cultivars evaluated, in different degree, there were decreases in photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, enhanced concentrations from 15 mmol L-1 NaCl. The decreases in the potential quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm were 27.9, 18.7, 20.5, and 27.4%, for cultivars 'Haden', 'Palmer', 'Tommy Atkins', and 'Uba', respectively, when grown in 45 mmol L-1 NaCl. It was found decreases in leaf emission and mean leaf area in all cultivars from 15 mmol L-1 NaCl. There were increases in leaf toxicity of 33.0, 67.5, 41.6 and 80.8% and in leaf abscission of 71.8, 29.2, 32.5, and 67.9% for the cultivars 'Haden', 'Palmer', 'Tommy Atkins', and 'Uba' respectively, when grown in 45 mmol L-1 NaCl. Leaf toxicity and leaf abscission were not observed in 15 mmol L-1 NaCl. The decrease in Fv/Fm ratio were accompanied by decreasing in leaf emission and increased leaf toxicity index, showing, therefore, the potential of chlorophyll fluorescence in the early detection of salt stress in mango tree.

  14. Temperature effects on microalgal photosynthesis-light responses measured by O-2 production, pulse-amplitude-modulated fluorescence, and C-14 assimilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancke, Kasper; Hancke, Torunn B.; Olsen, Lasse M.

    2008-01-01

    Short-term temperature effects on photosynthesis were investigated by measuring O-2 production, PSII-fluorescence kinetics, and C-14-incorporation rates in monocultures of the marine phytoplankton species Prorocentrum minimum (Pavill.) J. Schiller (Dinophyceae), Prymnesium parvum f. patelliferum (J...... three approaches. The maximum photosynthetic rate (P-max(C)) was strongly stimulated by temperature, reached an optimum for Pro. minimum only (20 degrees C-25 degrees C), and showed a similar relative temperature response for the three applied methods, with Q(10) ranging from 1.7 to 3.5. The maximum...... light utilization coefficient (alpha(C)) was insensitive or decreased slightly with increasing temperature. Absolute rates of O-2 production were calculated from pulse-amplitude-modulated (PAM) fluorometry measurements in combination with biooptical determination of absorbed quanta in PSII...

  15. Temperature effects on Microalgal Photosynthesis-Light responses measured by O2 production, Pulse-Amplitude-Modulated Fluorescence, and 14C assimilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancke, Kasper; Hancke, Torunn; Olsen, Lasse M.

    2008-01-01

    Short-term temperature effects on photosynthesis were investigated by measuring O2 production, PSII-fluorescence kinetics, and 14C-incorporation rates in monocultures of the marine phytoplankton species Prorocentrum minimum (Pavill.) J. Schiller (Dinophyceae), Prymnesium parvum f. patelliferum ( J...... photosynthetic rate (PCmax) was strongly stimulated by temperature, reached an optimum for Pro. minimum only (20oC–25oC), and showed a similar relative temperature response for the three applied methods, with Q10 ranging from 1.7 to 3.5. The maximum light utilization coefficient (alfaC) was insensitive...... or decreased slightly with increasing temperature. Absolute rates of O2 production were calculated from pulse-amplitude-modulated (PAM) fluorometry measurements in combination with biooptical determination of absorbed quanta in PSII. The relationship between PAM-based O2 production and measured O2 production...

  16. Correlated behavior of the EPR signal of cytochrome b-559 heme Fe(III) ligated by OH- and the multiline signal of the Mn cluster in PS-II membrane fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, R; Shuvalov, V A

    1996-05-27

    EPR signals of Cyt b-559 heme Fe(III) ligated by OH- and the multiline signal of the Mn cluster in PS-II membrane fragments have been investigated. In 2,3-dicyano-5,6-dichloro-p-benzoquinone-oxidized PS-II membrane fragments the light-induced decrease of the EPR signal of the heme Fe(III)-OH- is accompanied by the appearance of the EPR multiline signal of the Mn cluster. Addition of F- ions, which act as a stronger ligand for heme Fe(III) than OH-, decreases to the same extent the dark- and light-induced signal of the heme Fe(III)-OH- and the light-induced multiline signal of the Mn cluster. These results are discussed in terms of the light-induced formation of a bound OH' radical shared between the Cyt b-559 heme Fe and the Mn cluster as a first step of water oxidation.

  17. Spectral dependence of irreversible light-induced fluorescence quenching: Chlorophyll forms with maximal emission at 700-702 and 705-710nm as spectroscopic markers of conformational changes in the core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematov, Sherzod; Casazza, Anna Paola; Remelli, William; Khuvondikov, Vakhobjon; Santabarbara, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    The spectral dependence of the irreversible non-photochemical fluorescence quenching associated with photoinhibition in vitro has been comparatively investigated in thylakoid membranes, PSII enriched particles and PSII core complexes isolated from spinach. The analysis of the fluorescence emission spectra of dark-adapted and quenched samples as a function of the detection temperature in the 280-80K interval, indicates that Chlorophyll spectral forms having maximal emission in the 700-702nm and 705-710nm ranges gain relative intensity in concomitance with the establishment of irreversible light-induced quenching, acting thereby as spectroscopic markers. The relative enhancement of the 700-702nm and 705-710nm forms emission could be due either to an increase of their stoichiometric abundance or to their intrinsically low fluorescence quantum yields. These two factors, that can also coexist, need to be promoted by light-induced alterations in chromophore-protein as well as chromophore-chromophore interactions. The bands centred at about 701 and 706nm are also observed in the PSII core complex, suggesting their, at least partial, localisation in proximity to the reaction centre, and the occurrence of light-induced conformational changes in the core subunits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Seasonal and spatial variability of surface seawater fluorescence properties in the Baltic and Nordic Seas: results of lidar experiments Oceanologia 2007, no 49(1, pp. 59-69

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Drozdowska

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses experimental measurements of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF spectra in different seawaters. The fluorescence parameters, calculated from LIF spectra as the ratio of the integrals of fluorescence and Raman signal intensities, provide information about the relative changes in the concentrations of fluorescing molecules. Gathered during several cruises in 1994-2004 in the Baltic and Nordic Seas, all the data are presented as scatter plots of the fluorescence parameters of chlorophyll a (Chl a and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM. Satisfactory correlations between these two parameters were found a for open Nordic Seas waters, b for the southern Baltic in blooming periods only, and c for the Gulf of Gdańnsk in non-blooming periods only.

  19. Introduction to fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiran, Ionita C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of basic principles of fluorescence microscopy, including a brief history on the invention of this type of microscopy. The chapter highlights important points related to properties of fluorochromes, resolution in fluorescence microscopy, phase contrast and fluorescence, fluorescence filters, construction of a fluorescence microscope, and tips on the correct use of this equipment.

  20. Gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters of ornamental bromeliads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Gonçalves da Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence are widely used in physiological and ecological studies; however, few studies have used these techniques with ornamental plants. This study tested the potential contribution of gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence to evaluate the water and nutrients uptake by the tank and root system of epiphyte bromeliad Guzmania lingulata. For this purpose, we conducted an experiment with different water regime and another with different concentrations of nitrogen. The experiments were: 1 - Watering: Control (application of water into Tank and Root, Tank (watering into Tank, Root (watering Root and Drought (water suspension during the 90 days of experimentation and 2 - Nitrogen: Plants fertilized with Hoagland and Arnon nutrient solution exclusively into Tank or Root with nitrogen concentrations of control and 2.62 or 5.34 mM N applied as urea. The Fv /Fm ratio allowed comparing the treatments between experiments, demonstrating that Root and Tank both have the capacity to maintain G. lingulata photosynthetic activity and growth, while Drought treatment (water suspension was the limiting factor for energy conversion efficiency of PSII. However, gas exchange was more permissive as a parameter for comparing treatments in the nitrogen experiment, providing important information about the general aspects of the photosynthetic process in the watering experiment. Both gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence can support the evaluation of G. lingulata physiological status and can be useful tools in ornamental horticultural studies.

  1. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics.

  2. Is the OJIP Test a Reliable Indicator of Winter Hardiness and Freezing Tolerance of Common Wheat and Triticale under Variable Winter Environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapacz, Marcin; Sasal, Monika; Kalaji, Hazem M.; Kościelniak, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    OJIP analysis, which explores changes in photosystem II (PSII) photochemical performance, has been used as a measure of plant susceptibility to stress. However, in the case of freezing tolerance and winter hardiness, which are highly environmentally variable, the use of this method can give ambiguous results depending on the species as well as the sampling year and time. To clarify this issue, we performed chlorophyll fluorescence measurements over three subsequent winters (2010/11, 2011/12 and 2012/13) on 220 accessions of common winter wheat and 139 accessions of winter triticale. After freezing, leaves were collected from cold-acclimated plants in the laboratory and field-grown plants. Observations of field survival in seven locations across Poland and measurements of freezing tolerance of the studied plants were also recorded. Our results confirm that the OJIP test is a reliable indicator of winter hardiness and freezing tolerance of common wheat and triticale under unstable winter environments. Regardless of species, the testing conditions giving the most reliable results were identical, and the reliability of the test could be easily checked by analysis of some relationships between OJIP-test parameters. We also found that triticale is more winter hardy and freezing tolerant than wheat. In addition, the two species were characterized by different patterns of photosynthetic apparatus acclimation to cold. PMID:26230839

  3. Chlorophyll a fluorescence and herbicide efficacy, metabolism and selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbas Poor, Majid

    like black nightshade (Paper III). In field studies with logarithmic sprayer the effects of glyphosate (EPSPS inhibitor) and terbuthylazine (PSII inhibitor)mixed with three EC non-ionic adjuvants (Torpedo-II, Li-700 and Validate) on the fluorescence parameters were investigated in spring barley...... by analyzing the changes in Kautsky curve. Torpedo-II significantly increased the herbicide effect on fluorescence parameters while Li-700 decreased the effect. Spring barley sprayed with glyphosate died few weeks after spraying whether mixed with adjuvants or not while completely recovering from......) in the broad sense. This method can be used to test the effect of different adjuvants on efficacy of herbicides soon after spraying and be helpful in the quest for new and improved formulations and adjuvants....

  4. Effects of exogenous putrescine on gas-exchange characteristics and chlorophyll fluorescence of NaCl-stressed cucumber seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Run Hua; Li, Jun; Guo, Shi Rong; Tezuka, Takafumi

    2009-06-01

    The effects of 10 mM putrescine (Put) treated by spraying on leaves on growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic gas-exchange characteristics, and chlorophyll fluorescence were investigated by growing cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L. cv. ChangChun mici) using hydroponics with or without 65 mM NaCl as a salt stress. Salt stress caused the reduction of growth such as leaf area, root volume, plant height, and fresh and dry weights. Furthermore, net photosynthesis rate (P(n)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), intercellular CO(2) concentration (C(i)), and transpiration rate (T(r)) were also reduced by NaCl, but water use efficiency (WUE; P(n)/T(r)) showed a tendency to be enhanced rather than reduced by NaCl. However, Put alleviated the reduction of P (n) by NaCl, and showed a further reduction of C (i) by NaCl. The reduction of g(s) and T(r) by NaCl was not alleviated at all. The enhancement of WUE by NaCl was shown to have no alleviation at day 1 after starting the treatment, but after that, the enhancement was gradually reduced till the control level. Maximum quantum efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)) showed no effects by any conditions based on the combination of NaCl and Put, and in addition, kept constant values in plants grown in each nutrient solution during this experimental period. The efficiency of excitation energy capture by open photosystem II (PSII) (F(v)'/F(m)'), actual efficiency of PSII (Phi(PSII)), and the coefficient on photochemical quenching (qP) of plants with NaCl were reduced with time, and the reduction was alleviated till the control level by treatment with Put. The F(v)'/F(m)', Phi(PSII), and qP of plants without NaCl and/or with Put showed no variation during the experiment. Non-photochemical quenching of the singlet excited state of chlorophyll a (NPQ) showed quite different manner from the others as mentioned above, namely, continued to enhance during the experiment.

  5. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiple effects of chromate on the photosynthetic apparatus of Spirodela polyrhiza as probed by OJIP chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appenroth, K J; Stöckel, J; Srivastava, A; Strasser, R J

    2001-01-01

    Chromate (Cr) decreases the growth of Spirodela polyrhiza. The fronds lost their pigments. The O2 evolution was also decreased. The Cr effect was found to be dose dependent. The toxic effects of Cr have further been studied on the photosynthetic activity of Spirodela polyrhiza by means of the chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence transient O-J-I-P. The Chl a fluorescence transients were recorded in vivo with high time resolution and analyzed according to the JIP-test which can quantify the photosystem II behavior. Cr treated plants show a decrease in yield for primary photochemistry, phi Po. The performance index of PSII, PIABS, which is the combination of the indexes of three independent parameters, (1) the total number of active reaction centers per absorption (RC/ABS), (2) yield of primary photochemistry (phi Po) and (3) efficiency with which a trapped exciton can move an electron into the electron transport chain (psi 0), decreased due to Cr treatment. Chromate sensitivity varies within plant populations. In summary Cr affects several targets of PSII. More specifically, the main targets of Cr, according to the JIP-test, can be listed as a decrease in the number of active reaction centers and damage to the oxygen-evolving complex.

  7. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  8. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  9. Led induced chlorophyll fluorescence transient imager for measurements of health and stress status of whole plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalink, H.; Schoor, van der R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed LED (light emitting diode) induced fluorescence transient imaging instrumentation to image the plant health/stress status by calculation of two images: Fv/Fm (variable fluorescence over saturation level of fluorescence) and the time response, tTR, of the fluorescence time curve.

  10. Genotypic response of detached leaves versus intact plants for chlorophyll fluorescence parameters under high temperature stress in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Dew Kumari; Fernández, Juan Olivares; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The genotypic response of wheat cultivars as affected by two methods of heat stress treatment (treatment of intact plants in growth chambers versus treatment of detached leaves in test tubes) in a temperature controlled water bath were compared to investigate how such different methods of heat...... treatment affect chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. A set of 41 spring wheat cultivars differing in their maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem (PS) II (Fv/Fm) under heat stress conditions was used. These cultivars were previously evaluated based on the heat treatment of intact plants...... the fluorescence parameters. In contrast, heat induced reduction in the maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII of detached leaves occurred within 2h at 40°C and within 30min at 45°C, and the response was more pronounced than when intact plants were heat stressed for three days at 40°C. The proportion of total...

  11. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    C -1 D FLUORESCENT LAMP SPECIFICATION SHEETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D -1 E LED WAVES’ LED ...friendly products, advances in efficiency, and lower production costs for lamps . The conversion of fluorescent bulbs to LED technology has many benefits...repeatedly turned on and off. (5) LEDs can be used in existing fluorescent lighting fixtures using LED retrofit kits or replacement lamps . (6

  12. Fourier transform of delayed fluorescence as an indicator of herbicide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya; Tan, Jinglu

    2014-12-21

    It is well known that delayed fluorescence (DF) from Photosystem II (PSII) of plant leaves can be potentially used to sense herbicide pollution and evaluate the effect of herbicides on plant leaves. The research of using DF as a measure of herbicides in the literature was mainly conducted in time domain and qualitative correlation was often obtained. Fourier transform is often used to analyze signals. Viewing DF signal in frequency domain through Fourier transform may allow separation of signal components and provide a quantitative method for sensing herbicides. However, there is a lack of an attempt to use Fourier transform of DF as an indicator of herbicide. In this work, the relationship between the Fourier transform of DF and herbicide concentration was theoretically modelled and analyzed, which immediately yielded a quantitative method to measure herbicide concentration in frequency domain. Experiments were performed to validate the developed method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Effects of acid rain stress on Eleocarpus glabripetalus seedlings leaf chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics and growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiu-Min; Yu, Shu-Quan; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Mei-Hu

    2010-06-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the Eleocarpus glabripetalus seedlings leaf chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics and growth in different seasons under simulated acid rain stress (heavy, pH = 2. 5; moderate, pH = 4.0; and control, pH = 5.6). In the same treatments, the leaf relative chlorophyll content (SPAD), maximum PS II photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)), actual PSII photochemical quantum yield (phi(PS II)), plant height, and stem diameter in different seasons were all in the order of October > July > April > January. In the same seasons, all the parameters were in the order of heavy acid rain > moderate acid rain > control. The interactions between different acid rain stress and seasons showed significant effects on the SPAD, F(v)/F(m), plant height, and stem diameter, but lesser effects on phi(PS II), qp and qN.

  14. Impact of elevated temperatures on specific leaf weight, stomatal density, photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumrani, Kanchan; Bhatia, Virender Singh; Pandey, Govind Prakash

    2017-03-01

    High-temperature stress is a major environmental stress and there are limited studies elucidating its impact on soybean (Glycine max L. Merril.). The objectives of present study were to quantify the effect of high temperature on changes in leaf thickness, number of stomata on adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces, gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and seed yield in soybean. Twelve soybean genotypes were grown at day/night temperatures of 30/22, 34/24, 38/26 and 42/28 °C with an average temperature of 26, 29, 32 and 35 °C, respectively, under greenhouse conditions. One set was also grown under ambient temperature conditions where crop season average maximum, minimum and mean temperatures were 28.0, 22.4 and 25.2 °C, respectively. Significant negative effect of temperature was observed on specific leaf weight (SLW) and leaf thickness. Rate of photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and water use efficiency declined as the growing temperatures increased; whereas, intercellular CO2 and transpiration rate were increased. With the increase in temperature chlorophyll fluorescence parameters such as Fv/Fm, qP and PhiPSII declined while there was increase in qN. Number of stomata on both abaxial and adaxial surface of leaf increased significantly with increase in temperatures. The rate of photosynthesis, PhiPSII, qP and SPAD values were positively associated with leaf thickness and SLW. This indicated that reduction in photosynthesis and associated parameters appears to be due to structural changes observed at higher temperatures. The average seed yield was maximum (13.2 g/pl) in plants grown under ambient temperature condition and declined by 8, 14, 51 and 65% as the temperature was increased to 30/22, 34/24, 38/26 and 42/28 °C, respectively.

  15. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for ...

  16. STATE TRANSITIONS AND NONPHOTOCHEMICAL QUENCHING DURING A NUTRIENT-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE TRANSIENT IN PHOSPHORUS-STARVED DUNALIELLA TERTIOLECTA(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, K; Doblin, M A; Smith, R A; Ralph, P J; Shelly, K; Beardall, J

    2008-10-01

    Assessments of nutrient-limitation in microalgae using chl a fluorescence have revealed that nitrogen and phosphorus depletion can be detected as a change in chl a fluorescence signal when nutrient-starved algae are resupplied with the limiting nutrient. This photokinetic phenomenon is known as a nutrient-induced fluorescence transient, or NIFT. Cultures of the unicellular marine chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta Butcher were grown under phosphate starvation to investigate the photophysiological mechanism behind the NIFT response. A combination of low temperature (77 K) fluorescence, photosynthetic inhibitors, and nonphotochemical quenching analyses were used to determine that the NIFT response is associated with changes in energy distribution between PSI and PSII and light-stress-induced nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). Previous studies point to state transitions as the likely mechanism behind the NIFT response; however, our results show that state transitions are not solely responsible for this phenomenon. This study shows that an interaction of at least two physiological processes is involved in the rapid quenching of chl a fluorescence observed in P-starved D. tertiolecta: (1) state transitions to provide the nutrient-deficient cell with metabolic energy for inorganic phosphate (Pi )-uptake and (2) energy-dependent quenching to allow the nutrient-stressed cell to avoid photodamage from excess light energy during nutrient uptake. © 2008 Phycological Society of America.

  17. Optical properties of the adaxial and abaxial faces of leaves. Chlorophyll fluorescence, absorption and scattering coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordón, Gabriela B; Lagorio, María G

    2007-08-01

    Emission fluorescence spectra were obtained for the adaxial and abaxial faces of dicotyledonous (Ficus benjamina L., Ficus elastica, Gardenia jasminoides and Hedera helix) and monocotyledonous leaves (Gladiolus spp. and Dracaena cincta bicolor). After correction by light-re-absorption processes, using a previously published physical model, the adaxial faces of dicotyledons showed a fluorescence ratio Fred/Ffar-red rather lower than the respective values for the abaxial faces. Monocotyledons and shade-adapted-plants showed similar values for the corrected fluorescence ratio for both faces. Even when differences in experimental fluorescence emission from adaxial and abaxial leaves in dicotyledons are mostly due to light re-absorption processes, the residual dissimilarity found after application of the correction model would point to the fact that fluorescence re-absorption is not the only responsible for the observed disparity. It was concluded that light re-absorption processes does not account entirely for the differences in the experimental emission spectra between adaxial and abaxial leaves. Differences that remains still present after correction might be interpreted in terms of a different photosystem ratio (PSII/PSI). Experiments at low temperature sustained this hypothesis. In dicotyledons, light reflectance for adaxial leaves was found to be lower than for the abaxial ones. It was mainly due to an increase in the scattering coefficient for the lower leaf-side. The absorption coefficient values were slightly higher for the upper leaf-side. During senescence of Ficus benjamina leaves, the scattering coefficient increased for both the upper and lower leaf-sides. With senescence time the absorption coefficient spectra broadened while the corrected fluorescence ratio (Fred/Ffar-red) decreased for both faces. The results pointed to a preferential destruction of photosystem II relative to photosystem I during senescence.

  18. Gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence of pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants in response to ambient ozone at a rural site in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, I.M.; Basahi, J.M. [Air Pollution Laboratory (APL), Centre of Excellence in Environmental Studies (CEES), King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80216, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Hassan, I.A., E-mail: ihassan_eg@yahoo.com [Air Pollution Laboratory (APL), Centre of Excellence in Environmental Studies (CEES), King Abdulaziz University, P. O. Box 80216, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Alexandria University, 21526 El Shatby, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2014-11-01

    Egyptian pea cultivars (Pisum sativum L. cultivars Little Marvel, Perfection and Victory) grown in open-top chambers were exposed to either charcoal-filtered (FA) or non-filtered air (NF) for five consecutive years (2009–2013) at a rural site in northern Egypt. Net photosynthetic rates (P{sub N}), stomatal conductance (g{sub s}), intercellular CO{sub 2} (C{sub i}) and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured. Ozone (O{sub 3}) was found to be the most prevalent pollutant common at the rural site and is suspected to be involved in the alteration of the physiological parameters measured in the present investigation. P{sub N} of different cultivars were found to respond similarly; decreases of 23, 29 and 39% were observed in the cultivars Perfection, Little Marvel and Victory, respectively (averaged over the five years) due to ambient O{sub 3}. The maximum impairment in P{sub N} was recorded in the cultivar Victory (46%) in 2013 when the highest O{sub 3} levels were recorded (90 nL L{sup −1}). The average stomatal conductance decreased by 20 and 18% in the cultivars Little Marvel and Perfection, respectively, while the average stomatal conductance increased on average by 27% in the cultivar Victory. A significant correlation was found between P{sub N} and C{sub i}, indicating the importance of non-stomatal limitations of photosynthesis, especially in the cultivar Victory. The P{sub N} vs. Ci curves were fitted to a non-rectangular hyperbolic model. The actual quantum yield (Φ{sub PSII}) and photochemical quenching coefficient (qP) were significantly decreased in the leaves of plants exposed to NF air. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was increased in all cultivars. Exposure to NF air caused reductions in chlorophyll (Chl a) of 19, 16 and 30% in the Little Marvel, Perfection and Victory cultivars, respectively. - Highlights: • Ozone (O{sub 3}) concentrations recorded were within the ranges of phytotoxicity. • O{sub 3} has a clear influence on the physiological

  19. Experiments with Fluorescent Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-10-01

    The experiments described below show the irradiance and illuminance spectra of two fluorescent lamps in relation to their color temperatures, and the efficacy in comparison to that of an incandescent lamp. Spectra of "warm white" and "cool daylight" fluorescent lamps are demonstrated.

  20. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  1. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...

  2. Leaf Gas Exchange and Chlorophyll a Fluorescence in Maize Leaves Infected with Stenocarpella macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Cardona, Maria Bianney; Wordell Filho, João Américo; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of macrospora leaf spot (MLS), caused by Stenocarpella macrospora, on photosynthetic gas exchange parameters and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters determined in leaves of plants from two maize cultivars ('ECVSCS155' and 'HIB 32R48H') susceptible and highly susceptible, respectively, to S. macrospora. MLS severity was significantly lower in the leaves of plants from ECVSCS155 relative to the leaves of plants from HIB 32R48H. In both cultivars, net CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate significantly decreased, while the internal to ambient CO2 concentration ratio increased in inoculated plants relative to noninoculated plants. The initial fluorescence and nonphotochemical quenching significantly increased in inoculated plants of ECVSCS155 and HIB 32R48H, respectively, relative to noninoculated plants. The maximum fluorescence, maximum PSII quantum efficiency, coefficient for photochemical quenching, and electron transport rate significantly decreased in inoculated plants relative to noninoculated plants. For both cultivars, concentrations of total chlorophyll (Chl) (a+b) and carotenoids and the Chl a/b ratio significantly decreased in inoculated plants relative to noninoculated plants. In conclusion, the results from the present study demonstrate, for the first time, that photosynthesis in the leaves of maize plants is dramatically affected during the infection process of S. macrospora, and impacts are primarily associated with limitations of a diffusive and biochemical nature.

  3. Multicolor, Fluorescent Supercapacitor Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Meng; Sun, Hao; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Jingxia; Xie, Songlin; Fu, Xuemei; Sun, Xuemei; Wang, Bingjie; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-10-05

    Fiber-shaped supercapacitors have attracted broad attentions from both academic and industrial communities due to the demonstrated potentials as next-generation power modules. However, it is important while remains challenging to develop dark-environment identifiable supercapacitor fibers for enhancement on operation convenience and security in nighttime applications. Herein, a novel family of colorful fluorescent supercapacitor fibers has been produced from aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets. Fluorescent dye particles are introduced and stably anchored on the surfaces of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes to prepare hybrid fiber electrodes with a broad range of colors from red to purple. The fluorescent component in the dye introduces fluorescent indication capability to the fiber, which is particularly promising for flexible and wearable devices applied in dark environment. In addition, the colorful fluorescent supercapacitor fibers also maintain high electrochemical performance under cyclic bending and charge-discharge processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  5. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  6. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  7. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-07-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  8. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  9. Fluorescent radiation converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehmann, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A fluorescence radiation converter is described which includes a substantially undoped optically transparent substrate and a waveshifter coating deposited on at least one portion of the substrate for absorption of radiation and conversion of fluorescent radiation. The coating is formed to substantially 1000 g/liter of a solvent, 70 to 200 g/liter of an organic polymer, and 0.2 to 25 g/liter of at least one organic fluorescent dye. The incoming incident radiation impinges on the coating. Radiation is absorbed by the fluorescent dye and is re-emitted as a longer wavelength radiation. Radiation is trapped within the substrate and is totally internally reflected by the boundary surface. Emitted radiation leaves the substrate ends to be detected.

  10. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R [Princeton, NJ; Sun, Yiru [Princeton, NJ; Giebink, Noel [Princeton, NJ; Thompson, Mark E [Anaheim Hills, CA

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  11. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  12. Responses of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of the facultative halophyte and C3-CAM intermediate species Mesembryanthemum crystallinum to salinity and high irradiance stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broetto, Fernando; Monteiro Duarte, Heitor; Lüttge, Ulrich

    2007-07-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. (Aizoaceae) is a facultative annual halophyte and a C(3)-photosynthesis/crassulacean acid metabolism intermediate species currently used as a model plant in stress physiology. Both salinity and high light irradiance stress are known to induce CAM in this species. The present study was performed to provide a diagnosis of alterations at the photosystem II level during salinity and irradiance stress. Plants were subjected for up to 13 days to either 0.4M NaCl salinity or high irradiance of 1000 micromol m(-2)s(-1), as well as to both stress factors combined (LLSA=low light plus salt; HLCO=high light of 1000 micromol m(-2)s(-1), no salt; HLSA=high light plus salt). A control of LLCO=low light of 200 micromol m(-2)s(-1), no salt was used. Parameters of chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PSII) were measured with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer. HLCO and LLSA conditions induced a weak degree of CAM with day/night changes of malate levels (Deltamalate) of approximately 12mM in the course of the experiment, while HLSA induced stronger CAM of Deltamalate approximately 20 mM. Effective quantum yield of PSII, DeltaF/F'(m), was only slightly affected by LLSA, somewhat reduced during the course of the experiment by HLCO and clearly reduced by HLSA. Potential quantum efficiency of PSII, F(v)/F(m), at predawn times was not affected by any of the conditions, always remaining at 0.8, showing that there was no acute photoinhibition. During the course of the days HL alone (HLCO) also did not elicit photoinhibition; salt alone (LLSA) caused acute photoinhibition which was amplified by the combination of the two stresses (HLSA). Non-photochemical, NPQ, quenching remained low (crystallinum expresses effective stress tolerance mechanisms but photosynthetic capacity is reduced by the synergistic effects of salinity and light irradiance stress combined.

  13. Chlorophyll a fluorescence, under half of the adaptive growth-irradiance, for high-throughput sensing of leaf-water deficit in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumud B. Mishra

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive and high-throughput monitoring of drought in plants from its initiation to visible symptoms is essential to quest drought tolerant varieties. Among the existing methods, chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF imaging has the potential to probe systematic changes in photosynthetic reactions; however, prerequisite of dark-adaptation limits its use for high-throughput screening. Results To improve the throughput monitoring of plants, we have exploited their light-adaptive strategy, and investigated possibilities of measuring ChlF transients under low ambient irradiance. We found that the ChlF transients and associated parameters of two contrasting Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, Rsch and Co, give almost similar information, when measured either after ~20 min dark-adaptation or in the presence of half of the adaptive growth-irradiance. The fluorescence parameters, effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII and fluorescence decrease ratio (R FD resulting from this approach enabled us to differentiate accessions that is often not possible by well-established dark-adapted fluorescence parameter maximum quantum efficiency of PSII photochemistry (F V/F M. Further, we screened ChlF transients in rosettes of well-watered and drought-stressed six A. thaliana accessions, under half of the adaptive growth-irradiance, without any prior dark-adaptation. Relative water content (RWC in leaves was also assayed and compared to the ChlF parameters. As expected, the RWC was significantly different in drought-stressed from that in well-watered plants in all the six investigated accessions on day-10 of induced drought; the maximum reduction in the RWC was obtained for Rsch (16%, whereas the minimum reduction was for Co (~7%. Drought induced changes were reflected in several features of ChlF transients; combinatorial images obtained from pattern recognition algorithms, trained on pixels of image sequence, improved the contrast

  14. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of storage temperature of cucumber fruit on chlorophyll fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Kosson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of three storage temperature levels: 12,5°C, 20°C, and 1,5°C on basic indexes of chlorophyll fluorescence of cucumber fruits was studied. The greenhouse grown cucumber fruits cv. Wiktor F1 were stored in perforated polyethylene bags or without packages. The minimum chlorophyll fluorescence (Fo, maximum chlorophyll fluorescence (Fm, variable chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv and relative variable fluorescence (Fv/Fm of the cucumber peel were measured. Relative variable fluorescence was decTeasing when cucumbers were stored at temperature lower or higher than optimum level. The chlorophyll fluorescence measurements can be helpful for determination of appropriate temperature parameters of cucumber storage.

  16. Fluorescence-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strianese, Maria; Staiano, Maria; Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Labella, Tullio; Pellecchia, Claudio; D'Auria, Sabato

    2012-01-01

    The field of optical sensors has been a growing research area over the last three decades. A wide range of books and review articles has been published by experts in the field who have highlighted the advantages of optical sensing over other transduction methods. Fluorescence is by far the method most often applied and comes in a variety of schemes. Nowadays, one of the most common approaches in the field of optical biosensors is to combine the high sensitivity of fluorescence detection in combination with the high selectivity provided by ligand-binding proteins. In this chapter we deal with reviewing our recent results on the implementation of fluorescence-based sensors for monitoring environmentally hazardous gas molecules (e.g. nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide). Reflectivity-based sensors, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy-based (FCS) systems, and sensors relying on the enhanced fluorescence emission on silver island films (SIFs) coupled to the total internal reflection fluorescence mode (TIRF) for the detection of gliadin and other prolamines considered toxic for celiac patients are also discussed herein.

  17. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  18. A comparative study of the photosynthetic capacity in two green tide macroalgae using chlorophyll fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Qu, Tongfei; Zhao, Xinyu; Tang, Xianghai; Xiao, Hui; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-01-01

    Green tides have occurred in the Yellow Sea, China, every year from 2007 to 2015. The free-floating Ulva prolifera (Müller) J. Agardh was the causative macroalgal species. The co-occurring, attached U. intestinalis was also observed. Photosynthetic capacities were determined using chlorophyll fluorescence in situ and after 7 days lab acclimation, and a significant differences were noted. Pigment composition showed no obvious differences, but concentrations varied significantly, especially chlorophyll b in U. prolifera two times increase was observed after acclimation. The optimal photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm) was significantly higher in U. prolifera. Photosynthetic rate (α), maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax), and minimum saturating irradiance (Ek), obtained from rapid light response curves (RLCs), showed almost the same photosynthetic physiological status as Fv/Fm. Quenching coefficients and low temperature (77 K) chlorophyll fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoid membranes analysis showed U. prolifera has a better recovery activity and plasticity of PSII than U. intestinalis. Furthermore, energy dissipation via non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and state transitions showed efficacious photoprotection solution especially in U. prolifera suffered from the severe stresses. Results in the present study suggested that U. prolifera's higher photosynthetic capacity would contribute to its free-floating proliferation, and efficacious photoprotection in addition to favorable oceanographic conditions and high nutrient levels support its growth and aggregation.

  19. [Fluorescence used to investigate the sensitivity of spinach chloroplast membrane to low intensity electromagnetic radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Gang; Yang, Yun-Jing; Lu, Hong

    2009-07-01

    A system for studying biological effect of radio frequency electromagnetic field was developed. The system can form an area where electromagnetic wave with large frequency range is well distributed. The strength of electromagnetic wave was measured easily. Electromagnetic wave in the system did not have effect on environment. The sensitivity of spinach chloroplast membrane to low intensity electromagnetic radiation of 300 MHz under power density of 5 mW x cm(-2) was studied by the spectral analysis method of fluorescence of 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid (ANS) and the changes in chlorophyll a (Chla) fluorescence parameters of spinach chloroplast membrane. The result showed that the position of spectrum of ANS fluorescence of spinach chloroplast membrane did not change, but the intensity of ANS fluorescence was obviously increased under the action of electromagnetic radiation with power density of 1-5 mW x cm(-2). There was an increase in the intensity of ANS fluorescence with the increase in electromagnetic radiation. The increase of ANS fluorescence of spinach chloroplast membrane showed that low level electromagnetic field induced the decrease in fluidity of chloroplast membrane compared with control experiment. The cause of the change in the fluidity could be related to the polarization of chloroplast membrane under the electromagnetic field. The analysis of Chla fluorescence parameters of spinach chloroplast membrane indicated that low level electromagnetic field of 300 MHz made the fluorescence parameters F0 and F(VI/)F(V) decrease, and F(V)/Fo, Fv/F(m) and deltaF(V)/T increase. It was showed that low level electromagnetic field caused the change of non-active center of photosystem II of spinach chloroplast membrane to active center and the increase in potential active and photochemical efficiency of PSII, and promoted the transmit process of electron in photosynthesis of chloroplast membrane of photosynthesis cell in spinach leaf. The study confirmed

  20. Concentrators using fluorescent substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, M.; Tsukamoto, M. (Hitachi Seisakusho K.K., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    In luminescent concentrators - plates of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or other transparent material with a fluorescent compound dispersed within them - incident light is trapped and concentrated by internal reflection, and shifted to a longer wavelength, as it interacts with fluorescent particles. Experience with the use of luminescent concentrators for electricity generation in conjunction with solar cells, in solar heaters, in amplifiers for light intensity, in long-wave converters and in display panels is discussed. Solar energy conversion efficiencies of 4-5% have been obtained in generating systems combining concentrators containing Fluorol 555 or Rhodamin 6G with GaAs solar cells. (author).

  1. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojoeng; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of a specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route towards portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  2. Smartphone fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojeong; Tan, Yafang; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-09-02

    We demonstrate the first use of smartphone spectrophotometry for readout of fluorescence-based biological assays. We evaluated the smartphone fluorimeter in the context of a fluorescent molecular beacon (MB) assay for detection of specific nucleic acid sequences in a liquid test sample and compared performance against a conventional laboratory fluorimeter. The capability of distinguishing a one-point mismatch is also demonstrated by detecting single-base mutation in target nucleic acids. Our approach offers a route toward portable biomolecular assays for viral/bacterial pathogens, disease biomarkers, and toxins.

  3. Chlorophyll fluorescence in the leaves of Tradescantia species of different ecological groups: induction events at different intensities of actinic light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptushenko, Vasily V; Ptushenko, Elena A; Samoilova, Olga P; Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2013-11-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis is one of the most convenient and widespread techniques used to monitor photosynthesis performance in plants. In this work, after a brief overview of the mechanisms of regulation of photosynthetic electron transport and protection of photosynthetic apparatus against photodamage, we describe results of our study of the effects of actinic light intensity on photosynthetic performance in Tradescantia species of different ecological groups. Using the chlorophyll fluorescence as a probe of photosynthetic activity, we have found that the shade-tolerant species Tradescantia fluminensis shows a higher sensitivity to short-term illumination (≤20min) with low and moderate light (≤200μEm(-2)s(-1)) as compared with the light-resistant species Tradescantia sillamontana. In T. fluminensis, non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ) and photosystem II operational efficiency (parameter ΦPSII) saturate as soon as actinic light reaches ≈200μEm(-2)s(-1). Otherwise, T. sillamontana revealed a higher capacity for NPQ at strong light (≥800μEm(-2)s(-1)). The post-illumination adaptation of shade-tolerant plants occurs slower than in the light-resistant species. The data obtained are discussed in terms of reactivity of photosynthetic apparatus to short-term variations of the environment light. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  5. Fluorescent polymers from non-fluorescent photoreactive monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jan O; Voll, Dominik; Schmidt, Friedrich G; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2014-12-25

    A facile, fast and ambient-temperature avenue towards highly fluorescent polymers is introduced via polymerizing non-fluorescent photoreactive monomers based on light-induced NITEC chemistry, providing a platform technology for fluorescent polymers. The resulting polypyrazolines were analyzed in depth and the photo-triggered step-growth process was monitored in a detailed kinetic study.

  6. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy in polymer science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raja, T.N.; Brouwer, A.M.; Demchenko, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Polymer science is an interdisciplinary field, combining chemistry, physics, and in some cases biology. Structure, morphology, and dynamical phenomena in natural and synthetic polymers can be addressed using fluorescence spectroscopy. The most attractive aspect of fluorescent reporters is that their

  8. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  9. Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003553.htm Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) is a lab test that looks for micro- ...

  10. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-Ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital c...

  11. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  12. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) functions as a non-destructive microtome and microscope that uses a plane of light to optically section and view tissues with subcellular resolution. This method is well suited for imaging deep within transparent tissues or within whole organisms, and because tissues are exposed to only a thin plane of light, specimen photobleaching and phototoxicity are minimized compared to wide-field fluorescence, confocal, or multiphoton microscopy. LSFMs produce well-registered serial sections that are suitable for three-dimensional reconstruction of tissue structures. Because of a lack of a commercial LSFM microscope, numerous versions of light sheet microscopes have been constructed by different investigators. This review describes development of the technology, reviews existing devices, provides details of one LSFM device, and shows examples of images and three-dimensional reconstructions of tissues that were produced by LSFM. PMID:21339178

  13. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S. M.; Richardson, R. W.

    1983-12-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  14. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  15. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  16. Fluorescent quantification of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Bruno Pacheco; Matamá, Maria Teresa; Guimarães, Diana Isabel Pereira; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Theref...

  17. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    recycling , and can be disposed safely in a landfill. (2) LEDs offer reduced maintenance costs and fewer bulb replacements, significantly reducing...housings, plastic grates, old wiring) and the new LED technology (cardboard packaging) were broken down and separated into the appropriate container for... recycling . Several fixtures, ballasts and energy efficient fluorescent bulbs that were determined to be in pristine condition were returned to ATC

  18. Changes in chlorophyll content and fluorescence and fruit yield contributing traits in different genotypes of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa DUCH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Kaczmarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of changes in chlorophyll fluorescence parameters in strawberry leaves was based on a field experiment performed in the years 2009–2010. Ten genotypes including 5 cultivars: ‘Kent’, ‘Teresa’, ‘Senga Sengana’, ‘Chandler’ and the breeding clone 1387 as well as their inbred progeny, were the object of the study. During the experiment the following indicators were evaluated: chlorophyll a and b content in fresh leaf mass as well as fluorescence parameters: minimum (F0 and maximum fluorescence yield (Fm, photochemical efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm, actual quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (Y, minimum (F0’ and maximum efficiency of fluorescence (Fm’ in the light, coefficient of photochemical (qP and non-photo- chemical (qN fluorescence quenching. In this work, we also examined the effect of repeated inbreeding on strawberry fruit yield and yield components. The analysis of changes of these parameters showed that inbreeding caused a reaction in all tested cultivars. In all inbred progeny, chlorophyll a and b content decreased compared to the cultivars. Generally, the photoche- mical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm and the parameter ΔF/ Fm’ were not affected by strong inbreeding. In analyzing the values of the coefficients qP and qN, it has been observed that changes in their values depend on the sensitivity of the examined genotypes to self-pollination. The functioning of PS II is the most sensitive indicator of the effect of various factors on plants and is useful, among others, in breeding to select plants with a required genotype. The yield – determining features such as: fruit yield per plant, weight of single fruit, number of fruit per plant and weight of leaves per plant in S3 generation, were lower as compared with parental forms.

  19. Ashtekar variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    2015-05-01

    In the spirit of Scholarpedia, this invited article is addressed to students and younger researchers. It provides the motivation and background material, a summary of the main physical ideas, mathematical structures and results, and an outline of applications of the connection variables for general relativity. These variables underlie both the canonical/Hamiltonian and the spinfoam/path integral approaches in loop quantum gravity.

  20. SENSITIVITY TO ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS OF PRATA,JAPIRA AND VITÓRIA BANANA CULTIVARS PROVEN BY CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRISCILA NOBRES DOS SANTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the physiological responses to environmental stress during pre- and post-harvest of the following banana cultivars: Prata (AAB, Japira (AAAB and Vitoria (AAAB. Analyses were carried out on young plants at vegetative stage (daughter-plant and adult plants at reproductive stage (motherplant. The experimental design was completely randomized. In the in vivo pre-harvest analysis were used seven replications, in a factorial scheme (3x2x2, three cultivars and two stages (vegetative and reproductive and two collection periods (March and June. For the analysis of post-harvest quality were used five replications in a factorial design (3x2x5, corresponding to three cultivars, two development stages and five periods of post-harvest analysis, carried out every two days from stage 4 of fruit ripening. The chlorophyll a fluorescence emission kinetics showed low photochemical performance of the three cultivars in June, a period characterized by lower temperatures and water deficit. Prata was the cultivar with the lowest tolerance to abiotic physiological behavior changes, which also reflected in fruit quality, because there was a change in physical and physicochemical parameters. Japira and Vitoria cultivars showed similar physiological responses in the pre- and post-harvest periods, according to their phylogenetic proximity. The total performance index, i.e., the conservation of energy absorbed by PSII up to the reduction of the final PSI acceptors (PItotal and the di-malonic aldehyde (MDA content were significantly higher in Japira and Vitoria cultivars compared to Prata cultivar in the reproductive phase. There was no significant change in the potential quantum efficiency of PSII (FV / FM = jP0 among the three cultivars. It was concluded that Japira and Vitoria cultivars showed greater plasticity to tolerate or even adapt to abiotic variations keeping higher fruit yield. PItotal is the most sensitive parameter during

  1. Thylakoid membrane model of the Chl a fluorescence transient and P700 induction kinetics in plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, N E; Bulychev, A A; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B

    2016-12-01

    A new Thylakoid model is presented, which describes in detail the electron/proton transfer reactions between membrane protein complexes including photosystems II and I (PSII, PSI), cytochrome (Cyt) b 6 f, mobile plastoquinone PQ pool in the thylakoid membrane, plastocyanin in lumen and ferredoxin in stroma, reduction of NADP via FNR and cyclic electron transfer. The Thylakoid model parameters were fitted both to Chl fluorescence induction data (FI) and oxido-reductions of P700 (ΔA 810) measured from 20 μs up to 20 s in pea leaves. The two-wave kinetics of FI and ΔA 810 (O(JI)PSM and OABCDE) were described quantitatively, provided that the values of membrane electrochemical potential components ΔΨ(t), pHL(t)/pHS(t) are in physiologically relevant ranges. The time courses on the time scale from nanoseconds to tens of seconds of oxido-reduction changes of ET components as well as concentrations of proton/ions (K+, Cl-) were calculated. We assume a low constant FNR activity over this period. Charge movements across the thylakoid membrane by passive leakage and active ATPase transport and proton buffer reactions are simulated. The dynamics of charge fluxes during photosynthetic induction under low light (PFD 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1) were analyzed. The initial wave of P700 oxidation within 20 ms during independent operation of PSI and PSII was followed after 50 ms by PSI donor-side reduction from reduced PQ pool via Cyt b 6 f site. The Cyt b 6 f reactions contribute to the stabilization of fluxes in the time range 1 s  10 s) would need the investigation of FNR activation effect in order to explain the transitions between cyclic and linear electron transport.

  2. Variability Bugs:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melo, Jean

    2017-01-01

    be exploited. Variability bugs are not confined to any particular type of bug, error-prone feature, or location. In addition to introducing an exponential number of program variants, variability increases the complexity of bugs due to unintended feature interactions, hidden features, combinations of layers...... and bug finding, but not terribly so. This is positive and consistent with the existence of highly-configurable software systems with hundreds, even thousands, of features, testifying that developers in the trenches are able to deal with variability.......Many modern software systems are highly configurable. They embrace variability to increase adaptability and to lower cost. To implement configurable software, developers often use the C preprocessor (CPP), which is a well-known technique, mainly in industry, to deal with variability in code...

  3. Chlorophyll Fluorescence in Partially Defoliated Grape Plants (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay / Fluorescencia de la Clorofila en Plantas de Uva (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay Defoliadas Parcialmente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peña Olmos Jaime Ernesto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The chlorophyll content and fluorescence weredetermined in five-year-old grape plants (Vitis vinifera L. cv.Chardonnay that were subjected to early partial defoliation,in Villa de Leyva, Colombia. The experimental design wascompletely randomized, consisting of two treatments (50%defoliation and control, each with four replications of 35 plants. Every two weeks, one of every two recently-emerged leaves was removed from the non-control plants. The determination of total chlorophyll content was carried out on six leaves per plant using a CCM-200 Plus chlorophyll meter, while chlorophyll fluorescence measurements were taken with one darkadapted leaf per plant using a Junior-PAM fluorometer. Initial fluorescence (Fo, maximum fluorescence (Fm, terminal fluorescence (Ft, variable fluorescence (Fv, electron transport rate (ETR, maximum photochemical quantum yield of PSII (Fv/ Fm, effective photochemical quantum yield of photosystem II (Y(II, photochemical fluorescence quenching coefficient (qP, two non-photochemical quenching coefficients (qN and NPQ,quantum yield of light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (Y(NPQ, and quantum yield of non-light-induced non-photochemical quenching (Y(NO were measured. The chlorophyll concentration index showed higher values in the defoliated plants. There were no significant differences for the values of Fm, Ft and Fv. Fo was higher in the defoliated plants, while ETR, Fv/Fm and Y(II showed higher values in the control plants. It is evident that a reduction in leaf area modifies thepartitioning of excitation energy destined for photochemicaland non-photochemical processes, thus directly influencing the photosynthetic process of the plants evaluated. / Utilizando un diseño completamente aleatorizado,con dos tratamientos (defoliación al 50% y control y cuatrorepeticiones de 35 plantas cada una, se determinó el contenido y la fluorescencia de la clorofila en plantas de uva, sometidas a defoliación parcial

  4. Blue fluorescent cGMP sensor for multiparameter fluorescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Niino

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP (cGMP regulates many physiological processes by cooperating with the other signaling molecules such as cyclic AMP (cAMP and Ca(2+. Genetically encoded sensors for cGMP have been developed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between fluorescent proteins. However, to analyze the dynamic relationship among these second messengers, combined use of existing sensors in a single cell is inadequate because of the significant spectral overlaps. A single wavelength indicator is an effective alternative to avoid this problem, but color variants of a single fluorescent protein-based biosensor are limited. In this study, to construct a new color fluorescent sensor, we converted the FRET-based sensor into a single wavelength indicator using a dark FRET acceptor. We developed a blue fluorescent cGMP biosensor, which is spectrally compatible with a FRET-based cAMP sensor using cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (CFP/YFP. We cotransfected them and loaded a red fluorescent probe for Ca(2+ into cells, and accomplished triple-parameter fluorescence imaging of these cyclic nucleotides and Ca(2+, confirming the applicability of this combination to individually monitor their dynamics in a single cell. This blue fluorescent sensor and the approach using this FRET pair would be useful for multiparameter fluorescence imaging to understand complex signal transduction networks.

  5. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  6. Fluorescent Europium Chelate Stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaff, W. L.; Dyer, D. L.; Mori, K.

    1969-01-01

    The europium chelate of 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(2-thienyl)-1,3-butanedione (thenoyl-trifluoroacetone; TTA) is firmly bound to microorganisms. It fluoresces brightly at 613 nm with activation at 340 nm. Cells may be stained with 10−3m chelate in 50% ethyl alcohol, followed by washing with 50% ethyl alcohol. Equal or better stains are produced with 10−3m aqueous europium salt, water wash, and 10−2m aqueous TTA. A noncomplexing buffer should be used to maintain the pH at 6.5 to 6.8. Images PMID:4181107

  7. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ``fluorescent cryocooler`` could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance.

  8. Diffraction phase and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongkeun; Popescu, Gabriel; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2006-09-04

    We have developed diffraction phase and fluorescence (DPF) microscopy as a new technique for simultaneous quantitative phase imaging and epi-fluorescence investigation of live cells. The DPF instrument consists of an interference microscope, which is incorporated into a conventional inverted fluorescence microscope. The quantitative phase images are characterized by sub-nanometer optical path-length stability over periods from milliseconds to a cell lifetime. The potential of the technique for quantifying rapid nanoscale motions in live cells is demonstrated by experiments on red blood cells, while the composite phase-fluorescence imaging mode is exemplified with mitotic kidney cells.

  9. Fluorescent nanodiamonds for ultrasensitive detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Joseph; Shumilov, Dmytro; Maliwa, Badri; Zerda, T. W.; Rout, Bibhu; Fudala, Rafal; Raut, Sangram; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Simanek, Eric; Borejdo, Julian; Rich, Ryan; Akopova, Irina; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (NDs) are new and emerging nanomaterials that have potential to be used as fluorescence imaging agents and also as a highly versatile platform for the controlled functionalization and delivery of a wide spectrum of therapeutic agents. We will utilize two experimental methods, TIRF, a relatively simple method based on total internal reflection fluorescence and SPRF, fluorescence enhanced by resonance coupling with surface plasmons. We estimate that the SPRF method will be 100 times sensitive than currently available similar detectors based on detectors. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop microarray platforms that could be used for sensitive, fast and inexpensive gene sequencing and protein detection.

  10. The effects of short-term selenium stress on Polish and Finnish wheat seedlings-EPR, enzymatic and fluorescence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łabanowska, Maria; Filek, Maria; Kościelniak, Janusz; Kurdziel, Magdalena; Kuliś, Ewa; Hartikainen, Helina

    2012-02-15

    Biochemical analyses of antioxidant content were compared with measurements of fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the alteration of radicals in wheat seedlings exposed to 2 days of selenium stress. Two genotypes of Polish and one of Finnish wheat, differing in their tolerance to long-term stress treatment, were cultured under hydroponic conditions to achieve the phase of 3-leave seedlings. Afterwards, selenium (sodium selenate, 100 μM concentration) was added to the media. After Se-treatment, all varieties showed an increase in carbohydrates (soluble and starch), ascorbate and glutathione content in comparison to non-stressed plants. These changes were more visible in Finnish wheat. On the basis of lipid peroxidation measurements, Finnish wheat was recognized as the genotype more sensitive to short-term Se-stress than the Polish varieties. The antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) increased in Polish genotypes, whereas they decreased in Finnish wheat plants cultured on Se media. The action of reactive oxygen species in short-term action of Se stress was confirmed by the reduction of PSII and PSI system activities (measured by fluorescence parameters and EPR, respectively). EPR studies showed changes in redox status (especially connected with Mn(II)/Mn(III), and semiquinone/quinone ratios) in wheat cell after Se treatment. The involvement of the carbohydrate molecules as electron traps in production of long-lived radicals is postulated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Validation of the chlorophyll fluorescence imaging method (CFI for early detection of herbicide resistance in weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menegat, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of herbicide tolerant weed populations is illustrating the increasing demand for reliable methods for an accelerated detection of herbicide tolerance compared to greenhouse studies. Several methods for resistance quick detection have been published in previous years. One of the recent methods is the Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Method (CFI. For this method changes in photosynthetic activity of the target organisms, caused by herbicides, are determined. General assumption of this method in terms of herbicide resistance detection is that each herbicidal compound, independent of the mode of action, will cause changes within the photosynthetic apparatus of the target organisms. This effect already could be confirmed for several modes of action (PSII, ALS, ACCase, EPSPS, synth. Auxins. Aim of this study is to validate this novel method on the basis of greenhouse experiments and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP analysis. The resistance profiles of 10 black-grass populations (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds. have been determined in greenhouse herbicide efficacy trials and constitutive SNP analyses of the survivors. With the CFI-method it was possible to detect the resistance profile as well as the resistance frequency within the populations. The results from the greenhouse experiments could be reproduced with conformity of 94%. This result is valid for the tested herbicides mesosulfuron, pyroxsulam as well as clodinafop and pinoxaden.

  12. A new setup for in vivo fluorescence imaging of photosynthetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Xenie; Vandystadt, Guillaume; Bujaldon, Sandrine; Wollman, Francis-André; Dubois, Rémi; Roussel, Pierre; Alric, Jean; Béal, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Here, we describe a new imaging setup able to assess in vivo photosynthetic activity. The system specifically measures time-resolved chlorophyll fluorescence in response to light. It is composed of a fast digital camera equipped with a wide-angle lens for the analysis of samples up to 10 x 10 cm, i.e. entire plants or petri dishes. In the choice of CCD, we have opted for a 12-bits high frame rate [150 fps (frames per second)] at the expense of definition (640 x 480 pixels). Although the choice of digital camera is always a compromise between these two related features, we have designed a flexible system allowing the fast sampling of images (down to 100 micros) with a maximum spatial resolution. This image readout system, synchronized with actinic light and saturating pulses, allows a precise determination of F(0) and F(M), which is required to monitor PSII activity. This new imaging system, together with image processing techniques, is useful to investigate the heterogeneity of photosynthetic activity within leaves or to screen large numbers of unicellular algal mutant colonies to identify those with subtle changes in photosynthetic electron flow.

  13. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    1999-01-01

    The most important topics in the theory and application of complex variables receive a thorough, coherent treatment in this introductory text. Intended for undergraduates or graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering, this volume features hundreds of solved examples, exercises, and applications designed to foster a complete understanding of complex variables as well as an appreciation of their mathematical beauty and elegance. Prerequisites are minimal; a three-semester course in calculus will suffice to prepare students for discussions of these topics: the complex plane, basic

  14. Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) in Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) was expressed by transformed cells of Escherichia coli DH5-α grown in LB/amp broth at 37oC, for 8 h and 24 h. To evaluate the effectiveness of different parameters to improve the expression of GFPuv by E. coli, four variable culturing conditions were set up for assays by ...

  15. Distinguishability of Biological Material Using Ultraviolet Multi-Spectral Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P.C.; Heinen, R.J.; Rigdon, L.D.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Shokair, I.R.; Siragusa, G.R.; Tisone, G.C.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-14

    Recent interest in the detection and analysis of biological samples by spectroscopic methods has led to questions concerning the degree of distinguishability and biological variability of the ultraviolet (W) fluorescent spectra from such complex samples. We show that the degree of distinguishability of such spectra is readily determined numerically.

  16. Quantitative approach of speleothems fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiers, Marine; Perrette, Yves; Poulenard, Jérôme; Chalmin, Emilie; Revol, Morgane

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we propose a framework to interpret quantitatively the fluorescence of speleothems organic matter (OM) by the way of a bank of water-extracted organic matter. Due to its efficiency to described dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteritics, fluorescence has been used to determined DOM signatures in natural systems, water circulations, OM transfer from soils, OM evolution in soils or recently, DOM changes in engineered treatment systems. Fluorescence has also been used in speleothems studies, mainly as a growth indicator. Only few studies interpret it as an environmental proxy. Indeed, the fluorescence of OM provides information on the type of organic molecules trapped in speleothems and their evolutions. But the most direct information given by fluorescence is the variation of OM quantities. Actually, increase of fluorescence intensity is generally related to an increase in OM quantity but may also be induced by calcite optical effect or qualitative change of OM. However, analytical technics used in water environments cannot be used for speleothem samples. In this study we propose to give a frame to interpret quantitatively the fluorescence signal of speleothems. 3 different samples of stalagmites from french northern Prealps were used. To allow the quantification of the fluorescence signal, we need to measure the fluorescence and the quantity of organic matter on the same sample. OM of speleothems was extracted by an acid digestion method and analysed with a spectrofluorimeter. However, it was not possible to quantify directly the OM, as the extract solvant was a high-concentrated acid. To solve this problem, a calibration using soil extracts was realised. Soils were chosen in order to represent the diversity of OM present in the environment above the caves. Attention was focused on soil and vegetation types, and landuse. Organic material was water extracted from soils and its fluorescence was also measured. Total organic carbon was performed on the

  17. Drivers of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the global epipelagic ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catalá, T.S.; Álvarez-Salgado, X. A.; Otero, J.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in open surface waters (... was substantially larger (> 70%) than for the amino acid-like components (oxygen utilisation followed by chlorophyll a. Positive non-linear relationships between both predictor variables...

  18. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  19. Visible fluorescent proteins for FRET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremers, G.J.; Goedhart, J.; Gadella, T.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter discusses the use of Visible fluorescent proteins (VFPs) for FRET studies, a comprehensive table with Förster radii of VFP pairs is presented and recommendations for choosing the right pairs are made. The chapter discusses VFPs that are used for studies that use fluorescence resonance

  20. Fluorescent Proteins for Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Teresa S; Hawley, Robert G; Telford, William G

    2017-04-03

    Fluorescent proteins have become standard tools for cell and molecular biologists. The color palette of fluorescent proteins spans the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared spectrum. Utility of fluorescent proteins has been greatly facilitated by the availability of compact and affordable solid state lasers capable of providing various excitation wavelengths. In theory, the plethora of fluorescent proteins and lasers make it easy to detect multiple fluorescent proteins simultaneously. However, in practice, heavy spectral overlap due to broad excitation and emission spectra presents a challenge. In conventional flow cytometry, careful selection of excitation wavelengths and detection filters is necessary. Spectral flow cytometry, an emerging methodology that is not confined by the "one color, one detector" paradigm, shows promise in the facile detection of multiple fluorescent proteins. This chapter provides a synopsis of fluorescent protein development, a list of commonly used fluorescent proteins, some practical considerations and strategies for detection, and examples of applications. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Fluorescence Spectra of Highlighter Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; King, Damon

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra excited by laser pointers have been the subject of several papers in "TPT". These papers all describe a fluorescence phenomenon in which the reflected laser light undergoes a change in color: this color change results from the combination of some partially reflected laser light and additional colors generated by…

  2. Fluorescence calibration method for single-particle aerosol fluorescence instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Gao, Ru-Shan; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Fahey, David W.; Perring, Anne E.

    2017-05-01

    Real-time, single-particle fluorescence instruments used to detect atmospheric bioaerosol particles are increasingly common, yet no standard fluorescence calibration method exists for this technique. This gap limits the utility of these instruments as quantitative tools and complicates comparisons between different measurement campaigns. To address this need, we have developed a method to produce size-selected particles with a known mass of fluorophore, which we use to calibrate the fluorescence detection of a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A). We use mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles to calibrate one detector (FL1; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 310-400 nm) and pure quinine particles to calibrate the other (FL2; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 420-650 nm). The relationship between fluorescence and mass for the mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles is linear, while that for the pure quinine particles is nonlinear, likely indicating that not all of the quinine mass contributes to the observed fluorescence. Nonetheless, both materials produce a repeatable response between observed fluorescence and particle mass. This procedure allows users to set the detector gains to achieve a known absolute response, calculate the limits of detection for a given instrument, improve the repeatability of the instrumental setup, and facilitate intercomparisons between different instruments. We recommend calibration of single-particle fluorescence instruments using these methods.

  3. Understanding Solar Induced Fluorescence: Building up from Leaf Scale Measurements (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J. A.; Van der Tol, C.; Frankenberg, C.; Joiner, J.; Guanter, L.

    2013-12-01

    the photochemical reactions at PSII and with the emission of fluorescence. We used simultaneous measurements of CO2 exchange and PAM fluorescence under laboratory conditions to evaluate the dependence of the kinetic constant for non-photochemical quenching (Kn) on relative quantum yield (or light use efficiency) for photosynthesis under a range of conditions, and we integrated this with a conventional parameterization for photosynthetic biochemistry to simulate SIF and GPP in the SCOPE model. We show that the fluorescence parameterization is able to reproduce leaf scale measurements well and that fluorescence measurements place new and more stringent constraints on photosynthesis parameterizations. The model was then used to evaluate the potential for using retrievals of SIF to estimate GPP, the integrated Vcmax of the canopy, the presence of water stress, and biophysical properties such as leaf angle distribution and chlorophyll content. This study strongly supports the usefulness of SIF, and illustrates some of the interactions that must be taken into account in interpreting these measurements.

  4. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  5. Single-molecule spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  6. Synthesis of Fluorescent Gelators and Direct Observation of Gelation with a Fluorescence Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanabusa, Kenji; Ueda, Takuya; Takata, Shingo; Suzuki, Masahiro

    2016-11-14

    Fluorescein-, benzothiazole-, quinoline-, stilbene-, and carbazole-containing fluorescent gelators have been synthesized by connecting gelation-driving segments, including l-isoleucine, l-valine, l-phenylalanine, l-leucine residue, cyclo(l-asparaginyl-l-phenylalanyl), and trans-(1R,2R)-diaminocyclohexane. The emission behaviors of the gelators were investigated, and their gelation abilities studied against 15 solvents. The minimum gel concentration, variable-temperature spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy (FM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were used to characterize gelation. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-H and C=O of amide, van der Waals interactions and π-π stacking play important roles in gelation. The colors of emission are related to the fluorescence structures of gelators. Fibrous aggregates characterized by the color of their emission were observed by FM. 3D images are produced by the superposition of images captured by CLSM every 0.1 μm to a settled depth. The 3D images show that the large micrometer-sized aggregates spread out three dimensionally. FM observations of mixed gelators are studied. In the case of gelation, two structurally related gelators with the same gelation-driving segment lead to the gelators build up of the same aggregates through similar hydrogen-bonding patterns. When two gelators with structurally different gelation-driving segments induce gelation, the gelators build up each aggregate through individual hydrogen-bonding patterns. A fluorescent reagent that was incorporated into the aggregates of gels through van der Waals interactions was developed. The addition of this fluorescent reagent enables the successful observation of nonfluorescent gelators' aggregates by FM. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. [Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on mung bean leaf photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xing-yu; Han, Xue; Li, Ping; Yang, Hong-bin; Lin, Er-da

    2011-10-01

    By using free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) system, a pot experiment under field condition was conducted to study the effects of elevated CO2 concentration (550 +/- 60 micromol mol(-1)) on the leaf photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of mung bean. Comparing with the control (CO2 concentration averagely 389 +/- 40 micromol mol(-1)), elevated CO2 concentration increased the leaf intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and net photosynthesis rate (P(n)) at flowering and pod growth stage by 9.8% and 11.7%, decreased the stomatic conductance (G(s)) and transpiration rate (T(r)) by 32.0% and 24.6%, respectively, and increased the water use efficiency (WUE) by 83.5%. Elevated CO2 concentration had lesser effects on the minimal fluorescence (F0), maximal fluorescence (F(m)), variable fluorescence (F(v)), ratio of variable fluorescence to minimal fluorescence (F(v)/F0), and ratio of variable fluorescence to maximal fluorescence (F(v)/F(m)) at bud stage, but increased the F0 at pod filling stage by 19.1% and decreased the Fm, F(v), F(v)/F0, and F(v)/F(m) by 9.0%, 14.3%, 25.8% , and 6.2%, respectively. These results suggested that elevated CO2 concentration could damage the structure of leaf photosystem II and consequently decrease the leaf photosynthetic capacity in the late growth phase of mung bean.

  8. Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Eric W.; Zelten, J. Peter; Wiseman, Benjamin A.

    1988-06-01

    We report on the development of a laser scanning fluorescence microscope possessing several features which facilitate its application to biological and biophysical analyses in living cells. It is built around a standard inverted microscope stand, enabling the use of standard optics, micromanipulation apparatus, and conventional (including video) microscopy in conjunction with laser scanning. The beam is scanned across the specimen by a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors, driven by a programmable controller which can operate in three modes: full raster scan, region of interest, and random-access. A full 512x512 pixel image can be acquired in one second. In region of interest mode, several subareas of the field can be selected for more rapid or detailed analysis. For those cases where the time scale of the observed phenomenon precludes full-field imaging, or where a full-field image is unnecessary, the random access mode enables an arbitrary pattern of isolated points to be selected and rapidly sequenced through. Via a graphical user interface implemented on the system's host computer, a user will be able to take a scout image either with video or a full-field laser scan, select regions or points on the scout image with a mouse, and set up experimental parameters such as detector integration times with a window-style menu. The instrument is designed to be a flexible testbed for investigating new techniques, without compromising its utility as a tool for biological research.

  9. Spectral and Temporal Laser Fluorescence Analysis Such as for Natural Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekalyuk, Alexander (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An Advanced Laser Fluorometer (ALF) can combine spectrally and temporally resolved measurements of laser-stimulated emission (LSE) for characterization of dissolved and particulate matter, including fluorescence constituents, in liquids. Spectral deconvolution (SDC) analysis of LSE spectral measurements can accurately retrieve information about individual fluorescent bands, such as can be attributed to chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), phycobiliprotein (PBP) pigments, or chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), among others. Improved physiological assessments of photosynthesizing organisms can use SDC analysis and temporal LSE measurements to assess variable fluorescence corrected for SDC-retrieved background fluorescence. Fluorescence assessments of Chl-a concentration based on LSE spectral measurements can be improved using photo-physiological information from temporal measurements. Quantitative assessments of PBP pigments, CDOM, and other fluorescent constituents, as well as basic structural characterizations of photosynthesizing populations, can be performed using SDC analysis of LSE spectral measurements.

  10. Fluorescent labelling in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anselm Fabian Lowell; Hackenberger, Christian Peter Richard

    2017-12-01

    The labelling of proteins with green fluorescent protein enabled the visualization of proteins in living cells for the first time. Since then, much progress has been made in the field. Modern strategies allow the labelling of proteins in live cells through a range of specialized methods with sophisticated chemical probes that show enhanced photophysical properties compared to fluorescent proteins. This review briefly summarizes recent advances in the field of fluorescent chemical protein labelling inside living cells and illustrates key aspects on the requirements and advantages of each given method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Flanigan, Francis J

    2010-01-01

    A caution to mathematics professors: Complex Variables does not follow conventional outlines of course material. One reviewer noting its originality wrote: ""A standard text is often preferred [to a superior text like this] because the professor knows the order of topics and the problems, and doesn't really have to pay attention to the text. He can go to class without preparation."" Not so here-Dr. Flanigan treats this most important field of contemporary mathematics in a most unusual way. While all the material for an advanced undergraduate or first-year graduate course is covered, discussion

  12. Complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Joseph L

    2011-01-01

    The text covers a broad spectrum between basic and advanced complex variables on the one hand and between theoretical and applied or computational material on the other hand. With careful selection of the emphasis put on the various sections, examples, and exercises, the book can be used in a one- or two-semester course for undergraduate mathematics majors, a one-semester course for engineering or physics majors, or a one-semester course for first-year mathematics graduate students. It has been tested in all three settings at the University of Utah. The exposition is clear, concise, and lively

  13. Vegetation stress from soil moisture and chlorophyll fluorescence: synergy between SMAP and FLEX approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jose; Moran, Susan

    2014-05-01

    Vegetation stress detection continues being a focal objective for remote sensing techniques. It has implications not only for practical applications such as irrigation optimization or precision agriculture, but also for global climate models, providing data to better link water and carbon exchanges between the surface and the atmospheric and improved parameterization of the role of terrestrial vegetation in the coupling of water and carbon cycles. Traditional approaches to map vegetation stress using remote sensing techniques have been based on measurements of soil moisture status, canopy (radiometric) temperature and, to a lesser extent, canopy water content, but new techniques such as the dynamics of vegetation fluorescence emission, are also now available. Within the context of the preparatory activities for the SMAP and FLEX missions, a number of initiatives have been put in place to combine modelling activities and field experiments in order to look for alternative and more efficient ways of detecting vegetation stress, with emphasis on synergistic remote sensing approaches. The potential of solar-induced vegetation fluorescence as an early indicator of stress has been widely demonstrated, for different type of stress conditions: light amount (excess illumination) and conditions (direct/diffuse), temperature extremes (low and high), soil water availability (soil moisture), soil nutrients (nitrogen), atmospheric water vapour and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The effects caused by different stress conditions are sometimes difficult to be decoupled, also because different causes are often combined, but in general they then to change the overall fluorescence emission (modulating amplitude) or changing the relative contributions of photosystems PSI and PSII or the relative fluorescence re-absorption effects caused by modifications in the structure of pigment bed responsible for light absorption, in particular for acclimation for persistent stress conditions. While

  14. CFP and YFP, but Not GFP, Provide Stable Fluorescent Marking of Rat Hepatic Adult Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouzbeh R. Taghizadeh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The stable expression of reporter genes in adult stem cells (ASCs has important applications in stem cell biology. The ability to integrate a noncytotoxic, fluorescent reporter gene into the genome of ASCs with the capability to track ASCs and their progeny is particularly desirable for transplantation studies. The use of fluorescent proteins has greatly aided the investigations of protein and cell function on short-time scales. In contrast, the obtainment of stably expressing cell strains with low variability in expression for studies on longer-time scales is often problematic. We show that this difficulty is partly due to the cytotoxicity of a commonly used reporter, green fluorescent protein (GFP. To avoid GFP-specific toxicity effects during attempts to stably mark a rat hepatic ASC strain and, therefore, obtain stable, long-term fluorescent ASCs, we evaluated cyan fluorescent protein (CFP and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, in addition to GFP. Although we were unable to derive stable GFP-expressing strains, stable fluorescent clones (up to 140 doublings expressing either CFP or YFP were established. When fluorescently marked ASCs were induced to produce differentiated progeny cells, stable fluorescence expression was maintained. This property is essential for studies that track fluorescently marked ASCs and their differentiated progeny in transplantation studies.

  15. Heat generation and light scattering of green fluorescent protein-like pigments in coral tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndby, Niclas H.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like pigments have been proposed to have beneficial effects on coral photobiology. Here, we investigated the relationships between green fluorescence, coral heating and tissue optics for the massive coral Dipsastraea sp. (previously Favia sp.). We used microsensors to measure tissue scalar irradiance and temperature along with hyperspectral imaging and combined imaging of variable chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence. Green fluorescence correlated positively with coral heating and scalar irradiance enhancement at the tissue surface. Coral tissue heating saturated for maximal levels of green fluorescence. The action spectrum of coral surface heating revealed that heating was highest under red (peaking at 680 nm) irradiance. Scalar irradiance enhancement in coral tissue was highest when illuminated with blue light, but up to 62% (for the case of highest green fluorescence) of this photon enhancement was due to green fluorescence emission. We suggest that GFP-like pigments scatter the incident radiation, which enhances light absorption and heating of the coral. However, heating saturates, because intense light scattering reduces the vertical penetration depth through the tissue eventually leading to reduced light absorption at high fluorescent pigment density. We conclude that fluorescent pigments can have a central role in modulating coral light absorption and heating.

  16. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; Rietdorf, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique to map the spatial distribution of nanosecond excited state lifetimes within microscopic images. FLIM systems have been implemented both in the frequency domain, using sinusoidally intensity-modulated excitation light and modulated

  17. Advanced Methods in Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Fritzky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It requires a good deal of will power to resist hyperbole in considering the advances that have been achieved in fluorescence microscopy in the last 25 years. Our effort has been to survey the modalities of microscopic fluorescence imaging available to cell biologists and perhaps useful for diagnostic pathologists. The gamut extends from established confocal laser scanning through multiphoton and TIRF to the emerging technologies of super-resolution microscopy that breech the Abbé limit of resolution. Also considered are the recent innovations in structured and light sheet illumination, the use of FRET and molecular beacons that exploit specific characteristics of designer fluorescent proteins, fluorescence speckles, and second harmonic generation for native anisometric structures like collagen, microtubules and sarcomeres.

  18. Leaf morphology, photosynthetic performance, chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal development of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. exposed to different ratios of red light to blue light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Red and blue light are both vital factors for plant growth and development. We examined how different ratios of red light to blue light (R/B provided by light-emitting diodes affected photosynthetic performance by investigating parameters related to photosynthesis, including leaf morphology, photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal development, light response curve, and nitrogen content. In this study, lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L. were exposed to 200 μmol•m-2•s-1 irradiance for a 16 h•d-1 photoperiod under the following six treatments: monochromatic red light (R, monochromatic blue light (B and the mixture of R and B with different R/B ratios of 12, 8, 4, and 1. Leaf photosynthetic capacity (Amax and photosynthetic rate (Pn increased with decreasing R/B ratio until 1, associated with increased stomatal conductance, along with significant increase in stomatal density and slight decrease in stomatal size. Pn and Amax under B treatment had 7.6% and 11.8% reduction in comparison with those under R/B=1 treatment, respectively. The effective quantum yield of PSII and the efficiency of excitation captured by open PSII center were also significantly lower under B treatment than those under the other treatments. Shoot dry weight increased with increasing R/B ratio with the greatest value under R/B=12 treatment. The increase of shoot dry weight was mainly caused by increasing leaf area and leaf number, but no significant difference was observed between R and R/B=12 treatments. Based on the above results, we conclude that quantitative B could promote photosynthetic performance or growth by stimulating morphological and physiological responses, yet there was no positive correlation between Pn and shoot dry weight accumulation.

  19. Leaf Morphology, Photosynthetic Performance, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, Stomatal Development of Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) Exposed to Different Ratios of Red Light to Blue Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Lu, Wei; Tong, Yuxin; Yang, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    Red and blue light are both vital factors for plant growth and development. We examined how different ratios of red light to blue light (R/B) provided by light-emitting diodes affected photosynthetic performance by investigating parameters related to photosynthesis, including leaf morphology, photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal development, light response curve, and nitrogen content. In this study, lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) were exposed to 200 μmol⋅m(-2)⋅s(-1) irradiance for a 16 h⋅d(-1) photoperiod under the following six treatments: monochromatic red light (R), monochromatic blue light (B) and the mixture of R and B with different R/B ratios of 12, 8, 4, and 1. Leaf photosynthetic capacity (A max) and photosynthetic rate (P n) increased with decreasing R/B ratio until 1, associated with increased stomatal conductance, along with significant increase in stomatal density and slight decrease in stomatal size. P n and A max under B treatment had 7.6 and 11.8% reduction in comparison with those under R/B = 1 treatment, respectively. The effective quantum yield of PSII and the efficiency of excitation captured by open PSII center were also significantly lower under B treatment than those under the other treatments. However, shoot dry weight increased with increasing R/B ratio with the greatest value under R/B = 12 treatment. The increase of shoot dry weight was mainly caused by increasing leaf area and leaf number, but no significant difference was observed between R and R/B = 12 treatments. Based on the above results, we conclude that quantitative B could promote photosynthetic performance or growth by stimulating morphological and physiological responses, yet there was no positive correlation between P n and shoot dry weight accumulation.

  20. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Hui-Wang Ai; Wei Ren

    2013-01-01

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, adv...

  1. Fluorescence axial nanotomography with plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Nicholas I; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Krasavin, Alexey V; Ng, Tony; Richards, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel imaging technique with super-resolution axial sensitivity, exploiting the changes in fluorescence lifetime above a plasmonic substrate. Using conventional confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging, we show that it is possible to deliver down to 6 nm axial position sensitivity of fluorophores in whole biological cell imaging. We employ this technique to map the topography of the cellular membrane, and demonstrate its application in an investigation of receptor-mediated endocytosis in carcinoma cells.

  2. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  3. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM)

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Michael W.; Loftus, Andrew F.; Dunn, Sarah E.; Joens, Matthew S.; Fitzpatrick, James A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light Sheet Fluorescent Mi...

  4. Design Strategies for Fluorescent Biodegradable Polymeric Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-14

    The marriage of biodegradable polymer and fluorescent imaging has resulted in an important area of polymeric biomaterials: biodegradable fluorescent polymers. Researchers have put significant efforts on developing versatile fluorescent biomaterials due to their promising in biological/biomedical labeling, tracking, monitoring, imaging, and diagnostic applications, especially in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cancer imaging applications. Biodegradable fluorescent polymers can function not only as implant biomaterials but also as imaging probes. Currently, there are two major classes of biodegradable polymers used as fluorescent materials. The first class is the combination of non-fluorescent biodegradable polymers and fluorescent agents such as organic dyes and quantum dots. Another class of polymers shows intrinsic photoluminescence as polymers by themselves carrying integral fluorescent chemical structures in or pendent to their polymer backbone, such as Green Fluorescent protein (GFP), and the recently developed biodegradable photoluminescent polymer (BPLP). Thus there is no need to conjugate or encapsulate additional fluorescent materials for the latter. In the present review, we will review the fluorescent biodegradable polymers with emphases on material fluorescence mechanism, design criteria for fluorescence, and their cutting-edge applications in biomedical engineering. We expect that this review will provide insightful discussion on the fluorescent biomaterial design and lead to innovations for the development of the next generation of fluorescent biomaterials and fluorescence-based biomedical technology.

  5. Design Strategies for Fluorescent Biodegradable Polymeric Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The marriage of biodegradable polymer and fluorescent imaging has resulted in an important area of polymeric biomaterials: biodegradable fluorescent polymers. Researchers have put significant efforts on developing versatile fluorescent biomaterials due to their promising in biological/biomedical labeling, tracking, monitoring, imaging, and diagnostic applications, especially in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cancer imaging applications. Biodegradable fluorescent polymers can function ...

  6. Design Strategies for Fluorescent Biodegradable Polymeric Biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    The marriage of biodegradable polymer and fluorescent imaging has resulted in an important area of polymeric biomaterials: biodegradable fluorescent polymers. Researchers have put significant efforts on developing versatile fluorescent biomaterials due to their promising in biological/biomedical labeling, tracking, monitoring, imaging, and diagnostic applications, especially in drug delivery, tissue engineering, and cancer imaging applications. Biodegradable fluorescent polymers can function not only as implant biomaterials but also as imaging probes. Currently, there are two major classes of biodegradable polymers used as fluorescent materials. The first class is the combination of non-fluorescent biodegradable polymers and fluorescent agents such as organic dyes and quantum dots. Another class of polymers shows intrinsic photoluminescence as polymers by themselves carrying integral fluorescent chemical structures in or pendent to their polymer backbone, such as Green Fluorescent protein (GFP), and the recently developed biodegradable photoluminescent polymer (BPLP). Thus there is no need to conjugate or encapsulate additional fluorescent materials for the latter. In the present review, we will review the fluorescent biodegradable polymers with emphases on material fluorescence mechanism, design criteria for fluorescence, and their cutting-edge applications in biomedical engineering. We expect that this review will provide insightful discussion on the fluorescent biomaterial design and lead to innovations for the development of the next generation of fluorescent biomaterials and fluorescence-based biomedical technology. PMID:23710326

  7. Fluorescent retroreflective signing of work zones : abstract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, A.P. de; Horst, A.R.A. van der; Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.; Kooi, F.L.

    1999-01-01

    Fluorescent retroreflective materials increase the brightness of traffic signs. In construction work zones a benefit is expected from the increased conspicuity of fluorescent retroreflective signs. Fluorescent material can be used instead of non-fluorescent materials both for the advance warning

  8. 21 CFR 892.1220 - Fluorescent scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fluorescent scanner. 892.1220 Section 892.1220...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1220 Fluorescent scanner. (a) Identification. A fluorescent scanner is a device intended to measure the induced fluorescent radiation in the body by exposing...

  9. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  10. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sean C; Margineanu, Anca; Alibhai, Dominic; Kelly, Douglas J; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Katan, Matilda; Dunsby, Chris; French, Paul M W

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset). This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis of live cell

  11. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis revealed essential roles of FtsH11 protease in regulation of the adaptive responses of photosynthetic systems to high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junping; Burke, John J; Xin, Zhanguo

    2018-01-10

    Photosynthetic systems are known to be sensitive to high temperature stress. To maintain a relatively "normal" level of photosynthetic activities, plants employ a variety of adaptive mechanisms in response to environmental temperature fluctuations. Previously, we reported that the chloroplast-targeted AtFtsH11 protease played an essential role for Arabidopsis plants to survive at high temperatures and to maintain normal photosynthetic efficiency at moderately elevated temperature. To investigate the factors contributing to the photosynthetic changes in FtsH11 mutant, we performed detailed chlorophyll fluorescence analyses of dark-adapted mutant plants and compared them to Col-0 WT plants under normal, two moderate high temperatures, and a high light conditions. We found that mutation of FtsH11 gene caused significant decreases in photosynthetic efficiency of photosystems when environmental temperature raised above optimal. Under moderately high temperatures, the FtsH11 mutant showed significant 1) decreases in electron transfer rates of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI), 2) decreases in photosynthetic capabilities of PSII and PSI, 3) increases in non-photochemical quenching, and a host of other chlorophyll fluorescence parameter changes. We also found that the degrees of these negative changes for utilizing the absorbed light energy for photosynthesis in FtsH11 mutant were correlated with the level and duration of the heat treatments. For plants grown under normal temperature and subjected to the high light treatment, no significant difference in chlorophyll fluorescence parameters was found between the FtsH11 mutant and Col-0 WT plants. The results of this study show that AtFtsH11 is essential for normal photosynthetic function under moderately elevated temperatures. The results also suggest that the network mediated by AtFtsH11 protease plays critical roles for maintaining the thermostability and possibly structural integrity of both photosystems

  12. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM Data Analysis with TIMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Laptenok

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM allows fluorescence lifetime images of biological objects to be collected at 250 nm spatial resolution and at (sub-nanosecond temporal resolution. Often ncomp kinetic processes underlie the observed fluorescence at all locations, but the intensity of the fluorescence associated with each process varies per-location, i.e., per-pixel imaged. Then the statistical challenge is global analysis of the image: use of the fluorescence decay in time at all locations to estimate the ncomp lifetimes associated with the kinetic processes, as well as the amplitude of each kinetic process at each location. Given that typical FLIM images represent on the order of 102 timepoints and 103 locations, meeting this challenge is computationally intensive. Here the utility of the TIMP package for R to solve parameter estimation problems arising in FLIM image analysis is demonstrated. Case studies on simulated and real data evidence the applicability of the partitioned variable projection algorithm implemented in TIMP to the problem domain, and showcase options included in the package for the visual validation of models for FLIM data.

  13. Multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with total internal reflection fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsugi, Yu; Kinjo, Masataka

    2009-01-01

    We report simultaneous determination of diffusion coefficients at different points of a cell membrane using a multipoint fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) system. A system carrying seven detection areas in the evanescent field is achieved by using seven optical fibers on the image plane in the detection port of an objective-type total internal reflection FCS (TIR-FCS) system. Fluctuation of fluorescence intensity is monitored and evaluated using seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and a newly constructed multichannel correlator. We demonstrate simultaneous-multipoint FCS, with a 3-mus time resolution, to investigate heterogeneous structures such as cell membranes and membrane-binding molecular dynamics near glass surfaces in live cells.

  14. Ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathies, R.A.; Glazer, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    We have shown that a number of polycationic highly fluorescent dyes form complexes with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) which are stable to electrophoresis and have characterized in detail such dsDNA complexes with TOTO (1,1[prime]-(4,4,7,7-tetramethyl-4,7-diazaundecamethylene)-bis-4-[3-methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo-1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene]-quinolinium tetraiodide) and oxazole yellow dimer (YOYO; an analogue of TOTO with a benzo-1,3-oxazole in place of the benzo-1,3-thiazole). TOTO and YOYO are virtually non-fluorescent in solution, but form highly fluorescent complexes with dsDNA, up to a maximum dye to DNA bp ratio of 1:4, with >1000-fold fluorescence enhancement. We have developed an assay using YOYO for the quantitation of single-stranded and dsDNA in solution applicable over a range of DNA concentrations from 0.5 to 100 ng per ml. The fluorescent dsDNA-dye complexes allow detection of dsDNA on agarose and acrylamide gels with picogram sensitivity. We have applied these complexes in multiplex mapping experiments for accurate sizing and quantitation of restriction fragments. We have shown that in gel shift experiments the stable dsDNA-dye complexes can be used to detect heteroduplex-Muts complexes with a sensitivity comparable to radioisotopic detection.

  15. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  16. [Reading by fluorescent lamp light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfling, G

    1979-08-01

    In dioptrics courses it has hitherto been taught that eyes of near-sighted patients who work in fluorescent light should be slightly under-corrected, since the near point is approximated in bluish light as a result of the chromatic aberration of the eye, in contrast to its location in white light or even the reddish light of incandescent lamps. The theory further states that this recommendation does not apply if close-range refraction occurs under fluorescent light. However, this is seldom the case. In our own investigations this approximation of the near point, under uniform illumination by fluorescent strip lights running across the ceiling, did not occur, at least not in "white" light (No. 33). On the contrary, under an incandescent lamp which was only half as powerful the near point was regularly closer to the eye than under white fluorescent light. The recommendation for under-correction of pulpit spectacles computed in incandescent light can therefore no longer be upheld.--While many patients complain of difficulties in diffuse incandescent light, these may be due to several other illumination factors which have not yet been fully investigated.--Some fundamental differences between diffuse fluorescent lighting and incandescent lamp lighting where there is a fall-off in luminosity are described.

  17. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  18. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-05-18

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  19. Physiological responses of Brassica napus to fulvic acid under water stress: Chlorophyll a fluorescence and antioxidant enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Lotfi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ameliorative effect of fulvic acid (0, 300, and 600 mg L− 1 on photosystem II and antioxidant enzyme activity of the rapeseed (Brassica napus L. plant under water stress (60, 100, and 140 mm evaporation from class A pan was studied using split plots in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Results indicated that application of fulvic acid (FA improved the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm and performance index (PI of plants under both well-watered and limited-water conditions. The time span from Fo to Fm and the energy necessary for the closure of all reaction centers was significantly increased, but the size of the plastoquinone pool was reduced with increasing water stress levels. Plants treated with FA had higher peroxidase and catalase activities under all irrigation conditions. Activities of ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in plants increased with increasing water stress. Malondialdehyde increased under severe water stress, but application of FA significantly decreased lipid peroxidation. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS is a common phenomenon in plants under stress. Under this condition, the balance between the production of ROS and the quenching activity of antioxidants is upset, often resulting in oxidative damage. In this study, application of FA significantly increased fluorescence of chlorophyll a, inhibiting ROS production and enhancing antioxidant enzymes activity that destroyed ROS. Thus, ROS in plant cells was reduced under water stress by application of FA and consequently lipid peroxidation was reduced.

  20. Diurnal and Seasonal Responses of High Frequency Chlorophyll Fluorescence and PRI Measurements to Abiotic Stress in Almonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambach-Ortiz, N. E.; Paw U, K. T.

    2016-12-01

    Plants have evolved to efficiently utilize light to synthesize energy-rich carbon compounds, and at the same time, dissipate absorbed but excessive photon that would otherwise transfer excitation energy to potentially toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nevertheless, even the most rapidly growing plants with the highest rates of photosynthesis only utilize about half of the light their leaves absorb during the hours of peak irradiance in sun-exposed habitats. Usually, that daily peak of irradiance coincides with high temperature and a high vapor pressure deficit, which are conditions related to plant stomata closure. Consequently, specially in water stressed environments, plants need to have mechanisms to dissipate most of absorbed photons. Plants avoid photo-oxidative damage of the photosynthetic apparatus due to the formation of ROS under excess light using different mechanisms in order to either lower the amount of ROS formation or detoxify already formed ROS. Photoinhibition is defined as a reduction in photosynthetic activity due largely to a sustained reduction in the photochemical efficiency of Photosystem II (PSII), which can be assessed by monitoring Chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF). Alternatively, monitoring abiotic stress effects upon photosynthetic activity and photoinhibition may be possible using high frequency spectral reflectance sensors. We aim to find the potential relationships between high frequency PRI and ChlF as indicators of photoinhibition and permanent photodamage at a seasonal scale. Preliminary results show that PRI responses are sensitive to photoinhibition, but provide a poor representation of permanent photodamage observed at a seasonal scale.

  1. Spectral effects of LEDs on chlorophyll fluorescence and pigmentation in Phalaenopsis 'Vivien' and 'Purple Star'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Fretté, Xavier; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    /night temperature, respectively, from January to April 2013. The light treatments were (1) 40% blue in 60% red (40% B/R), (2) 0% blue in 100% red (0% B/R) and (3) white LEDs with 32% blue in white (32% B/W, control), with background daylight under shade screens. The plants were harvested twice for leaf growth...... and pigmentation. There was no clear pattern in the spectral effect on growth since the order of leaf size differed between harvests in March and April. Fv/Fm was in the range of 0.52-0.72, but overall slightly higher in the control, which indicated a permanent downregulation of PSII in the colored treatments....... The fluorescence quenching showed no acclimation to color in 'Purple Star', while 'Vivien' had lower ETR and higher NPQ in the 40% B/R, resembling low light acclimation. The pigmentation showed corresponding spectral response with increasing concentration of lutein while increasing the fraction of blue light...

  2. A novel method for rapid and non-invasive detection of plants senescence using delayed fluorescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingrui; Xing, Da; Wang, Junsheng; Zeng, Lizhang; Li, Qiang

    2007-05-01

    Plants senescence is a phase of plants ontogeny marked by declining photosynthetic activity that is paralleled by a decline in chloroplast function. The photosystem II ( PSII ) in a plant is considered the primary site where light-induced delayed fluorescence (DF) is produced. With the leaves of Catharanthus roseus (Catharanthus roseus (L.) G.Don) as testing models, we have studied the effects of plants senescence induced by dark and/or exogenous hormones treatments on characteristics of DF by using a home-made portable DF detection system, which can enable various DF parameters, such as DF decay kinetic curve and DF intensity, to be rapidly produced for the plants in a short time. The results show that the changes in DF intensity of green plants can truly reflect the changes in photosynthetic capacity and chlorophyll content. Therefore, DF may be used an important means of evaluating in vivo plants senescence physiology. The changes in DF intensity may provide a new approach for the rapid and early detection of plants senescence caused by age or other senescence-related factors. DF technique could be potential useful for high throughput screening and less time-consuming and automated identifying the interesting mutants with genetic modifications that change plants senescence progress.

  3. Modeling of the redox state dynamics in photosystem II of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick cells and leaves of spinach and Arabidopsis thaliana from single flash-induced fluorescence quantum yield changes on the 100 ns-10 s time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B

    2015-08-01

    The time courses of the photosystem II (PSII) redox states were analyzed with a model scheme supposing a fraction of 11-25 % semiquinone (with reduced [Formula: see text]) RCs in the dark. Patterns of single flash-induced transient fluorescence yield (SFITFY) measured for leaves (spinach and Arabidopsis (A.) thaliana) and the thermophilic alga Chlorella (C.) pyrenoidosa Chick (Steffen et al. Biochemistry 44:3123-3132, 2005; Belyaeva et al. Photosynth Res 98:105-119, 2008, Plant Physiol Biochem 77:49-59, 2014) were fitted with the PSII model. The simulations show that at high-light conditions the flash generated triplet carotenoid (3)Car(t) population is the main NPQ regulator decaying in the time interval of 6-8 μs. So the SFITFY increase up to the maximum level [Formula: see text]/F 0 (at ~50 μs) depends mainly on the flash energy. Transient electron redistributions on the RC redox cofactors were displayed to explain the SFITFY measured by weak light pulses during the PSII relaxation by electron transfer (ET) steps and coupled proton transfer on both the donor and the acceptor side of the PSII. The contribution of non-radiative charge recombination was taken into account. Analytical expressions for the laser flash, the (3)Car(t) decay and the work of the water-oxidizing complex (WOC) were used to improve the modeled P680(+) reduction by YZ in the state S 1 of the WOC. All parameter values were compared between spinach, A. thaliana leaves and C. pyrenoidosa alga cells and at different laser flash energies. ET from [Formula: see text] slower in alga as compared to leaf samples was elucidated by the dynamics of [Formula: see text] fractions to fit SFITFY data. Low membrane energization after the 10 ns single turnover flash was modeled: the ∆Ψ(t) amplitude (20 mV) is found to be about 5-fold smaller than under the continuous light induction; the time-independent lumen pHL, stroma pHS are fitted close to dark estimates. Depending on the flash energy used at 1

  4. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  5. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wang Ai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  6. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2013-11-11

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  7. [Fluorescence spectra of ponceau-4R].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ai-Min; Zhu, Tuo; Gu, En-Dong; Liu, Zhou-Yi; Xu, Hui

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence spectra of ponceau 4R induced by 220-400 nm light were studied in the present paper. The result shows that ponceau 4R has four obvious fluorescence spectral peaks respectively located at 420, 530, 635 and 687 nm, each of these fluorescence spectral peaks has different best induced light, and the corresponding fluorescence spectra were listed. It was considered that this fluorescence comes from the transition n --> pi* of n electrons in the -OH and pi* --> pi of pi electrons in the naphthalene. The fluorescence spectral peaks at 420 nm come from the transition n --> pi* and the other three fluorescence spectral peaks come from pi* --> pi. But the intensity of the four fluorescence spectral peaks changes differently with the excited wavelength This paper attempted to give the expression of the four fluorescence spectral peaks based on the microcosmic mechanism. The reason for that ponceau 4R has complex fluorescence characteristic is that ponceau 4R not only has big and conjugate structure such as naphthalene and provides electron group -OH which can intensify its ability to emit fluorescence, but also absorbs electron group such as N=N which can depress its ability to emit fluorescence. Investigation on the fluorescence spectra and its characteristics will contribute to the study on the fluorescence spectra of other azo pigment and help find a new way for checking food safety.

  8. Fluorescence lifetime standards for time and frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boens, N.; Qin, Wenwu; Basaric, N.; Hofkens, J.; Ameloot, M.; Pouget, J.; Lefevre, J.P.; Valeur, B.; Gratton, E.; Ven, van de M.; Silva jr., D.; Engelborghs, Y.; Willaert, K.; Sillen, A.; Rumbles, G.; Philips, D.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Hoek, van A.; Lakowicz, J.R.; Malak, H.; Gryczynski, I.; Szabo, A.G.; Krajcarski, D.T.; Tamai, N.; Miura, A.

    2007-01-01

    A series of fluorophores with single-exponential fluorescence decays in liquid solution at 20 C were measured independently by nine laboratories using single-photon timing and multifrequency phase and modulation fluorometry instruments with lasers as excitation source. The dyes that can serve as

  9. PH-sensitive fluorescence detection by diffuse fluorescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao; Gao, Feng; Duan, Linjing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan

    2012-03-01

    The importance of cellular pH has been shown clearly in the study of cell activity, pathological feature, drug metabolism, etc. Monitoring pH changes of living cells and imaging the regions with abnormal pH values in vivo could provide the physiologic and pathologic information for the research of the cell biology, pharmacokinetics, diagnostics and therapeutics of certain diseases such as cancer. Thus, pH-sensitive fluorescence imaging of bulk tissues has been attracting great attention in the regime of near-infrared diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT), an efficient small-animal imaging tool. In this paper, the feasibility of quantifying pH-sensitive fluorescence targets in turbid medium is investigated using both time-domain and steady-state DFT methods. By use of the specifically designed time-domain and continuous-wave systems and the previously proposed image reconstruction scheme, we validate the method through 2-dimensional imaging experiments on a small-animal-sized phantom with multiply targets of distinct pH values. The results show that the approach can localize the targets with reasonable accuracy and achieve quantitative reconstruction of the pH-sensitive fluorescent yield.

  10. Use of fluorescent Ca2+ dyes with green fluorescent protein and its variants: problems and solutions.

    OpenAIRE

    Bolsover, S.; O. Ibrahim; O'luanaigh, N; Williams, H; Cockcroft, S

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the degree to which fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator dyes, and green fluorescent protein and its variants, can be used together. We find that the most commonly used fluorescent protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), seriously contaminates fura 2 signals. We suggest two alternative combinations for which there is no detectable contamination of the Ca(2+) indicator signal by the fluorescent protein. Blue fluorescent protein can be used with the Ca(2+) indicator Fura Red...

  11. Chemometric endogenous fluorescence for tissue diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run; Vasquez, Kevin; Xu, M.

    2017-02-01

    Endogenous fluorescence is a powerful technique for probing both structure and function of tissue. We show that enabling wide-field fluorescence microscopy with chemometrics can significantly enhance the performance of tissue diagnosis with endogenous fluorescence. The spatial distribution and absolute concentration of fluorophores is uncovered with non-negative factorization aided by the spatial diversity from microscopic autofluorescence color images. Fluorescence quantification in terms of its absolute concentration map avoids issues dependent on specific measurement approach or systems and yields biologically meaningful data. The standardization of endogenous fluorescence in terms of absolute concentration will facilitate its translation to the clinics and simplifies the assessment of competing methods relating to tissue fluorescence.

  12. A Dimmable Electrodeless Fluorescent Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuming; Long, Qi; Chen, Dahua; Li, Weide; Wang, Aiqun

    A dimmable electrodeless fluorescent lamp (induction lamp) is introduced in this paper. The principles of the induction lamp are introduced in details. A dimming approach for the lamp is discussed in both theory and experiment. A continuous dimming range from 30%-100% can be realized with the application of the IC chip.

  13. Fluorescence Spectroscopy in a Shoebox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq Wahab, M.

    2007-08-01

    This article describes construction of a simple, inexpensive fluorometer. It utilizes a flashlight or sunlight source, highlighter marker ink, bowl of water with mirror as dispersing element, and colored cellophane sheets as filters. The human eye is used as a detector. This apparatus is used to demonstrate important concepts related to fluorescence spectroscopy. Using ink from a highlighter marker, one can demonstrate the difference between light scattering and fluorescence emission, the need for an intense light source, phenomenon of the Stokes shift, the choice of filters, the preferred geometry of excitation source and emission detector, and the low detection limits that can be achieved by fluorescence measurements. By reflecting the fluorescence emission from a compact disk, it can be seen that the light emitted by molecules is not monochromatic. Furthermore, a spectrofluorometer is constructed using gratings made from a DVD or a CD. The shoebox fluorometer and spectrofluorometer can serve as useful teaching aids in places where commercial instruments are not available, and it avoids the black box problem of modern instruments.

  14. Fluorescence Spectroscopy and its Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    ferent aspects of fluorescence spectroscopy and applications in chemistry, which I hope would be useful to both chemists and spectroscopists. I thank the Indian Academy of Sciences and, in particular, the Editorial. Board of the Journal of Chemical Sciences for inviting me to be the Guest. Editor of this Special Issue.

  15. Fluorescence for high school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultheiss, N.G.; Kool, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    In a not obligatory series of lessons for high school students in the Netherlands we discuss the fluorescence aspects of anthracene. These lessons were developed because HiSPARC (High school Project on Astrophysics Research with Cosmics) detection of cosmic rays are available for different secondary

  16. Fluorescence diagnostics in oncological gynecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, Ludmila A.; Adamyan, Leila V.; Kozachenko, Vladimir P.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Stranadko, Eugene F.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-10-01

    The method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) of tumors is a promising tool that may allow to increase sensitivity of tumor detection especially at initial stages. One of the most promising photosensitizers today is 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) that, actually, is not photosensitizer itself but precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This paper deals with cancer diagnostics in gynecology by means of ALA-induced Pp IX laser-fluorescence spectroscopy. The tissue fluorescence spectra in vivo were studied in patients with various pathologies of ovaries, uterine and vulva after 5-aminolevulinic acid administration. It was shown that different pathologies varies in accumulation of Pp IX. Coefficient of fluorescence kf for normal tissue is not high, but exceptions are endometrium and mucous membrane of uterine tubes. Benign tumors of uterus and ovary have low values of kf, but polyps of endometrium exhibit high kf. Optical express-biopsy is important for diagnosis of ovarian cancer and micrometastatic spread. Coefficients of diagnostic contrast were determined for cancer of endometrium, cervical cancer, vulvar cancer.

  17. Ultraviolet Fluorescence Spectra of Fingerprints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Saitoh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied inherent fluorescence spectra and imaging of fingerprints in the deep ultraviolet (UV region with a nanosecond-pulsed Nd-YAG laser system that consists of a tunable laser, a cooled CCD camera, and a grating spectrometer. In this paper, we have studied UV fluorescence spectra of fingerprints under 266-nm illumination. Fluorescence spectra of fingerprints have two main peaks, around 330 nm (peak A and 440 nm (peak B. At first, when a fingerprint has just been pressed, peak A is dominant. However, its intensity reduces as the total illumination time increases. On the other hand, peak B is weak at first. It appears after enough 266-nm illumination and its intensity increases as time elapses. After 3 h of illumination, peak A almost diminishes and peak B becomes dominant. By leaving the fingerprint under a fluorescent lamp in a room without laser illumination, peak A can be restored partly, while the intensity of peak B still increases.Time-resolved fluorescence spectra were also measured for these two peaks. The lifetime of each peak is 2.0 nsec (peak A and 6.2 nsec (peak B on average. Both peaks seem to consist of several components with different lifetimes. In the case of peak A, the 330-nm peak decays fast and a new component at 360 nm becomes dominant when the delay time exceeds 20 nsec. In the case of peak B, unlike peak A, no clear peak separation is observed, but the peak position seems to move from 440 to 460 nm when the delay time becomes larger.

  18. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  19. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Engel, Esteban A.; Scherer, Julian; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; del Rio, Tony; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2015-01-01

    In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP), fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PRV) structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer. PMID:26610544

  20. Preparation and Application of Fluorescent Carbon Dots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zuo, Jun; Jiang, Tao; Zhao, Xiaojing; Xiong, Xiaohong; Xiao, Saijin; Zhu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

      Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs) are a novel type of fluorescent nanomaterials, which not only possess the specific quantum confinement effects of nanomaterials due to the small size of nanomaterials, but also have good...

  1. Preparation and Application of Fluorescent Carbon Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs are a novel type of fluorescent nanomaterials, which not only possess the specific quantum confinement effects of nanomaterials due to the small size of nanomaterials, but also have good biocompatibility and high fluorescence. Meanwhile, fluorescence CDs overcome the shortcomings of high toxicity of traditional nanomaterials. Moreover, the preparation procedure of fluorescent CDs is simple and easy. Therefore, fluorescent CDs have great potential applied in photocatalysis, biochemical sensing, bioimaging, drug delivery, and other related areas. In this paper, recent hot researches on fluorescent CDs are reviewed and some problems in the progress of fluorescent CDs are also summarized. At last, a future outlook in this direction is presented.

  2. CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS IN FORESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pollastrini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A European-wide assessment of chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF, prompt fluorescence on dark-adapted samples parameters in forest ecosystems was carried out in the years 2012-2013, within the 7FP FunDivEUROPE project. A total of 1596 trees growing in 209 stands distributed in six countries, from Mediterranean to boreal sites, were sampled. This paper shows the applicability of the ChlF in forest ecology surveys, the protocols adopted for leaf sampling and ChlF measurements, the variability of the ChlF parameters within and between trees, their dependence to environmental factors and the relationships with other functional leaf traits. The most relevant findings were as follows: (i The least variable ChlF parameter within and between the trees was the maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry (FV/FM, whereas the performance indices (PIABS and PITOT showed the highest variability; (ii for a given tree, the ChlF parameters measured at two heights of the crown (top and bottom leaves were correlated and, in coniferous species, the ChlF parameters were correlated between different needle age classes (from the current year and previous year; (iii the ChlF parameters showed a geographical pattern, and the photochemical performance of the forest trees was higher in central Europe than in the edge sites (northernmost and southernmost; and (iv ChlF parameters showed different sensitivity to specific environmental factors: FV/FM increased with the increase of the leaf area index of stands and soil fertility; ΔVIP was reduced under high temperature and drought. The photochemical responses of forest tree species, analyzed with ChlF parameters, were influenced by the ecology of the trees (i.e. their functional groups, continental distribution, successional status, etc., tree species’ richness and composition of the stands. Our results support the applicability and usefulness of the ChlF in forest monitoring investigations on a large spatial scale and

  3. Electromagnetic fields emitted by fluorescent and compact fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, C.; Sebastiao, D.; Ladeira, D.; Carpinteiro, G.; Antunes, M.; Correia, L.M.; Fernandes, C. [Instituto de Telecomunicacoes, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-05-15

    In the scope of the monIT Project, it was found that fluorescent and compact fluorescent lamps are also important sources of radiation. More than increasing electromagnetic field (EMF) levels in a particular environment, the radiated EMFs from ballasts may cause interference in other devices. Two different lamps are analysed, both in terms of their radiated frequency spectrum and of their compliance with European EMF recommended exposure levels. As expected, the analysis of results shows that, in the immediate vicinity of a lamp, EMF levels radiated by lighting devices depend on the lamp power. Finally, one can conclude that EMFs radiated from both lamps are in compliance with the EMF reference levels. (author)

  4. Species-specific and seasonal differences in chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic light response among three evergreen species in a Madrean sky island mixed conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, D. L.; Minor, R. L.; Braun, Z.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Unlike the snowmelt-dominated hydroclimate of more northern mountainous regions, the hydroclimate of the Madrean sky islands is characterized by snowmelt and convective storms associated with the North American Monsoon. These mid-summer storms trigger biological activity and are important drivers of primary productivity. For example, at the highest elevations where mixed conifer forests occur, ecosystem carbon balance is influenced by monsoon rains. Whereas these storms' significance is increasingly recognized at the ecosystem scale, species-specific physiological responses to the monsoon are poorly known. Prior to and following monsoon onset, we measured pre-dawn and light-adapted chlorophyll fluorescence as well as photosynthetic light response in southwestern white pine (Pinus strobiformis), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in a Madrean sky island mixed conifer forest near Tucson, Arizona. Photochemical quenching (qp), an indicator of the proportion of open PSII reaction centers, was greatest in P. strobiformis and least in P. menziesii and increased in response to monsoon rains (repeated-measures ANOVA; species, F2,14 = 6.17, P = 0.012; time, F2,14= 8.17, P = 0.013). In contrast, non-photochemical quenching (qN), an indicator of heat dissipation ability, was greatest in P. ponderosa and least in P. menziesii, but was not influenced by monsoon onset (repeated-measures ANOVA; species, F2,12 = 4.18, P = 0.042). Estimated from leaf area-adjusted photosynthetic light response curves, maximum photosynthetic rate (Amax) was greatest in P. ponderosa and least in P. menziesii (repeated-measures ANOVA; species, F2,8= 40.8, P = 0.001). Surprisingly, while the monsoon positively influenced Amax among P. ponderosa and P. strobiformis, Amax of P. menziesii declined with monsoon onset (repeated-measures ANOVA; species x time, F2,8 = 13.8, P = 0.002). Calculated as the initial slope of the photosynthetic light response curve, light

  5. Two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-01-01

    We discovered that hemoglobin emits high energy Soret fluorescence when two-photon excited by the visible femtosecond light sources. The unique spectral and temporal characteristics of hemoglobin fluorescence were measured by using a time-resolved spectroscopic detection system. The high energy Soret fluorescence of hemoglobin shows the spectral peak at 438 nm with extremely short lifetime. This discovery enables two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy to become a potentially powerful t...

  6. Entangled-photon coincidence fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok H

    2008-09-29

    We describe fluorescence imaging using the second-order correlation of entangled photon pairs. The proposed method is based on the principle that one photon of the pair carries information on where the other photon has been absorbed and has produced fluorescence in a sample. Because fluorescent molecules serve as "detectors" breaking the entanglement, multiply-scattered fluorescence photons within the sample do not cause image blur. We discuss experimental implementations.

  7. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  8. Characterization of Fluorescent Polystyrene Microspheres for Advanced Flow Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisto, Pietro M. F.; Lowe, K. Todd; Byun, Guibo; Simpson, Roger; Vercamp, Max; Danley, Jason E.; Koh, Brian; Tiemsin, Pacita; Danehy, Paul M.; Wohl, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent dye-doped polystyrene latex microspheres (PSLs) are being developed for velocimetry and scalar measurements in variable property flows. Two organic dyes, Rhodamine B (RhB) and dichlorofluorescence (DCF), are examined to assess laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) properties for flow imaging applications and single-shot temperature measurements. A major interest in the current research is the application of safe dyes, thus DCF is of particular interest, while RhB is used as a benchmark. Success is demonstrated for single-point laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) and also imaging fluorescence, excited via a continuous wave 2 W laser beam, for exposures down to 10 ms. In contrast, when exciting with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 200 mJ/pulse, no fluorescence was detected, even when integrating tens of pulses. We show that this is due to saturation of the LIF signal at relatively low excitation intensities, 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than the pulsed laser intensity. A two-band LIF technique is applied in a heated jet, indicating that the technique effectively removes interfering inputs such as particle diameter variation. Temperature measurement uncertainties are estimated based upon the variance measured for the two-band LIF intensity ratio and the achievable dye temperature sensitivity, indicating that particles developed to date may provide about +/-12.5 C precision, while future improvements in dye temperature sensitivity and signal quality may enable single-shot temperature measurements with sub-degree precision.

  9. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  10. ATP Changes the Fluorescence Lifetime of Cyan Fluorescent protein via an Interaction with His148

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.W.; Willemse, M.; Slijkhuis, R.; Krogt, G.; Laptenok, S.; Jalink, K.; Wieringa, B.; Fransen, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we described that ATP induces changes in YFP/CFP fluorescence intensities of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors based on CFP-YFP. To get insight into this phenomenon, we employed fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy to analyze the influence of ATP on these fluorescent

  11. ATP changes the fluorescence lifetime of cyan fluorescent protein via an interaction with His148.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.W.; Willemse, M.P.; Slijkhuis, R.; Krogt, G. van der; Laptenok, S.P.; Jalink, K.; Wieringa, B.; Fransen, J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we described that ATP induces changes in YFP/CFP fluorescence intensities of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors based on CFP-YFP. To get insight into this phenomenon, we employed fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy to analyze the influence of ATP on these fluorescent

  12. Application of the Doehlert design to optimize the signal obtained in photochemically induced fluorescence for the determination of eight phenylureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-García, M D; Martínez-Galera, M; Parrilla-Vázquez, P; Mughari, A R; Ortiz-Rodríguez, I M

    2008-03-01

    This work describes the optimization of a photochemically induced method for the detection of eight phenylureas has been developed by response surface methodology (RSM). These pesticides do not show native fluorescence but they were photolyzed into strongly fluorescent photoproducts under UV irradiation. The effect of the main variables affecting the yield of the photoderivatization reaction, and hence the fluorescence intensity, such as solvent, UV irradiation time and pH were optimized for each pesticide. A Doehlert design was applied in order to obtain maximum intensity fluorescence using response surface methodology. In general, a maximum was found for all pesticides using MeOH as organic solvent, except for diuron, whereas the effect of pH and irradiation time was different, according to each pesticide. Finally, the addition of beta-cyclodextrin upon the photochemically induced fluorescence intensity was investigate. The fluorescence intensity was only improved for monolinuron at a concentration of 4 x 10(-3) M of beta-cyclodextrin.

  13. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  15. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, Randall T; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-10-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associated with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology has led to rapid improvement in the protocols and has ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation--integration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Fluorescence imaging agents in cancerology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganin-Gioanni, Aurélie; Bellard, Elisabeth; Paquereau, Laurent; Ecochard, Vincent; Golzio, Muriel; Teissié, Justin

    2010-09-01

    One of the major challenges in cancer therapy is to improve early detection and prevention using novel targeted cancer diagnostics. Detection requests specific recognition. Tumor markers have to be ideally present on the surface of cancer cells. Their targeting with ligands coupled to imaging agents make them visible/detectable. Fluorescence imaging is a newly emerging technology which is becoming a complementary medical method for cancer diagnosis. It allows detection with a high spatio-temporal resolution of tumor markers in small animals and in clinical studies. In this review, we focus on the recent outcome of basic studies in the design of new approaches (probes and devices) used to detect tumor cells by fluorescence imaging.

  17. Fluorescent compounds present in food

    OpenAIRE

    Soto Serrano, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Póster The food industry demands fast, reliable, cheap and reproducible methods for quality and process control. This bibliographic review work investigates florescence spectroscopy, a method that couldn’t be used in food until the recent technological advances, concretely front-face fluorescence and chemometric tools. This technology presents advantages as compared to classical methods like HPLC or capillary electrophoresis, which require qualified staff, sample preparation and are time-c...

  18. Fluorescent lamp and ballast options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This paper reviews some of the current technologies for fluorescent lamps and ballasts with particular focus on the most common configuration in Canada - the F32T8, 4 ft length, two-lamp ballast combination. Fluorescent lamps require a high voltage surge for start-up. Technical specifications for the F32T8 lamp were provided along with reasons why they are the preferred choice. The three types of ballasts include electromagnetic, electronic and hybrid. While electromagnetic ballasts perform the same start-up duty, they are not as efficient as electronic or hybrid ballasts. Hybrid ballasts are energy efficient, but they have problems with lamp flicker, tar leakage and shorter life expectancy. Electronic ballasts eliminate flicker, do not leak and have a life expectancy of 25 years. Electronic ballasts can be instant, rapid start, or dimmable. Energy information on different types of ballast systems was presented along with a comparison of the type of light produced according to lamp and ballast combinations. This paper also presents a case study in which the lighting system of a 25-storey building was retrofitted with energy efficient fluorescent lamps and ballasts for an energy savings of about $100,000 per year and a 5 year payback period. 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  19. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Bobin George Abraham; Karen S Sarkisyan; Mishin, Alexander S.; Ville Santala; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Matti Karp

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicit...

  20. Fluorescent multiple chemical sensing using time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Nagl, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging in multiple chemical sensing approaches. Using fluorescence lifetime as an analytical parameter allows extracting more information out of probes than fluorescence intensity measurements and it is therefore attractive in order to quantitate multiple species. It leads to better data quality as fluorescence lifetime measurements are not or less affected by many sources of noise in fluorescence signals such as straylight and othe...

  1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  2. Application of Fluorescent Label in Polymer Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Zarybnicka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrospinning of fluorescent probe polyamide 6 doped by 7H-benzimidazo[2,1-a]benzo[de]isoquinolin-7-on is presented as a model processing photoluminescent nanofibers. The presence of the fluorescent probe in the fiber layers was confirmed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR; the surface nanofiber structure was described by high-resolution fluorescence microscope and scanning electron microscope images. The prepared nanofibers with the fluorescent label were further characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, both in the solid phase and in the solution.

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy of synthetic melanin in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, G.; Frassanito, M.C. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Palazzo, G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Gallone, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy); Mallardi, A. [ICPS-CNR, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Biagi, P.F. [Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica, Universita di Bari, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Capozzi, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Universita di Foggia, Viale Pinto, 71100 Foggia (Italy)], E-mail: v.capozzi@unifg.it

    2009-01-15

    We report a detailed investigation of fluorescence properties of synthetic eumelanin pigment in solution. A complete set of fluorescence spectra in the near-UV and visible range is analysed. Excitation spectra at a few selected emission energies are also investigated. Our measurements support the hypothesis that fluorescence in eumelanin is related to chemically distinct oligomeric units that can be selectively excited. Fluorescence due to large oligomer systems is spectrally differentiated from that due to monomers and small oligomer systems. Fluorescence excitation measurements show the contribution of 5,6-dihydroxyndole-2-carboxylic acid and 5,6-dihydroxyndole monomers to the emission of small-size oligomers.

  4. Modulation of photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency in nature: from seconds to seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Cohu, Christopher M; Muller, Onno; Adams, William W

    2012-09-01

    Modulation of the efficiency with which leaves convert absorbed light to photochemical energy [intrinsic efficiency of open photosystem II (PSII) centers, as the ratio of variable to maximal chlorophyll fluorescence] as well as leaf xanthophyll composition (interconversions of the xanthophyll cycle pigments violaxanthin and zeaxanthin) were characterized throughout single days and nights to entire seasons in plants growing naturally in contrasting light and temperature environments. All pronounced decreases of intrinsic PSII efficiency took place in the presence of zeaxanthin. The reversibility of these PSII efficiency changes varied widely, ranging from reversible-within-seconds (in a vine experiencing multiple sunflecks under a eucalypt canopy) to apparently permanently locked-in for entire seasons (throughout the whole winter in a subalpine conifer forest at 3,000 m). While close association between low intrinsic PSII efficiency and zeaxanthin accumulation was ubiquitous, accompanying features (such as trans-thylakoid pH gradient, thylakoid protein composition, and phosphorylation) differed among contrasting conditions. The strongest and longest-lasting depressions in intrinsic PSII efficiency were seen in the most stress-tolerant species. Evergreens, in particular, showed the most pronounced modulation of PSII efficiency and thermal dissipation, and are therefore suggested as model species for the study of photoprotection. Implications of the responses of field-grown plants in nature for mechanistic models are discussed.

  5. Interaction of fluorescent phospholipids with cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denz, Manuela; Haralampiev, Ivan; Schiller, Sabine; Szente, Lajos; Herrmann, Andreas; Huster, Daniel; Müller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent analogs of phospholipids are often employed to investigate the structure and dynamics of lipids in membranes. Some of those studies have used cyclodextrins e.g., to modulate the lipid phase. However, the role of the fluorescence moiety of analogs for the interaction between cyclodextrins and fluorescent lipids has not been investigated so far in detail. Therefore, in the present study the interaction of various fluorescent phospholipid analogs with methylated α-, β- and γ- cyclodextrins was investigated. The analogs differed in their structure, in the length of the fatty acyl chain, in the position of the fluorescence group, and in the attached fluorescence moiety (7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl (NBD) or dipyrrometheneboron difluoride (BODIPY)). In aqueous buffer, cyclodextrins bind fluorescent lipids disturbing the organization of the analogs. When incorporated into lipid vesicles, analogs are selectively extracted from the membrane upon addition of cyclodextrins. The results show that the interaction of cyclodextrins with fluorescent phospholipids depends on the cyclodextrin species, the fluorescence moiety and the phospholipid structure. The presented data should be of interest for studies using fluorescent phospholipids and cyclodextrins, since the interaction between the fluorescence group and the cyclodextrin may interfere with the process(es) under study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Basic investigation of concentrator using fluorescent substance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, Mitsuo

    1986-12-01

    A concentrator was manufactured on an experimental basis to improve the performance of the concentrator using fluorescent substance and the analysis based on the test result of optical characteristics of the materials composing the concentrator was made. The concentrator is composed of fluorescent substance sandwiched between two acrylic sheets. Organic fluorescent solution prepared by dissolving eosin to alcohol and capsulating with transparent encapsulant was used as the fluorescent substance. The concentration ratio based on the characteristic tests of the fluorescent substance and material of acrylic sheet composing the concentrator and the numerical calculation model was calculated. The results show that the difference between the experimental and calculated values is 10%. The result of calculation based on the numerical model indicates that the energy efficiency is decreased through the concentration ratio is increased in a thin concentrator, because the fluorescence is decreased by the absorption during passing more frequently through the fluorescent layer. (1 ref, 10 figs)

  7. Comparative study of thylakoid membranes in terminal heterocysts and vegetative cells from two cyanobacteria, Rivularia M-261 and Anabaena variabilis, by fluorescence and absorption spectral microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozue, Shuho; Katayama, Mitsunori; Terazima, Masahide; Kumazaki, Shigeichi

    2017-09-01

    Heterocyst is a nitrogen-fixing cell differentiated from a cell for oxygen-evolving photosynthesis (vegetative cell) in some filamentous cyanobacteria when fixed nitrogen (e.g., ammonia and nitrate) is limited. Heterocysts appear at multiple separated positions in a single filament with an interval of 10-20 cells in some genera (including Anabaena variabilis). In other genera, a single heterocyst appears only at the basal terminal in a filament (including Rivularia M-261). Such morphological diversity may necessitate different properties of heterocysts. However, possible differences in heterocysts have largely remained unexplored due to the minority of heterocysts among major vegetative cells. Here, we have applied spectroscopic microscopy to Rivularia and A. variabilis to analyze their thylakoid membranes in individual cells. Absorption and fluorescence spectral imaging enabled us to estimate concentrations and interconnections of key photosynthetic components like photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII) and subunits of light-harvesting phycobilisome including phycocyanin (PC). The concentration of PC in heterocysts of Rivularia is far higher than that of A. variabilis. Fluorescence quantum yield of PC in Rivularia heterocysts was found to be virtually the same as those in its vegetative cells, while fluorescence quantum yield of PC in A. variabilis heterocysts was enhanced in comparison with its vegetative cells. PSI concentration in the thylakoid membranes of heterocysts seems to remain nearly the same as those of the vegetative cells in both the species. The average stoichiometric ratio between PSI monomer and PC hexamer in Rivularia heterocysts is estimated to be about 1:1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative assessment of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging in an animal model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppert, Jennifer K; Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Higgins, Christopher D; Steward, Annette; Ahringer, Julie; Kuhn, Jeffrey R; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-11-07

    Fluorescent protein tags are fundamental tools used to visualize gene products and analyze their dynamics in vivo. Recent advances in genome editing have expedited the precise insertion of fluorescent protein tags into the genomes of diverse organisms. These advances expand the potential of in vivo imaging experiments and facilitate experimentation with new, bright, photostable fluorescent proteins. Most quantitative comparisons of the brightness and photostability of different fluorescent proteins have been made in vitro, removed from biological variables that govern their performance in cells or organisms. To address the gap, we quantitatively assessed fluorescent protein properties in vivo in an animal model system. We generated transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains expressing green, yellow, or red fluorescent proteins in embryos and imaged embryos expressing different fluorescent proteins under the same conditions for direct comparison. We found that mNeonGreen was not as bright in vivo as predicted based on in vitro data but is a better tag than GFP for specific kinds of experiments, and we report on optimal red fluorescent proteins. These results identify ideal fluorescent proteins for imaging in vivo in C. elegans embryos and suggest good candidate fluorescent proteins to test in other animal model systems for in vivo imaging experiments. © 2016 Heppert et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Determination of absolute population densities of eroded tungsten in hollow cathode lamps and fluorescent lamps by laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadrath, S [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Ehlbeck, J [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Lieder, G [Research Light Sources, Osram GmbH, Hellabrunner Str. 1, D 81536 Muenchen (Germany); Sigeneger, F [Institute of Low-Temperature Plasma Physics, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2005-09-07

    The high energy ion bombardment during instant start of a fluorescent lamp (FL) leads to intense sputtering of the electrode material including tungsten and emitter. Thus, a cold started FL often suffers from early failures due to coil fracture. The main goal of this paper is to investigate tungsten erosion. We have employed the ultra-sensitive method of laser-induced fluorescence. This technique is particularly well-suited to determining absolute population densities of neutral and singly ionized atoms of liberated electrode material. In addition to FL, our investigations have been performed also on hollow cathode lamps (HCLs). These are useful because they provide a variable source of sputtered tungsten atoms and can serve as tuning tools for precise adjustment of the laser radiation. We will present absolute atomic tungsten population densities in a commercial FL and in an HCL. Furthermore, the results of a theoretical investigation of the argon plasma and the tungsten density in the HCL are represented.

  10. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  11. Pollution detection using the spectral fluorescent signatures (SFS technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Del Carmen Martín

    2014-06-01

    was adopted as the ligand owing to its ability to react with Al3+ ion to form the stoichiometric 1:3 complex (Figure 4 with excellent fluorescent properties. On the other hand the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris was tested for growth in a photobioreactor (Figure 5 with controlled growth conditions. The system is monitored throughout software developed by the Remote Sensing laboratory (University of Vigo. It allows checking in real time all system variables, to connect a pH sensor as well and to register temperature. Besides each one of its 8 columns can be individually controlled. The SFS in BIO mode of a sample of C. vulgaris and aluminum complex are shown in Figure 6. In this image, maximum intensity value corresponds to the 465.0/690.0 nm excitation/emission wavelength for C. vulgaris and to 415.0/530.0 nm for the aluminum complex. Figure 7 shows (in UV mode the comparison between the SFS of C. vulgaris and the aluminum complex fluorescence. Maximum value for the aluminum complex appears at 360/495 nm excitation/emission for this complex. SFSs of C. vulgaris and the aluminum complex are both, clearly different (in BIO or in UV mode and the region of the image where the maximum value appears is also visibly characteristic. Besides, UV and BIO images can be used in a complementary manner when it comes to the discrimination of compounds.Finally, a study between absorption measurements and chlorophyll-a (through SFS has been carried out. A total of 14 samples (obtained by a series of dilutions of a C. vulgaris culture with an initial concentration of 2.70E+07 cell/mL (Figure 8 have been examined with the SFS analyzer Instant Screener. For absorbance measurements (Figure 9, a PX-2 lamp has been used as the exclusive source of light. The same volume (50 mL of the sample has been used for each measurement. The signal has been obtained with a USB4000-FL spectrophotometer.

  12. Far-Field Fluorescence Nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    The resolution of a far-field optical microscopy is usually limited to d=λ/ λ( 2,α ) . - ( 2,α ) > 200 nm, with nα denoting the numerical aperture of the lens and λ the wavelength of light. While the diffraction barrier has prompted the invention of electron, scanning probe, and x-ray microscopy, the 3D-imaging of the interior of (live) cells requires the use of focused visible light. I will discuss new developments of optical microscopy that I anticipate to have a lasting impact on our understanding of living matter. Emphasis will be placed on physical concepts that have overcome the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy. To set the scene for future directions, I will show that all these concepts share a common strategy: exploiting selected states and transitions of the fluorescent marker to neutralize the limiting role of diffraction. The first viable concept of this kind was Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy where the spot diameter followsd λ/ λ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ) . - ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ); I / I Is . - Isis a measure of the strength with which the molecule is send from the fluorescent state to the dark ground state. For I / I Is . - Is->∞ it follows that d->0, meaning that the resolution that can, in principle, be molecular. The concept underlying STED microscopy can be expanded by employing other transitions that shuffle the molecule between a dark and a bright state, such as (i) shelving the fluorophore in a dark triplet state, and (ii) photoswitching between a `fluorescence activated' and a `fluorescence deactivated' conformational state. Examples for the latter include photochromic organic compounds, and fluorescent proteins which undergo a cis-trans photoisomerizations. Photoswitching provides ultrahigh resolution at ultralow light levels. Switching can be performed in an ensemble or individually in which case the image is assembled molecule by molecule at high resolution. By providing molecular

  13. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M C Volgenant

    Full Text Available Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation. Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  14. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  15. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of a plastic embedding method for large-volume and fluorescent-protein-expressing tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqin Yang

    Full Text Available Fluorescent proteins serve as important biomarkers for visualizing both subcellular organelles in living cells and structural and functional details in large-volume tissues or organs. However, current techniques for plastic embedding are limited in their ability to preserve fluorescence while remaining suitable for micro-optical sectioning tomography of large-volume samples. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the fluorescence preservation and penetration time of several commonly used resins in a Thy1-eYFP-H transgenic whole mouse brain, including glycol methacrylate (GMA, LR White, hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA and Unicryl. We found that HMPA embedding doubled the eYFP fluorescence intensity but required long durations of incubation for whole brain penetration. GMA, Unicryl and LR White each penetrated the brain rapidly but also led to variable quenching of eYFP fluorescence. Among the fast-penetrating resins, GMA preserved fluorescence better than LR White and Unicryl. We found that we could optimize the GMA formulation by reducing the polymerization temperature, removing 4-methoxyphenol and adjusting the pH of the resin solution to be alkaline. By optimizing the GMA formulation, we increased percentage of eYFP fluorescence preservation in GMA-embedded brains nearly two-fold. These results suggest that modified GMA is suitable for embedding large-volume tissues such as whole mouse brain and provide a novel approach for visualizing brain-wide networks.

  17. Evaluating the use of fluorescent imaging for the quantification of dental fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The quantification of fluorosis using fluorescence imaging (QLF) hardware and stain analysis software has been demonstrated in selected populations with good correlation between fluorescent image metrics and TF Index scores from photographs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of QLF to quantify fluorosis in a population of subjects (aged 11–13) participating in an epidemiological caries and fluorosis survey in fluoridated and non-fluoridated communities in Northern England. Methods Fluorescent images of the maxillary incisors were captured together with standardized photographs were scored blind for fluorosis using the TF Index. Subjects were excluded from the analysis if there were restorations or caries on the maxillary central incisors. Results Data were available for 1774 subjects (n=905 Newcastle, n=869 Manchester). The data from the fluorescence method demonstrated a significant correlation with TF Index scores from photographs (Kendall’s tau = 0.332 pfluorosis or at low levels of fluorosis severity had an adverse impact on tooth fluorescence and hence the outcome variable. This in conjunction with an uneven distribution of subjects across the range of fluorosis presentations may have resulted in the lower than anticipated correlations between the fluorescent imaging metrics and the photographic fluorosis scores. Nevertheless, the fluorescence imaging technique was able to discriminate between a fluoridated and non-fluoridated population (pfluorosis when used adjunctively with photographic scoring. PMID:23116324

  18. Fluorescent pH sensor based on Ag@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhenhua; Chen, Rui; Si, Peng; Huang, Youju; Sun, Handong; Kim, Dong-Hwan

    2013-06-26

    We have demonstrated a novel method for the preparation of a fluorescence-based pH sensor by combining the plasmon resonance band of Ag core and pH sensitive dye (HPTS). A thickness-variable silica shell is placed between Ag core and HPTS dye to achieve the maximum fluorescence enhancement. At the shell thickness of 8 nm, the fluorescence intensity increases 4 and 9 times when the sensor is excited at 405 and 455 nm, respectively. At the same time, the fluorescence intensity shows a good sensitivity toward pH value in the range of 5-9, and the ratio of emission intensity at 513 nm excited at 455 nm to that excited at 405 nm versus the pH value in the range of 5-9 is determined. It is believed that the present pH sensor has the potential for determining pH real time in the biological sample.

  19. Chromosome characterization using single fluorescent dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissman, Harry A. (Los Alamos, NM); Hirons, Gregory T. (Irvine, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomes are characterized by fluorescent emissions from a single fluorescent dye that is excited over two different wavelengths. A mixture containing chromosomes is stained with a single dye selected from the group consisting of TOTO and YOYO and the stained chromosomes are placed in a flow cytometer. The fluorescent dye is excited sequentially by a first light having a wavelength in the ultraviolet range to excite the TOTO or YOYO to fluoresce at a first intensity and by a second light having a wavelength effective to excite the TOTO or YOYO dye to fluoresce at a second intensity. Specific chromosomes may be identified and sorted by intensity relationships between the first and second fluorescence emissions.

  20. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% agave tequila. Such fluorescence differences can even be observed with naked eyes. The presented results demonstrate that the fluorescence measurement could be a good method to detect counterfeit tequila.

  1. Halochromic Isoquinoline with Mechanochromic Triphenylamine: Smart Fluorescent Material for Rewritable and Self-Erasable Fluorescent Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Palamarneri Sivaraman; Mothi, Ebrahim M; Moon, Dohyun; Anthony, Savarimuthu Philip

    2016-12-07

    Halochromic isoquinoline attached mechanochromic triphenylamine, N-phenyl-N-(4-(quinolin-2-yl)phenyl)benzenamine (PQPBA) and tris(4-(quinolin-2-yl)phenyl)amine (TQPA), smart fluorescent materials exhibit thermo/mechanochromism and tunable solid state fluorescence and their unusual halochromic response in PMMA matrix have been used for fabricating rewritable and self-erasable fluorescent platforms. PQPBA and TQPA showed strong fluorescence in solution (Φf = 0.9290 (PQPBA) and 0.9160 (TQPA)) and moderate solid state fluorescence (Φf = 20 (PQPBA) and 17% (TQPA). Interestingly, they exhibited a rare temperature (0-100 °C) dependent positive fluorescence enhancement via activating radiative vibrational transition. The deaggregation of PQPBA and TQPA in PMMA polymer matrix lead to the enhancement of fluorescence intensity strongly and fabricated strong blue fluorescent thin films (Φf = 58% (PQPBA) and 54% (TQPA). The halochromic isoquinoline has been exploited for demonstrating reversible off-on fluorescence switching by acid (TFA (trifluoroacetic acid)/HCl) and base (NH3) treatment in both solids as well as PMMA thin films. Importantly, rewritable and self-erasable fluorescent platform has been achieved by make use of unusual fluorescence responses of PQPBA/TQPA with TFA/HCl after exposing NH3. Single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) studies provided the insight on the solid-state fluorescence and external stimuli-induced fluorescence changes.

  2. Barium transport in fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigeneger, F.; Rackow, K.; Uhrlandt, D.; Ehlbeck, J.; Lieder, G.

    2008-10-01

    The transport of barium atoms and ions in the cathode region of fluorescent lamps driven at 25,Hz is studied experimentally and theoretically. The density of Ba atoms and ions have been measured time-resolved by laserinduced fluorescence at different distances from the spot center. Furthermore, the time-dependent cathode fall voltage was approximately determined using an improved band method. The model comprises the solution of the time-dependent particle balance equations of Ba and Ba^+ which include the Ba ionization as gain and loss terms, respectively. The ionization rate coefficient of Ba and the electron density are determined by solving the space-dependent electron Boltzmann equation in spherical geometry using the measured cathode fall voltage and the discharge current as input. Good agreement between the measured and calculated density profiles of barium atoms has been obtained. The results demonstrate the sensitive dependence of the Ba density profiles on the ionization which leads to a strong depletion of the Ba density in the cathode phase of the investigated electrode. The model yields the Ba flux from the cathode which limits the lifetime of the lamp.

  3. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael W; Loftus, Andrew F; Dunn, Sarah E; Joens, Matthew S; Fitzpatrick, James A J

    2015-01-05

    The development of confocal microscopy techniques introduced the ability to optically section fluorescent samples in the axial dimension, perpendicular to the image plane. These approaches, via the placement of a pinhole in the conjugate image plane, provided superior resolution in the axial (z) dimension resulting in nearly isotropic optical sections. However, increased axial resolution, via pinhole optics, comes at the cost of both speed and excitation efficiency. Light sheet fluorescent microscopy (LSFM), a century-old idea made possible with modern developments in both excitation and detection optics, provides sub-cellular resolution and optical sectioning capabilities without compromising speed or excitation efficiency. Over the past decade, several variations of LSFM have been implemented each with its own benefits and deficiencies. Here we discuss LSFM fundamentals and outline the basic principles of several major light-sheet-based imaging modalities (SPIM, inverted SPIM, multi-view SPIM, Bessel beam SPIM, and stimulated emission depletion SPIM) while considering their biological relevance in terms of intrusiveness, temporal resolution, and sample requirements. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. TIR lenses for fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkyn, William A.; Pelka, David G.

    1995-08-01

    The total internal reflection lens has been successfully applied to the efficient collimation of light from incandescent lamps and light-emitting diodes, and it is currently being marketed in several retail products. These circularly symmetric designs operated with relatively small sources. Two new forms of the TIR lens have been designed, and prototypes fabricated, for forming beams from fluorescent lamps. The toroidal fluorescent lamp is formed by circularly sweeping a faceted profile about its outer edge. A 5 inch diameter prototype lens has been diamond turned, and has 80% efficiency. When covering a 2.5 inch toroidal source of 0.25 inch minor diameter, it forms a smooth structureless beam of 40 degrees FWHM. The linear TIR lens has a faceted profile that is extended in cylindrical symmetry. In conjunction with a planar back mirror, a 6 inch diameter lens collects 85% of the light from a 5/8 inch lamp. The full width at half maximum is 30 degrees transversely and 120 degrees longitudinally, in a stripe pattern with twin peaks at +/- 47 degrees parallel to the lamp axis. These designs are applicable to other tubular light sources: discharge lamps, such as aircraft strobes and camera flashlamps, as well as neon lamps. They offer greater efficiency, narrower beamwidths, and much more compact profiles than conventional relfector designs.

  5. Super-resolution methods for fluorescence microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Mandula, Ondrej

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is an important tool for biological research. However, the resolution of a standard fluorescence microscope is limited by diffraction, which makes it difficult to observe small details of a specimen’s structure. We have developed two fluorescence microscopy methods that achieve resolution beyond the classical diffraction limit. The first method represents an extension of localisation microscopy. We used nonnegative matrix factorisation (NMF) to model ...

  6. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  7. NOVEL FLUORESCENT PROBES FOR THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, J; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Adkins, Erica

    To enable visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) through fluorescence technologies we have synthesized a novel series of fluorescently tagged analogs of cocaine. Previous structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have demonstrated that the dopamine transporter (DAT) can tolerate...... in untransfected control cells. The possibility of using these ligands for direct labeling of the DAT in living cells represents a new and important approach for understanding cellular targeting and trafficking of the DAT. Moreover, these fluorescent ligands might also provide the molecular tools...

  8. Fluorescent Flippers for Mechanosensitive Membrane Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Dal Molin, Marta; Verolet, Quentin; Colom Diego, Adai; Letrun, Romain; Derivery, Emmanuel; Gonzalez Gaitan, Marcos; Vauthey, Eric; Roux, Aurélien; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this report, ?fluorescent flippers? are introduced to create planarizable push?pull probes with the mechanosensitivity and fluorescence lifetime needed for practical use in biology. Twisted push?pull scaffolds with large and bright dithienothiophenes and their S,S-dioxides as the first ?fluorescent flippers? are shown to report on the lateral organization of lipid bilayers with quantum yields above 80% and lifetimes above 4 ns. Their planarization in liquid-ordered (Lo) and solid-ordered (...

  9. Fluorescent flippers for mechanosensitive membrane probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Dal Molin Marta; Verolet Quentin; Colom Adai; Letrun Romain; Derivery Emmanuel; Gonzalez-Gaitan Marcos; Vauthey Eric; Roux Aurélien; Sakai Naomi; Matile Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this report "fluorescent flippers" are introduced to create planarizable push pull probes with the mechanosensitivity and fluorescence lifetime needed for practical use in biology. Twisted push pull scaffolds with large and bright dithienothiophenes and their SS dioxides as the first "fluorescent flippers" are shown to report on the lateral organization of lipid bilayers with quantum yields above 80 and lifetimes above 4 ns. Their planarization in liquid ordered (Lo) and solid ordered (So)...

  10. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I. [Becker & Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, Berlin 12277 (Germany); Institute of Biomedical Technologies, Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy, Minin and Pozharsky Square, 10/1, Nizhny Novgorod 603005 (Russian Federation); Neubauer, A.; Becker, W. [Becker & Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, Berlin 12277 (Germany); Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F. [Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Str. 10, Berlin 13092 (Germany)

    2016-02-29

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  11. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K. M. K.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn2+, Hg2+, Cu2+ and Au3+, and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  12. Carbon nanoparticle-based fluorescent bioimaging probes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Saha, Arindam; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Ray, Sekhar C; Jana, Nikhil R

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticle-based imaging probes have advanced current labelling technology and are expected to generate new medical diagnostic tools based on their superior brightness and photostability...

  13. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  14. Intra- and interspecific differences of 10 barley and 10 tomato cultivars in response to short-time UV-B radiation: A study analysing thermoluminescence, fluorescence, gas-exchange and biochemical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Matthias, E-mail: mgilbert@rz.uni-leipzig.d [University of Leipzig, Institute of Biology I, Plant Physiology, Johannisallee 21-23, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Poers, Yvonne, E-mail: yvonne.poers@rz.hu-berlin.d [Humboldt University Berlin, Institute of Biology, Cell Biology, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Humboldt University Berlin, Institute of Biology, Plant Physiology, Philippstrasse 13, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Grover, Kirsten, E-mail: sandhyagro@gmx.d [University of Leipzig, Institute of Biology I, Plant Physiology, Johannisallee 21-23, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Weingart, Ilka, E-mail: sounso@googlemail.co [University of Leipzig, Institute of Biology I, Plant Physiology, Johannisallee 21-23, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Skotnica, Jiri, E-mail: skotnica2@seznam.c [University of Leipzig, Institute of Biology I, Plant Physiology, Johannisallee 21-23, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Grimm, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.grimm@rz.hu-berlin.d [Humboldt University Berlin, Institute of Biology, Plant Physiology, Philippstrasse 13, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Seidlitz, Harald K., E-mail: harald.seidlitz@helmholtz-muenchen.d [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Soil Ecology, Department of Environmental Engineering, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Langebartels, Christian, E-mail: langebartels@helmholtz-muenchen.d [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Program Planning and Management Department, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Wilhelm, Christian, E-mail: cwilhelm@rz.uni-leipzig.d [University of Leipzig, Institute of Biology I, Plant Physiology, Johannisallee 21-23, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    The impact of UV-B radiation on 10 genotypically different barley and tomato cultivars was tested in a predictive study to screen for potentially UV-tolerant accessions and to analyze underlying mechanisms for UV-B sensitivity. Plant response was analyzed by measuring thermoluminescence, fluorescence, gas exchange and antioxidant status. Generally, barley cultivars proved to be much more sensitive against UV-B radiation than tomato cultivars. Statistical cluster analysis could resolve two barley groups with distinct differences in reaction patterns. The UV-B sensitive group showed a stronger loss in PSII photochemistry and a lower gas-exchange performance and regulation after UV-B radiation compared to the more tolerant group. The results indicate that photosynthetic light and dark reactions have to play optimally in concert to render plants more tolerant against UV-B radiation. Hence, measuring thermoluminescence/fluorescence and gas exchange in parallel will have much higher potential in identifying tolerant cultivars and will help to understand the underlying mechanisms. - Mechanisms of UV-B tolerance and sensitivity in crop plants.

  15. Absorption reconstruction improves biodistribution assessment of fluorescent nanoprobes using hybrid Fluorescence-mediated tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gremse, F.; Theek, B.; Kunjachan, S.; Lederle, W.; Pardo, A.; Barth, S.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Naumann, U.; Kiessling, F.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT) holds potential for accelerating diagnostic and theranostic drug development. However, for proper quantitative fluorescence reconstruction, knowledge on optical scattering and absorption, which are highly heterogeneous in different (mouse) tissues, is

  16. Variable importance in latent variable regression models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvalheim, O.M.; Arneberg, R.; Bleie, O.; Rajalahti, T.; Smilde, A.K.; Westerhuis, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The quality and practical usefulness of a regression model are a function of both interpretability and prediction performance. This work presents some new graphical tools for improved interpretation of latent variable regression models that can also assist in improved algorithms for variable

  17. Control of fluorescence in quantum emitter and metallic nanoshell hybrids for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Guo, Jiaohan; J. Cid, José M.; De Hoyos Martinez, Jesús E.

    2017-03-01

    We study the light emission from a quantum emitter and double metallic nanoshell hybrid systems. Quantum emitters act as local sources which transmit their light efficiently due to a double nanoshell near field. The double nanoshell consists of a dielectric core and two outer nanoshells. The first nanoshell is made of a metal, and the second spacer nanoshell is made of a dielectric material or human serum albumin. We have calculated the fluorescence emission for a quantum emitter-double nanoshell hybrid when it is injected in an animal or a human body. Surface plasmon polariton resonances in the double nanoshell are calculated using Maxwell's equations in the quasi-static approximation, and the fluorescence emission is evaluated using the density matrix method in the presence of dipole-dipole interactions. We have compared our theory with two fluorescence experiments in hybrid systems in which the quantum emitter is Indocyanine Green or infrared fluorescent molecules. The outer spacer nanoshell of double metallic nanoshells consists of silica and human serum albumin with variable thicknesses. Our theory explains the enhancement of fluorescence spectra in both experiments. We find that the thickness of the spacer nanoshell layer increases the enhancement when the fluorescence decreases. The enhancement of the fluorescence depends on the type of quantum emitter, spacer layer, and double nanoshell. We also found that the peak of the fluorescence spectrum can be shifted by changing the shape and the size of the nanoshell. The fluorescence spectra can be switched from one peak to two peaks by removing the degeneracy of excitonic states in the quantum emitter. Hence, using these properties, one can use these hybrids as sensing and switching devices for applications in medicine.

  18. Classifying variability modeling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinnema, Marco; Deelstra, Sybren

    Variability modeling is important for managing variability in software product families, especially during product derivation. In the past few years, several variability modeling techniques have been developed, each using its own concepts to model the variability provided by a product family. The

  19. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    In-Suck Baek; Moon S. Kim; Hoosoo Lee; Wang-Hee Lee; Byoung-Kwan Cho

    2014-01-01

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 4...

  20. Photoelectric effects on chlorophyll fluorescence of photosystem II in vivo. Kinetics in the absence and presence of valinomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vredenberg, Wim J; Bulychev, Alexander

    2003-08-01

    Fluorescence induction curves (F(t)) in low intensity 1s light pulses have been measured in leaf discs in the presence and absence of valinomycin (VMC). Addition of VMC causes: (i) no effect on the initial fluorescence level Fo and the initial (O-J) phase of F(t) in the 0.01-1 ms time range. (ii) An approximately 10% decrease in the maximal fluorescence Fm in the light reached at the P level in the O-J-I-P induction curve. (iii) Nearly twofold increase in the rate and extent of the F(t) rise in the J-I phase in the 1-50 ms time range. (iv) A 60-70% decrease in the rise (I-P phase) in the 50-1000 ms time range with no appreciable effect, if at all, on the rate. System analysis of F(t) in terms of rate constants of electron transfer at donor and acceptor sides have been done using the Three State Trapping Model (TSTM). This reveals that VMC causes: (i) no, or very little effect on rate constants of e-transfer reactions powered by PSII. (ii) A manifold lower rate constant of radical pair recombination (k(-1)) in the light as compared to that in the control. The low rate constant of radical pair recombination in the reaction center (RC) in the presence of VMC is reflected by a substantial increase in the nonzero trapping efficiency in RCs in which the primary quinone acceptor (Q(A)) is reduced (semi-open centers). This causes an increase in their rate of closure and in the overall trapping efficiency. Data suggest evidence that membrane chaotropic agents like VMC abolish the stimulation of the rate constant of radical pair recombination by light. This light stimulation that becomes apparent as an increase in Fo has been documented before [Biophys. J. 79 (2000) 26]. It has been ascribed to effects of (changes in) local electric fields in the vicinity of the RC. The decrease of the I-P phase is attributed to a decrease in the photoelectric trans-thylakoid potential in the presence of VMC. Such effects have been hypothesized and illustrated.

  1. Searching the fluorescent protein color palette for new FRET pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelwood, Kristin L.; Ramko, Ericka B.; Ozarowska, Anna P.; Olenych, Scott G.; Worthy, Patrice N.; Guan, Amy; Murphy, Christopher S.; Davidson, Michael W.

    2008-02-01

    One of the most promising imaging techniques for monitoring dynamic protein interactions in living cells with optical microscopy, universally referred to as FRET, employs the non-radiative transfer of energy between two closely adjacent spectrally active molecules, often fluorescent proteins. The use of FRET in cell biology has expanded to such a degree that hundreds of papers are now published each year using biosensors to monitor a wide spectrum of intracellular processes. Most of these sensors sandwich an environmentally active peptide between cyan and yellow fluorescent protein (CFP and YFP) derivatives to assay variables such as pH, calcium ion concentration, enzyme activity, or membrane potential. The availability of these sensitive indicators is growing rapidly, but many are hampered by a low dynamic range that often is only marginally detectable over the system noise. Furthermore, extended periods of excitation at wavelengths below 500 nm have the potential to induce phototoxic effects that can mask or alter the biological events under observation. Recent success in expanding the fluorescent protein color palette offers the opportunity to explore new FRET partners that may be suitable for use in advanced biosensors.

  2. Next Generation of Advanced Laser Fluorescence Technology for Characterization of Natural Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    phycobiliprotein-containing phytoplankton and cyanobacteria. The measurements of variable fluorescence, Fv/Fm, yield assessments of phytoplankton ...LDEO), a biological oceanographer, assisted this project by maintaining phytoplankton cultures for tests and calibrations. Mr. Mark Hafez, Staff...required new solutions, and careful component selection to design a compact, robust, low power instrument capable of long-term autonomous operation in the

  3. Rapid identification of bacteria in blood cultures by using fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, GJ; Mooibroek, M; Idema, J; Harmsen, HJM; Welling, GW; Degener, JE

    The applicability of whole-cell hybridization for the identification of pathogenic bacteria in blood from septic patients was examined. Oligonucleotide probes, fluorescently labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, directed against the variable regions of the 16S rRNAs of the following bacterial

  4. Improved monomeric red, orange and yellow fluorescent proteins derived from Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaner, Nathan C; Campbell, Robert E; Steinbach, Paul A; Giepmans, Ben N G; Palmer, Amy E; Tsien, Roger Y

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are genetically encoded, easily imaged reporters crucial in biology and biotechnology. When a protein is tagged by fusion to a fluorescent protein, interactions between fluorescent proteins can undesirably disturb targeting or function. Unfortunately, all wild-type yellow-to-red

  5. Optimal fluorescence waveband determination for detecting defect cherry tomatoes using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defect cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface, and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-...

  6. Seasonal variability in irradiance affects herbicide toxicity to the marine flagellate Dunaliella tertiolecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha eSjollema

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR and Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR of the solar spectrum affect microalgae directly and modify the toxicity of phytotoxic compounds present in water. As a consequence seasonal variable PAR and UVR levels are likely to modulate the toxic pressure of contaminants in the field. Therefore the present study aimed to determine the toxicity of two model contaminants, the herbicides diuron and Irgarol®1051, under simulated irradiance conditions mimicking different seasons. Irradiance conditions of spring and autumn were simulated with a set of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs. Toxicity of both herbicides was measured individually and in a mixture by determining the inhibition of photosystem II efficiency (ΦPSII of the marine flagellate Dunaliella teriolecta using Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM fluorometry. Toxicity of the single herbicides was higher under simulated spring irradiance than under autumn irradiance and this effect was also observed for mixtures of the herbicides. This irradiance dependent toxicity indicates that herbicide toxicity in the field is seasonally variable. Consequently toxicity tests under standard light conditions may overestimate or underestimate the toxic effect of phytotoxic compounds.

  7. Assessing the impact of polysomy-17 on HER2 status and the correlations of HER2 status with prognostic variables (ER, PR, p53, Ki-67) in epithelial ovarian cancer: a tissue microarray study using immunohistochemistry and fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Kuang; Lin, Wea-Lung; Chen, Fong-Lin; Lee, Ming-Yung; Kuo, Jang-Fang; Ruan, Alexandra; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Chiang, Hung; Chou, Ming-Chih; Han, Chih-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Although HER2 overexpression and Her2 amplification have been noted in breast and a variety of human cancers, we report here for the first time the impact of polysomy-17 on HER2 status and the correlations between HER2 status and other prognostic factors in patients with epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC).We analyzed HER2, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), p53, and Ki-67 protein overexpressions by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and determined Her2 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in 27 tissue microarray samples from EOC patients.We achieved 100% positive concordance (3/3) and 100% negative concordance (19/19) between HER2 testing by IHC and FISH. Both the total Her2 gene copies and FISH scores increased significantly in a stepwise order through the negative, equivocal, and positive HER2 IHC result categories in all 27 cases (P=0.001, P=0.001), and still increased significantly in 18 nonpolysomy-17 cases (P=0.007 and 0.013) after the exclusion of 9 polysomy-17 cases. HER2 protein expression is inversely correlated with both ER (P=0.002) and PR expressions (P=0.046). Her2 gene amplification is inversely correlated with ER expression (P=0.007) but not with PR expression (P=0.106).This study showed extremely high positive and negative concordances between Her2 FISH and HER2 IHC assays. Polysomy-17 is insufficient for causing a significant impact on the relationship between HER2 testing by IHC and FISH in EOC. ER and PR expressions were inversely correlated with HER2 protein expression. In addition, ER but not PR expression is inversely correlated with Her2 gene amplification.

  8. ULTRAFINE FLUORESCENT DIAMONDS IN NANOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanyuk M. I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to summarize the literature data concerning ultrafine diamonds, namely their industrial production, as well as considerable photostability and biocompatibility that promote their use in modern visualization techniques. It is shown that due to the unique physical properties, they are promising materials for using in nanotechnology in the near future. Possibility of diverse surface modification, small size and large absorption surface are the basis for their use in different approaches for drug and gene delivery into a cell. The changes in the properties of nanodiamond surface modification methods of their creation, stabilization and applications are described. It can be said that fluorescent surface-modified nanodiamonds are a promising target in various research methods that would be widely used for labeling of living cells, as well as in the processes of genes and drugs delivery into a cell.

  9. Short-chain fluorescent tryptophan tags for on-line detection of functional recombinant proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siepert Eva-Maria

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional fluorescent proteins, such as GFP, its derivatives and flavin mononucleotide based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs are often used as fusion tags for detecting recombinant proteins during cultivation. These reporter tags are state-of-the-art; however, they have some drawbacks, which can make on-line monitoring challenging. It is discussed in the literature that the large molecular size of proteins of the GFP family may stress the host cell metabolism during production. In addition, fluorophore formation of GFP derivatives is oxygen-dependent resulting in a lag-time between expression and fluorescence detection and the maturation of the protein is suppressed under oxygen-limited conditions. On the contrary, FbFPs are also applicable in an oxygen-limited or even anaerobic environment but are still quite large (58% of the size of GFP. Results As an alternative to common fluorescent tags we developed five novel tags based on clustered tryptophan residues, called W-tags. They are only 5-11% of the size of GFP. Based on the property of tryptophan to fluoresce in absence of oxygen it is reasonable to assume that the functionality of our W-tags is also given under anaerobic conditions. We fused these W-tags to a recombinant protein model, the anti-CD30 receptor single-chain fragment variable antibody (scFv Ki-4(scFv and the anti-MucI single-chain fragment variable M12(scFv. During cultivation in Microtiter plates, the overall tryptophan fluorescence intensity of all cultures was measured on-line for monitoring product formation via the different W-tags. After correlation of the scattered light signal representing biomass concentration and tryptophan fluorescence for the uninduced cultures, the fluorescence originating from the biomass was subtracted from the overall tryptophan signal. The resulting signal, thus, represents the product fluorescence of the tagged and untagged antibody fragments. The product fluorescence signal

  10. Modern fluorescent techniques to investigate the mechanisms of lymphocyte activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Liubchenko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent proteins are promising tools for studying intracellular signaling processes in lymphocytes. This brief review summarizes fluorescence-based imaging techniques developed in recent years and discusses new methodological advances, such as fluorescent photoswitches, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM, photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM, stimulated emission depletion (STED, total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF and other techiques. This survey also highlights recent advances in vitro imaging of live tissues, novel applications of flow cytometry with genetically modified fluorescent proteins, and future prospects for the development of new immunological test systems based on fluorescent protein technology.

  11. Luminance Analysis of Linear Fluorescent Lamp

    OpenAIRE

    Štěpánek, J.

    2015-01-01

    My paper deals with theme of luminance analysis. The aim of the paper is to find out how change luminance of linear fluorescent lamps with the change of light source position. Linear fluorescent lamp will be measured in horizontal position and in vertical position. Digital camera will be used for measurement. Paper is divided into theoretical part and into practical part.

  12. Agreement between direct fluorescent microscopy and Ziehl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sensitivity of smear microscopy for diagnosis of tuberculosis might be improved through treatment of sputum with sodium hypochlorite and application of fluorescent microscopy. This study aimed to determine the agreement between direct Fluorescent Microscopy and Ziehl-Neelsen concentration technique ...

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Gordon T; Munro, Ian; Poher, Vincent; French, Paul M W; Neil, Mark A A [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Elson, Daniel S [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hares, Jonathan D [Kentech Instruments Ltd, Unit 9, Hall Farm Workshops, South Moreton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 9AG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gordon.kennedy@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-05-07

    We demonstrate flexible use of low cost, high-power light emitting diodes as illumination sources for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques have been implemented at wavelengths spanning the range 450-640 nm. Additionally, we demonstrate optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging by combining structured illumination with frequency-domain FLIM.

  14. A sensitive fluorescent sensor of lanthanide ions

    CERN Document Server

    Bekiari, V; Lianos, P

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescent probe bearing a diazostilbene chromophore and a benzo-15-crown-5 ether moiety is a very efficient sensor of lanthanide ions. The ligand emits strong fluorescence only in the presence of specific ions, namely lanthanide ions, while the emission wavelength is associated with a particular ion providing high sensitivity and resolution.

  15. Bridging fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    Development of new fluorescent probes and fluorescence microscopes has led to new ways to study cell biology. With the emergence of specialized microscopy units at most universities and research centers, the use of these techniques is well within reach for a broad research community. A major

  16. Synthesis and characterization of multicolour fluorescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, we successfully developed Y 2 O 3 nanoparticles doped with Tb 3 + and Eu 3 + ions to generate fluorescent images of latent fingerprints. The optical and structural characterization of the nanoparticles was carried out and the fluorescence mechanisms are discussed. In our studies, the developed nanoparticles ...

  17. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  18. FLUORESCENCE IN DISSOLVED FRACTIONS OF HUMAN ENAMEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAFSTROMBJORKMAN, U; SUNDSTROM, F; TENBOSCH, JJ

    Fluorescence induced by laser light is useful in early detection of enamel caries. The present work studied the fluorescence emission pattern in dissolved human enamel and in different molecular weight fractions obtained after gel chromatography or dialysis followed by ultrafiltration. For

  19. Design of fluorescent materials for chemical sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basabe Desmonts, M.L.; Reinhoudt, David; Crego Calama, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    There is an enormous demand for chemical sensors for many areas and disciplines. High sensitivity and ease of operation are two main issues for sensor development. Fluorescence techniques can easily fulfill these requirements and therefore fluorescent-based sensors appear as one of the most

  20. Absorbance and fluorescence studies on porphyrin Nanostructures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work was to study some photophysical properties of PNR for application as light harvester in dye sensitized solar cells. These properties included absorbance, fluorescence, and fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime. The results of Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) images showed the formation of ...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of multicolour fluorescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    producing fluorescent images of latent fingerprints in shades of green, red and yellow with high-contrast colour under ultraviolet lighting. Keywords. Fingerprint; nanocrystals; rare-earths; fluorescence. 1. Introduction. The search for latent fingerprints at crime scenes is already a routine long present in the forensic science.

  2. Hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer for intracellular thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, Chie; Okabe, Kohki; Funatsu, Takashi; Harada, Yoshie; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2009-03-04

    The first methodology to measure intracellular temperature is described. A highly hydrophilic fluorescent nanogel thermometer developed for this purpose stays in the cytoplasm and emits stronger fluorescence at a higher temperature. Thus, intracellular temperature variations associated with biological processes can be monitored by this novel thermometer with a temperature resolution of better than 0.5 degrees C.

  3. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  4. Holograms preparation using commercial fluorescent benzyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorantes-GarcIa, V; Olivares-Perez, A; Ordonez-Padilla, M J; Mejias-Brizuela, N Y, E-mail: valdoga@Hotmail.com, E-mail: olivares@inaoep.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Coordinacion de Optica, Calle Luis Enrique Erro N0 1, Santa Maria Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    We have been able to make holograms with substances such as fluorescence thought of light blue laser to make transmissions holograms, using ammonium dichromate as photo-sensitizer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as matrix. Ammonium dichromate inhibit the fluorescence properties of inks, both mixed in a (PVA) matrix, but we avoid this chemical reaction and we show the results to use the method of painting hologram with fluorescents ink and we describe how the diffraction efficiency parameter changes as a function of the ink absorbed by the emulsion recorded with the gratings, we got good results, making holographic gratings with a blue light from laser diode 470 nm. And we later were painting with fluorescent ink, integrating fluorescence characteristics to the hologram.

  5. Intense fluorescence of Au 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chongqi; Harbich, Wolfgang; Sementa, Luca; Ghiringhelli, Luca; Apra, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Brune, Harald

    2017-08-21

    Ligand-protected Au clusters are non-bleaching fluorescence markers in bio- and medical applications. We show that their fluorescence is an intrinsic property of the Au cluster itself. We find a very intense and sharp fluorescence peak located at λ =739.2 nm (1.68 eV) for Au20 clusters in a Ne matrix held at 6 K. The fluorescence reflects the HOMO-LUMO diabatic bandgap of the cluster. The cluster shows a very rich absorption fine structure reminiscent of well defined molecule-like quantum levels. These levels are resolved since Au20 has only one stable isomer (tetrahedral), therefore our sample is mono-disperse in cluster size and conformation. Density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations clarify the nature of optical absorptionand predict both main absorption peaks and intrinsic fluorescence in good agreement with experiment.

  6. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  7. Differential Counting of Asbestos Using Phase Contrast and Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Tomoki; Alexandrov, Maxym; Ishida, Takenori; Hirota, Ryuichi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Sekiguchi, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-11-01

    Considering the increasing use of various asbestos substitutes, asbestos risk management in many industries may require accurate techniques for detecting and distinguishing asbestos from non-asbestos fibers. Using fluorescently labeled asbestos-binding proteins, we previously developed a novel method for detection and counting of asbestos fibers under fluorescence microscopy (FM). This method can provide speedy, on-site detection and identification of the asbestos fibers and has higher sensitivity than phase contrast microscopy (PCM). However, current asbestos exposure limits are derived from risk assessments based on epidemiological studies that were conducted using PCM fiber counts. Therefore, the sensitivity of asbestos testing should be maintained at PCM level to properly assess compliance with these limit values. Here, we developed and tested a novel application of FM as a differential counting method that complements PCM analysis and is fully compatible with the PCM-based epidemiological data. In the combined PCM-FM method, the fluorescent asbestos-binding probe is applied prior to filter clearing. The method makes it possible to easily switch between two microscopic techniques while analyzing the same fields of view: PCM is used for counting fibers, and FM for differentiating asbestos from non-asbestos fibers. Using airborne dust samples from demolition sites in Japan, we compared PCM-FM with scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-based differential counting method. Statistical analysis indicated a slight conservative bias of PCM-FM method, combined with relatively high variability across the full range of fiber concentrations in our sample set. Using correlative microscopy, we also evaluated the specificity of FM staining, which is a potential cause of variability between the two methods. The energy-dispersive X-ray analysis indicated that ~95% of fluorescently stained fibers in the demolition site samples were correctly identified as asbestos. While further

  8. Enhanced ALA-induced fluorescence in hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosst, Ruediger L; Schroeter, Lioba; Gahlen, Johannes

    2005-04-04

    Intraoperative localization of parathyroid glands can be challenging especially in minimally invasive surgery. Fluorescence diagnosis using the photosensitizer aminolevulinic acid (ALA) has been described to identify normal parathyroid glands during experimental bilateral neck exploration. The present study evaluated fluorescence differences between hyperplastic and normal parathyroid glands as a precondition for a clinical application of the technique. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) rats with hyperparathyroidism due to hyperplastic parathyroid glands and Wistar rats with normal parathyroid glands were photosensitized by peritoneal lavage with ALA solution. After surgical exposure of thyroid and parathyroid glands the operative site was observed under blue light conditions using the d-light system to assess fluorescence characteristics of each tissue. Fluorescence intensities of parathyroid glands and surrounding thyroid tissue were measured by spectrometry. Parathyroid hormone in serum of the rats was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Observation of the exposed thyroid site showed a subjectively stronger red fluorescence of the parathyroid glands in the PKD rats in comparison to the Wistar rats, whereas thyroid tissue appeared equally fluorescent. In the PKD animals, spectrometric fluorescence intensity was 10 times higher in the parathyroid glands than in the thyroid gland, whereas in the Wistar rats the ratio was 3.2:1. Fluorescence intensity in the parathyroid glands was more than twice in the PKD rats than in the Wistar rats, however slightly lower in the thyroid tissue. ELISA confirmed the pathophysiological change of a hyperparathyroidism with significantly increased serum levels of parathyroid hormone in the PKD rats. Hyperparathyroidism enhances ALA-induced fluorescence of the parathyroid glands. A combined surgical fluorescence strategy may justify a unilateral, minimally invasive approach in selected patients and serve to improve

  9. The photochemical and fluorescence properties of whole cells, spheroplasts and spheroplast particles from the blue-green alga Phormidium luridum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel-or, E; Malkin, S

    1977-02-07

    The photochemical activities and fluorescence properties of cells, spheroplasts and spheroplast particles from the blue-green alga Phormidium luridum were compared. The photochemical activities were measured in a whole range of wavelengths and expressed as quantum yield spectra (quantum yield vs. wavelength). The following reactions were measured. Photosynthesis (O2 evolution) in whole cells; Hill reaction (O2 evolution) with Fe(CN)63- and NADP as electron acceptors (Photosystem II and photosystem II + Photosystem I reactions); electron transfer from reduced 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol to diquat (Photosystem I reaction). The fluorescence properties were emission spectra, quantum yield spectra and the induction pattern. On the basis of comparison between the quantum yield spectra and the pigments compositions the relative contribution of each pigment to each photosystem was estimated. In normal cells and spheroplasts it was found that Photosystem I (Photosystem II) contains about 90% (10%) of the chlorophyll a, 90% (10%) of the carotenoids and 15% (85%) of the phycocyanin. In spheroplast particles there is a reorganization of the pigments; they loose a certain fraction (about half) of the phycocyanin but the remaining phycocyanin attaches itself exclusively to Photosystem I (!). This is reflected by the loss of Photosystem II activity, a flat quantum yield vs. wavelength dependence and a loss of the fluorescence induction. The fluorescence quantum yield spectra conform qualitatively to the above conclusion. More quantitative estimation shows that only a fraction (20--40%) of the chlorophyll of Photosystem II is fluorescent. Total emission spectrum and the ratio of variable to constant fluorescence are in agreement with this conclusion. The fluorescence emission spectrum shows characteristic differences between the constant and variable components. The variable fluorescence comes exclusively from chlorophyll a; the constant fluorescence is contributed, in addition

  10. Further insights into metal-DOM interaction: consideration of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huacheng Xu

    Full Text Available Information on metal binding with fluorescent substances has been widely studied. By contrast, information on metal binding with non-fluorescent substances remains lacking despite the dominance of these substances in aquatic systems. In this study, the metal binding properties of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances were investigated by using metal titration combined with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS analysis. The organic matters in the eutrophic algae-rich lake, including natural organic matters (NOM and algae-induced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, both contained fluorescent and non-fluorescent substances. The peaks in the one-dimensional spectra strongly overlapped, while 2D-COS can decompose the overlapped peaks and thus enhanced the spectral resolution. Moreover, 2D FTIR COS demonstrated that the binding susceptibility of organic ligands in both NOM and algal EPS matrices followed the order: 3400>1380>1650 cm-1, indicative the significant contribution of non-fluorescent ligands in metal binding. The modified Stern-Volmer equation also revealed a substantial metal binding potential for the non-fluorescent substances (logKM: 3.57∼4.92. As for the effects of organic ligands on metal binding, EPS was characterized with higher binding ability than NOM for both fluorescent and non-fluorescent ligands. Algae-induced EPS and the non-fluorescent substances in eutrophic algae-rich lakes should not be overlooked because of their high metal binding potential.

  11. Fluorescent probes and fluorescence (microscopy) techniques--illuminating biological and biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummen, Gregor P C

    2012-11-28

    Fluorescence, the absorption and re-emission of photons with longer wavelengths, is one of those amazing phenomena of Nature. Its discovery and utilization had, and still has, a major impact on biological and biomedical research, since it enables researchers not just to visualize normal physiological processes with high temporal and spatial resolution, to detect multiple signals concomitantly, to track single molecules in vivo, to replace radioactive assays when possible, but also to shed light on many pathobiological processes underpinning disease states, which would otherwise not be possible. Compounds that exhibit fluorescence are commonly called fluorochromes or fluorophores and one of these fluorescent molecules in particular has significantly enabled life science research to gain new insights in virtually all its sub-disciplines: Green Fluorescent Protein. Because fluorescent proteins are synthesized in vivo, integration of fluorescent detection methods into the biological system via genetic techniques now became feasible. Currently fluorescent proteins are available that virtually span the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Concomitantly, fluorescence imaging techniques were developed, and often progress in one field fueled innovation in the other. Impressively, the properties of fluorescence were utilized to develop new assays and imaging modalities, ranging from energy transfer to image molecular interactions to imaging beyond the diffraction limit with super-resolution microscopy. Here, an overview is provided of recent developments in both fluorescence imaging and fluorochrome engineering, which together constitute the “fluorescence toolbox” in life science research.

  12. Fluorescent Probes and Fluorescence (Microscopy Techniques — Illuminating Biological and Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor P. C. Drummen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence, the absorption and re-emission of photons with longer wavelengths, is one of those amazing phenomena of Nature. Its discovery and utilization had, and still has, a major impact on biological and biomedical research, since it enables researchers not just to visualize normal physiological processes with high temporal and spatial resolution, to detect multiple signals concomitantly, to track single molecules in vivo, to replace radioactive assays when possible, but also to shed light on many pathobiological processes underpinning disease states, which would otherwise not be possible. Compounds that exhibit fluorescence are commonly called fluorochromes or fluorophores and one of these fluorescent molecules in particular has significantly enabled life science research to gain new insights in virtually all its sub-disciplines: Green Fluorescent Protein. Because fluorescent proteins are synthesized in vivo, integration of fluorescent detection methods into the biological system via genetic techniques now became feasible. Currently fluorescent proteins are available that virtually span the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Concomitantly, fluorescence imaging techniques were developed, and often progress in one field fueled innovation in the other. Impressively, the properties of fluorescence were utilized to develop new assays and imaging modalities, ranging from energy transfer to image molecular interactions to imaging beyond the diffraction limit with super-resolution microscopy. Here, an overview is provided of recent developments in both fluorescence imaging and fluorochrome engineering, which together constitute the “fluorescence toolbox” in life science research.

  13. Practical use of corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of fluorescent proteins in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Visser, N.V.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2003-01-01

    Corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra have been obtained from several enhanced variants of the green fluorescent protein (EGFP) isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, blue fluorescence protein (EBFP), cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), EGFP and yellow fluorescent protein

  14. Rotational multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound: bimodal system for intravascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marcu, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report the development and validation of a hybrid intravascular diagnostic system combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for cardiovascular imaging applications. A prototype FLIm system based on fluorescence pulse sampling technique providing information on artery biochemical composition was integrated with a commercial IVUS system providing information on artery morphology. A customized 3-Fr bimodal catheter combining a rotational side-view fiberoptic and a 40-MHz IVUS transducer was constructed for sequential helical scanning (rotation and pullback) of tubular structures. Validation of this bimodal approach was conducted in pig heart coronary arteries. Spatial resolution, fluorescence detection efficiency, pulse broadening effect, and lifetime measurement variability of the FLIm system were systematically evaluated. Current results show that this system is capable of temporarily resolving the fluorescence emission simultaneously in multiple spectral channels in a single pullback sequence. Accurate measurements of fluorescence decay characteristics from arterial segments can be obtained rapidly (e.g., 20 mm in 5 s), and accurate co-registration of fluorescence and ultrasound features can be achieved. The current finding demonstrates the compatibility of FLIm instrumentation with in vivo clinical investigations and its potential to complement conventional IVUS during catheterization procedures. PMID:24898604

  15. Using simulated fluorescence cell micrographs for the evaluation of cell image segmentation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, Veit; Bergler, Matthias; Palmisano, Ralf; Prinzen, Martin; Franz, Daniela; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2017-03-18

    Manual assessment and evaluation of fluorescent micrograph cell experiments is time-consuming and tedious. Automated segmentation pipelines can ensure efficient and reproducible evaluation and analysis with constant high quality for all images of an experiment. Such cell segmentation approaches are usually validated and rated in comparison to manually annotated micrographs. Nevertheless, manual annotations are prone to errors and display inter- and intra-observer variability which influence the validation results of automated cell segmentation pipelines. We present a new approach to simulate fluorescent cell micrographs that provides an objective ground truth for the validation of cell segmentation methods. The cell simulation was evaluated twofold: (1) An expert observer study shows that the proposed approach generates realistic fluorescent cell micrograph simulations. (2) An automated segmentation pipeline on the simulated fluorescent cell micrographs reproduces segmentation performances of that pipeline on real fluorescent cell micrographs. The proposed simulation approach produces realistic fluorescent cell micrographs with corresponding ground truth. The simulated data is suited to evaluate image segmentation pipelines more efficiently and reproducibly than it is possible on manually annotated real micrographs.

  16. Influence of hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels on color, opacity, and fluorescence of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, C R G; Ribeiro, C F; Bresciani, E; Borges, A B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 20% and 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels on the color, opacity, and fluorescence of composite resins. Seven composite resin brands were tested and 30 specimens, 3-mm in diameter and 2-mm thick, of each material were fabricated, for a total of 210 specimens. The specimens of each tested material were divided into three subgroups (n=10) according to the bleaching therapy tested: 20% hydrogen peroxide gel, 35% hydroxide peroxide gel, and the control group. The baseline color, opacity, and fluorescence were assessed by spectrophotometry. Four 30-minute bleaching gel applications, two hours in total, were performed. The control group did not receive bleaching treatment and was stored in deionized water. Final assessments were performed, and data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (ptherapies (phydrogen peroxide gel. No difference in opacity was detected for all analyzed parameters. Fluorescence changes were influenced by composite resin brand (ptherapy (p=0.0016) used. No significant differences in fluorescence between different bleaching gel concentrations were detected by Tukey test. The greatest fluorescence alteration was detected on the brand Z350. It was concluded that 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel generated the greatest color change among all evaluated materials. No statistical opacity changes were detected for all tested variables, and significant fluorescence changes were dependent on the material and bleaching therapy, regardless of the gel concentration.

  17. Rotational multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound: bimodal system for intravascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marcu, Laura

    2014-06-01

    We report the development and validation of a hybrid intravascular diagnostic system combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for cardiovascular imaging applications. A prototype FLIm system based on fluorescence pulse sampling technique providing information on artery biochemical composition was integrated with a commercial IVUS system providing information on artery morphology. A customized 3-Fr bimodal catheter combining a rotational side-view fiberoptic and a 40-MHz IVUS transducer was constructed for sequential helical scanning (rotation and pullback) of tubular structures. Validation of this bimodal approach was conducted in pig heart coronary arteries. Spatial resolution, fluorescence detection efficiency, pulse broadening effect, and lifetime measurement variability of the FLIm system were systematically evaluated. Current results show that this system is capable of temporarily resolving the fluorescence emission simultaneously in multiple spectral channels in a single pullback sequence. Accurate measurements of fluorescence decay characteristics from arterial segments can be obtained rapidly (e.g., 20 mm in 5 s), and accurate co-registration of fluorescence and ultrasound features can be achieved. The current finding demonstrates the compatibility of FLIm instrumentation with in vivo clinical investigations and its potential to complement conventional IVUS during catheterization procedures.

  18. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of photosynthetic activity and pigment contents of the resurrection plants Ramonda serbica and Ramonda nathaliae during dehydration and rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashi, Bekim; Babani, Fatbardha; Kongjika, Efigjeni

    2013-07-01

    The desiccation-tolerant plants of the R. serbica and R. nathaliae are resurrection plants which are able to fully recover their physiological function after anabiosis. A comparison of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and photosynthetic pigment contents responses of R. serbica and, for the first time, R. nathaliae to dehydration and rehydration were investigated. For this purpose, plants after collection from their natural habitats were kept fully watered for 14 days at natural condition. The experiment was conducted with mature leaves of both species. R. serbica and R. nathaliae plants were dehydrated to 5.88 % and 7.87 % relative water content (RWC) by withholding water for 15 days, afterwards the plants were rehydrated for 72 hours to 94.67 % and 97.02 % RWC. During desiccation, R. serbica plants preserved the chlorophyll content about 84 %, while R. nathaliae about 90 %. During dehydration when RWC were more than 40 %, photochemical efficiency of PSII for photochemistry, the Fv/Fm ratio, decreased about 40 % in R. nathaliae plants, but a strong reduction with 60 % was recorded for R. serbica. Following rehydration, the Fv/Fm ratio recovered more rapidly in R. nathaliae. The higher photosynthetic rates could also be detected via imaging the chlorophyll fluorescence decrease ratio Rfd, which possessed higher values after rehydration leaves of R. nathaliae as compared to R. serbica. The results showed that the photosynthetic activity and chlorophyll contents after rehydration are recovered more rapidly in R. nathaliae in comparison to R. serbica.

  19. Ultrafast fluorescence of photosynthetic crystals and light-harvesting complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van B.F.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes using time resolved fluorescence techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy often requires attaching fluorescent labels to the proteins under investigation. With photosynthetic proteins this is not necessary, because these

  20. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Belousov, Vsevolod V

    2014-02-01

    Life is a constant flow of electrons via redox couples. Redox reactions determine many if not all major cellular functions. Until recently, redox processes remained hidden from direct observation in living systems due to the lack of adequate methodology. Over the last years, imaging tools including small molecule probes and genetically encoded sensors appeared, which provided, for the first time, an opportunity to visualize and, in some cases, quantify redox reactions in live cells. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes, such as HyPer, rxYFP and roGFPs, have been used in several models, ranging from cultured cells to transgenic animals, and now enough information has been collected to highlight advantages and pitfalls of these probes. In this review, we describe the main types of genetically encoded redox probes, their essential properties, advantages and disadvantages. We also provide an overview of the most important, in our opinion, results obtained using these probes. Finally, we discuss redox-dependent photoconversions of GFP and other prospective directions in redox probe development. Fluorescent protein-based redox probes have important advantages such as high specificity, possibility of transgenesis and fine subcellular targeting. For proper selection of a redox sensor for a particular model, it is important to understand that HyPer and roGFP2-Orp1 are the probes for H2O2, whereas roGFP1/2, rxYFP and roGFP2-Grx1 are the probes for GSH/GSSG redox state. Possible pH changes should be carefully controlled in experiments with HyPer and rxYFP. Genetically encoded redox probes are the only instruments allowing real-time monitoring of reactive oxygen species and thiol redox state in living cells and tissues. We believe that in the near future the palette of FP-based redox probes will be expanded to red and far-red parts of the spectrum and to other important reactive species such as NO, O2 and superoxide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  1. Types of biological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayya, Shreemathi S; Monteiro, Ashma D; Ganapathy, Sachit

    2017-06-01

    Identification and description of variables used in any study is a necessary component in biomedical research. Statistical analyses rely on the type of variables that are involved in the study. In this short article, we introduce the different types of biological variables. A researcher has to be familiar with the type of variable he/she is dealing with in his/her research to decide about appropriate graphs/diagrams, summary measures and statistical analysis.

  2. Variable mechanical ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Fontela, Paula Caitano; Prestes, Renata Bernardy; Forgiarini Jr.,Luiz Alberto; Friedman, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the use of variable mechanical ventilation and the main outcomes of this technique. Methods Search, selection, and analysis of all original articles on variable ventilation, without restriction on the period of publication and language, available in the electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE?, and PubMed, by searching the terms "variable ventilation" OR "noisy ventilation" OR "biologically variable ventilation". Results A total of 36 studies were selected. ...

  3. Latent variable theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsboom, D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper formulates a metatheoretical framework for latent variable modeling. It does so by spelling out the difference between observed and latent variables. This difference is argued to be purely epistemic in nature: We treat a variable as observed when the inference from data structure to

  4. Amplification variable factor amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akitsugu, Oshita; Nauta, Bram

    2007-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an amplification factor variable amplifier capable of achieving temperature compensation of an amplification factor over a wide variable amplification factor range. ; SOLUTION: A Gilbert type amplification factor variable amplifier 11 amplifies an input signal and

  5. Amplification variable factor amplifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akitsugu, O.; Nauta, Bram

    2006-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an amplification factor variable amplifier capable of achieving temperature compensation of an amplification factor over a wide variable amplification factor range. ; SOLUTION: A Gilbert type amplification factor variable amplifier 11 amplifies an input signal and

  6. Mean fluorescence lifetime and its error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiserova, Eva [Department of Mathematical Analysis and Applications of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kubala, Martin, E-mail: mkubala@prfnw.upol.cz [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-15

    Mean excited-state lifetime is one of the fundamental fluorescence characteristics and enters as an important parameter into numerous calculations characterizing molecular interactions, such as e.g. FRET or fluorescence quenching. Our experiments demonstrated that the intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic, in contrast to the amplitude-weighted one, which value is dependent on the data quality and particularly on the used fitting model. For the first time, we also report the procedure for the error estimation for both the intensity- and amplitude-weighted mean fluorescence lifetimes. Furthermore, we present a method for estimation of the mean fluorescence lifetime directly from the fluorescence-decay curve recorded by TCSPC (Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting) method. For its simplicity and low computational demands, it could be a useful tool in the high-throughput applications, such as FACS, FLIM-FRET or HPLC detectors. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amplitude-weighted mean lifetime depends on the selection of fitting model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigorous procedure for estimation of confidence intervals for mean lifetime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean lifetime can be estimated directly from the TCSPC histogram.

  7. [Fluorescence microscopy detection of dermatophytes with Blankophor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, D; Zeller, R; Böhm, K H

    1987-01-01

    It is the first time that a fluorescent microscopic rapid-stain process is compared with the alkali method and with mycological culture examination. 810 skin scrapings primarily from horse, cat, and dog were available for analysis. The preparation of the samples for the fluorescent microscope test is easy and quick. The fluorescent stain solution keeps sufficiently long. When the slide preparations are looked at under the fluorescent microscope, the mycological elements light up and can easily be distinguished under survey enlargement. This leads to a considerable reduction of evaluation time. The microscopic proof of dermatophytes is considerably improved by the introduction of the fluorescent microscopic technique into mycological diagnosis, as this process is clearly superior to the alkali method. Dermatophytes are identified and finally evaluated after finishing the cultural analysis. Furthermore, the fluorescent microscopic proof of yeasts of the kind of Pityrosporum yeasts and of Demodex mites is possible. The not inconsiderable costs of the technical equipment may stand in the way of general and routine use of the fluorescent microscope for diagnosing dermatophytes. However, for laboratories with a large number of submitted skin scrapings, this process can be rated as a useful enrichment of their diagnostic potential.

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopic behaviour of folic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2010-02-08

    The fluorescence spectroscopic behaviour of folic acid (FA) in 4 M HCl (dominant bi-cationic form), 0.1 M HCl (bi-cationic and cationic form), citric acid-NaOH pH 6 buffer (neutral form), 0.1 M and 4 M KOH (anionic form), and trifluoroacetic acid is studied. The thermal stability is investigated. Absolute absorption cross-section spectra are determined and compared with fluorescence excitation spectra. Intrinsic fluorescence quantum distributions and fluorescence quantum yields are extracted from fluorescence spectra measurements. The temporal fluorescence decay after picosecond pulse excitation is studied. The fluorescence quenching mechanisms for the different ionic forms of FA are discussed: excited-state proton release for bi-cationic FA, photo-physical non-radiative relaxation for cationic FA, and photo-induced intra-molecular electron transfer for neutral and anionic FA. Aerobic FA in 4 M KOH at elevated temperature dehydrated to 9,10-dehydro-folic acid. Its photo-dynamics was governed by twisted intra-molecular charge transfer and photo-isomerisation.

  9. Mechanism of fluorescent silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Woong Young; Li, Qi; Jin, Rongchao; Peteanu, Linda

    2017-08-01

    Silicon (Si) is known to have an indirect bandgap transition, which means it has poor fluorescence properties. However, when engineered into sub-nm sized particles, Si nanoparticles become emissive due to quantum confinement. However, in unmodified Si particles, this effect is limited to generating red or near-infrared emission with low quantum yield. To resolve these limitations, surface-modification methods have successfully generated Si particles that emit in the blue, cyan, and green with quantum yields up to 90%.1,2 These modifications have also made the Si nanoparticles watersoluble, making them promising in biological applications. To date, the mechanism of emission in these species is still unclear although it has been speculated that charge transfer of Si-O-N could be responsible. To investigate whether emission by these Si nanoparticles proceeds via a charge transfer mechanism, Stark spectroscopy is used. In this method, an external electric field is applied to the Si nanoparticles. Changes in the absorption and/or emission spectra due to the applied field can be taken as strong evidence for a charge transfer mechanism. From the results of Stark spectroscopy, Si nanoparticles are revealed to have ligand to metal charge transfer mechanism along with electric-field quenching, which is useful information for utilization into applications. Addition to the information found, a method of how to tune the emission maxima based on selection of ligands is prosed.

  10. Fluorescence characterization of clinically-important bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Roberts, Tom A; Moore, Ginny; Ward, John M; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAI/HAI) represent a substantial threat to patient health during hospitalization and incur billions of dollars additional cost for subsequent treatment. One promising method for the detection of bacterial contamination in a clinical setting before an HAI outbreak occurs is to exploit native fluorescence of cellular molecules for a hand-held, rapid-sweep surveillance instrument. Previous studies have shown fluorescence-based detection to be sensitive and effective for food-borne and environmental microorganisms, and even to be able to distinguish between cell types, but this powerful technique has not yet been deployed on the macroscale for the primary surveillance of contamination in healthcare facilities to prevent HAI. Here we report experimental data for the specification and design of such a fluorescence-based detection instrument. We have characterized the complete fluorescence response of eleven clinically-relevant bacteria by generating excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) over broad wavelength ranges. Furthermore, a number of surfaces and items of equipment commonly present on a ward, and potentially responsible for pathogen transfer, have been analyzed for potential issues of background fluorescence masking the signal from contaminant bacteria. These include bedside handrails, nurse call button, blood pressure cuff and ward computer keyboard, as well as disinfectant cleaning products and microfiber cloth. All examined bacterial strains exhibited a distinctive double-peak fluorescence feature associated with tryptophan with no other cellular fluorophore detected. Thus, this fluorescence survey found that an emission peak of 340nm, from an excitation source at 280nm, was the cellular fluorescence signal to target for detection of bacterial contamination. The majority of materials analysed offer a spectral window through which bacterial contamination could indeed be detected. A few instances were found of potential problems

  11. Fluorescence characterization of clinically-important bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis R Dartnell

    Full Text Available Healthcare-associated infections (HCAI/HAI represent a substantial threat to patient health during hospitalization and incur billions of dollars additional cost for subsequent treatment. One promising method for the detection of bacterial contamination in a clinical setting before an HAI outbreak occurs is to exploit native fluorescence of cellular molecules for a hand-held, rapid-sweep surveillance instrument. Previous studies have shown fluorescence-based detection to be sensitive and effective for food-borne and environmental microorganisms, and even to be able to distinguish between cell types, but this powerful technique has not yet been deployed on the macroscale for the primary surveillance of contamination in healthcare facilities to prevent HAI. Here we report experimental data for the specification and design of such a fluorescence-based detection instrument. We have characterized the complete fluorescence response of eleven clinically-relevant bacteria by generating excitation-emission matrices (EEMs over broad wavelength ranges. Furthermore, a number of surfaces and items of equipment commonly present on a ward, and potentially responsible for pathogen transfer, have been analyzed for potential issues of background fluorescence masking the signal from contaminant bacteria. These include bedside handrails, nurse call button, blood pressure cuff and ward computer keyboard, as well as disinfectant cleaning products and microfiber cloth. All examined bacterial strains exhibited a distinctive double-peak fluorescence feature associated with tryptophan with no other cellular fluorophore detected. Thus, this fluorescence survey found that an emission peak of 340nm, from an excitation source at 280nm, was the cellular fluorescence signal to target for detection of bacterial contamination. The majority of materials analysed offer a spectral window through which bacterial contamination could indeed be detected. A few instances were found of

  12. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  13. LCLS in—photon out: fluorescence measurement of neon using soft x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Razib; Buth, Christian; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Beerwerth, Randolf; Holmes, Michael; Aldrich, Jeff; Lin, Ming-Fu; Minitti, Michael; Osipov, Timur; Schlotter, William; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Fritzsche, Stephan; Berrah, Nora

    2018-02-01

    We measured the fluorescence photon yield of neon upon soft x-ray ionization (∼1200 eV) from the x-ray free-electron laser at Linac Coherent Light Source, and demonstrated the usage of a grazing incidence spectrometer with a variable line spacing grating to perform x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy on a gas phase system. Our measurements also allowed us to estimate the focal size of the beam from the theoretical description developed, in terms of the rate equation approximation accounting for photoionization shake off of neutral neon and double auger decay of single core holes.

  14. Conjugation-induced fluorescent labeling of proteins and polymers using dithiomaleimides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Mathew P; Wilson, Paul; Mabire, Anne B; Kiviaho, Jenny K; Raymond, Jeffery E; Haddleton, David M; O'Reilly, Rachel K

    2013-02-27

    Dithiomaleimides (DTMs) with alkyl substituents are shown to be a novel class of highly emissive fluorophores. Variable solubility and further functionalization can easily be tailored through the choice of N and S substituents. Inclusion of a DTM unit into a ROP/RAFT initiator or insertion into the disulfide bond of salmon calcitonin (sCT) demonstrates the utility for fluorescent labeling of polymers and proteins. Simultaneous PEGylation and fluorescent labeling of sCT is also demonstrated, using the DTM unit as both a linker and a fluorophore. It is anticipated that DTMs will offer an attractive alternative to commonly used bulky, planar fluorophores.

  15. LCLS in - photon out: fluorescence measurement of neon using soft x-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Obaid, Razib; Buth, Christian; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Beerwerth, Randolf; Holmes, Michael; Aldrich, Jeff; Lin, Ming-Fu; Minitti, Michael; Osipov, Timur; Schlotter, William; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.; Fritzsche, Stephan; Berrah, Nora

    2017-01-01

    We measured the fluorescence photon yield of neon upon soft x-ray ionization (~1200 eV) from the x-ray free electron laser at Linac Coherent Light Source, and demonstrated the usage of a grazing incidence spectrometer with a variable linespacing grating to perform x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy on a gas phase system. Our measurements also allowed us to estimate the focal size of the beam from the theoretical description developed, in terms of the rate equation approximation accounting for ph...

  16. Fluorescence Immunoassay System via Enzyme-Enabled in Situ Synthesis of Fluorescent Silicon Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Hu, Tao; Chen, Chuanxia; Zhao, Dan; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2016-10-04

    The emergence of fluorescent nanomaterials with excellent performances has triggered the development of fluorescence analysis technique, which possesses several advantages in the research and clinical applications. However, current strategies for fluorescence immunoassay usually involve the routine fluorophore-labeled antibody and/or awkward signal generation procedure that may not be available in conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) systems. Herein, we circumvent this problem by imparting an exquisite signal generation mechanism to commercially available alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-based ELISA platform and putting forward a conceptual fluorescent ELISA system based on an original ALP-enabled in situ synthesis of fluorescent nanomaterials. After adding target antigen, the presence of ALP labeled on antibody catalyzes the transformation of the substrate ascorbic acid 2-phosphate into ascorbic acid. Then the resultant ascorbic acid (i.e., ascorbate) interacts with amine-containing silane molecules (no fluorescence) to produce intense cyan fluorescent silicon nanoparticles. For the proof-of-concept, alpha-fetoprotein and human immunoglobulin G are chosen as the model antigen targets, and our proposed immunoassay (designated as the nanoparticles generation-based fluorescent ELISA) enables the detection with either fluorescence spectroscopy or naked-eye readout under the ultraviolet lamp. The convincing recognition mechanism and assay performance ensure fluorescent ELISA to quantitatively evaluate the alpha-fetoprotein level in serologic test and potentially apply in the clinic diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Aubert, Pascal; Sennour, Mohamed; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf; Thorel, Alain; Gaffet, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties. PMID:19451687

  18. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  19. Nonextensive kinetics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, Olaf J; Birch, David J S

    2008-10-14

    Some fluorescence dyes in complex media, such as those found in biology, demonstrate nonextensive kinetics, which implies representing their fluorescence decays in terms of lifetime distributions rather than simple exponentials. Complex kinetics usually discourage application to lifetime sensors, as it is believed, that additional molecular mechanisms employed for detection of an analyte will make the resulting kinetics ambiguous and the sensor response inconclusive. In this paper we investigate theoretically the applicability of complex dye kinetics as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer based lifetime sensor and demonstrate that the nonextensive nature of its kinetics does not decrease the sensing performance, and indeed even provides richer structural information than a simple exponential behavior.

  20. Synthetic pathways to make nanoparticles fluorescent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Viktoriya; Epple, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    In biosciences, it is often necessary to follow the pathway of nanoparticles within cells or tissues. The nanoparticles can be used as labeled sensors which may, e.g., address functionalities within a cell, carry other specific agents like drugs or be magnetic for tumor thermotherapy. In the context of nanotoxicology, the fate of a given nanoparticle is of interest. As many methods in cell biology are based on fluorescence detection, there is a strong demand to make nanoparticles fluorescent. Different ways to introduce fluorescence are reviewed and exemplified with typical kinds of nanoparticles, i.e. polymers, silica and calcium phosphate.

  1. Solvent dependence of cyanoindole fluorescence lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilaire, Mary Rose; Mukherjee, Debopreeti; Troxler, Thomas; Gai, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Several cyanotryptophans have been shown to be useful biological fluorophores. However, how their fluorescence lifetimes vary with solvent has not been examined. In this regard, herein we measure the fluorescence decay kinetics as well as the absorption and emission spectra of six cyanoindoles in different solvents. In particular, we find, among other results, that only 4-cyanoindole affords a long fluorescence lifetime and hence high quantum yield in H2O. Therefore, our measurements provide not only a guide for choosing which cyanotryptophan to use in practice but also data for computational modeling of the substitution effect on the electronic transitions of indole.

  2. Cathode fall measurements in fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtrieb, Robert [Lutron Electronics Co Inc., 7200 Suter Rd., Coopersburg, PA 18036 (United States); Khan, Farheen [Lutron Electronics Co Inc., 7200 Suter Rd., Coopersburg, PA 18036 (United States); Waymouth, John F [Consultant, 16 Bennett Rd. Marblehead, MA 01945 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    We describe an improved method and apparatus for making capacitive measurements of the cathode fall in fluorescent lamps employing known behaviour of anode oscillations to provide a zero-of-potential reference, placing the entire cathode and anode fall waveform on an absolute rather than relative scale. The improved method is applicable to any diameter of fluorescent lamp currently manufactured. We also describe a method and apparatus for making spectroscopic measurements of the cathode fall in fluorescent lamps. This uses the abrupt onset of emission of certain selected spectral lines of the rare gas filling as a signal that the cathode fall has exceeded the excitation potentials of the spectral lines in question.

  3. Variable mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Paula Caitano; Prestes, Renata Bernardy; Forgiarini Jr., Luiz Alberto; Friedman, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the use of variable mechanical ventilation and the main outcomes of this technique. Methods Search, selection, and analysis of all original articles on variable ventilation, without restriction on the period of publication and language, available in the electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE®, and PubMed, by searching the terms "variable ventilation" OR "noisy ventilation" OR "biologically variable ventilation". Results A total of 36 studies were selected. Of these, 24 were original studies, including 21 experimental studies and three clinical studies. Conclusion Several experimental studies reported the beneficial effects of distinct variable ventilation strategies on lung function using different models of lung injury and healthy lungs. Variable ventilation seems to be a viable strategy for improving gas exchange and respiratory mechanics and preventing lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation. However, further clinical studies are necessary to assess the potential of variable ventilation strategies for the clinical improvement of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. PMID:28444076

  4. Variable mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Paula Caitano; Prestes, Renata Bernardy; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Friedman, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    To review the literature on the use of variable mechanical ventilation and the main outcomes of this technique. Search, selection, and analysis of all original articles on variable ventilation, without restriction on the period of publication and language, available in the electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE®, and PubMed, by searching the terms "variable ventilation" OR "noisy ventilation" OR "biologically variable ventilation". A total of 36 studies were selected. Of these, 24 were original studies, including 21 experimental studies and three clinical studies. Several experimental studies reported the beneficial effects of distinct variable ventilation strategies on lung function using different models of lung injury and healthy lungs. Variable ventilation seems to be a viable strategy for improving gas exchange and respiratory mechanics and preventing lung injury associated with mechanical ventilation. However, further clinical studies are necessary to assess the potential of variable ventilation strategies for the clinical improvement of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation.

  5. Color Variable Light Source Using Electrodeless Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Ryoji; Motomura, Hideki; Jinno, Masahumi; Aono, Masaharu

    Color variable pulsed Hg-Ne discharge lamp was invented and reported by Itatani's group in 1973. The color of Hg-Ne discharge was controlled by changing electron temperature by changing pulse frequency. Maya's group reported about color variable mercury fluorescent lamps using burst pulse and different type of phosphors. Kroesen's group proposed Hg-Ne color variable lamp using depletion effect. All these lamps use electrodes inside a tube. The authors propose a new type of color variable discharge lamp using inductively coupled plasma (ICP), electrodeless discharge. Color variable lamp using ICP is demonstrated. Just after starting discharge of Hg-Ne, the luminescent color of the lamp is red because of Ne emission. After that, the color changes gradually toward blue resulting from increase in mercury vapor pressure. When the color change stoppes and it is in the steady state with blue color, the color can be changed toward red by increasing input power. This is due to Ne emission resulting from increase in current density.

  6. Sensor combination and chemometric variable selection for online monitoring of Streptomyces coelicolor fed-batch cultivations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ödman, Peter; Johansen, C.L.; Olsson, L.

    2010-01-01

    selection using a genetic algorithm, interval PLS, and the principal variables method, respectively. A stepwise variable elimination method was applied to the three-way fluorescence data, resulting in simpler and more accurate N-PLS models. The prediction models were validated using leave......Fed-batch cultivations of Streptomyces coelicolor, producing the antibiotic actinorhodin, were monitored online by multiwavelength fluorescence spectroscopy and off-gas analysis. Partial least squares (PLS), locally weighted regression, and multilinear PLS (N-PLS) models were built for prediction...... of biomass and substrate (casamino acids) concentrations, respectively. The effect of combination of fluorescence and gas analyzer data as well as of different variable selection methods was investigated. Improved prediction models were obtained by combination of data from the two sensors and by variable...

  7. Optimal fluorescence waveband determination for detecting defective cherry tomatoes using a fluorescence excitation-emission matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, In-Suck; Kim, Moon S; Lee, Hoosoo; Lee, Wang-Hee; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2014-11-14

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  8. Fluorescence labeling of carbon nanotubes and visualization of a nanotube-protein hybrid under fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Khan, Shahbaz; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2011-04-11

    Biological applications of carbon nanotubes have been hampered by the inability to visualize them using conventional optical microscope, which is the most common tool for the observation and measurement of biological processes. Recently, a number of fluorescence labeling methods for biomolecules and various fluorescence probes have been developed and widely utilized in biological fields. Therefore, labeling carbon nanotubes with such fluorophores under physiological conditions will be highly useful in their biological applications. In this Article, we present a method to fluorescently label nanotubes by combining a detergent and a fluorophore commonly used in biological experiments. Fluorophores carrying an amino group (Texas Red hydrazide or BODIPY FL-hydrazide) were covalently attached to the hydroxyl groups of Tween 20 using carbonyldiimidazole. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that nanotubes were efficiently solubilized and labeled by this fluorescently labeled detergent. By using this technique, we also demonstrated multicolor fluorescence imaging of a nanotube-protein hybrid.

  9. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  10. Fluorescent carbon nanomaterials: "quantum dots" or nanoclusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekaliuk, Mariia O; Viagin, Oleg; Malyukin, Yuriy V; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2014-08-14

    Despite many efforts, the mechanisms of light absorption and emission of small fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (C-dots) are still unresolved and are a subject of active discussion. In this work we address the question as to whether the fluorescence is a collective property of these nanoparticles or they are composed of assembled individual emitters. Selecting three types of C-dots with "violet", "blue" and "green" emissions and performing a detailed study of fluorescence intensity, lifetime and time-resolved anisotropy as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths together with the effect of viscogen and dynamic fluorescence quencher, we demonstrate that the C-dots represent assemblies of surface-exposed fluorophores. They behave as individual emitters, display electronic anisotropy, do not exchange their excited-state energies via homo-FRET and possibly display sub-nanosecond intra-particle mobility.

  11. Smart Phone Fluorescent Chem8 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ionu Biosystems will develop a fluorescent smart phone blood analyzer that can measure important physiological concentrations from a drop of blood. The approach will...

  12. Accuracy and Precision in Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jennifer C. Waters

    2009-01-01

    .... With advances in digital cameras and the discovery and development of genetically encoded fluorophores, there has been a huge increase in the use of fluorescence microscopy to quantify spatial...

  13. Advances in Fluorescent Single-Chain Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julen De-La-Cuesta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorophore molecules can be monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy, which are highly useful and widely used techniques in cell biology, biochemistry, and medicine (e.g., biomarker analysis, immunoassays, cancer diagnosis. Several fluorescent micro- and nanoparticle systems based on block copolymer micelles and cross-linked polymer networks, quantum dots, π-conjugated polymers, and dendrimers have been evaluated as optical imaging systems. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the construction of fluorescent single-chain nanoparticles (SCNPs, which are valuable artificial soft nano-objects with a small tunable size (as small as 3 nm. In particular, the main methods currently available to endow SCNPs with fluorescent properties are discussed in detail, showing illustrative examples.

  14. Why do aged fluorescent tubes flicker?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plihon, Nicolas; Ferrand, Jérémy; Guyomar, Tristan; Museur, Flavien; Taberlet, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    Our everyday experience of aged and defective fluorescent tubes or bulbs informs us that they may flicker and emit a clicking sound while struggling to light up. In this article, the physical mechanisms controlling the initial illumination of a functioning fluorescent tube are investigated using a simple and affordable experimental setup. Thermionic emission from the electrodes of the tube controls the startup of fluorescent tubes. The origin of the faulty startup of aged fluorescent tubes is discussed and flickering regimes using functional tubes are artificially produced using a dedicated setup that decreases electron emission by the thermionic effect in a controlled manner. The physical parameters controlling the occurrence of flickering light are discussed, and their temporal statistics are reported.

  15. Fluorescence diagnosis in keratinocytic intraepidermal neoplasias.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, T.; Kleinpenning, M.M.; Blokx, W.A.M.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Erp, P.E.J. van; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As different tissue types have distinct capabilities to accumulate protoporphyrin-IX, fluorescence diagnosis with aminolevulinic acid-induced porphyrin (FDAP) could be used to discriminate between different tissue types. OBJECTIVE: Protoporphyrin-IX accumulation and proliferation were

  16. Anthozoa red fluorescent protein in biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Suresh; Deo, Sapna K

    2006-10-01

    The identification and cloning of a red fluorescent protein (DsRed) obtained from Anthozoa corals has provided an alternative to commonly used green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) in bioanalytical and biomedical research. DsRed in tandem with GFPs has enhanced the feasibility of multicolor labeling studies. Properties of DsRed, for example high photostability, red-shifted fluorescence emission, and stability to pH changes have proven valuable in its use as a fluorescent tag in cell-biology applications. DsRed has some limitations, however. Its slow folding and tendency to form tetramers have been a hurdle. Several different mutational studies have been performed on DsRed to overcome these problems. In this paper, applications of DsRed in biosensing, specifically in FRET/BRET assays, whole-cell assays, and in biosensors, is discussed. In the future, construction of DsRed mutants with unique characteristics will further expand its applications in bioanalysis.

  17. Flow cytometry, fluorescent probes, and flashing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunthof, C.J.

    2002-01-01


    Key words: fluorescent probes, flow cytometry, CSLM, viability, survival, microbial physiology, lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis , Lactobacillus plantarum , cheese, milk,

  18. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver to NASA an innovative, portable, and power efficient Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer...

  19. Fluorescence of berberine in microheterogeneous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colina, Ariel N.; Díaz, Marta S.; Gutiérrez, María Isela, E-mail: isela@unpata.edu.ar

    2013-12-15

    Spectral properties of the alkaloid berberine were studied in micellar solution and microemulsions based on anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate, cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and nonionic Triton X-100 surfactants. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectra were determined. For screening the influence of type and concentration of micelles on the fluorescence of berberine a 3{sup 2} full factorial design was used. Higher responses were obtained when berberine was dissolved in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles 0.01 M. Comparative results of fluorescence quantum yields (Φ{sub f}) reveal that the highest values (Φ{sub f}≥0.01) were observed in microemulsions. In the microheterogeneous systems investigated the most probable location of berberine is the micellar interfacial region. -- Highlights: • Spectroscopic propereies of berberine in microheterogeneous media were investigated. • Berberine shows enhanced fluorescence in SDS micelles as compared to water • Berberine is probably located in the interface of the microheterogeneous systems.

  20. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, Andreea; Meininger, Gerald A

    2008-08-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy represents a method of exciting and visualizing fluorophores present in the near-membrane region of live or fixed cells grown on coverslips. TIRF microscopy is based on the total internal reflection phenomenon that occurs when light passes from a high-refractive medium (e.g., glass) into a low-refractive medium (e.g., cell, water). The evanescent field produced by total internally reflected light excites the fluorescent molecules at the cell-substrate interface and is accompanied by minimal exposure of the remaining cell volume. This technique provides high-contrast fluorescence images, with very low background and virtually no out-of-focus light, ideal for visualization and spectroscopy of single-molecule fluorescence near a surface. This unit presents, in a concise manner, the principle of operation, instrument diversity, and TIRF microscopy applications for the study of biological samples. Copyright 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Carbon nanoparticle-based fluorescent bioimaging probes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Saha, Arindam; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Ray, Sekhar C; Jana, Nikhil R

    2013-01-01

    ... metals have severely limited the application potential of these nanocrystals. Here, we report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based, alternative, nontoxic imaging probe that is suitable for biological staining and diagnostics...

  2. Improved Charge-Transfer Fluorescent Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Improved charge-transfer fluorescent dyes have been developed for use as molecular probes. These dyes are based on benzofuran nuclei with attached phenyl groups substituted with, variously, electron donors, electron acceptors, or combinations of donors and acceptors. Optionally, these dyes could be incorporated as parts of polymer backbones or as pendant groups or attached to certain surfaces via self-assembly-based methods. These dyes exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields -- ranging from 0.2 to 0.98, depending upon solvents and chemical structures. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes of the fluorescence emitted by these dyes vary with (and, hence, can be used as indicators of) the polarities of solvents in which they are dissolved: In solvents of increasing polarity, fluorescence spectra shift to longer wavelengths, fluorescence quantum yields decrease, and fluorescence lifetimes increase. The wavelengths, quantum yields, intensities, and lifetimes are also expected to be sensitive to viscosities and/or glass-transition temperatures. Some chemical species -- especially amines, amino acids, and metal ions -- quench the fluorescence of these dyes, with consequent reductions in intensities, quantum yields, and lifetimes. As a result, the dyes can be used to detect these species. Another useful characteristic of these dyes is a capability for both two-photon and one-photon absorption. Typically, these dyes absorb single photons in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum (wavelengths fluorescence spectra identical to those obtained in response to excitation by single photons at half the corresponding wavelengths (300 to 400 nm). While many prior fluorescent dyes exhibit high quantum yields, solvent-polarity- dependent fluorescence behavior, susceptibility to quenching by certain chemical species, and/or two-photon fluorescence, none of them has the combination of all of these attributes. Because the present dyes do have all of these attributes

  3. Concepts for nanoscale resolution in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Stefan W; Dyba, Marcus; Jakobs, Stefan

    2004-10-01

    Spatio-temporal visualization of cellular structures by fluorescence microscopy has become indispensable in biology. However, the resolution of conventional fluorescence microscopy is limited by diffraction to about 180 nm in the focal plane and to about 500 nm along the optic axis. Recently, concepts have emerged that overcome the diffraction resolution barrier fundamentally. Formed on the basis of reversible saturable optical transitions, these concepts might eventually allow us to investigate hitherto inaccessible details within live cells.

  4. Fluorescent magnetic hybrid nanoprobe for multimodal bioimaging

    OpenAIRE

    Koktysh, Dmitry; Bright, Vanessa; Pham, Wellington

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescent magnetic hybrid imaging nanoprobe (HINP) was fabricated by conjugation of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and visible light-emitting (~600 nm) fluorescent CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs). The assembly strategy used the covalent linking of the oxidized dextran shell of magnetic particles to the glutathione ligands of QDs. Synthesized HINP formed stable water-soluble colloidal dispersions. The structure and properties of the particles were characterized by transmission electron ...

  5. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Santi, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) functions as a non-destructive microtome and microscope that uses a plane of light to optically section and view tissues with subcellular resolution. This method is well suited for imaging deep within transparent tissues or within whole organisms, and because tissues are exposed to only a thin plane of light, specimen photobleaching and phototoxicity are minimized compared to wide-field fluorescence, confocal, or multiphoton microscopy. LSFMs produce...

  6. Fluorescent nanolatex particles as nano-sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Méallet-Renault, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    Our aim is to design fluorescent nanosensors : we have demonstrated the feasability of separating the detection and signalization functions. We have chosen fluorescent latex nanoparticles to act as signalling part. They achieve the transduction of the information from the probe molecules (detection function) which are adsorbed at the surface of the latex beads. We have shown that information was mediated by energy transfer from the probe molecules to the latex particles.; Nous avons montré la...

  7. Characterization of flavin-based fluorescent proteins: an emerging class of fluorescent reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Walker, Joshua; Weyant, Kevin B; Schroeder, Charles M

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent reporter proteins based on flavin-binding photosensors were recently developed as a new class of genetically encoded probes characterized by small size and oxygen-independent maturation of fluorescence. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs) address two major limitations associated with existing fluorescent reporters derived from the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-namely, the overall large size and oxygen-dependent maturation of fluorescence of GFP. However, FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development and have been utilized in only a handful of biological studies. Importantly, a full understanding of the performance and properties of FbFPs as a practical set of biological probes is lacking. In this work, we extensively characterize three FbFPs isolated from Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Arabidopsis thaliana, using in vitro studies to assess probe brightness, oligomeric state, maturation time, fraction of fluorescent holoprotein, pH tolerance, redox sensitivity, and thermal stability. Furthermore, we validate FbFPs as stable molecular tags using in vivo studies by constructing a series of FbFP-based transcriptional constructs to probe promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Overall, FbFPs show key advantages as broad-spectrum biological reporters including robust pH tolerance (4-11), thermal stability (up to 60°C), and rapid maturation of fluorescence (fluorescence and slow kinetics of fluorescence maturation (10-40 minutes for half maximal fluorescence recovery). From this view, FbFPs represent a useful new addition to the fluorescent reporter protein palette, and our results constitute an important framework to enable researchers to implement and further engineer improved FbFP-based reporters with enhanced brightness and tighter flavin binding, which will maximize their potential benefits.

  8. A label-free fluorescent aptamer sensor based on regulation of malachite green fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Weichen; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    We report a label-free fluorescent aptamer sensor for adenosine based on the regulation of malachite green (MG) fluorescence, with comparable sensitivity and selectivity to other labeled adenosine aptamer-based sensors. The sensor consists of free MG, an aptamer strand containing an adenosine aptamer next to an MG aptamer, and a bridging strand that partially hybridizes to the aptamer strand. Such a hybridization prevents MG from binding to MG aptamer, resulting in low fluorescence of MG in t...

  9. Fluorescence markers in some New Zealand honeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Jessie; Loomes, Kerry M; Schlothauer, Ralf C; Stephens, Jonathan M

    2016-02-01

    The fluorescence characteristics of various New Zealand honeys were investigated to establish if this technique might detect signatures unique to manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides) honeys. We found unique fluorescence profiles for these honeys which distinguished them from other New Zealand honey floral types. Two excitation-emission (ex-em) marker wavelengths each for manuka and kanuka honeys were identified; manuka honey at 270-365 (MM1) and 330-470 (MM2) nm and kanuka honey at 275-305 (KM1) and 445-525 (KM2) nm. Dilution of manuka and kanuka honeys with other honey types that did not possess these fluorescence profiles resulted in a proportional reduction in fluorescence signal of the honeys at the marker wavelengths. By comparison, rewarewa (Knightia excelsa), kamahi (Weinmannia racemosa), and clover (Trifolium spp.) honeys did not exhibit unique fluorescence patterns. These findings suggests that a fluorescence-based screening approach has potential utility for determining the monoflorality status of manuka and kanuka honeys. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluorescence Properties of Chlorella sp. Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Teplicky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality and its fast and reliable monitoring is the challenge of the future. Design of appropriate biosensors that would be capable of non-invasive identification of water pollution is an important prerequisite for such challenge. Chlorophylls are pigments, naturally presented in all plants that absorb light. The main forms of chlorophyll in algae are chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, other pigments include xantophylls and beta-carotenes. Our aim was to characterize endogenous fluorescence of the Chlorella sp. algae, present naturally in drinking water. We recorded spatial, spectral and lifetime fluorescence distribution in the native algae. We noted that the fluorescence was evenly distributed in the algae cytosol, but lacked in the nucleus and reached maximum at 680-690 nm. Fluorescence decay of chlorella sp. was double-exponential, and clearly shorter than that of its isolated pigments. For the first time, fluorescence lifetime image of the algae is presented. Study of the fluorescence properties of algae is aimed at the improvement of water supply contamination detection and cleaning.

  11. Modeling fluorescent light distributions in scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-02-01

    It is hoped that the non-invasive optical characterization of physiological features of normal and diseased epithelia can be assessed through the fluorescent emission of such tissues. With a high percentage of cancers arising in the epithelium, the characterization of carcinogenesis in such tissues is imperative. Fluorescent emission from the epithelium, e.g. oral mucosa, has been shown to be sensitive to physiological features, such as cellular morphology, and the amount and types of biochemical agents present in the tissue. Efforts to distinguish the spectral signatures of diseased and healthy states of tissues from fluorescence have been confounded by the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescent signature as a result of wavelength dependent absorption and scattering within the tissue. Theoretical models of light propagation in biological media are required for understanding the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescence arising from compromised tissues. In this work we model the distortion of the intrinsic fluorescence emitted from a tissue with wavelength dependent optical properties, arising from varying blood and water content, using the radiative transport equation. As an example, we demonstrate the ability of blood and water content to distort the signal of a white light source as it is embedded deeper into a tissue.

  12. Fluorescence imaging of early lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Ikeda, Norihiko; Palcic, Branko

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a fluorescence imaging device was compared with conventional white-light bronchoscopy in 100 patients with lung cancer, 46 patients with resected State I nonsmall cell lung cancer, 10 patients with head and neck cancer, and 67 volunteers who had smoked at least one pack of cigarettes per day for twenty-five years or more. Using differences in tissue autofluorescence between premalignant, malignant and normal tissues, fluorescence bronchoscopy was found to detect more than twice as many moderate-severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ sites than conventional white-light bronchoscopy. The use of fluorescence imaging to detect small peripheral lung nodules was investigated in a micro metastatic lung model of mice implanted with Lewis lung tumor cells. Fluorescence imaging was found to be able to detect small malignant lung lesions. The use of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to enhance fluorescence detection of CIS was investigated in a patient after oral administration of 60 mg/kg of ALA four hours prior to bronchoscopy, although ALA enhanced the tumor's visibility, multiple sites of false positive fluorescence were observed in areas of inflammation or metaplasia.

  13. Fluorescent Penetration Enhancers for Transdermal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Jennifer E.; Polat, Baris E.; VanVeller, Brett; Lopez, Renata F.V.; Langer, Robert; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Chemical penetration enhancers are often used to enhance transdermal drug delivery. However, the fundamental mechanisms that govern the interactions between penetration enhancers and skin are not fully understood. Therefore, the goal of this work was to identify naturally fluorescent penetration enhancers (FPEs) in order to utilize well-established fluorescence techniques to directly study the behavior of FPEs within skin. In this study, 12 fluorescent molecules with amphiphilic characteristics were evaluated as skin penetration enhancers. Eight of the molecules exhibited significant activity as skin penetration enhancers, determined using skin current enhancement ratios. In addition, to illustrate the novel, direct, and non-invasive visualization of the behavior of FPEs within skin, three case studies involving the use of two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) are presented, including visualizing glycerol-mitigated and ultrasound-enhanced FPE skin penetration. Previous TPM studies have indirectly visualized the effect of penetration enhancers on skin by using a fluorescent dye to probe the transdermal pathways of the enhancer. These effects can now be directly visualized and investigated using FPEs. Finally, future studies are proposed for generating FPE design principles. The combination of FPEs with fluorescence techniques represents a useful novel approach for obtaining physical insights on the behavior of penetration enhancers within skin. PMID:22062691

  14. New method of acne disease fluorescent diagnostics in natural and fluorescent light and treatment control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimova, L. N.; Berezin, A. N.; Shevchik, S. A.; Kharnas, S. S.; Kusmin, S. G.; Loschenov, V. B.

    2005-08-01

    In the given research the new method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) control of acne disease is submitted. Method is based on simultaneous diagnostics in natural and fluorescent light. PDT was based on using 5-ALA (5- aminolevulinic acid) preparation and 600-730 nanometers radiation. If the examined site of a skin possessed a high endogenous porphyrin fluorescence level, PDT was carried out without 5-ALA. For FD and treatment control a dot spectroscopy and the fluorescent imaging of the affected skin were used.

  15. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  16. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin George Abraham

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM.

  17. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM).

  18. Influence of vessel stenosis on indocyanine green fluorescence intensity assessed by near-infrared fluorescence angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Nishimori, Hideaki; Fukutomi, Takashi; Handa, Takemi; Kihara, Kazuki; Tashiro, Miwa; Sato, Takayuki; Orihashi, Kazumasa

    2017-07-01

    Although useful for visualizing blood flow during revascularization surgery, the permeability of near-infrared fluorescence (NIR) angiography using indocyanine green (ICG) does not allow for vessel stenosis visualization. We hypothesized that changes in ICG fluorescence intensity reflect vessel stenosis, and evaluated the influence of stenosis on blood flow by ex vivo experimentation. The vessel stenosis model comprised a silicon tube, a graft occluder, and artificial blood. During near-infrared angiography, the fluorescense intensity was calculated during pre- and post-stenosis of an artificial circuit, using a NIR angiography. We measured the maximum fluorescence intensity and the time to maximum fluorescence intensity. Severe stenosis (≥75%) attenuated the increase in ICG fluorescence intensity in the tube significantly, pre- and post-stenosis. The time to maximum fluorescence intensity did not differ between sites pre- and post-stenosis, irrespective of stenosis severity. Stenosis affected the ICG fluorescence intensity through the vessel. Thus, quantitative analysis using NIR angiography may detect severe vessel stenosis (≥75%), and the extinction curve of indocyanine fluorescence intensity may support the evaluation of blood flow. The absence of differences in the time to maximum fluorescence intensity for degrees of stenosis might suggest a limitation of previous conventional qualitative assessments.

  19. Action spectra of photosystems II and I and quantum yield of photosynthesis in leaves in State 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The spectral global quantum yield (YII, electrons/photons absorbed) of photosystem II (PSII) was measured in sunflower leaves in State 1 using monochromatic light. The global quantum yield of PSI (YI) was measured using low-intensity monochromatic light flashes and the associated transmittance change at 810nm. The 810-nm signal change was calibrated based on the number of electrons generated by PSII during the flash (4·O2 evolution) which arrived at the PSI donor side after a delay of 2ms. The intrinsic quantum yield of PSI (yI, electrons per photon absorbed by PSI) was measured at 712nm, where photon absorption by PSII was small. The results were used to resolve the individual spectra of the excitation partitioning coefficients between PSI (aI) and PSII (aII) in leaves. For comparison, pigment-protein complexes for PSII and PSI were isolated, separated by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, and their optical density was measured. A good correlation was obtained for the spectral excitation partitioning coefficients measured by these different methods. The intrinsic yield of PSI was high (yI=0.88), but it absorbed only about 1/3 of quanta; consequently, about 2/3 of quanta were absorbed by PSII, but processed with the low intrinsic yield yII=0.63. In PSII, the quantum yield of charge separation was 0.89 as detected by variable fluorescence Fv/Fm, but 29% of separated charges recombined (Laisk A, Eichelmann H and Oja V, Photosynth. Res. 113, 145-155). At wavelengths less than 580nm about 30% of excitation is absorbed by pigments poorly connected to either photosystem, most likely carotenoids bound in pigment-protein complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Genotyping isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus beauveria bassiana by RAPD with fluorescent labels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta; Lecuona; Zandomeni; Grau

    1998-03-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with incorporation of fluorescent deoxynucleotides was used to examine the genetic diversity among Beauveria bassiana isolates from Argentina and Brazil. High-resolution DNA fingerprints were generated on line, during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of amplification products, by automated laser fluorescence analysis. Each isolate displayed a distinct genotype. Cluster analysis showed a high level of variability among these genotypes. No correlation with geographical origin or host was detected. Nevertheless, a phenetic group of 80% similarity represented mainly the isolates exhibiting high virulence against the sugar cane borer, Diatraea saccharalis. Fluorescence-based RAPD fingerprints provide a useful tool for identifying entomopathogenic fungi, and this technique is specially applicable to screening many isolates in population studies. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  1. Planar laser-induced fluorescence fuel imaging during gas-turbine relight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Read, Robert; Rogerson, J.W.; Hochgreb, S.

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study investigates the influence of fuel distribution on ignition outcome during high-altitude relight of a gas turbine. Planar laser-induced fluorescence is used to image fuel inside a lean direct-injection combustor under realistic conditions. A novel apparatus is developed...... to permit planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging, in which large quantities of poorly atomized fuel impinges on the internal surfaces of the combustor. Results reveal high variability in atomization quality. In the absence of flame, small droplets are confined to areas of recirculating flow, whereas......-induced fluorescence is a useful tool for the analysis of all stages of altitude relight. Copyright © 2013 by R. W. Read, J. W. Rogerson, and S. Hochgreb....

  2. The determination of nitrite by a graphene quantum dot fluorescence quenching method without sample pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Li; Wang, Ying; Liu, Fangtong; Yu, Shihua; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Jianpo

    2017-10-25

    A method for quantitative analysis of nitrite was achieved based on fluorescence quenching of graphene quantum dots. To obtain reliable results, the effects of pH, temperature and reaction time on this fluorescence quenching system were studied. Under optimized conditions, decrease in fluorescence intensity of graphene quantum dots (F0 /F) showed a good linear relationship with nitrite concentration between 0.007692-0.38406 mmol/L and 0.03623-0.13043 μmol/L; the limits of detection were 9.8 μmol/L and 5.4 nmol/L, respectively. Variable temperature experiments, UV absorption spectra and thermodynamic calculations were used to determine the quenching mechanism, and indicated that it was an exothermic, spontaneous dynamic quenching process. This method was used to analyse urine samples, and showed that it could be applied to analyse biological samples. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Identification of a suitable internal control for fluorescence analysis on canine peripheral blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riondato, F; Martini, V; Poggi, A; Rota, A; Comazzi, S; Sulce, M; Bruno, B; Borrelli, A; Miniscalco, B

    2016-04-01

    Reliable detection of fluorescence intensity (FI) by flow cytometry (FC) is fundamental. FI depends on instrument settings and sample processing procedures: thus, measurements should be done using internal controls with known FI. Commercially available beads-based standards are expensive, thus reducing their usability in the veterinary practice. Cell subsets with stable mean FI (MFI) within the population have been proposed as acceptable surrogates in human medicine. In veterinary medicine, no data exist about stability of antigen expression among different subjects or upon sample storage. The aim of the present study was to evaluate MFI variability of main lymphocytes antigens among the lymphoid cells within each subject, among different subjects, and upon 24-h storage, in order to identify the antigen most suitable as stable internal control in MFI analyses. Peripheral blood samples from 18 healthy dogs were analysed by FC within 3h from sampling to assess the expression of CD3, CD5, CD4, CD8, CD21 and cyCD79b using conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Analyses were restricted to the lymphoid population. Fluorescent microbeads were added to each tube, and antigen MFI was calculated as Relative Fluorescence Intensity RFI (CD/beads). Fluorescence histogram CV (fhCV) for each CD was regarded as an index of the variability of expression among lymphocytes within each subject (cell-to-cell variability); whereas the CV of RFI was regarded as an index of inter-subjects variability (dog-to-dog variability). In 11 cases, FC analyses were repeated after 24h storage at 4°C and RFI and CVs of fresh and stored samples were compared to assess variability linked to storage. CD4 was identified as the best antigen to be used as an internal control for MFI analyses in canine peripheral blood samples because of low cell-to-cell and dog-to-dog variability, and optimal stability upon 24-h storage. Blood samples from a second group of 21 healthy dogs were labelled only with CD4, in order

  4. The nebular variables

    CERN Document Server

    Glasby, John S

    1974-01-01

    The Nebular Variables focuses on the nebular variables and their characteristics. Discussions are organized by type of nebular variable, namely, RW Aurigae stars, T Orionis stars, T Tauri stars, and peculiar nebular objects. Topics range from light variations of the stars to their spectroscopic and physical characteristics, spatial distribution, interaction with nebulosity, and evolutionary features. This volume is divided into four sections and consists of 25 chapters, the first of which provides general information on nebular variables, including their stellar associations and their classifi

  5. Expression of recombinant multi-coloured fluorescent antibodies in gor -/trxB- E. coli cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markiv Anatoliy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibody-fluorophore conjugates are invaluable reagents used in contemporary molecular cell biology for imaging, cell sorting and tracking intracellular events. However they suffer in some cases from batch to batch variation, partial loss of binding and susceptibility to photo-bleaching. In theory, these issues can all be addressed by using recombinant antibody fused directly to genetically encoded fluorescent reporters. However, single-chain fragment variable domains linked by long flexible linkers are themselves prone to disassociation and aggregation, and in some cases with isoelectric points incompatible with use in physiologically relevant milieu. Here we describe a general approach that permits fully functional intracellular production of a range of coloured fluorescent recombinant antibodies with optimally orientated VH/VL interfaces and isoelectric points compatible for use in physiological solutions at pH 7.4 with a binding site to fluorophore stoichiometry of 1:1. Results Here we report the design, assembly, intracellular bacterial production and purification of a panel of novel antibody fluorescent protein fusion constructs. The insertion of monomeric fluorescent protein derived from either Discosoma or Aequorea in-between the variable regions of anti-p185HER2-ECD antibody 4D5-8 resulted in optimal VH/VL interface interactions to create soluble coloured antibodies each with a single binding site, with isoelectric points of 6.5- 6. The fluorescent antibodies used in cell staining studies with SK-BR-3 cells retained the fluorophore properties and antibody specificity functions, whereas the conventional 4D5-8 single chain antibody with a (Gly4Ser3 linker precipitated at physiological pH 7.4. Conclusions This modular monomeric recombinant fluorescent antibody platform may be used to create a range of recombinant coloured antibody molecules for quantitative in situ, in vivo and ex vivo imaging, cell sorting and cell

  6. An apertureless near-field microscope for fluorescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, T. J.; Lessard, Guillaume A.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2000-01-01

    We describe an apertureless near field microscope for imaging fluorescent samples. Optical contrast is generated by exploiting fluorescent quenching near a metallized atomic force microscope tip. This microscope has been used to image fluorescent latex beads with subdiffraction limit resolution. The use of fluorescence allows us to prove that the contrast mechanism is indeed spectroscopic in origin.

  7. Nucleic acid distribution pattern in avian erythrocytes and mammalian lymphocytes: comparative studies by fluorescence microscopy and digital imaging analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isitor, G N; Asgarali, Z; Pouching, K

    2008-12-01

    Nucleated erythrocytes of healthy domestic chicken and ducks, and lymphocytes of healthy Sprague Dawley rats were evaluated for nucleic acid distribution pattern, employing light and fluorescence microscopy procedures, as well as digital imaging analytical methods. The results demonstrate a unique organization of nuclear DNA of mature chicken and duck erythrocytes, as well as immature duck erythrocytes, as delineated spherical nuclear bodies that mostly corresponded with euchromatin zones of the cells in routine Wright-stain blood smears. The nuclear DNA of the rat lymphocytes, on the other hand, was observed as a more diffuse green fluorescing nuclear areas, with punctate variably-sized diffuse areas of RNA red fluorescence. RNA red color fluorescence was also evident in the narrow cytoplasm of the lymphocytes, especially in large lymphocytes, in comparison with the cytoplasm of the mature avian erythrocytes that completely lacked any nucleic acid fluorescence. Nuclear RNA fluorescence was lacking in the mature chicken erythrocytes, compared with those of the mature and immature duck erythrocytes as well as lymphocytes of both avian and rats blood. The significance of these findings lies in the establishment of normal benchmarks for the nuclear and cytoplasmic nucleic acid pattern in eukaryotic cells. These normal benchmarks become valuable in rapid diagnostic situations associated with pathologies, such as the presence of viral nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusion bodies that can alter the nucleic acid pattern of the host cells, and in conditions of cellular abnormal protein aggregations. Variability of cellular nucleic acid pattern can also aid in prognostic assessments of neoplastic conditions.

  8. Interconversion of Anthozoa GFP-like fluorescent and non-fluorescent proteins by mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulina, Maria E; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Mudrik, Nikolay N; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2002-01-01

    Background Within the family of green fluorescent protein (GFP) homologs, one can mark two main groups, specifically, fluorescent proteins (FPs) and non-fluorescent or chromoproteins (CPs). Structural background of differences between FPs and CPs are poorly understood to date. Results Here, we applied site-directed and random mutagenesis in order to to transform CP into FP and vice versa. A purple chromoprotein asCP (asFP595) from Anemonia sulcata and a red fluorescent protein DsRed from Discosoma sp. were selected as representatives of CPs and FPs, respectively. For asCP, some substitutions at positions 148 and 165 (numbering in accordance to GFP) were found to dramatically increase quantum yield of red fluorescence. For DsRed, substitutions at positions 148, 165, 167, and 203 significantly decreased fluorescence intensity, so that the spectral characteristics of these mutants became more close to those of CPs. Finally, a practically non-fluorescent mutant DsRed-NF was generated. This mutant carried four amino acid substitutions, specifically, S148C, I165N, K167M, and S203A. DsRed-NF possessed a high extinction coefficient and an extremely low quantum yield (< 0.001). These spectral characteristics allow one to regard DsRed-NF as a true chromoprotein. Conclusions We located a novel point in asCP sequence (position 165) mutations at which can result in red fluorescence appearance. Probably, this finding could be applied onto other CPs to generate red and far-red fluorescent mutants. A possibility to transform an FP into CP was demonstrated. Key role of residues adjacent to chromophore's phenolic ring in fluorescent/non-fluorescent states determination was revealed. PMID:11972899

  9. Interconversion of Anthozoa GFP-like fluorescent and non-fluorescent proteins by mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudrik Nikolay N

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the family of green fluorescent protein (GFP homologs, one can mark two main groups, specifically, fluorescent proteins (FPs and non-fluorescent or chromoproteins (CPs. Structural background of differences between FPs and CPs are poorly understood to date. Results Here, we applied site-directed and random mutagenesis in order to to transform CP into FP and vice versa. A purple chromoprotein asCP (asFP595 from Anemonia sulcata and a red fluorescent protein DsRed from Discosoma sp. were selected as representatives of CPs and FPs, respectively. For asCP, some substitutions at positions 148 and 165 (numbering in accordance to GFP were found to dramatically increase quantum yield of red fluorescence. For DsRed, substitutions at positions 148, 165, 167, and 203 significantly decreased fluorescence intensity, so that the spectral characteristics of these mutants became more close to those of CPs. Finally, a practically non-fluorescent mutant DsRed-NF was generated. This mutant carried four amino acid substitutions, specifically, S148C, I165N, K167M, and S203A. DsRed-NF possessed a high extinction coefficient and an extremely low quantum yield ( Conclusions We located a novel point in asCP sequence (position 165 mutations at which can result in red fluorescence appearance. Probably, this finding could be applied onto other CPs to generate red and far-red fluorescent mutants. A possibility to transform an FP into CP was demonstrated. Key role of residues adjacent to chromophore's phenolic ring in fluorescent/non-fluorescent states determination was revealed.

  10. Fluorescent Nanoparticle Uptake for Brain Tumor Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Tréhin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate delineation of tumor margins is vital to the successful surgical resection of brain tumors. We have previously developed a multimodal nanoparticle CLIO-Cy5.5, which is detectable by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence, to assist in intraoperatively visualizing tumor boundaries. Here we examined the accuracy of tumor margin determination of orthotopic tumors implanted in hosts with differing immune responses to the tumor. Using a nonuser-based signal intensity method applied to fluorescent micrographs of 9L gliosarcoma green fluorescent protein (GFP tumors, mean overestimations of 2 and 24 µm were obtained using Cy5.5 fluorescence, compared to the true tumor margin determined by GFP fluorescence, in nude mice and rats, respectively. To resolve which cells internalized the nanoparticle and to quantitate degree of uptake, tumors were disaggregated and cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Nanoparticle uptake was seen in both CD11b+ cells (representing activated microglia and macrophages and tumor cells in both animal models by both methods. CD11b+ cells were predominantly found at the tumor margin in both hosts, but were more pronounced at the margin in the rat model. Additional metastatic (CT26 colon and primary (Gli36 glioma brain tumor models likewise demonstrated that the nanoparticle was internalized both by tumor cells and by host cells. Together, these observations suggest that fluorescent nanoparticles provide an accurate method of tumor margin estimation based on a combination of tumor cell and host cell uptake for primary and metastatic tumors in animal model systems and offer potential for clinical translation.

  11. INTER-EXAMINER VARIABILITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The traditional clinical examination has fallen into disfavour on account of considerable inter-examiner variability. The OSCE is gaining popularity as it is perceived to be less prone to this. Objective: To establish whether inter-examiner variability is still a significant factor for the undergraduate orthopaedic ...

  12. Software variability management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, J; Nord, RL

    2004-01-01

    During recent years, the amount of variability that has to be supported by a software artefact is growing considerably and its management is evolving into a major challenge during development, usage, and evolution of software artefacts. Successful management of variability in software leads to

  13. Microinertia and internal variables

    CERN Document Server

    Berezovski, A

    2015-01-01

    The origin of microinertia of micromorphic theories is investigated from the point of view of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In the framework of dual internal variables microinertia stems from a thermodynamic equation of state related to the internal variable with the properties of mechanical momentum.

  14. Variable volume combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  15. Effect of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on chlorophyll fluorescence emission by the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J.M.; Lara, C. (Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis, Univ. de Sevilla y CSIC, Sevilla (ES)); Sivak, M.N. (Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (US))

    1992-01-01

    O{sub 2} evolution and chlorophyll A fluorescence emission have been monitored in intact cells of the cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans 1402-1 to study the influence of carbon and nitrogen assimilation on the operation of the photosynthetic apparatus. The pattern of fluorescence induction in dark-adapted cyanobacterial cells was different from that of higher plants. Cyanobacteria undergo large, rapid state transitions upon illumination, which lead to marked changes in the fluorescence yield, complicating the estimation of quenching coefficients. The Kautsky effect was not evident, although it could be masked by a state II-state I transition, upon illumination with actinic light. The use of inhibitors of carbon assimilation such as D,L-glyceraldehyde or iodoacetamide allowed us to relate changes in variable fluorescence to active CO{sub 2} fixation. Ammonium, but not nitrate, induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching, in agreement with a previous report on green algae, indicative of an ammonium-induced state i transition. (au).

  16. Assessing the photoaging process at sun exposed and non-exposed skin using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Photoaging is the skin premature aging due to exposure to ultraviolet light, which damage the collagen, elastin and can induce alterations on the skin cells DNA, and, then, it may evolve to precancerous lesions, which are widely investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime. The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime analysis has been presented as a technique of great potential for biological tissue characterization at optical diagnostics. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and may contribute to a non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries such as skin lesions. These lesions and the possible areas where they may develop can be interrogated using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy taking into account the variability of skin phototypes and the changes related to melanin, collagen and elastin, endogenous fluorophores which have emissions that spectrally overlap to the NADH and FAD emission. The objective of this study is to assess the variation on fluorescence lifetimes of normal skin at sun exposed and non-exposed areas and associate this variation to the photoaging process.

  17. Applicability of Fluorescence and Absorbance Spectroscopy to Estimate Organic Pollution in Rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapik, Heloise Garcia; Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo; de Azevedo, Júlio Cesar Rodrigues; do Amaral Porto, Monica Ferreira

    2014-12-01

    This article explores the applicability of fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy for estimating organic pollution in polluted rivers. The relationship between absorbance, fluorescence intensity, dissolved organic carbon, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and other water quality parameters were used to characterize and identify the origin and the spatial variability of the organic pollution in a highly polluted watershed. Analyses were performed for the Iguassu River, located in southern Brazil, with area about 2,700 km 2 and ∼3 million inhabitants. Samples were collect at six monitoring sites covering 107 km of the main river. BOD, COD, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentration indicates a high input of sewage to the river. Specific absorbance at 254 and 285 nm (SUVA 254 and A 285 /COD) did not show significant variation between sites monitored, indicating the presence of both dissolved compounds found in domestic effluents and humic and fulvic compounds derived from allochthonous organic matter. Correlations between BOD and tryptophan-like fluorescence peak (peak T 2 , r =0.7560, and peak T 1 , r =0.6949) and tyrosine-like fluorescence peak (peak B, r =0.7321) indicated the presence of labile organic matter and thus confirmed the presence of sewage in the river. Results showed that fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy provide useful information on pollution in rivers from critical watersheds and together are a robust method that is simpler and more rapid than traditional methods employed by regulatory agencies.

  18. Computer-assisted sperm morphometry fluorescence-based analysis has potential to determine progeny sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Santolaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the ability of computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASA-Morph with fluorescence to discriminate between spermatozoa carrying different sex chromosomes from the nuclear morphometrics generated and different statistical procedures in the bovine species. The study was divided into two experiments. The first was to study the morphometric differences between X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa (SX and SY, respectively. Spermatozoa from eight bulls were processed to assess simultaneously the sex chromosome by FISH and sperm morphometry by fluorescence-based CASA-Morph. SX cells were larger than SY cells on average (P < 0.001 although with important differences between bulls. A simultaneous evaluation of all the measured features by discriminant analysis revealed that nuclear area and average fluorescence intensity were the variables selected by stepwise discriminant function analysis as the best discriminators between SX and SY. In the second experiment, the sperm nuclear morphometric results from CASA-Morph in nonsexed (mixed SX and SY and sexed (SX semen samples from four bulls were compared. FISH allowed a successful classification of spermatozoa according to their sex chromosome content. X-sexed spermatozoa displayed a larger size and fluorescence intensity than nonsexed spermatozoa (P < 0.05. We conclude that the CASA-Morph fluorescence-based method has the potential to find differences between X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa in bovine species although more studies are needed to increase the precision of sex determination by this technique.

  19. Body temperature changes of newborns under fluorescent versus LED phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Ozge; Soysaldı, Emel; Kale, Yusuf; Kavurt, Sumru; Bas, Ahmet Yagmur; Demirel, Nihal

    2014-08-01

    To determine changes in body temperature (BT) of hyperbilirubinemic newborns under conventional phototherapy with fluorescent lamps and light emitting diodes (LED) at different irradiances. Otherwise healthy newborn infants >34 wk gestational age (GA) hospitalized for indirect hyperbilirubinemia, requiring phototherapy in the first 10 d of life were enrolled. Infants who received conventional phototherapy with fluorescent lamps (10-15 μW/cm(2)/nm irradiance) were defined as group 1, LED phototherapy of 26-60 μW/cm(2)/nm irradiance as group 2, and LED phototherapy of 60-120 μW/cm(2)/nm irradiance as group 3. Primary outcome measure was mean BT which was defined as arithmetical mean of axillary BT measured at 2 h intervals during the first day of phototherapy. Thirty patients were enroled in each group. Mean birth weight and GA of the total cohort was 2800 ± 530 g and 36.6 ± 2 wk, respectively. Baseline demographic variables and serum total bilirubin levels were similar among groups. Mean BT was 36.7 ± 0.1 °C in group 1, 36.6 ± 0.2 °C in group 2, 37.7 ± 0.2 °C in group 3. Mean BT was higher in group 3 compared to group 1 (p LED phototherapy of ≥ 60 μW/cm(2)/nm intensity significantly increases BT in hyperbilirubinemic newborns.

  20. Fluorescent proteins as genetically encoded FRET biosensors in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochreiter, Bernhard; Garcia, Alan Pardo; Schmid, Johannes A

    2015-10-16

    Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a) cleavage; (b) conformational-change; (c) mechanical force and (d) changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  1. Fluorescent Proteins as Genetically Encoded FRET Biosensors in Life Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Hochreiter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence- or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET is a measurable physical energy transfer phenomenon between appropriate chromophores, when they are in sufficient proximity, usually within 10 nm. This feature has made them incredibly useful tools for many biomedical studies on molecular interactions. Furthermore, this principle is increasingly exploited for the design of biosensors, where two chromophores are linked with a sensory domain controlling their distance and thus the degree of FRET. The versatility of these FRET-biosensors made it possible to assess a vast amount of biological variables in a fast and standardized manner, allowing not only high-throughput studies but also sub-cellular measurements of biological processes. In this review, we aim at giving an overview over the recent advances in genetically encoded, fluorescent-protein based FRET-biosensors, as these represent the largest and most vividly growing group of FRET-based sensors. For easy understanding, we are grouping them into four categories, depending on their molecular mechanism. These are based on: (a cleavage; (b conformational-change; (c mechanical force and (d changes in the micro-environment. We also address the many issues and considerations that come with the development of FRET-based biosensors, as well as the possibilities that are available to measure them.

  2. A PROTOCOL FOR CRYOEMBEDDING THE ADULT GUINEA PIG COCHLEA FOR FLUORESCENCE IMMUNOHISTOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    COLEMAN, Bryony; Hardie, Natalie A.; de Silva, Michelle G.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has been used extensively to label cells in vitro and to track them following their transplantation in vivo. During our studies using the mouse embryonic stem cell line R1 B5-EGFP, we observed variable levels of fluorescence intensity of the GFP within these transfected cells. The variable fluorescence of this protein coupled with the innately autofluorescent nature of several structures within the cochlea collectively made the in vivo identification of these transplanted stem cells difficult. We have modified previously published protocols to enable the discrimination of an authentic GFP signal from autofluorescence in the adult guinea pig cochlea using fluorescence-based immunohistochemistry. The protocol described can also be used to label tissues of the cochlea using a chromogen, such as 3,3′-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB). Moreover, the described method gives excellent preservation of structural morphology making the tissues useful for both morphological and quantitative studies in combination with robust immunohistochemistry in the adult guinea pig cochlea. PMID:18835298

  3. Partitioning Variability of a Compartmentalized In Vitro Transcriptional Thresholding Circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsner, Korbinian; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2015-10-16

    Encapsulation of in vitro biochemical reaction circuits into small, cell-sized compartments can result in considerable variations in the dynamical properties of the circuits. As a model system, we here investigate a simple in vitro transcriptional reaction circuit, which generates an ultrasensitive fluorescence response when the concentration of an RNA transcript reaches a preset threshold. The reaction circuit is compartmentalized into spherical water-in-oil microemulsion droplets, and the reaction progress is monitored by fluorescence microscopy. A quantitative statistical analysis of thousands of individual droplets ranging in size from a few up to 20 μm reveals a strong variability in effective RNA production rates, which by computational modeling is traced back to a larger-than-Poisson variability in RNAP activities in the droplets. The noise level in terms of the noise strength (the Fano factor) is strongly dependent on the ratio between transcription templates and polymerases, and increases for higher template concentrations.

  4. Developing an imaging bi-spectrometer for fluorescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mahnaz

    Fluorescent effects have been observed for thousands of years. Stokes, in 1852, began the science of fluorescence culminating in his law of fluorescence, which explained that fluorescence emission occurs at longer wavelengths than the excitation wavelength. This phenomenon is observed extensively in the art world. Daylight fluorescent colors known as Day-GloRTM have become an artistic medium since the 1960s. Modern artists exploit these saturated and brilliant colors to glitter their painting. Multipsectral imaging as a noninvasive technique has been used for archiving by museums and cultural-heritage institutions for about a decade. The complex fluorescence phenomenon has been often ignored in the multispectral projects. The ignored fluorescence results in errors in digital imaging of artwork containing fluorescent colors. The illuminant-dependency of the fluorescence radiance makes the fluorescence colorimetry and consequently spectral imaging more complex. In this dissertation an abridged imaging bi-spectrometer for artwork containing both fluorescent and non-fluorescent colors was developed. The method developed included two stages of reconstruction of the spectral reflected radiance factor and prediction of the fluorescent radiance factor. The estimation of the reflected radiance factor as a light source independent component was achieved by imaging with a series of short-wavelength cutoff filters placed in the illumination path. The fluorescent radiance factor, a light source dependent component, was estimated based on a proposed model, the abridged two-monochromator method. The abridged two-monochromator method was developed for reconstructing the bi-spectral matrix of a fluorescent color based on a calibrated UV-fluorescence imaging. In this way, one could predict the fluorescence radiance factor under any desired illuminant and consequently a better color evaluation and rendering could be obtained. Furthermore, this method easily fitted in a general system

  5. Visualizing Fluorescence: Using a Homemade Fluorescence "Microscope" to View Latent Fingerprints on Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFratta, Christopher N.; Huh, Sun Phill; Mallillin, Allistair C.; Riviello, Peter J.; Walt, David R.

    2010-01-01

    We describe an inexpensive hand-held fluorescence imager (low-magnification microscope), constructed from poly(vinyl chloride) pipe and other inexpensive components for use as a teaching tool to understand the principles of fluorescence detection. Optical filters are used to select the excitation and emission wavelengths and can be easily…

  6. Sensitive turn-on fluorescent detection of tartrazine based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng Tian; Shi, Yan; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2012-01-18

    We introduce a sensitive, rapid, label-free and general fluorescent method for the determination of tartrazine by competitive binding to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) against fluorescein, and the fluorescence recovery upon fluorescein desorption from rGO provides a quantitative readout for tartrazine, giving a detection limit of 0.53 ng mL(-1).

  7. Green fluorescent protein with anionic tryptophan-based chromophore and long fluorescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisyan, Karen S; Goryashchenko, Alexander S; Lidsky, Peter V; Gorbachev, Dmitry A; Bozhanova, Nina G; Gorokhovatsky, Andrey Yu; Pereverzeva, Alina R; Ryumina, Alina P; Zherdeva, Victoria V; Savitsky, Alexander P; Solntsev, Kyril M; Bommarius, Andreas S; Sharonov, George V; Lindquist, Jake R; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E; Rebane, Aleksander; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Mishin, Alexander S

    2015-07-21

    Spectral diversity of fluorescent proteins, crucial for multiparameter imaging, is based mainly on chemical diversity of their chromophores. Recently we have reported, to our knowledge, a new green fluorescent protein WasCFP-the first fluorescent protein with a tryptophan-based chromophore in the anionic state. However, only a small portion of WasCFP molecules exists in the anionic state at physiological conditions. In this study we report on an improved variant of WasCFP, named NowGFP, with the anionic form dominating at 37°C and neutral pH. It is 30% brighter than enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and exhibits a fluorescence lifetime of 5.1 ns. We demonstrated that signals of NowGFP and EGFP can be clearly distinguished by fluorescence lifetime in various models, including mammalian cells, mouse tumor xenograft, and Drosophila larvae. NowGFP thus provides an additional channel for multiparameter fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of green fluorescent proteins. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression-Enhanced Fluorescent Proteins Based on Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein for Super-resolution Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwé, Sam; De Zitter, Elke; Gielen, Vincent; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Vandenberg, Wim; Grotjohann, Tim; Clays, Koen; Jakobs, Stefan; Van Meervelt, Luc; Dedecker, Peter

    2015-10-27

    "Smart fluorophores", such as reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins, are crucial for advanced fluorescence imaging. However, only a limited number of such labels is available, and many display reduced biological performance compared to more classical variants. We present the development of robustly photoswitchable variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), named rsGreens, that display up to 30-fold higher fluorescence in E. coli colonies grown at 37 °C and more than 4-fold higher fluorescence when expressed in HEK293T cells compared to their ancestor protein rsEGFP. This enhancement is not due to an intrinsic increase in the fluorescence brightness of the probes, but rather due to enhanced expression levels that allow many more probe molecules to be functional at any given time. We developed rsGreens displaying a range of photoswitching kinetics and show how these can be used for multimodal diffraction-unlimited fluorescence imaging such as pcSOFI and RESOLFT, achieving a spatial resolution of ∼70 nm. By determining the first ever crystal structures of a negative reversibly switchable FP derived from Aequorea victoria in both the "on"- and "off"-conformation we were able to confirm the presence of a cis-trans isomerization and provide further insights into the mechanisms underlying the photochromism. Our work demonstrates that genetically encoded "smart fluorophores" can be readily optimized for biological performance and provides a practical strategy for developing maturation- and stability-enhanced photochromic fluorescent proteins.

  9. Novel disposable biochip platform employing supercritical angle fluorescence for enhanced fluorescence collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Duncan; McDonnell, Barry; Hearty, Stephen; Basabe-Desmonts, Lourdes; Blue, Robert; Trnavsky, Michal; McAtamney, Colm; O'Kennedy, Richard; MacCraith, Brian D

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of development of a novel disposable plastic biochip for multiplexed clinical diagnostic applications. The disposable biochip is manufactured using a low-cost, rapid turn- around injection moulding process and consists of nine parabolic elements on a planar substrate. The optical elements are based on supercritical angle fluorescence (SAF) which provides substantial enhancement of the fluorescence collection efficiency but also confines the fluorescence detection volume strictly to the immediate proximity of the biochip surface, thereby having the potential to discriminate against background fluorescence from the analyte solution. An optical reader is also described that enables interrogation and fluorescence collection from the nine optical elements on the chip. The sensitivity of the system was determined with a biotin-avidin assay while its clinical utility was demonstrated in an assay for C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammation marker.

  10. Synthesis of fluorescent dipeptidomimetics and their ribosomal incorporation into green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sandipan Roy; Maini, Rumit; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M

    2015-11-01

    The synthesis and incorporation into position 66 of green fluorescent protein (GFP) by in vitro protein translation of novel oxazole and thiazole based dipeptidomimetics are described. The compounds may be regarded as GFP chromophore analogues, and are strongly fluorescent. An α-amido-β-ketoester intermediate was obtained via bisacylation of a protected glycine. The intermediate underwent dehydrative cyclization to afford the 1,3-oxazole and was treated with Lawesson's reagent to furnish the 1,3-thiazole. When these fluorophores were introduced into position 66 of GFP in place of Tyr66, the resulting GFP analogues exhibited fluorescence emission several-fold greater than wild-type GFP; the emission was also shifted to shorter wavelength. It may be noted that compared to the typical fluorophores formed in the natural and modified fluorescent proteins, the oxazole and thiazole fluorophores are completely stable and do not require activation by posttranslational modification to exhibit fluorescence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of a Langmuir Monolayer of C-16 Fluorescent Dipyrrinone Liquid Crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struebing, Christian; Deluca, Giovanni; Prayaga, Chandra; Wade, Aaron; Huggins, Michael; Renaud, Amy; Chandler, Rebecca

    2013-03-01

    A C-16 Fluorescent Dipyrrinone Liquid Crystal synthesized by the Chemistry department, University of West Florida, has been prepared in a Langmuir monolayer using a Nima Langmuir-Blodgett Trough. DeLuca et al. studied how the length of the hydrocarbon tail influences the behavior of the pressure-area isotherm of the Langmuir film. The C-16 Fluorescent Dipyrrinone Liquid Crystal film produced a stable film at 20 mN/m and a stable, optical quality film at 40 mN/m. We present a study of the fluorescence properties of the C-16 fluorescent dipyrrinone liquid crystal film. Once the monolayer is compressed the sample is excited using a 410 nm wavelength laser and the fluorescence is measured using an Oriel MS260i 1/4 m Spectrograph. Undergraduate Student

  12. Fluorescence diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Kate C.; Inada, Natalia M.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The pharyngitis and laryngitis are respiratory tract infections highly common. Pharyngitis can be accompanied by fever, especially if caused by a systemic infection. Laryngitis is an inflammation of your voice box (larynx) from irritation or infection. The conventional treatment is the antibiotics administration, which may be responsible by an increase of identification of bacterial strains resistant to drug. This fact associated to high incidence of these infections become important to develop new technologies for diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the use of widefield fluorescence imaging for the characterization of oropharynx infections, in order to diagnose the bacteria colonization. The imaging system for wide field fluorescence visualization is Evince® (MMOptics, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) coupled to an Apple iPhone® cell phone device. The system consists of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) operating in the violet blue region centered at green-red spectrum 450 nm and optical filters that allow viewing of fluorescence. A tongue depressor was adapted to Evince® for mouth opening. The same images were captured with white light and fluorescence with an optical system. The red fluorescence may be a bacterial marker for physiological monitoring of oropharynx infection processes. The bacterial biofilm on tissue were assigned to the presence of protoporphyrin IX. This work indicates that the autofluorescence of the tissue may be used as a non-invasive technique to aid in the oropharynx infection diagnostic.

  13. A novel fluorescent assay for sucrose transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gora Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed a novel assay based on the ability of type I sucrose uptake transporters (SUTs to transport the fluorescent coumarin β-glucoside, esculin. Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae is routinely used for the heterologous expression of SUTs and does not take up esculin. Results When type I sucrose transporters StSUT1 from potato or AtSUC2 from Arabidopsis were expressed in yeast, the cells were able to take up esculin and became brightly fluorescent. We tested a variety of incubation times, esculin concentrations, and buffer pH values and found that for these transporters, a 1 hr incubation at 0.1 to 1 mM esculin at pH 4.0 produced fluorescent cells that were easily distinguished from vector controls. Esculin uptake was assayed by several methods including fluorescence microscopy, spectrofluorometry and fluorescence-activiated cell sorting (FACS. Expression of the type II sucrose transporter OsSUT1 from rice did not result in increased esculin uptake under any conditions tested. Results were reproduced successfully in two distinct yeast strains, SEY6210 (an invertase mutant and BY4742. Conclusions The esculin uptake assay is rapid and sensitive and should be generally useful for preliminary tests of sucrose transporter function by heterologous expression in yeast. This assay is also suitable for selection of yeast showing esculin uptake activity using FACS.

  14. Use of astronomy filters in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Monochrome astronomy filters are well suited for use as excitation or suppression filters in fluorescence microscopy. Because of their particular optical design, such filters can be combined with standard halogen light sources for excitation in many fluorescent probes. In this "low energy excitation," photobleaching (fading) or other irritations of native specimens are avoided. Photomicrographs can be taken from living motile fluorescent specimens also with a flash so that fluorescence images can be created free from indistinctness caused by movement. Special filter cubes or dichroic mirrors are not needed for our method. By use of suitable astronomy filters, fluorescence microscopy can be carried out with standard laboratory microscopes equipped with condensers for bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) illumination in transmitted light. In BF excitation, the background brightness can be modulated in tiny steps up to dark or black. Moreover, standard industry microscopes fitted with a vertical illuminator for examinations of opaque probes in DF or BF illumination based on incident light (wafer inspections, for instance) can also be used for excitation in epi-illumination when adequate astronomy filters are inserted as excitatory and suppression filters in the illuminating and imaging light path. In all variants, transmission bands can be modulated by transmission shift.

  15. Is the flower fluorescence relevant in biocommunication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriel, Analía; Lagorio, María Gabriela

    2010-10-01

    Flower fluorescence has been previously proposed as a potential visual signal to attract pollinators. In this work, this point was addressed by quantitatively measuring the fluorescence quantum yield ( Φ f) for flowers of Bellis perennis (white, yellow, pink, and purple), Ornithogalum thyrsoides (petals and ovaries), Limonium sinuatum (white and yellow), Lampranthus productus (yellow), Petunia nyctaginiflora (white), Bougainvillea spectabilis (white and yellow), Antirrhinum majus (white and yellow), Eustoma grandiflorum (white and blue), Citrus aurantium (petals and stigma), and Portulaca grandiflora (yellow). The highest values were obtained for the ovaries of O. thyrsoides ( Φ f = 0.030) and for Citrus aurantium petals ( Φ f = 0.014) and stigma ( Φ f = 0.013). Emitted photons as fluorescence were compared with reflected photons. It was concluded that the fluorescence emission is negligible compared to the reflected light, even for the most fluorescent samples, and it may not be considered as an optical signal in biocommunication. The work was complemented with the calculation of quantum catches for each studied flower species to describe the visual sensitization of eye photoreceptors.

  16. Fabrication of fluorescent chitosan-containing microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang R.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intense emission peaks of Eu(DBM3Phen (DBM and Phen are dibenzoylmethane and 1,10-phenanthroline, respectively in the microcapsules containing molecules of quaternary ammonium chitosan (QACS and sodium alginate are observed. The microcapsules are assembled by using CaCO3 particles as template cores by the layer-by-layer (LbL technique. Observation of microcapsules by the fluorescence mode and the transmission mode in the confocal laser scanning microscopy shows that the microcapsules are intact after core decomposition. Fluorescence under ultraviolet irradiation comes directly from the Eu(DBM3Phen. Homogeneous assembly of Eu(DBM3Phen can be deduced due to the homogeneous fluorescence of the microcapsules in the fluorescence micrographs. The microcapsules show adherence to solid substrates due to large quantities of hydroxyl groups of QACS. AFM measurements of dried hollow microcapsules with only 4 bilayers of (CS/SA fabricated with Eu(DBM3Phen show the intact shell with a thickness of 3.0 nm. Regarding the biocompatible natural polysaccharides and the intense fluorescence emission, the microcapsules in this work might be of great importance in potential application in drug delivery and bioassay.

  17. Upconverting fluorescent nanoparticles for biodetection and photoactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai; Li, WenKai; Jayakumar, Muthu Kumara Gnanasammandhan; Zhang, Yong

    2013-03-01

    Fluorophores including fluorescent dyes/proteins and quantum dots (QDs) are used for fluorescence-based imaging and detection. These are based on `downconversion fluorescence' and have several drawbacks: photobleaching, autofluorescence, short tissue penetration depth and tissue photo-damage. Upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles (UCNs) emit detectable photons of higher energy in the short wavelength range upon irradiation with near-infrared (NIR) light based on a process termed `upconversion'. UCNs show absolute photostability, negligible autofluorescence, high penetration depth and minimum photodamage to biological tissues. Lanthanide doped nanocrystals with nearinfrared NIR-to-NIR and/or NIR-to-VIS and/or NIR-to-UV upconversion fluorescence emission have been synthesized. The nanocrystals with small size and tunable multi-color emission have been developed. The emission can be tuned by doping different upconverting lanthanide ions into the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals with core-shell structure have also been prepared to tune the emission color. The surfaces of these nanocrystals have been modified to render them water dispersible and biocompatible. They can be used for ultrasensitive interference-free biodetection because most biomolecules do not have upconversion properties. UCNs are also useful for light based therapy with enhanced efficiency, for example, photoactivation.

  18. Hitherto Unrecognized Fluorescence Properties of Coniferyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Kumar Singh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We instituted a quasi-quality assurance program for demonstrating coniferyl alcohol’s fluorescence and fluorescence diminishment following enzymatic oxidation. The magnitude of diminishment was a measure of catalysis. High throughput screening was performed in pseudo-kinetic and endpoint modes by measuring the fluorescence at 416 nm following excitation at 290, 310 or 340 nm. Dose-response tracings were linear between two and three orders of magnitude with average limits of detection and quantitation of 1.8 and 6.9 mM coniferyl alcohol, respectively. Oxidation was evident with 0.025 mg/mL laccase or 0.003 mg/mL peroxidase or inside 5 min using 0.5 mg/mL laccase or 5 mM substrate. Sodium chloride inhibited (IC50, 25 mM laccase oxidation of coniferyl alcohol. Fluorescence from 10 concentrations (1 to 1000 mM of coniferyl alcohol was stable for 24 hours over 14 excitation/emission cycles at 3 different combinations of excitation and emission wavelengths. In conclusion, coniferyl alcohol absorption and fluorescence assays should facilitate biomass lignin analyses and improve delignification.

  19. Effect of fluorescence characteristics and different algorithms on the estimation of leaf nitrogen content based on laser-induced fluorescence lidar in paddy rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Sun, Jia; Du, Lin; Chen, Biwu; Zhang, Zhenbing; Shi, Shuo; Gong, Wei

    2017-02-20

    Paddy rice is one of the most significant food sources and an important part of the ecosystem. Thus, accurate monitoring of paddy rice growth is highly necessary. Leaf nitrogen content (LNC) serves as a crucial indicator of growth status of paddy rice and determines the dose of nitrogen (N) fertilizer to be used. This study aims to compare the predictive ability of the fluorescence spectra excited by different excitation wavelengths (EWs) combined with traditional multivariate analysis algorithms, such as principal component analysis (PCA), back-propagation neural network (BPNN), and support vector machine (SVM), for estimating paddy rice LNC from the leaf level with three different fluorescence characteristics as input variables. Then, six estimation models were proposed. Compared with the five other models, PCA-BPNN was the most suitable model for the estimation of LNC by improving R2 and reducing RMSE and RE. For 355, 460 and 556 nm EWs, R2 was 0.89, 0.80 and 0.88, respectively. Experimental results demonstrated that the fluorescence spectra excited by 355 and 556 nm EWs were superior to those excited by 460 nm for the estimation of LNC with different models. BPNN algorithm combined with PCA may provide a helpful exploratory and predictive tool for fluorescence spectra excited by appropriate EW based on practical application requirements for monitoring the N status of crops.

  20. Quantifying the influence of yellow fluorescent protein photoconversion on acceptor photobleaching-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Arne; Terjung, Stefan; Zimmermann, Timo; Pepperkok, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiency measurements based on acceptor photobleaching of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) are affected by the fact that bleaching of YFP produces a fluorescent species that is detectable in cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) image channels. The presented quantitative measurement of this conversion makes it possible to correct the obtained FRET signal to increase the accuracy of intensity based CFP/YFP FRET measurements. The described method can additionally be used to compare samples with very different fluorescence levels.

  1. Rapidly variable relatvistic absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, M.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A.; Lohfink, A.; Buisson, D.; Alston, W.; Jiang, J.

    2017-10-01

    I will present results from the 1.5Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the most X-ray variable AGN, IRAS 13224-3809. We find a series of nine absorption lines with a velocity of 0.24c from an ultra-fast outflow. For the first time, we are able to see extremely rapid variability of the UFO features, and can link this to the X-ray variability from the inner accretion disk. We find a clear flux dependence of the outflow features, suggesting that the wind is ionized by increasing X-ray emission.

  2. Eternity Variables to Simulate Specifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, WH; Boiten, EA; Moller, B

    2002-01-01

    Simulation of specifications is introduced as a unification and generalization of refinement mappings, history variables, forward simulations, prophecy variables, and backward simulations. Eternity variables are introduced as a more powerful alternative for prophecy variables and backward

  3. Oligothiophenes as Fluorescent Markers for Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Manetto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes some of our results on the application of oligothiophenes as fluorescent markers for biological studies. The oligomers of thiophene, widely known for their semiconductor properties in organic electronics, are also fluorescent compounds characterized by chemical and optical stability, high absorbance and quantum yield. Their fluorescent emission can be easily modulated via organic synthesis by changing the number of thiophene rings and the nature of side-chains. This review shows how oligothiophenes can be derivatized with active groups such as phosphoramidite, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl and 4-sulfotetrafluorophenyl esters, isothiocyanate and azide by which the (biomolecules of interest can be covalently bound. This paper also describes how molecules such as oligonucleotides, proteins and even nanoparticles, tagged with oligothiophenes, can be used in experiments ranging from hybridization studies to imaging of fixed and living cells. Finally, a few multilabeling experiments are described.

  4. A Quantitative Fluorescence-Based Lipase Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Lomolino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An easy and fast gel diffusion assay for detecting and monitoring lipase activity by quantification of fluorescein is described. By measuring the intensity of fluorescein, it is possible to obtain a calibration curve with a regression coefficient better than by using the radius of fluorescent haloes. Through the quantification of fluorescence intensity of fluorescein released after the hydrolysis of a fluorescent ester, fluorescein dibutyrate, used as substrate in agar plates, commercial and skimmed milk lipase activity were studied. Moreover, with this method, lipase activity can be monitored in reaction medium that contains compounds which are affected by turbidity or cause measurement interference for UV-spectrophotometer and fluorimeter. In this experiment, boiled skimmed milk was dispersed in the agar gel with fluorescein dibutyrate, and it was used as a reaction medium to mimic natural conditions. The development of such an assay has a potential for applications in industries ranging from pharmaceuticals to food production and monitoring.

  5. [Fluorescent diagnostics of urinary bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatkin, N A; Kamalov, A A; Kudriavtsev, Iu V; Tokarev, F V

    2000-01-01

    Introduction of optic markers in screening for cancer of the urinary bladder (UB) raises diagnostic significance of UB cystoscopy. Application of intravesical form of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), precursor of photodynamically active protoporphirine IX, prevents complications in systemic use of tetracycline or hepatoprophirines. Fluorescent cystoscopy with 5-ALA (n = 59) was made in 51 patients treated in the Research Institute of Urology. UB cancer was detected in 32 patients. This procedure proved highly sensitive and specific (97.0 and 75.6%, respectively, being much more effective than standard cystoscopy and biopsy in the white light (85.1 and 81.4%, respectively). Specificity of fluorescent cystoscopy is much higher in detection of tumors and pretumor lesions (88.4%). Fluorescent diagnosis is expected to become a gold standard in the program of UB cancer detection.

  6. Albumin-stabilized fluorescent silver nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sych, Tomash; Polyanichko, Alexander; Kononov, Alexei

    2017-07-01

    Ligand-stabilized Ag nanoclusters (NCs) possess many attractive features including high fluorescence quantum yield, large absorption cross-section, good photostability, large Stokes shift and two-photon absorption cross sections. While plenty of fluorescent clusters have been synthesized on various polymer templates, only a few studies have been reported on the fluorescent Ag clusters on peptides and proteins. We study silver NCs synthesized on different protein matrices, including bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, egg albumin, equine serum albumin, and lysozyme. Our results show that red-emitting Ag NCs can effectively be stabilized by the disulfide bonds in proteins and that the looser structure of the denatured protein favors formation of the clusters.

  7. Photobleaching correction in fluorescence microscopy images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, Nathalie B; Diaz Zamboni, Javier E; Adur, Javier F; Paravani, Enrique V; Casco, Victor H [Microscopy Laboratory, School of Engineering - Bioengineering, National University of Entre Rios (UNER), Ruta 11, Km 10 (3101), Oro Verde, Entre Rios (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Fluorophores are used to detect molecular expression by highly specific antigen-antibody reactions in fluorescence microscopy techniques. A portion of the fluorophore emits fluorescence when irradiated with electromagnetic waves of particular wavelengths, enabling its detection. Photobleaching irreversibly destroys fluorophores stimulated by radiation within the excitation spectrum, thus eliminating potentially useful information. Since this process may not be completely prevented, techniques have been developed to slow it down or to correct resulting alterations (mainly, the decrease in fluorescent signal). In the present work, the correction by photobleaching curve was studied using E-cadherin (a cell-cell adhesion molecule) expression in Bufo arenarum embryos. Significant improvements were observed when applying this simple, inexpensive and fast technique.

  8. Fluorescent multiplex cell flow systems and methods

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen

    2017-06-01

    Systems and methods are provided for simultaneously assaying cell adhesion or cell rolling for multiple cell specimens. One embodiment provides a system for assaying adhesion or cell rolling of multiple cell specimens that includes a confocal imaging system containing a parallel plate flow chamber, a pump in fluid communication with the parallel plate flow chamber via a flow chamber inlet line and a cell suspension in fluid communication with the parallel plate flow chamber via a flow chamber outlet line. The system also includes a laser scanning system in electronic communication with the confocal imaging system, and a computer in communication with the confocal imaging system and laser scanning system. In certain embodiments, the laser scanning system emits multiple electromagnetic wavelengths simultaneously it cause multiple fluorescent labels having different excitation wavelength maximums to fluoresce. The system can simultaneously capture real-time fluorescence images from at least seven cell specimens in the parallel plate flow chamber.

  9. Hyperspectral Fluorescence and Reflectance Imaging Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert E.; O'Neal, S. Duane; Lanoue, Mark; Russell, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    The system is a single hyperspectral imaging instrument that has the unique capability to acquire both fluorescence and reflectance high-spatial-resolution data that is inherently spatially and spectrally registered. Potential uses of this instrument include plant stress monitoring, counterfeit document detection, biomedical imaging, forensic imaging, and general materials identification. Until now, reflectance and fluorescence spectral imaging have been performed by separate instruments. Neither a reflectance spectral image nor a fluorescence spectral image alone yields as much information about a target surface as does a combination of the two modalities. Before this system was developed, to benefit from this combination, analysts needed to perform time-consuming post-processing efforts to co-register the reflective and fluorescence information. With this instrument, the inherent spatial and spectral registration of the reflectance and fluorescence images minimizes the need for this post-processing step. The main challenge for this technology is to detect the fluorescence signal in the presence of a much stronger reflectance signal. To meet this challenge, the instrument modulates artificial light sources from ultraviolet through the visible to the near-infrared part of the spectrum; in this way, both the reflective and fluorescence signals can be measured through differencing processes to optimize fluorescence and reflectance spectra as needed. The main functional components of the instrument are a hyperspectral imager, an illumination system, and an image-plane scanner. The hyperspectral imager is a one-dimensional (line) imaging spectrometer that includes a spectrally dispersive element and a two-dimensional focal plane detector array. The spectral range of the current imaging spectrometer is between 400 to 1,000 nm, and the wavelength resolution is approximately 3 nm. The illumination system consists of narrowband blue, ultraviolet, and other discrete

  10. Quantitative Fluorescence Measurements with Multicolor Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Gaigalas, Adolfas K; Wood, James

    2018-01-01

    Multicolor flow cytometer assays are routinely used in clinical laboratories for immunophenotyping, monitoring disease and treatment, and determining prognostic factors. However, existing methods for quantitative measurements have not yet produced satisfactory results independent of flow cytometers used. This chapter details a procedure for quantifying surface and intracellular protein biomarkers by calibrating the output of a multicolor flow cytometer in units of antibodies bound per cell (ABC). The procedure includes the following critical steps: (a) quality control (QC) and performance characterization of the multicolor flow cytometer, (b) fluorescence calibration using hard dyed microspheres assigned with fluorescence intensity values in equivalent number of reference fluorophores (ERF), (c) compensation for correction of fluorescence spillover, and (d) application of a biological reference standard for translating the ERF scale to the ABC scale. The chapter also points out current efforts for implementing quantification of biomarkers in a manner which is independent of instrument platforms and reagent differences.

  11. Fluorescein Derivatives in Intravital Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Roberts

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intravital fluorescence microscopy enables the direct imaging of fluorophores in vivo and advanced techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM enable the simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores. Consequently, it is now possible to record distribution and metabolism of a chemical in vivo and to optimise the delivery of fluorophores in vivo. Recent clinical applications with fluorescein and other intravital fluorescent stains have occurred in neurosurgery, dermatology [including photodynamic therapy (PDT] and endomicroscopy. Potential uses have been identified in periodontal disease, skin graft and cancer surgery. Animal studies have demonstrated that diseased tissue can be specifically stained with fluorophore conjugates. This review focuses on the fluorescein derived fluorophores in common clinical use and provides examples of novel applications from studies in tissue samples.

  12. Rapid analysis & design methodologies of High-Frequency LCLC Resonant Inverter as Electrodeless Fluorescent Lamp Ballast

    OpenAIRE

    Ang, Y A; Stone, D A; Bingham, Chris; Foster, M

    2007-01-01

    The papers presents methodologies for the analysis of 4th-order LCLC resonant power converters operating at 2.63 MHz as fluorescent lamp ballasts, where high frequency operation facilitates capacitive discharge into the tube, with near resonance operation at high load quality factor enabling high efficiency. State-variable dynamic descriptions of the converter are employed to rapidly determine the steady-state cyclic behaviour of the ballast during nominal operation. Simulation and experiment...

  13. Using simulated fluorescence cell micrographs for the evaluation of cell image segmentation algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Wiesmann, Veit; Bergler, Matthias; Palmisano, Ralf; Prinzen, Martin; Franz, Daniela; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Manual assessment and evaluation of fluorescent micrograph cell experiments is time-consuming and tedious. Automated segmentation pipelines can ensure efficient and reproducible evaluation and analysis with constant high quality for all images of an experiment. Such cell segmentation approaches are usually validated and rated in comparison to manually annotated micrographs. Nevertheless, manual annotations are prone to errors and display inter- and intra-observer variability which ...

  14. Diversity and Evolution of Coral Fluorescent Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alieva, Naila O.; Konzen, Karen A.; Field, Steven F.; Meleshkevitch, Ella A.; Hunt, Marguerite E.; Beltran-Ramirez, Victor; Miller, David J.; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Salih, Anya; Matz, Mikhail V.

    2008-01-01

    GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs) are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia) and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full complement of typical coral fluorescent colors (cyan, green, and red) and underwent sorting between coral groups. Among the newly cloned proteins are a “chromo-red” color type from Echinopora forskaliana (family Faviidae) and pink chromoprotein from Stylophora pistillata (Pocilloporidae), both evolving independently from the rest of coral chromoproteins. There are several cyan FPs that possess a novel kind of excitation spectrum indicating a neutral chromophore ground state, for which the residue E167 is responsible (numeration according to GFP from A. victoria). The chromoprotein from Acropora millepora is an unusual blue instead of purple, which is due to two mutations: S64C and S183T. We applied a novel probabilistic sampling approach to recreate the common ancestor of all coral FPs as well as the more derived common ancestor of three main fluorescent colors of the Faviina suborder. Both proteins were green such as found elsewhere outside class Anthozoa. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the all-coral ancestral protein had a chromohore apparently locked in a non-fluorescent neutral state, which may reflect the transitional stage that enabled rapid color diversification early in the history of coral FPs. Our results highlight the extent of convergent or parallel evolution of the color diversity in corals, provide the foundation for experimental studies of evolutionary processes that led to color diversification, and enable a comparative analysis of structural

  15. Diversity and evolution of coral fluorescent proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila O Alieva

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full complement of typical coral fluorescent colors (cyan, green, and red and underwent sorting between coral groups. Among the newly cloned proteins are a "chromo-red" color type from Echinopora forskaliana (family Faviidae and pink chromoprotein from Stylophora pistillata (Pocilloporidae, both evolving independently from the rest of coral chromoproteins. There are several cyan FPs that possess a novel kind of excitation spectrum indicating a neutral chromophore ground state, for which the residue E167 is responsible (numeration according to GFP from A. victoria. The chromoprotein from Acropora millepora is an unusual blue instead of purple, which is due to two mutations: S64C and S183T. We applied a novel probabilistic sampling approach to recreate the common ancestor of all coral FPs as well as the more derived common ancestor of three main fluorescent colors of the Faviina suborder. Both proteins were green such as found elsewhere outside class Anthozoa. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the all-coral ancestral protein had a chromohore apparently locked in a non-fluorescent neutral state, which may reflect the transitional stage that enabled rapid color diversification early in the history of coral FPs. Our results highlight the extent of convergent or parallel evolution of the color diversity in corals, provide the foundation for experimental studies of evolutionary processes that led to color diversification, and enable a comparative analysis of

  16. Variable-Rate Premiums

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation — These interest rates are used to value vested benefits for variable rate premium purposes as described in PBGC's regulation on Premium Rates (29 CFR Part 4006) and...

  17. Software Testing Requires Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2003-01-01

    Software variability is the ability of a software system or artefact to be changed, customized or configured for use in a particular context. Variability in software systems is important from a number of perspectives. Some perspectives rightly receive much attention due to their direct economic i...... impact in software production. As is also apparent from the call for papers these perspectives focus on qualities such as reuse, adaptability, and maintainability.......Software variability is the ability of a software system or artefact to be changed, customized or configured for use in a particular context. Variability in software systems is important from a number of perspectives. Some perspectives rightly receive much attention due to their direct economic...

  18. Variable Attitude Test Stand

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Variable Attitude Test Stand designed and built for testing of the V-22 tilt rotor aircraft propulsion system, is used to evaluate the effect of aircraft flight...

  19. Mercury dosing solutions for fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, A.; Boffito, C.

    2008-07-01

    A review of the different technologies used to dose mercury in fluorescent lamps is presented. Conventional liquid mercury dosing is gradually being replaced with more reliable and environmentally friendly solutions that enable a significant reduction of the amount of mercury introduced in the lamp, so as to cope with more stringent regulations issued to minimize the environmental impact of exhausted lamps. This paper will review the most advanced novel methods to assure an accurate and fine dosing of mercury in fluorescent lamps, especially focusing on solutions based on the use of solid alloys.

  20. Fluorescent proteins: powerful tools in phagocyte biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajno, L; Grinstein, S

    1999-12-17

    Phagocyte functions such as chemotaxis and phagocytosis involve the rapid and transient development of cellular polarity. Study of this highly complex spatial and temporal cellular remodelling has been limited by the static nature of immunofluorescence and immunogold microscopy and because biochemical techniques are not vectorial. The recent introduction of fluorescent proteins (FPs) provides new approaches and opportunities to study phagocyte functions non-invasively, with excellent temporal and spatial resolution. This review summarizes the main properties and possible uses of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants in phagocyte biology.

  1. Analysis of Cholesterol Trafficking with Fluorescent Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wustner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in determining the biophysical properties of biological membranes, and its concentration is tightly controlled by homeostatic processes. The intracellular transport of cholesterol among organelles is a key part of the homeostatic mechanism, but sterol transport...... that can bind to cholesterol to reveal its distribution in cells. We also discuss the use of intrinsically fluorescent sterols that closely mimic cholesterol, as well as some minimally modified fluorophore-labeled sterols. Methods for imaging these sterols by conventional fluorescence microscopy...... and by multiphoton microscopy are described. Some label-free methods for imaging cholesterol itself are also discussed briefly....

  2. A Guide to Fluorescent Protein FRET Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Zhang, Shu; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-09-14

    Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and genetically encoded FRET biosensors provide a powerful tool for visualizing signaling molecules in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolution. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as both donor and acceptor fluorophores in FRET biosensors, especially since FPs are genetically encodable and live-cell compatible. In this review, we will provide an overview of methods to measure FRET changes in biological contexts, discuss the palette of FP FRET pairs developed and their relative strengths and weaknesses, and note important factors to consider when using FPs for FRET studies.

  3. Ultrabright fluorescent OLEDS using triplet sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifan; Forrest, Stephen R; Thompson, Mark

    2013-06-04

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer further comprises an organic host compound, an organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature, and an organic dopant compound. The triplet energy of the dopant compound is lower than the triplet energy of the host compound. The dopant compound does not strongly absorb the fluorescent emission of the emitting compound.

  4. Fluorescent DNA Stabilized Silver Nanoclusters as Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Latorre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA stabilized fluorescent silver nanoclusters are promising materials, of which fluorescent properties can be exploited to develop sensors. Particularly, the presence of a DNA strand in the structure has promoted the development of gene sensors where one part of the sensor is able to recognize the target gene sequence. Moreover, since oligonucleotides can be designed to have binding properties (aptamers a variety of sensors for proteins and cells have been developed using silver nanoclusters. In this review the applications of this material as sensors of different biomolecules are summarized.

  5. Mercury dosing solutions for fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corazza, A; Boffito, C [SAES Getters S.p.A., Viale Italia 77, Lainate (MI) 20020 (Italy)], E-mail: alessio_corazza@saes-group.com

    2008-07-21

    A review of the different technologies used to dose mercury in fluorescent lamps is presented. Conventional liquid mercury dosing is gradually being replaced with more reliable and environmentally friendly solutions that enable a significant reduction of the amount of mercury introduced in the lamp, so as to cope with more stringent regulations issued to minimize the environmental impact of exhausted lamps. This paper will review the most advanced novel methods to assure an accurate and fine dosing of mercury in fluorescent lamps, especially focusing on solutions based on the use of solid alloys.

  6. Calculus of one variable

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Stanley I

    1986-01-01

    Calculus of One Variable, Second Edition presents the essential topics in the study of the techniques and theorems of calculus.The book provides a comprehensive introduction to calculus. It contains examples, exercises, the history and development of calculus, and various applications. Some of the topics discussed in the text include the concept of limits, one-variable theory, the derivatives of all six trigonometric functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and infinite series.This textbook is intended for use by college students.

  7. Chlorophyll alpha fluorescence analysis along a vertical gradient of the crown in a poplar (Oxford clone) subjected to ozone and water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desotgiu, Rosanna; Pollastrini, Martina; Cascio, Chiara; Gerosa, Giacomo; Marzuoli, Riccardo; Bussotti, Filippo

    2012-08-01

    An experiment in open-top chambers was carried out in summer 2008 at Curno (Northern Italy) in order to study the effects of ozone and mild water stress on poplar cuttings (Oxford clone). In this experiment direct fluorescence parameters (JIP-test) were measured in leaves from different sections of the crown (L: lower; M: medium; U: upper parts of the crown). The parameters considered were calculated at the different steps of the fluorescence transient, and include maximum quantum yield efficiency in the dark-adapted state (F(v)/F(M)); the L-band, at 100 ∝ s, that expresses the stability of the tripartite system reaction centre-harvesting light complex-core antenna; the K-band, at 300 ∝ s, that expresses the efficiency of the oxygen-evolving complex; the J-phase, at 2 ms, that expresses the efficiency with which a trapped exciton can move an electron into the electron transport chain from Q(A)(-) to the intersystem electron acceptors; the IP-phase, which expresses the efficiency of electron transport around the photosystem 1 (PSI) to reduce the final acceptors of the electron transport chain, i.e., ferredoxin and NADP; and finally the performance index total (PItot) for energy conservation from photons absorbed by PSII to the reduction flux of PSI end acceptors. The main results are: (i) different dynamics were observed between leaves in the lower section, whose PItot decreased over time, and those in the upper sections in which it increased, with a dynamic connected to the leaf age; (ii) ozone depressed all the considered fluorescence parameters in basal leaves of well-watered plants, while it had little or no damaging effect on medium-level or upper-section leaves; (iii) PItot and IP-phase increased in upper leaves of plants subjected to ozone stress, as well as the net photosynthesis; (iv) water stress increased PItot of leaves in all levels of the crown. The results suggest that ozone-damaged poplar plants compensate, at least partially, for the

  8. Manganese binding to the 23 kDa extrinsic protein of Photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarava, Natallia; Un, Sun; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2007-06-01

    The recombinant form of the extrinsic 23 kDa protein (psbP) of Photosystem II (PSII) was studied with respect to its capability to bind Mn. The stoichiometry was determined to be one manganese bound per protein. A very high binding constant, K(A)=10(-17) M(-1), was determined by dialysis of the Mn containing protein against increasing EDTA concentration. High Field EPR spectroscopy was used to distinguish between specific symmetrically ligated Mn(II) from those non-specifically Mn(II) attached to the protein surface. Upon Mn binding PsbP exhibited fluorescence emission with maxima at 415 and 435 nm when tryptophan residues were excited. The yield of this blue fluorescence was variable from sample to sample. It was likely that different conformational states of the protein were responsible for this variability. The importance of Mn binding to PsbP in the context of photoactivation of PSII is discussed.

  9. [Construction and Fluorescence Analysis of the Recombinant Listeria ivanovii Strain Expressing Green Fluorescent Protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Su, Lin; Liu, Si-Jing; Li, Yong-Yu; Jiang, Ming-Juan; Huang, Huan; Wang, Chuan

    2017-11-01

    Constructing the recombinant Listeria ivanovii strain expressing green fluorescent protein to provide an important tool for study of Listeria ivanovii. The promoter of Listeria monocytogenes Listeriolysin O (phly) and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene were fused by SOEing PCR,and then ligated the fusion gene into plasmid pCW to result in recombinant plasmid pCW-phly-GFP. Recombinant plasmid was electroporated into Listeria ivanovii,and fluorescence microscope was used to analyze the expression of GFP. To observe the stability of recombinant plasmid and the stable expression of GFP in Listeria ivanovii,bacteria were cultured in the BHI broth with or without erythromycin for several generations. The stability of recombinant plasmid pCW-phly-GFP and fluorescent protein in each generation of bacteriawas studied by extracting plasmids and observing fluorescence. The exactness of recombinant plasmid pCW-phly-GFP was confirmed with restrictive endonuclease assay and sequence analysis. Under the fluorescence microscope,the green fluorescence was obvious in Listeria ivanovii carried with pCW-phly-GFP. The recombinant plasmid pCW-phly-GFP was stable in Listeria ivanovii and the GFP kept expressing in a high level under the pressure of erythromycin. The prokaryotic expression plasmid pCW-phly-GFP containing GFP gene was successfully constructed. Listeria ivanovii carried with the plasmid efficiently expressed GFP. This research provides an important tool for further study of Listeria ivanovii as a vaccine carrier.

  10. Exploration of fluorescent protein voltage probes based on circularly permuted fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita G Gautam

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetically-encoded fluorescent protein voltage sensors are promising tools for optical monitoring of the electrical activity of cells. Over the last decade, several designs of fusion proteins have been explored and some of them have proven to be sensitive enough to record membrane voltage transients from single mammalian cells. Most prominent are the families of VSFPs (Voltage Sensitive Fluorescent Proteins that utilize the voltage sensor domain of Ci-VSP (Ciona Intestinalis voltage sensor-containing phosphatase. The voltage sensitivity of the fluorescence readout of these previously reported membrane potential indicators is achieved either via a change in the efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET between two fluorescent protein (FP spectral variants or via modulation in the fluorescence intensity of a single FP. Here, we report our exploration on a third VSFP design principle based on circularly-permuted fluorescent protein (cpFP variants. Using circularly-permuted EGFP derived from GCaMP2 and two newly generated circularly-permuted variants of the far-red emitting protein named mKate, we generated and characterized a series of voltage-sensitive probes wherein the cpFPs were fused to the voltage sensor domain of Ci-VSP. The most promising variants were based on circularly permuted mKate with new N- and C-termini given by residues 180 and 182. Even so their voltage sensitivity was relatively modest, they constitute a proof of principle for this novel protein design.

  11. An HPLC-CAD/fluorescence lipidomics platform using fluorescent fatty acids as metabolic tracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Vanessa H; Wilson, Meredith H; Ruzicka, Josef; Farber, Steven A

    2017-05-01

    Fluorescent lipids are important tools for live imaging in cell culture and animal models, yet their metabolism has not been well-characterized. Here we describe a novel combined HPLC and LC-MS/MS method developed to characterize both total lipid profiles and the products of fluorescently labeled lipids. Using this approach, we found that lipids labeled with the fluorescent tags, 4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY FL), 4,4-difluoro-5-(2-thienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene [BODIPY(558/568)], and dipyrrometheneboron difluoride undecanoic acid (TopFluor) are all metabolized into varying arrays of polar and nonpolar fluorescent lipid products when they are fed to larval zebrafish. Quantitative metabolic labeling experiments performed in this system revealed significant effects of total dietary lipid composition on fluorescent lipid partitioning. We provide evidence that cholesterol metabolism in the intestine is important in determining the metabolic fates of dietary FAs. Using this method, we found that inhibitors of dietary cholesterol absorption and esterification both decreased incorporation of dietary fluorescent FAs into cholesterol esters (CEs), suggesting that CE synthesis in enterocytes is primarily responsive to the availability of dietary cholesterol. These results are the first to comprehensively characterize fluorescent FA metabolism and to demonstrate their utility as metabolic labeling reagents, effectively coupling quantitative biochemistry with live imaging studies. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-11

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water.

  13. Characterization of flavin-based fluorescent proteins: an emerging class of fluorescent reporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Fluorescent reporter proteins based on flavin-binding photosensors were recently developed as a new class of genetically encoded probes characterized by small size and oxygen-independent maturation of fluorescence. Flavin-based fluorescent proteins (FbFPs address two major limitations associated with existing fluorescent reporters derived from the green fluorescent protein (GFP-namely, the overall large size and oxygen-dependent maturation of fluorescence of GFP. However, FbFPs are at a nascent stage of development and have been utilized in only a handful of biological studies. Importantly, a full understanding of the performance and properties of FbFPs as a practical set of biological probes is lacking. In this work, we extensively characterize three FbFPs isolated from Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus subtilis, and Arabidopsis thaliana, using in vitro studies to assess probe brightness, oligomeric state, maturation time, fraction of fluorescent holoprotein, pH tolerance, redox sensitivity, and thermal stability. Furthermore, we validate FbFPs as stable molecular tags using in vivo studies by constructing a series of FbFP-based transcriptional constructs to probe promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Overall, FbFPs show key advantages as broad-spectrum biological reporters including robust pH tolerance (4-11, thermal stability (up to 60°C, and rapid maturation of fluorescence (<3 min.. In addition, the FbFP derived from Arabidopsis thaliana (iLOV emerged as a stable and nonperturbative reporter of promoter activity in Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrate that FbFP-based reporters have the potential to address key limitations associated with the use of GFP, such as pH-sensitive fluorescence and slow kinetics of fluorescence maturation (10-40 minutes for half maximal fluorescence recovery. From this view, FbFPs represent a useful new addition to the fluorescent reporter protein palette, and our results constitute an important framework to

  14. Modern stromatolite phototrophic communities: a comparative study of procaryote and eucaryote phototrophs using variable chlorophyll fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perkins, R.G.; Mouget, J.L.; Kromkamp, J.C.; Stolz, J.; Reid, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    Stromatolites are laminated organosedimentary structures formed by microbial communities, principally cyanobacteria although eucaryote phototrophs may also be involved in the construction of modern stromatolites. In this study, productivity and photophysiology of communities from stromatolites

  15. Prognostic variables for high titres in a fluorescent antibody test to diagnose tuberculosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doveren, R.F.; Goudswaard, J.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Bins, M.C.; Belzen, C.

    2005-01-01

    SETTING: The four hospitals and a tuberculosis clinic in the province of Zeeland, The Netherlands. OBJECTIVE: To assess the usefulness of PPD antibody measurement in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in patients admitted to hospital. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-one patients presenting with active

  16. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Fluorescent Conjugated Indole Oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Bouldin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent conjugated materials exhibiting reasonable biocompatibility that are capable of interacting with biological molecules are of interest for bio-sensing and imaging applications. Traditional approaches do not allow for the synthesis of conjugated materials in the presence of biologically relevant substrates. Further conjugated polymers synthesized using conventional methods are doped and not fluorescent. Here we explore the possibility of synthesizing fluorescent oligomers of indole using enzymes as catalyst under mild conditions. The peroxidase catalyzed coupling reaction presented here creates a photoluminescent material that allows for direct utilization (without purification and separation of the dopant in biosensing applications. The polymerization reaction proceeds smoothly in just deionized water and ethanol. Monitoring of the absorption and fluorescence spectra over one hour shows that the concentration of both absorbing and emitting species grows steadily over time. The presence of anionic buffers and templates is shown to effectively retard the development of light emitting species and instead leads to the formation of an electrically doped conjugated polymer. Structural characterization through FTIR and 1H-NMR analysis suggests that the oligomer is coupled through the 2 and 3 positions on the indole ring.

  17. Fluorescent hybridization probes for nucleic acid detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Ju, Jingyue; Turro, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, minimum interference with living biological systems, and ease of design and synthesis, fluorescent hybridization probes have been widely used to detect nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Molecular beacons (MBs) and binary probes (BPs) are two very important hybridization probes that are designed based on well-established photophysical principles. These probes have shown particular applicability in a variety of studies, such as mRNA tracking, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) monitoring, and microorganism identification. Molecular beacons are hairpin oligonucleotide probes that present distinctive fluorescent signatures in the presence and absence of their target. Binary probes consist of two fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide strands that can hybridize to adjacent regions of their target and generate distinctive fluorescence signals. These probes have been extensively studied and modified for different applications by modulating their structures or using various combinations of fluorophores, excimer-forming molecules, and metal complexes. This review describes the applicability and advantages of various hybridization probes that utilize novel and creative design to enhance their target detection sensitivity and specificity.

  18. Laser Induced Fluorescence on Molecular Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, Hjalmar; Rijke, Arij; Girault, Vincent; Stoffels, Winfred

    2008-10-01

    In the last half century, mercury has been used widely as the radiating species in many low pressure fluorescent lamps. Mercury primarily radiates at 254 nm and 185 nm. These photons excite a phosphor that fluoresces back to the ground state producing visible photons. This process reduces the efficiency because much of the energy of the UV photons has to be discarded. Using a species that emits light closer to or even in the visible range reduces these losses. Ideally the species (or a mixture of several species) should build up the whole visible spectrum, much like in HID lamps. InBr seems to be a good candidate for such a lamp, because it is an efficient radiator that emits most of its light around 370 nm; much closer to the visible part of the spectrum. In order to get insight in the energy transfer processes going on in these molecules we have conducted a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiment on InBr vapour and on a plasma. We have measured the decay times of different rovibrational levels of the InBr-molecule as well as the spectral distribution of the fluorescence from these levels. From the former we calculated the rotational temperature of the plasma and from the latter we calculated the Franck-Condon factors for the A-state as well as the vibrational temperature.

  19. Techniques for sperm evaluation using fluorescent probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrielle Thainar Mendes Cunha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available  A variety of laboratory tests were developed to obtain more reliable results of sperm evaluation and increase the accuracy of sperm fertility predictions. These tests detected damage of sperm specific compartments or organelles, which cannot be detected in routine sperm analysis. The use of fluorescent probes and detection using fluorescent microscopy or flow cytometry is an important tool but a more precise and accurate laboratory test is needed. Propidium iodide and 6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate are used for evaluations of plasmatic membrane integrity. Fluorescein isothiocyanate, associated with conjugated lecithin Psium sativum or Arachis hypogaea, are used for evaluations of acrosome integrity. Two probes, MitoTracker or Rhodamine123, are generally used to measure the absence or presence of mitochondrial potential. However, a better option is 5,5’; 6,6’ - tetrachloro - 1,1’; 3,3’ -tetraetilbenzimidazolil-carbocyanine (JC-1 dye, which assesses not only the presence of mitochondrial potential and distinguished spermatozoa with poorly and highly functional mitochondria. Two techniques, TUNEL or COMETA, and the Acridine Orange Test (AOT dye are used to evaluate chromatin integrity. A fluorescence technique based on chlortetracycline (CTC or Merocyanine 540 is used to estimate whether sperm pass by or through the capacitation process. This review focuses on the fluorescent probes that are most widely used to evaluate plasma membrane integrity, capacitation, acrosome integrity, chromatin integrity and mitochondrial potential.

  20. Laser-stimulated fluorescence in paleontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Thomas G; Falk, Amanda R; Pittman, Michael; Sereno, Paul C; Martin, Larry D; Burnham, David A; Gong, Enpu; Xu, Xing; Wang, Yinan

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence using ultraviolet (UV) light has seen increased use as a tool in paleontology over the last decade. Laser-stimulated fluorescence (LSF) is a next generation technique that is emerging as a way to fluoresce paleontological specimens that remain dark under typical UV. A laser's ability to concentrate very high flux rates both at the macroscopic and microscopic levels results in specimens fluorescing in ways a standard UV bulb cannot induce. Presented here are five paleontological case histories that illustrate the technique across a broad range of specimens and scales. Novel uses such as back-lighting opaque specimens to reveal detail and detection of specimens completely obscured by matrix are highlighted in these examples. The recent cost reductions in medium-power short wavelength lasers and use of standard photographic filters has now made this technique widely accessible to researchers. This technology has the potential to automate multiple aspects of paleontology, including preparation and sorting of microfossils. This represents a highly cost-effective way to address paleontology's preparatory bottleneck.