WorldWideScience

Sample records for psii electron transport

  1. Isolation of novel PSII-LHCII megacomplexes from pea plants characterized by a combination of proteomics and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Pascal; Nield, Jon; Tabares, Jose Alejandro Muñoz; Chiodoni, Angelica; Manfredi, Marcello; Gosetti, Fabio; Marengo, Emilio; Saracco, Guido; Barber, James; Pagliano, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    In higher plants, photosystem II (PSII) is a multi-subunit pigment-protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts, where it is present mostly in dimeric form within the grana. Its light-harvesting antenna system, LHCII, is composed of trimeric and monomeric complexes, which can associate in variable number with the dimeric PSII core complex in order to form different types of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes. Moreover, PSII-LHCII supercomplexes can laterally associate within the thylakoid membrane plane, thus forming higher molecular mass complexes, termed PSII-LHCII megacomplexes (Boekema et al. 1999a, in Biochemistry 38:2233-2239; Boekema et al. 1999b, in Eur J Biochem 266:444-452). In this study, pure PSII-LHCII megacomplexes were directly isolated from stacked pea thylakoid membranes by a rapid single-step solubilization, using the detergent n-dodecyl-α-D-maltoside, followed by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. The megacomplexes were subjected to biochemical and structural analyses. Transmission electron microscopy on negatively stained samples, followed by single-particle analyses, revealed a novel form of PSII-LHCII megacomplexes, as compared to previous studies (Boekema et al.1999a, in Biochemistry 38:2233-2239; Boekema et al. 1999b, in Eur J Biochem 266:444-452), consisting of two PSII-LHCII supercomplexes sitting side-by-side in the membrane plane, sandwiched together with a second copy. This second copy of the megacomplex is most likely derived from the opposite membrane of a granal stack. Two predominant forms of intact sandwiched megacomplexes were observed and termed, according to (Dekker and Boekema 2005 Biochim Biophys Acta 1706:12-39), as (C2S2)4 and (C2S2 + C2S2M2)2 megacomplexes. By applying a gel-based proteomic approach, the protein composition of the isolated megacomplexes was fully characterized. In summary, the new structural forms of isolated megacomplexes and the related modeling performed provide novel insights into

  2. Proteomic characterization and three-dimensional electron microscopy study of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes from higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliano, Cristina; Nield, Jon; Marsano, Francesco; Pape, Tillmann; Barera, Simone; Saracco, Guido; Barber, James

    2014-09-01

    In higher plants a variable number of peripheral LHCII trimers can strongly (S), moderately (M) or loosely (L) associate with the dimeric PSII core (C2) complex via monomeric Lhcb proteins to form PSII-LHCII supercomplexes with different structural organizations. By solubilizing isolated stacked pea thylakoid membranes either with the α or β isomeric forms of the detergent n-dodecyl-D-maltoside, followed by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, we previously showed that PSII-LHCII supercomplexes of types C2S2M2 and C2S2, respectively, can be isolated [S. Barera et al., Phil. Trans. R Soc. B 67 (2012) 3389-3399]. Here we analysed their protein composition by applying extensive bottom-up and top-down mass spectrometry on the two forms of the isolated supercomplexes. In this way, we revealed the presence of the antenna proteins Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 and of the extrinsic polypeptides PsbP, PsbQ and PsbR exclusively in the C2S2M2 supercomplex. Other proteins of the PSII core complex, common to the C2S2M2 and C2S2 supercomplexes, including the low molecular mass subunits, were also detected and characterized. To complement the proteomic study with structural information, we performed negative stain transmission electron microscopy and single particle analysis on the PSII-LHCII supercomplexes isolated from pea thylakoid membranes solubilized with n-dodecyl-α-D-maltoside. We observed the C2S2M2 supercomplex in its intact form as the largest PSII complex in our preparations. Its dataset was further analysed in silico, together with that of the second largest identified sub-population, corresponding to its C2S2 subcomplex. In this way, we calculated 3D electron density maps for the C2S2M2 and C2S2 supercomplexes, approaching respectively 30 and 28Å resolution, extended by molecular modelling towards the atomic level. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. Copyright © 2013. Published by

  3. Cyclic electron flow may provide some protection against PSII photoinhibition in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essemine, Jemaa; Xiao, Yi; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2017-04-01

    Previously we have shown that a quick down-regulation in PSI activity compares to that of PSII following short-term heat stress for two rice groups including C4023 and Q4149, studied herein. These accessions were identified to have different natural capacities in driving cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI; i.e., low CEF (lcef) and high CEF (hcef) for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these two lines have different mechanisms of protecting photosystem II from photodamage under heat stress. We observed a stepwise alteration in the shape of Chl a fluorescence induction (OJIP) with increasing temperature treatment. The effect of 44°C treatment on the damping in Chl a fluorescence was more pronounced in C4023 than in Q4149. Likewise, we noted a disruption in the I-step, a decline in the Fv due to a strong damping in the Fm, and a slight increase in the F0. Normalized data demonstrated that the I-step seems more susceptible to 44°C in C4023 than in Q4149. We also measured the redox states of plastocyanin (PC) and P700 by monitoring the transmission changes at 820nm (I820), and observed a disturbance in the oxidation/reduction kinetics of PC and P700. The decline in the amplitude of their oxidation was shown to be about 29% and 13% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The electropotential component (Δφ) of ms-DLE appeared more sensitive to temperature stress than the chemical component (ΔpH), and the impact of heat was more evident and drastic in C4023 than in Q4149. Under heat stress, we noticed a concomitant decline in the primary photochemistry of PSII as well as in both the membrane energization process and the lumen protonation for both accessions, and it is evident that heat affects these parameters more in C4023 than in Q4149. All these data suggest that higher CET can confer higher photoprotection to PSII in rice lines, which can be a desirable trait during rice breeding, especially in the context of a "warming

  4. The cytochrome b6f complex at the crossroad of photosynthetic electron transport pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2014-08-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic electron transport at the level of the cytochrome b6f complex provides efficient performance of the chloroplast electron transport chain (ETC). In this review, after brief overview of the structural organization of the chloroplast ETC, the consideration of the problem of electron transport control is focused on the plastoquinone (PQ) turnover and its interaction with the b6f complex. The data available show that the rates of plastoquinol (PQH2) formation in PSII and its diffusion to the b6f complex do not limit the overall rate of electron transfer between photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI). Analysis of experimental and theoretical data demonstrates that the rate-limiting step in the intersystem chain of electron transport is determined by PQH2 oxidation at the Qo-site of the b6f complex, which is accompanied by the proton release into the thylakoid lumen. The acidification of the lumen causes deceleration of PQH2 oxidation, thus impeding the intersystem electron transport. Two other mechanisms of regulation of the intersystem electron transport have been considered: (i) "state transitions" associated with the light-induced redistribution of solar energy between PSI and PSII, and (ii) redistribution of electron fluxes between alternative pathways (noncyclic electron transport and cyclic electron flow around PSI). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Basic Electron Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, B. J.; Morgan, G. J.; Howson, M. A.

    This chapter will take you through a simple introduction to transport theory covering the Boltzmann equation, the Fuchs-Sondheimer model for thin films, the normal magnetoresistance and quantum interference effects in metals with strong electron scattering. At the end of the chapter we will also introduce you to a number of the basic techniques involved in electron transport measurements. All of this is by way of introduction to basic transport properties common to all metals. In later chapters these ideas will be developed and applied to systems in which spin dependent transport is important.

  6. Improved electron transport layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution......; a method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according...

  7. Computer modeling of electron and proton transport in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Alexander N; Vershubskii, Alexey V

    2014-07-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most important biological processes in biosphere, which provides production of organic substances from atmospheric CO2 and water at expense of solar energy. In this review, we contemplate computer models of oxygenic photosynthesis in the context of feedback regulation of photosynthetic electron transport in chloroplasts, the energy-transducing organelles of the plant cell. We start with a brief overview of electron and proton transport processes in chloroplasts coupled to ATP synthesis and consider basic regulatory mechanisms of oxygenic photosynthesis. General approaches to computer simulation of photosynthetic processes are considered, including the random walk models of plastoquinone diffusion in thylakoid membranes and deterministic approach to modeling electron transport in chloroplasts based on the mass action law. Then we focus on a kinetic model of oxygenic photosynthesis that includes key stages of the linear electron transport, alternative pathways of electron transfer around photosystem I (PSI), transmembrane proton transport and ATP synthesis in chloroplasts. This model includes different regulatory processes: pH-dependent control of the intersystem electron transport, down-regulation of photosystem II (PSII) activity (non-photochemical quenching), the light-induced activation of the Bassham-Benson-Calvin (BBC) cycle. The model correctly describes pH-dependent feedback control of electron transport in chloroplasts and adequately reproduces a variety of experimental data on induction events observed under different experimental conditions in intact chloroplasts (variations of CO2 and O2 concentrations in atmosphere), including a complex kinetics of P700 (primary electron donor in PSI) photooxidation, CO2 consumption in the BBC cycle, and photorespiration. Finally, we describe diffusion-controlled photosynthetic processes in chloroplasts within the framework of the model that takes into account complex architecture of

  8. In vivo assessment of effect of phytotoxin tenuazonic acid on PSII reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiguo; Strasser, Reto Jörg; Qiang, Sheng

    2014-11-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA), a phytotoxin produced by the fungus Alternaria alternata isolated from diseased croftonweed (Ageratina adenophora), exhibits a strong inhibition in photosystem II (PSII) activity. In vivo chlorophyll fluorescence transients of the host plant croftonweed, show that the dominant effect of TeA is not on the primary photochemical reaction but on the biochemical reaction after QA. The most important action site of TeA is the QB site on the PSII electron-acceptor side, blocking electron transport beyond QA(-) by occupying the QB site in the D1 protein. However, TeA does not affect the antenna pigments, the energy transfer from antenna pigment molecules to reaction centers (RCs), and the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) at the donor side of PSII. TeA severely inactivated PSII RCs. The fraction of non-QA reducing centers and non-QB reducing centers show a time- and concentration-dependent linear increase. Conversely, the amount of active QA or QB reducing centers declined sharply in a linear way. The fraction of non-QB reducing centers calculated from data of fluorescence transients is close to the number of PSII RCs with their QB site filled by TeA. An increase of the step-J level (VJ) in the OJIP fluorescence transients attributed to QA(-) accumulation due to TeA bound to the QB site is a typical characteristic response of the plants leaf with respect to TeA penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular electronic junction transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Gemma C.; Herrmann, Carmen; Ratner, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Whenasinglemolecule,oracollectionofmolecules,isplacedbetween two electrodes and voltage is applied, one has a molecular transport junction. We discuss such junctions, their properties, their description, and some of their applications. The discussion is qualitative rather than quantitative......, and focuses on mechanism, structure/function relations, regimes and mechanisms of transport, some molecular regularities, and some substantial challenges facing the field. Because there are many regimes and mechanisms in transport junctions, we will discuss time scales, geometries, and inelastic scattering...

  10. Modulation of photosynthetic electron transport in the absence of terminal electron acceptors: characterization of the rbcL deletion mutant of tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Mamedov, Fikret; Mäenpää, Pirkko; Vass, Imre; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2005-08-15

    Tobacco rbcL deletion mutant, which lacks the key enzyme Rubisco for photosynthetic carbon assimilation, was characterized with respect to thylakoid functional properties and protein composition. The Delta rbcL plants showed an enhanced capacity for dissipation of light energy by non-photochemical quenching which was accompanied by low photochemical quenching and low overall photosynthetic electron transport rate. Flash-induced fluorescence relaxation and thermoluminescence measurements revealed a slow electron transfer and decreased redox gap between Q(A) and Q(B), whereas the donor side function of the Photosystem II (PSII) complex was not affected. The 77 K fluorescence emission spectrum of Delta rbcL plant thylakoids implied a presence of free light harvesting complexes. Mutant plants also had a low amount of photooxidisible P700 and an increased ratio of PSII to Photosystem I (PSI). On the other hand, an elevated level of plastid terminal oxidase and the lack of F0 'dark rise' in fluorescence measurements suggest an enhanced plastid terminal oxidase-mediated electron flow to O2 in Delta rbcL thylakoids. Modified electron transfer routes together with flexible dissipation of excitation energy through PSII probably have a crucial role in protection of PSI from irreversible protein damage in the Delta rbcL mutant under growth conditions. This protective capacity was rapidly exceeded in Delta rbcL mutant when the light level was elevated resulting in severe degradation of PSI complexes.

  11. Stoichiometric relationship between the (Mn){sub 4}-cluster and PSII Ca{sup 2+} necessary for O{sub 2}-evolution. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This report focuses on the following research accomplishments: Stoichiometric relationship between the (Mn){sub 4}-cluster and PSII Ca{sup 2+} necessary for O{sub 2}-evolution; Photodamage of Mn-depleted PSII membranes: Sites and mechanisms of photoinactivation of primary reactions; The photoassembly of the PSII (Mn){sub 4}cluster is modulated by Ca{sup 2+} and DCIP; The natural product sorgoleone inhibits electron transfer at the Q{sub A}/Q{sub B} site of PSII; and Photodamages of Ca{sup 2+}-depleted PSII membranes: Sites and mechanisms of inactivation of donor side reactions.

  12. Electron transport in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    When I was contacted by Kluwer Academic Publishers in the Fall of 200 I, inviting me to edit a volume of papers on the issue of electron transport in quantum dots, I was excited by what I saw as an ideal opportunity to provide an overview of a field of research that has made significant contributions in recent years, both to our understanding of fundamental physics, and to the development of novel nanoelectronic technologies. The need for such a volume seemed to be made more pressing by the fact that few comprehensive reviews of this topic have appeared in the literature, in spite of the vast activity in this area over the course of the last decade or so. With this motivation, I set out to try to compile a volume that would fairly reflect the wide range of opinions that has emerged in the study of electron transport in quantum dots. Indeed, there has been no effort on my part to ensure any consistency between the different chapters, since I would prefer that this volume instead serve as a useful forum for the...

  13. Electron and Phonon Transport in Molecular Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian

    Molecular electronics provide the possibility to investigate electron and phonon transport at the smallest imaginable scale, where quantum effects can be investigated and exploited directly in the design. In this thesis, we study both electron transport and phonon transport in molecular junctions....... The system we are interested in here are π-stacked molecules connected with two semi-infinite leads. π-stacked aromatic rings, connected via π-π electronic coupling, provides a rather soft mechanical bridge while maintaining high electronic conductivity. We investigate electron transport...

  14. Electronic transport in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui

    2006-01-01

    A combined density functional theory and Green function method is used to study some basics and applications in the field of molecular electronics. We have investigated the effects of lateral interactions on the conductance of two molecules connected in parallel to semi-infinite leads. The system, modeled after a self-assembled monolayer, consists of benzylmercaptane molecules sandwiched between gold electrodes. We find that the conductance increases when intermolecular interaction comes into play. The source of this increase is the indirect interaction through the gold substrate rather than direct molecule-molecule interaction. As for applications, single-molecule spintronic switch and spin valve, rectifier and negative differential resistive (NDR) diode are proposed. Spintronic switch is constructed by a di-cobaltocene containing molecule. The anti-parallel (singlet) configuration blocks electron transport near the Fermi energy, while the spin parallel (triplet) configuration enables a much higher current. The energy difference between the anti-parallel and parallel states depends on the insulating spacer separating the two cobaltocenes, allowing switching through the application of a moderate magnetic field. In addition, single cobaltocene containing molecule can be used as a spin valve. Rectification of current through a single molecule with an intrinsic spatial asymmetry is studied. The molecule contains a cobaltocene moiety in order to take advantage of its relatively localized and high energy d states. A rectifier with large voltage range, high current density, and low threshold voltage can be realized. The evolution of molecular orbitals under both forward and reverse bias reveals the source of rectification being asymmetric potential drop. Our calculations demonstrate the plausibility of making excellent molecular diodes by using metallocenes, pointing to a fruitful class of molecules. Analogous to a quantum double dot system, we found that diblock

  15. Paleoclassical transport explains electron transport barriers in RTP and TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Callen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    The recently developed paleoclassical transport model sets the minimum level of electron thermal transport in a tokamak. This transport level has proven to be in good agreement with experimental observations in many cases when fluctuation-induced anomalous transport is small, i.e. in (near-) ohmic

  16. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic

  17. Electron and proton transport by NADPH oxidases

    OpenAIRE

    Demaurex, Nicolas; Petheö, Gábor L

    2005-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase is the main weapon of phagocytic white blood cells that are the first line of defence of our body against invading pathogens, and patients lacking a functional oxidase suffer from severe and recurrent infections. The oxidase is a multisubunit enzyme complex that transports electrons from cytoplasmic NADPH to molecular oxygen in order to generate superoxide free radicals. Electron transport across the plasma membrane is electrogenic and is associated with the flux of protons ...

  18. Flexibility in photosynthetic electron transport: the physiological role of plastoquinol terminal oxidase (PTOX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Allison E; Ivanov, Alex G; Bode, Rainer; Maxwell, Denis P; Rodermel, Steven R; Hüner, Norman P A

    2011-08-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis depends on a highly conserved electron transport system, which must be particularly dynamic in its response to environmental and physiological changes, in order to avoid an excess of excitation energy and subsequent oxidative damage. Apart from cyclic electron flow around PSII and around PSI, several alternative electron transport pathways exist including a plastoquinol terminal oxidase (PTOX) that mediates electron flow from plastoquinol to O(2). The existence of PTOX was first hypothesized in 1982 and this was verified years later based on the discovery of a non-heme, di-iron carboxylate protein localized to thylakoid membranes that displayed sequence similarity to the mitochondrial alternative oxidase. The absence of this protein renders higher plants susceptible to excitation pressure dependant variegation combined with impaired carotenoid synthesis. Chloroplasts, as well as other plastids (i.e. etioplasts, amyloplasts and chromoplasts), fail to assemble organized internal membrane structures correctly, when exposed to high excitation pressure early in development. While the role of PTOX in plastid development is established, its physiological role under stress conditions remains equivocal and we postulate that it serves as an alternative electron sink under conditions where the acceptor side of PSI is limited. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the past achievements in this field and to offer directions for future investigative efforts. Plastoquinol terminal oxidase (PTOX) is involved in an alternative electron transport pathway that mediates electron flow from plastoquinol to O(2). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Regulation of Electron Transport in Chloroplasts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Phonon limited electronic transport in Pb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittweger, Florian; Hinsche, Nicki Frank; Mertig, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    We present a fully ab initio based scheme to compute electronic transport properties, i.e. the electrical conductivity σ and thermopower S, in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. We explicitly investigate the k-dependent structure of the Éliashberg spectral function, the coupling strengt...

  20. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  1. Electronic Ticketing in Public Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, J.E.C.; Rietveld, P.

    2007-01-01

    The NoordNed Mobile Ticketing service (in this article referred to as M-Ticketing) is an early example of electronic ticketing in the Netherlands. Using this service, customers no longer need to buy a ticket at a ticket office or ticket machine. Instead, people can order M-Tickets through the

  2. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living......Oxygen consumption in marine sediments is often coupled to the oxidation of sulphide generated by degradation of organic matter in deeper, oxygen-free layers. Geochemical observations have shown that this coupling can be mediated by electric currents carried by unidentified electron transporters...

  3. Electron transport through monovalent atomic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Y. J.; Brandbyge, Mads; Puska, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Using a first-principles density-functional method we model electron transport through linear chains of monovalent atoms between two bulk electrodes. For noble-metal chains the transport resembles that for free electrons over a potential barrier whereas for alkali-metal chains resonance states...... at the chain determine the conductance. As a result, the conductance for noble-metal chains is close to one quantum of conductance, and it oscillates moderately so that an even number of chain atoms yields a higher value than an odd number. The conductance oscillations are large for alkali-metal chains...

  4. Semiconductor Nanostructures Quantum States and Electronic Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Ihn, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This textbook describes the physics of semiconductor nanostructures with emphasis on their electronic transport properties. At its heart are five fundamental transport phenomena: quantized conductance, tunnelling transport, the Aharonov-Bohm effect, the quantum Hall effect, and the Coulomb blockade effect. The book starts out with the basics of solid state and semiconductor physics, such as crystal structure, band structure, and effective mass approximation, including spin-orbit interaction effects important for research in semiconductor spintronics. It contains material aspects such as band e

  5. Electron transport in wurtzite InN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Using ensemble Monte Carlo simulation technique, we have calculated the transport properties of InN such as the drift velocity, the drift mobility, the average electron, energy relaxation times and momentum relaxation times at high electric field. The scattering mechanisms included are polar optical phonon, ionized ...

  6. BITLLES: Electron Transport Simulation with Quantum Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Albareda, Guillermo; Benali, Abdelilah; Alarcón, Alfonso; Moises, Simeon; Oriols, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    After the seminal work of R. Landauer in 1957 relating the electrical resistance of a conductor to its scattering properties, much progress has been made in our ability to predict the performance of electron devices in the DC (stationary) regime. Computational tools to describe their dynamical behavior (including the AC, transient and noise performance), however, are far from being as trustworthy as would be desired by the electronic industry. While there is no fundamental limitation to correctly modeling the high-frequency quantum transport and its fluctuations, certainly more careful attention must be paid to delicate issues such as overall charge neutrality, total current conservation, or the back action of the measuring apparatus. In this review, we will show how the core ideas behind the Bohmian formulation of quantum mechanics can be exploited to design an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm that provides a quantitative description of electron transport in open quantum systems. By making the most of traject...

  7. Seasonal trends in photosynthesis and electron transport during the Mediterranean summer drought in leaves of deciduous oaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna, Jessica L; Baldocchi, Dennis D; Kobayashi, Hideki; Dawson, Todd E

    2015-05-01

    The California Mediterranean savanna has harsh summer conditions with minimal soil moisture, high temperature, high incoming solar radiation and little or no precipitation. Deciduous blue oaks, Quercus douglasii Hook. and Arn., are winter-deciduous obligate phreatophytes, transpiring mostly groundwater throughout the summer drought. The objective of this work is to fully characterize the seasonal trends of photosynthesis in blue oaks as well as the mechanistic relationships between leaf structure and function. We estimate radiative load of the leaves via the FLiES model and perform in situ measurements of leaf water potential, leaf nitrogen content, an index of chlorophyll content (SPAD readings), photosynthetic and electron transport capacity, and instantaneous rates of CO2 assimilation and electron transport. We measured multiple trees over 3 years providing data from a range of conditions. Our study included one individual that demonstrated strong drought stress as indicated by changes in SPAD readings, leaf nitrogen and all measures of leaf functioning. In the year following severe environmental stress, one individual altered foliation patterns on the crown but did not die. In all other individuals, we found that net carbon assimilation and photosynthetic capacity decreased during the summer drought. SPAD values, electron transport rate (ETR) and quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) did not show a strong decrease during the summer drought. In most individuals, PSII activity and SPAD readings did not indicate leaf structural or functional damage throughout the season. While net carbon assimilation was tightly coupled to stomatal conductance, the coupling was not as tight with ETR possibly due to contributions from photorespiration or other protective processes. Our work demonstrates that the blue oaks avoid structural damage by maintaining the capacity to convert and dissipate incoming solar radiation during the hot summer drought and are effective at fixing

  8. Beneficial roles of melatonin on redox regulation of photosynthetic electron transport and synthesis of D1 protein in tomato seedlings under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is important in the protection of plants suffering various forms of abiotic stress. The molecular mechanisms underlying the melatonin-mediated protection of their photosynthetic machinery are not completely resolved. This study investigates the effects of exogenous melatonin applications on salt-induced damage to the light reaction components of the photosynthetic machinery of tomato seedlings. The results show that melatonin pretreatments can help maintain growth and net photosynthetic rate (PN under salt stress conditions. Pretreatment with melatonin increased the effective quantum yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII, the photochemical quenching coefficient (qP and the proportion of PSII centers that are ‘open’ (qL under saline conditions. In this way, damage to the photosynthetic electron transport chain (PET in photosystem II (PSII is mitigated. In addition, melatonin pretreatment facilitated the repair of PSII by maintaining the availability of D1 protein that was otherwise reduced by salinity. The ROS levels and the gene expressions of the chloroplast TRXs and PRXs were also investigated. Salt stress resulted in increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which were mitigated by melatonin. In tomato leaves under salt stress, the expressions of PRXs and TRXf declined but the expressions of TRXm1/4 and TRXm2 increased. Melatonin pretreatment promoted the expression of TRXf and the abundances of TRXf and TRXm gene products but had no effects on the expressions of PRXs. In summary, melatonin improves the photosynthetic activities of tomato seedlings under salt stress. The mechanism could be that: (1 Melatonin controls ROS levels and prevents damaging elevations of ROS caused by salt stress. (2 Melatonin facilitates the recovery of PET and D1 protein synthesis, thus enhancing the tolerance of photosynthetic activities to salinity. (3 Melatonin induces the expression of TRXf and regulates the abundance of TRXf and TRXm gene

  9. The role of electron transport in determining the temperature dependence of the photosynthetic rate in spinach leaves grown at contrasting temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Noguchi, Ko; Kashino, Yasuhiro; Terashima, Ichiro

    2008-04-01

    The temperature response of the uncoupled whole-chain electron transport rate (ETR) in thylakoid membranes differs depending on the growth temperature. However, the steps that limit whole-chain ETR are still unclear and the question of whether the temperature dependence of whole-chain ETR reflects that of the photosynthetic rate remains unresolved. Here, we determined the whole-chain, PSI and PSII ETR in thylakoid membranes isolated from spinach leaves grown at 30 degrees C [high temperature (HT)] and 15 degrees C [low temperature (LT)]. We measured temperature dependencies of the light-saturated photosynthetic rate at 360 microl l(-1) CO2 (A360) in HT and LT leaves. Both of the temperature dependences of whole-chain ETR and of A360 were different depending on the growth temperature. Whole-chain ETR was less than the rates of PSI ETR and PSII ETR in the broad temperature range, indicating that the process was limited by diffusion processes between the PSI and PSII. However, at high temperatures, whole-chain ETR appeared to be limited by not only the diffusion processes but also PSII ETR. The C3 photosynthesis model was used to evaluate the limitations of A360 by whole-chain ETR (Pr) and ribulose bisphosphate carboxylation (Pc). In HT leaves, A360 was co-limited by Pc and Pr at low temperatures, whereas at high temperatures, A360 was limited by Pc. On the other hand, in LT leaves, A360 was solely limited by Pc over the entire temperature range. The optimum temperature for A360 was determined by Pc in both HT and LT leaves. Thus, this study showed that, at low temperatures, the limiting step of A360 was different depending on the growth temperature, but was limited by Pc at high temperatures regardless of the growth temperatures.

  10. Electron transport in Tore Supra with fast wave electron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, G.T.; Aniel, T.; Ottaviani, M.; Garbet, X. [CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Horton, W.; Zhu, P. [University of Texas at Austin (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1999-09-15

    The hot electron plasmas (T{sub e} > 2T{sub i}) in Tore Supra driven by Fast Wave Electron Heating (FWEH) are analyzed for thermal transport. Both neoclassical and anomalous transport processes are taken into account. The dominant power flow is through the electron channel of anomalous thermal diffusivity. The electron and ion temperature gradient driven instabilities are analyzed for a well documented discharge and shown to explain the diffusivities inferred from the steady power balance analysis. The discharges are maintained in a quasi-steady state for periods up to one hundred global energy replacement times. A large Tore S database is tested against two models for the turbulent electron thermal conductivity Good correlation is obtained with an updated version of the collisionless skin depth formula. The electrostatic turbulence-based formula performs poorly in the core but well in the outer plasma. The electromagnetic turbulence theory based formula is benchmarked with the empirical Taroni-Bohm formula derived from JET data. (author)

  11. Electron and proton transport by NADPH oxidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaurex, Nicolas; Petheö, Gábor L

    2005-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase is the main weapon of phagocytic white blood cells that are the first line of defence of our body against invading pathogens, and patients lacking a functional oxidase suffer from severe and recurrent infections. The oxidase is a multisubunit enzyme complex that transports electrons from cytoplasmic NADPH to molecular oxygen in order to generate superoxide free radicals. Electron transport across the plasma membrane is electrogenic and is associated with the flux of protons through voltage-activated proton channels. Both proton and electron currents can be recorded with the patch-clamp technique, but whether the oxidase is a proton channel or a proton channel modulator remains controversial. Recently, we have used the inside–out configuration of the patch-clamp technique to record proton and electron currents in excised patches. This approach allows us to measure the oxidase activity under very controlled conditions, and has provided new information about the enzymatic activity of the oxidase and its coupling to proton channels. In this chapter I will discuss how the unique characteristics of the electron and proton currents associated with the redox activity of the NADPH oxidase have extended our knowledge about the thermodynamics and the physiological regulation of this remarkable enzyme. PMID:16321802

  12. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Ana I.; Krupa, Kateryna; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Blanco, Francisco; Muñoz, Antonio; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; García, Gustavo

    2017-09-01

    We report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mTorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulation, our preferred energy loss distribution function is presented and discussed.

  13. Spin dependent electron transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Ahmet Ali

    2007-12-01

    Spin-electronic devices, exploiting the spin degree of freedom of the current carrying particles, are currently a topic of great interest. In parallel with experimental developments, theoretical studies in this field have been mainly focused on the coherent transport regime characteristics of these devices. However, spin dephasing processes are still a fundamental concern [1-6]. The Landauer transmission formalism has been the widely used method in the coherent transport regime [7]. Recently this formalism has been adapted to incorporate spin scattering processes by introducing random disorder directly into the conducting medium and subsequently solving the disordered transport problem over a large ensemble of disorder distributions [8-10]. Although proposed to be a way of incorporating spin scattering processes, what this approach basically offers is an averaged way of adding random coherent scatterings (similar to the scatterings from boundaries) into the transport problem. Certainly such a treatment of spin-dephasing processes misses the incoherent and inelastic nature of the scattering processes. As a result, a rigorous way of treating the spin scattering processes is still needed [10-12]. The objective of this thesis is to present a quantum transport model based on non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism providing a unified approach to incorporate spin scattering processes using generalized interaction Hamiltonians. Here, the NEGF formalism is presented for both coherent and incoherent transport regimes without going into derivational details. Subsequently, spin scattering operators are derived for the specific case of electron-impurity exchange interactions and the model is applied to clarify the experimental measurements [5]. Device characteristics of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with embedded magnetic impurity layers are studied as a function of tunnel junction thicknesses and barrier heights for varying impurity concentrations in comparison

  14. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, M. L.; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Lyra, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  15. Characterizing Destructive Quantum Interference in Electron Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Sam-ang, Panu; Reuter, Matthew G.

    2017-01-01

    Destructive quantum interference in electron transport through molecules provides an unconventional route for suppressing electric current. In this work we introduce "interference vectors" for each interference and use them to characterize the interference. An interference vector may be an orbital of the bare molecule, in which case the interference is very sensitive to perturbation. In contrast, an interference vector may be a combination of multiple molecular orbitals, leading to more robus...

  16. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, M. L. de; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L., E-mail: umbertofulco@gmail.com; Albuquerque, E. L. [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Freire, V. N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Caetano, E. W. S. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Lyra, M. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil)

    2015-11-16

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  17. Domain organization of photosystem II in membranes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 investigated by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Aro, Eva-Mari; Boekema, Egbert J.

    2008-01-01

    The supramolecular organization of photosystem II (PSII) complexes in the photosynthetic membrane of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 was studied by electron microscopy. After mild detergent solubilization, crystalline PSII arrays were extracted in which dimeric PSII particles associate in

  18. Fused electron deficient semiconducting polymers for air stable electron transport

    KAUST Repository

    Onwubiko, Ada

    2018-01-23

    Conventional semiconducting polymer synthesis typically involves transition metal-mediated coupling reactions that link aromatic units with single bonds along the backbone. Rotation around these bonds contributes to conformational and energetic disorder and therefore potentially limits charge delocalisation, whereas the use of transition metals presents difficulties for sustainability and application in biological environments. Here we show that a simple aldol condensation reaction can prepare polymers where double bonds lock-in a rigid backbone conformation, thus eliminating free rotation along the conjugated backbone. This polymerisation route requires neither organometallic monomers nor transition metal catalysts and offers a reliable design strategy to facilitate delocalisation of frontier molecular orbitals, elimination of energetic disorder arising from rotational torsion and allowing closer interchain electronic coupling. These characteristics are desirable for high charge carrier mobilities. Our polymers with a high electron affinity display long wavelength NIR absorption with air stable electron transport in solution processed organic thin film transistors.

  19. Quantum electron transport in toroidal carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Mark; Encinosa, Mario

    2008-03-01

    Electron transport under bias is treated in tight-binding approximation using a non-equilibrium Green's function approach. Density-of-states D(E), transmissivity T(E), and current ISD are calculated through a (3,3) armchair nanotorus with laterally attached metallic leads and a magnetic field penetrating the toroidal plane. Plateaus in T(E) through the torus are observed as a function of both the relative angle between leads and magnetic flux. Initial computational studies performed with 1800 atoms and attached leads show substantial computational slowdown when increasing the system size by a factor of two. Results are generated by inverting the device Hamiltonian with a standard recursion method extended to account for unit cell toroidal closure. Significant computational speed-up is expected for a parallelized code on a multiprocessor computer cluster. The dependence of electronic features on torus size and torus curvature is tested for three tori with 900, 1800 and 3600 carbon atoms, respectively. References: 1. M. Jack and M. Encinosa, Quantum electron transport in toroidal carbon nanotubes with metallic leads. ArXiv: quant-ph/0709.0760. 2. M. Encinosa and M. Jack, Dipole and solenoidal magnetic moments of electronic surface currents on toroidal nanostructures. J. Comp.-Aided Mat. Design (Springer), 14 (1) (2007) 65 -- 71.

  20. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots and Heat Transport in Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsanskas, Gediminas

    Since the invention of the transistor in 1947 and the development of integrated circuits in the late 1950’s, there was a rapid progress in the development and miniaturization of the solid state devices and electronic circuit components. This miniaturization raises a question “How small do we have...... and to perform electrical transport experiments at temperatures below one Kelvin (1 K), and thus to address such question. In this thesis we are concerned with the theoretical description of one kind of such devices called quantum dots. As the name suggest a quantum dot is a system where particles are confined...... in all three directions, which makes it effectively zero dimensional and corresponds to discrete electronic orbitals (levels) and excitation spectrum. This is analogous to the situation in atoms, where confinement potential replaces the potential of the nucleus, thus quantum dots are often referred...

  1. Electronic and transport properties of kinked graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jesper Toft; Gunst, Tue; Bøggild, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Local curvature, or bending, of a graphene sheet is known to increase the chemical reactivity presenting an opportunity for templated chemical functionalisation. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we investigate the reaction barrier reduction for the ads......Local curvature, or bending, of a graphene sheet is known to increase the chemical reactivity presenting an opportunity for templated chemical functionalisation. Using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), we investigate the reaction barrier reduction...... for the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at linear bends in graphene. We find a significant barrier lowering (≈15%) for realistic radii of curvature (≈20 Å) and that adsorption along the linear bend leads to a stable linear kink. We compute the electronic transport properties of individual and multiple kink lines......, and demonstrate how these act as efficient barriers for electron transport. In particular, two parallel kink lines form a graphene pseudo-nanoribbon structure with a semimetallic/semiconducting electronic structure closely related to the corresponding isolated ribbons; the ribbon band gap translates...

  2. Replacing Electron Transport Cofactors with Hydrogenases

    KAUST Repository

    Laamarti, Rkia

    2016-12-01

    Enzymes have found applications in a broad range of industrial production processes. While high catalytic activity, selectivity and mild reaction conditions are attractive advantages of the biocatalysts, particularly costs arising from required cofactors pose a sever limitation. While cofactor-recycling systems are available, their use implies constraints for process set-up and conditions, which are a particular problem e.g. for solid-gas-phase reactions. Several oxidoreductases are able to directly exchange electrons with electrodes. Hence, the co-immobilization of both, an electron-utilizing and an electron-generating oxidoreductase on conductive nanoparticles should facilitate the direct electron flow from an enzymatic oxidation to a reduction reaction circumventing redox-cofactors requirements. In such a set-up, hydrogenases could generate and provide electrons directly form gaseous hydrogen. This thesis describes the co-immobilization of the oxygen tolerant hydrogenases from C. eutropha or C. metallidurans and cytochrome P450BM3 as test system. Conductive material in the form of carbon nanotubes (CNT) serves as a suitable support. A combination of the hydrogenase and the catalytic domain of P450BM3 immobilized on carbon nanotubes were tested for the oxidation of lauric acid in the presence of hydrogen instead of an electron-transport cofactor. The GC-MS analysis reveals the conversion of 4% of lauric acid (LA) into three products, which correspond to the hydroxylated lauric acid in three different positions with a total turnover (TON) of 34. The product distribution is similar to that obtained when using the wildtype P450BM3 with the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) cofactor. Such electronic coupling couldn’t be achieved for the conversion of other substrates such as propane and cyclohexane, probably due to the high uncoupling rate within the heme-domain of cytochrome P450BM3 when unnatural substrates are introduced.

  3. Electron transport in doped fullerene molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Milanpreet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    The effect of doping on the electron transport of molecular junctions is analyzed in this paper. The doped fullerene molecules are stringed to two semi-infinite gold electrodes and analyzed at equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions of these device configurations. The contemplation is done using nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF)-density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate its density of states (DOS), transmission coefficient, molecular orbitals, electron density, charge transfer, current, and conductance. We conclude from the elucidated results that Au-C16Li4-Au and Au-C16Ne4-Au devices behave as an ordinary p-n junction diode and a Zener diode, respectively. Moreover, these doped fullerene molecules do not lose their metallic nature when sandwiched between the pair of gold electrodes.

  4. Electronic transport properties of (fluorinated) metal phthalocyanine

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M M

    2015-12-21

    The magnetic and transport properties of the metal phthalocyanine (MPc) and F16MPc (M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ag) families of molecules in contact with S–Au wires are investigated by density functional theory within the local density approximation, including local electronic correlations on the central metal atom. The magnetic moments are found to be considerably modified under fluorination. In addition, they do not depend exclusively on the configuration of the outer electronic shell of the central metal atom (as in isolated MPc and F16MPc) but also on the interaction with the leads. Good agreement between the calculated conductance and experimental results is obtained. For M = Ag, a high spin filter efficiency and conductance is observed, giving rise to a potentially high sensitivity for chemical sensor applications.

  5. Adaptation of the photosynthetic electron transport chain in cyanobacteria to iron deficiency: The function of IdiA and IsiA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Klaus-Peter; Pistorius, Elfriede K.

    2004-01-01

    In this review we give an overview on the adaptational responses of photosystem (PS) II and PSI in cyanobacteria to iron starvation, mainly summarizing our results with the mesophilic Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We also discuss this process with respect to the strong interrelationship between iron limitation and oxidative stress that exists in cyanobacteria as oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. The adaptation of the multiprotein complexes PSII and PSI to iron starvation is a sequential process, which is characterized by the enhanced expression of two major iron-regulated proteins, IdiA (iron deficiency induced protein A) and IsiA (iron stress induced protein A). Our results suggest that IdiA protects the acceptor side of PSII against oxidative stress under conditions of mild iron limitation in a currently unclear way, whereas prolonged iron deficiency leads to the synthesis of a chlorophyll a antenna around PSI-trimers consisting of IsiA molecules. The physiological consequences of these alterations under prolonged iron starvation, as shown by acridine yellow fluorescence measurements, are a reduction of linear electron transport activity through PSII and an increase of cyclic electron flow around PSI as well as an increase in respiratory activity. IdiA and IsiA expression are mediated by two distinct helix-turn-helix transcriptional regulators of the Crp/Fnr family. IdiB positively regulates expression of idiA under iron starvation, and Fur represses transcription of isiA under iron-sufficient conditions. Although both transcriptional regulators seem to operate independently of each other, our results indicate that a cross-talk between the signal transduction pathways exists. Moreover, IdiA as well as IsiA expression are affected by hydrogen peroxide. We suggest that due to the interdependence of iron limitation and the formation of reactive oxygen species, peroxide stress might be the superior trigger that leads to expression of these proteins under iron

  6. Optical, electronic and transport properties of tetrahedrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Simon; Vielma, Jason; Foster, David; Schneider, Guenter

    2014-03-01

    Doped Tetrahedrites Cu12-xTMxSb4S13 (TM=Fe,Mn,Zn) have recently attracted interest as thermoelectric materials. We present an ab-initio study based on density functional theory of the optical, electronic and transport properties of these materials. We find in Cu12-xZnxSb~4S13: 1. the band-gap can be tuned through chalcogenide substitution and the optical absorption is very large making tetrahedrites attractive also as solar absorber materials. A point defect study of the Zn rich tetrahedrite (x=2) based on supercell calculations indicates p-type conductivity and Cu-Zn antisite defects are the dominant acceptor defect with Cu-vacancies also contributing. The calculated hole concentration is much larger than what is expected from conductivity measurements. We discuss these results in the context of the observed unusual, variable range hoping like electronic transport properties. Finally we present results of thermopower calculations based on semiclassical Boltzmann theory and discuss the applicability of these approach for tetrahedrites.

  7. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, J.A.

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  8. Ion age transport: developing devices beyond electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2014-03-01

    There is more to current devices than conventional electronics. Increasingly research into the controlled movement of ions and molecules is enabling a range of new technologies. For example, as Weihua Guan, Sylvia Xin Li and Mark Reed at Yale University explain, 'It offers a unique opportunity to integrate wet ionics with dry electronics seamlessly'. In this issue they provide an overview of voltage-gated ion and molecule transport in engineered nanochannels. They cover the theory governing these systems and fabrication techniques, as well as applications, including biological and chemical analysis, and energy conversion [1]. Studying the movement of particles in nanochannels is not new. The transport of materials in rock pores led Klinkenberg to describe an analogy between diffusion and electrical conductivity in porous rocks back in 1951 [2]. And already in 1940, Harold Abramson and Manuel Gorin noted that 'When an electric current is applied across the living human skin, the skin may be considered to act like a system of pores through which transfer of substances like ragweed pollen extract may be achieved both by electrophoretic and by diffusion phenomena' [3]. Transport in living systems through pore structures on a much smaller scale has attracted a great deal of research in recent years as well. The selective transport of ions and small organic molecules across the cell membrane facilitates a number of functions including communication between cells, nerve conduction and signal transmission. Understanding these processes may benefit a wide range of potential applications such as selective separation, biochemical sensing, and controlled release and drug delivery processes. In Germany researchers have successfully demonstrated controlled ionic transport through nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes [4]. The polymer nanobrushes swell and shrink in response to changes in temperature, thus opening and closing the nanopore passage to ionic

  9. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiujun; Wang, Guangce; Pan, Guanghua; Gao, Shan; Xu, Pu; Zhu, Jianyi

    2010-04-28

    Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta). Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks). During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII) activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within the young germling, the hetero-distribution of PSII

  10. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Shan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta. Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. Results In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks. During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Conclusions Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within

  11. Characterizing destructive quantum interference in electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam-ang, Panu; Reuter, Matthew G.

    2017-05-01

    Destructive quantum interference in electron transport through molecules provides an unconventional route for suppressing electric current. In this work we introduce ‘interference vectors’ for each interference and use them to characterize the interference. An interference vector may be a combination of multiple molecular orbitals (MOs), leading to more robust interference that is likelier to be experimentally observable. In contrast, an interference vector may itself be a MO, in which case the interference is not robust and will be harder to detect. Our characterization scheme quantifies these two possibilities through the degree of rotation and also assigns an order to each interference that describes the shape of the Landauer-Büttiker transmission function around the interference. Several examples are then presented, showcasing the generality of our theory and characterization scheme, which is not limited to specific classes of molecules or particular molecule-electrode coupling patterns.

  12. Magnetoelectronic transport of the two-dimensional electron gas in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 72; Issue 2 ... CdSe quantum wells; 2D electron gas; magneto-electronic transport. Abstract. Hall mobility and magnetoresistance coefficient for the two-dimensional (2D) electron transport parallel to the heterojunction interfaces in a single quantum well of CdSe are ...

  13. Electron scattering and transport in liquid argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville 4810 (Australia); McEachran, R. P. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2015-04-21

    The transport of excess electrons in liquid argon driven out of equilibrium by an applied electric field is revisited using a multi-term solution of Boltzmann’s equation together with ab initio liquid phase cross-sections calculated using the Dirac-Fock scattering equations. The calculation of liquid phase cross-sections extends previous treatments to consider multipole polarisabilities and a non-local treatment of exchange, while the accuracy of the electron-argon potential is validated through comparison of the calculated gas phase cross-sections with experiment. The results presented highlight the inadequacy of local treatments of exchange that are commonly used in liquid and cluster phase cross-section calculations. The multi-term Boltzmann equation framework accounting for coherent scattering enables the inclusion of the full anisotropy in the differential cross-section arising from the interaction and the structure factor, without an a priori assumption of quasi-isotropy in the velocity distribution function. The model, which contains no free parameters and accounts for both coherent scattering and liquid phase screening effects, was found to reproduce well the experimental drift velocities and characteristic energies.

  14. Problems of linear electron (polaron) transport theory in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, M I

    1979-01-01

    Problems of Linear Electron (Polaron) Transport Theory in Semiconductors summarizes and discusses the development of areas in electron transport theory in semiconductors, with emphasis on the fundamental aspects of the theory and the essential physical nature of the transport processes. The book is organized into three parts. Part I focuses on some general topics in the theory of transport phenomena: the general dynamical theory of linear transport in dissipative systems (Kubo formulae) and the phenomenological theory. Part II deals with the theory of polaron transport in a crystalline semicon

  15. Electronic transport in Si:P δ-doped wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, J. S.; Drumm, D. W.; Budi, Akin

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of Si:P δ-doped wires for modern nanoelectronics, there are currently no computational models of electron transport in these devices. In this paper we present a nonequilibrium Green’s function model for electronic transport in a δ-doped wire, which is described by a tight...

  16. Rice Photosynthetic Productivity and PSII Photochemistry under Nonflooded Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibing He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM, furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN, and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI. Compared with the conventional flooding (CF treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN, lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm, and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII. And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC. Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation.

  17. Spin transport in tilted electron vortex beams

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Banasri; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we have enlightened the spin related issues of tilted Electron vortex beams. We have shown that in the skyrmionic model of electron we can have the spin Hall current considering the tilted type of electron vortex beam. We have considered the monopole charge of the tilted vortex as time dependent and through the time variation of the monopole charge we can explain the spin Hall effect of electron vortex beams. Besides, with an external magnetic field we can have a spin filter con...

  18. Terahertz electromodulation spectroscopy of electron transport in GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, S. G.; Arend, T. R.; Kersting, R., E-mail: roland.kersting@lmu.de [Photonics and Optoelectronics Group, Physics Department and Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Amalienstr. 54, 80799 München (Germany); Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-02

    Time-resolved terahertz (THz) electromodulation spectroscopy is applied to investigate the high-frequency transport of electrons in gallium nitride at different doping concentrations and densities of threading dislocations. At THz frequencies, all structures reveal Drude transport. The analysis of the spectral response provides the fundamental transport properties, such as the electron scattering time and the electrons' conductivity effective mass. We observe the expected impact of ionized-impurity scattering and that scattering at threading dislocations only marginally affects the high-frequency mobility.

  19. Terahertz electromodulation spectroscopy of electron transport in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, S. G.; Arend, T. R.; Zhu, T.; Kappers, M. J.; Kersting, R.

    2015-03-01

    Time-resolved terahertz (THz) electromodulation spectroscopy is applied to investigate the high-frequency transport of electrons in gallium nitride at different doping concentrations and densities of threading dislocations. At THz frequencies, all structures reveal Drude transport. The analysis of the spectral response provides the fundamental transport properties, such as the electron scattering time and the electrons' conductivity effective mass. We observe the expected impact of ionized-impurity scattering and that scattering at threading dislocations only marginally affects the high-frequency mobility.

  20. Fast electron generation and transport in a turbulent, magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoneking, Matthew Randall [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The nature of fast electron generation and transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated using two electron energy analyzer (EEA) probes and a thermocouple calorimeter. The parallel velocity distribution of the fast electron population is well fit by a drifted Maxwellian distribution with temperature of about 100 eV and drift velocity of about 2 x 106 m/s. Cross-calibration of the EEA with the calorimeter provides a measurement of the fast electron perpendicular temperature of 30 eV, much lower than the parallel temperature, and is evidence that the kinetic dynamo mechanism (KDT) is not operative in MST. The fast electron current is found to match to the parallel current at the edge, and the fast electron density is about 4 x 1011 cm-3 independent of the ratio of the applied toroidal electric field to the critical electric field for runaways. First time measurements of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport are reported. By correlating electron current fluctuations with radial magnetic fluctuations the transported flux of electrons is found to be negligible outside r/a~0.9, but rises the level of the expected total particle losses inside r/a~0.85. A comparison of the measured diffusion coefficient is made with the ausilinear stochastic diffusion coefficient. Evidence exists that the reduction of the transport is due to the presence of a radial ambipolar electric field of magnitude 500 V/m, that acts to equilibrate the ion and electron transport rates. The convective energy transport associated with the measured particle transport is large enough to account for the observed magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport in MST.

  1. An ab initio electronic transport database for inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Francesco; Chen, Wei; Aydemir, Umut; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Jain, Anubhav; Hautier, Geoffroy

    2017-07-01

    Electronic transport in materials is governed by a series of tensorial properties such as conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and effective mass. These quantities are paramount to the understanding of materials in many fields from thermoelectrics to electronics and photovoltaics. Transport properties can be calculated from a material's band structure using the Boltzmann transport theory framework. We present here the largest computational database of electronic transport properties based on a large set of 48,000 materials originating from the Materials Project database. Our results were obtained through the interpolation approach developed in the BoltzTraP software, assuming a constant relaxation time. We present the workflow to generate the data, the data validation procedure, and the database structure. Our aim is to target the large community of scientists developing materials selection strategies and performing studies involving transport properties.

  2. Nonequilibrium electron transport through quantum dots in the Kondo regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wölfle, Peter; Paaske, Jens; Rosch, Achim

    2005-01-01

    Electron transport at large bias voltage through quantum dots in the Kondo regime is described within the perturbative renormalization group extended to nonequilibrium. The conductance, local magnetization, dynamical spin susceptibility and local spectral function are calculated. We show how...

  3. Extracellular Electron Transport Coupling Biogeochemical Processes Centimeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Fossing, Henrik; Christensen, Peter Bondo

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations in marine sediment have revealed  conductive networks transmitting electrons from oxidation processes in the anoxic zone to oxygen reduction in the oxiczone [1]. The electrochemical processes and conductors seem to be biologically controlled and may account for more than half...... of the oxygen uptake in laboratory incubations of initially homogenized and stabilized sediment. Using microsensors and process rate measurements we further investigated the effect of the electric currents on sediment biogeochemistry. Dissolved sulfide readily donated electrons to the networks and could...... confirmed the depth range of the electric communication and indicated donation of electrons directly from organotrophic bacteria. The separation of oxidation and reduction processes created steep pH gradients eventually causing carbonate precipitation at the surface. The results indicate that electron...

  4. Hot electrons in superlattices: quantum transport versus Boltzmann equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Rott, S.

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent solution of the transport equation is presented for semiconductor superlattices within different approaches: (i) a full quantum transport model based on nonequilibrium Green functions, (ii) the semiclassical Boltzmann equation for electrons in a miniband, and (iii) Boltzmann...... equation for electrons in Wannier-Stark states. We find good quantitative agreement of the approximations (ii) and (iii) with (i) in their respective ranges of validity. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  5. Electron transport in wurtzite InN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This critical field is strongly dependent on InN parameters. The steady-state transport parameters are in fair agreement with other recent calculations. Author Affiliations. F M Abou El-Ela1 B M El-Assy1. Department of Physics, Faculty of Girls, Ain Shams University, Heliopolis, Cairo, Egypt. Dates. Manuscript received: 4 July ...

  6. Unconventional aspects of electronic transport in delafossite oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Daou, Ramzy; Frésard, Raymond; Eyert, Volker; Hébert, Sylvie; Maignan, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of the delafossite oxides ABO$_2$ are usually understood in terms of two well separated entities, namely, the triangular A$^+$ and (BO$_2$)$^-$ layers. Here we review several cases among this extensive family of materials where the transport depends on the interlayer coupling and displays unconventional properties. We review the doped thermoelectrics based on CuRhO$_2$ and CuCrO$_2$, which show a high-temperature recovery of Fermi-liquid transport exponents...

  7. Transport properties of copper phthalocyanine based organic electronic divices

    OpenAIRE

    Opitz, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Transport properties of copper phthalocyanine based organic electronic divices / W. Brütting ... - In: Cooperative phenomena in solids with electronic correlations / Ed. by: U. Eckern ... - Les Ulis : EDP Sciences, 2010. - S. 117-134. - (The European physical journal : special topics ; 180)

  8. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Surdutovich, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well.

  9. Structural disorder and electron transport in graphene at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobenko, N. G.; Egorushkin, V. E.; Melnikova, N. V.; Ponomarev, A. N.; Belosludtseva, A. A.; Barkalov, L. D.

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical study of electron transport characteristics of metalized epitaxial graphene with impurities and structural inhomogeneous of the short-range order type was performed. The electron relaxation time, mean free path, and diffusion coefficient were calculated and shown to be of the same order of magnitude as the corresponding values for phonon characteristics. It means that electron scattering on the short-range ordered domains has to be taken into account, especially at low temperatures when it may dominate phonon scattering.

  10. Electron transport in stretched monoatomic gold wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, A; Skorodumova, N V; Simak, S I; Wendin, G; Johansson, B; Ahuja, R

    2006-12-08

    The conductance of monoatomic gold wires containing 3-7 gold atoms has been obtained from ab initio calculations. The transmission is found to vary significantly depending on the wire stretching and the number of incorporated atoms. Such oscillations are determined by the electronic structure of the one-dimensional (1D) part of the wire between the contacts. Our results indicate that the conductivity of 1D wires can be suppressed without breaking the contact.

  11. Vibrationally coupled electron transport through single-molecule junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertle, Rainer

    2012-04-26

    Single-molecule junctions are among the smallest electric circuits. They consist of a molecule that is bound to a left and a right electrode. With such a molecular nanocontact, the flow of electrical currents through a single molecule can be studied and controlled. Experiments on single-molecule junctions show that a single molecule carries electrical currents that can even be in the microampere regime. Thereby, a number of transport phenomena have been observed, such as, for example, diode- or transistor-like behavior, negative differential resistance and conductance switching. An objective of this field, which is commonly referred to as molecular electronics, is to relate these transport phenomena to the properties of the molecule in the contact. To this end, theoretical model calculations are employed, which facilitate an understanding of the underlying transport processes and mechanisms. Thereby, one has to take into account that molecules are flexible structures, which respond to a change of their charge state by a profound reorganization of their geometrical structure or may even dissociate. It is thus important to understand the interrelation between the vibrational degrees of freedom of a singlemolecule junction and the electrical current flowing through the contact. In this thesis, we investigate vibrational effects in electron transport through singlemolecule junctions. For these studies, we calculate and analyze transport characteristics of both generic and first-principles based model systems of a molecular contact. To this end, we employ a master equation and a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Both methods are suitable to describe this nonequilibrium transport problem and treat the interactions of the tunneling electrons on the molecular bridge non-perturbatively. This is particularly important with respect to the vibrational degrees of freedom, which may strongly interact with the tunneling electrons. We show in detail that the resulting

  12. On the accuracy of the noninteracting electron approximation for vibrationally coupled electron transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haobin, E-mail: haobin.wang@ucdenver.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO 80217-3364 (United States); Thoss, Michael [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Molekulare Materialien, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 7/B2, D-91058 (Germany)

    2016-12-20

    The accuracy of the noninteracting electron approximation is examined for a model of vibrationally coupled electron transport in single molecule junction. In the absence of electronic-vibrational coupling, steady state transport in this model is described exactly by Landauer theory. Including coupling, both electronic-vibrational and vibrationally induced electron–electron correlation effects may contribute to the real time quantum dynamics. Using the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) theory to describe nuclear dynamics exactly while maintaining the noninteracting electron approximation for the electronic dynamics, the correlation effects are analyzed in different physical regimes. It is shown that although the noninteracting electron approximation may be reasonable for describing short time dynamics, it does not give the correct long time limit for certain initial conditions.

  13. Structure of PSI, PSII and antennae complexes from yellow-green alga Xanthonema debile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardian, Zdenko; Tichý, Josef; Vácha, František

    2011-05-01

    Photosynthetic carbon fixation by Chromophytes is one of the significant components of a carbon cycle on the Earth. Their photosynthetic apparatus is different in pigment composition from that of green plants and algae. In this work we report structural maps of photosystem I, photosystem II and light harvesting antenna complexes isolated from a soil chromophytic alga Xanthonema debile (class Xanthophyceae). Electron microscopy of negatively stained preparations followed by single particle analysis revealed that the overall structure of Xanthophytes' PSI and PSII complexes is similar to that known from higher plants or algae. Averaged top-view projections of Xanthophytes' light harvesting antenna complexes (XLH) showed two groups of particles. Smaller ones that correspond to a trimeric form of XLH, bigger particles resemble higher oligomeric form of XLH.

  14. Electron transport in InAs nanowire quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuhrer, Andreas [Nanometer Structure Consortium, Lund Universtity, Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Fasth, Carina; Samuelson, Lars [Nanometer Structure Consortium, Lund Universtity, Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    We investigate electron transport in single and double quantum dots defined in catalytically grown InAs nanowires containing down to a single electron. We determine g-factor and strength of the spin-orbit interaction directly from excited state measurements in these few electron quantum dots. Using local gates to deplete homogeneous InAs nanowires offers a high degree of tunability for defining double quantum dots. Here we show that such systems are ideally suited to manipulate single spins and charges for electron pumping, charge read-out and spin manipulation applications.

  15. Electron transport through a quantum interferometer: a theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Santanu K.

    2010-05-01

    In the present work, we explore the properties of electron transport through a quantum interferometer attached symmetrically to two one-dimensional semi-infinite metallic electrodes, namely the source and the drain. The interferometer is made up of two sub-rings where individual sub-rings are penetrated by the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) fluxes phi1 and phi2, respectively. We adopt a simple tight-binding framework to describe the model, and all the calculations are done based on the single-particle Green's function formalism. Our exact numerical calculations describe two-terminal conductance and current as functions of the interferometer-to-electrode coupling strength, magnetic fluxes threaded by left and right sub-rings of the interferometer and the difference of these two fluxes. Our theoretical results reveal several interesting features of electron transport across the interferometer, and these aspects may be utilized to study electron transport in AB geometries.

  16. Dissipationless transport of spin-polarized electrons and Cooper pairs in an electron waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, J.; Annadi, A.; Lu, S.; Cheng, G.; Tylan-Tyler, A.; Briggeman, M.; Tomczyk, M.; Huang, M.; Pekker, D.; Irvin, P.; Lee, H.; Lee, J.-W.; Eom, C.-B.

    Electron systems undergo profound changes in their behavior when constrained to move along a single axis. To date, clean one-dimensional (1D) electron transport has only been observed in carbon-based nanotubes and nanoribbons, and compound semiconductor nanowires. Complex-oxide heterostructures can possess conductive two-dimensional (2D) interfaces with much richer chemistries and properties, e.g., superconductivity, but with mobilities that appear to preclude ballistic transport in 1D. Here we show that nearly ideal 1D electron waveguides exhibiting ballistic transport of electrons and non-superconducting Cooper pairs can be formed at the interface between the two band insulators LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The electron waveguides possess gate and magnetic-field selectable spin and charge degrees of freedom, and can be tuned to the one-dimensional limit of a single spin-polarized quantum channel. The strong attractive electron-electron interactions enable a new mode of dissipationless transport of electron pairs that is not superconducting. The selectable spin and subband quantum numbers of these electron waveguides may be useful for quantum simulation, quantum informatio We gratefully acknowledge financial support from ONR N00014-15-1-2847 (JL), AFOSR (FA9550-15-1-0334 (CBE) and FA9550-12-1-0057 (JL, CBE)), AOARD FA2386-15-1-4046 (CBE) and NSF (DMR-1104191 (JL), DMR-1124131 (CBE, JL) and DMR-1234096 (CBE)).

  17. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    If the operation of electronic components switching scheme to reduce congestion and losses (in power converters in general and switching power supplies in particular), it also generates electromagnetic type of pollution in its immediate environment. Power Electronics for Industry and Transport, Volume 4 is devoted to electromagnetic compatibility. It presents the sources of disturbance and the square wave signal, spectral modeling generic perturbation. Disturbances propagation mechanisms called ""lumped"" by couplings such as a common impedance, a parasitic capacitance or a mutual and ""dis

  18. Electron beam induced electronic transport in alkyl amine-intercalated VOx nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dwyer, C.; Lavayen, V.; Clavijo Cedeno, C.E.; Sotomayor Torres, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The electron beam induced electronic transport in primary alkyl amine-intercalated V2O5 nanotubes is investigated where the organic amine molecules are employed as molecular conductive wires to an aminosilanized substrate surface and contacted to Au interdigitated electrode contacts. The results

  19. Photosynthetic electron transport system promotes synthesis of Au-nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Shabnam

    Full Text Available In this communication, a novel, green, efficient and economically viable light mediated protocol for generation of Au-nanoparticles using most vital organelle, chloroplasts, of the plant system is portrayed. Thylakoids/chloroplasts isolated from Potamogeton nodosus (an aquatic plant and Spinacia oleracea (a terrestrial plant turned Au³⁺ solutions purple in presence of light of 600 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹ photon flux density (PFD and the purple coloration intensified with time. UV-Vis spectra of these purple colored solutions showed absorption peak at ∼545 nm which is known to arise due to surface plasmon oscillations specific to Au-nanoparticles. However, thylakoids/chloroplasts did not alter color of Au³⁺ solutions in dark. These results clearly demonstrated that photosynthetic electron transport can reduce Au³⁺ to Au⁰ which nucleate to form Au-nanoparticles in presence of light. Transmission electron microscopic studies revealed that Au-nanoparticles generated by light driven photosynthetic electron transport system of thylakoids/chloroplasts were in range of 5-20 nm. Selected area electron diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction indicated crystalline nature of these nanoparticles. Energy dispersive X-ray confirmed that these nanoparticles were composed of Au. To confirm the potential of light driven photosynthetic electron transport in generation of Au-nanoparticles, thylakoids/chloroplasts were tested for their efficacy to generate Au-nanoparticles in presence of light of PFD ranging from 60 to 600 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹. The capacity of thylakoids/chloroplasts to generate Au-nanoparticles increased remarkably with increase in PFD, which further clearly demonstrated potential of light driven photosynthetic electron transport in reduction of Au³⁺ to Au⁰ to form nanoparticles. The light driven donation of electrons to metal ions by thylakoids/chloroplasts can be exploited for large scale production of nanoparticles.

  20. Role of hot electron transport in scintillators: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Huihui [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China); Li, Qi [Physical Sciences Division, IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Lu, Xinfu; Williams, R.T. [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Qian, Yiyang [College of Engineering and Applied Science, Nanjing University (China); Wu, Yuntao [Scintillation Materials Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Despite recent intensive study on scintillators, several fundamental questions on scintillator properties are still unknown. In this work, we use ab-initio calculations to determine the energy dependent group velocity of the hot electrons from the electronic structures of several typical scintillators. Based on the calculated group velocities and optical phonon frequencies, a Monte-Carlo simulation of hot electron transport in scintillators is carried out to calculate the thermalization time and diffusion range in selected scintillators. Our simulations provide physical insights on a recent trend of improved proportionality and light yield from mixed halide scintillators. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Transport Theory for Kinetic Emission of Secondary Electrons from Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen

    1980-01-01

    . These quantities are determined from the solutions to a system of Boltzmann transport equations. Input quantities are the cross sections for collisions between the involved particles and the surface barrier of the target. A general power cross section has been utilized in the analytical procedure. It is shown......Kinetic secondary electron emission from a solid target resulting from incidence of keV electrons or keV and MeV ions is treated theoretically on the basis of ionization cascade theory. The energy and angular distribution and the yield of secondary electrons are calculated for a random target...

  2. Magnetoelectronic transport of the two-dimensional electron gas in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Hall mobility and magnetoresistance coefficient for the two-dimensional (2D) electron transport parallel to the heterojunction interfaces in a single quantum well of. CdSe are calculated with a numerical iterative technique in the framework of Fermi–Dirac statistics. Lattice scatterings due to polar-mode longitudinal ...

  3. Thermal and electronic transport characteristics of highly stretchable graphene kirigami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Lherbier, Aurélien; Fan, Zheyong; Harju, Ari; Rabczuk, Timon; Charlier, Jean-Christophe

    2017-10-20

    For centuries, cutting and folding papers with special patterns have been used to build beautiful, flexible and complex three-dimensional structures. Inspired by the old idea of kirigami (paper cutting), and the outstanding properties of graphene, recently graphene kirigami structures were fabricated to enhance the stretchability of graphene. However, the possibility of further tuning the electronic and thermal transport along the 2D kirigami structures has remained original to investigate. We therefore performed extensive atomistic simulations to explore the electronic, heat and load transfer along various graphene kirigami structures. The mechanical response and thermal transport were explored using classical molecular dynamics simulations. We then used a real-space Kubo-Greenwood formalism to investigate the charge transport characteristics in graphene kirigami. Our results reveal that graphene kirigami structures present highly anisotropic thermal and electrical transport. Interestingly, we show the possibility of tuning the thermal conductivity of graphene by four orders of magnitude. Moreover, we discuss the engineering of kirigami patterns to further enhance their stretchability by more than 10 times as compared with pristine graphene. Our study not only provides a general understanding concerning the engineering of electronic, thermal and mechanical response of graphene, but more importantly can also be useful to guide future studies with respect to the synthesis of other 2D material kirigami structures, to reach highly flexible and stretchable nanostructures with finely tunable electronic and thermal properties.

  4. Electron transport and coherence in semiconductor quantum dots and rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wiel, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    A number of experiments on electron transport and coherence in semiconductor vertical and lateral quantum dots and semiconductor rings is described. Quantum dots are often referred to as "artificial atoms", because of their similarities with real atoms. Examples of such atom-like properties that

  5. Electronic repository and standardization of processes and electronic documents in transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz DĘBICKI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article refers to the idea of the use of electronic repository to store standardised scheme of processes between a Logistics Service Provider and its business partners. Application of repository for automatic or semi-automatic configuration of interoperability in electronic data interchange between information systems of differentcompanies based on transport (road, rail, sea and combined related processes. Standardisation includes processes, scheme of cooperation and related to them, electronic messages.

  6. Pair tunneling resonance in the single-electron transport regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijnse, M; Wegewijs, M R; Hettler, M H

    2009-10-09

    We predict a new electron pair tunneling (PT) resonance in nonlinear transport through quantum dots with positive charging energies exceeding the broadening due to thermal and quantum fluctuations. The PT resonance shows up in the single-electron transport (SET) regime as a peak in the derivative of the nonlinear conductance, d(2)I/dV(2), when the electrochemical potential of one electrode matches the average of two subsequent charge addition energies. For a single level quantum dot (Anderson model) we find the analytic peak shape and the dependence on temperature, magnetic field, and junction asymmetry and compare with the inelastic cotunneling peak which is of the same order of magnitude. In experimental transport spectroscopy the PT resonance may be mistaken for a weak SET resonance judging only by the voltage dependence of its position. Our results provide essential clues to avoid such erroneous interpretation.

  7. Power electronics for renewable energy systems, transportation and industrial applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malinowski, Mariusz; Al-Haddad, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Power Electronics for Renewable Energy, Transportation, and Industrial Applications combines state-of-the-art global expertise to present the latest research on power electronics and its application in transportation, renewable energy, and different industrial applications. This timely book aims to facilitate the implementation of cutting-edge techniques to design problems offering innovative solutions to the growing power demands in small- and large-size industries. Application areas in the book range from smart homes and electric and plug-in hybrid electrical vehicles (PHEVs), to smart distribution and intelligence operation centers where significant energy efficiency improvements can be achieved through the appropriate use and design of power electronics and energy storage devices.

  8. Advanced electronic displays and their potential in future transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that electronic displays represent one of the keys to continued integration and improvement of the effectiveness of avionic systems in future transport aircraft. An employment of modern electronic display media and generation has become vital in connection with the increases in modes and functions of modern aircraft. Requirements for electronic systems of future transports are examined, and a description is provided of the tools which are available for cockpit integration, taking into account trends in information processing and presentation, trends in integrated display devices, and trends concerning input/output devices. Developments related to display media, display generation, and I/O devices are considered, giving attention to a comparison of CRT and flat-panel display technology, advanced HUD technology and multifunction controls. Integrated display formats are discussed along with integrated systems and cockpit configurations.

  9. Ultrafast electron transport in graphene and magnetic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2016-03-01

    Ultrafast terahertz spectroscopy is an ideal tool for observation of dynamics of charge, lattice and spin in solids on the most elementary timescale: in the regime ωτ ~ 1, where ω is the electromagnetic wave oscillation frequency, and τ is the characteristic timescale at which the fundamental phenomena in the three subsystems comprising the solid occur. In this paper two case studies will be discussed. (i) Ultrafast electron transport in graphene. We will show, that the free-carrier conductivity of graphene in arbitrary ultrafast, (sub-)picosecond electric fields is defined by the thermodynamic balance maintained within the electronic structure of graphene acting as thermalized electron gas. Within this simple thermodynamic picture, the electron gas quasi-instantaneously increases its temperature by absorbing the energy of driving ultrafast electric field, and at the same time cools down via a time-retarded, few picosecond-long process of phonon emission. The asymmetry in electron heating and cooling dynamics leads to heat accumulation in the electron population of graphene, concomitantly lowering the chemical potential for hotter electrons, and thereby reducing the intraband conductivity of graphene - an effect crucially important for understanding of ultrafast graphene transistors and photodetectors. (ii) We will also discuss the fundamental observation of spin-controlled electron conduction of Fermilevel electrons in ferromagnetic metals, and will directly quantify the Mott picture of conduction in ferromagnets - the effect directly employed in modern magnetic sensor technologies such as giant magnetoresistance.

  10. Response of Lemna minor L. to short-term cobalt exposure: The effect on photosynthetic electron transport chain and induction of oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begović, Lidija, E-mail: lbegovic@biologija.unios.hr [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Department of Biology, Ulica cara Hadrijana 8/A, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia); Mlinarić, Selma, E-mail: smlinaric@biologija.unios.hr [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Department of Biology, Ulica cara Hadrijana 8/A, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia); Antunović Dunić, Jasenka, E-mail: jantunovic@biologija.unios.hr [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Department of Biology, Ulica cara Hadrijana 8/A, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia); Katanić, Zorana, E-mail: zkatanic@biologija.unios.hr [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Department of Biology, Ulica cara Hadrijana 8/A, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia); Lončarić, Zdenko, E-mail: zdenko.loncaric@pfos.hr [Faculty of Agriculture, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Ulica kralja Petra Svačića 1d, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia); Lepeduš, Hrvoje, E-mail: hlepedus@yahoo.com [Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Lorenza Jägera 9, HR-31000 Osijek (Croatia); Cesar, Vera, E-mail: vcesarus@yahoo.com [Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, Department of Biology, Ulica cara Hadrijana 8/A, H R -31000 Osijek (Croatia)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) impaired the function of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in L. minor L. • Electron transport through PSII components varied depending on Co{sup 2+} concentration. • K-band was proven to be suitable parameter for investigation of Co{sup 2+} toxicity. • Increased lipid peroxidation level showed early oxidative damage induced by Co{sup 2+}. - Abstract: The effect of two concentrations of cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) on photosynthetic activity and antioxidative response in Lemna minor L. were assessed 24, 48 and 72 h after the start of the exposure. Higher concentration of cobalt (1 mM) induced growth inhibition while lower concentration (0.01 mM) increased photosynthetic pigments content. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence transients revealed high sensitivity of photosystem II primary photochemistry to excess of Co{sup 2+} especially at the higher concentration where decreased electron transport beyond primary quinone acceptor Q{sub A}{sup −} and impaired function of oxygen evolving complex (OEC) was observed. Due to impairment of OEC, oxygen production was decreased at higher Co{sup 2+} concentration. Activity of superoxide dismutase was mainly inhibited while lipid peroxidation increased, at both concentrations, indicating that cobalt-induced oxidative damage after short exposure and moreover, susceptibility of the membranes in the cell to cobalt toxicity. Results obtained in this study suggest possible application of used parameters as tools in assessment of early damage caused by metals.

  11. Modelling of electron transport and of sawtooth activity in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angioni, C

    2001-10-01

    Transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas strongly limit the particle and energy confinement and represent a crucial obstacle to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of transport studies, three topics have been tackled in the present thesis: first, the computation of neoclassical transport coefficients for general axisymmetric equilibria and arbitrary collisionality regime; second, the analysis of the electron temperature behaviour and transport modelling of plasma discharges in the Tokamak a configuration Variable (TCV); third, the modelling and simulation of the sawtooth activity with different plasma heating conditions. The work dedicated to neoclassical theory has been undertaken in order to first analytically identify a set of equations suited for implementation in existing Fokker-Planck codes. Modifications of these codes enabled us to compute the neoclassical transport coefficients considering different realistic magnetic equilibrium configurations and covering a large range of variation of three key parameters: aspect ratio, collisionality, and effective charge number. A comparison of the numerical results with an analytical limit has permitted the identification of two expressions for the trapped particle fraction, capable of encapsulating the geometrical effects and thus enabling each transport coefficient to be fitted with a single analytical function. This has allowed us to provide simple analytical formulae for all the neoclassical transport coefficients valid for arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality in general realistic geometry. This work is particularly useful for a correct evaluation of the neoclassical contribution in tokamak scenarios with large bootstrap cur- rent fraction, or improved confinement regimes with low anomalous transport and for the determination of the plasma current density profile, since the plasma conductivity is usually assumed neoclassical. These results have been included in the plasma transport code

  12. Extracellular Electron Transport (EET): Metal Cycling in Extreme Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealson, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular electron transport, or EET, is the process whereby bacteria either donate electrons to an electron acceptor (usually insoluble), or take up electrons from and electron donor (usually insoluble) that is located outside the cell. Iron cycling is inherently linked to EET, as both reduced iron (electron donors), and oxidized iron (electron acceptors) can be found as insoluble minerals, and require specialized molecular machines to accomplish these extracellular geobiological reactions. Bacteria in the group Shewanella are able to catalyze EET in both directions, and are involved with a number of different iron conversions, but are not good role models for extreme conditions - to our knowledge there are no shewanellae that are tolerant to extremes of temperature or pH, the two usual. This being said, when cells are energy starved via limitation for electron acceptors, they respond by turning on the system(s) for EET. Thus, in this presentation the known mechanism(s) of EET will be discussed, along with recent findings and reports of EET-capable organisms from a variety of extreme environments. From these data, I put forward the hypothesis that there are many microbes (many of them from extreme environments) that will be resistant to cultivation by "standard microbiological methods", yet lend themselves well to cultivation via electrochemical methods.

  13. Electronic transport in benzodifuran single-molecule transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, An; Li, Hui; Chen, Songjie; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin; Liao, Jianhui

    2015-04-01

    Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices.Benzodifuran (BDF) single-molecule transistors have been fabricated in electromigration break junctions for electronic measurements. The inelastic electron tunneling spectrum validates that the BDF molecule is the pathway of charge transport. The gating effect is analyzed in the framework of a single-level tunneling model combined with transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). The analysis reveals that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the thiol-terminated BDF molecule dominates the charge transport through Au-BDF-Au junctions. Moreover, the energy shift of the HOMO caused by the gate voltage is the main reason for conductance modulation. In contrast, the electronic coupling between the BDF molecule and the gold electrodes, which significantly affects the low-bias junction conductance, is only influenced slightly by the applied gate voltage. These findings will help in the design of future molecular electronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The fabrication procedure for BDF single

  14. Semiclassical electronic transport in MnAs thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helman, C. [Dpto de Fisica, ' Juan Jose Giambiagi' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Fisica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: helman@tandar.cnea.gov.ar; Milano, J.; Steren, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, S.C. Bariloche (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Dpto de Fisica, ' Juan Jose Giambiagi' , Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Unidad de Actividad Fisica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    Magneto-transport experiments have been recently performed on MnAs thin films. Hall effect and transverse magnetoresistance measurements have shown interesting and, until now, unknown results. For instance, the transverse magnetoresistance shows no saturation in the presence of very high magnetic fields. In order to understand the contribution of the electronic band structure to the non-saturating magnetoresistance, we perform ab initio calculations, using the Wien2K code and analyze the magneto-transport properties within the semiclassical approximation. We show that non-saturation may be due to the presence of open orbits on the majority Fermi surface.

  15. Europium Effect on the Electron Transport in Graphene Ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobadilla, Alfredo D.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Kaminski, Michael; Kumar, Narendra; Seminario, Jorge M.

    2015-10-01

    We report in this complementary theoretical-experimental work the effect of gating on the election transport of grapheme ribbons when exposed to very low concentration of europium in an aqueous solution. We find a direct correlation between the level of concentration of europium ions in the solvent and the change in electron transport in graphene, observing a change of up to 3 orders of magnitude at the lowest level of concentration tested (0.1 mM), suggesting a possibility that graphene ribbons can be used for detecting very low concentrations of europium in liquid solutions.

  16. Electronic transport across metal-graphene edge contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Cheng; Zhang, Chenxi; Oh, Young Jun; Wang, Weichao; Lee, Geunsik; Shan, Bin; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2017-06-01

    The electronic transport across metal-graphene edge-contact structures is studied by first principles methods. Unusual double-dip transmission as a function of Fermi level is found for a Pd electrode over varying grapheme lengths. Interface metal-carbon hybridization is shown to introduce random distribution of π-orbital local density of states at different carbon sites leading to transmission suppression. For a Ti electrode, two dips are merged into one with a ~0.2 eV transport gap opening. Our work sheds light on the origin of intrinsic contact resistance at metal-graphene edge contact.

  17. Fabrication and electronic transport studies of single nanocrystal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, David Louis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    Semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals exhibit interesting electronic transport behavior as a result of electrostatic and quantum mechanical confinement effects. These effects can be studied to learn about the nature of electronic states in these systems. This thesis describes several techniques for the electronic study of nanocrystals. The primary focus is the development of novel methods to attach leads to prefabricated nanocrystals. This is because, while nanocrystals can be readily synthesized from a variety of materials with excellent size control, means to make electrical contact to these nanocrystals are limited. The first approach that will be described uses scanning probe microscopy to first image and then electrically probe surfaces. It is found that electronic investigations of nanocrystals by this technique are complicated by tip-sample interactions and environmental factors such as salvation and capillary forces. Next, an atomic force microscope technique for the catalytic patterning of the surface of a self assembled monolayer is described. In principle, this nano-fabrication technique can be used to create electronic devices which are based upon complex arrangements of nanocrystals. Finally, the fabrication and electrical characterization of a nanocrystal-based single electron transistor is presented. This device is fabricated using a hybrid scheme which combines electron beam lithography and wet chemistry to bind single nanocrystals in tunneling contact between closely spaced metallic leads. In these devices, both Au and CdSe nanocrystals show Coulomb blockade effects with characteristic energies of several tens of meV. Additional structure is seen the transport behavior of CdSe nanocrystals as a result of its electronic structure.

  18. Photosystem II-cyclic electron flow powers exceptional photoprotection and record growth in the microalga Chlorella ohadii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Kaplan, Aaron; Dismukes, G Charles

    2017-11-01

    The desert microalga Chlorella ohadii was reported to grow at extreme light intensities with minimal photoinhibition, tolerate frequent de/re-hydrations, yet minimally employs antenna-based non-photochemical quenching for photoprotection. Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms by measuring Photosystem II charge separation yield (chlorophyll variable fluorescence, Fv/Fm) and flash-induced O2 yield to measure the contributions from both linear (PSII-LEF) and cyclic (PSII-CEF) electron flow within PSII. Cells grow increasingly faster at higher light intensities (μE/m2/s) from low (20) to high (200) to extreme (2000) by escalating photoprotection via shifting from PSII-LEF to PSII-CEF. This shifts PSII charge separation from plastoquinone reduction (PSII-LEF) to plastoquinol oxidation (PSII-CEF), here postulated to enable proton gradient and ATP generation that powers photoprotection. Low light-grown cells have unusually small antennae (332 Chl/PSII), use mainly PSII-LEF (95%) and convert 40% of PSII charge separations into O2 (a high O2 quantum yield of 0.06mol/mol PSII/flash). High light-grown cells have smaller antenna and lower PSII-LEF (63%). Extreme light-grown cells have only 42 Chl/PSII (no LHCII antenna), minimal PSII-LEF (10%), and grow faster than any known phototroph (doubling time 1.3h). Adding a synthetic quinone in excess to supplement the PQ pool fully uncouples PSII-CEF from its natural regulation and produces maximum PSII-LEF. Upon dark adaptation PSII-LEF rapidly reverts to PSII-CEF, a transient protection mechanism to conserve water and minimize the cost of antenna biosynthesis. The capacity of the electron acceptor pool (plastoquinone pool), and the characteristic times for exchange of (PQH2)B with PQpool and reoxidation of (PQH2)pool were determined. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Electronic transport properties of graphene doped by gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, J.; Procházka, P.; Bartošík, M.; Nezval, D.; Piastek, J.; Hulva, J.; Švarc, V.; Konečný, M.; Kormoš, L.; Šikola, T.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we present the effect of low dose gallium (Ga) deposition (graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. In situ graphene transport measurements performed with a graphene field-effect transistor structure show that at low Ga coverages a graphene layer tends to be strongly n-doped with an efficiency of 0.64 electrons per one Ga atom, while the further deposition and Ga cluster formation results in removing electrons from graphene (less n-doping). The experimental results are supported by the density functional theory calculations and explained as a consequence of distinct interaction between graphene and Ga atoms in case of individual atoms, layers, or clusters.

  20. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of power electronic converters (DC / DC, DC / AC, AC / DC and AC / AC) conventionally used in industrial and transportation applications, specifically for the supply of electric machines with variable speed drop off window. From the perspective of design and sizing, this book presents the different functions encountered in a modular way for power electronics.Power Converters and Their Control details less traditional topics such as matrix converters and multilevel converters. This book also features a case study design of an industrial controller, wh

  1. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Some power electronic converters are specifically designed to power equipment under a smoothed DC voltage. Therefore, the filtering part necessarily involves the use of auxiliary passive components (inductors and capacitors). This book deals with technical aspects such as classical separation between isolated and non-isolated power supplies, and soft switching through a special converter. It addresses the problem of regulating the output voltage of the switching power supplies in terms of modeling and obtaining transfer of SMPS functions.Power Electronics for Industry and Transport, Volume 3,

  2. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role. PMID:27098939

  3. Memory function approach to correlated electron transport: A comprehensive review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nabyendu; Bhalla, Pankaj; Singh, Navinder

    2016-09-01

    Memory function formalism or projection operator technique is an extremely useful method to study the transport and optical properties of various condensed matter systems. A recent revival of its uses in various correlated electronic systems is being observed. It is being used and discussed in various contexts, ranging from non-equilibrium dynamics to the optical properties of various strongly correlated systems such as high temperature superconductors. However, a detailed discussion on this method, starting from its origin to its present day applications at one place is lacking. In this article we attempt a comprehensive review of the memory function approach focusing on its uses in studying the dynamics and the transport properties of correlated electronic systems.

  4. Electronic, adsorption, and transport properties of diamondoid-based complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Adhikari, Bibek

    2017-01-01

    Quantum simulation is an invaluable tool to researchers from various fields of scientific research. It allows the investigation of various complex condensed matter in the regimes of physics, chemistry, and biology. In this work, we focused our attention in unraveling the physical, chemical, electronic, transport, and optical properties of diamondoids and their complexes through quantum simulations. We have implemented a bottom-up approach where we move from the doping and functionalization of...

  5. Quantum effective potential, electron transport and conformons in biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandoloff, Rossen [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Balakrishnan, Radha [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2005-07-08

    In the Kirchhoff model of a biopolymer, conformation dynamics can be described in terms of solitary waves, for certain special cross-section asymmetries. Applying this to the problem of electron transport, we show that the quantum effective potential arising due to the bends and twists of the polymer enables us to formalize and quantify the concept of a conformon that has been hypothesized in biology. Its connection to the soliton solution of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation emerges in a natural fashion.

  6. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C., E-mail: robert.c.tautz@gmail.com [Zentrum für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Dresing, N., E-mail: dresing@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 11, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  7. Detecting Electron Transport of Amino Acids by Using Conductance Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Qiong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The single molecular conductance of amino acids was measured by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM break junction. Conductance measurement of alanine gives out two conductance values at 10−1.85 G0 (1095 nS and 10−3.7 G0 (15.5 nS, while similar conductance values are also observed for aspartic acid and glutamic acid, which have one more carboxylic acid group compared with alanine. This may show that the backbone of NH2–C–COOH is the primary means of electron transport in the molecular junction of aspartic acid and glutamic acid. However, NH2–C–COOH is not the primary means of electron transport in the methionine junction, which may be caused by the strong interaction of the Au–SMe (methyl sulfide bond for the methionine junction. The current work reveals the important role of the anchoring group in the electron transport in different amino acids junctions.

  8. Heat Transport in Interacting Magnetized Electron Temperature Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydora, Richard; Karbashewski, Scott; van Compernolle, Bart; Poulos, Matt; Morales, George

    2017-10-01

    Results are presented from basic heat transport experiments and numerical simulations of multiple magnetized electron temperature filaments in close proximity. This arrangement samples cross-field transport from nonlinear drift-Alfven waves and large scale convective cells. Experiments are performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. The setup consists of three biased CeB6 crystal cathodes that inject low energy electrons (below ionization energy) along a strong magnetic field into a pre-existing large and cold plasma forming 3 electron temperature filaments embedded in a colder plasma, and far from the machine walls. A triangular spatial pattern is chosen for the thermal sources and multiple axial and transverse probe measurements allow for determination of the cross-field mode patterns and axial filament length. We have characterized the spontaneous thermal waves and drift-Alfven waves that develop on an individual filament when a single source is activated. When the 3 sources are activated, and in close proximity, a complex wave pattern emerges due to interference of the various wave modes leading to enhanced cross-field transport and chaotic mixing. Steep thermal gradients develop in a periphery region of the filaments where higher azimuthal wavenumber drift-Alfven modes are excited. Detailed spectral analysis and comparison with nonlinear fluid and gyrokinetic simulations will be reported. Work Supported by NSERC, Canada and NSF-DOE, USA.

  9. Electron transport through a quantum dot assisted by cavity photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2013-11-01

    We investigate transient transport of electrons through a single quantum dot controlled by a plunger gate. The dot is embedded in a finite wire with length Lx assumed to lie along the x-direction with a parabolic confinement in the y-direction. The quantum wire, originally with hard-wall confinement at its ends, ±Lx/2, is weakly coupled at t = 0 to left and right leads acting as external electron reservoirs. The central system, the dot and the finite wire, is strongly coupled to a single cavity photon mode. A non-Markovian density-matrix formalism is employed to take into account the full electron-photon interaction in the transient regime. In the absence of a photon cavity, a resonant current peak can be found by tuning the plunger-gate voltage to lift a many-body state of the system into the source-drain bias window. In the presence of an x-polarized photon field, additional side peaks can be found due to photon-assisted transport. By appropriately tuning the plunger-gate voltage, the electrons in the left lead are allowed to undergo coherent inelastic scattering to a two-photon state above the bias window if initially one photon was present in the cavity. However, this photon-assisted feature is suppressed in the case of a y-polarized photon field due to the anisotropy of our system caused by its geometry.

  10. Simulations of electron transport in GaN devices

    CERN Document Server

    Arabshahi, H

    2002-01-01

    model of a device with traps to investigate this suggestion. The model includes the simulation of the capture and release of electrons by traps whose charge has a direct effect on the current flowing through the transistor terminals. The influence of temperature and light on the occupancy of the traps and the I-V characteristics are considered. It is concluded that traps are likely to play a substantial role in the behaviour of GaN field effect transistors. Further simulations were performed to model electron transport in AIGaN/GaN heterojunction FETs. So called HFET structures with a 78 nm Al sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ga sub 0 sub . sub 8 N pseudomorphically strained layer have been simulated, with the inclusion of spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization effects in the strained layer. The polarization effects are shown to not only increase the current density, but also improve the electron transport by inducing a higher electron density close to the positive charge sheet that occurs in the channel. This thesis de...

  11. Control of electronic transport in graphene by electromagnetic dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristinsson, K; Kibis, O V; Morina, S; Shelykh, I A

    2016-02-03

    We demonstrated theoretically that the renormalization of the electron energy spectrum near the Dirac point of graphene by a strong high-frequency electromagnetic field (dressing field) drastically depends on polarization of the field. Namely, linear polarization results in an anisotropic gapless energy spectrum, whereas circular polarization leads to an isotropic gapped one. As a consequence, the stationary (dc) electronic transport in graphene strongly depends on parameters of the dressing field: A circularly polarized field monotonically decreases the isotropic conductivity of graphene, whereas a linearly polarized one results in both giant anisotropy of conductivity (which can reach thousands of percents) and the oscillating behavior of the conductivity as a function of the field intensity. Since the predicted phenomena can be observed in a graphene layer irradiated by a monochromatic electromagnetic wave, the elaborated theory opens a substantially new way to control electronic properties of graphene with light.

  12. Creation, Transport and Measurement of Bright Relativistic Electron Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Chad Bennett

    This thesis deals with three topics relevant to linac-driven free electron lasers: the creation, transport and measurement of bright relativistic electron beams. Thermionic microwave electron guns produce bright electron beams that are well suited to drive free electron lasers, FELs. The rf fields in the gun cause some of the emitted electrons to reverse direction and strike the cathode. These back-bombarding electrons heat the cathode limiting both the pulse length and time averaged current. The cathode heating is reduced if a transverse magnetic field is applied across the gun cavity to deflect back-bombarding electrons. We improve the thermionic microwave electron gun by redesigning the deflection magnet to minimize the back-heating power. Computer simulations show that transverse magnetic fields with rapid axial falloffs reduce the back-heating power more than fields that are axially constant. Experiments verify these simulations. The deflection magnet presently installed on the Mark III gun has a slow axial falloff and reduces the back-heating power by 31%. Using the simulation results we design a new deflection magnet having a rapid axial falloff. This magnet has been installed on the NCCU gun and reduces the back-heating power by 63%. Improper transport of the electron beam through the beam line degrades the quality of the electron beam and lowers the performance of the FEL. We propose to improve the beam line commissioning and control procedures on linac -driven FELs by experimentally measuring the transfer matrix of each beam line section. The transfer matrix of a given section is measured by dithering the electron beam, measuring the beam vector before and after the section and inverting the subsequent data matrix. We minimize the beam line errors by minimizing the deviation between the experimentally measured transfer matrix and the design transfer matrix of each beam line section. While not experimentally verified, computer simulations show that this

  13. Gyrokinetic calculations of steady-state particle transport in electron internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fable, E; Sauter, O [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Angioni, C [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: emiliano.fable@epfl.ch

    2008-11-15

    The appearance of an internal particle transport barrier, correlated with a heat transport barrier, during strongly electron heated discharges in reversed magnetic shear scenario is well-established experimental evidence. Turbulent transport is believed to be responsible for the observed inward pinch. The mechanisms for the sustainment of such peaked density profiles in the absence of core particle sources are analysed in the framework of collisionless linear gyrokinetic turbulence theory. In particular, it is elucidated how the thermodiffusive pinch can become the dominant contribution to the total inward pinch. In stationary conditions, the pinch is shown to be carried mostly by trapped electrons, while passing electrons give a smaller contribution. The pinch is maximized when two different microinstabilities, namely the ion temperature gradient mode and the trapped electron mode are believed to coexist at similar linear growth rates. To reach this state at high values of the normalized density gradient, it is necessary to reduce the trapped electron mode activity via different stabilizing mechanisms. The role of impurities is also briefly discussed. A comprehensive analytical-numerical study of the linear stability properties of the modes allows the understanding of the physical mechanism in detail and the clarification of the possible drive of the observed pinch.

  14. The macro response Monte Carlo method for electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatos, Michelle Marie

    1998-10-01

    This thesis proves the feasibility of basing depth dose calculations for electron radiotherapy on first- principles single scatter physics, in an amount of time that is comparable to or better than current electron Monte Carlo methods. The Macro Response Monte Carlo (MRMC) method achieves run times that have potential to be much faster than conventional electron transport methods such as condensed history. This is possible because MRMC is a Local-to- Global method, meaning the problem is broken down into two separate transport calculations. The first stage is a local, single scatter calculation, which generates probability distribution functions (PDFs) to describe the electron's energy, position and trajectory after leaving the local geometry, a small sphere or 'kugel'. A number of local kugel calculations were run for calcium and carbon, creating a library of kugel data sets over a range of incident energies (0.25 MeV-8 MeV) and sizes (0.025 cm to 0.1 cm in radius). The second transport stage is a global calculation, where steps that conform to the size of the kugels in the library are taken through the global geometry, which in this case is a CT (computed tomography) scan of a patient or phantom. For each step, the appropriate PDFs from the MRMC library are sampled to determine the electron's new energy, position and trajectory. The electron is immediately advanced to the end of the step and then chooses another kugel to sample, which continues until transport is completed. The MRMC global stepping code was benchmarked as a series of subroutines inside of the Peregrine Monte Carlo code against EGS4 and MCNP for depth dose in simple phantoms having density inhomogeneities. The energy deposition algorithms for spreading dose across 5-10 zones per kugel were tested. Most resulting depth dose calculations were within 2-3% of well-benchmarked codes, with one excursion to 4%. This thesis shows that the concept of using single scatter-based physics in clinical radiation

  15. Non-renewal statistics for electron transport in a molecular junction with electron-vibration interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosov, Daniel S.

    2017-09-01

    Quantum transport of electrons through a molecule is a series of individual electron tunneling events separated by stochastic waiting time intervals. We study the emergence of temporal correlations between successive waiting times for the electron transport in a vibrating molecular junction. Using the master equation approach, we compute the joint probability distribution for waiting times of two successive tunneling events. We show that the probability distribution is completely reset after each tunneling event if molecular vibrations are thermally equilibrated. If we treat vibrational dynamics exactly without imposing the equilibration constraint, the statistics of electron tunneling events become non-renewal. Non-renewal statistics between two waiting times τ1 and τ2 means that the density matrix of the molecule is not fully renewed after time τ1 and the probability of observing waiting time τ2 for the second electron transfer depends on the previous electron waiting time τ1. The strong electron-vibration coupling is required for the emergence of the non-renewal statistics. We show that in the Franck-Condon blockade regime, extremely rare tunneling events become positively correlated.

  16. Electronic transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloemers, Christian

    2012-10-19

    Throughout this work the electronic transport properties of InAs, InN, and GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires have been analyzed. This includes the analysis of specific resistivity at room temperature and low temperatures as well as the breakdown of resistivity by a contribution of mobility and carrier concentration using gate measurements. While the InN nanowires showed homogeneous transport properties, there was a large statistical spread in the properties of InAs nanowires. Differing crystal structures and the surface conditions are identified to be the main reasons for the statistical spread. Both quantities of influence have been pointed out by comparing the transport parameters before and after a surface treatment (electron irradiation and long time ambient air exposure), and by comparing the transport parameters of wires grown by different growth methods which exhibit different kinds of crystal structure. In particular, the temperature dependence of the conductivity revealed different activation energies in nanowires with differing crystal structures. An explanation has been suggested in terms of stacking fault induced potential barriers. A field-effect measurement setup has been utilized to determine the nanowire mobility and carrier concentration. Even though this method is widely used for nanowires, it is subject to a serious disadvantage concerning the influence of surface and interface states on the measurements. As an alternative method which does not suffer from this drawback, Hall measurements have been successfully performed on InAs nanowires for the first time. These measurements became possible because of the utilization of a new electron beam lithographic procedure with an alignment accuracy in the 5 nm range. Carrier concentration values could be determined and compared to the ones obtained from conventional field-effect measurements. The results of the Hall measurements revealed a methodical overestimation of the carrier concentrations obtained

  17. Long-distance electron transport occurs globally in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdorf, Laurine D. W.; Tramper, Anton; Seitaj, Dorina; Meire, Lorenz; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Zetsche, Eva-Maria; Boschker, Henricus T. S.; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, long filamentous bacteria have been reported conducting electrons over centimetre distances in marine sediments. These so-called cable bacteria perform an electrogenic form of sulfur oxidation, whereby long-distance electron transport links sulfide oxidation in deeper sediment horizons to oxygen reduction in the upper millimetres of the sediment. Electrogenic sulfur oxidation exerts a strong impact on the local sediment biogeochemistry, but it is currently unknown how prevalent the process is within the seafloor. Here we provide a state-of-the-art assessment of its global distribution by combining new field observations with previous reports from the literature. This synthesis demonstrates that electrogenic sulfur oxidation, and hence microbial long-distance electron transport, is a widespread phenomenon in the present-day seafloor. The process is found in coastal sediments within different climate zones (off the Netherlands, Greenland, the USA, Australia) and thrives on a range of different coastal habitats (estuaries, salt marshes, mangroves, coastal hypoxic basins, intertidal flats). The combination of a widespread occurrence and a strong local geochemical imprint suggests that electrogenic sulfur oxidation could be an important, and hitherto overlooked, component of the marine cycle of carbon, sulfur and other elements.

  18. Nanoscale Electron Transport Measurements of Immobilized Cytochrome P450 Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, Christopher D.; Flora, Darcy R.; Gannett, Peter M.; Tracy, Timothy S.; Lederman, David

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanopillars, functionalized with an organic self-assembled monolayer, can be used to measure the electrical conductance properties of immobilized proteins without aggregation. Measurements of the conductance of nanopillars with cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) proteins using conducting probe atomic force microscopy demonstrate that a correlation exists between the energy barrier height between hopping sites and CYP2C9 metabolic activity. Measurements performed as a function of tip force indicate that, when subjected to a large force, the protein is more stable in the presence of a substrate. This agrees with the hypothesis that substrate entry into the active site helps to stabilize the enzyme. The relative distance between hopping sites also increases with increasing force, possibly because protein functional groups responsible for electron transport depend on the structure of the protein. The inhibitor sulfaphenazole, in addition to the previously studied aniline, increased the barrier height for electron transfer and thereby makes CYP2C9 reduction more difficult and inhibits metabolism. This suggests that P450 Type II binders may decrease the ease of electron transport processes in the enzyme, in addition to occupying the active site. PMID:25804257

  19. Artemisinin inhibits chloroplast electron transport activity: mode of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adyasha Bharati

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a secondary metabolite produced in Artemisia plant species, besides having antimalarial properties is also phytotoxic. Although, the phytotoxic activity of the compound has been long recognized, no information is available on the mechanism of action of the compound on photosynthetic activity of the plant. In this report, we have evaluated the effect of artemisinin on photoelectron transport activity of chloroplast thylakoid membrane. The inhibitory effect of the compound, under in vitro condition, was pronounced in loosely and fully coupled thylakoids; being strong in the former. The extent of inhibition was drastically reduced in the presence of uncouplers like ammonium chloride or gramicidin; a characteristic feature described for energy transfer inhibitors. The compound, on the other hand, when applied to plants (in vivo, behaved as a potent inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. The major site of its action was identified to be the Q(B; the secondary quinone moiety of photosystemII complex. Analysis of photoreduction kinetics of para-benzoquinone and duroquinone suggest that the inhibition leads to formation of low pool of plastoquinol, which becomes limiting for electron flow through photosystemI. Further it was ascertained that the in vivo inhibitory effect appeared as a consequence of the formation of an unidentified artemisinin-metabolite rather than by the interaction of the compound per se. The putative metabolite of artemisinin is highly reactive in instituting the inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow eventually reducing the plant growth.

  20. Theory of Fast Electron Transport for Fast Ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A P L; Davies, J R; Gremillet, L; Honrubia, J J; Johzaki, T; Kingham, R J; Sherlock, M; Solodov, A A

    2013-01-01

    Fast Ignition Inertial Confinement Fusion is a variant of inertial fusion in which DT fuel is first compressed to high density and then ignited by a relativistic electron beam generated by a fast (< 20 ps) ultra-intense laser pulse, which is usually brought in to the dense plasma via the inclusion of a re-entrant cone. The transport of this beam from the cone apex into the dense fuel is a critical part of this scheme, as it can strongly influence the overall energetics. Here we review progress in the theory and numerical simulation of fast electron transport in the context of Fast Ignition. Important aspects of the basic plasma physics, descriptions of the numerical methods used, a review of ignition-scale simulations, and a survey of schemes for controlling the propagation of fast electrons are included. Considerable progress has taken place in this area, but the development of a robust, high-gain FI `point design' is still an ongoing challenge.

  1. Helium, Iron and Electron Particle Transport and Energy Transport Studies on the TFTR Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synakowski, E. J.; Efthimion, P. C.; Rewoldt, G.; Stratton, B. C.; Tang, W. M.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Johnson, D .W.; Mansfield, D. K.; McCune, D.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Ramsey, A. T.; Redi, M. H.; Scott, S. D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Zarnstorff, M. C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Kissick, M. W. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Results from helium, iron, and electron transport on TFTR in L-mode and Supershot deuterium plasmas with the same toroidal field, plasma current, and neutral beam heating power are presented. They are compared to results from thermal transport analysis based on power balance. Particle diffusivities and thermal conductivities are radially hollow and larger than neoclassical values, except possibly near the magnetic axis. The ion channel dominates over the electron channel in both particle and thermal diffusion. A peaked helium profile, supported by inward convection that is stronger than predicted by neoclassical theory, is measured in the Supershot The helium profile shape is consistent with predictions from quasilinear electrostatic drift-wave theory. While the perturbative particle diffusion coefficients of all three species are similar in the Supershot, differences are found in the L-Mode. Quasilinear theory calculations of the ratios of impurity diffusivities are in good accord with measurements. Theory estimates indicate that the ion heat flux should be larger than the electron heat flux, consistent with power balance analysis. However, theoretical values of the ratio of the ion to electron heat flux can be more than a factor of three larger than experimental values. A correlation between helium diffusion and ion thermal transport is observed and has favorable implications for sustained ignition of a tokamak fusion reactor.

  2. Elastic properties and electron transport in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, Vadim

    2013-02-22

    The electron transport and elastic properties of InAs nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition on InAs (001) substrate were studied experimentally, in-situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). A TEM holder allowing the measurement of a nanoforce while simultaneous imaging nanowire bending was used. Diffraction images from local areas of the wire were recorded to correlate elastic properties with the atomic structure of the nanowires. Another TEM holder allowing the application of electrical bias between the nanowire and an apex of a metallic needle while simultaneous imaging the nanowire in TEM or performing electron holography was used to detect mechanical vibrations in mechanical study or holographical observation of the nanowire inner potential in the electron transport studies. The combination of the scanning probe methods with TEM allows to correlate the measured electric and elastic properties of the nanowires with direct identification of their atomic structure. It was found that the nanowires have different atomic structures and different stacking fault defect densities that impacts critically on the elastic properties and electric transport. The unique methods, that were applied in this work, allowed to obtain dependencies of resistivity and Young's modulus of left angle 111 right angle -oriented InAs nanowires on defect density and diameter. It was found that the higher is the defect density the higher are the resistivity and the Young's modulus. Regarding the resistivity, it was deduced that the stacking faults increase the scattering of the electrons in the nanowire. These findings are consistent with the literature, however, the effect described by the other groups is not so pronounced. This difference can be attributed to the significant incompleteness of the physical models used for the data analysis. Regarding the elastic modulus, there are several mechanisms affecting the elasticity of the nanowires discussed in the thesis. It

  3. Coherent manipulation of thermal transport by tunable electron-photon and electron-phonon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Federico; Timossi, Giuliano; Solinas, Paolo; Giazotto, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    We propose a system where coherent thermal transport between two reservoirs in non-galvanic contact is modulated by independently tuning the electron-photon and the electron-phonon coupling. The scheme is based on two gate-controlled electrodes capacitively coupled through a dc-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as an intermediate phase-tunable resonator. Thereby the electron-photon interaction is modulated by controlling the flux threading the dc-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) and the impedance of the two reservoirs, while the electron-phonon coupling is tuned by controlling the charge carrier concentration in the electrodes. To quantitatively evaluate the behavior of the system, we propose to exploit the graphene reservoirs. In this case, the scheme can work at temperatures reaching 1 K, with unprecedented temperature modulations as large as 245 mK, transmittance up to 99%, and energy conversion efficiency up to 50%. Finally, the accuracy of heat transport control allows us to use this system as an experimental tool to determine the electron-phonon coupling in two-dimensional electronic systems.

  4. Contacting nanowires and nanotubes with atomic precision for electronic transport

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Shengyong

    2012-01-01

    Making contacts to nanostructures with atomic precision is an important process in the bottom-up fabrication and characterization of electronic nanodevices. Existing contacting techniques use top-down lithography and chemical etching, but lack atomic precision and introduce the possibility of contamination. Here, we report that a field-induced emission process can be used to make local contacts onto individual nanowires and nanotubes with atomic spatial precision. The gold nano-islands are deposited onto nanostructures precisely by using a scanning tunneling microscope tip, which provides a clean and controllable method to ensure both electrically conductive and mechanically reliable contacts. To demonstrate the wide applicability of the technique, nano-contacts are fabricated on silicide atomic wires, carbon nanotubes, and copper nanowires. The electrical transport measurements are performed in situ by utilizing the nanocontacts to bridge the nanostructures to the transport probes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Convective and diffusive ULF wave driven radiation belt electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, A. W.; Rankin, R.; Elkington, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    The process of magnetospheric radiation belt electron transport driven by ULF waves is studied using a 2-D ideal MHD model for ULF waves in the equatorial plane including day/night asymmetry and a magnetopause boundary, and a test kinetic model for equatorially mirroring electrons. We find that ULF wave disturbances originating along the magnetopause flanks in the afternoon sector can act to periodically inject phase space density from these regions into the magnetosphere. Closely spaced drift-resonant surfaces for electrons with a given magnetic moment in the presence of the ULF waves create a layer of stochastic dynamics for L-shells above 6.5-7 in the cases examined, extending to the magnetopause. The phase decorrelation time scale for the stochastic region is estimated by the relaxation time for the diffusion coefficient to reach a steady value. This is found to be of the order of 10-15 wave periods, which is commensurate with the typical duration of observed ULF wave packets in the magnetosphere. For L-shells earthward of the stochastic layer, transport is limited to isolated drift-resonant islands in the case of narrowband ULF waves. We examine the effect of increasing the bandwidth of the ULF wave driver by summing together wave components produced by a set of independent runs of the ULF wave model. The wave source spectrum is given a flat-top amplitude of variable width (adjusted for constant power) and random phase. We find that increasing bandwidth can significantly enhance convective transport earthward of the stochastic layer and extend the stochastic layer to lower L-shells.

  6. The transport of 2D electrons through magnetic barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrak, V.; Rushforth, A. W.; Neumann, A. C.; Rahman, F.; Gallagher, B. L.; Main, P. C.; Henini, M.; Marrows, C. H.; Hickey, B. J.

    2000-05-01

    We have fabricated three different types of hybrid ferromagnet-semiconductor devices. In each case, the stray field from a magnetic element on the surface of the semiconductor gives rise to a different type of inhomogeneous magnetic profile at a near-surface two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). We investigate how these different types of magnetic barriers influence the transport properties of the 2DEG. Implications for potential applications of hybrid devices for nanomagnetometry, magnetic field sensors and spin-injection devices are discussed.

  7. Electron transport in silicon nanowires having different cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muscato Orazio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transport phenomena in silicon nanowires with different cross-section are investigated using an Extended Hydrodynamic model, coupled to the Schrödinger-Poisson system. The model has been formulated by closing the moment system derived from the Boltzmann equation on the basis of the maximum entropy principle of Extended Thermodynamics, obtaining explicit closure relations for the high-order fluxes and the production terms. Scattering of electrons with acoustic and non polar optical phonons have been taken into account. The bulk mobility is evaluated for square and equilateral triangle cross-sections of the wire.

  8. An electron transport code independent of the planetary thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, J.

    2017-09-01

    Transsolo is a code that describes the transport of the electrons from solar origin of from photoionisation in the upper atmosphere. Up to now, it has been adapted to the Earth, Venus, Jupiter, Uranus, Mars and Titan. However, these adaptations resulted in separate codes and improvements of one did not automatically follow in the others. In the frame of Europlanet, we re-wrote this code in a user-friendly manner to make it independent of the planet, so that it is easy to make measurements in many circumstances.

  9. Study of electronic transport properties of doped 8AGNR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Uma Shankar, E-mail: umashankar-rjit@yahoo.co.in [Rustamji Institute of Technology, BSF Academy Tekanpur, Gwalior-475005 (India); Srivastava, Anurag [Advanced Materials Research Group, Computational Nanoscience and Technology Lab, ABV-Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management Gwalior-474015 (India); Verma, U. P. [School of Studies in Physics, Jiwaji University, Gwalior-474011 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The electronic and transport properties of 8-armchair graphene nanoribbon (8AGNR) with defect at different sites are investigated by performing first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The calculated results show that the 8AGNR are semiconductor. The introduction of 3d transition metals, creates the nondegenerate states in the conduction band, makes 8AGNR metallic. The computed transmission spectrum confirms that AGNR are semiconducting in nature and their band gap remain unchanged and localized states appear when there is vacancy in their structures, and the conductance decreases due to defects compared with the pristine nanoribbon.

  10. Electron transport in argon in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness; Makabe

    2000-09-01

    An investigation of electron transport in argon in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields is carried out over a wide range of values of electric and magnetic field strengths. Values of mean energy, ionization rate, drift velocity, and diffusion tensor are reported here. Two unexpected phenomena arise; for certain values of electric and magnetic field we find regions where the swarm mean energy decreases with increasing electric fields for a fixed magnetic field and regions where swarm mean energy increases with increasing magnetic field for a fixed electric field.

  11. Electronic transport properties of carbon nanotube metal-semiconductor-metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Khoeini

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available  In this work, we study electronic transport properties of a quasi-one dimensional pure semi-conducting Zigzag Carbon Nanotube (CNT attached to semi-infinite clean metallic Zigzag CNT leads, taking into account the influence of topological defect in junctions. This structure may behave like a field effect transistor. The calculations are based on the tight-binding model and Green’s function method, in which the local density of states(LDOS in the metallic section to semi-conducting section, and muli-channel conductance of the system are calculated in the coherent and linear response regime, numerically. Also we have introduced a circuit model for the system and investigated its current. The theoretical results obtained, can be a base, for developments in designing nano-electronic devices.

  12. Electronic structure, transport, and collective effects in molecular layered systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hahn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The great potential of organic heterostructures for organic device applications is exemplified by the targeted engineering of the electronic properties of phthalocyanine-based systems. The transport properties of two different phthalocyanine systems, a pure copper phthalocyanine (CoPc and a flourinated copper phthalocyanine–manganese phthalocyanine (F16CoPc/MnPc heterostructure, are investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF approach. Furthermore, a master-equation-based approach is used to include electronic correlations beyond the mean-field-type approximation of DFT. We describe the essential theoretical tools to obtain the parameters needed for the master equation from DFT results. Finally, an interacting molecular monolayer is considered within a master-equation approach.

  13. Behaviour of fast electron transport in solid targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, M.; Baton, S. D.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Fuchs, J.; Loupias, B.; Guillou, P.; Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Piazza, D.; Kodama, R.; Norimatsu, T.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Rousseaux, C.

    2006-06-01

    One of the main issues of the fast ignitor scheme is the role of fast electron transport in the solid fuel heating. Recent experiments used a new target scheme based on the use of cone to guide the PW laser and enhance the electron production. In this context it is fundamental to understand the physics underlying this new target scheme. We report here recent and preliminary results of ultra-intense laser pulse interaction with three layer targets in presence of the cone or without. Experiments have been performed at LULI with the 100 TW laser facility, at intensities up to 3 1019 W/cm2. Several diagnostics have been implemented (2D Kα imaging, Kα spectroscopy and rear side imaging, protons emission) to quantify the cone effect.

  14. Density-functional method for nonequilibrium electron transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Mozos, J.L.; Ordejon, P.

    2002-01-01

    We describe an ab initio method for calculating the electronic structure, electronic transport, and forces acting on the atoms, for atomic scale systems connected to semi-infinite electrodes and with an applied voltage bias. Our method is based on the density-functional theory (DFT) as implemented...... the contact and the electrodes on the same footing. The effect of the finite bias (including self-consistency and the solution of the electrostatic problem) is taken into account using nonequilibrium Green's functions. We relate the nonequilibrium Green's function expressions to the more transparent scheme...... wires connected to aluminum electrodes with extended or finite cross section, (ii) single atom gold wires, and finally (iii) large carbon nanotube systems with point defects....

  15. Computational aspects of electronic transport in nanoscale devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg

    2008-01-01

    is for the calculation of the block tridiagonal matrix inverse of a block tridiagonal matrix in O(N) operations. This algorithm also leads to an optimal evaluation of the frequently used Caroli transmission formula. A modified wave function matching scheme is then developed which allows for a significant reduction......This thesis is concerned with the modeling of electronic properties of nano-scale devices. In particular the computational aspects of calculating the transmission and current-voltage characteristics of Landauer-Büttiker two-probe systems are in focus. To begin with, the main existing methods...... are described in detail and benchmarked. These are the Green’s function method and the wave function matching method. The methods are subsequently combined in a hybrid scheme in order to benefit from a common formalism. The most time demanding stages of common electronic transport calculations are identified...

  16. Modified Monte Carlo method for study of electron transport in degenerate electron gas in the presence of electron-electron interactions, application to graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Piotr; Thobel, Jean-Luc; Adamowicz, Leszek

    2017-07-01

    Standard computational methods used to take account of the Pauli Exclusion Principle into Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron transport in semiconductors may give unphysical results in low field regime, where obtained electron distribution function takes values exceeding unity. Modified algorithms were already proposed and allow to correctly account for electron scattering on phonons or impurities. Present paper extends this approach and proposes improved simulation scheme allowing including Pauli exclusion principle for electron-electron (e-e) scattering into MC simulations. Simulations with significantly reduced computational cost recreate correct values of the electron distribution function. Proposed algorithm is applied to study transport properties of degenerate electrons in graphene with e-e interactions. This required adapting the treatment of e-e scattering in the case of linear band dispersion relation. Hence, this part of the simulation algorithm is described in details.

  17. Attosecond photoelectron spectroscopy of electron transport in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerl, Elisabeth

    2011-03-31

    Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of condensed matter systems in the attosecond regime promises new insights into excitation mechanisms and transient dynamics of electrons in solids. This timescale became accessible directly only recently with the development of the attosecond streak camera and of laser systems providing few-cycle, phase-controlled laser pulses in the near-infrared, which are used to generate isolated, sub-femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses with a well-defined timing with respect to the near-infrared pulse. Employing these pulses, the attosecond streak camera offers time resolutions as short as a few 10 attoseconds. In the framework of this thesis, a new, versatile experimental apparatus combining attosecond pulse generation in gases with state of the art surface science techniques is designed, constructed, and commissioned. Employing this novel infrastructure and the technique of the attosecond transient recorder, we investigate transport phenomena occurring after photoexcitation of electrons in tungsten and rhenium single crystals and show that attosecond streaking is a unique method for resolving extremely fast electronic phenomena in solids. It is demonstrated that electrons originating from different energy levels, i.e. from the conduction band and the 4f core level, are emitted from the crystal surface at different times. The origin of this time delay, which is below 150 attoseconds for all studied systems, is investigated by a systematic variation of several experimental parameters, in particular the photon energy of the employed attosecond pulses. These experimental studies are complemented by theoretical studies of the group velocity of highly-excited electrons based on ab initio calculations. While the streaking technique applied on single crystals can provide only information about the relative time delay between two types of photoelectrons, the absolute transport time remains inaccessible. We introduce a scheme of a reference

  18. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwal K. Thakur

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The electron diffusion length (Ln is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D structures such as nanowires (NWs and nanotubes (NTs as electron transport layers (ETLs is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs. ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs. This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells.

  19. Plasmonic hot electron transport drives nano-localized chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Emiliano; Xie, Wei; Cambiasso, Javier; Jermyn, Adam S.; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Schlücker, Sebastian; Maier, Stefan A.

    2017-03-01

    Nanoscale localization of electromagnetic fields near metallic nanostructures underpins the fundamentals and applications of plasmonics. The unavoidable energy loss from plasmon decay, initially seen as a detriment, has now expanded the scope of plasmonic applications to exploit the generated hot carriers. However, quantitative understanding of the spatial localization of these hot carriers, akin to electromagnetic near-field maps, has been elusive. Here we spatially map hot-electron-driven reduction chemistry with 15 nm resolution as a function of time and electromagnetic field polarization for different plasmonic nanostructures. We combine experiments employing a six-electron photo-recycling process that modify the terminal group of a self-assembled monolayer on plasmonic silver nanoantennas, with theoretical predictions from first-principles calculations of non-equilibrium hot-carrier transport in these systems. The resulting localization of reactive regions, determined by hot-carrier transport from high-field regions, paves the way for improving efficiency in hot-carrier extraction science and nanoscale regio-selective surface chemistry.

  20. Electron transport in stepped Bi2Se3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S.; Bobisch, C. A.

    2017-08-01

    We analyse the electron transport in a 16 quintuple layer thick stepped Bi2Se3 film grown on Si(1 1 1) by means of scanning tunnelling potentiometry (STP) and multi-point probe measurements. Scanning tunnelling microscopy images reveal that the local structure of the Bi2Se3 film is dominated by terrace steps and domain boundaries. From a microscopic study on the nm scale by STP, we find a mostly linear gradient of the voltage on the Bi2Se3 terraces which is interrupted by voltage drops at the position of the domain boundaries. The voltage drops indicate that the domain boundaries are scatterers for the electron transport. Macroscopic resistance measurements (2PP and in-line 4PP measurement) on the µm scale support the microscopic results. An additional rotational square 4PP measurement shows an electrical anisotropy of the sheet conductance parallel and perpendicular to the Bi2Se3 steps of about 10%. This is a result of the anisotropic step distribution at the stepped Bi2Se3 surface while domain boundaries are distributed isotropically. The determined value of the conductivity of the Bi2Se3 steps of about 1000 S cm-1 verifies the value of an earlier STP study.

  1. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  2. Electron transport in coupled double quantum wells and wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harff, N.E.; Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Due to inter-quantum well tunneling, coupled double quantum wells (DQWs) contain an extra degree of electronic freedom in the growth direction, giving rise to new transport phenomena not found in single electron layers. This report describes work done on coupled DQWs subject to inplane magnetic fields B{sub {parallel}}, and is based on the lead author`s doctoral thesis, successfully defended at Oregon State University on March 4, 1997. First, the conductance of closely coupled DQWs in B{sub {parallel}} is studied. B{sub {parallel}}-induced distortions in the dispersion, the density of states, and the Fermi surface are described both theoretically and experimentally, with particular attention paid to the dispersion anticrossing and resulting partial energy gap. Measurements of giant distortions in the effective mass are found to agree with theoretical calculations. Second, the Landau level spectra of coupled DQWs in tilted magnetic fields is studied. The magnetoresistance oscillations show complex beating as Landau levels from the two Fermi surface components cross the Fermi level. A third set of oscillations resulting from magnetic breakdown is observed. A semiclassical calculation of the Landau level spectra is then performed, and shown to agree exceptionally well with the data. Finally, quantum wires and quantum point contacts formed in DQW structures are investigated. Anticrossings of the one-dimensional DQW dispersion curves are predicted to have interesting transport effects in these devices. Difficulties in sample fabrication have to date prevented experimental verification. However, recently developed techniques to overcome these difficulties are described.

  3. Electronic transport in the multi-terminal graphene nanodevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, En-Jia [Zhejiang Institute of Modern Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Lan, Jin; Sui, Wen-Quan [Zhejiang–California International Nanosystem Institute, Electronic Department, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310029 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 639798 (Singapore); Zhao, Xuean, E-mail: zhaoxa@zju.edu.cn [Zhejiang Institute of Modern Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2012-07-30

    We examined the ac transport attribute of the multi-terminal structures in the absence and presence of magnetic field. We found that the ac response depends on the structural configurations and that the admittance varies with the features of the attached nanoribbons. In the vicinity of Dirac point the dc conductance manifests a dip or peak and the imaginary part (emittance) vanishes or not, depending on whether the attached ribbon is semiconductive or metallic. In the presence of magnetic field, the emittance becomes asymmetric reflecting the dynamic behaviors of electron and hole. -- Highlights: ► Ac transport of multi-terminal graphene nanoribbon structures is studied in the absence and presence of magnetic field. ► The admittances of the devices are related to the configurations of attached ribbons. ► The negative and positive signs of the imaginary part of admittance (emittance) relate to the capacitive and inductive responses of the system. ► In the presence of magnetic field, emittance becomes asymmetric reflecting the dynamic behaviors of electron and hole.

  4. One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ujwal K.; Kisslinger, Ryan; Shankar, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    The electron diffusion length (Ln) is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp) in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D) structures such as nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) as electron transport layers (ETLs) is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs). This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells. PMID:28468280

  5. Physiological Functions of Cyclic Electron Transport Around Photosystem I in Sustaining Photosynthesis and Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-04-29

    The light reactions in photosynthesis drive both linear and cyclic electron transport around photosystem I (PSI). Linear electron transport generates both ATP and NADPH, whereas PSI cyclic electron transport produces ATP without producing NADPH. PSI cyclic electron transport is thought to be essential for balancing the ATP/NADPH production ratio and for protecting both photosystems from damage caused by stromal overreduction. Two distinct pathways of cyclic electron transport have been proposed in angiosperms: a major pathway that depends on the PROTON GRADIENT REGULATION 5 (PGR5) and PGR5-LIKE PHOTOSYNTHETIC PHENOTYPE 1 (PGRL1) proteins, which are the target site of antimycin A, and a minor pathway mediated by the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex. Recently, the regulation of PSI cyclic electron transport has been recognized as essential for photosynthesis and plant growth. In this review, we summarize the possible functions and importance of the two pathways of PSI cyclic electron transport.

  6. Electronic Interactions of n-Doped Perylene Diimide Groups Appended to Polynorbornene Chains: Implications for Electron Transport in Organic Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh T; Biberdorf, Joshua D; Holliday, Bradley J; Jones, Richard A

    2017-11-01

    A polymer consisting of a polynorbornene backbone with perylene diimide (PDI) pendant groups on each monomeric unit is synthesized via ring opening metathesis polymerization. The PDI pendant groups along the polymer backbone, studied by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence emission, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in addition to electrochemical methods, show evidence of molecular aggregation and corresponding electronic coupling with neighboring groups, which forms pathways for efficient electron transport from one group to another in a specific reduced form. When n-doped, the title polymer shows redox conductivity of 5.4 × 10-3 S cm-1 , comparable with crystalline PDI materials, and is therefore a promising material for use in organic electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Effects of metallic contacts on electron transport through graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; Vanevic, Mihajlo; Kindermann, Markus; Chou, Mei-Yin

    2010-03-01

    Despite their undoubted importance in eventual graphene electronics, theoretical studies of the specific features of electron transport through graphene between metal contacts are in their first stages. In order to bridge this gap we perform a first-principles based, non-equilibrium Green's functions study of the conductance through graphene junctions suspended between noncovalent aluminum contacts as a function of the distance L between metal leads and the width W (up to 100 nm) of the junction. Electron-hole asymmetry is obtained as a consequence of doping at the leads. Furthermore, the doping in graphene originated by charge transfer from metals at the leads results in two conductance minima at the energies of the crossing of the linear bands in suspended and clamped graphene, for sufficiently large L. We present a tight-binding model that accounts for the first-principles results and can be employed for larger lengths and widths of the junctions up to experimental accessible values and for arbitrary noncovalent-bonding metal leads.

  8. Lead induced changes in phosphorylation of PSII proteins in low light grown pea plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wioleta, Wasilewska; Anna, Drożak; Ilona, Bacławska; Kamila, Kąkol; Elżbieta, Romanowska

    2015-02-01

    Light-intensity and redox-state induced thylakoid proteins phosphorylation involved in structural changes and in regulation of protein turnover. The presence of heavy metal ions triggers a wide range of cellular responses including changes in plant growth and photosynthesis. Plants have evolved a number of mechanisms to protect photosynthetic apparatus. We have characterized the effect of lead on PSII protein phosphorylation in pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants grown in low light conditions. Pb ions affected only slightly photochemical efficiency of PSII and had no effect on organization of thylakoid complexes. Lead activated strongly phosphorylation of PSII core D1 protein and dephosphorylation of this protein did not proceed in far red light. D1 protein was also not degraded in this conditions. However, phosphorylation of LHCII proteins was not affected by lead. These results indicate that Pb(2+) stimulate the phosphorylation of PSII core proteins and by disturbing the disassembly of supercomplexes play a role in PSII repair mechanism. LHCII phosphorylation could control the distribution of energy between the photosystems in low light conditions. This demonstrates that plants may respond to heavy metals by induction different pathways responsible for protein protection under stress conditions.

  9. Chloroplast movement provides photoprotection to plants by redistributing PSII damage within leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Phillip A; Hangarter, Roger P

    2012-09-01

    Plants use light to fix carbon through the process of photosynthesis but light also causes photoinhibition, by damaging photosystem II (PSII). Plants can usually adjust their rate of PSII repair to equal the rate of damage, but under stress conditions or supersaturating light-intensities damage may exceed the rate of repair. Light-induced chloroplast movements are one of the many mechanisms plants have evolved to minimize photoinhibition. We found that chloroplast movements achieve a measure of photoprotection to PSII by altering the distribution of photoinhibition through depth in leaves. When chloroplasts are in the low-light accumulation arrangement a greater proportion of PSII damage occurs near the illuminated surface than for leaves where the chloroplasts are in the high-light avoidance arrangement. According to our findings chloroplast movements can increase the overall efficiency of leaf photosynthesis in at least two ways. The movements alter light profiles within leaves to maximize photosynthetic output and at the same time redistribute PSII damage throughout the leaf to reduce the amount of inhibition received by individual chloroplasts and prevent a decrease in photosynthetic potential.

  10. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei, E-mail: lwliu2007@sinano.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications-CAS and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Guangtong [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  11. On the application of quantum transport theory to electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kevin L

    2003-01-01

    Electron sources (e.g., field emitter arrays, wide band-gap (WBG) semiconductor materials and coatings, carbon nanotubes, etc.) seek to exploit ballistic transport within the vacuum after emission from microfabricated structures. Regardless of kind, all sources strive to minimize the barrier to electron emission by engineering material properties (work function/electron affinity) or physical geometry (field enhancement) of the cathode. The unique capabilities of cold cathodes, such as instant ON/OFF performance, high brightness, high current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, cold emission, small size and/or low voltage operation characteristics, commend their use in several advanced devices when physical size, weight, power consumption, beam current, and pulse repletion frequency are important, e.g., RF power amplifier such as traveling wave tubes (TWTs) for radar and communications, electrodynamic tethers for satellite deboost/reboost, and electric propulsion systems such as Hall thrusters for small satellites. The theoretical program described herein is directed towards models to evaluate emission current from electron sources (in particular, emission from WBG and Spindt-type field emitter) in order to assess their utility, capabilities and performance characteristics. Modeling efforts particularly include: band bending, non-linear and resonant (Poole-Frenkel) potentials, the extension of one-dimensional theory to multi-dimensional structures, and emission site statistics due to variations in geometry and the presence of adsorbates. Two particular methodologies, namely, the modified Airy approach and metal-semiconductor statistical hyperbolic/ellipsoidal model, are described in detail in their present stage of development.

  12. Anomalous Electron Transport Due to Multiple High Frequency Beam Ion Driven Alfven Eigenmode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Boozer, A.; Delgardo-Aparicio, L.; Fredrickson, E.; Kaye, S.; White, R.

    2010-07-13

    We report on the simulations of recently observed correlations of the core electron transport with the sub-thermal ion cyclotron frequency instabilities in low aspect ratio plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to model the electron transport of the guiding center code ORBIT is employed. A spectrum of test functions of multiple core localized Global shear Alfven Eigenmode (GAE) instabilities based on a previously developed theory and experimental observations is used to examine the electron transport properties. The simulations exhibit thermal electron transport induced by electron drift orbit stochasticity in the presence of multiple core localized GAE.

  13. Respiratory metabolism: glycolysis, the TCA cycle and mitochondrial electron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernie, Alisdair R; Carrari, Fernando; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2004-06-01

    The respiratory pathways of glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the mitochondrial electron transport chain are ubiquitous throughout nature. They are essential for both energy provision in heterotrophic cells and a wide range of other physiological functions. Although the series of enzymes and proteins that participate in these pathways have long been known, their regulation and control are much less well understood. Further complexity arises due to the extensive interaction among these pathways in particular, and also between cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolism in general. These interactions include those between mitochondrial function in the photosynthetic and photorespiratory processes, amino-acid biosynthesis and the regulation of cellular redox. Recently, a wide range of molecular and biochemical strategies have been adopted to elucidate the functional significance of these interactions.

  14. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Electron Transport and Tunneling Resistance between Carbon Nanotube Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Luginsland, J. W.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) has exceptional intrinsic properties in its mechanical strength and stiffness, low density, and electrical and thermal conductivity. However, on a macroscopic level, these outstanding properties, especially the electrical conductivity, remain elusive. The CNT fibers contain a very large number of junctions and contacts. It is therefore important to understand the electron transport through the contact between individual CNTs as well as the contact between CNT and the substrate. Based on a simple transmission line model, we study the tunneling resistance for a parallel contact formed between two closely spaced CNTs. The localized contact resistance along the contact region is modeled by the tunneling resistance, which is calculated from a recent self-consistent model. The results give insights on the macroscopic electrical conductivity of CNT fibers. This work was supported by AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0309.

  16. Electron transport in Bi2Se3 ultra thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bernhart, Alexander M.; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2018-02-01

    We studied the electronic transport properties of a 4 QL thin Bi2Se3 film in the hybridized phase on Si(111) by scanning tunneling potentiometry. When a transverse voltage is applied, the film exhibits a homogeneous electric field on the nm scale. In addition, thermovoltage signals with lateral nm variations are found which result from sample heating by the transverse current. The thermovoltage signals are directly correlated to morphological structures on the surface, i.e. step edges, and indicate a lateral variation of the local density of states at the Bi2Se3 surface. No discernible voltage drops appear at the surface so that the whole film serves as a current carrying medium and scattering at surface defects is less important.

  17. Electronic transport properties of a quinone-based molecular switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ya-Peng; Bian, Bao-An; Yuan, Pei-Pei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we carried out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function to investigate the electronic transport properties of a quinone-based molecule sandwiched between two Au electrodes. The molecular switch can be reversibly switched between the reduced hydroquinone (HQ) and oxidized quinone (Q) states via redox reactions. The switching behavior of two forms is analyzed through their I- V curves, transmission spectra and molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian at zero bias. Then we discuss the transmission spectra of the HQ and Q forms at different bias, and explain the oscillation of current according to the transmission eigenstates of LUMO energy level for Q form. The results suggest that this kind of a quinone-based molecule is usable as one of the good candidates for redox-controlled molecular switches.

  18. Modeling Blazar Spectra by Solving an Electron Transport Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tiffany; Finke, Justin; Becker, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Blazars are luminous active galaxies across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, but the spectral formation mechanisms, especially the particle acceleration, in these sources are not well understood. We develop a new theoretical model for simulating blazar spectra using a self-consistent electron number distribution. Specifically, we solve the particle transport equation considering shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration due to MHD waves, Bohm diffusive particle escape, synchrotron radiation, and Compton radiation, where we implement the full Compton cross-section for seed photons from the accretion disk, the dust torus, and 26 individual broad lines. We used a modified Runge-Kutta method to solve the 2nd order equation, including development of a new mathematical method for normalizing stiff steady-state ordinary differential equations. We show that our self-consistent, transport-based blazar model can qualitatively fit the IR through Fermi g-ray data for 3C 279, with a single-zone, leptonic configuration. We use the solution for the electron distribution to calculate multi-wavelength SED spectra for 3C 279. We calculate the particle and magnetic field energy densities, which suggest that the emitting region is not always in equipartition (a common assumption), but sometimes matter dominated. The stratified broad line region (based on ratios in quasar reverberation mapping, and thus adding no free parameters) improves our estimate of the location of the emitting region, increasing it by ~5x. Our model provides a novel view into the physics at play in blazar jets, especially the relative strength of the shock and stochastic acceleration, where our model is well suited to distinguish between these processes, and we find that the latter tends to dominate.

  19. Electron transport in molecular junctions with graphene as protecting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüser, Falco; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2015-12-01

    We present ab initio transport calculations for molecular junctions that include graphene as a protecting layer between a single molecule and gold electrodes. This vertical setup has recently gained significant interest in experiment for the design of particularly stable and reproducible devices. We observe that the signals from the molecule in the electronic transmission are overlayed by the signatures of the graphene sheet, thus raising the need for a reinterpretation of the transmission. On the other hand, we see that our results are stable with respect to various defects in the graphene. For weakly physiosorbed molecules, no signs of interaction with the graphene are evident, so the transport properties are determined by offresonant tunnelling between the gold leads across an extended structure that includes the molecule itself and the additional graphene layer. Compared with pure gold electrodes, calculated conductances are about one order of magnitude lower due to the increased tunnelling distance. Relative differences upon changing the end group and the length of the molecule on the other hand, are similar.

  20. Electronic transport through nanowires: a real-space finite-difference approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khomyakov, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Nanoelectronics is a fast developing ¯eld. Therefore understanding of the electronic transport at the nanoscale is currently of great interest. This thesis "Electronic transport through nanowires: a real-space ¯nite-difference approach" aims at a general theoretical treatment of coherent electronic

  1. Electronic, Spin and Valley Transport in Two Dimensional Dirac Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hongya

    This dissertation aims to study and understand relevant issues related to the electronic, spin and valley transport in two-dimensional Dirac systems for different given physical settings. In summary, four key findings are achieved. First, studying persistent currents in confined chaotic Dirac fermion systems with a ring geometry and an applied Aharonov-Bohm flux, unusual whispering-gallery modes with edge-dependent currents and spin polarization are identified. They can survive for highly asymmetric rings that host fully developed classical chaos. By sustaining robust persistent currents, these modes can be utilized to form a robust relativistic quantum two-level system. Second, the quantized topological edge states in confined massive Dirac fermion systems exhibiting a remarkable reverse Stark effect in response to an applied electric field, and an electrically or optically controllable spin switching behavior are uncovered. Third, novel wave scattering and transport in Dirac-like pseudospin-1 systems are reported. (a), for small scatterer size, a surprising revival resonant scattering with a peculiar boundary trapping by forming unusual vortices is uncovered. Intriguingly, it can persist in arbitrarily weak scatterer strength regime, which underlies a superscattering behavior beyond the conventional scenario. (b), for larger size, a perfect caustic phenomenon arises as a manifestation of the super-Klein tunneling effect. (c), in the far-field, an unexpected isotropic transport emerges at low energies. Fourth, a geometric valley Hall effect (gVHE) originated from fractional singular Berry flux is revealed. It is shown that gVHE possesses a nonlinear dependence on the Berry flux with asymmetrical resonance features and can be considerably enhanced by electrically controllable resonant valley skew scattering. With the gVHE, efficient valley filtering can arise and these phenomena are robust against thermal fluctuations and disorder averaging.

  2. Oxygen tolerance and coupling of mitochondrial electron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campian, Jian Li; Qian, Mingwei; Gao, Xueshan; Eaton, John W

    2004-11-05

    Oxygen is critical to aerobic metabolism, but excessive oxygen (hyperoxia) causes cell injury and death. An oxygen-tolerant strain of HeLa cells, which proliferates even under 80% O2, termed "HeLa-80," was derived from wild-type HeLa cells ("HeLa-20") by selection for resistance to stepwise increases of oxygen partial pressure. Surprisingly, antioxidant defenses and susceptibility to oxidant-mediated killing do not differ between these two strains of HeLa cells. However, under both 20 and 80% O2, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is significantly (approximately 2-fold) less in HeLa-80 cells. In both cell lines the source of ROS is evidently mitochondrial. Although HeLa-80 cells consume oxygen at the same rate as HeLa-20 cells, they consume less glucose and produce less lactic acid. Most importantly, the oxygen-tolerant HeLa-80 cells have significantly higher cytochrome c oxidase activity (approximately 2-fold), which may act to deplete upstream electron-rich intermediates responsible for ROS generation. Indeed, preferential inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by treatment with n-methyl protoporphyrin (which selectively diminishes synthesis of heme a in cytochrome c oxidase) enhances ROS production and abrogates the oxygen tolerance of the HeLa-80 cells. Thus, it appears that the remarkable oxygen tolerance of these cells derives from tighter coupling of the electron transport chain.

  3. Electron transport through ac driven graphene p-n junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Kang, Yan-Zhuo; Ding, Kai-He

    2018-02-01

    We study the electronic transport through ac driven graphene p-n junctions under a perpendicular magnetic field. It is found that subject to the transversely or longitudinally polarized ac field, in the p-n region, the conductance versus the on-site energy of the right electrode exhibits a characteristic structure with a zero value plateau and the followed oscillation peaks, whose widths are greatly suppressed by the ac field. In the n-n region, the conductance plateaus at G = (n + 1 / 2) (4e2 / h) (n is an integer) shrink for the transversely polarized ac field, whereas accompanied with the addition of the new quantized plateaus at G = n (4e2 / h) for the longitudinally polarized ac field. The combined influence of the ac field with the disorder can trigger a change in the mixing of the hole and electron states at the p-n interface, which leads to a destruction of the plateaus structure in the conductance versus the disorder strength with the emergence of new ones. The influence of the elliptically and circularly polarized ac field on the conductance is also shown.

  4. Spatial transport of electron quantum states with strong attosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovancova, M.; Agueny, H.; Førre, M.; Kocbach, L.; Hansen, J. P.

    2017-11-01

    This work follows up the work of Dimitrovsky, Briggs and co-workers on translated electron atomic states by a strong field of an atto-second laser pulse, also described as creation of atoms without a nucleus. Here, we propose a new approach by analyzing the electron states in the Kramers–Henneberger moving frame in the dipole approximation. The wave function follows the displacement vector α (t). This allows arbitrarily shaped pulses, including the model delta-function potentials in the Dimitrovsky and Briggs approach. In the case of final-length single-cycle pulses, we apply both the Kramers–Henneberger moving frame analysis and a full numerical treatment of our 1D model. When the laser pulse frequency exceeds the frequency associated by the energy difference between initial and final states, the entire wavefunction is translated in space nearly without loss of coherence, to a well defined distance from the original position where the ionized core is left behind. This statement is demonstrated on the excited Rydberg states (n = 10, n = 15), where almost no distortion in the transported wave functions has been observed. However, the ground state (n = 1) is visibly distorted during the removal by pulses of reasonable frequencies, as also predicted by Dimitrovsky and Briggs analysis. Our approach allows us to analyze general pulses as well as the model delta-function potentials on the same footing in the Kramers–Henneberger frame.

  5. Electron transport characteristics of organic molecule encapsulated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Uck; Belosludov, Rodion V; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2011-04-01

    One-dimensional carbon nanotube (CNT) junctions with interesting device characteristics have been designed by encapsulating p- and n-type organic molecules into CNTs with electrophilic tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) and nucleophilic tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene (TDAE) molecules in order to explore the effect of encapsulation of organic molecules and rectifying behaviors of the designed one-dimensional CNT p-n junctions. Our results show that p- and n-type doping of CNTs and their associated charge transfer play an important role in determining the electron transport characteristics and lead to materials with unique properties, p-n junction diode, i.e. Zener-like diode. Furthermore, we show that the operational device characteristics of non-covalently doped CNT junctions originate from the distinct response of intrinsic transmission peaks of pure CNTs according to the type of dopant and the applied bias. We believe that the results give an insight into the design and implementation of various electronic logic functions based on CNTs for applications in the field of nanoelectronics.

  6. Basic concepts of quantum interference and electron transport in single-molecule electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, C J

    2015-02-21

    This tutorial outlines the basic theoretical concepts and tools which underpin the fundamentals of phase-coherent electron transport through single molecules. The key quantity of interest is the transmission coefficient T(E), which yields the electrical conductance, current-voltage relations, the thermopower S and the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of single-molecule devices. Since T(E) is strongly affected by quantum interference (QI), three manifestations of QI in single-molecules are discussed, namely Mach-Zehnder interferometry, Breit-Wigner resonances and Fano resonances. A simple MATLAB code is provided, which allows the novice reader to explore QI in multi-branched structures described by a tight-binding (Hückel) Hamiltonian. More generally, the strengths and limitations of materials-specific transport modelling based on density functional theory are discussed.

  7. Light dependence of quantum yields for PSII charge separation and oxygen evolution in eucaryotic algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flameling, I.A.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum yields of photosystem II (PSII) charge separation (Phi(P)) and oxygen production (Phi(O2)) were determined by simultaneous measurements of oxygen production and variable fluorescence in four different aquatic microalgae representing three different taxonomic groups: the freshwater alga

  8. Oxyradicals and PSII activity in maize leaves in the absence of UV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... oxyradicals invoked higher activity of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and peroxidase under ambient UV, they also imposed limitation on the photosynthetic efficiency of PSII. Exclusion of UV components (UV-B 280–315 nm; UV-A 315–400 nm) translated to enhanced photosynthesis, growth and biomass.

  9. Diamond-like nanocomposites: electronic transport mechanisms and some applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorfman, V.F.; Skotheim, T.A.; Srivatsa, A.R. (Moltech Corporation, Engineering Building, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Bozhko, A.; Khan, I. (Dept. of Physics, Moscow State Univ. (Russia)); Pypkin, B.N. (Moscow Inst. of Controlling Machines, Moscow (Russia)); Borra, R.T.; Zhang, H. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Rodichev, D.; Kirpilenko, G. (Inst. of Physical Problems, Zelenograd (Russia))

    1992-05-15

    A new class of electrically conductive diamond-like nanocomposite (DLN) was synthesized in which the conductivity can be varied over 18 orders of magnitude, from 10{sup 14}-10{sup 16} {Omega} cm to 2-4 x 10{sup -4} {Omega} cm. The electron transport mechanisms of the materials as amorphous dielectric, amorphous metal and in an intermediate state were studied. In the highly conducting state, the DLN structure contains a filamentary (on an atomic scale) random metallic network. A variety of metals, including lithium, silver, copper, aluminum, zinc, magnesium, niobium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, iron, cobalt and nickel can be used to form metallic DLN. Conducting DLN materials can be used as Schottky barriers with semiconductors such as silicon and GaAs. Extremely stable metal-dielectric multilayer structures without interfacial structural boundaries were fabricated. The unique combination of diamond-like chemical and mechanical properties and high electrical conductivity opens the possibility for applications of DLN materials in several areas such as microelectronics and stable anode materials for battery technology. (orig.).

  10. Defect engineering of the electronic transport through cuprous oxide interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, Mohamed M.

    2016-06-03

    The electronic transport through Au–(Cu2O)n–Au junctions is investigated using first-principles calculations and the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. The effect of varying the thickness (i.e., n) is studied as well as that of point defects and anion substitution. For all Cu2O thicknesses the conductance is more enhanced by bulk-like (in contrast to near-interface) defects, with the exception of O vacancies and Cl substitutional defects. A similar transmission behavior results from Cu deficiency and N substitution, as well as from Cl substitution and N interstitials for thick Cu2O junctions. In agreement with recent experimental observations, it is found that N and Cl doping enhances the conductance. A Frenkel defect, i.e., a superposition of an O interstitial and O substitutional defect, leads to a remarkably high conductance. From the analysis of the defect formation energies, Cu vacancies are found to be particularly stable, in agreement with earlier experimental and theoretical work.

  11. Electron transport in reduced graphene oxides in high electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wen-Bin; Lai, Jian-Jhong; Wang, Sheng-Tsung; Tsao, Rui-Wen; Su, Min-Chia; Tsai, Wei-Yu; Rosenstein, Baruch; Zhou, Xufeng; Liu, Zhaoping

    Due to a honeycomb structure, charge carriers in graphene exhibit quasiparticles of linear energy-momentum dispersion and phenomena of Schwinger pair creation may be explored. Because graphene is easily broken in high electric fields, single-layer reduced graphene oxides (rGO) are used instead. The rGO shows a small band gap while it reveals a graphene like behavior in high electric fields. Electron transport in rGO exhibits two-dimensional Mott's variable range hopping. The temperature behavior of resistance in low electric fields and the electric field behavior of resistance at low temperatures are all well explained by the Mott model. At temperatures higher than 200 K, the electric field behavior does not agree with the model while it shows a power law behavior with an exponent of 3/2, being in agreement with the Schwinger model. Comparing with graphene, the rGO is more sustainable to high electric field thus presenting a complete high-electric field behavior. When the rGO is gated away from the charge neutral point, the turn-on electric field of Schwinger phenomena is increased. A summary figure is given to present electric field behaviors and power law variations of resistances of single-layer rGO, graphene, and MoS2.

  12. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each use, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document. 22 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each case, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document.

  14. Overexpressed Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Act Synergistically to Protect the Repair of PSII during Photoinhibition in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Tang, Penporn; Hihara, Yukako; Yumoto, Isao; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2016-09-01

    The repair of PSII under strong light is particularly sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, and these ROS are efficiently scavenged by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. In the present study, we generated transformants of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 that overexpressed an iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803; a highly active catalase (VktA) from Vibrio rumoiensis; and both enzymes together. Then we examined the sensitivity of PSII to photoinhibition in the three strains. In cells that overexpressed either Fe-SOD or VktA, PSII was more tolerant to strong light than it was in wild-type cells. Moreover, in cells that overexpressed both Fe-SOD and VktA, PSII was even more tolerant to strong light. However, the rate of photodamage to PSII, as monitored in the presence of chloramphenicol, was similar in all three transformant strains and in wild-type cells, suggesting that the overexpression of these ROS-scavenging enzymes might not protect PSII from photodamage but might protect the repair of PSII. Under strong light, intracellular levels of ROS fell significantly, and the synthesis de novo of proteins that are required for the repair of PSII, such as the D1 protein, was enhanced. Our observations suggest that overexpressed Fe-SOD and VktA might act synergistically to alleviate the photoinhibition of PSII by reducing intracellular levels of ROS, with resultant protection of the repair of PSII from oxidative inhibition. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Using Adobe Flash Animations of Electron Transport Chain to Teach and Learn Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash…

  16. Diffusive transport of energetic electrons in the solar corona: X-ray and radio diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musset, S.; Kontar, E. P.; Vilmer, N.

    2018-02-01

    Context. Imaging spectroscopy in X-rays with RHESSI provides the possibility to investigate the spatial evolution of X-ray emitting electron distribution and therefore, to study transport effects on energetic electrons during solar flares. Aims: We study the energy dependence of the scattering mean free path of energetic electrons in the solar corona. Methods: We used imaging spectroscopy with RHESSI to study the evolution of energetic electrons distribution in various parts of the magnetic loop during the 2004 May 21 flare. We compared these observations with the radio observations of the gyrosynchrotron radiation of the same flare and with the predictions of a diffusive transport model. Results: X-ray analysis shows a trapping of energetic electrons in the corona and a spectral hardening of the energetic electron distribution between the top of the loop and the footpoints. Coronal trapping of electrons is stronger for radio-emitting electrons than for X-ray-emitting electrons. These observations can be explained by a diffusive transport model. Conclusions: We show that the combination of X-ray and radio diagnostics is a powerful tool to study electron transport in the solar corona in different energy domains. We show that the diffusive transport model can explain our observations, and in the range 25-500 keV, the scattering mean free path of electrons decreases with electron energy. We can estimate for the first time the scattering mean free path dependence on energy in the corona.

  17. Modeling electron transport in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Wesley C.; Drumm, Clifton Russell; Pautz, Shawn D.; Turner, C. David

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the theoretical background on modeling electron transport in the presence of electric and magnetic fields by incorporating the effects of the Lorentz force on electron motion into the Boltzmann transport equation. Electromagnetic fields alter the electron energy and trajectory continuously, and these effects can be characterized mathematically by differential operators in terms of electron energy and direction. Numerical solution techniques, based on the discrete-ordinates and finite-element methods, are developed and implemented in an existing radiation transport code, SCEPTRE.

  18. Electron collision cross sections of CHF3 and electron transport in CHF3 and CHF3-Ar mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satoru; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    A set of electron collision cross sections for trifluoromethane (CHF3) is estimated by the electron swarm method. Electron transport coefficients in CHF3, such as the electron drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionisation coefficient, are calculated from the estimated cross section set by the Monte Carlo method, and the values are compared with the measured data. In the case of the transport coefficients, good agreement is obtained between the calculated and measured values in a wide range of reduced electric fields. Furthermore, the transport coefficients described above and the characteristic energy in CHF3-Ar mixtures are calculated, and the values are found to agree well with the measured data. This confirms the validity of the cross section set for CHF3 estimated here.

  19. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic

  20. Assessing the additive risks of PSII herbicide exposure to the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen E; Schaffelke, Britta; Shaw, Melanie; Bainbridge, Zoë T; Rohde, Ken W; Kennedy, Karen; Davis, Aaron M; Masters, Bronwyn L; Devlin, Michelle J; Mueller, Jochen F; Brodie, Jon E

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide residues have been measured in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon at concentrations which have the potential to harm marine plant communities. Monitoring on the Great Barrier Reef lagoon following wet season discharge show that 80% of the time when herbicides are detected, more than one are present. These herbicides have been shown to act in an additive manner with regards to photosystem-II inhibition. In this study, the area of the Great Barrier Reef considered to be at risk from herbicides is compared when exposures are considered for each herbicide individually and also for herbicide mixtures. Two normalisation indices for herbicide mixtures were calculated based on current guidelines and PSII inhibition thresholds. The results show that the area of risk for most regions is greatly increased under the proposed additive PSII inhibition threshold and that the resilience of this important ecosystem could be reduced by exposure to these herbicides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Induction events and short-term regulation of electron transport in chloroplasts: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic electron transport at different levels of structural and functional organization of photosynthetic apparatus provides efficient performance of oxygenic photosynthesis in plants. This review begins with a brief overview of the chloroplast electron transport chain. Then two noninvasive biophysical methods (measurements of slow induction of chlorophyll a fluorescence and EPR signals of oxidized P700 centers) are exemplified to illustrate the possibility of monitoring induction events in chloroplasts in vivo and in situ. Induction events in chloroplasts are considered and briefly discussed in the context of short-term mechanisms of the following regulatory processes: (i) pH-dependent control of the intersystem electron transport; (ii) the light-induced activation of the Calvin-Benson cycle; (iii) optimization of electron transport due to fitting alternative pathways of electron flow and partitioning light energy between photosystems I and II; and (iv) the light-induced remodeling of photosynthetic apparatus and thylakoid membranes.

  2. Deletion of CGLD1 Impairs PSII and Increases Singlet Oxygen Tolerance of Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiale Xing

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a key model organism for studying photosynthesis and oxidative stress in unicellular eukaryotes. Using a forward genetics approach, we have identified and characterized a mutant x32, which lacks a predicted protein named CGLD1 (Conserved in Green Lineage and Diatom 1 in GreenCut2, under normal and stress conditions. We show that loss of CGLD1 resulted in minimal photoautotrophic growth and PSII activity in the organism. We observed reduced amount of PSII complex and core subunits in the x32 mutant based on blue-native (BN/PAGE and immunoblot analysis. Moreover, x32 exhibited increased sensitivity to high-light stress and altered tolerance to different reactive oxygenic species (ROS stress treatments, i.e., decreased resistance to H2O2/or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH and increased tolerance to neutral red (NR and rose bengal (RB that induce the formation of singlet oxygen, respectively. Further analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR indicated that the increased singlet-oxygen tolerance of x32 was largely correlated with up-regulated gene expression of glutathione-S-transferases (GST. The phenotypical and physiological implications revealed from our experiments highlight the important roles of CGLD1 in maintaining structure and function of PSII as well as in protection of Chlamydomonas under photo-oxidative stress conditions.

  3. Bifunctional electroluminescent and photovoltaic devices using bathocuproine as electron-transporting material and an electron acceptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.L. [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100039 (China); Institute of Functional Material Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, 130024 (China); Li, W.L. [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China)]. E-mail: wllioel@yahoo.com.cn; Li, M.T. [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100039 (China); Chu, B. [Key Laboratory of the Excited States Process, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, 130033 (China)

    2007-01-15

    Electroluminescence (EL) devices, using 4, 4',4''-tris (2-methylphenyl- phenylamino) triphenylamine (m-MTDATA) as hole-transporting material and bathocuproine (BCP) as an electron-transporting material, were fabricated, which emitted bright green light peaked at 520 nm instead of the emission of m-MTDATA or BCP. It was attributed to the exciplex formation and emission at the interface of m-MTDATA and BCP. EL performance was significantly enhanced by a thin mixed layer (5 nm) of m-MTDATA and BCP inserted between the two organic layers of the original m-MTDATA/BCP bilayer device. The trilayer device showed maximum luminance of 1,205 cd/m{sup 2} at 8 V. At a luminance of 100 cd/m{sup 2}, the power efficiency is 1.64 cd/A. Commission International De L'Eclairoge (CIE) color coordinates of the output spectrum of the devices at 8 V are x=0.244 and y=0.464. These devices also showed photovoltaic (PV) properties, which were sensitive to UV light. The PV diode exhibits high open-circuit voltage (V {sub oc}) of 2.10 V under illumination of 365 nm UV light with 2 mW/cm{sup 2}. And the short-circuit current (I {sub sc}) of 92.5x10{sup -6} A/cm{sup 2}, fill factor (FF) of 0.30 and power conversion efficiency ({eta} {sub e}) of 2.91% are respectively achieved. It is considered that strong exciplex emission in an EL device is a good indicator of efficient charge transfer at the organic interface, which is a basic requirement for good PV performance. Both the bilayer and trilayer devices showed EL and PV properties, suggesting their potential use as multifunction devices.

  4. The effect of electron induced hydrogenation of graphene on its electrical transport properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sung Oh [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Teizer, Winfried [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2013-07-22

    We report a deterioration of the electrical transport properties of a graphene field effect transistor due to energetic electron irradiation on a stack of Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) on graphene (PMMA/graphene bilayer). Prior to electron irradiation, we observed that the PMMA layer on graphene does not deteriorate the carrier transport of graphene but improves its electrical properties instead. As a result of the electron irradiation on the PMMA/graphene bilayer, the Raman “D” band appears after removal of PMMA. We argue that the degradation of the transport behavior originates from the binding of hydrogen generated during the PMMA backbone secession process.

  5. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-09-14

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  6. Electron transport in carbon tetrafluoride along a magnetically neutral plane between constant gradient antiparallel magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara, Hirotake; Sakai, Yosuke

    2008-01-01

    Electron motion in CF4 at 0.67 Pa under crossed electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields was simulated by a Monte Carlo method to investigate fundamental properties of electron transport in neutral loop discharge plasmas for dry etching. As a simplified model of the electron path in the plasma, a magnetically neutral plane was assumed between linearly gradient antiparallel B fields, and a uniform E field was applied along the neutral plane perpendicularly to the B fields. The electron behavio...

  7. Modified Monte Carlo method for study of electron transport in degenerate electron gas in the presence of electron–electron interactions, application to graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Piotr, E-mail: pborow@poczta.onet.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Thobel, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.thobel@iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologies, UMR CNRS 8520, Université Lille 1, Avenue Poincaré, CS 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cédex (France); Adamowicz, Leszek, E-mail: adamo@if.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland)

    2017-07-15

    Standard computational methods used to take account of the Pauli Exclusion Principle into Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron transport in semiconductors may give unphysical results in low field regime, where obtained electron distribution function takes values exceeding unity. Modified algorithms were already proposed and allow to correctly account for electron scattering on phonons or impurities. Present paper extends this approach and proposes improved simulation scheme allowing including Pauli exclusion principle for electron–electron (e–e) scattering into MC simulations. Simulations with significantly reduced computational cost recreate correct values of the electron distribution function. Proposed algorithm is applied to study transport properties of degenerate electrons in graphene with e–e interactions. This required adapting the treatment of e–e scattering in the case of linear band dispersion relation. Hence, this part of the simulation algorithm is described in details.

  8. Radial transport of radiation belt electrons due to stormtime Pc5 waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Ukhorskiy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During geomagnetic storms relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt exhibit dynamic variability over multiple orders of magnitude. This requires radial transport of electrons across their drift shells and implies violation of their third adiabatic invariant. Radial transport is induced by the interaction of the electron drift motion with electric and magnetic field fluctuations in the ULF frequency range. It was previously shown that solar-wind driven ULF waves have long azimuthal wave lengths and thus can violate the third invariant of trapped electrons in the process of resonant interaction with their gradient-curvature motion. However, the amplitude of solar-wind driven ULF waves rapidly decreases with decreasing L. It is therefore not clear what mechanisms are responsible for fast transport rates observed inside the geosynchronous orbit. In this paper we investigate wether stormtime Pc5 waves can contribute to this process. Stormtime Pc5s have short azimuthal wave lengths and therefore cannot exhibit resonance with the the electron drift motion. However we show that stormtime Pc5s can cause localized random scattering of electron drift motion that violates the third invariant. According to our results electron interaction with stormtime Pc5s can produce rapid radial transport even as low as L≃4. Numerical simulations show that electron transport can exhibit large deviations from radial diffusion. The diffusion approximation is not valid for individual storms but only applies to the statistically averaged response of the outer belt to stormtime Pc5 waves.

  9. Coupling between electronic transport and longitudinal phonons in suspended nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapmaz, S; Jarillo-Herrero, P; Blanter, Ya M; Zant, H S J van der [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, PO Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands)

    2005-11-15

    Current-voltage characteristics of suspended single-wall carbon nanotube (NT) quantum dots show a series of steps equally spaced in voltage. The energy scale of this harmonic, low-energy excitation spectrum is consistent with that of the longitudinal low-k phonon mode in the NT. Agreement is found with a Franck-Condon-based model in which the phonon-assisted tunnelling process is modelled as a coupling of electronic levels to underdamped quantum harmonic oscillators. Comparison with this model indicates a rather strong electron-phonon coupling factor of order unity. We investigate different electron-phonon coupling mechanisms and give estimates of the coupling factor.

  10. Electron transport system activity of microfouling material: Relationships with biomass parameters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Tulaskar, A.; Wagh, A.B.

    Microfouling material developed on aluminium panels immersed in surface waters of the Dona Paula Bay, Goa India was analysed for biomass (measured as dry weight, organic crabon, protein and chlorophyll @ia@@) and electron transport system actitity...

  11. Color stable white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with red emissive electron transport layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wook Kim, Jin; Yoo, Seung Il; Sung Kang, Jin [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Eun Lee, Song; Kwan Kim, Young [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwa Yu, Hyeong; Turak, Ayse [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Young Kim, Woo, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2015-06-28

    We analyzed the performance of multi-emissive white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) in relation to various red emitting sites of hole and electron transport layers (HTL and ETL). The shift of the recombination zone producing stable white emission in PHOLEDs was utilized as luminance was increased with red emission in its electron transport layer. Multi-emissive white PHOLEDs including the red light emitting electron transport layer yielded maximum external quantum efficiency of 17.4% with CIE color coordinates (−0.030, +0.001) shifting only from 1000 to 10 000 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, we observed a reduction of energy loss in the white PHOLED via Ir(piq){sub 3} as phosphorescent red dopant in electron transport layer.

  12. Electron transport and electrocatalytic properties of MWCNT/nickel nanocomposites: hydrazine and diethylaminoethanethiol as analytical probes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adekunle, AS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the electron transport and electrocatalytic properties of chemically-synthesized nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) platforms. Successful modification...

  13. Ultrafast electron transport across nano gaps in nanowire circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potma, Eric O. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-07-31

    In this Program we aim for a closer look at electron transfer through single molecules. To achieve this, we use ultrafast laser pulses to time stamp an electron tunneling event in a molecule that is connected between two metallic electrodes, while reading out the electron current. A key aspect of this project is the use of metallic substrates with plasmonic activity to efficiently manipulate the tunneling probability. The first Phase of this program is concerned with developing highly sensitive tools for the ultrafast optical manipulation of tethered molecules through the evanescent surface field of plasmonic substrates. The second Phase of the program aims to use these tools for exercising control over the electron tunneling probability.

  14. Nonlinear charge transport in bipolar semiconductors due to electron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Valdovinos, S., E-mail: sergiom@fisica.uaz.edu.mx [Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Académica de Física, Calzada Solidaridad esq. Paseo, La Bufa s/n, CP 98060, Zacatecas, Zac, México (Mexico); Gurevich, Yu.G. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Departamento de Física, Av. IPN 2508, México D.F., CP 07360, México (Mexico)

    2016-05-27

    It is known that when strong electric field is applied to a semiconductor sample, the current voltage characteristic deviates from the linear response. In this letter, we propose a new point of view of nonlinearity in semiconductors which is associated with the electron temperature dependence on the recombination rate. The heating of the charge carriers breaks the balance between generation and recombination, giving rise to nonequilibrium charge carriers concentration and nonlinearity. - Highlights: • A new mechanism of nonlinearity of current-voltage characteristic (CVC) is proposed. • The hot electron temperature violates the equilibrium between electrons and holes. • This violation gives rise to nonequilibrium concentration of electrons and holes. • This leads to nonlinear CVC (along with the heating nonlinearity).

  15. The Role of Electron Transport and Trapping in MOS Total-Dose Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Winokur, P.S.; Riewe, L.C.; Flament, O.; Paillet, P.; Leray, J.L.

    1999-07-19

    Radiation-induced hole and electron transport and trapping are fundamental to MOS total-dose models. Here we separate the effects of electron-hole annihilation and electron trapping on the neutralization of radiation-induced charge during switched-bias irradiation for hard and soft oxides, via combined thermally stimulated current (TSC) and capacitance-voltage measurements. We also show that present total-dose models cannot account for the thermal stability of deeply trapped electrons near the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface, or the inability of electrons in deep or shallow traps to contribute to TSC at positive bias following (1) room-temperature, (2) high-temperature, or (3) switched-bias irradiation. These results require revisions of modeling parameters and boundary conditions for hole and electron transport in SiO{sub 2}. The nature of deep and shallow electron traps in the near-interfacial SiO{sub 2} is discussed.

  16. Theory of Electron Transport in Semiconductors A Pathway from Elementary Physics to Nonequilibrium Green Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Jacoboni, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    This book describes in details the theory of the electron transport in the materials and structures at the basis of modern micro- and nano-electronics. It leads and accompanies the reader, through a step-by-step derivation of all calculations, from the basic laws of classical and quantum physics up to the most modern theoretical techniques, such as nonequilibrium Green functions, to study transport properties of both semiconductor materials and modern low-dimensional and mesoscopic structures.

  17. Spin dependent transport of hot electrons through ultrathin epitaxial metallic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heindl, Emanuel

    2010-06-23

    In this work relaxation and transport of hot electrons in thin single crystalline metallic films is investigated by Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy. The electron mean free paths are determined in an energy interval of 1 to 2 eV above the Fermi level. While fcc Au-films appear to be quite transmissive for hot electrons, the scattering lengths are much shorter for the ferromagnetic alloy FeCo revealing, furthermore, a strong spin asymmetry in hot electron transport. Additional information is gained from temperature dependent studies in combination with golden rule approaches in order to disentangle the impact of several relaxation and transport properties. It is found that bcc Fe-films are much less effective in spin filtering than films made of the FeCo-alloy. (orig.)

  18. Anoxygenic photosynthetic hydrogen production and electron transport in the cyanobacterium oscillatoria limnetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybesma, C; Schowanek, D; Slooten, L; Walravens, N

    1986-01-01

    The induction of anoxygenic photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica by sulfide was shown to involve the synthesis of a "sulfide oxidizing factor"; this factor, partly adsorbed on the thylakoid membrane, can be recovered in the soluble phase and is active also on membranes from oxygenically grown cells. The factor is required for sulfide dependent light-induced hydrogen evolution. It accelerates electron transport from sulfide to the electron donor of photosystem I, P700, in membranes from cells in which anoxygenic photosynthesis is induced. The plastiquinone analogue DBMIB does not inhibit electron transport to P700 but accelerates it. The analogue might promote cyclic electron transport involving P700, thus preventing electrons to reach hydrogenase.

  19. [Electron transport chain in a thermophilic methane-oxidizing culture of Methylococcus thermophilus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, I G; Malashenko, Iu R; Romanovskaia, V A

    1981-01-01

    The electron transport chain was studied in the obligate methane oxidizing culture of Methylococcus thermophilus during the oxidation of methanol (the source of carbon) which is an oxidized derivative of methane as well as during the oxidation of hydroxylamine which is an intermediate in the oxidation of ammonium (the source of nitrogen) by Mc. thermophilus cells. Cytochromes a, b and c are involved in electron transport. Cytochrome cco and cytochrome c554 have been isolated from the cell-free extract of Mc. thermophilus and purified. A scheme for electron transport operating in the oxidation of methanol and hydroxylamine is suggested on the basis of studying the characteristics of these cytochromes. Cytochrome a was shown to be a component of terminal oxidase. Cytochromes b are connected with membranes and also found in the composition of hydroxylamine oxidase. Cytochrome cco and, possibly, terminal oxidase (cytochromes a) are involved, in the oxidation of CH3OH by methanol dehydrogenase, in electron transport; cytochrome c554 as well as cytochrome b and c in the composition of hydroxylamine oxidase participate in electron transport in the oxidation of NH2OH by hydroxylamine oxidase. The characteristics of the electron transport system in Mc. thermophilus are discussed.

  20. Bulk packaging for consumer electronics products as a strategy for eco-efficient transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, R.; Boks, C.B.; Stevels, A.L.N.

    2006-01-01

    By postponing the packing of consumer electronics (CE) products into their final consumer package, until after long-distance transportation, substantial economic savings and environmental improvements can be achieved, due to higher efficiency during transportation. In such a case, long-distance

  1. Bulk packaging for consumer electronics products as a strategy for eco-efficient transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, R.; Boks, C.B.; Stevels, A.L.N.

    By postponing the packing of consumer electronics (CE) products into their final consumer package, until after long-distance transportation, substantial economic savings and environmental improvements can be achieved, due to higher efficiency during transportation. In such a case, long-distance

  2. Electron transport in edge-disordered graphene nanoribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saloriutta, Karri; Hancock, Y.; Karkkainen, Asta

    2011-01-01

    Ab initio methods are used to study the spin-resolved transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) that have both chemical and structural edge disorder. Oxygen edge adsorbates on ideal and protruded ribbons are chosen as representative examples, with the protrusions forming the smallest...

  3. Molecular Electronics: Insight from First-Principles Transport Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsson, Magnus; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Conduction properties of nanoscale contacts can be studied using first-principles simulations. Such calculations give insight into details behind the conductance that is not readily available in experiments. For example, we may learn how the bonding conditions of a molecule to the electrodes affe...... the atomic arrangement and transport channels....

  4. Electronic spin transport in graphene field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popinciuc, M.; Jozsa, C.; Zomer, P. J.; Tombros, N.; Veligura, A.; Jonkman, H. T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    Spin transport experiments in graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms ordered in a honeycomb lattice, indicate spin-relaxation times that are significantly shorter than the theoretical predictions. We investigate experimentally whether these short spin-relaxation times are due to extrinsic factors,

  5. Comparison between s - and d -electron mediated transport in a photoswitching dithienylethene molecule using ab initio transport methods

    KAUST Repository

    Odell, Anders

    2011-10-03

    The influence of the electrode\\'s Fermi surface on the transport properties of a photoswitching molecule is investigated with state-of-the-art ab initio transport methods. We report results for the conducting properties of the two forms of dithienylethene attached either to Ag or to nonmagnetic Ni leads. The I-V curves of the Ag/dithienylethene/Ag device are found to be very similar to those reported previously for Au. In contrast, when Ni is used as the electrode material the zero-bias transmission coefficient is profoundly different as a result of the role played by the Ni d bands in the bonding between the molecule and the electrodes. Intriguingly, despite these differences the overall conducting properties depend little on the electrode material. We thus conclude that electron transport in dithienylethene is, for the cases studied, mainly governed by the intrinsic electronic structure of the molecule. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  6. Transportation Accessibility and Location Choice of Japanese-Funded Electronic Information Manufacturing Firms in Shanghai

    OpenAIRE

    Haining Jiang; Wei Xu; Wenzhong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid development of globalization, information communication and transportation, it is argued that the effect of transportation accessibility in the location choice of manufacturing firms has diminished. However, comprehensive and systematic research on the impact of transportation accessibility on firm location choice in cities remains scarce. Taking Shanghai as the research area, this paper uses a catalog of Japanese-funded electronic information manufacturing firms to explore the...

  7. Treatment of the electrons-photons cascade in the high energy gamma transport; Traitement de la cascade electrons - photons dans le transport des gammas de haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riz, D

    1999-10-01

    The electrons-photons cascade is an important phenomena occurring in gamma transport. This phenomena called also Bremsstrahlung happens whenever electrons, produced in a photon-atom interaction, trigger emission of photons while slowing down in the matter. Some previous calculations have shown that in particular circumstances, a flux of photons going through a lead plate can be multiplied by 3 when Bremsstrahlung is taken into account. This work is dedicated to a new method developed in CEA to take into account Bremsstrahlung in any gamma transport code using multigroup constants. An electron or a positron produced by an incident photon {gamma} will move till it has lost all its energy in collisions or in emissions of Bremsstrahlung {gamma}'. The path of the electron is short so all the Bremsstrahlung {gamma}' are assumed to be produced at the point of creation of the electron or positron. The result of this method is the knowledge of a transfer probability {gamma}{yields}{gamma}' that can be used in classical gamma transport codes. (A.C.)

  8. Role of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain in electrogenic activity of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, John M; Zou, Yongjin; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2011-07-01

    Certain anaerobic bacteria, termed electrogens, produce an electric current when electrons from oxidized organic molecules are deposited to extracellular metal oxide acceptors. In these heterotrophic "metal breathers", the respiratory electron transport chain (R-ETC) works in concert with membrane-bound cytochrome oxidases to transfer electrons to the extracellular acceptors. The diversity of bacteria able to generate an electric current appears more widespread than previously thought, and aerobic phototrophs, including cyanobacteria, possess electrogenic activity. However, unlike heterotrophs, cyanobacteria electrogenic activity is light dependent, which suggests that a novel pathway could exist. To elucidate the electrogenic mechanism of cyanobacteria, the current studies used site-specific inhibitors to target components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain (P-ETC) and cytochrome oxidases. Here, we show that (1) P-ETC and, particularly, water photolysed by photosystem II (PSII) is the source of electrons discharged to the environment by illuminated cyanobacteria, and (2) water-derived electrons are transmitted from PSII to extracellular electron acceptors via plastoquinone and cytochrome bd quinol oxidase. Two cyanobacterial genera (Lyngbya and Nostoc) displayed very similar electrogenic responses when treated with P-ETC site-specific inhibitors, suggesting a conserved electrogenic pathway. We propose that in cyanobacteria, electrogenic activity may represent a form of overflow metabolism to protect cells under high-intensity light. This study offers insight into electron transfer between phototrophic microorganisms and the environment and expands our knowledge into biologically based mechanisms for harnessing solar energy.

  9. Blue emitting 1,8-naphthalimides with electron transport properties for organic light emitting diode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulla, Hidayath; Kiran, M. Raveendra; Garudachari, B.; Ahipa, T. N.; Tarafder, Kartick; Adhikari, Airody Vasudeva; Umesh, G.; Satyanarayan, M. N.

    2017-09-01

    In this article, the synthesis, characterization and use of two novel naphthalimides as electron-transporting emitter materials for organic light emitting diode (OLED) applications are reported. The molecules were obtained by substituting electron donating chloro-phenoxy group at the C-4 position. A detailed optical, thermal, electrochemical and related properties were systematically studied. Furthermore, theoretical calculations (DFT) were performed to get a better understanding of the electronic structures. The synthesized molecules were used as electron transporters and emitters in OLEDs with three different device configurations. The devices with the molecules showed blue emission with efficiencies of 1.89 cdA-1, 0.98 lmW-1, 0.71% at 100 cdm-2. The phosphorescent devices with naphthalimides as electron transport materials displayed better performance in comparison to the device without any electron transporting material and were analogous with the device using standard electron transporting material, Alq3. The results demonstrate that the naphthalimides could play a significant part in the progress of OLEDs.

  10. Merging Structural Information from X-ray Crystallography, Quantum Chemistry, and EXAFS Spectra: The Oxygen-Evolving Complex in PSII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Rossini, Emanuele; Galstyan, Artur; Dau, Holger; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2016-10-12

    of the OEC for the most recent high-resolution crystal structure of PSII are determined. We find that the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) structure is indeed not significantly affected by exposure to XFEL pulses and thus results in a radiation-damage-free model of the OEC.

  11. Properties and Implications of Radial Transport in the Outer Electron Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Millan, R. M.; Kress, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    Earth's outer radiation belt extends above approximately 3.5 Re and is populated by relativistic electrons trapped in the geomagnetic field. Radiation levels across the belt can vary by multiple orders of magnitude on the time scales ranging from minutes to days. One of the basic processes leading to global variability of radiation levels in the belt is radial transport of electrons across their drift shell. The inward radial diffusion followed by "adiabatic" acceleration was the first mechanism put forward to explain creation of the outer belt. This paper reviews the results of recent analysis of basic properties of radial transport and discusses their implications to the global state of the belt. We will focus on stochastic transport which traditionally is referred to as radial diffusion. Stochastic radial transport is driven by interactions of the gradient curvature motion of the electron guiding center with ULF waves. Long-term electron motion can become stochastic due to non-linearity of electron interaction with the waves as well as to the random nature of their solar-wind driver. In spite of the underlying stochasticity the radial diffusion limit is not fully attainable in the outer radiation belt. This is attributed to the fact that phase correlations in electron motion do not have time to decay due to finite size of the system. As a result collective motion of the outer belt electrons can exhibit large deviations from radial diffusion. We will also discuss how the electron belt is affected by drift orbit bifurcations (DOBs). In a day-side compressed geomagnetic field electron orbits around Earth can exhibit bifurcations which violate their second adiabatic invariant and produce complex non-diffusive radial transport. Consequently, the third invariant is undefined for the bifurcating orbits, which means that electron motion can no not be analyzed in terms of adiabatic invariants. Even during quiet solar wind conditions DOBs affect a broad region of the belt

  12. Electronic transport in graphene nanoribbons with sublattice-asymmetric doping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aktor, Thomas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Power, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental findings and theoretical predictions suggest that nitrogen-doped CVD-grown graphene may give rise to electronic band gaps due to impurity distributions which favor segregation on a single sublattice. Here, we demonstrate theoretically that such distributions lead to more complex...... behavior in the presence of edges, where geometry determines whether electrons in the sample view the impurities as a gap-opening average potential or as scatterers. Zigzag edges give rise to the latter case, and remove the electronic band gaps predicted in extended graphene samples.We predict...... that such behavior will give rise to leakage near grain boundaries with a similar geometry or in zigzag-edged etched devices. Furthermore, we examine the formation of one-dimensional metallic channels at interfaces between different sublattice domains, which should be observable experimentally and offer intriguing...

  13. Super-micron-scale atomistic simulation for electronic transport with atomic vibration: Unified approach from quantum to classical transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizeki, Keisuke; Sasaoka, Kenji; Konabe, Satoru; Souma, Satofumi; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2017-07-01

    We develop a powerful simulation method that can treat electronic transport in a super-micron-scale open system with atomic vibration at finite temperature. As an application of the developed method to realistic materials, we simulate electronic transport in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes from nanometer scale to micrometer scale at room temperature. Based on the simulation results, we successfully identify two different crossovers, namely, ballistic to diffusive crossover and coherent to incoherent crossover, simultaneously and with equal footing, from which the mean free path and the phase coherence length can be extracted clearly. Moreover, we clarify the scaling behavior of the electrical resistance and the electronic current in the crossover regime.

  14. New electron multiple scattering distributions for Monte Carlo transport simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, Omar (Haut Commissariat a la Recherche (C.R.S.), 2 Boulevard Franz Fanon, Alger B.P. 1017, Alger-Gare (Algeria)); Patau, Jean Paul (Laboratoire de Biophysique et Biomathematiques, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Universite Paul Sabatier, 35 Chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France))

    1994-10-01

    New forms of electron (positron) multiple scattering distributions are proposed. The first is intended for use in the conditions of validity of the Moliere theory. The second distribution takes place when the electron path is so short that only few elastic collisions occur. These distributions are adjustable formulas. The introduction of some parameters allows impositions of the correct value of the first moment. Only positive and analytic functions were used in constructing the present expressions. This makes sampling procedures easier. Systematic tests are presented and some Monte Carlo simulations, as benchmarks, are carried out. ((orig.))

  15. Power electronics applied to industrial systems and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Patin, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Power electronics is based on the switching operating mode of semiconductor components. On this basis, the concepts of type (voltage or current) and reversibility of interconnected sources make it possible to apply a methodology for the synthesis of various types of converters. This book also focuses on the importance of packaging by reviewing the electrical representation of components’ thermal models and the currently available electronics’ cooling technologies. Modeling is discussed, as well as different technological aspects used in the engineering design of an electronic power converter, useful for obtaining satisfactory performance and reliability.

  16. The role of transition metal interfaces on the electronic transport in lithium–air batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jingzhe; Hummelshøj, Jens S.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Low electronic conduction is expected to be a main limiting factor in the performance of reversible lithium–air, Li–O2, batteries. Here, we apply density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function calculations to determine the electronic transport through lithium peroxide, Li2O2, form...

  17. 76 FR 17470 - Notice of Transportation Services' Transition From Paper to Electronic Fare Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... Electronic Fare Media AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Office of... Transportation within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration is adopting a new program distribution methodology. TRANServe is planning to shift to electronic fare media in particular areas...

  18. Cytochrome C And The Role Of Zinc Ions In Electron Transport In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The inhibition of electron transfer by zinc ions in the electron transport system of the rat liver mitochondria was investigated. There was an increase in the rate at which oxygen was consumed in rat liver mitochondria pre-incubated with cytochrome c. However, the rate of inhibition of oxygen consumption by zinc ions was ...

  19. Spin and charge transport in a gated two dimensional electron gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerescu, Alexandru Ionut

    2007-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is centered around the idea of how one can inject, transport and detect the electron's spin in a two dimensional electron gas (a semiconductor heterostructure). Metal based spintronic devices have been established to be the easy way to implement spintronic concepts

  20. The multiplicity of dehydrogenases in the electron transport chain of plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Geisler, Daniela A; Møller, Ian Max

    2008-01-01

    The electron transport chain in mitochondria of different organisms contains a mixture of common and specialised components. The specialised enzymes form branches to the universal electron path, especially at the level of ubiquinone, and allow the chain to adjust to different cellular and metabol...

  1. Identification of pristine and defective graphene nanoribbons by phonon signatures in the electron transport characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Frederiksen, Thomas; Brandbyge, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by recent experiments where electron transport was measured across graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) suspended between a metal surface and the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope [Koch, Nat. Nanotechnol.7, 713 (2012)], we present detailed first-principles simulations of inelastic electron t...

  2. Coupled electron-phonon transport from molecular dynamics with quantum baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Wang, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    -classical approximation. Both charge and energy transport and their interplay can be studied. We compare the MD results with those of a fully quantum mechanical nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) approach for the electron currents. We find a ballistic to diffusive transition of the electron conduction in one...

  3. Electron transport and spin phenomena in hybrid organic/inorganic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naber, W.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes several experiments in hybrid organic/inorganic systems, in which electron transport and/or spin behavior is studied. The basic concepts of organic electronics and spintronics are given, to understand the described spin-valve experiments. The problems and obstacles for

  4. Exploring coherent transport through π-stacked systems for molecular electronic devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qian; Solomon, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Understanding electron transport across π-stacked systems can help to elucidate the role of intermolecular tunneling in molecular junctions and potentially with the design of high-efficiency molecular devices. Here we show how conjugation length and substituent groups influence the electron...

  5. Inelastic vibrational signals in electron transport across graphene nanoconstrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Stokbro, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations of the inelastic vibrational signals in the electrical current through a graphene nanoconstriction. We find that the inelastic signals are only present when the Fermi-level position is tuned to electron transmission resonances, thus, providing a fingerprint which can link ...

  6. Coexistence of electron and hole transport in graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiedmann, S.; van Elferen, H. J.; Kurganova, E. V.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Giesbers, A. J. M.; Veligura, A.; van Wees, B. J.; Gorbachev, R. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Maan, J. C.; Zeitler, U.

    2011-01-01

    When sweeping the carrier concentration in monolayer graphene through the charge neutrality point, the experimentally measured Hall resistivity shows a smooth zero crossing. Using a two-component model of coexisting electrons and holes around the charge neutrality point, we unambiguously show that

  7. Electron transport in a ferromagnet-superconductor junction on graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Asano, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Yukio; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch

    2008-01-01

    In a usual ferromagnet connected with a superconductor, the exchange potential suppresses the superconducting pairing correlation. We show that this common knowledge does not hold in a ferromagnetsuperconductor junction on a graphene. When the chemical potential of a graphene is close to the conical point of energy dispersion, the exchange potential rather assists the charge transport through a junction interface. The loose-bottomed electric structure causes this unusual effect

  8. Point-contact transport properties of strongly correlated electrons on liquid helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, D G; Kuroda, I; Marrache-Kikuchi, C A; Höfer, M; Leiderer, P; Kono, K

    2011-01-14

    We present transport measurements of a nondegenerate two-dimensional electron system on the surface of liquid helium at a point constriction. The constriction is formed in a microchannel by a split gate beneath the helium surface. The electrostatic energy of the electron system, which depends in part on the electron density, determines the split-gate voltage threshold of current flow through the constriction. Steplike increases in conductance are observed as the confinement strength is reduced. As the Coulomb interaction between electrons is strong, we attribute this effect to the increase in the number of electrons that can pass simultaneously through the constriction. Close to the threshold, single-electron transport is observed.

  9. Real-space calculations for electron transport properties of nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Tomoya; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Egami, Yoshiyuki; Fujimoto, Yoshitaka

    2011-10-05

    Recent developments in the fabrication and investigation of conductors of atomic dimensions have stimulated a large number of experimental and theoretical studies on these nanoscale devices. In this paper, we introduce examples presenting the efficiencies and advantages of a first-principles transport calculation scheme based on the real-space finite-difference (RSFD) formalism and the overbridging boundary-matching (OBM) method. The RSFD method does not suffer from the artificial periodicity problems that arise in methods using plane-wave basis sets or the linear dependence problems that occur in methods using atomic basis sets. Moreover, the algorithm of the RSFD method is suitable for massively parallel computers and, thus, the combination of the RSFD and OBM methods enables us to execute first-principles transport calculations using large models. To demonstrate the advantages of this method, several applications of the transport calculations in various systems ranging from jellium nanowires to the tip and surface system of scanning tunneling microscopy are presented. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  10. The effect of electron transport on the characterization of x-ray free-electron laser pulses via ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Pardini, Tom

    2017-10-01

    The spatial intensity distribution of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses in-focus is commonly characterized by performing ablative imprints in thin gold films on silica substrates. In many cases, the range of the electrons generated in the gold by x-ray absorption far exceeds the beam size, and so, it is not clear if the results of imprint studies are compromised by electron transport. Thermal conduction could further modify the energy density profile in the material. We used a combination of Monte-Carlo transport and continuum models to quantify the accuracy of the imprint method for characterizing XFEL beam profiles. We found that for x-ray energies in the range of 1 to 10 keV, the actual and the measured beam diameters agree within 12% or better for beam diameters between 0.1 and 1 μm.

  11. Transport of fast electrons in lower hybrid current drive plasmas in the HT-7 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z Y [Institute of Plasma Physics, College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Fang, D; Dai, F; Duan, Z Q; Zhu, J X; Sun, W M [Department of Physics, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China); Wan, B N; Shi, Y J, E-mail: chenzy1003@163.com [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefe 230031 (China)

    2011-04-15

    The transport of fast electrons in lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) plasmas in the HT-7 tokamak was investigated in this work. The evolution of fast electron bremsstrahlung emission profiles after switching off the lower hybrid power was analyzed. We found that the dynamics of the fast electrons is governed by the slowing-down process, and the current density profile can be controlled by LHCD in the HT-7 tokamak.

  12. Computation and analysis of the electron transport properties for nitrogen and air inductively-coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minghao; Kihara, Hisashi; Abe, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    A relatively simple method for calculating accurately the third-order electron transport properties of nitrogen and air thermal plasmas is presented. The electron transport properties, such as the electrical conductivity and the electron thermal conductivity, were computed with the best and latest available collision cross-section data in the temperature and pressure ranges of T = 300 - 15000 K and p = 0.01 - 1.0 atm, respectively. The results obtained under the atmospheric pressure condition showed good agreements with the experimental and the high-accuracy theoretical results. The presently-introduced method has good application potential in numerical simulations of nitrogen and air inductively-coupled plasmas.

  13. Tuning the electronic transport properties of graphene through functionalisation with fluorine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubois Marc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We demonstrate the possibility to tune the electronic transport properties of graphene mono-layers and multi-layers by functionalisation with fluorine. For mono-layer samples, with increasing the fluorine content, we observe a transition from electronic transport through Mott variable range hopping (VRH in two dimensions to Efros-Shklovskii VRH. Multi-layer fluorinated graphene with high concentration of fluorine show two-dimensional Mott VRH transport, whereas CF0.28 multi-layer flakes exhibit thermally activated transport through near neighbour hopping. Our experimental findings demonstrate that the ability to control the degree of functionalisation of graphene is instrumental to engineer different electronic properties in graphene materials.

  14. Electron-electron scattering in linear transport in two-dimensional systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Flensberg, Karsten

    1996-01-01

    We describe a method for numerically incorporating electron-electron scattering in quantum wells for small deviations of the distribution function from equilibrium, within the framework of the Boltzmann equation. For a given temperature T and density n, a symmetric matrix needs to be evaluated only...... once, and henceforth it can be used to describe electron-electron scattering in any Boltzmann equation linear-response calculation for that particular T and n. Using this method, we calculate the distribution function and mobility for electrons in a quantum well, including full finite...

  15. Influence of temperature on properties of nitrogen plasma source ion implantation (N-PSII) of Ti6A14V alloy

    CERN Document Server

    Geng Man; Zhao Qing

    2001-01-01

    Specimens of Ti6Al4V alloy were implanted with nitrogen plasma source ion implantation (N-PSII) at temperatures between 100 degree C and 600 degree C to a ion dose of 4 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was used to determine the nitrogen concentration depth profiles. Microhardness measurements and pin-on-disk wear test were performed to evaluate the improvements of the surface modification. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) was employed to determine the phases presented in the surface modified layer. The thickness of implanted layer increased by about an order of magnitude when the temperature was elevated from 100 degree C to 600 degree C. Higher surface hardness and wear resistance was also obtained at higher temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed distinct microstructural changes and the presence of titanium nitrides in the implanted surface

  16. Study on the Electronic Transport Properties of Zigzag GaN Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Enling; Wang Xiqiang; Hou Liping; Zhao Danna; Dai Yuanbin [Sciences School, Xi' an University of Technology, Xi' an, China 710054 (China); Wang Xuewen [Electronic Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi' an, China 710068 (China)

    2011-02-01

    The electronic transport properties of zigzag GaN nanotubes (n, 0) (4 {<=} n {<=} 9) have been calculated using the density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions method. Firstly, the density functional theory (DFT) is used to optimize and calculate the electronic structure of GaNNTs (n, 0) (4{<=}n{<=}9). Secondly, DFT and non-equilibrium Green function (NEGF) method are also used to predict the electronic transport properties of GaNNTs two-probe system. The results showed: there is a corresponding relation between the electronic transport properties and the valley of state density of each GaNNT. In addition, the volt-ampere curve of GaNNT is approximately linear.

  17. Enhanced radial transport and energization of radiation belt electrons due to drift orbit bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Millan, R M; Kress, B T; Smith, D C

    2014-01-01

    [1]Relativistic electron intensities in Earth's outer radiation belt can vary by multiple orders of magnitude on the time scales ranging from minutes to days. One fundamental process contributing to dynamic variability of radiation belt intensities is the radial transport of relativistic electrons across their drift shells. In this paper we analyze the properties of three-dimensional radial transport in a global magnetic field model driven by variations in the solar wind dynamic pressure. We use a test particle approach which captures anomalous effects such as drift orbit bifurcations. We show that the bifurcations lead to an order of magnitude increase in radial transport rates and enhance the energization at large equatorial pitch angles. Even at quiet time fluctuations in dynamic pressure, radial transport at large pitch angles exhibits strong deviations from the diffusion approximation. The radial transport rates are much lower at small pitch angle values which results in a better agreement with the diffusion approximation.

  18. High-speed evaluation of track-structure Monte Carlo electron transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciak, A. S.; Ford, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    There are many instances where Monte Carlo simulation using the track-structure method for electron transport is necessary for the accurate analytical computation and estimation of dose and other tally data. Because of the large electron interaction cross-sections and highly anisotropic scattering behavior, the track-structure method requires an enormous amount of computation time. For microdosimetry, radiation biology and other applications involving small site and tally sizes, low electron energies or high-Z/low-Z material interfaces where the track-structure method is preferred, a computational device called a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is capable of executing track-structure Monte Carlo electron-transport simulations as fast as or faster than a standard computer can complete an identical simulation using the condensed history (CH) technique. In this paper, data from FPGA-based track-structure electron-transport computations are presented for five test cases, from simple slab-style geometries to radiation biology applications involving electrons incident on endosteal bone surface cells. For the most complex test case presented, an FPGA is capable of evaluating track-structure electron-transport problems more than 500 times faster than a standard computer can perform the same track-structure simulation and with comparable accuracy.

  19. High-speed evaluation of track-structure Monte Carlo electron transport simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciak, A S; Ford, J R

    2008-10-07

    There are many instances where Monte Carlo simulation using the track-structure method for electron transport is necessary for the accurate analytical computation and estimation of dose and other tally data. Because of the large electron interaction cross-sections and highly anisotropic scattering behavior, the track-structure method requires an enormous amount of computation time. For microdosimetry, radiation biology and other applications involving small site and tally sizes, low electron energies or high-Z/low-Z material interfaces where the track-structure method is preferred, a computational device called a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is capable of executing track-structure Monte Carlo electron-transport simulations as fast as or faster than a standard computer can complete an identical simulation using the condensed history (CH) technique. In this paper, data from FPGA-based track-structure electron-transport computations are presented for five test cases, from simple slab-style geometries to radiation biology applications involving electrons incident on endosteal bone surface cells. For the most complex test case presented, an FPGA is capable of evaluating track-structure electron-transport problems more than 500 times faster than a standard computer can perform the same track-structure simulation and with comparable accuracy.

  20. Transport properties of local thermodynamic equilibrium hydrogen plasmas including electronically excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, M; Celiberto, R; Gorse, C; Laricchiuta, A; Pagano, D; Traversa, P

    2004-02-01

    A study of the dependence of transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, viscosity, electrical conductivity) of local thermodynamic equilibrium H2 plasmas on the presence of electronically atomic excited states, H(n), is reported. The results show that excited states with their "abnormal" cross sections strongly affect the transport coefficients especially at high pressure. Large relative errors are found when comparing the different quantities with the corresponding values obtained by using ground-state transport cross sections. The accuracy of the present calculation is finally discussed in the light of the selection of transport cross sections and in dependence of the considered number of excited states.

  1. Electronic transport in disordered graphene antidot lattice devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Power, Stephen; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructuring of graphene is in part motivated by the requirement to open a gap in the electronic band structure. In particular, a periodically perforated graphene sheet in the form of an antidot lattice may have such a gap. Such systems have been investigated with a view towards application...... range of finite graphene antidot devices to determine the effect of such disorders on their performance. Modest geometric disorder is seen to have a detrimental effect on devices containing small, tightly packed antidots, which have optimal performance in pristine lattices. Larger antidots display...

  2. Ballistic Electron Quantum Transport in Presence of a Disordered Background

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolov, Valentin V.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of a complicated many-body environment is analyzed on the electron random scattering by a 2D mesoscopic open ballistic structure. A new mechanism of decoherence is proposed. The temperature of the environment is supposed to be zero whereas the energy of the incoming particle $E_{in}$ can be close to or somewhat above the Fermi surface in the environment. The single-particle doorway resonance states excited in the structure via external channels are damped not only because of escape thr...

  3. Computational aspects of electronic transport in nanoscale devices

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg; Hansen, Per Christian; Stokbro, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the modeling of electronic properties of nano-scale devices. In particular the computational aspects of calculating the transmission and current-voltage characteristics of Landauer-Büttiker two-probe systems are in focus. To begin with, the main existing methods are described in detail and benchmarked. These are the Green’s function method and the wave function matching method. The methods are subsequently combined in a hybrid scheme in order to benefit from a co...

  4. Development and application of a 2-electron reduced density matrix approach to electron transport via molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Erik P.; Mazziotti, David A.; Seideman, Tamar

    2017-11-01

    Can an electronic device be constructed using only a single molecule? Since this question was first asked by Aviram and Ratner in the 1970s [Chem. Phys. Lett. 29, 277 (1974)], the field of molecular electronics has exploded with significant experimental advancements in the understanding of the charge transport properties of single molecule devices. Efforts to explain the results of these experiments and identify promising new candidate molecules for molecular devices have led to the development of numerous new theoretical methods including the current standard theoretical approach for studying single molecule charge transport, i.e., the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism (NEGF). By pairing this formalism with density functional theory (DFT), a wide variety of transport problems in molecular junctions have been successfully treated. For some systems though, the conductance and current-voltage curves predicted by common DFT functionals can be several orders of magnitude above experimental results. In addition, since density functional theory relies on approximations to the exact exchange-correlation functional, the predicted transport properties can show significant variation depending on the functional chosen. As a first step to addressing this issue, the authors have replaced density functional theory in the NEGF formalism with a 2-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) method, creating a new approach known as the NEGF-RDM method. 2-RDM methods provide a more accurate description of electron correlation compared to density functional theory, and they have lower computational scaling compared to wavefunction based methods of similar accuracy. Additionally, 2-RDM methods are capable of capturing static electron correlation which is untreatable by existing NEGF-DFT methods. When studying dithiol alkane chains and dithiol benzene in model junctions, the authors found that the NEGF-RDM predicts conductances and currents that are 1-2 orders of magnitude below

  5. Methods of Monte Carlo electron transport in particle-in-cell codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    An algorithm has been implemented in CCUBE and ISIS to treat electron transport in materials using a Monte Carlo method in addition to the electron dynamics determined by the self-consistent electromagnetic, relativistic, particle-in-cell simulation codes that have been used extensively to model generation of electron beams and intense microwave production. Incorporation of a Monte Carlo method to model the transport of electrons in materials (conductors and dielectrics) in a particle-in-cell code represents a giant step toward realistic simulation of the physics of charged-particle beams. The basic Monte Carlo method used in the implementation includes both scattering of electrons by background atoms and energy degradation.

  6. High-performance electronic transport in the plane of 3D type-II Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yanfeng; Wan, Wenhui; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Ying

    2017-10-01

    Recently, the type-II Dirac fermion, a new topological state, has been proposed in the Al3V family. It breaks Lorentz symmetry and has unique physical properties. We use first-principles calculations to investigate electronic transport limited by phonon scattering. The electronic resistivity in the xy plane is estimated to be 24.1 μ Ω \\cdot cm for Al3V and is much lower than that along the z direction. The heavy electronic effective mass along the z direction and the main electron-phonon coupling, originating from the phonon modes vibrating along the z direction, lead to anisotropic electronic transport, which is also found in other members of the Al3V family.

  7. Specific Interaction between Redox Phospholipid Polymers and Plastoquinone in Photosynthetic Electron Transport Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenya; Kaneko, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Masahito; Kato, Souichiro; Ito, Hidehiro; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Kamiya, Kazuhide; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2017-04-19

    Redox phospholipid polymers added in culture media are known to be capable of extracting electrons from living photosynthetic cells across bacterial cell membranes with high cytocompatibility. In the present study, we identify the intracellular redox species that transfers electrons to the polymers. The open-circuit electrochemical potential of an electrolyte containing the redox polymer and extracted thylakoid membranes shift to positive (or negative) under light irradiation, when an electron transport inhibitor specific to plastoquinone is added upstream (or downstream) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain. The same trend is also observed for a medium containing living photosynthetic cells of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. These results clearly indicate that the phospholipid redox polymers extract photosynthetic electrons mainly from plastoquinone. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Theoretical study of electronic transport properties of a graphene-silicene bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdiyorov, G. R. [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Bahlouli, H. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, 31261 Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Saudi Center for Theoretical Physics, 31261 Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Peeters, F. M. [Departement Fysica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2015-06-14

    Electronic transport properties of a graphene-silicene bilayer system are studied using density-functional theory in combination with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. Depending on the energy of the electrons, the transmission can be larger in this system as compared to the sum of the transmissions of separated graphene and silicene monolayers. This effect is related to the increased electron density of states in the bilayer sample. At some energies, the electronic states become localized in one of the layers, resulting in the suppression of the electron transmission. The effect of an applied voltage on the transmission becomes more pronounced in the layered sample as compared to graphene due to the larger variation of the electrostatic potential profile. Our findings will be useful when creating hybrid nanoscale devices where enhanced transport properties will be desirable.

  9. Electronic transport properties of tungsten silicide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T. L.; Malhotra, V.; Mahan, J. E.

    1984-03-01

    Tungsten suicide thin films have been prepared by neutralized ion beam sputtering of the metal onto a polycrystalline silicon layer followed by furnace annealing. The films appear to be essentially sing le-phase disilicide with the possibility of a percent or so carbon and oxygen content. The material behaves as a classical metallic conductor, with a temperature-independent residual resistivity of 16 μΩ-cm and a room temperature intrinsic resistivity of 7 μΩ-cm. Hall effect measurements indicate the material is predominantly a hole conductor, with a room temperature Hall mobility of 30cm2/V-s and an apparent free carrier concentration of 8.9×1021 cm-3. The effective one-carrier mobility derived from geometrical magnetoresistance data, on the other hand, is ≈95 cm2/V-s; this difference, taken together with the effect of temperature on the transport properties, suggests there is mixed conduction.

  10. 'All-Metal' Aromatic Sandwich Molecules: An Electronic Structure and Transport Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bidisa

    2015-01-01

    Electronic structure and transport is theoretically studied for neutral, all-metal aromatic sandwich molecules, Al4MAl4 (M = Cr, Mo) along with Al4 and Al4M (M = Cr, Mo) clusters in two-probe setups with silver and gold electrodes. Detailed electronic structure and transport studies of metallaromatic Al4MAl4 molecules show high electronic conductance [2.5*10(-4) S for Al4CrAl4 and 2.9*10(-4) S for Al4MoAl4] and three conduction channels simultaneously contribute to the total transmission probability. The study of transport properties of the bare Al4 cluster and Al4M cluster also show very high electronic conductance. The neutral Al4 cluster, when connected parallel to the electrodes, four Al atoms couple to the electrode atoms and at least eight electron conduction pathways contribute simultaneously to the conductance whereas for perpendicular connectivity only three conduction channels operate. All the molecules couple strongly to the electrodes by well-defined metal-metal bonds owing to their metallic nature indicating an easier electrode integration process, and the calculated current voltage curves are almost linear till applied voltages of 1 V for Al4MAl4 (M = Cr, Mo). The electronic transport of the clusters studied here resembles the values found for metal atomic chains in break junction studies.

  11. Molecular Engineering of Non-Halogenated Solution-Processable Bithiazole based Electron Transport Polymeric Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Boyi

    2015-04-01

    The electron deficiency and trans planar conformation of bithiazole is potentially beneficial for the electron transport performance of organic semiconductors. However, the incorporation of bithiazole into polymers through a facile synthetic strategy remains a challenge. Herein, 2,2’-bithiazole was synthesized in one step and copolymerized with dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole to afford poly(dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole-bithiazole), PDBTz. PDBTz exhibited electron mobility reaching 0.3 cm2V-1s-1 in organic field-effect transistor (OFET) configuration; this contrasts with a recently discussed isoelectronic conjugated polymer comprising an electron rich bithiophene and dithienyldiketopyrrolopyrrole, which displays merely hole transport characteristics. This inversion of charge carrier transport characteristics confirms the significant potential for bithiazole in the development of electron transport semiconducting materials. Branched 5-decylheptacyl side chains were incorporated into PDBTz to enhance polymer solubility, particularly in non-halogenated, more environmentally compatible solvents. PDBTz cast from a range of non-halogenated solvents exhibited film morphologies and field-effect electron mobility similar to those cast from halogenated solvents.

  12. Two-dimensional electron transport in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan Renbing [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China); Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu Wen, E-mail: wenxu_issp@yahoo.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhou Yu; Zhang Xiaoyu [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China); Qin Hua, E-mail: hqin2007@sinano.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2012-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of electron transport properties of two-dimensional electron gas in AlGaN/GaN heterostructures. By assuming a drifted Fermi-Dirac distribution and taking into account all major scattering mechanisms, including polar optical and acoustic phonons, background impurities, dislocation and interface roughness, the momentum- and energy-balance equations derived from Boltzmann equation are solved self-consistently. The dependence of the electron drift velocity and electron temperature as a function of the applied electric field are obtained and discussed.

  13. Manipulation of electron transport in graphene by nanopatterned electrostatic potential on an electret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Rui; Wang, Shengnan; Zhang, Dongdong; Jiang, Xingbin; Cheng, Zhihai; Qiu, Xiaohui

    2018-01-01

    The electron transport characteristics of graphene can be finely tuned using local electrostatic fields. Here, we use a scanning probe technique to construct a statically charged electret gate that enables in-situ fabrication of graphene devices with precisely designed potential landscapes, including p-type and n-type unipolar graphene transistors and p-n junctions. Electron dynamic simulation suggests that electron beam collimation and focusing in graphene can be achieved via periodic charge lines and concentric charge circles. This approach to spatially manipulating carrier density distribution may offer an efficient way to investigate the novel electronic properties of graphene and other low-dimensional materials.

  14. Magnetic shear effect on confinement and electron heat transport in dominant electron heating experiments in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, G.T.; Saoutic, B.; Guiziou, L.; Basiuk, V.; Becoulet, A.; Clairet, F.; Colas, L.; Devynck, P.; Gil, C.; Joffrin, E.; Litaudon, X.; Segui, J.L.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Zou, X.L. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Budny, R.V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, New Jersey (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Various steady-state non-inductive plasmas, with strong electron heating and significant modification of the current density profile, have been routinely obtained on Tore Supra in either Lower Hybrid Current Drive or Fast Ware Heating experiments. In those dominant electron heating discharges, the dependence of electron heat diffusivity({chi}{sub e}) on the electron temperature gradient, the magnetic shear (s) and the safety factor (q) has been investigated. The increase of {chi}{sub e} with {nabla}T{sub e} indicates the existence of a critical temperature gradient. Moreover, the current density profile effect on the global confinement and the local transport is clearly observed. The electron heat flux (q{sub e}) is found to be roughly proportional to q{sup 2}. The effect of magnetic shear on {chi}{sub e} is studied in the improved confinement discharges obtained by modifying of the current profile. {chi}{sub e} decreases when the magnetic shear increases in the confinement zone and/or when it vanishes in the plasma center. When s becomes negative a decrease in {chi}{sub e} by two orders of magnitude is observed. The effect of the current profile is also observed in the saturated ohmic regime. Comparisons between experimental {chi}{sub e} and well known local transport models (Taroni, and Rebut - Lallia -Watkins) are reported. (authors). 31 refs.

  15. Radial transport of radiation belt electrons due to stormtime Pc5 waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Ukhorskiy

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During geomagnetic storms relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt exhibit dynamic variability over multiple orders of magnitude. This requires radial transport of electrons across their drift shells and implies violation of their third adiabatic invariant. Radial transport is induced by the interaction of the electron drift motion with electric and magnetic field fluctuations in the ULF frequency range. It was previously shown that solar-wind driven ULF waves have long azimuthal wave lengths and thus can violate the third invariant of trapped electrons in the process of resonant interaction with their gradient-curvature motion. However, the amplitude of solar-wind driven ULF waves rapidly decreases with decreasing L. It is therefore not clear what mechanisms are responsible for fast transport rates observed inside the geosynchronous orbit. In this paper we investigate wether stormtime Pc5 waves can contribute to this process. Stormtime Pc5s have short azimuthal wave lengths and therefore cannot exhibit resonance with the the electron drift motion. However we show that stormtime Pc5s can cause localized random scattering of electron drift motion that violates the third invariant. According to our results electron interaction with stormtime Pc5s can produce rapid radial transport even as low as L≃4. Numerical simulations show that electron transport can exhibit large deviations from radial diffusion. The diffusion approximation is not valid for individual storms but only applies to the statistically averaged response of the outer belt to stormtime Pc5 waves.

  16. Theoretical study of electron transport throughout some molecular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohammed A. A.; Hanoon, Falah H.; Al-Badry, Lafy F.

    2017-11-01

    The present work is a theoretical study of the electronic properties of some molecular structures. The system that takes into account in the study is left lead-donor-molecule-acceptor-right lead. The molecule, such as (phenyl, biphenyl, triphenyl, naphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene), is threaded by magnetic flux. This work contains two parts. First is computing density of states of the molecular structures as a closed system by density functional theory (DFT). Second is calculating the transmission probability and electric current of such molecular structures as an open system by steady-state theoretical model. Furthermore, the most important effects, taking into consideration are quantum interference, magnetic flux, and interface structure. Our results show that the connection of the molecule to the two leads, the number of rings, the magnetic flux, and the geometrical structure of the molecule play an important role in determining the energy gap of molecular structures.

  17. Opto-electronic and quantum transport properties of semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabathil, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a novel and efficient method for the calculation of the ballistic transport properties of open semiconductor nanostructures connected to external reservoirs is presented. It is based on the Green's function formalism and reduces the effort to obtain the transmission and the carrier density to a single solution of a hermitian eigenvalue problem with dimensions proportional to the size of the decoupled device and the multiple inversion of a small matrix with dimensions proportional to the size of the contacts to the leads. Using this method, the 4-band GaAs hole transport through a 2-dimensional three-terminal T-junction device, and the resonant tunneling current through a 3-dimensional InAs quantum dot molecule embedded into an InP heterostructure have been calculated. The further extension of the method into a charge self-consistent scheme enables the efficient prediction of the IV-characteristics of highly doped nanoscale field effect transistors in the ballistic regime, including the influence of quasi bound states and the exchange-correlation interaction. Buettiker probes are used to emulate the effect of inelastic scattering on the current for simple 1D devices, systematically analyzing the dependence of the density of states and the resulting self-consistent potential on the scattering strength. The second major topic of this work is the modeling of the optical response of quantum confined neutral and charged excitons in single and coupled self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots. For this purpose the existing device simulator nextnano{sup 3} has been extended to incorporate particle-particle interactions within the means of density functional theory in local density approximation. In this way the exciton transition energies for neutral and charged excitons as a function of an externally applied electric field have been calculated, revealing a systematic reduction of the intrinsic dipole with the addition of extra holes to the exciton, a finding

  18. Physiological Evidence for Isopotential Tunneling in the Electron Transport Chain of Methane-Producing Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duszenko, Nikolas; Buan, Nicole R

    2017-09-15

    Many, but not all, organisms use quinones to conserve energy in their electron transport chains. Fermentative bacteria and methane-producing archaea (methanogens) do not produce quinones but have devised other ways to generate ATP. Methanophenazine (MPh) is a unique membrane electron carrier found in Methanosarcina species that plays the same role as quinones in the electron transport chain. To extend the analogy between quinones and MPh, we compared the MPh pool sizes between two well-studied Methanosarcina species, Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A and Methanosarcina barkeri Fusaro, to the quinone pool size in the bacterium Escherichia coli We found the quantity of MPh per cell increases as cultures transition from exponential growth to stationary phase, and absolute quantities of MPh were 3-fold higher in M. acetivorans than in M. barkeri The concentration of MPh suggests the cell membrane of M. acetivorans , but not of M. barkeri , is electrically quantized as if it were a single conductive metal sheet and near optimal for rate of electron transport. Similarly, stationary (but not exponentially growing) E. coli cells also have electrically quantized membranes on the basis of quinone content. Consistent with our hypothesis, we demonstrated that the exogenous addition of phenazine increases the growth rate of M. barkeri three times that of M. acetivorans Our work suggests electron flux through MPh is naturally higher in M. acetivorans than in M. barkeri and that hydrogen cycling is less efficient at conserving energy than scalar proton translocation using MPh. IMPORTANCE Can we grow more from less? The ability to optimize and manipulate metabolic efficiency in cells is the difference between commercially viable and nonviable renewable technologies. Much can be learned from methane-producing archaea (methanogens) which evolved a successful metabolic lifestyle under extreme thermodynamic constraints. Methanogens use highly efficient electron transport systems and

  19. Electron transport in InAs nanowires and heterostructure nanowire devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelander, C.; Björk, M. T.; Larsson, M. W.; Hansen, A. E.; Wallenberg, L. R.; Samuelson, L.

    2004-09-01

    Nanowires in the InAs/InP material system are grown with catalyst-assisted chemical beam epitaxy. Ohmic contacts are then fabricated to selected wires, allowing electron transport measurements to be carried out at room-temperature as well as at low T. InAs nanowires show strong quantum confinement effects, where thin wires (Heterostructure barriers of InP are also incorporated into InAs wires to produce resonant tunneling diodes and single-electron transistors (SETs) with different dot lengths. Wires containing dots with a length of 100 nm function as ideal SETs, whereas the transport in wires with 15 nm long dots is strongly governed by quantum confinement and resonant tunneling. For the smaller dots it is possible to observe electron transport through excited states.

  20. Effect of quasihelical symmetry on trapped-electron mode transport in the HSX stellarator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttenfelder, W; Lore, J; Anderson, D T; Anderson, F S B; Canik, J M; Dorland, W; Likin, K M; Talmadge, J N

    2008-11-21

    This Letter presents theory-based predictions of anomalous electron thermal transport in the Helically Symmetric eXperiment stellarator, using an axisymmetric trapped-electron mode drift wave model. The model relies on modifications to a tokamak geometry that approximate the quasihelical symmetry in the Helically Symmetric eXperiment (particle trapping and local curvature) and is supported by linear 3D gyrokinetic calculations. Transport simulations predict temperature profiles that agree with experimental profiles outside a normalized minor radius of rho>0.3 and energy confinement times that agree within 10% of measurements. The simulations can reproduce the large measured electron temperatures inside rho<0.3 if an approximation for turbulent transport suppression due to shear in the radial electric field is included.

  1. Microbial electron transport and energy conservation – the foundation for optimizing bioelectrochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke eKracke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial electrochemical techniques describe a variety of emerging technologies that use electrode-bacteria-interactions for biotechnology applications including the production of electricity, waste and wastewater treatment, bioremediation and production of valuable products. Central in each application is the ability of the microbial catalyst to interact with external electron acceptors and/or donors and its metabolic properties that enable the combination of electron transport and carbon metabolism. And here also lies the key challenge. A wide range of microbes has been discovered to be able to exchange electrons with solid surfaces or mediators but only a few have been studied in depth. Especially electron transfer mechanisms from cathodes towards the microbial organism are poorly understood but are essential for many applications such as microbial electrosynthesis. We analyse the different electron transport chains that nature offers for organisms such as metal respiring bacteria and acetogens, but also standard biotechnological organisms currently used in bio-production. Special focus lies on the essential connection of redox and energy metabolism, which is often ignored when studying bio-electrochemical systems. The possibility of extracellular electron exchange at different points in each organism is discussed regarding required redox potentials and effect on cellular redox and energy levels. Key compounds such as electron carriers (e.g. cytochromes, ferredoxin, quinones, flavins are identified and analysed regarding their possible role in electrode-microbe-interactions. This work summarizes our current knowledge on electron transport processes and uses a theoretical approach to predict the impact of different modes of transfer on the energy metabolism. As such it adds an important piece of fundamental understanding of microbial electron transport possibilities to the research community and will help to optimize and advance bio

  2. Microbial electron transport and energy conservation – the foundation for optimizing bioelectrochemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracke, Frauke; Vassilev, Igor; Krömer, Jens O.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrochemical techniques describe a variety of emerging technologies that use electrode–bacteria interactions for biotechnology applications including the production of electricity, waste and wastewater treatment, bioremediation and the production of valuable products. Central in each application is the ability of the microbial catalyst to interact with external electron acceptors and/or donors and its metabolic properties that enable the combination of electron transport and carbon metabolism. And here also lies the key challenge. A wide range of microbes has been discovered to be able to exchange electrons with solid surfaces or mediators but only a few have been studied in depth. Especially electron transfer mechanisms from cathodes towards the microbial organism are poorly understood but are essential for many applications such as microbial electrosynthesis. We analyze the different electron transport chains that nature offers for organisms such as metal respiring bacteria and acetogens, but also standard biotechnological organisms currently used in bio-production. Special focus lies on the essential connection of redox and energy metabolism, which is often ignored when studying bioelectrochemical systems. The possibility of extracellular electron exchange at different points in each organism is discussed regarding required redox potentials and effect on cellular redox and energy levels. Key compounds such as electron carriers (e.g., cytochromes, ferredoxin, quinones, flavins) are identified and analyzed regarding their possible role in electrode–microbe interactions. This work summarizes our current knowledge on electron transport processes and uses a theoretical approach to predict the impact of different modes of transfer on the energy metabolism. As such it adds an important piece of fundamental understanding of microbial electron transport possibilities to the research community and will help to optimize and advance bioelectrochemical

  3. Surface electronic transport measurements: A micro multi-point probe approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreto, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    This work is mostly focused on the study of electronic transport properties of two-dimensional materials, in particular graphene and topological insulators. To study these, we have improved a unique micro multi-point probe instrument used to perform transport measurements. Not only the experimental...... setup, but the terminology used and data analysis were also ameliorated in order to simplify the interpretation of the results. We used the mentioned technique in the following projects: • The electronic transport dimensionality of epitaxial grahene grown on SiC is detected and important physical...... quantities are extracted, such as conductivity, carrier density and carrier mobility. • A method to insulate electrically epitaxial graphene grown on metals, based on a stepwise intercalation methodology, is developed and transport measurements are performed in order to test the insulation. • We show...

  4. Physics Design Considerations for Diagnostic X Electron Beam Transport System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y-J

    2000-04-10

    The Diagnostic X (D-X) beamlines will transport the DARHT-II beam from the end of the accelerator to the Diagnostic X firing point providing four lines of sight for x-ray radiography. The design goal for the Diagnostic X beamline is to deliver four x-ray pulses with the DARHT-II dose format and time integrated spot size on each line of sight. The D-X beamline's final focus should be compatible with a range of first conjugates from 1 m-5 m. Furthermore, the D-X beamline operational parameters and the beamline layout should not preclude a possible upgrade to additional lines of sight. The DARHT-II accelerator is designed to deliver beams at a rate of 1 pulse per minute or less. Tuning the D-X beamline with several hundred optical elements would be time consuming. Therefore, minimizing the required number of tuning shots for the D-X beamline is also an important design goal. Many different beamline configurations may be able to accomplish these design objectives, and high beam quality (i.e., high current and low emittance) must be maintained throughout the chosen beamline configuration in order to achieve the DARHT-II x-ray dose format. In general, the longer the distance a beam travels, the harder it is to preserve the beam quality. Therefore, from the point of view of maintaining beam quality, it is highly desirable to minimize the beamline length. Lastly, modification to the DARHT-II building and the downstream transport should be minimized. Several processes can degrade beam quality by increasing the beam emittance, increasing the time-varying transverse beam motion, creating a beam halo, or creating a time-varying beam envelope. In this report, we consider those processes in the passive magnet lattice beamline and indicate how they constrain the beamline design. The physics design considerations for the active components such as the kicker system will be discussed in Ref. 2. In Sec. I, we discuss how beam emittance affects the x-ray forward dose. We also

  5. Electron heat transport in EAST steady-state H-mode discharges with a weak electron internal transport barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, H.; Ding, S.; Chen, J.; Wang, Y.; Lian, H.; Liu, H.; Zang, Q.; Lyu, B.; Duan, Y.; Xu, G.; Qian, J.; Gong, X.

    2017-10-01

    The global confinement (H98) increases with the internal inductance (1.0 1.2) in the recent steady-state H-mode discharges, which exhibit a weak electron ITB started at ρ = 0.4 in EAST. After turning off ECRH, the stored energy decreases by 30% in 2.5 s. Calculations suggest that both the lower hybrid electron heating and driven current move from the core to large radii after turning off ECRH. Power balance analysis show that the LH deposition profile shift from just inside the ITB to outside the ITB after ECRH termination appears to be responsible for the marked drop in stored energy. The slow stored energy decrease is believed to be connected to the long plasma current profile relaxation time. Linear gyrokinetic simulations indicate increasing low-k instability growth rate from small to large radii, which is consistent with the reduced diffusivity within the ITB. The calculations also show that the CTEM dominate within the ITB, ETG modes grow rapidly outside this region, and that ITG modes dominate near the pedestal top. Work supported by the NNSF of China #11575248.

  6. Single-electron transport in graphene-like nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Kuei-Lin, E-mail: klc43@mit.edu [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Xu, Yang, E-mail: yangxu-isee@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, College of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, Zhejiang University, 310027 (China)

    2017-01-31

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials for their versatile band structures and strictly 2D nature have attracted considerable attention over the past decade. Graphene is a robust material for spintronics owing to its weak spin–orbit and hyperfine interactions, while monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) possess a Zeeman effect-like band splitting in which the spin and valley degrees of freedom are nondegenerate. The surface states of topological insulators (TIs) exhibit a spin–momentum locking that opens up the possibility of controlling the spin degree of freedom in the absence of an external magnetic field. Nanostructures made of these materials are also viable for use in quantum computing applications involving the superposition and entanglement of individual charge and spin quanta. In this article, we review a selection of transport studies addressing the confinement and manipulation of charges in nanostructures fabricated from various 2D materials. We supply the entry-level knowledge for this field by first introducing the fundamental properties of 2D bulk materials followed by the theoretical background relevant to the physics of nanostructures. Subsequently, a historical review of experimental development in this field is presented, from the early demonstration of graphene nanodevices on SiO{sub 2} substrate to more recent progress in utilizing hexagonal boron nitride to reduce substrate disorder. In the second part of this article, we extend our discussion to TMDs and TI nanostructures. We aim to outline the current challenges and suggest how future work will be geared towards developing spin qubits in 2D materials.

  7. Single-electron transport in graphene-like nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Kuei-Lin; Xu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials for their versatile band structures and strictly 2D nature have attracted considerable attention over the past decade. Graphene is a robust material for spintronics owing to its weak spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions, while monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) possess a Zeeman effect-like band splitting in which the spin and valley degrees of freedom are nondegenerate. The surface states of topological insulators (TIs) exhibit a spin-momentum locking that opens up the possibility of controlling the spin degree of freedom in the absence of an external magnetic field. Nanostructures made of these materials are also viable for use in quantum computing applications involving the superposition and entanglement of individual charge and spin quanta. In this article, we review a selection of transport studies addressing the confinement and manipulation of charges in nanostructures fabricated from various 2D materials. We supply the entry-level knowledge for this field by first introducing the fundamental properties of 2D bulk materials followed by the theoretical background relevant to the physics of nanostructures. Subsequently, a historical review of experimental development in this field is presented, from the early demonstration of graphene nanodevices on SiO2 substrate to more recent progress in utilizing hexagonal boron nitride to reduce substrate disorder. In the second part of this article, we extend our discussion to TMDs and TI nanostructures. We aim to outline the current challenges and suggest how future work will be geared towards developing spin qubits in 2D materials.

  8. Electron transport in a one dimensional conductor with inelastic scattering by self-consistent reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Dibyendu; Dhar, Abhishek

    2006-01-01

    We present an extension of the work of D'Amato and Pastawski on electron transport in a one-dimensional conductor modeled by the tight binding lattice Hamiltonian and in which inelastic scattering is incorporated by connecting each site of the lattice to one-dimensional leads. This model incorporates B\\"uttiker's original idea of dephasing probes. Here we consider finite temperatures and study both electrical and heat transport across a chain with applied chemical potential and temperature gr...

  9. Quantum electronic transport of topological surface states in beta-Ag2Se nanowire

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jihwan; Hwang, Ahreum; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Sunghun; Park, Yun Chang; Kim, Si-in; Kim, Hong-Seok; Doh, Yong-Joo; Kim, Jinhee; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystalline \\beta-Ag2Se nanostructures, a new class of 3D topological insulators (TIs), were synthesized using the chemical vapor transport method. The topological surface states were verified by measuring electronic transport properties including the weak antilocalization effect, Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, and Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. First-principles band calculations revealed that the band inversion in \\b{eta}-Ag2Se is caused by strong spin-orbit coupling and Ag-Se bonding h...

  10. Electron uptake and delivery sites on plastocyanin in its reactions with the photosynthetic electron transport system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Shahak, Y; Pecht, I

    1982-01-01

    French bean plastocyanin is stoichiometrically and specifically labeled upon reduction by Cr(II)aq ions, yielding a substitution-inert (Cr(III) adduct at the protein surface. The effect of the modification on the activity of plastocyanin in electron transfer between photosystems II and I has been...... and Cr-labeled plastocyanin were indistinguishable, the rates of photooxidation of the modified protein were markedly attenuated relative to those of the native one. This difference in reactivity clearly reflects the perturbation of the electron transfer pathway to P700. These findings, in conjunction...... with the structure of plastocyanin and the locus of CR(III) binding on its surface, lead to the following interpretation: (a) There are most probably two physiologically significant, electron transfer sites on plastocyanin. (b) The site involved in the electron transfer to P700 is most likely in the region...

  11. "Sticky electrons" transport and interfacial transfer of electrons in the dye-sensitized solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Laurence

    2009-11-17

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs, also known as Gratzel cells) mimic the photosynthetic process by using a sensitizer dye to harvest light energy to generate electrical power. Several functional features of these photochemical devices are unusual, and DSC research offers a rewarding arena in which to test new ideas, new materials, and new methodologies. Indeed, one of the most attractive chemical features of the DSC is that the basic concept can be used to construct a range of devices, replacing individual components with alternative materials. Despite two decades of increasing research activity, however, many aspects of the behavior of electrons in the DSC remain puzzling. In this Account, we highlight current understanding of the processes involved in the functioning of the DSC, with particular emphasis on what happens to the electrons in the mesoporous film following the injection step. The collection of photoinjected electrons appears to involve a random walk process in which electrons move through the network of interconnected titanium dioxide nanoparticles while undergoing frequent trapping and detrapping. During their passage to the cell contact, electrons may be lost by transfer to tri-iodide species in the redox electrolyte that permeates the mesoporous film. Competition between electron collection and back electron transfer determines the performance of a DSC: ideally, all injected electrons should be collected without loss. This Account then goes on to survey recent experimental and theoretical progress in the field, placing particular emphasis on issues that need to be resolved before we can gain a clear picture of how the DSC works. Several important questions about the behavior of "sticky" electrons, those that undergo multiple trapping and detrapping, in the DSC remain unanswered. The most fundamental of these concerns is the nature of the electron traps that appear to dominate the time-dependent photocurrent and photovoltage response of DSCs. The

  12. Solar UV-B effects on PSII performance in Betula nana are influenced by PAR level and reduced by EDU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    2012-01-01

    The long-term and diurnal responses of photosystem II (PSII) performance to near-ambient UV-B radiation were investigated in High Arctic Betula nana. We conducted an UV exclusion experiment with five replicated blocks consisting of open control (no filter), photosynthetic active radiation and UV...... the effects of UV-B. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction curves were used for analysis of OJIP test parameters. Near-ambient UV-B radiation reduced across season maximum quantum yield (TRo /ABS = Fv /Fm ), approximated number of active PSII reaction center (RC/ABS) and the performance index (PIABS ), despite...... in reduced UV-B compared to near-ambient UV-B. This demonstrates current solar UV-B to reduce the PSII performance both on a daily as well as a seasonal basis in this High Arctic species....

  13. Antagonism between elevated CO2, nighttime warming, and summer drought reduces the robustness of PSII performance to freezing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Boesgaard, Kristine Stove; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    2013-01-01

    out in the CLIMAITE multifactor experiment, which includes the combined impact of elevated CO2 (free air carbon enrichment; CO2), warming (passive nighttime warming; T) and summer drought (rain-excluding curtains; D) in a temperate heath ecosystem. PSII performance was probed by the effective quantum...... in the wavy hair-grass, Deschampsia flexuosa, and in the evergreen dwarf shrub common heather, Calluna vulgaris, and following freezing events the PItotal and Fv′/Fm′ were reduced even more. Contrary to expected, indirect effects of the previous summer drought reduced PSII performance before freezing events......, particularly in Calluna. In combinations with elevated CO2 interactive effects with drought, D×CO2 and warming, T×D×CO2, were negatively skewed and caused the reduction of PSII performance in both species after occurrence of freezing events. Neither passive nighttime warming nor elevated CO2 as single factors...

  14. Electronic structure and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y. N.; Cheng, P.; Wu, M. J.; Zhu, H.; Xiang, Q.; Ni, J.

    2017-09-01

    Based on the density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function, the influence of the wrinkle on the electronic structures and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials have been investigated, in which the wrinkled armchair graphene nanoribbons (wAGNRs) and the composite of AGNRs and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were considered with different connection of ripples. The wrinkle adjusts the electronic structures and transport properties of AGNRs. With the change of the strain, the wAGNRs for three width families reveal different electrical behavior. The band gap of AGNR(6) increases in the presence of the wrinkle, which is opposite to that of AGNR(5) and AGNR(7). The transport of AGNRs with the widths 6 or 7 has been modified by the wrinkle, especially by the number of isolated ripples, but it is insensitive to the strain. The nanojunctions constructed by AGNRs and SWCNTs can form the quantum wells, and some specific states are confined in wAGNRs. Although these nanojunctions exhibit the metallic, they have poor conductance due to the wrinkle. The filling of C20 into SWCNT has less influence on the electronic structure and transport of the junctions. The width and connection type of ripples have greatly influenced on the electronic structures and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional nanomaterials.

  15. Electronic structure and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green’s function, the influence of the wrinkle on the electronic structures and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional carbon nanomaterials have been investigated, in which the wrinkled armchair graphene nanoribbons (wAGNRs and the composite of AGNRs and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs were considered with different connection of ripples. The wrinkle adjusts the electronic structures and transport properties of AGNRs. With the change of the strain, the wAGNRs for three width families reveal different electrical behavior. The band gap of AGNR(6 increases in the presence of the wrinkle, which is opposite to that of AGNR(5 and AGNR(7. The transport of AGNRs with the widths 6 or 7 has been modified by the wrinkle, especially by the number of isolated ripples, but it is insensitive to the strain. The nanojunctions constructed by AGNRs and SWCNTs can form the quantum wells, and some specific states are confined in wAGNRs. Although these nanojunctions exhibit the metallic, they have poor conductance due to the wrinkle. The filling of C20 into SWCNT has less influence on the electronic structure and transport of the junctions. The width and connection type of ripples have greatly influenced on the electronic structures and transport properties of quasi-one-dimensional nanomaterials.

  16. Thermally driven hopping and electron transport in amorphous materials from density functional calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abtew, Tesfaye A; Drabold, D A [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701-2979 (United States)

    2004-11-10

    In this paper we study electron dynamics and transport in models of amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon hydride. By integrating the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation, we compute the time evolution of electron states near the gap, and study the spatial and spectral diffusion of these states due to lattice motion. We perform these calculations with a view to developing ab initio hopping transport methods. The techniques are implemented with the ab initio local basis code SIESTA, and may be applicable to molecular, biomolecular and other condensed matter systems.

  17. Time-resolved electron transport in quantum-dot systems; Zeitaufgeloester Elektronentransport in Quantendotsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croy, Alexander

    2010-06-30

    In this thesis the time-resolved electron transport in quantum dot systems was studied. For this two different formalisms were presented: The nonequilibrium Green functions and the generalized quantum master equations. For both formalisms a propagation method for the numerical calculation of time-resolved expectation values, like the occupation and the electron current, was developed. For the demonstration of the propagation method two different question formulations were considered. On the one hand the stochastically driven resonant-level model was studied. On the other hand the pulse-induced transport through a double quantum dot was considered.

  18. Iterative solution of the multistream electron transport equation. I - Comparison with laboratory beam injection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, H. S.; Varosi, F.; Mayr, H. G.

    1987-01-01

    The Neumann iteration method presently used for solving the electron transport equation in which energy, attitude, and pitch angle are independent variables is fast, and can compute numerical point-response-function solutions of the electron transport equation. Because both the inelastic cross sections and angular elastic cross sections of the model are empirically based, the solutions obtained represent a test of compatibility between various sets of cross sections and energy deposition measurements. The use of a numerical quadrature based on analytic phase function forms yields accurate phase function integrals at low computational cost.

  19. Probing the electronic transport on the reconstructed Au/Ge(001 surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszek Krok

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By using scanning tunnelling potentiometry we characterized the lateral variation of the electrochemical potential µec on the gold-induced Ge(001-c(8 × 2-Au surface reconstruction while a lateral current flows through the sample. On the reconstruction and across domain boundaries we find that µec shows a constant gradient as a function of the position between the contacts. In addition, nanoscale Au clusters on the surface do not show an electronic coupling to the gold-induced surface reconstruction. In combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we conclude that an additional transport channel buried about 2 nm underneath the surface represents a major transport channel for electrons.

  20. Electron transport in bulk GaN under ultrashort high-electric field transient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotyeyev, V. V.; Kochelap, V. A.; Kim, K. W.

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated nonlinear electron transport in GaN induced by high-electric field transients by analyzing the temporal dependence of the electron drift velocity and temperature. For picosecond transients, our calculations have established that the electron dynamics retain almost all the features of the steady-state velocity-field characteristics including the portion with negative differential conductivity. It was also found that transient currents in GaN samples give rise to the THz re-emission effect—radiation of electromagnetic field, temporal and spectral properties of which directly relate to the velocity-field characteristics of the sample. The results clearly indicate that existing methods for the generation of high-electric field transients and subpicosecond signal measurements can be applied to the characterization of hot electron transport at ultrahigh fields while avoiding Joule self-heating, hot phonon accumulation and other undesirable effects.

  1. Probing the electronic transport on the reconstructed Au/Ge(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krok, Franciszek; Kaspers, Mark R; Bernhart, Alexander M; Nikiel, Marek; Jany, Benedykt R; Indyka, Paulina; Wojtaszek, Mateusz; Möller, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Summary By using scanning tunnelling potentiometry we characterized the lateral variation of the electrochemical potential µec on the gold-induced Ge(001)-c(8 × 2)-Au surface reconstruction while a lateral current flows through the sample. On the reconstruction and across domain boundaries we find that µec shows a constant gradient as a function of the position between the contacts. In addition, nanoscale Au clusters on the surface do not show an electronic coupling to the gold-induced surface reconstruction. In combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we conclude that an additional transport channel buried about 2 nm underneath the surface represents a major transport channel for electrons. PMID:25247129

  2. Extensive electron transport and energization via multiple, localized dipolarizing flux bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielse, Christine; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Harris, Camilla; Artemyev, Anton; Kepko, Larry; Runov, Andrei

    2017-05-01

    Using an analytical model of multiple dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs) embedded in earthward traveling bursty bulk flows, we demonstrate how equatorially mirroring electrons can travel long distances and gain hundreds of keV from betatron acceleration. The model parameters are constrained by four Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellite observations, putting limits on the DFBs' speed, location, and magnetic and electric field magnitudes. We find that the sharp, localized peaks in magnetic field have such strong spatial gradients that energetic electrons ∇B drift in closed paths around the peaks as those peaks travel earthward. This is understood in terms of the third adiabatic invariant, which remains constant when the field changes on timescales longer than the electron's drift timescale: An energetic electron encircles a sharp peak in magnetic field in a closed path subtending an area of approximately constant flux. As the flux bundle magnetic field increases the electron's drift path area shrinks and the electron is prevented from escaping to the ambient plasma sheet, while it continues to gain energy via betatron acceleration. When the flux bundles arrive at and merge with the inner magnetosphere, where the background field is strong, the electrons suddenly gain access to previously closed drift paths around the Earth. DFBs are therefore instrumental in transporting and energizing energetic electrons over long distances along the magnetotail, bringing them to the inner magnetosphere and energizing them by hundreds of keV.Plain Language SummaryScientists have wondered how narrow flow channels in space could transport and energize electrons enough before the electrons escape the channel. They also wondered how narrow, localized magnetic field peaks (and their electric fields) contribute to electron energization in comparison to wide, large-scale electromagnetic fields. We show that it is actually because these fields are so

  3. Investigations of Electron Transport Properties in Metal-Organic Frameworks for Catalytic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ahrenholtz, Spencer Rae

    2016-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have attracted much attention in the past few decades due to their ordered, crystalline nature, synthetic tunability, and porosity. MOFs represent a class of hybrid inorganic-organic materials that have been investigated for their applications in areas such as gas sorption and separation, catalysis, drug delivery, and electron or proton conduction. It has been the goal of my graduate research to investigate MOFs for their ability to transport electrons and stor...

  4. Spin-polarized transport in a two-dimensional electron gas with interdigital-ferromagnetic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, C.-M.; Nitta, Junsaku; Jensen, Ane

    2001-01-01

    Ferromagnetic contacts on a high-mobility, two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a narrow gap semiconductor with strong spin-orbit interaction are used to investigate spin-polarized electron transport. We demonstrate the use of magnetized contacts to preferentially inject and detect specific spin...... orientations. Spin dephasing and spin precession effects are studied by temperature and 2DEG channel length dependent measurements. Interdigital-ferromagnetic contacts suppress unwanted effects due to ferromagnetic microstrip inhomogeneities by averaging....

  5. Specification of Requirements for Visually Impaired Persons in Services in Transportation Electronic Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Jerabek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights the basic concept of the expansion of the current transportation information system in the Czech Republic by employing the Near Field Communication technology for the visually impaired passengers. Nowadays are electronic information systems an integral part of transportation arrangements in every city. They are built with the aim to offer to its constituents various services and to facilitate their orientation in a complex transportation network. These systems, however, do not necessarily take into consideration the needs of the handicapped, for example the visually impaired, although precisely this group needs correct and aptly transmitted information more than any other segment of the population.

  6. CO2 assimilation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport probed by the JIP-test, of tea leaves in response to phosphorus supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zheng-He; Chen, Li-Song; Chen, Rong-Bing; Zhang, Fang-Zhou; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Tang, Ning

    2009-04-21

    Although the effects of P deficiency on tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) growth, P uptake and utilization as well as leaf gas exchange and Chl a fluorescence have been investigated, very little is known about the effects of P deficiency on photosynthetic electron transport, photosynthetic enzymes and carbohydrates of tea leaves. In this study, own-rooted 10-month-old tea trees were supplied three times weekly for 17 weeks with 500 mL of nutrient solution at a P concentration of 0, 40, 80, 160, 400 or 1000 microM. This objective of this study was to determine how P deficiency affects CO2 assimilation, Rubisco, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport in tea leaves to understand the mechanism by which P deficiency leads to a decrease in CO2 assimilation. Both root and shoot dry weight increased as P supply increased from 0 to 160 microM, then remained unchanged. P-deficient leaves from 0 to 80 muM P-treated trees showed decreased CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, but increased intercellular CO2 concentration. Both initial and total Rubisco activity, contents of Chl and total soluble protein in P-deficient leaves decreased to a lesser extent than CO2 assimilation. Contents of sucrose and starch were decreased in P-deficient leaves, whereas contents of glucose and fructose did not change significantly except for a significant increase in the lowest P leaves. OJIP transients from P-deficient leaves displayed a rise at the O-step and a depression at the P-step, accompanied by two new steps at about 150 mus (L-step) and at about 300 mus (K-step). RC/CSo, TRo/ABS (or Fv/Fm), ETo/ABS, REo/ABS, maximum amplitude of IP phase, PIabs and PItot, abs were decreased in P-deficient leaves, while VJ, VI and dissipated energy were increased. P deficiency decreased photosynthetic electron transport capacity by impairing the whole electron transport chain from the PSII donor side up to the PSI, thus decreasing ATP content which limits RuBP regeneration, and

  7. CO2 assimilation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport probed by the JIP-test, of tea leaves in response to phosphorus supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Rong-Bing

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the effects of P deficiency on tea (Camellia sinensis (L. O. Kuntze growth, P uptake and utilization as well as leaf gas exchange and Chl a fluorescence have been investigated, very little is known about the effects of P deficiency on photosynthetic electron transport, photosynthetic enzymes and carbohydrates of tea leaves. In this study, own-rooted 10-month-old tea trees were supplied three times weekly for 17 weeks with 500 mL of nutrient solution at a P concentration of 0, 40, 80, 160, 400 or 1000 μM. This objective of this study was to determine how P deficiency affects CO2 assimilation, Rubisco, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport in tea leaves to understand the mechanism by which P deficiency leads to a decrease in CO2 assimilation. Results Both root and shoot dry weight increased as P supply increased from 0 to 160 μM, then remained unchanged. P-deficient leaves from 0 to 80 μM P-treated trees showed decreased CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, but increased intercellular CO2 concentration. Both initial and total Rubisco activity, contents of Chl and total soluble protein in P-deficient leaves decreased to a lesser extent than CO2 assimilation. Contents of sucrose and starch were decreased in P-deficient leaves, whereas contents of glucose and fructose did not change significantly except for a significant increase in the lowest P leaves. OJIP transients from P-deficient leaves displayed a rise at the O-step and a depression at the P-step, accompanied by two new steps at about 150 μs (L-step and at about 300 μs (K-step. RC/CSo, TRo/ABS (or Fv/Fm, ETo/ABS, REo/ABS, maximum amplitude of IP phase, PIabs and PItot, abs were decreased in P-deficient leaves, while VJ, VI and dissipated energy were increased. Conclusion P deficiency decreased photosynthetic electron transport capacity by impairing the whole electron transport chain from the PSII donor side up to the PSI, thus decreasing

  8. Electron transport and nonlinear optical properties of substituted aryldimesityl boranes: a DFT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaf Hussain Pandith

    Full Text Available A comprehensive theoretical study was carried out on a series of aryldimesityl borane (DMB derivatives using Density Functional theory. Optimized geometries and electronic parameters like electron affinity, reorganization energy, frontiers molecular contours, polarizability and hyperpolarizability have been calculated by employing B3PW91/6-311++G (d, p level of theory. Our results show that the Hammett function and geometrical parameters correlates well with the reorganization energies and hyperpolarizability for the series of DMB derivatives studied in this work. The orbital energy study reveals that the electron releasing substituents increase the LUMO energies and electron withdrawing substituents decrease the LUMO energies, reflecting the electron transport character of aryldimesityl borane derivatives. From frontier molecular orbitals diagram it is evident that mesityl rings act as the donor, while the phenylene and Boron atom appear as acceptors in these systems. The calculated hyperpolarizability of secondary amine derivative of DMB is 40 times higher than DMB (1. The electronic excitation contributions to the hyperpolarizability studied by using TDDFT calculation shows that hyperpolarizability correlates well with dipole moment in ground and excited state and excitation energy in terms of the two-level model. Thus the results of these calculations can be helpful in designing the DMB derivatives for efficient electron transport and nonlinear optical material by appropriate substitution with electron releasing or withdrawing substituents on phenyl ring of DMB system.

  9. Ambient UV-B radiation reduces PSII performance and net photosynthesis in high Arctic Salix arctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2011-01-01

    Ambient ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation potentially impacts the photosynthetic performance of high Arctic plants. We conducted an UV-B exclusion experiment in a dwarf shrub heath in NE Greenland (74°N), with open control, filter control, UV-B filtering and UV-AB filtering, all in combination...... was characterized by simultaneous gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements and the PSII performance through the growing season was investigated with fluorescence measurements. Leaf harvest towards the end of the growing season was done to determine the specific leaf area and the content of carbon......, nitrogen and UV-B absorbing compounds. Compared to a 60% reduced UV-B irradiance, the ambient solar UV-B reduced net photosynthesis in Salix arctica leaves fixed in the 45° position which exposed leaves to maximum natural irradiance. Also a reduced Calvin Cycle capacity was found, i.e. the maximum rate...

  10. Electronic transport of molecular nanowires by considering of electron hopping energy between the second neighbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rabani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the electronic conductance of molecular nanowires by considering the electron hopping between the first and second neighbors with the help Green’s function method at the tight-binding approach. We investigate three types of structures including linear uniform and periodic chains as well as poly(p-phenylene molecule which are embedded between two semi-infinite metallic leads. The results show that in the second neighbor approximation, the resonance, anti-resonance and Fano phenomena occur in the conductance spectra of these structures. Moreover, a new gap is observed at edge of the lead energy band wich its width depends on the value of the electron hopping energy between the second neighbors. In the systems including intrinsic gap, this hopping energy shifts the gap in the energy spectra.

  11. Effect of leaf dehydration duration and dehydration degree on PSII photochemical activity of papaya leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meijun; Zhang, Zishan; Gao, Huiyuan; Yang, Cheng; Fan, Xingli; Cheng, Dandan

    2014-09-01

    Although the effect of dehydration on photosynthetic apparatus has been widely studied, the respective effect of dehydration duration and dehydration degree was neglected. This study showed that, when leaves dehydrated in air, the PSII activities of leaves decreased with the decline of leaf relative water content (RWC). Unexpectedly, when leaves dehydrated to same RWC, the decreases in Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm were lower in leaves dehydrating at 43 °C than those at 25 °C. However, to reach the same RWC, leaves dehydrating at 43 °C experienced 1/6 of the dehydration duration for leaves dehydrating at 25 °C. To distinguish the respective effect of dehydration degree and dehydration duration on photosynthetic apparatus, we studied the PSII activities of leaves treated with different concentration of PEG solutions. Increasing dehydration degree aggravated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with the same dehydration duration, while prolonging the dehydration duration also exacerbated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with identical dehydration degree. With the same dehydration degree and duration, high temperature enhanced the decrease of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in the leaves. When leaves dehydrated in air, the effect of high temperature was underestimated due to reduction of dehydration duration. The results demonstrated that, dehydration degree and duration both play important roles in damage to photosynthetic apparatus. We suggest that, under combined stresses, the effects of dehydration degree and duration on plants should be considered comprehensively, otherwise, partial or incorrect results may be obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron transport in heterogeneous media; Transporte de eletrons em meios heterogeneos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcao, Rossana Cavalieri

    1992-05-15

    In this work it is presented a model to calculate dose enhancement in the vicinity of plane interfaces irradiated by therapeutic electron beams. The proposed model is based on an approximation of the Boltzmann Equation. The solutions presented to the equation are exact on its angular dependency, making it possible to observe that at low Z/high Z interfaces the dose enhancement is due to an increase of the backscattering. For the inverse situation a decrease of the backscattering can be observed. Calculations have been made for some tissue-metal interfaces irradiated by 13 MeV electron beam. The dose perturbations in tissue were obtained and the results were compared with experimental data as well as Monte Carlo simulations. In both cases the agreement found was very good. (author)

  13. Low-loss electron beam transport in a high-power, electrostatic free-electron maser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, M.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    At the FOM Institute for Plasma Physics ''Rijnhuizen'', The Netherlands, the commissioning of a high-power, electrostatic free-electron maser is in progress. The design target is the generation of 1 MW microwave power in the frequency range 130-260 GHz. The foreseen application

  14. Diffusive Transport of Several Hundred keV Electrons in the Earth's Slot Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Q.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Turner, D. L.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Baker, D. N.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the gradual diffusion of energetic electrons from the inner edge of the outer radiation belt into the slot region. The Van Allen Probes observed slow inward diffusion and decay of 200-600 keV electrons following the intense geomagnetic storm that occurred on 17 March 2013. During the 10 day nondisturbed period following the storm, the peak of electron fluxes gradually moved from L 2.7 to L 2.4, and the flux levels decreased by a factor of 2-4 depending on the electron energy. We simulated the radial intrusion and decay of electrons using a three-dimensional diffusion code, which reproduced the energy-dependent transport of electrons from 100 keV to 1 MeV in the slot region. At energies of 100-200 keV, the electrons experience fast transport across the slot region due to the dominance of radial diffusion; at energies of 200-600 keV, the electrons gradually diffuse and decay in the slot region due to the comparable rate of radial diffusion and pitch angle scattering by plasmaspheric hiss; at energies of E > 700 keV, the electrons stopped diffusing near the inner edge of outer radiation belt due to the dominant pitch angle scattering loss. In addition to plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves and VLF transmitters can cause the loss of high pitch angle electrons, relaxing the sharp "top-hat" shaped pitch angle distributions created by plasmaspheric hiss. Our simulation indicates the importance of balance between radial diffusion and loss through pitch angle scattering in forming the diffusive intrusion of energetic electrons across the slot region.

  15. Diffusive transport of energetic electrons in the solar corona: X-ray and radio diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musset, Sophie; Kontar, Eduard; Vilmer, Nicole

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares are associated with efficient particle acceleration. In particular, energetic electrons are diagnosed through X-ray and radio emissions produced as they interact with the solar atmosphere. Particle transport from the acceleration region to the emission sites remains one of the challenging topics in the field of high energy solar physics and has a crucial impact on the interpretation of particles emissions in the context of acceleration models.In order to address the transport of flare associated energetic electrons in the low corona, we used the imaging spectroscopy capabilities of the RHESSI spacecraft to analyze the X-ray emission during the 2004 May 21 solar flare. We show that non-thermal X-ray emitting energetic electrons are trapped in the coronal part of the flaring loop. In the hypothesis of turbulent pitch-angle scattering of energetic electrons (Kontar et al. 2014), diffusive transport can lead to a confinement of energetic electrons in the coronal part of the loop. We show that this model can explain the X-ray observations with a scattering mean free path of the order of 10^8 cm, much smaller than the length of the loop itself.Such results are compared with the study by Kuznetsov and Kontar (2015) of the gyrosynchrotron emission of the same flare. The diffusive transport model can explain the radio observations with a scattering mean free path of the order of 10^7 cm. This combination of X-ray and radio observations during a flare leads to the first estimate of the energy dependence of the scattering mean free path of energetic electrons in the low corona. This result is comparable with studies of the energy dependence of the scattering mean free path of electrons in the interplanetary medium.

  16. Stable sustainment of plasmas with electron internal transport barrier by ECH in the LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Y.; Kasahara, H.; Tokitani, M.; Sakamoto, R.; Ueda, Y.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Seki, R.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Makino, R.; Kobayashi, S.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Akiyama, T.; Tanaka, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Yamada, I.; Yamada, H.; Mutoh, T.; Takeiri, Y.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2018-02-01

    The long pulse experiments in the Large Helical Device has made progress in sustainment of improved confinement states. It was found that steady-state sustainment of the plasmas with improved confinement at the core region, that is, electron internal transport barrier (e-ITB), was achieved with no significant difficulty. Sustainment of a plasma having e-ITB with the line average electron density n e_ave of 1.1 × 1019 m‑3 and the central electron temperature T e0 of ∼3.5 keV for longer than 5 min only with 340 kW ECH power was successfully demonstrated.

  17. High field electron transport in indium gallium nitride and indium aluminium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masyukov, N. A.; Dmitriev, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we study theoretically the hot electron transport in two nitride semiconductor solid solutions, InxGa1-xN and InxAl1-xN, in the electric fields up to 30 kV/cm. We calculate the electron drift velocity field dependence at 77 and 300 K for the bulk samples with the electron concentration of 1 × 1018 and 1 × 1019 cm-3 and alloy composition x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.

  18. Simulation of the transport of low-energy electrons in various forms of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrissol, M.; Combes, M.A.; Patau, J.P. (Centre de Physique Atomique, Toulouse (France))

    1981-10-01

    This work describes a Monte Carlo transport simulation of electrons with energies ranging from 10 eV to 30 keV in homogeneous and porous graphites and amorphous carbon. We have used results of Lindhard theory adapted by Ritchie for the free electron model and by Ashley who takes electron bond into account. In the case of porous graphite we have considered the pore crossing as an interaction with the possibility of surface plasmon creation at interfaces. We compare our results with Jacobi experiments and Ashley calculations.

  19. Effect of increasing length on the electronic transport of an armchair graphene nano-ribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Aghamiri Esfahani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we have investigated the effect of increasing length on the electronic transport of an armchair graphene nano-ribbons with nitrogen atom impurity and without impurity. The semi-infinite, one-dimensional molecular systems are connected to two electrodes and the electron-electron interaction is ignored. The system is described by a simple tight binding model. All calculations are based on the Green's function and Landauer–Buttiker approach, and the electrodes are described in a wide band approximation.

  20. The Possibilities of Installing Electronic CMR Waybill in Road Transport Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvydas Baublys

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article opportunities of changing paper CMR waybill into electronic are analysed, whereas the paper CMR waybill does not guarantee operational information exchange between participants of logistics chain components in road transport. Due to this reason use ofelectronic CMR waybill becomes more and more important. According to researches done by article authors, the article submitted the limitations of paper CMR waybill, benefits of electronic CMR waybill, concept model of implementing electronic CMR waybill and application possibilities of supply chain components.

  1. Electronic transport and magnetoresistivity of La0. 4Bi0. 1Ca0. 5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electronic transport and magnetoresistivity of La0.4Bi0.1Ca0.5–SrMnO3 ( = 0.1 and 0.2) ... University, Tirupati 517 502, India; NDT/SPP, SDSC, Sriharikota 524 124, India; Low Temperature Laboratory, UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001, India ...

  2. Structural, magnetic and electronic transport studies of RAgSn2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structural, magnetic and electronic transport studies of RAgSn2 compounds (R = Y, Tb, Dy, Ho and Er) with Cu3Au-type. L ROMAKAa, V V ROMAKAb, I LOTOTSKAa, A SZYTULAc, B KUZHELa, A ZARZYCKIc,. E K HLILd,∗ and D FRUCHARTd. aDepartment of Inorganic Chemistry, Ivan Franko Lviv National University, Kyryl ...

  3. Electron transport through SWNT/trans-PA/ SWNT structure (the role ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    661–668. Electron transport through SWNT/trans-PA/. SWNT structure (the role of solitons):. A t-matrix technique. S A KETABI. 1. , H MILANI MOGHADDAM. 2,3 and N SHAHTAHMASEBI. 2. 1. School of Physics, Damghan University of Basic Sciences, Damghan, Iran. 2. Department of Physics and Center for Nanotechnology ...

  4. Halogenated 1-Hydroxynaphthalene-2-Carboxanilides Affecting Photosynthetic Electron Transport in Photosystem II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goněc, T.; Kos, J.; Pesko, M.; Dohanosová, J.; Oravec, Michal; Liptaj, T.; Králová, K.; Jampílek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 1709. ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : hydroxynaphthalene-carboxamides * photosynthetic electron transport (PET) inhibition * spinach chloroplasts * structure-activity relationships Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.861, year: 2016

  5. Extension of a biochemical model for the generalized stoichiometry of electron transport limited C3 photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Oijen, van M.; Schapendonk, A.H.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The widely used steady-state model of Farquhar et al. (Planta 149: 78-90, 1980) for C-3 photosynthesis was developed on the basis of linear whole-chain (non-cyclic) electron transport. In this model, calculation of the RuBP-regeneration limited CO2-assimilation rate depends on whether it is

  6. Photosynthetic control of electron transport and the regulation of gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foyer, C.H.; Neukermans, J.; Queval, G.; Noctor, G.; Harbinson, J.

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘photosynthetic control’ describes the short- and long-term mechanisms that regulate reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) chain so that the rate of production of ATP and NADPH is coordinated with the rate of their utilization in metabolism. At low irradiances these

  7. Giant electron-hole transport asymmetry in ultra-short quantum transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, A C; Tayari, V; Porter, J M; Champagne, A R

    2017-05-31

    Making use of bipolar transport in single-wall carbon nanotube quantum transistors would permit a single device to operate as both a quantum dot and a ballistic conductor or as two quantum dots with different charging energies. Here we report ultra-clean 10 to 100 nm scale suspended nanotube transistors with a large electron-hole transport asymmetry. The devices consist of naked nanotube channels contacted with sections of tube under annealed gold. The annealed gold acts as an n-doping top gate, allowing coherent quantum transport, and can create nanometre-sharp barriers. These tunnel barriers define a single quantum dot whose charging energies to add an electron or a hole are vastly different (e-h charging energy asymmetry). We parameterize the e-h transport asymmetry by the ratio of the hole and electron charging energies ηe-h. This asymmetry is maximized for short channels and small band gap tubes. In a small band gap device, we demonstrate the fabrication of a dual functionality quantum device acting as a quantum dot for holes and a much longer quantum bus for electrons. In a 14 nm-long channel, ηe-h reaches up to 2.6 for a device with a band gap of 270 meV. The charging energies in this device exceed 100 meV.

  8. Biguanides sensitize leukemia cells to ABT-737-induced apoptosis by inhibiting mitochondrial electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Juliana; Pan, Rongqing; Lee, Jason T.C.; Enciso, Leonardo; Suarez, Marta; Duque, Jorge Eduardo; Jaramillo, Daniel; Lopez, Catalina; Morales, Ludis; Bornmann, William; Konopleva, Marina; Krystal, Gerald; Andreeff, Michael; Samudio, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    Metformin displays antileukemic effects partly due to activation of AMPK and subsequent inhibition of mTOR signaling. Nevertheless, Metformin also inhibits mitochondrial electron transport at complex I in an AMPK-independent manner, Here we report that Metformin and rotenone inhibit mitochondrial electron transport and increase triglyceride levels in leukemia cell lines, suggesting impairment of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). We also report that, like other FAO inhibitors, both agents and the related biguanide, Phenformin, increase sensitivity to apoptosis induction by the bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 supporting the notion that electron transport antagonizes activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in leukemia cells. Both biguanides and rotenone induce superoxide generation in leukemia cells, indicating that oxidative damage may sensitize toABT-737 induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that Metformin sensitizes leukemia cells to the oligomerization of Bak, suggesting that the observed synergy with ABT-737 is mediated, at least in part, by enhanced outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Notably, Phenformin was at least 10-fold more potent than Metformin in abrogating electron transport and increasing sensitivity to ABT-737, suggesting that this agent may be better suited for targeting hematological malignancies. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism by Metformin or Phenformin is associated with increased leukemia cell susceptibility to induction of intrinsic apoptosis, and provide a rationale for clinical studies exploring the efficacy of combining biguanides with the orally bioavailable derivative of ABT-737, Venetoclax. PMID:27283492

  9. Electron-phonon scattering from Green’s function transport combined with molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Palsgaard, Mattias Lau Nøhr; Stradi, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    We present a conceptually simple method for treating electron-phonon scattering and phonon limited mobilities. By combining Green’s function based transport calculations and molecular dynamics, we obtain a temperature dependent transmission from which we evaluate the mobility. We validate our...

  10. Promotion of Cyclic Electron Transport Around Photosystem I with the Development of C4 Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munekage, Yuri Nakajima; Taniguchi, Yukimi Y

    2016-05-01

    C4 photosynthesis is present in approximately 7,500 species classified into 19 families, including monocots and eudicots. In the majority of documented cases, a two-celled CO2-concentrating system that uses a metabolic cycle of four-carbon compounds is employed. C4 photosynthesis repeatedly evolved from C3 photosynthesis, possibly driven by the survival advantages it bestows in the hot, often dry, and nutrient-poor soils of the tropics and subtropics. The development of the C4 metabolic cycle greatly increased the ATP demand in chloroplasts during the evolution of malic enzyme-type C4 photosynthesis, and the additional ATP required for C4 metabolism may be produced by the cyclic electron transport around PSI. Recent studies have revealed the nature of cyclic electron transport and the elevation of its components during C4 evolution. In this review, we discuss the energy requirements of C3 and C4 photosynthesis, the current model of cyclic electron transport around PSI and how cyclic electron transport is promoted during C4 evolution using studies on the genus Flaveria, which contains a number of closely related C3, C4 and C3-C4 intermediate species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Krylov subspace method for evaluating the self-energy matrices in electron transport calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg; Hansen, Per Christian; Petersen, D. E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a Krylov subspace method for evaluating the self-energy matrices used in the Green's function formulation of electron transport in nanoscale devices. A procedure based on the Arnoldi method is employed to obtain solutions of the quadratic eigenvalue problem associated with the infinite...

  12. A reflective optical transport system for ultraviolet Thomson scattering from electron plasma waves on OMEGAa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J.; Boni, R.; Sorce, C.; Follett, R.; Shoup, M. J.; Froula, D. H.

    2012-10-01

    A reflective optical transport system has been designed for the OMEGA Thomson-scattering diagnostic. A Schwarzschild objective that uses two concentric spherical mirrors coupled to a Pfund objective provides diffraction-limited imaging across all reflected wavelengths. This enables the operator to perform Thomson-scattering measurements of ultraviolet (0.263 μm) light scattered from electron plasma waves.

  13. A reflective optical transport system for ultraviolet Thomson scattering from electron plasma waves on OMEGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, J; Boni, R; Sorce, C; Follett, R; Shoup, M J; Froula, D H

    2012-10-01

    A reflective optical transport system has been designed for the OMEGA Thomson-scattering diagnostic. A Schwarzschild objective that uses two concentric spherical mirrors coupled to a Pfund objective provides diffraction-limited imaging across all reflected wavelengths. This enables the operator to perform Thomson-scattering measurements of ultraviolet (0.263 μm) light scattered from electron plasma waves.

  14. A reflective optical transport system for ultraviolet Thomson scattering from electron plasma waves on OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, J.; Boni, R.; Sorce, C.; Follett, R.; Shoup, M. J. III; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A reflective optical transport system has been designed for the OMEGA Thomson-scattering diagnostic. A Schwarzschild objective that uses two concentric spherical mirrors coupled to a Pfund objective provides diffraction-limited imaging across all reflected wavelengths. This enables the operator to perform Thomson-scattering measurements of ultraviolet (0.263 {mu}m) light scattered from electron plasma waves.

  15. Using Adobe Flash animations of electron transport chain to teach and learn biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash CS3 Professional animation program and is designed for high school chemistry students. Our goal is to develop educational materials that facilitate the comprehension of this complex subject through dynamic animations which show the course of the electron transport chain and simultaneously explain its nature. We record the process of the electron transport chain, including connections with oxidative phosphorylation, in such a way as to minimize the occurrence of discrepancies in interpretation. The educational program was evaluated in high schools through the administration of a questionnaire, which contained 12 opened-ended items and which required participants to evaluate the graphics of the animations, chemical content, student preferences, and its suitability for high school biochemistry teaching. © 2015 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Study of structural and electronic transport properties of Ce-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 5-6. Study of structural and electronic transport properties of Ce-doped LaMnO3. Shahid Husain R J Choudhary Ravi Kumar S I Patil J P Srivastava. Colossal Magnetoresistance & Other Materials Volume 58 Issue 5-6 May-June 2002 pp 1045-1049 ...

  17. Model for ballistic spin-transport in ferromagnet/two-dimensional electron gas/ferromagnet structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schapers, T; Nitta, J; Heersche, HB; Takayanagi, H

    The spin dependent conductance of a ferromagnet/two-dimensional electron gas ferromagnet structure is theoretically examined in the ballistic transport regime. It is shown that the spin signal can be improved considerably by making use of the spin filtering effect of a barrier at the ferromagnet

  18. Giant electron-hole transport asymmetry in ultra-short quantum transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, A. C.; Tayari, V.; Porter, J. M.; Champagne, A. R.

    2017-05-01

    Making use of bipolar transport in single-wall carbon nanotube quantum transistors would permit a single device to operate as both a quantum dot and a ballistic conductor or as two quantum dots with different charging energies. Here we report ultra-clean 10 to 100 nm scale suspended nanotube transistors with a large electron-hole transport asymmetry. The devices consist of naked nanotube channels contacted with sections of tube under annealed gold. The annealed gold acts as an n-doping top gate, allowing coherent quantum transport, and can create nanometre-sharp barriers. These tunnel barriers define a single quantum dot whose charging energies to add an electron or a hole are vastly different (e-h charging energy asymmetry). We parameterize the e-h transport asymmetry by the ratio of the hole and electron charging energies ηe-h. This asymmetry is maximized for short channels and small band gap tubes. In a small band gap device, we demonstrate the fabrication of a dual functionality quantum device acting as a quantum dot for holes and a much longer quantum bus for electrons. In a 14 nm-long channel, ηe-h reaches up to 2.6 for a device with a band gap of 270 meV. The charging energies in this device exceed 100 meV.

  19. Landauer’s formula with finite-time relaxation: Kramers’ crossover in electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Daniel; Velizhanin, Kirill A.; Zwolak, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Landauer’s formula is the standard theoretical tool to examine ballistic transport in nano- and meso-scale junctions, but it necessitates that any variation of the junction with time must be slow compared to characteristic times of the system, e.g., the relaxation time of local excitations. Transport through structurally dynamic junctions is, however, increasingly of interest for sensing, harnessing fluctuations, and real-time control. Here, we calculate the steady-state current when relaxation of electrons in the reservoirs is present and demonstrate that it gives rise to three regimes of behavior: weak relaxation gives a contact-limited current; strong relaxation localizes electrons, distorting their natural dynamics and reducing the current; and in an intermediate regime the Landauer view of the system only is recovered. We also demonstrate that a simple equation of motion emerges, which is suitable for efficiently simulating time-dependent transport.

  20. Theoretical study of hysteresis in electron transport through spin-crossover molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kristen; Park, Kyungwha

    2012-02-01

    Recent advances in nanoscale molecular systems stimulate experimental studies of electron transport across molecular junctions formed by single molecules or nanoparticles bridged between electrodes, or molecular monolayers adsorbed onto surfaces, using three-terminal set-ups or scanning tunneling microscope. Among them, spin-crossover molecular systems draw attention due to their unusual coupling between spin degrees of freedom and external stimuli. Spin magnetic moments of these molecular systems increase with increasing temperature or pressure, or shining light, and their magnetization shows hysteresis behavior with temperature, pressure, or light. Recent transport measurements across nanoparticles made of such spin-crossover molecules reveal hysteresis behavior in current-voltage characteristics, driven by voltage at a given temperature. In this talk, we present our work on understanding of hysteresis in electron transport through a nanoparticle consisting of Fe-based spin-crossover molecules, using a model-Hamiltonian approach and insight obtained from density functional theory.

  1. Dopant controlled trap-filling and conductivity enhancement in an electron-transport polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Andrew; Mohapatra, Swagat K.; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R.; Kahn, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    Charge transport in organic semiconductors is often inhibited by the presence of tail states that extend into the band gap of a material and act as traps for charge carriers. This work demonstrates the passivation of acceptor tail states by solution processing of ultra-low concentrations of a strongly reducing air-stable organometallic dimer, the pentamethylrhodocene dimer, [RhCp*Cp]2, into the electron transport polymer poly{[N,N'-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-bithiophene)}, P(NDI2OD-T2). Variable-temperature current-voltage measurements of n-doped P(NDI2OD-T2) are presented with doping concentration varied through two orders of magnitude. Systematic variation of the doping parameter is shown to lower the activation energy for hopping transport and enhance film conductivity and electron mobility.

  2. Electron recombination in ionized liquid argon: a computational approach based on realistic models of electron transport and reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskolski, Michal; Wojcik, Mariusz

    2011-05-05

    In this work, we propose a new theoretical approach to modeling the electron-ion recombination processes in ionization tracks in liquid argon at 87 K. We developed a computer simulation method using realistic models of charge transport and electron-ion reactions. By introducing the concept of one-dimensional periodicity in the track, we are able to model very large cylindrical structures of charged particles. We apply our simulation method to calculate the electron escape probability as a function of the initial ionization density in the track. The results are in quantitative agreement with experiment for radiation tracks of relatively high ionization density. At low ionization densities, the simulation results slightly overestimate the experimental data. We discuss possible reasons for this disagreement and conclude that it can be explained by the role of δ tracks (short tracks of secondary electrons) in electron-ion recombination processes. We introduce an approximate model that takes into account the presence of δ tracks and allows the experimental data obtained from a liquid-argon ionization detector to be reproduced over a wide range of ionization density.

  3. Transportation Accessibility and Location Choice of Japanese-Funded Electronic Information Manufacturing Firms in Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haining Jiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of globalization, information communication and transportation, it is argued that the effect of transportation accessibility in the location choice of manufacturing firms has diminished. However, comprehensive and systematic research on the impact of transportation accessibility on firm location choice in cities remains scarce. Taking Shanghai as the research area, this paper uses a catalog of Japanese-funded electronic information manufacturing firms to explore the influence of transportation accessibility on their location choice. The paper first describes firm distribution using the nuclear density estimation method. The Poisson regression model is then used to estimate the significance of transportation accessibility in influencing firm location. The empirical results show that most of the firms are concentrated in the inner suburbs of Shanghai, with only a small number in the outer suburban areas. The spatial coupling relationship between firm distribution and transportation accessibility is significant. These firms tend to choose areas with good accessibility to transportation infrastructure, and, in particular, the effect of airport accessibility is significant. Compared with the joint venture enterprises, wholly-owned Japanese enterprises are more inclined to be in areas with better transportation accessibility.

  4. Electrical transport, electrothermal transport, and effective electron mass in single-crystalline In2O3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Natalie; Bierwagen, Oliver; Ramu, Ashok T.; Speck, James S.

    2013-08-01

    A comprehensive study of the room-temperature electrical and electrothermal transport of single-crystalline indium oxide (In2O3) and indium tin oxide (ITO) films over a wide range of electron concentrations is reported. We measured the room-temperature Hall mobility μH and Seebeck coefficient S of unintentionally doped and Sn-doped high-quality, plasma-assisted molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown In2O3 for volume Hall electron concentrations nH from 7×1016 cm-3 (unintentionally doped) to 1×1021 cm-3 (highly Sn-doped, ITO). The resulting empirical S(nH) relation can be directly used in other In2O3 samples to estimate the volume electron concentration from simple Seebeck coefficient measurements. The mobility and Seebeck coefficient were modeled by a numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. Ionized impurity scattering and polar optical phonon scattering were found to be the dominant scattering mechanisms. Acoustic phonon scattering was found to be negligible. Fitting the temperature-dependent mobility above room temperature of an In2O3 film with high mobility allowed us to find the effective Debye temperature (ΘD=700 K) and number of phonon modes (NOPML=1.33) that best describe the polar optical phonon scattering. The modeling also yielded the Hall scattering factor rH as a function of electron concentration, which is not negligible (rH≈1.4) at nondegenerate electron concentrations. Fitting the Hall-scattering-factor corrected concentration-dependent Seebeck coefficient S(n) for nondegenerate samples to the numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and to widely used, simplified equations allowed us to extract an effective electron mass of m*=(0.30±0.03)me (with free electron mass me). The modeled mobility and Seebeck coefficient based on polar optical phonon and ionized impurity scattering describes the experimental results very accurately up to electron concentrations of 1019 cm-3, and qualitatively explains a mobility plateau or local

  5. Sputter Deposited TiOx Thin-Films as Electron Transport Layers in Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirsafaei, Mina; Bomholt Jensen, Pia; Lakhotiya, Harish

    transparency and favorable energy-level alignment with many commonly used electron-acceptor materials. There are several methods available for fabricating compact TiOx thin-films for use in organic solar cells, including sol-gel solution processing, spray pyrolysis and atomic-layer deposition; however...... of around 7%, by incorporating sputter deposited TiOx thin-films as electron-transport and exciton-blocking layers. In the work, we report on the effect of different TiOx deposition temperatures and thicknesses on the organic-solar-cell device performance. Besides optical characterization, AFM and XRD...... analyses are performed to characterize the morphology and crystal structure of the films, and external quantum efficiency measurements are employed to shed further light on the device performance. Our study presents a novel method for implementation of TiOx thin-films as electron-transport layer in organic...

  6. First-principles study of electron transport through monatomic Al and Na wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Brandbyge, Mads; Tsukada, Masaru

    2000-01-01

    We present first-principles calculations of electron transport, in particular, the conduction channels of monatomic Al and Na atom wires bridged between metallic jellium electrodes. The electronic structures are calculated by the first-principles recursion-transfer matrix method, and the conduction...... channels are investigated using the eigenchannel decomposition (ECD) of the conductance, the local density of states (LDOS), and the current density. The ECD is different from the conventional decomposition of atomic orbitals, and the study of decomposed electronic structures is shown to be effective...... in clarifying the details of transport through atomic wires. We show channel transmissions, channel resolved LDOS, and channel resolved current density, and elucidate the number of conduction channels, the relation between atomic orbitals and the channels, and their dependency on the geometry of the atomic wire...

  7. Phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes by electron transporting layer engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok Jae; Koo, Ja Ryong; Lee, Dong Hyung; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, Kum Hee; Yoon, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Kwan

    2014-10-01

    The authors describe the fabrication of white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) with dual electron transporting layers (D-ETL) using 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanhroline/ 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) and bis-(2-methyl-8-quinolinolate)-4-(phenylphenolato) aluminum/BPhen. Stepwise D-ETL easily transports electrons easily to the emitting layer and reduces the leakage of electrons. Therefore, WOLEDs with D-ETL show higher external quantum efficiency (EQE) when compared to a control WOLED with a single ETL device. The optimized WOLEDs showed a peak EQE of 13.0%, luminous efficiency of 27.4 cd/A, and Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.40, 0.39) at 1000 cd/m2.

  8. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  9. Modulation of the electron transport properties in graphene nanoribbons doped with BN chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using density-functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method, the electron transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs doped with BN chains are studied by systematically calculating the energy band structure, density of states and the transmission spectra for the systems. The BN chains destroyed the electronic transport properties of the ZGNRs, and an energy gap appeared for the ZGNRs, and displayed variations from a metal to a wide-gap semiconductor. With an increase in the number of BN chains, the band gap increased gradually in the band structure and the transmission coefficient decreased near the Fermi surface. Additionally, the doping position had a significant effect on the electronic properties of the ZGNRs.

  10. Alfven Waves and Electron Energization and Their Interaction with Auroral Ionospheric Plasma Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafari, F. B.; Horwitz, J. L.; Jones, S.; Su, Y.; Zeng, W.

    2008-12-01

    When inertial Alfvén waves propagate along auroral field lines, they involve parallel electric fields which can accelerate auroral electrons. Here, we simulate the propagation of Alfvén waves through O+ and H+ auroral ionosphere-magnetosphere density profiles obtained from the UT Arlington Dynamic Fluid- Kinetic (DyFK) ionospheric plasma transport model. A linear one dimensional gyrofluid code [Jones and Parker, 2003] is used for the Alfvén wave description, incorporating electron inertia, electron pressure gradient and finite ion gyroradius effects. Then, the test particle approach of Su et al. [2004] is used to simulate the response of a distribution of electrons to these Alfvén wave electric fields. These electrons are incorporated into the DyFK model to produce a partially-self-consistent approach to producing the associated ionization and thermal electron heating within the ionosphere-magnetosphere system. Jones, S. T., and S. E. Parker (2003), Including electron inertia without advancing electron flow, J. Comput. Phys., 191, 322. Su, Y.-J., S. T. Jones, R. E. Ergun, and S. E. Parker (2004), Modeling of field-aligned electron bursts by dispersive Alfvén waves in the dayside auroral region, J. Geophys. Res., 109, A11201, doi:10.1029/2003JA010344.

  11. Cryo electron tomography of herpes simplex virus during axonal transport and secondary envelopment in primary neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosune Ibiricu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1 egress in neurons, viral particles travel from the neuronal cell body along the axon towards the synapse. Whether HSV1 particles are transported as enveloped virions as proposed by the 'married' model or as non-enveloped capsids suggested by the 'separate' model is controversial. Specific viral proteins may form a recruitment platform for microtubule motors that catalyze such transport. However, their subviral location has remained elusive. Here we established a system to analyze herpesvirus egress by cryo electron tomography. At 16 h post infection, we observed intra-axonal transport of progeny HSV1 viral particles in dissociated hippocampal neurons by live-cell fluorescence microscopy. Cryo electron tomography of frozen-hydrated neurons revealed that most egressing capsids were transported independently of the viral envelope. Unexpectedly, we found not only DNA-containing capsids (cytosolic C-capsids, but also capsids lacking DNA (cytosolic A-/B-capsids in mid-axon regions. Subvolume averaging revealed lower amounts of tegument on cytosolic A-/B-capsids than on C-capsids. Nevertheless, all capsid types underwent active axonal transport. Therefore, even few tegument proteins on the capsid vertices seemed to suffice for transport. Secondary envelopment of capsids was observed at axon terminals. On their luminal face, the enveloping vesicles were studded with typical glycoprotein-like spikes. Furthermore, we noted an accretion of tegument density at the concave cytosolic face of the vesicle membrane in close proximity to the capsids. Three-dimensional analysis revealed that these assembly sites lacked cytoskeletal elements, but that filamentous actin surrounded them and formed an assembly compartment. Our data support the 'separate model' for HSV1 egress, i.e. progeny herpes viruses being transported along axons as subassemblies and not as complete virions within transport vesicles.

  12. Electron transport in ultra-thin films and ballistic electron emission microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claveau, Y.; Di Matteo, S.; de Andres, P. L.; Flores, F.

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a calculation scheme for the elastic electron current in ultra-thin epitaxial heterostructures. Our model uses a Keldysh’s non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism and a layer-by-layer construction of the epitaxial film. Such an approach is appropriate to describe the current in a ballistic electron emission microscope (BEEM) where the metal base layer is ultra-thin and generalizes a previous one based on a decimation technique appropriated for thick slabs. This formalism allows a full quantum mechanical description of the transmission across the epitaxial heterostructure interface, including multiple scattering via the Dyson equation, which is deemed a crucial ingredient to describe interfaces of ultra-thin layers properly in the future. We introduce a theoretical formulation needed for ultra-thin layers and we compare with results obtained for thick Au(1 1 1) metal layers. An interesting effect takes place for a width of about ten layers: a BEEM current can propagate via the center of the reciprocal space (\\overlineΓ ) along the Au(1 1 1) direction. We associate this current to a coherent interference finite-width effect that cannot be found using a decimation technique. Finally, we have tested the validity of the handy semiclassical formalism to describe the BEEM current.

  13. Nonconjugated Polymer Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as an Efficient Interlayer Promoting Electron Transport for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pengcheng; Fang, Zhimin; Zhou, Weiran; Qiao, Qiquan; Wang, Mingtai; Chen, Tao; Yang, Shangfeng

    2017-09-27

    The interfaces between perovskite layer and electrodes play a crucial role on efficient charge transport and extraction in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Herein, for the first time we applied a low-cost nonconjugated polymer poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) as a new interlayer between PCBM electron transport layer (ETL) and Ag cathode for high-performance inverted planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells (iPSCs), leading to a dramatic efficiency enhancement. The CH3NH3PbI3-xClx-based iPSC device incorporating the PVP interlayer exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12.55%, which is enhanced by ∼15.9% relative to that of the control device without PVP interlayer (10.83%). The mechanistic investigations based on morphological, optical, and impedance spectroscopic characterizations reveal that incorporation of PVP interlayer promotes electron transport across the CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite/Ag interface via PCBM ETL. Besides, PVP incorporation induces the formation of a dipole layer, which may enhance the built-in potential across the device, conjunctly promoting electron transport from PCBM to Ag cathode and consequently leading to significantly improved fill factor (FF) from 58.98 to 66.13%.

  14. Electron and heat transport in graphene-based single-molecule devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Jan; Gehring, Pascal; Lau, Chit; Briggs, Andrew

    Graphene nano-electrodes provide a versatile platform for contacting individual molecules. Unlike metal electrodes, graphene is atomically stable at room temperature and screening of the gate electric field is strongly reduced by the two-dimensional nature of the electrodes. Molecules can be anchored to the graphene via π- π stacking bonds. We will present single electron transport measurements of single pyrene-functionalised C60 molecules. Strong electron-phonon coupling in these molecules leads to the observation of Franck-Condon blockade. In addition to spectroscopic transport features arising from the electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom of the fullerene molecule, we observe the effect of quantum interference in the graphene leads. Density-of-states fluctuations due to multi-mode Fabry-Perot interference in graphene result in energy dependent coupling between the graphene leads and the molecule. Finally, we will present thermoelectric measurements of our graphene-based nanostructures, and show the energy dependent Seebeck coefficient both in the sequential electron tunnelling and quantum interference regime. Our experiments demonstrate the capability of graphene-based molecular junctions for studying transport in single molecules, and highlight spectroscopic features that cannot readily be observed in metal-molecule junctions.

  15. Asymmetric Electron Transport at Monolayer-Bilayer Heterojunctions of Epitaxial Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, An-Ping [ORNL; Clark, Kendal W [ORNL; Zhang, Xiaoguang [ORNL; Gu, Gong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); He, Guowei [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Feenstra, Randall [Carnegie Mellon University (CMU)

    2014-01-01

    The symmetry of the graphene honeycomb lattice is a key element determining many of graphene s unique electronic properties, such as the linear energy-momentum dispersion and the suppressed backscattering 1,2. However, line defects in large-scale epitaxial graphene films, such as grain boundaries, edges, surface steps, and changes in layer thickness, often break the sublatttice symmetry and can impact transport properties of graphene profoundly 3-6. Here we report asymmetric electron transport upon polarity reversal at individual monolayer-bilayer (ML-BL) boundaries in epitaxial graphene on SiC (0001), revealed by scanning tunneling potentiometry. A greater voltage drop is observed when the current flows from BL to ML graphene than in the reverse direction, and the difference remains nearly unchanged with increasing current. This is not a typical nonlinear conductance due to electron transmission through an asymmetric potential. Rather, it indicates the opening of a dynamic energy gap at the Fermi energy due to the Coulomb interaction between the injected nonequilibrium electron density and the pseudospin polarized Friedel oscillation charge density at the boundary. This intriguing heterojunction transport behavior opens a new avenue towards novel quantum functions such as quantum switching.

  16. Effects of electron-phonon interaction on thermal and electrical transport through molecular nano-conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Tao Lü

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this review is the effects of electron-phonon interaction (EPI on the transport properties of molecular nano-conductors. A nano-conductor connects to two electron leads and two phonon leads, possibly at different temperatures or chemical potentials. The EPI appears only in the nano-conductor. We focus on its effects on charge and energy transport. We introduce three approaches. For weak EPI, we use the nonequilibrium Green’s function method to treat it perturbatively. We derive the expressions for the charge and heat currents. For weak system-lead couplings, we use the quantum master equation approach. In both cases, we use a simple single level model to study the effects of EPI on the system’s thermoelectric transport properties. It is also interesting to look at the effect of currents on the dynamics of the phonon system. For this, we derive a semi-classical generalized Langevin equation to describe the nano-conductor’s atomic dynamics, taking the nonequilibrium electron system, as well as the rest of the atomic degrees of freedom as effective baths. We show simple applications of this approach to the problem of energy transfer between electrons and phonons.

  17. Electronic transport on the spatial structure of the protein: Three-dimensional lattice model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, R.G. [Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Piauí, 64800-000 Floriano, PI (Brazil); Frazão, N.F. [Centro de Educação e Saúde, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 581750-000 Cuité, PB (Brazil); Macedo-Filho, A., E-mail: amfilho@gmail.com [Campus Prof. Antonio Geovanne Alves de Sousa, Universidade Estadual do Piauí, 64260-000 Piripiri, PI (Brazil)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • The electronic transport on the structure of the three-dimensional lattice model of the protein is studied. • The signing of the current–voltage is directly affected by permutations of the weak bonds in the structure. • Semiconductor behave of the proteins suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors. - Abstract: We report a numerical analysis of the electronic transport in protein chain consisting of thirty-six standard amino acids. The protein chains studied have three-dimensional structure, which can present itself in three distinct conformations and the difference consist in the presence or absence of thirteen hydrogen-bondings. Our theoretical method uses an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model, appropriate to describe the protein segments modeled by the amino acid chain. We note that the presence and the permutations between weak bonds in the structure of proteins are directly related to the signing of the current–voltage. Furthermore, the electronic transport depends on the effect of temperature. In addition, we have found a semiconductor behave in the models investigated and it suggest a potential application in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  18. Diffraction effects and inelastic electron transport in angle-resolved microscopic imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, A; Nolze, G; Vespucci, S; Naresh-Kumar, G; Trager-Cowan, C; Vilalta-Clemente, A; Wilkinson, A J; Vos, M

    2017-09-01

    We analyse the signal formation process for scanning electron microscopic imaging applications on crystalline specimens. In accordance with previous investigations, we find nontrivial effects of incident beam diffraction on the backscattered electron distribution in energy and momentum. Specifically, incident beam diffraction causes angular changes of the backscattered electron distribution which we identify as the dominant mechanism underlying pseudocolour orientation imaging using multiple, angle-resolving detectors. Consequently, diffraction effects of the incident beam and their impact on the subsequent coherent and incoherent electron transport need to be taken into account for an in-depth theoretical modelling of the energy- and momentum distribution of electrons backscattered from crystalline sample regions. Our findings have implications for the level of theoretical detail that can be necessary for the interpretation of complex imaging modalities such as electron channelling contrast imaging (ECCI) of defects in crystals. If the solid angle of detection is limited to specific regions of the backscattered electron momentum distribution, the image contrast that is observed in ECCI and similar applications can be strongly affected by incident beam diffraction and topographic effects from the sample surface. As an application, we demonstrate characteristic changes in the resulting images if different properties of the backscattered electron distribution are used for the analysis of a GaN thin film sample containing dislocations. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  20. The role of three-dimensional transport in driving enhanced electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, J. T.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important driver of energetic particles in many astrophysical phenomena. Using kinetic particle-in-cell simulations, we explore the impact of three-dimensional reconnection dynamics on the efficiency of particle acceleration. In two-dimensional systems, Alfvénic outflows expel energetic electrons into flux ropes where they become trapped and disconnected from acceleration regions. However, in three-dimensional systems these flux ropes develop an axial structure that enables particles to leak out and return to acceleration regions. This requires a finite guide field so that particles may move quickly along the flux rope axis. We show that greatest energetic electron production occurs when the guide field is of the same order as the reconnecting component: large enough to facilitate strong transport, but not so large as to throttle the dominant Fermi mechanism responsible for efficient electron acceleration. This suggests a natural explanation for the envelope of electron acceleration during the impulsive phase of eruptive flares.

  1. Structural, electronic, mechanical and quantum transport of ultrathin gold nanowire: A density functional approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariwala, P. H.; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2017-06-01

    We have scrutinized the gold (Au) nanowires with distinct cross-section with 1-10 Au atoms for each unit cell by density-functional approach and performed first-principles computation. Here, we have investigated structural, electronic, transport and mechanical characteristic of Au nanowires. The structural characteristic of cubic bulk and nanowires of Au are very diverse from each other. The electronic density of state (DOS) and band structures of different formations express that all the nanowires are very good conductor in nature. The figure of conduction channels leans on number of atoms for each unit cell, diameter and structure of nanowires. We also inspect that the electronic thermal conductivities dependency on the temperature and we found that all the considered AuNWs have low conductivity than that of the bulk Au. Our results show that AuNWs have potential application in electronic devices like nanoelectro-mechanical systems (NEMS).

  2. Modification of the electronic transport in Au by prototypical impurities and interlayers

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, Majida M.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic transport calculations for metallic interfaces based on density functional theory and a scattering theory on the Landauer-Büttiker level are presented. We study the modifications of the transport through Au due to prototypical impurities and interlayers. Our results show that the influence of S and Si impurities is well described in terms of simple vacancies. Metallic impurities and interlayers, on the other hand, have even more drastic effects, in particular when the Au s-d hybrid states at the Fermi energy are perturbed. The effects of a possible interface alloy formation are discussed in detail. © 2010 EPLA.

  3. Electron transport in some transition metal di-chalcogenides: MoS2 and WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, D. K.

    2017-08-01

    The transition metal di-chalcogenides are promising single monolayer materials that hold promise for applications in several fields, including nanoelectronics. Here, I study the transport of electrons in two of these materials, MoS2 and WS2. While the low-field behavior shows very low mobility, due mostly to impurity scattering, the high-field behavior shows a relatively high saturated velocity and a high breakdown field. Complications arise due to the relative narrowness of the conduction band, and the effect of this on the transport is discussed.

  4. Electron transport and room temperature single-electron charging in 10 nm scale PtC nanostructures formed by electron beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Z. A. K.; Jones, M. E.; Wang, C.; Scotuzzi, M.; Hagen, C. W.

    2017-11-01

    Nanostructures of platinum-carbon nanocomposite material have been formed by electron-beam induced deposition. These consist of nanodots and nanowires with a minimum size ∼20 nm, integrated within ∼100 nm nanogap n-type silicon-on-insulator transistor structures. The nanodot transistors use ∼20 nm Pt/C nanodots, tunnel-coupled to Pt/C nanowire electrodes, bridging the Si nanogaps. Room-temperature single-electron transistor operation has been measured, and single-electron current oscillations and ‘Coulomb diamonds’ observed. In nanowire transistors, the temperature dependence from 290 to 8 K suggests that the current is a combination of thermally activated and tunnelling transport of carriers across potential barriers along the current path, and that the Pt/C is p-type at low temperature.

  5. Tunable Interface Non-linear Electron Transport in Semiconductor Nanowire Heterostructure and Its Application in Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guannan

    Understanding the effects of finite size and dimensionality on the interaction of light with nanoscale semiconductor heterostructure is central to identifying and exploiting novel modes in optoelectronic devices. In type-I heterostructured core-shell GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs nanowires, the real space transfer (RST) of photogenerated hot electrons across the interface from the GaAs core to the AlxGa1-xAs shell forms the basis of a new family of optoelectronic devices by a carefully designed and optimized nanofabrication process. Due to the large mobility difference, we observed negative differential resistance (NDR) on single nanowire devices. External modulation of the transfer rates, manifested as a large tunability of the voltage onset of NDR, is achieved using three different modes: electrostatic gating, incident photon flux, and photon energy. In this dissertation, the physics of coupling of external control to transfer rate was investigated. The combined influences of geometric confinement, heterojunction shape and carrier scattering on hot-electron transfer is discussed. Temperature-dependent transport study under monochromatic tunable laser illumination reveals an ultrafast carrier dynamics related to RST of excess carriers, which provides an insight into hot carrier cooling. Device element showing adjustable phase shift and frequency doubling of ac modulation is demonstrated. For a full understanding, Carrier transport properties are probed through electron beam induced current, which is capable of imaging sub-surface feature in excess carrier transport. Along with simulation of injected electron trajectories, selective probing of core and shell by tuning electron beam energies reveals axial and bias dependent transport along parallel channels. The drift and diffusion component of the excess carrier current is deconvoluted from a coupled decay length, from which lower than bulk shell electron mobility is extracted. A precise knowledge of band edge discontinuities at

  6. Solution processed reduced graphene oxide/metal oxide hybrid electron transport layers for highly efficient polymer solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jayawardena, KDGI; Rhodes, R; Gandhi, KK; Prabhath, MRR; Dabera, GDMR; Beliatis, MJ; Rozanski, LJ; Henley, SJ; Silva, SRP

    2013-01-01

    We report new solution processable electron transport layers for organic photovoltaic devices based on composites of metal oxides and reduced graphene oxides. Low bandgap polymer cells fabricated using these nanohybrid transport layers display power conversion efficiencies in the range of 7.4-7.5% which is observed to be an improvement over conventional metal oxide or thermally evaporated electron transport layers. This efficiency enhancement is driven mainly by improvements in the short circ...

  7. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopies for Probing Electronic Structure and Charge Transfer: Applications to Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-11-22

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water, making the elucidation of its design principles critical for our fundamental understanding of photosynthesis and for our ability to mimic PSII’s remarkable properties. This report discusses progress towards addressing key open questions about the PSII RC. It describes new spectroscopic methods that were developed to answer these questions, and summarizes the outcomes of applying these methods to study the PSII RC. Using 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D electronic Stark spectroscopy, models for the PSII RC were tested and refined. Work is ongoing to use the collected data to elucidate the charge separation mechanism in the PSII RC. Coherent dynamics were also observed in the PSII RC for the first time. Through extensive characterization and modeling we have assigned these coherences as vibronic in nature, and believe that they reflect resonances between key vibrational pigment modes and electronic energy gaps that may facilitate charge separation. Work is ongoing to definitively test the functional relevance of electronic-vibrational resonances.

  8. The Role of Shape on Electronic Structure and Charge Transport in Faceted PbSe Nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Kaushik, Ananth P.

    2014-03-25

    We have determined the effect of shape on the charge transport characteristics of nanocrystals. Our study looked at the explicit determination of the electronic properties of faceted nanocrystals that essentially probe the limit of current computational reach, i.e., nanocrystals from 1.53 to 2.1 nm in diameter. These nanocrystals, which resemble PbSe systems, are either bare or covered in short ligands. They also differ in shape, octahedral vs cube-octahedral, and in superlattice symmetry (fcc vs bcc). We have provided insights on electron and hole coupling along different facets and overall charge mobility in bcc and fcc superlattices. We have determined that the relative areas of (100) to (111) facets, and facet atom types are important factors governing the optimization of charge transport. The calculated electronic density of states shows no role of -SCH3 - ligands on states near the band gap. Electron coupling between nanocrystals is significantly higher than that of hole coupling; thiol ligands lower the ratio between electron and hole couplings. Stronger coupling exists between smaller nanocrystals. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  9. Effect of electronic contribution on temperature-dependent thermal transport of antimony telluride thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won-Yong; Park, No-Won [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ji-Eun [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Soon-Gil, E-mail: sgyoon@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Jung-Hyuk [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Kwon, E-mail: sangkwonlee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We investigated thermal transport of the antimony telluride thin films. • The contribution of the electronic thermal conductivity increased up to ∼77% at 300 K. • We theoretically analyze and explain the high contribution of electronic component. - Abstract: We study the theoretical and experimental characteristics of thermal transport of 100 nm and 500 nm-thick antimony telluride (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) thin films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was measured at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K, using four-point-probe 3-ω method. Out-of-plane thermal conductivity of the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film was much lesser in comparison to the bulk material in the entire temperature range, confirming that the phonon- and electron-boundary scattering are enhanced in thin films. Moreover, we found that the contribution of the electronic thermal conductivity (κ{sub e}) in total thermal conductivity (κ) linearly increased up to ∼77% at 300 K with increasing temperature. We theoretically analyze and explain the high contribution of electronic component of thermal conductivity towards the total thermal conductivity of the film by a modified Callaway model. Further, we find the theoretical model predictions to correspond well with the experimental results.

  10. Transport and spatial energy deposition of relativistic electrons in copper-doped fast ignition plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrott, L. C.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F. N.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Qiao, B.; Stoeckl, C.; Betti, R.; Chen, H.; Delettrez, J.; Döppner, T.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Key, M. H.; Luo, R. W.; Marshall, F. J.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Patel, P. K.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Stephens, R. B.; Yabuuchi, T.; Wei, M. S.

    2017-10-01

    Fast electron transport and spatial energy deposition are investigated in integrated cone-guided Fast Ignition experiments by measuring fast electron induced copper K-shell emission using a copper tracer added to deuterated plastic shells with a geometrically reentrant gold cone. Experiments were carried out at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics on the OMEGA/OMEGA-EP Laser where the plastic shells were imploded using 54 of the 60 OMEGA60 beams (3ω, 20 kJ), while the high intensity OMEGA-EP (BL2) beam (1 ω, 10 ps, 500 J, Ipeak > 1019 W/cm2) was focused onto the inner cone tip. A retrograde analysis using the hybrid-PIC electron transport code, ZUMA, is performed to examine the sensitivity of the copper Kα spatial profile on the laser-produced fast electrons, facilitating the optimization of new target point designs and laser configurations to improve the compressed core areal density by a factor of 4 and the fast electron energy coupling by a factor of 3.5.

  11. Transport Properties of an Electron-Hole Bilayer in Contact with a Superconductor Hybrid Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercioux, D; Klapwijk, T M; Bergeret, F S

    2017-08-11

    We investigate the transport properties of a junction consisting of an electron-hole bilayer in contact with normal and superconducting leads. The electron-hole bilayer is considered as a semimetal with two electronic bands. We assume that in the region between the contacts the system hosts an exciton condensate described by a BCS-like model with a gap Γ in the quasiparticle density of states. We first discuss how the subgap electronic transport through the junction is mainly governed by the interplay between two kinds of reflection processes at the interfaces: the standard Andreev reflection at the interface between the superconductor and the exciton condensate, and a coherent crossed reflection at the semimetal-exciton-condensate interface that converts electrons from one layer into the other. We show that the differential conductance of the junction shows a minimum at voltages of the order of Γ/e. Such a minimum can be seen as a direct hallmark of the existence of the gapped excitonic state.

  12. Implicit two-fluid simulation of electron transport in a plasma erosion opening switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.J.; Wallace, J.M.; Lee, K.

    1986-01-01

    The two-dimensional implicit code ANTHEM is used to model electron transport in Plasma Opening Switches. We look at low density (approx.4 x 10/sup 12/cm/sup -3/) switches at initial plasma temperatures as low as 5 eV. Two-fluid modeling (ions and electrons with inertia) and implicit determination of the fields is employed to allow time steps well in excess of the inverse plasma period, and cell sizes much larger than a Debye length - with the avoidance of the finite grid anomalous plasma heating characteristic of particle codes. Features indicative of both erosion and E > B plasma drift are manifest in the simulations.

  13. Electron transport through a linear tri-quantum-dot molecule Aharonov-Bohm interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jiyuan; He, Zelong; Li, Li; Ye, Shujiang; Sun, Weimin

    2017-09-01

    Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function technique, electron transport properties through a two-terminal linear tri-quantum-dot molecule Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) interference are investigated. The conductance as a function of electron energy is numerically calculated. The influence of magnetic flux and interdot coupling strength on the conductance is researched. Fano resonances emerge in the conductance spectrum, and two bound states in the continuum form simultaneously when the interdot couplings take appropriate values. A conductance dip is observed and evolves into an antiresonance band with increasing magnetic flux. The system can be designed as a quantum switch by adjusting the intramolecular couplings.

  14. Giant increase in cross-magnetic-field transport rate as an electron-positron plasma cools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, F. F.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2017-10-01

    An electron-positron plasma in thermal equilibrium within a uniform magnetic field is studied using a classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-magnetic-field single-particle diffusion coefficient is evaluated as a function of the magnetic field strength and plasma temperature. The transport rate is found to increase by many orders of magnitude as the plasma temperature is lowered, for a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The sharp dependence on temperature is due to electrons and positrons becoming temporarily correlated and drifting across the magnetic field before dissociating.

  15. Strain Modulation of Electronic and Heat Transport Properties of Bilayer Boronitrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Sun, Fang-Yuan; Wang, Rui-Ning; Zhang, Hang; Tang, Da-Wei

    2017-10-01

    Strain engineering has been proven as an effective approach to modify electronic and thermal properties of materials. Recently, strain effects on two-dimensional materials have become important relevant topics in this field. We performed density functional theory studies on the electronic and heat transport properties of bilayer boronitrene samples under an isotropic strain. We demonstrate that the strain will reduce the band gap width but keep the band gap type robust and direct. The strain will enhance the thermal conductivity of the system because of the increase in specific heat. The thermal conductivity was studied as a function of the phonon mean-free path.

  16. Electron-phonon interactions in manganites: efect on the electronic transport and magnetization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otero-Leal, M.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-valent manganese oxides with perovskite structure offer a certain degree of chemical flexibility that allows making systematic studies of the relationship between the electric and magnetic properties with the crystalline structure. Here we present magnetic measurements in La2/3(Ca1-xSrx1/3MnO3 that demonstrate that the adiabatic approximation breaks down at low x, due to the strong coupling of the electronic and the lattice degrees of freedom.

    Los óxidos de manganeso con valencia mixta y estructura de perovskita poseen un cierto grado de flexibilidad química que permite hacer estudios sistemáticos entre las propiedades eléctricas y magnéticas, con la estructura cristalina. En este trabajo presentamos medidas magnéticas en la serie La2/3(Ca1-xSrx1/3MnO3 donde se demuestra que la aproximación adiabática falla para pequeñas x, debido el fuerte acoplamiento de los grados de libertad electrónicos y de la red.

  17. Quantum ballistic transport by interacting two-electron states in quasi-one-dimensional channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Danhong [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard St SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Gumbs, Godfrey [Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard St SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Abranyos, Yonatan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Pepper, Michael; Kumar, Sanjeev [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    For quantum ballistic transport of electrons through a short conduction channel, the role of Coulomb interaction may significantly modify the energy levels of two-electron states at low temperatures as the channel becomes wide. In this regime, the Coulomb effect on the two-electron states is calculated and found to lead to four split energy levels, including two anticrossing-level and two crossing-level states. Moreover, due to the interplay of anticrossing and crossing effects, our calculations reveal that the ground two-electron state will switch from one anticrossing state (strong confinement) to a crossing state (intermediate confinement) as the channel width gradually increases and then back to the original anticrossing state (weak confinement) as the channel width becomes larger than a threshold value. This switching behavior leaves a footprint in the ballistic conductance as well as in the diffusion thermoelectric power of electrons. Such a switching is related to the triple spin degeneracy as well as to the Coulomb repulsion in the central region of the channel, which separates two electrons away and pushes them to different channel edges. The conductance reoccurrence region expands from the weak to the intermediate confinement regime with increasing electron density.

  18. Electron transport with re-acceleration and radiation in the jets of X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Fu; Li, Zhi-Ren; Xiang, Fu-Yuan; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2018-01-01

    This paper studies the acceleration processes of background thermal electrons in X-ray binary jets via turbulent stochastic interactions and shock collisions. By considering turbulent magnetized jets mixed with fluctuating magnetic fields and an ordered large-scale magnetic field, and numerically solving the transport equation along the jet axis, we explore the influence on acceleration efficiency of magnetic turbulence, electron injection, the location of the acceleration region and various cooling mechanisms. The results show the following: (1) Dominant turbulent magnetic fields in the jets are necessary to accelerate background thermal electrons to relativistic energies. (2) The acceleration of electrons depends on the type of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and turbulence with a hard slope can accelerate electrons more effectively. (3) The effective acceleration region is located at a distance >103Rg away from the central black hole (Rg being the gravitational radius). As a result of acceleration mechanisms competing with various cooling mechanisms, background thermal electrons gain energy and their spectra are broadened beyond the initial distribution to form a thermal-like distribution. (4) The acceleration mechanisms explored in this work can reasonably provide the maximum electron energy required for interpreting high-energy γ-ray observations from microquasars; however, some extreme parameter values are needed for the possible very high-energy γ-ray signals.

  19. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  20. Silicon based nanogap device for investigating electronic transport through 12 nm long oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strobel, S.; Albert, E.; Csaba, G.

    2009-01-01

    We have fabricated vertical nanogap electrode devices based on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) substrates for investigating the electronic transport properties of long, conjugated molecular wires. Our nanogap electrode devices comprise smooth metallic contact pairs situated at the sidewall of an SOI...... structure, obtained by selective recess-etching a few nanometers thin buried oxide layer and subsequent thin film metallization. The electrodes are separated by a predetermined distance down to about 5 nm and feature a well-tailored material layer structure, as characterized by SEM and scanning TEM analysis....... We studied the electronic transport properties of 12 nm long, specifically synthesized dithiolated oligo-phenylene-vinylene derivatives assembled onto the electrode gap from solution. In particular, we observed a pronounced, non-linear current-voltage characteristic featuring a large conductance gap...

  1. Mathematical modelling of coupled heat and mass transport into an electronic enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Zygimantas; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to high fidelity CFD codes which require higher computational effort/time, the well-known Resistor-Capacitor (RC) approach requires much lower calculation time, but also with a lower resolution of the geometrical arrangement. Therefore, for enclosures without too complex geometry...... in their interior, it is more efficient to use the RC method for thermal management and design of electronic compartments. Thus, the objective of this paper is to build an in-house code based on the RC approach for simulating coupled heat and mass transport into a (closed) electronic enclosure. The developed code...... has the capability of combining lumped components and a 1D description. Heat and mass transport is based on a FVM discretization of the heat conduction equation and Fick's second law. Simulation results are compared with corresponding experimental findings and good agreement is found. Second...

  2. Plasmonic Hot Electron Transport Driven Site-Specific Surface-Chemistry with Nanoscale Spatial Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cortés, Emiliano; Cambiasso, Javier; Jermyn, Adam S; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Narang, Prineha; Schlücker, Sebastian; Maier, Stefan A

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale localization of electromagnetic fields near metallic nanostructures underpins the fundamentals and applications of plasmonics. The unavoidable energy loss from plasmon decay, initially seen as a detriment, has now expanded the scope of plasmonic applications to exploit the generated hot carriers. However, quantitative understanding of the spatial localization of these hot carriers, akin to electromagnetic near-field maps, has been elusive. Here we spatially map hot-electron-driven reduction chemistry with 15 nanometre resolution as a function of time and electromagnetic field polarization for different plasmonic nanostructures. We combine experiments employing a six-electron photo-recycling process that modify the terminal group of a self-assembled monolayer on plasmonic silver nanoantennas, with theoretical predictions from first-principles calculations of non-equilibrium hot-carrier transport in these systems. The resulting localization of reactive regions, determined by hot carrier transport from...

  3. Spherical Harmonic Expansion Method for Coupled Electron-Phonon Boltzmann Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santia, Marco; Albrecht, John

    2014-03-01

    Thermoelectric transport modeling often relies on independent Boltzmann transport equations (BTEs) for electrons and phonons which work best near equilibrium (linearized) and steady-state. Device design relies heavily on this baseline approximation. Monte Carlo methods can allow for complex physical interactions (e.g., anharmonicity) but their stochastic nature has practical limits. Distribution functions with wide disparities in population (e.g., ratios >108 between majority and minority carriers.[1]) are a computational challenge. We present a coupled BTE solver based on a k-space spherical harmonic expansion (SHE) of the distribution functions and eigenstates of electrons and phonons. The method is deterministic and allows for detailed treatments of scattering processes, yet ameliorates the issues with population disparity within phase space. We set the formalism and examine the accuracy of the SHE for phonon band structures, calculate scattering rates determined within that representation, and compare our preliminary results for distribution statistics in control examples such as thermal conductivity and drift velocity.

  4. Electron transport parameters in CO$_2$: scanning drift tube measurements and kinetic computations

    CERN Document Server

    Vass, M; Loffhagen, D; Pinhao, N; Donko, Z

    2016-01-01

    This work presents transport coefficients of electrons (bulk drift velocity, longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and effective ionization frequency) in CO2 measured under time-of-flight conditions over a wide range of the reduced electric field, 15Td <= E/N <= 2660Td in a scanning drift tube apparatus. The data obtained in the experiments are also applied to determine the effective steady-state Townsend ionization coefficient. These parameters are compared to the results of previous experimental studies, as well as to results of various kinetic computations: solutions of the electron Boltzmann equation under different approximations (multiterm and density gradient expansions) and Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental data extend the range of E/N compared with previous measurements and are consistent with most of the transport parameters obtained in these earlier studies. The computational results point out the range of applicability of the respective approaches to determine the different measured tr...

  5. The dependence of electronic transport on compressive deformation of C{sub 60} molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)], E-mail: lihuilmy@hotmail.com; Zhang, X.Q. [Physics Department, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China)

    2008-06-02

    The dependence of electronic transport on compressive deformation of C{sub 60} molecule is studied theoretically in this work. Brenner's 'second generation' empirical potential is used to describe the many-body short-range interatomic interactions for C{sub 60} in the molecular dynamics simulations. Our results demonstrate that C{sub 60} can be compressed up to a strain {epsilon}=0.31 before collapsing. Electronic transport under an applied bias is calculated by using a self-consistent field approach coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The transmission probability, conductance gap, and conductance spectrum are found to be sensitive to the compression. The peak value of conductance decreases with the increase of strain until the C{sub 60} is compressed up to a strain {epsilon}=0.31.

  6. Study of structural and electronic transport properties of Ce-doped ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The structural and electronic transport properties of La1−x Cex MnO3 (x =0.0–1.0) have been studied. All the samples exhibit orthorhombic crystal symmetry and the unit cell volume de- creases with Ce doping. They also make a metal–insulator transition (MIT) and transition temper- ature increases with increase in ...

  7. Significant Electronic Thermal Transport in the Conducting Polymer Poly(3,4‐ethylenedioxythiophene)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weathers, Annie; Khan, Zia Ullah; Brooke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Suspended microdevices are employed to measure the in-plane electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient of suspended poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) thin films. The measured thermal conductivity is higher than previously reported for PEDOT and generally increas...... with the electrical conductivity. The increase exceeds that predicted by the Wiedemann–Franz law for metals and can be explained by significant electronic thermal transport in PEDOT....

  8. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  9. Electronic Commerce: a battle on regulation, standards transportation media and business integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Andersen

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The drive towards the electronic commerce organisation is both a troublesome and a strifted path for government, enterprises and consumers worldwide. In this article we analyse the evolution of electronic commerce in Denmark during the period 1995-1998 from four perspectives: regulation, standards, transportation media and business integration. The Danish government is stimulating the use of electronic commerce using direct and indirect policy initiatives on central, governmental regulation and establishment of greens enabling self-regulation. Also, the governments own, organisational management is in Denmark seen as a mean to exalt electronic commerce. Onwards, the fist on proprietary standards and the UN/EDIFACT is an ongoing source of delaying, stimulating or reventing electronic commerce depending on the business sector and the size of market actor addressed. In Denmark, the direct access and value added network supporters have so far been the dominating mean to transport the electronic documents in the business transaction. The Internet and XML technology is at the turn of the century challenging the way of doing business within this field. Some view this as the big blue to speed the diffusion of electronic commerce; others are worried that the incentive to investment and pull the partners in the value chain to use EDI might be lost. Finally, our study conclude that the debate on business integration issues is ambiguous and characterised by substantial uncertainty on for example the role of intermediates, direct sale, hyper-shift in business partners and the pull/push of global enterprises at the local markets.

  10. Design and engineering of a man-made diffusive electron-transport protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Bryan A; Solomon, Lee A; Leslie Dutton, P; Moser, Christopher C

    2016-05-01

    Maquettes are man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences. Here we focus on water-soluble maquettes designed and engineered to perform diffusive electron transport of the kind typically carried out by cytochromes, ferredoxins and flavodoxins and other small proteins in photosynthetic and respiratory energy conversion and oxido-reductive metabolism. Our designs were tested by analysis of electron transfer between heme maquettes and the well-known natural electron transporter, cytochrome c. Electron-transfer kinetics were measured from seconds to milliseconds by stopped-flow, while sub-millisecond resolution was achieved through laser photolysis of the carbon monoxide maquette heme complex. These measurements demonstrate electron transfer from the maquette to cytochrome c, reproducing the timescales and charge complementarity modulation observed in natural systems. The ionic strength dependence of inter-protein electron transfer from 9.7×10(6) M(-1) s(-1) to 1.2×10(9) M(-1) s(-1) follows a simple Debye-Hückel model for attraction between +8 net charged oxidized cytochrome c and -19 net charged heme maquette, with no indication of significant protein dipole moment steering. Successfully recreating essential components of energy conversion and downstream metabolism in man-made proteins holds promise for in vivo clinical intervention and for the production of fuel or other industrial products. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Coupling electron cryomicroscopy and X-ray crystallography to understand secondary active transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ching-Ju; Ziegler, Christine

    2010-08-01

    In the past few years we have seen an amazing increase in the number of high-resolution structures for secondary transporters determined by X-ray crystallography, while 3D data obtained by electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) from two-dimensional (2D) crystals are only available at medium resolutions of about 6-10A. Despite their superior resolution, it turned out that the description of a molecular mechanism of secondary transport could not solely rely on high-resolution X-ray structures and have to be supplemented with biochemical and spectroscopic data. Moreover, the comparison of X-ray structures and 3D EM maps has proved to be an important tool for validating native conformations of several membrane proteins, especially when functional data contradicted predictions based on a crystal structure. In addition, 3D EM maps are better suited to investigate transporter activation because of the lipidic environment. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Control of thermal and electronic transport in defect-engineered graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin; Kınacı, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Cağın, Tahir

    2011-05-24

    The influence of the structural detail and defects on the thermal and electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is explored by molecular dynamics and non-equilibrium Green's function methods. A variety of randomly oriented and distributed defects, single and double vacancies, Stone-Wales defects, as well as two types of edge form (armchair and zigzag) and different edge roughnesses are studied for model systems similar in sizes to experiments (>100 nm long and >15 nm wide). We observe substantial reduction in thermal conductivity due to all forms of defects, whereas electrical conductance reveals a peculiar defect-type-dependent response. We find that a 0.1% single vacancy concentration and a 0.23% double vacancy or Stone-Wales concentration lead to a drastic reduction in thermal conductivity of GNRs, namely, an 80% reduction from the pristine one of the same width. Edge roughness with an rms value of 7.28 Å leads to a similar reduction in thermal conductivity. Randomly distributed bulk vacancies are also found to strongly suppress the ballistic nature of electrons and reduce the conductance by 2 orders of magnitude. However, we have identified that defects close to the edges and relatively small values of edge roughness preserve the quasi-ballistic nature of electronic transport. This presents a route of independently controlling electrical and thermal transport by judicious engineering of the defect distribution; we discuss the implications of this for thermoelectric performance.

  13. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of single-electron multiple-trapping transport in disordered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Mohammad; Abdi, Yaser

    2017-12-01

    The conventional single-particle Monte Carlo simulation of charge transport in disordered media is based on the truncated density of localized states (DOLS) which benefits from very short time execution. Although this model successfully clarifies the properties of electron transport in moderately disordered media, it overestimates the electron diffusion coefficient for strongly disordered media. The origin of this deviation is discussed in terms of zero-temperature approximation in the truncated DOLS and the ignorance of spatial occupation of localized states. Here, based on the multiple-trapping regime we introduce a modified single-particle kinetic Monte Carlo model that can be used to investigate the electron transport in any disordered media independent from the value of disorder parameter. In the proposed model, instead of using a truncated DOLS we imply the raw DOLS. In addition, we have introduced an occupation index for localized states to consider the effect of spatial occupation of trap sites. The proposed model is justified in a simple cubic lattice of trap sites for broad interval of disorder parameters, Fermi levels, and temperatures.

  14. Competition between deformability and charge transport in semiconducting polymers for flexible and stretchable electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Printz, Adam D.; Lipomi, Darren J., E-mail: dlipomi@ucsd.edu [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, Mail Code 0448, La Jolla, California 92093-0448 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The primary goal of the field concerned with organic semiconductors is to produce devices with performance approaching that of silicon electronics, but with the deformability—flexibility and stretchability—of conventional plastics. However, an inherent competition between deformability and charge transport has long been observed in these materials, and achieving the extreme (or even moderate) deformability implied by the word “plastic” concurrently with high charge transport may be elusive. This competition arises because the properties needed for high carrier mobilities—e.g., rigid chains in π-conjugated polymers and high degrees of crystallinity in the solid state—are antithetical to deformability. On the device scale, this competition can lead to low-performance yet mechanically robust devices, or high-performance devices that fail catastrophically (e.g., cracking, cohesive failure, and delamination) under strain. There are, however, some observations that contradict the notion of the mutual exclusivity of electronic and mechanical performances. These observations suggest that this problem may not be a fundamental trade-off, but rather an inconvenience that may be negotiated by a logical selection of materials and processing conditions. For example, the selection of the poly(3-alkylthiophene) with a critical side-chain length—poly(3-heptylthiophene) (n = 7)—marries the high deformability of poly(3-octylthiophene) (n = 8) with the high electronic performance (as manifested in photovoltaic efficiency) of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (n = 6). This review explores the relationship between deformability and charge transport in organic semiconductors. The principal conclusions are that reducing the competition between these two parameters is in fact possible, with two demonstrated routes being: (1) incorporation of softer, insulating material into a stiffer, semiconducting material and (2) increasing disorder in a highly ordered film, but not

  15. Hall-Effect Thruster Simulations with 2-D Electron Transport and Hydrodynamic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard H.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach that has been used extensively in the last two decades for Hall thruster simulations is to solve a diffusion equation and energy conservation law for the electrons in a direction that is perpendicular to the magnetic field, and use discrete-particle methods for the heavy species. This "hybrid" approach has allowed for the capture of bulk plasma phenomena inside these thrusters within reasonable computational times. Regions of the thruster with complex magnetic field arrangements (such as those near eroded walls and magnets) and/or reduced Hall parameter (such as those near the anode and the cathode plume) challenge the validity of the quasi-one-dimensional assumption for the electrons. This paper reports on the development of a computer code that solves numerically the 2-D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law, with no assumptions regarding the rate of electron transport in the parallel and perpendicular directions. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations in a computational mesh that is aligned with the magnetic field. The fully-2D approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction, and encompasses the cathode boundary. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for charge-exchange and multiple-ionization collisions in the momentum equations. A first series of simulations of two Hall thrusters, namely the BPT-4000 and a 6-kW laboratory thruster, quantifies the significance of ion diffusion in the anode region and the importance of the extended physical domain on studies related to the impact of the transport coefficients on the electron flow field.

  16. Electron injection into hole-transporting layer from emitting layer in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuboi, Taiju [Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kamigamo (Japan); Kishimoto, Tadahi; Wako, Kazuhiro [Research Institute for Advanced Liquid Crystal Technology, Aomori (Japan); Matsuda, Kuniharu; Iguchi, Hirofumi [Tohoku Device Co., Ltd., Hanamaki, Iwate (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Optical and electrical characteristics of organic light emitting diode devices with emitting layer of N,N'-di(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N'-diphenyl-benzidine (NPB) doped with 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0% tris[1-phenylisoquinolinato-C2, N] iridium [Ir(piq){sub 3}] are presented. Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq{sub 3}) and NPB were used as electron and hole transport layers, respectively. Emissions from Ir(piq){sub 3} dopant and Alq{sub 3} have been observed in all the devices. No emission from NPB host was observed even in device with 0.2% dopant concentration. This is understood by the high HOMO gap (0.8 eV) between NPB and Alq{sub 3} and by the very small HOMO gap (0.1 eV) between Ir(piq){sub 3} and Alq{sub 3}, which do not lead to injection of electrons from Alq{sub 3} electron transport layer into NPB host in emitting layer but lead to direct injection of electrons from Alq{sub 3} into Ir(piq){sub 3}. It was found that the driving voltage, external quantum efficiency, and luminous efficiency increase with increasing dopant concentration, but power efficiency decrease. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Spin-orbit coupling, electron transport and pairing instabilities in two-dimensional square structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocharian, Armen N. [Department of Physics, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Fernando, Gayanath W.; Fang, Kun [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Palandage, Kalum [Department of Physics, Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut 06106 (United States); Balatsky, Alexander V. [AlbaNova University Center Nordita, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    Rashba spin-orbit effects and electron correlations in the two-dimensional cylindrical lattices of square geometries are assessed using mesoscopic two-, three- and four-leg ladder structures. Here the electron transport properties are systematically calculated by including the spin-orbit coupling in tight binding and Hubbard models threaded by a magnetic flux. These results highlight important aspects of possible symmetry breaking mechanisms in square ladder geometries driven by the combined effect of a magnetic gauge field spin-orbit interaction and temperature. The observed persistent current, spin and charge polarizations in the presence of spin-orbit coupling are driven by separation of electron and hole charges and opposite spins in real-space. The modeled spin-flip processes on the pairing mechanism induced by the spin-orbit coupling in assembled nanostructures (as arrays of clusters) engineered in various two-dimensional multi-leg structures provide an ideal playground for understanding spatial charge and spin density inhomogeneities leading to electron pairing and spontaneous phase separation instabilities in unconventional superconductors. Such studies also fall under the scope of current challenging problems in superconductivity and magnetism, topological insulators and spin dependent transport associated with numerous interfaces and heterostructures.

  18. Spin-orbit coupling, electron transport and pairing instabilities in two-dimensional square structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen N. Kocharian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rashba spin-orbit effects and electron correlations in the two-dimensional cylindrical lattices of square geometries are assessed using mesoscopic two-, three- and four-leg ladder structures. Here the electron transport properties are systematically calculated by including the spin-orbit coupling in tight binding and Hubbard models threaded by a magnetic flux. These results highlight important aspects of possible symmetry breaking mechanisms in square ladder geometries driven by the combined effect of a magnetic gauge field spin-orbit interaction and temperature. The observed persistent current, spin and charge polarizations in the presence of spin-orbit coupling are driven by separation of electron and hole charges and opposite spins in real-space. The modeled spin-flip processes on the pairing mechanism induced by the spin-orbit coupling in assembled nanostructures (as arrays of clusters engineered in various two-dimensional multi-leg structures provide an ideal playground for understanding spatial charge and spin density inhomogeneities leading to electron pairing and spontaneous phase separation instabilities in unconventional superconductors. Such studies also fall under the scope of current challenging problems in superconductivity and magnetism, topological insulators and spin dependent transport associated with numerous interfaces and heterostructures.

  19. Electronic and thermoelectric transport in graphene double layer structures with boron nitride spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiuning; Wu, Tailung; Tian, Jifa; Chen, Yong

    2013-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been devoted to electrically isolated graphene-graphene double layers in which interaction-driven novel physics such as exciton condensation are predicted. We have used polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based carrier films and a micro-manipulator to transfer mechanically exfoliated flakes onto desired locations with accuracy of ~1 μm. We have fabricated graphene/boron nitride (BN)/graphene stacking structures on BN substrates to study their electronic and thermoelectric transport properties. We observed the low temperature mobility of graphene as high as 75000 cm2/V-s. We have performed Coulomb drag measurements and observed the sign and magnitude dependence of the drag resistivity on the carrier types and densities of both graphene layers, consistent with the previous reports. We also performed thermoelectric transport measurements in such graphene double layer structures, especially in the complementary doped regime (so called excitonic regime) with one layer of electrons and the other layer of holes. Our approach may be useful to probe exciton condensation and other novel physics driven by electron-electron interactions in graphene double layers.

  20. The Gate Hysteresis in Single Electron Transport Driven by Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW/SET) Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Chen, Shuwei

    2017-11-01

    We study the gate hysteresis behavior in single electron transport driven by surface acoustic wave (SAW/SET) devices over a wide temperature range from 1.7 to 200 K. From the temperature dependence, we come to the conclusion that the gate hysteresis in SAW/SET devices arises from a combination of the screening effect of the surface state and the electron tunneling between the moving quantum dot and the impurity quantum dot. In addition, when a perpendicular magnetic field is applied to the sample, the behavior of the gate hysteresis changes substantially. A competition between the magnetic field and the gate voltage on determining the electronic wave function is considered as the reason for the experimental results.

  1. Quantum interference and electron correlation in charge transport through triangular quantum dot molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chieh; Chang, Yia-chung; Kuo, David M T

    2015-03-07

    We study the charge transport properties of triangular quantum dot molecules (TQDMs) connected to metallic electrodes, taking into account all correlation functions and relevant charging states. The quantum interference (QI) effect of TQDMs resulting from electron coherent tunneling between quantum dots is revealed and well interpreted by the long distance coherent tunneling mechanism. The spectra of electrical conductance of TQDMs with charge filling from one to six electrons clearly depict the many-body and topological effects. The calculated charge stability diagram for conductance and total occupation numbers matches well with the recent experimental measurements. We also demonstrate that the destructive QI effect on the tunneling current of TQDMs is robust with respect to temperature variation, making the single electron QI transistor feasible at higher temperatures.

  2. Transport studies of LPA electron beam towards the FEL amplification at COXINEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khojoyan, M., E-mail: martin.khojoyan@synchrotron-soleil.fr; Briquez, F.; Labat, M.; Loulergue, A.; Marcouillé, O.; Marteau, F.; Sharma, G.; Couprie, M.E.

    2016-09-01

    Laser Plasma Acceleration (LPA) [1] is an emerging concept enabling to generate electron beams with high energy, high peak current and small transverse emittance within a very short distance. The use of LPA can be applied to the Free Electron Laser (FEL) [2] case in order to investigate whether it is suitable for the light amplification in the undulator. However, capturing and guiding of such beams to the undulator is very challenging, because of the large divergence and high energy spread of the electron beams at the plasma exit, leading to large chromatic emittances. A specific beam manipulation scheme was recently proposed for the COXINEL (Coherent X-ray source inferred from electrons accelerated by laser) setup, which makes an advantage from the intrinsically large chromatic emittance of such beams [3]. The electron beam transport is studied using two simulation codes: a SOLEIL in-house one and ASTRA [4]. The influence of the collective effects on the electron beam performance is also examined.

  3. Secondary Electron Production and Transport Induced by Fast Protons in Thin Foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toburen, L. H.; Friedland, W.; Dingfelder, M.; Ozturk, N.; Christou, C.; DuBois, R. D.; Lapicki, G.; Shinpaugh, J. L.; Drexler, C. G.; Justiniano, E. L. B.; Paretzke, H. G.

    2003-08-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of charged particle track structure has become an important tool in radiation biology. MC calculations provide detailed spatial information on the production of radiation damage to DNA and other cellular structures. To test the physical parameters used in these models and to explore details of electron transport in condensed matter we have initiated a comparison of MC results to measured doubly differential yields of electrons emitted from thin foils by the passage of fast charged particles. Our initial studies focus on the calculation of differential electron yields resulting from passage of 1-2 MeV protons through thin carbon foils using the MC code PARTRAC developed at the Institute of Radiation Protection — GSF, Neuherberg, Germany. Preliminary calculations are in relatively good agreement with spectra measured for secondary electrons with energies larger than about 50 eV, however large variations are observed for smaller energies. The effects of changes in such parameters as electron mean free path, elastic and inelastic electron scattering cross sections, and foil thickness are illustrated.

  4. Comparative study of electron transport mechanisms in epitaxial and polycrystalline zinc nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Xiang; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Naoomi, E-mail: n-yamada@isc.chubu.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Chubu University, 1200 Matsumoto, Kasugai, Aichi 487–8501 (Japan)

    2016-01-14

    Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2} has been reported to have high electron mobility even in polycrystalline films. The high mobility in polycrystalline films is a striking feature as compared with group-III nitrides. However, the origins of the high mobility have not been elucidated to date. In this paper, we discuss the reason for high mobility in Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2}. We grew epitaxial and polycrystalline films of Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2}. Electron effective mass (m*) was determined optically and found to decrease with a decrease in electron density. Using a nonparabolic conduction band model, the m* at the bottom of the conduction band was derived to be (0.08 ± 0.03)m{sub 0} (m{sub 0} denotes the free electron mass), which is comparable to that in InN. Optically determined intra-grain mobility (μ{sub opt}) in the polycrystalline films was higher than 110 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, resulting from the small m*. The Hall mobility (μ{sub H}) in the polycrystalline films was significantly smaller than μ{sub opt}, indicating that electron transport is impeded by scattering at the grain boundaries. Nevertheless, μ{sub H} higher than 70 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} was achievable owing to the beneficial effect of the high μ{sub opt}. As for the epitaxial films, we revealed that electron transport is hardly affected by grain boundary scattering and is governed solely by ionized impurity scattering. The findings in this study suggest that Zn{sub 3}N{sub 2} is a high-mobility semiconductor with small effective mass.

  5. An overview of the Boltzmann transport equation solution for neutrons, photons and electrons in cartesian geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Barbara D. do Amaral, E-mail: barbara.arodriguez@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Vilhena, Marco Tullio, E-mail: vilhena@mat.ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Pura e Aplicada

    2009-07-01

    Questions regarding accuracy and efficiency of deterministic transport methods are still on our mind today, even with modern supercomputers. The most versatile and widely used deterministic methods are the P{sub N} approximation, the S{sub N} method (discrete ordinates method) and their variants. In the discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) formulations of the transport equation, it is assumed that the linearized Boltzmann equation only holds for a set of distinct numerical values of the direction-of-motion variables. In this work, looking forward to confirm the capabilities of deterministic methods in obtaining accurate results, we present a general overview of deterministic methods to solve the Boltzmann transport equation for neutral and charged particles. First, we describe a review in the Laplace transform technique applied to S{sub N} two dimensional transport equation in a rectangular domain considering Compton scattering. Next, we solved the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, an alternative approach for the Boltzmann transport equation, assuming a monoenergetic electron beam in a rectangular domain. The main idea relies on applying the P{sub N} approximation, a recent advance in the class of deterministic methods, in the angular variable, to the two dimensional Fokker-Planck equation and then applying the Laplace Transform in the spatial x-variable. Numerical results are given to illustrate the accuracy of deterministic methods presented. (author)

  6. Unravelling the progressive role of rattlers in thermoelectric clathrate and strategies for performance improvement: Concurrently enhancing electronic transport and blocking phononic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Yue; Cheng, Long; Hu, Ming

    2017-12-01

    Intermetallic clathrates, one class of guest-host systems with perfectly crystalline structures, hold great potential to be the "phonon glass - electron crystal" thermoelectric materials. Previous studies focus on revealing the atomistic origins of blocked phononic transport, yet little attention is drawn to the enhanced electronic transport. In this work, we investigate the binary type-I M8Si46 (M = Sr, Ba, Tl, and Pb) clathrates and unravel how rattlers concurrently block phononic transport and enhance electronic transport from first-principles. By comparing the empty and filled clathrates, the lattice thermal conductivity is greatly reduced by a factor of 21 due to the decrease in phonon relaxation time for propagative phonons over 0-6 THz by 1.5 orders of magnitude. On the other hand, rattlers bridge charge gaps among cages by donating electrons and thus drastically increase electrical conductivity. The concurrent realization of blocked phononic transport and enhanced electronic transport boosts the figure-of-merit (ZT) of empty clathrate by 4 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, by manipulating metallic rattlers and n-type doping, the power factor is markedly improved and ZT can reach 0.55 at 800 K. These results provide a quantitative description of the guest-host interaction and coupling dynamics from first-principles. The proposed strategy of manipulating ratting atoms and in-situ doping offers important guidance to engineer clathrates with high thermoelectric performance.

  7. Electron transport in mercury vapor: cross sections, pressure and temperature dependence of transport coefficients and NDC effects★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirić, Jasmina; Simonović, Ilija; Petrović, Zoran Lj.; White, Ronald D.; Dujko, Saša

    2017-11-01

    In this work we propose a complete and consistent set of cross sections for electron scattering in mercury vapor. The set is validated through a series of comparisons between swarm data calculated using a multi term theory for solving the Boltzmann equation and Monte Carlo simulations, and the available experimental data. Other sets of cross sections for electron scattering in mercury vapor were also used as input in our numerical codes with the aim of testing their completeness, consistency and accuracy. The calculated swarm parameters are compared with measurements in order to assess the quality of the cross sections in providing data for plasma modeling. In particular, we discuss the dependence of transport coefficients on the pressure and temperature of mercury vapor, and the occurrence of negative differential conductivity (NDC) in the limit of lower values of E/N. We have shown that the phenomenon of NDC is induced by the presence of mercury dimers and that can be controlled by varying either pressure or temperature of mercury vapor. The effective inelastic cross section for mercury dimers is estimated for a range of pressures and temperatures. It is shown that the measured and calculated drift velocities agree very well only if the effective inelastic cross section for mercury dimers and thermal motion of mercury atoms are carefully considered and implemented in numerical calculations. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  8. A study of transport suppression in an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs quantum dot single-electron transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, A. M.; Klochan, O.; Micolich, P.

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of transport blockade features in a quantum dot single-electron transistor, based on an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. We observe suppression of transport through the ground state of the dot, as well as negative differential conductance at finite source-drain bias. The tem......We report a study of transport blockade features in a quantum dot single-electron transistor, based on an undoped AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. We observe suppression of transport through the ground state of the dot, as well as negative differential conductance at finite source-drain bias...

  9. Reactive oxygen intermediates produced by photosynthetic electron transport are enhanced in short-day grown plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelet, Laure; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2012-08-01

    Leaves of tobacco plants grown in short days (8h light) generate more reactive oxygen species in the light than leaves of plants grown in long days (16h light). A two fold higher level of superoxide production was observed even in isolated thylakoids from short day plants. By using specific inhibitors of photosystem II and of the cytochrome b(6)f complex, the site of O(2) reduction could be assigned to photosystem I. The higher rate of O(2) reduction led to the formation of a higher proton gradient in thylakoids from short day plants. In the presence of an uncoupler, the differences in O(2) reduction between thylakoids from short day and long day plants were abolished. The pigment content and the protein content of the major protein complexes of the photosynthetic electron transport chain were unaffected by the growth condition. Addition of NADPH, but not of NADH, to coupled thylakoids from long day plants raised the level of superoxide production to the same level as observed in thylakoids from short day plants. The hypothesis is put forward that the binding of an unknown protein permits the higher rate of pseudocyclic electron flow in thylakoids from short-day grown plants and that this putative protein plays an important role in changing the proportions of linear, cyclic and pseudocyclic electron transport in favour of pseudocyclic electron transport. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of model approximations for electron, hole, and photon transport in swift heavy ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymzhanov, R. A.; Medvedev, N. A.; Volkov, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    The event-by-event Monte Carlo code, TREKIS, was recently developed to describe excitation of the electron subsystems of solids in the nanometric vicinity of a trajectory of a nonrelativistic swift heavy ion (SHI) decelerated in the electronic stopping regime. The complex dielectric function (CDF) formalism was applied in the used cross sections to account for collective response of a matter to excitation. Using this model we investigate effects of the basic assumptions on the modeled kinetics of the electronic subsystem which ultimately determine parameters of an excited material in an SHI track. In particular, (a) effects of different momentum dependencies of the CDF on scattering of projectiles on the electron subsystem are investigated. The 'effective one-band' approximation for target electrons produces good coincidence of the calculated electron mean free paths with those obtained in experiments in metals. (b) Effects of collective response of a lattice appeared to dominate in randomization of electron motion. We study how sensitive these effects are to the target temperature. We also compare results of applications of different model forms of (quasi-) elastic cross sections in simulations of the ion track kinetics, e.g. those calculated taking into account optical phonons in the CDF form vs. Mott's atomic cross sections. (c) It is demonstrated that the kinetics of valence holes significantly affects redistribution of the excess electronic energy in the vicinity of an SHI trajectory as well as its conversion into lattice excitation in dielectrics and semiconductors. (d) It is also shown that induced transport of photons originated from radiative decay of core holes brings the excess energy faster and farther away from the track core, however, the amount of this energy is relatively small.

  11. Temperature-sensitive PSII: a novel approach for sustained photosynthetic hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayro-Kaiser, Vinzenz; Nelson, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    The need for energy and the associated burden are ever growing. It is crucial to develop new technologies for generating clean and efficient energy for society to avoid upcoming energetic and environmental crises. Sunlight is the most abundant source of energy on the planet. Consequently, it has captured our interest. Certain microalgae possess the ability to capture solar energy and transfer it to the energy carrier, H2. H2 is a valuable fuel, because its combustion produces only one by-product: water. However, the establishment of an efficient biophotolytic H2 production system is hindered by three main obstacles: (1) the hydrogen-evolving enzyme, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, is highly sensitive to oxygen; (2) energy conversion efficiencies are not economically viable; and (3) hydrogen-producing organisms are sensitive to stressful conditions in large-scale production systems. This study aimed to circumvent the oxygen sensitivity of this process with a cyclic hydrogen production system. This approach required a mutant that responded to high temperatures by reducing oxygen evolution. To that end, we randomly mutagenized the green microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to generate mutants that exhibited temperature-sensitive photoautotrophic growth. The selected mutants were further characterized by their ability to evolve oxygen and hydrogen at 25 and 37 °C. We identified four candidate mutants for this project. We characterized these mutants with PSII fluorescence, P700 absorbance, and immunoblotting analyses. Finally, we demonstrated that these mutants could function in a prototype hydrogen-producing bioreactor. These mutant microalgae represent a novel approach for sustained hydrogen production.

  12. Understanding the effects of electronic polarization and delocalization on charge-transport levels in oligoacene systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2017-06-13

    Electronic polarization and charge delocalization are important aspects that affect the charge-transport levels in organic materials. Here, using a quantum mechanical/ embedded-charge (QM/EC) approach based on a combination of the long-range corrected omega B97X-D exchange-correlation functional (QM) and charge model 5 (CM5) point-charge model (EC), we evaluate the vertical detachment energies and polarization energies of various sizes of crystalline and amorphous anionic oligoacene clusters. Our results indicate that QM/EC calculations yield vertical detachment energies and polarization energies that compare well with the experimental values obtained from ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements. In order to understand the effect of charge delocalization on the transport levels, we considered crystalline naphthalene systems with QM regions including one or five-molecules. The results for these systems show that the delocalization and polarization effects are additive; therefore, allowing for electron delocalization by increasing the size of the QM region leads to the additional stabilization of the transport levels. Published by AIP Publishing.

  13. Electron and Hole Transport Layers: Their Use in Inverted Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Lattante

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells (BHJ PSCs are very promising organic-based devices for low-cost solar energy conversion, compatible with roll-to-roll or general printing methods for mass production. Nevertheless, to date, many issues should still be addressed, one of these being the poor stability in ambient conditions. One elegant way to overcome such an issue is the so-called “inverted” BHJ PSC, a device geometry in which the charge collection is reverted in comparison with the standard geometry device, i.e., the electrons are collected by the bottom electrode and the holes by the top electrode (in contact with air. This reverted geometry allows one to use a high work function top metal electrode, like silver or gold (thus avoiding its fast oxidation and degradation, and eliminates the need of a polymeric hole transport layer, typically of an acidic nature, on top of the transparent metal oxide bottom electrode. Moreover, this geometry is fully compatible with standard roll-to-roll manufacturing in air and is less demanding for a good post-production encapsulation process. To date, the external power conversion efficiencies of the inverted devices are generally comparable to their standard analogues, once both the electron transport layer and the hole transport layer are fully optimized for the particular device. Here, the most recent results on this particular optimization process will be reviewed, and a general outlook regarding the inverted BHJ PSC will be depicted.

  14. Transport coefficients for electrons in water vapor: definition, measurement, and calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, R E; White, R D; Ness, K F

    2011-02-14

    Comparison of experimental and theoretical transport data for electron swarms in water vapour over a wide range of fields provides a rigorous test of (e(-), H(2)O) scattering cross sections over a correspondingly broad range of energies. That like should be compared with like is axiomatic, but the definition of transport coefficients at high fields, when non-conservative processes are significant, has long been contentious. This paper revisits and distills the most essential aspects of the definition and calculation of transport coefficients, giving numerical results for the drift velocity and ionisation coefficient of electrons in water vapour. In particular, the relationship between the theoretically calculated bulk drift velocities of [K. F. Ness and R. E. Robson, Phys. Rev. A 38, 1446 (1988)] and the experimental "arrival time spectra" drift velocity data of Hasegawa et al. [J. Phys. D 40(8), 2495 (2007)] is established. This enables the Hasegawa et al. data to be reconciliated with the previous literature, and facilitates selection of the best (e(-), H(2)O) cross section set.

  15. Experimental observations of transport of picosecond laser generated electrons in a nail-like target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasley, J.; Wei, M.; Shipton, E.; Chen, S.; Ma, T.; Beg, F. N.; Alexander, N.; Stephens, R.; MacPhee, A. G.; Hey, D.; Le Pape, S.; Patel, P.; Mackinnon, A.; Key, M.; Offermann, D.; Link, A.; Chowdhury, E.; Van-Woerkom, L.; Freeman, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    The transport of relativistic electrons, generated by the interaction of a high intensity (2×1020W/cm2) laser, has been studied in a nail-like target comprised of a 20μm diameter solid copper wire, coated with ˜2μm of titanium, with an 80μm diameter hemispherical termination. A ˜500fs, ˜200J pulse of 1.053μm laser light produced by the Titan Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was focused to a ˜20μm diameter spot centered on the flat face of the hemisphere. Kα fluorescence from the Cu and Ti regions was imaged together with extreme ultraviolet (XUV) emission at 68 and 256eV. Results showed a quasiexponential decline in Kα emission along the wire over a distance of a few hundred microns from the laser focus, consistent with bulk Ohmic inhibition of the relativistic electron transport. Weaker Kα and XUV emission on a longer scale length showed limb brightening suggesting a transition to enhanced transport at the surface of the wire.

  16. Bulk and surface electron transport in topological insulator candidate YbB{sub 6-δ}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glushkov, Vladimir V.; Demishev, Sergey V.; Sluchanko, Nikolay E. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Vavilov str. 38, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskii per. 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Bozhko, Alexey D.; Bogach, Alexey V.; Semeno, Alexey V.; Voronov, Valeriy V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, Vavilov str. 38, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dukhnenko, Anatoliy V.; Filipov, Volodimir B.; Shitsevalova, Natalya Yu. [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science NAS, Krzhyzhanovsky str. 3, 03680, Kiev (Ukraine); Kondrin, Mikhail V. [Vereshchagin Institute of High Pressure Physics of RAS, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Alexey V.; Sannikov, Ilia I. [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' , Kashirskoe Shosse 31, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-15

    We report the study of transport and magnetic properties of the YbB{sub 6-δ}single crystals grown by inductive zone melting. A strong disparity in the low temperature resistivity, Seebeck and Hall coefficients is established for the samples with the different level of boron deficiency. The effective parameters of the charge transport in YbB{sub 6-δ} are shown to depend on the concentration of intrinsic defects, which is estimated to range from 0.09% to 0.6%. The pronounced variation of Hall mobility μ{sub H} found for bulk holes is induced by the decrease of transport relaxation time from τ ∼ 7.7 fs for YbB{sub 5.994} to τ ∼ 2.2 fs for YbB{sub 5.96}. An extra contribution to conductivity from electrons with μ{sub H}∼ -1000 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1} and the very low concentration n /n{sub Yb}∼ 10{sup -6} discovered below 20 K for all the single crystals under investigation is suggested to arise from the surface electron states appeared in the inversion layer due to the band bending. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. ITS Version 6 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2008-04-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of lineartime-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 90. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.

  18. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.

    1994-11-01

    The goal of this particular task is to consider, for the first time, the explicit transport of beta particles and photon-generated electrons in the series of six phantoms developed by Cristy and Eckerman (1987) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In their report, ORNL/TM-8381, specific absorbed fractions of energy are reported for phantoms representing the newborn (3.4 kg), the one-year-old (9.8 kg), the five-year-old (19 kg), the ten-year-old (32 kg), the fifteen-year-old/adult female (55-58 kg), and the adult male (70 kg). Radiation transport calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo code ALGAMP which allows photon transport only. In subsequent calculations of radionuclide S values as is done in the MIRDOSE2 computer program, electron absorbed fractions are thus considered to be either unity or zero depending upon whether the source region does or does not equal the target region, respectively.

  19. Dopant controlled trap-filling and conductivity enhancement in an electron-transport polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Andrew, E-mail: aehiggin@princeton.edu, E-mail: kahn@princeton.edu; Kahn, Antoine, E-mail: aehiggin@princeton.edu, E-mail: kahn@princeton.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-5263 (United States); Mohapatra, Swagat K.; Barlow, Stephen; Marder, Seth R. [Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400 (United States)

    2015-04-20

    Charge transport in organic semiconductors is often inhibited by the presence of tail states that extend into the band gap of a material and act as traps for charge carriers. This work demonstrates the passivation of acceptor tail states by solution processing of ultra-low concentrations of a strongly reducing air-stable organometallic dimer, the pentamethylrhodocene dimer, [RhCp*Cp]{sub 2}, into the electron transport polymer poly([N,N′-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide) -2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5′-(2,2′-bithiophene)), P(NDI{sub 2}OD-T{sub 2}). Variable-temperature current-voltage measurements of n-doped P(NDI{sub 2}OD-T{sub 2}) are presented with doping concentration varied through two orders of magnitude. Systematic variation of the doping parameter is shown to lower the activation energy for hopping transport and enhance film conductivity and electron mobility.

  20. The electron transport system of the anaerobic Propionibacterium shermanii: cytochrome and inhibitor studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, A C; Sporkenbach, J

    1975-03-10

    1. Electron transport particles obtained from cell-free extracts of Propionibacterium shermanii by centrifugation at 105000 times g for 3 hrs oxidized NADH, D,L-lactate, L-glycerol-3-phosphate and succinate with oxygen and, except for succinate, with fumarate, too. 2. Spectral investigation of the electron transport particles revealed the presence of cytochromes b, d and o, and traces of cytochrome alpha1 and a c-type cytochrome. Cytochrome b was reduced by succinate to about 50%, and by NADH, lactate or glycerol-3-phosphate to 80--90%. 3. The inhibitory effects of amytal and rotenone on NADH oxidation, but not on the oxidation of the other substrates, indicated the presence of the NADH dehydrogenase complex, or "site I region", in the electron transport system of P. shermanii. 4. NQNO inhibited substrate oxidations by oxygen and fumarate, as well as equilibration of the flavoproteins of the substrate dehydrogenases by way of menaquinone. The inhibition occurred at low concentrations of the inhibitor and reached 80--100%, depending on the substrate tested. The site of inhibition of the respiratory activity was located between menaquinone and cytochrome b. In addition, inhibition of flavoprotein equilibration suggested that NQNO acted upon the electron transfer directed from menaquinol towards the acceptor to be reduced, either cytochrome b or the flavoproteins, which would include fumarate reductase. 5. In NQNO-inhibited particles, cytochrome b was not oxidized by oxygen-free fumarate, but readily oxidized by oxygen. It was concluded from this and the above evidence that the branching-point of the electron transport chain towards fumarate reductase was located at the menaquinone in P. shermanii. It was further concluded that all cytochromes were situated in the oxygen-linked branch of the chain, which formed a dead end of the system under anaerobic conditions. 6. Antimycin A inhibited only oxygen-linked reactions of the particles to about 50% at high concentrations

  1. Experimental verification of NOVICE transport code predictions of electron distributions from targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, S.; Brucker, G.J.; Jordan, T.; Bechtel, E.; Gentner, F.; Groeber, E

    2002-04-01

    This paper reports the results of experiments that were designed to check the validity of the NOVICE Adjoint Monte Carlo Transport code in predicting emission-electron distributions from irradiated targets. Previous work demonstrated that the code accurately calculated total electron yields from irradiated targets. In this investigation, a gold target was irradiated by X-rays with effective quantum energies of 79, 127, 174, 216, and 250 keV. Spectra of electrons from the target were measured for an incident photon angle of 45 deg., an emission-electron polar angle of 45 deg., azimuthal angles of 0 deg. and 180 deg., and in both the forward and backward directions. NOVICE was used to predict those electron-energy-distributions for the same set of experimental conditions. The agreement in shape of the theoretical and experimental distributions was good, whereas the absolute agreement in amplitude was within about a factor of 2 over most of the energy range of the spectra. Previous experimental and theoretical comparisons together with these results show that the code can be used to simulate the generation physics of those distributions.

  2. Experimental verification of NOVICE transport code predictions of electron distributions from targets

    CERN Document Server

    Kronenberg, S; Jordan, T; Bechtel, E; Gentner, F; Groeber, E

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the results of experiments that were designed to check the validity of the NOVICE Adjoint Monte Carlo Transport code in predicting emission-electron distributions from irradiated targets. Previous work demonstrated that the code accurately calculated total electron yields from irradiated targets. In this investigation, a gold target was irradiated by X-rays with effective quantum energies of 79, 127, 174, 216, and 250 keV. Spectra of electrons from the target were measured for an incident photon angle of 45 deg., an emission-electron polar angle of 45 deg., azimuthal angles of 0 deg. and 180 deg., and in both the forward and backward directions. NOVICE was used to predict those electron-energy-distributions for the same set of experimental conditions. The agreement in shape of the theoretical and experimental distributions was good, whereas the absolute agreement in amplitude was within about a factor of 2 over most of the energy range of the spectra. Previous experimental and theoretical c...

  3. Cold-acclimation limits low temperature induced photoinhibition by promoting a higher photochemical quantum yield and a more effective PSII restoration in darkness in the Antarctic rather than the Andean ecotype of Colobanthus quitensis Kunt Bartl (Cariophyllaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bascuñán-Godoy Luisa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecotypes of Colobanthus quitensis Kunt Bartl (Cariophyllaceae from Andes Mountains and Maritime Antarctic grow under contrasting photoinhibitory conditions, reaching differential cold tolerance upon cold acclimation. Photoinhibition depends on the extent of photodamage and recovery capability. We propose that cold acclimation increases resistance to low-temperature-induced photoinhibition, limiting photodamage and promoting recovery under cold. Therefore, the Antarctic ecotype (cold hardiest should be less photoinhibited and have better recovery from low-temperature-induced photoinhibition than the Andean ecotype. Both ecotypes were exposed to cold induced photoinhibitory treatment (PhT. Photoinhibition and recovery of photosystem II (PSII was followed by fluorescence, CO2 exchange, and immunoblotting analyses. Results The same reduction (25% in maximum PSII efficiency (Fv/Fm was observed in both cold-acclimated (CA and non-acclimated (NA plants under PhT. A full recovery was observed in CA plants of both ecotypes under dark conditions, but CA Antarctic plants recover faster than the Andean ecotype. Under PhT, CA plants maintain their quantum yield of PSII, while NA plants reduced it strongly (50% and 73% for Andean and Antarctic plants respectively. Cold acclimation induced the maintenance of PsaA and Cyt b6/f and reduced a 41% the excitation pressure in Antarctic plants, exhibiting the lowest level under PhT. xCold acclimation decreased significantly NPQs in both ecotypes, and reduced chlorophylls and D1 degradation in Andean plants under PhT. NA and CA plants were able to fully restore their normal photosynthesis, while CA Antarctic plants reached 50% higher photosynthetic rates after recovery, which was associated to electron fluxes maintenance under photoinhibitory conditions. Conclusions Cold acclimation has a greater importance on the recovery process than on limiting photodamage. Cold acclimation determined the

  4. Neutron, electron and photon transport in ICF tragets in direct and fast ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parvazian

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusion energy due to inertial confinement has progressed in the last few decades. In order to increase energy efficiency in this method various designs have been presented. The standard scheme for direct ignition and fast ignition fuel targets are considered. Neutrons, electrons and photons transport in targets containing different combinations of Li and Be are calculated in both direct and fast ignition schemes. To compress spherical multilayer targets having fuel in the central part, they are irradiated by laser or heavy ion beams. Neutrons energy deposition in the target is considered using Monte Carlo method code MCNP. A significant amount of neutrons energy is deposited in the target which resulted in growing fusion reactions rates. It is found that Beryllium compared to Lithium is more important. In an introductory consideration of relativistic electron beam transport into central part of a fast ignition target, we have calculated electron energy deposition in highly dense D-T fuel and Beryllium layer of the target. It has been concluded that a fast ignition scheme is preferred to direct ignition because of the absence of hydrodynamic instability.

  5. Graphene for amino acid biosensing: Theoretical study of the electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, S. J.; Makinistian, L.; Albanesi, E. A.

    2017-10-01

    The study of biosensors based on graphene has increased in the last years, the combination of excellent electrical properties and low noise makes graphene a material for next generation electronic devices. This work discusses the application of a graphene-based biosensor for the detection of amino acids histidine (His), alanine (Ala), aspartic acid (Asp), and tyrosine (Tyr). First, we present the results of modeling from first principles the adsorption of the four amino acids on a graphene sheet, we calculate adsorption energy, substrate-adsorbate distance, equilibrium geometrical configurations (upon relaxation) and densities of states (DOS) for each biomolecule adsorbed. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the effects of amino acid adsorption on the electronic transport of graphene, we modeled a device using first-principles calculations with a combination of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Nonequilibrium Greens Functions (NEGF). We provide with a detailed discussion in terms of transmission, current-voltage curves, and charge transfer. We found evidence of differences in the electronic transport through the graphene sheet due to amino acid adsorption, reinforcing the possibility of graphene-based sensors for amino acid sequencing of proteins.

  6. Role of Mitochondrial Reverse Electron Transport in ROS Signaling: Potential Roles in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Scialò

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS can cause oxidative damage and have been proposed to be the main cause of aging and age-related diseases including cancer, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, mitochondria from old individuals have higher levels of ROS. However, ROS also participate in cellular signaling, are instrumental for several physiological processes and boosting ROS levels in model organisms extends lifespan. The current consensus is that low levels of ROS are beneficial, facilitating adaptation to stress via signaling, whereas high levels of ROS are deleterious because they trigger oxidative stress. Based on this model the amount of ROS should determine the physiological effect. However, recent data suggests that the site at which ROS are generated is also instrumental in determining effects on cellular homeostasis. The best example of site-specific ROS signaling is reverse electron transport (RET. RET is produced when electrons from ubiquinol are transferred back to respiratory complex I, reducing NAD+ to NADH. This process generates a significant amount of ROS. RET has been shown to be instrumental for the activation of macrophages in response to bacterial infection, re-organization of the electron transport chain in response to changes in energy supply and adaptation of the carotid body to changes in oxygen levels. In Drosophila melanogaster, stimulating RET extends lifespan. Here, we review what is known about RET, as an example of site-specific ROS signaling, and its implications for the field of redox biology.

  7. Engineering band gap and electronic transport in organic-inorganic halide perovskites by superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Kottokkaran, Ranjith; Dalal, Vikram L; Balasubramanian, Ganesh

    2017-06-29

    Organic/inorganic lead and tin halide perovskites (CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3SnI3) have been promising for photovoltaics because of their high charge carrier mobility, and large absorption coefficient and diffusion length. Both these perovskites also have a notable Seebeck coefficient, depending on the doping level, indicating their potential as thermoelectrics. We create superlattices of these hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskites and investigate electronic transport through them using first principles computations and experiments. While the transverse components of electrical and electronic thermal conductivities for the superlattices are higher than those for simple perovskite lattices, their longitudinal counterparts are 103 times smaller resulting in overall lower transport coefficients. The superlattice structures have more carriers, but with less average energy compared to pure perovskites causing a lower Seebeck coefficient. However, with the impedance to thermal conduction being relatively stronger than that to charge transfer, the electronic thermoelectric figure of merit of superlattices is higher. Our results lead towards a unique opportunity to engineer the band gap of perovskites by nanostructuring for thermoelectric and optoelectronic applications.

  8. Ab-initio electron scattering cross-sections and transport in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, Greg; Cocks, Daniel; Brunger, Michael; Buckman, Steve; Dujko, Sasa; White, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Ab-initio electron - liquid phase xenon fully differential cross-sections for electrons scattering in liquid xenon are developed from a solution of the Dirac-Fock scattering equations, using a recently developed framework [1] which considers multipole polarizabilities, a non-local treatment of exchange, and screening and coherent scattering effects. A multi-term solution of Boltzmann's equation accounting for the full anisotropic nature of the differential cross-section is used to calculate transport properties of excess electrons in liquid xenon. The results were found to agree to within 25% of the measured mobilities and characteristic energies over the reduced field range of 10^{-4} to 1 Td. The accuracies are comparable to those achieved in the gas phase. A simple model, informed by highly accurate gas-phase cross-sections, is presented to transform highly accurate gas-phase cross-sections to improve the liquid cross-sections, which was found to enhance the accuracy of the transport coefficient calculatio...

  9. Stoichiometry of vectorial H+ movements coupled to electron transport and to ATP synthesis in mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Adolfo; Reynafarje, Baltazar; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1978-01-01

    In order to verify more directly our earlier measurements showing that, on the average, close to four vectorial H+ are rejected per pair of electrons passing each of the three energy-conserving sites of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, direct tests of the H+/2e- ratio for sites 2 and 3 were carried out in the presence of permeant charge-compensating cations. Site 2 was examined by utilizing succinate as electron donor and ferricyanide as electron acceptor from mitochondrial cytochrome c; the directly measured H+/2e- ratio was close to 4. Energy-conserving site 3 was isolated for study with ferrocyanide or ascorbate plus tetramethylphenylenediamine as electron donors to cytochrome c and with oxygen as electron acceptor. The directly measured H+/2e- ratio for site 3 was close to 4. The H+/ATP ratio (number of vectorial H+ ejected per ATP hydrolyzed) was determined with a new method in which the steady-state rates of both H+ ejection and ATP hydrolysis were measured in the presence of K+ + valinomycin. The H+/ATP ratio was found to approach 3.0. A proton cycle for oxidative phosphorylation is proposed, in which four electrochemical H+ equivalents are ejected per pair of electrons passing each energy-conserving site; three of the H+ equivalents pass inward to derive ATP synthesis from ADP and phosphate and the fourth H+ is used to bring about the energy-requiring electrogenic expulsion of ATP4- in exchange for extramitochondrial ADP3-, via the H+/H2PO4- symporter. PMID:31621

  10. Electron transport and low-temperature electrical and galvanomagnetic properties of zinc oxide and indium oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Kytin, V. G.; Reukova, O. V.; Burova, L. I.; Kaul, A. R.; Ulyashin, A. G.

    2015-02-01

    The electrical and galvanomagnetic properties of zinc oxide films with and without gallium, aluminum, and cobalt doping and of tin-doped indium oxide films are studied over a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields. It is shown that the mechanism for electron transport in these films changes from band to hopping transport as the degree of crystallinity of the films is reduced because of the methods and conditions for their synthesis. The change in the dimensionality of the films with band electron transport at low temperatures is studied in terms of the weak localization induced by a magnetic field. The localization radius and density of electron states in the Fermi level are estimated for the films with a hopping electron transport.

  11. Electron Temperature Fluctuation Measurements and Transport Model Validation at Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Anne [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-06-22

    for studying core turbulence are needed in order to assess the accuracy of gyrokinetic models for turbulent-driven particle, heat and momentum transport. New core turbulence diagnostics at the world-class tokamaks Alcator C-Mod at MIT and ASDEX Upgrade at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics have been designed, developed, and operated over the course of this project. These new instruments are capable of measuring electron temperature fluctuations and the phase angle between density and temperature fluctuations locally and quantitatively. These new data sets from Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX Upgrade are being used to fill key gaps in our understanding of turbulent transport in tokamaks. In particular, this project has results in new results on the topics of the Transport Shortfall, the role of ETG turbulence in tokamak plasmas, profile stiffness, the LOC/SOC transition, and intrinsic rotation reversals. These data are used in a rigorous process of “Transport model validation”, and this group is a world-leader on using turbulence models to design new hardware and new experiments at tokamaks. A correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) diagnostic is an instrument used to measure micro-scale fluctuations (mm-scale, compared to the machine size of meters) of electron temperature in magnetically confined fusion plasmas, such as those in tokamaks and stellarators. These micro-scale fluctuations are associated with drift-wave type turbulence, which leads to enhanced cooling and mixing of particles in fusion plasmas and limits achieving the required temperatures and densities for self-sustained fusion reactions. A CECE system can also be coupled with a reflectometer system that measured micro-scale density fluctuations, and from these simultaneous measurements, one can extract the phase between the density (n) and temperature (T) fluctuations, creating an nT phase diagnostic. Measurements of the fluctuations and the phase angle between them are extremely useful for

  12. Modification of argon impurity transport by electron cyclotron heating in KSTAR H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joohwan; Henderson, S. S.; Kim, Kimin; Seon, C. R.; Song, Inwoo; Lee, H. Y.; Jang, Juhyeok; Park, Jae Sun; Lee, S. G.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, Seung Hun; Hong, Suk-Ho; Choe, Wonho

    2017-03-01

    Experiments with a small amount of Ar gas injection as a trace impurity were conducted in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) H-mode plasma ({{B}\\text{T}}   =  2.8 T, {{I}\\text{P}}   =  0.6 MA, and {{P}\\text{NBI}}   =  4.0 MW). 170 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) at 600 and 800 kW was focused along the mid-plane with a fixed major radial position of R   =  1.66 m. The emissivity of the Ar16+ (3.949 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) and Ar15+ (353.860 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) spectral lines were measured by x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy (XICS) and a vacuum UV (VUV) spectrometer, respectively. ECH reduces the peak Ar15+ emission and increases the Ar16+ emission, an effect largest with 800 kW. The ADAS-SANCO impurity transport code was used to evaluate the Ar transport coefficients. It was found that the inward convective velocity found in the plasma core without ECH was decreased with ECH, while diffusion remained approximately constant resulting in a less-peaked Ar density profile. Theoretical results from the NEO code suggest that neoclassical transport is not responsible for the change in transport, while the microstability analysis using GKW predicts a dominant ITG mode during both ECH and non-ECH plasmas.

  13. Effects of hole and electron transporting interlayers for inverted polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung Min; Kim, Jae-Ryoung; Kim, Hong Il; Lee, Jong-Cheol; Lee, Sang Kyu; Moon, Sang-Jin; Yoo, Seunghyup; Shin, Won Suk

    2014-08-01

    An efficient inverted polymer solar cell (PSC) with a transparent amorphous titanium oxide (TiOx) as an electron transporting layer (ETL) between bottom electrode and photo-active layer, and a tungsten oxide (WO3) inserted as a hole transporting layer (HTL) was fabricated. Introducing of ETL and HTL results in increases in the open circuit voltage (VOC), short circuit current (JSC) and the fill factor (FF). The inverted PSC device with TiOx and WO3 layer showed the higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) than that of conventional PSC. The PCE of 3.73% was achieved at inverted device, and was retained over 87% of its initial efficiency after 25 days in the ambient air without encapsulation.

  14. Electronic transport in armchair graphene nanoribbon under double magnetic barrier modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyan; Wu, Chao; Xie, Fang; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Zhou, Guanghui

    2018-03-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the transport properties and the magnetoresistance effect in armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) under modulation by two magnetic barriers. The energy levels are found to be degenerate for a metallic AGNR but are not degenerate for a semiconducting AGNR. However, the conductance characteristics show quantized plateaus in both the metallic and semiconducting cases. When the magnetization directions of the barriers change from parallel to antiparallel, the conductance plateau in the metallic AGNR shows a degenerate feature due to matching between the transport modes in different regions. As the barrier height increases, the conductance shows more oscillatory behavior with sharp peaks and troughs. Specifically, the initial position of nonzero conductance for the metallic AGNR system moves towards a higher energy regime, which indicates that an energy gap has been opened. In addition, the magnetoresistance ratio also shows plateau structures in certain specific energy regions. These results may be useful in the design of electron devices based on AGNR nanostructures.

  15. Edge modulation of electronics and transport properties of cliff-edge phosphorene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Caixia; Wang, Tianxing; Xia, Congxin; Liu, Yufang

    2017-12-01

    Based on the first-principles calculations, we study the electronic structures and transport properties of cliff-like edge phosphorene nanoribbons (CPNRs), considering different types of edge passivation. The band structures of bare CPNRs possess the metallic features; while hydrogen (H), fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl) and oxygen (O) atoms-passivated CPNRs are semiconductor materials, and the band gap values monotonically decrease when the ribbon width increases. Moreover, the H and F-passivated CPNRs exhibit the direct band gap characteristics, while the Cl and O-passivated cases show the features of indirect band gap. In addition, the edge passivated CPNRs are more energetically stable than bare edge case. Meanwhile, our results also show that the transport properties of the CPNRs can be obviously influenced by the different edge passivation.

  16. Effects of acute O3 stress on PSII and PSI photochemistry of sensitive and resistant snap bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), probed by prompt chlorophyll "a" fluorescence and 820 nm modulated reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Elisabetta; Fusaro, Lina; Strasser, Reto J; Bussotti, Filippo; Manes, Fausto

    2015-12-01

    The response of PSII and PSI photochemistry to acute ozone (O3) stress was tested in a "model plant system", namely the O3 sensitive (S156) and O3 resistant (R123) genotype pairs of Phaseolus vulgaris L., during a phenological phase of higher O3 sensitivity (pod formation). The modulation of the photosynthetic activity during O3 stress was analysed by measuring gas exchanges, Prompt Fluorescence (PF, JIP-test) and 820 nm Modulated Reflectance (MR), a novel techniques which specifically detects the changes in the redox state of P700 and plastocyanin. The results showed that, coherently with genotypic-specific O3 sensitivity, the response of the two snap bean genotypes differed for the intensity and time of onset of the considered physiological changes. In fact, despite leaf injury and gas exchanges reduction appeared concurrently in both genotypes, S156 showed a PSII down regulation already after the first day of fumigation (DOF), and an enhancement of Cyclic Electron Flow of PSI after the second DOF, whereas R123 showed only slight adjustments until the third DOF, when the activity of both photosystems was down-regulated. Despite these differences, it is possible to distinguish in both genotypes an early O3 response of the photochemical apparatus, involving PSII only, and a following response, in which PSI activity and content are also modulated. The measurement of the MR signal, performed simultaneously with the PF measurements and the JIP-test analysis, has allowed a better understanding of the role that PSI plays in the O3 stress response of the S156/R123 model plant system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of functioning of mitochondrial electron transport chain with NADH and FAD autofluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Danylovych

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We prove the feasibility of evaluation of mitochondrial electron transport chain function in isolated mitochondria of smooth muscle cells of rats from uterus using fluorescence of NADH and FAD coenzymes. We found the inversely directed changes in FAD and NADH fluorescence intensity under normal functioning of mitochondrial electron transport chain. The targeted effect of inhibitors of complex I, III and IV changed fluorescence of adenine nucleotides. Rotenone (5 μM induced rapid increase in NADH fluorescence due to inhibition of complex I, without changing in dynamics of FAD fluorescence increase. Antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor, in concentration of 1 μg/ml caused sharp increase in NADH fluorescence and moderate increase in FAD fluorescence in comparison to control. NaN3 (5 mM, a complex IV inhibitor, and CCCP (10 μM, a protonophore, caused decrease in NADH and FAD fluorescence. Moreover, all the inhibitors caused mitochondria swelling. NO donors, e.g. 0.1 mM sodium nitroprusside and sodium nitrite similarly to the effects of sodium azide. Energy-dependent Ca2+ accumulation in mitochondrial matrix (in presence of oxidation substrates and Mg-ATP2- complex is associated with pronounced drop in NADH and FAD fluorescence followed by increased fluorescence of adenine nucleotides, which may be primarily due to Ca2+-dependent activation of dehydrogenases of citric acid cycle. Therefore, the fluorescent signal of FAD and NADH indicates changes in oxidation state of these nucleotides in isolated mitochondria, which may be used to assay the potential of effectors of electron transport chain.

  18. Modeling Transport of Relativistic Electrons through Warm-Dense Matter Using Collisional PIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J.; McGuffey, C.; Yabuuchi, T.; Wei, Ms; Beg, F.; Mori, Wb

    2017-10-01

    In electron transport experiments performed on the OMEGA EP laser system, a relativistic electron beam was created by focusing a high intensity (eA /me c > 1) laser onto a gold (Au) foil. Behind the Au foil was a layer of plastic (CH) foam, with an initial density of 200mg /cm3 . Before the high intensity laser was switched on, this foam was either left unperturbed; or it was shocked using a lower intensity laser (eA /me c 10-4) with beam path perpendicular to the high intensity laser, which left the CH layer in a warm dense matter (WDM) state with temperature of 40 eV and density of 30mg /cm3 . The electron beam was imaged by observing the k- α signal from a copper foil on the far side from the Au. The result was that transport was decreased by an order of magnitude in the WDM compared to the cold foam. We have modeled this experiment using the PIC code OSIRIS, with also a Monte Carlo Coulomb collision package. Our simulations indicate that the main cause of the differences in transport is a collimating magnetic field in the higher density, cold foam, created by collisional resistivity. The plasma density of the Au layer, difficult to model fully in PIC, appears to effect the heat capacity and therefore temperature and resistivity of the target. The authors acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy under contract DE-NA 0001833 and the National Science Foundation under contract ACI 1339893.

  19. Okadaic acid inhibits cell growth and photosynthetic electron transport in the alga Dunaliella tertiolecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perreault, Francois; Matias, Marcelo Seleme; Oukarroum, Abdallah [Department of Chemistry, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 2101, Rue Jeanne Mance, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 2J6 (Canada); Matias, William Gerson [Department of Chemistry, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 2101, Rue Jeanne Mance, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 2J6 (Canada); Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, LABTOX, Depto. de Engenharia Sanitaria e Ambiental, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario, CEP: 88040-970, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Popovic, Radovan, E-mail: popovic.radovan@uqam.ca [Department of Chemistry, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, 2101, Rue Jeanne Mance, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 2J6 (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), which is produced by several dinoflagellate species, is a phycotoxin known to induce a decrease of biomass production in phytoplankton. However, the mechanisms of OA cytotoxicity are still unknown in microalgae. In this study, we exposed the green microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta to OA concentrations of 0.05 to 0.5 {mu}M in order to evaluate its effects on cell division, reactive oxygen species production and photosynthetic electron transport. After 72 h of treatment under continuous illumination, OA concentrations higher than 0.10 {mu}M decreased culture cell density, induced oxidative stress and inhibited photosystem II electron transport capacity. OA effect in D. tertiolecta was strongly light dependent since no oxidative stress was observed when D. tertiolecta was exposed to OA in the dark. In the absence of light, the effect of OA on culture cell density and photosystem II activity was also significantly reduced. Therefore, light appears to have a significant role in the toxicity of OA in microalgae. Our results indicate that the site of OA interaction on photosynthetic electron transport is likely to be at the level of the plastoquinone pool, which can lead to photo-oxidative stress when light absorbed by the light-harvesting complex of photosystem II cannot be dissipated via photochemical pathways. These findings allowed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of OA toxicity in microalgae. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposition of Dunaliella tertiolecta to okadaic acid in light conditions results in reactive oxygen species formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of photosystem II is dependent on oxidative stress and effects of okadaic acid on the plastoquinone pool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress and inhibition of photosynthesis increase okadaic acid effect on cell density in light conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Okadaic acid induces toxicity in algae via both light-dependent and light

  20. Integrated electronic transport and thermometry at milliKelvin temperatures and in strong magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkharadze, N; Kumar, A; Manfra, M J; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Csáthy, G A

    2011-05-01

    We fabricated a He-3 immersion cell for transport measurements of semiconductor nanostructures at ultra low temperatures and in strong magnetic fields. We have a new scheme of field-independent thermometry based on quartz tuning fork Helium-3 viscometry which monitors the local temperature of the sample's environment in real time. The operation and measurement circuitry of the quartz viscometer is described in detail. We provide evidence that the temperature of two-dimensional electron gas confined to a GaAs quantum well follows the temperature of the quartz viscometer down to 4 mK.

  1. Vanishing magnetic shear and electron transport barriers in the RFX-mod reversed field pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbin, M; Bonfiglio, D; Escande, D F; Fassina, A; Marrelli, L; Alfier, A; Martines, E; Momo, B; Terranova, D

    2011-01-14

    We define the safety factor q for the helical plasmas of the experiment RFX-mod by accounting for the actual three-dimensional nature of the magnetic flux surfaces. Such a profile is not monotonic but goes through a maximum located in the vicinity of the electron transport barriers measured by a high resolution Thomson scattering diagnostic. Helical states with a single axis obtained in viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations exhibit similar nonmonotonic q profiles provided that the final states are preceded by a magnetic island phase, like in the experiment.

  2. Revealing thermal effects in the electronic transport through irradiated atomic metal point contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastian Kopp

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on the electronic transport through nanoscopic metallic contacts under the influence of external light fields. Various processes can be of relevance here, whose underlying mechanisms can be studied by comparing different kinds of atomic contacts. For this purpose two kinds of contacts, which were established by electrochemical deposition, forming a gate-controlled quantum switch (GCQS, have been studied. We demonstrate that in these kinds of contacts thermal effects resulting from local heating due to the incident light, namely thermovoltage and the temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity and the electrochemical (Helmholtz double layer are the most prominent effects.

  3. Antioxidant defense in quiescent cells determines selectivity of electron transport chain inhibition-induced cell death

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blecha, Jan; Novais, Silvia Magalhaes; Rohlenová, Kateřina; Novotná, Eliška; Lettlová, Sandra; Schmitt, S.; Zischka, H.; Neužil, Jiří; Rohlena, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 112, NOV 2017 (2017), s. 253-266 ISSN 0891-5849 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-22823S; GA ČR GA17-20904S; GA ČR GA16-12719S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-31604A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Electron transport chain * Supercomplexes * Antioxidant defense * SOD2 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.606, year: 2016

  4. Anaerobic Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens: Analysis of the electron transport chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daad Saffarini

    2004-01-20

    The goals of the project were to isolate mutants that are deficient in metal reduction, identify components of the electron transport chain that are involved in this process, and purify some of these proteins for biochemical analyses. In the 3-year period since the start of the project, we have accomplished many of these goals. We have isolated several new S. oneidensis mutants that are deficient in metal reduction, and have initiated the development of vectors for the overexpression of cytochromes and other proteins in S. oneidensis. We have also overexpressed CymA, one of the c cytochromes that are involved in metal reduction.

  5. Tunable electronic transport properties of metal-cluster-decorated III-V nanowire transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ning; Wang, Fengyun; Hou, Jared J; Yip, Sen Po; Lin, Hao; Xiu, Fei; Fang, Ming; Yang, Zaixing; Shi, Xiaoling; Dong, Guofa; Hung, Tak Fu; Ho, Johnny C

    2013-08-27

    A metal-cluster-decoration approach is utilized to tailor electronic transport properties (e.g., threshold voltage) of III-V NWFETs through the modulation of free carriers in the NW channel via the deposition of different metal clusters with different work function. The versatility of this technique has been demonstrated through the fabrication of high-mobility enhancement-mode InAs NW parallel FETs as well as the construction of low-power InAs NW inverters. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Radial transport of radiation belt electrons in kinetic field-line resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaston, C. C.; Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Melrose, D. B.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2017-08-01

    A representative case study from the Van Allen Probes during a geomagnetic storm recovery phase reveals enhanced electron fluxes at intermediate pitch angles over energies from 100 keV to 5 MeV coincident with broadband low-frequency electromagnetic waves. The statistical properties of these waves are used to build a model for radial diffusion via drift-bounce resonances in kinetic Alfvén eigenmodes/kinetic field-line resonances. Estimated diffusion coefficients indicate timescales for radial transport on the order of hours in storm time events at energies from belt.

  7. 2D particle-in-cell simulations of the electron drift instability and associated anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croes, Vivien; Lafleur, Trevor; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne; Chabert, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    In this work we study the electron drift instability in Hall-effect thrusters (HETs) using a 2D electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The simulation is configured with a Cartesian coordinate system modeling the radial-azimuthal (r{--}θ ) plane for large radius thrusters. A magnetic field, {{B}}0, is aligned along the Oy axis (r direction), a constant applied electric field, {{E}}0, along the Oz axis (perpendicular to the simulation plane), and the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction is along the Ox axis (θ direction). Although electron transport can be well described by electron-neutral collisions for low plasma densities, at high densities (similar to those in typical HETs), a strong instability is observed that enhances the electron cross-field mobility; even in the absence of electron-neutral collisions. The instability generates high frequency (of the order of MHz) and short wavelength (of the order of mm) fluctuations in both the azimuthal electric field and charged particle densities, and propagates in the {{E}}0× {{B}}0 direction with a velocity close to the ion sound speed. The correlation between the electric field and density fluctuations (which leads to an enhanced electron-ion friction force) is investigated and shown to be directly responsible for the increased electron transport. Results are compared with a recent kinetic theory, showing good agreement with the instability properties and electron transport.

  8. Magneto-transport and electronic structures of BaZnBi2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Yan; Guo, Peng-Jie; Yu, Qiao-He; Xu, Sheng; Liu, Kai; Xia, Tian-Long

    2017-12-01

    We report the magneto-transport properties and electronic structures of BaZnBi2. BaZnBi2 is a quasi-two-dimensional material with metallic behavior. Transverse magnetoresistance (MR) depends on magnetic field linearly and exhibits Shubnikov–de Haas (SdH) oscillation at low temperature and high field. The observed linear MR may originate from the disorder in samples or the edge conductivity in compensated two-component systems. The first-principles calculations reveal the absence of stable gapless Dirac fermion. Combined with the trivial Berry phase extracted from the SdH oscillation, BaZnBi2 is suggested as a topologically trivial semimetal. Nearly compensated electron-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) and hole-like FSs coexist in BaZnBi2.

  9. Voltage-driven electronic transport and shot noise in armchair graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Jian-Hui, E-mail: jianhui831110@163.com [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cheng, Ze; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Qi-Jun; Zhang, Jun-Pei [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-07-04

    We study theoretically shot noise and minimal conductivity of electrons by evanescent states penetrating through clean graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). With increasing of the barrier voltage, we find that the minimum conductivity will increase to 4e{sup 2}/πh and the maximum Fano factor will increase to 1/3. More interestingly, quantum oscillations can be tuned by the gate voltage and separated by tuning the barrier voltage -- Highlights: → This manuscript reports that 'voltage-driven electronic transport in armchair grapheme nanoribbons'. This is new and interesting topic. → The conductivity minimum can change by tuning the voltage. → Quantum oscillations can be tuned by the gate voltage and separated by tuning the barrier voltage.

  10. Enhancing electron transport in molecular wires by insertion of a ferrocene center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Yan; Peng, Zheng-Lian; Hou, Rong; Liang, Jing-Hong; Zheng, Ju-Fang; Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Zhou, Xiao-Shun; Jin, Shan; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Mao, Bing-Wei

    2014-02-14

    We have determined the conductance of alkane-linked ferrocene molecules with carboxylic acid anchoring groups using the STM break junction technique, and three sets of conductance values were found, i.e. high conductance (HC), medium conductance (MC) and low conductance (LC) values. The enhancing effect of the incorporated ferrocene on the electron transport in saturated alkane molecular wires is demonstrated by the increased conductance of the ferrocene molecules, attributed to the reduction of the tunneling barrier and the HOMO-LUMO gap induced by the insertion of ferrocene. Furthermore, the electron-withdrawing carbonyl group on the unconjugated backbone has little or no influence on single-molecule conductance. The current work provides a feasible approach for the design of high-performance molecular wires.

  11. Calculation of electrical transport properties and electron entanglement in inhomogeneous quantum wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Shokri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the spin-dependent transport properties and electron entanglement in a mesoscopic system, which consists of two semi-infinite leads (as source and drain separated by a typical quantum wire with a given potential. The properties studied include current-voltage characteristic, electrical conductivity, Fano factor and shot noise, and concurrence. The calculations are based on the transfer matrix method within the effective mass approximation. Using the Landauer formalism and transmission coefficient, the dependence of the considered quantities on type of potential well, length and width of potential well, energy of transmitted electron, temperature and the voltage have been theoretically studied. Also, the effect of the above-mentioned factors has been investigated in the nanostructure. The application of the present results may be useful in designing spintronice devices.

  12. penORNL: a parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport package using PENELOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekar, Kursat B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Weber, Charles F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport code package penORNL was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to enable advanced scanning electron microscope (SEM) simulations on high-performance computing systems. This paper discusses the implementations, capabilities and parallel performance of the new code package. penORNL uses PENELOPE for its physics calculations and provides all available PENELOPE features to the users, as well as some new features including source definitions specifically developed for SEM simulations, a pulse-height tally capability for detailed simulations of gamma and x-ray detectors, and a modified interaction forcing mechanism to enable accurate energy deposition calculations. The parallel performance of penORNL was extensively tested with several model problems, and very good linear parallel scaling was observed with up to 512 processors. penORNL, along with its new features, will be available for SEM simulations upon completion of the new pulse-height tally implementation.

  13. Electronic and transport properties of fluorite structure of La2Ce2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahida, H. R.; Singh, Deobrat; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh; Thakor, P. B.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we have symmetrically investigated the structural, electronic and transport properties of fluorite structure of lanthanum cerate oxide (La2Ce2O7) using density functional theory (DFT). The electronic band structure of La2Ce2O7 show semiconducting in nature with band gap of 1.54 eV (indirect at R-X points) and 1.71 eV (direct at R points). We have also calculated the susceptibility, hall resistance, electrical, and thermal conductivity by using Boltztrap equation. The electrical conductivity decreases where as thermal conductivity increases with increase in the temperature. Our result shows that La2Ce2O7 has application in Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells applications.

  14. Theoretical investigation of the electronic structures and carrier transport of hybrid graphene and boron nitride nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Tao Sun

    2012-09-01

    graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (C-BN nanostructures receive much research interest due to the complementary electronic properties. Graphene is a zero-gap semiconductor, while hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN is a wide gap semiconductor. Here we studied the electronic structures and carrier transport of hybrid C-BN nanostructures by using first principles calculations and deformation potential theory. We have found that the physical quantities in these systems under study, band gap, effective mass, deformation potential, and carrier mobility, can be categorised into three different families depending on the width of graphene nanoribbon. This family behavior is similar to pristine armchair graphene nanoribbon, but with slight difference from the individual component. New opportunities of designing nanoelectric devices are discussed by utilizing the quantum confinement effect based on such kind of hybrid nanostructures.

  15. Magnetic and electronic transport properties of Pr5Ge4 compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. F.; Rao, G. H.; Liu, G. Y.; Ouyang, Z. W.; Feng, X. M.; Liu, W. F.; Chu, W. G.; Liang, J. K.

    2003-07-01

    The magnetic and electronic transport properties of the compound Pr5Ge4 were investigated by means of magnetic and electrical resistivity measurements. The results indicate that for the compound Pr5Ge4 there are two magnetic transitions at TIC = 25 K and TIIC = 41 K in a low field of 500 Oe. In analogy to Nd5Ge4 compound, the magnetic structure of Pr5Ge4 may be a canted one, which can be induced by a competition between nearest-neighbor Pr-Pr ferromagnetic (FM) and Pr-Pr antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange interactions. The main contribution to the electrical resistivity of Pr5Ge4 is the scattering of conduction electrons on localized magnetic moments. A large magnetoresistance (ρ/ρ) was observed (about 25% at 24 K and 15% at 40 K) in the presence of a magnetic field of 50 kOe.

  16. Parallel FE Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, C.R.; Lorenz, J.

    1999-03-02

    A novel solution method has been developed to solve the coupled electron-photon transport problem on an unstructured triangular mesh. Instead of tackling the first-order form of the linear Boltzmann equation, this approach is based on the second-order form in conjunction with the conventional multi-group discrete-ordinates approximation. The highly forward-peaked electron scattering is modeled with a multigroup Legendre expansion derived from the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The finite element method is used to treat the spatial dependence. The solution method is unique in that the space-direction dependence is solved simultaneously, eliminating the need for the conventional inner iterations, a method that is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  17. 41 CFR 102-118.80 - Who is responsible for keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who is responsible for keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records? 102-118.80 Section 102-118.80 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118...

  18. Highly efficient hybrid photovoltaics based on hyperbranched three-dimensional TiO2 electron transporting materials

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2015-03-23

    A 3D hyperbranched TiO2 electron transporting material is demonstrated, which exhibits superior carrier transport and lifetime, as well as excellent infiltration, leading to highly efficient mesostructured hybrid solar cells, such as lead-halide perovskites (15.5%) and dye-sensitized solar cells (11.2%).

  19. Linear stability analysis of microinstabilities in electron internal transport barrier non-inductive discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottino, A; Sauter, O; Camenen, Y; Fable, E [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2006-02-15

    The role of the current profile and ion and electron temperature ratio in Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) electron internal transport barrier (eITB) non-inductive discharges is inspected by means of the linear gyrokinetic global code LORB5 (Bottino et al 2004 Phys. Plasmas 11 198) and the Gyro-Landau fluid transport model GLF23 (Waltz et al 1997 Phys. Plasmas 4 2482). In this work we have compared two different MHD equilibria for a TCV discharge with an eITB, corresponding to a monotonic and a reversed safety factor profile. The latter has been obtained using the calculated electron-cyclotron driven density profile, the bootstrap current and the experimental pressure. Global simulations show that the most unstable electrostatic instabilities in the spectrum are trapped electron modes (TEM) for both equilibria. In the vicinity of the reverse shear region, where the magnetic shear s is positive and small (s << 1), modes tend to preserve the ballooning structure but their mixing length estimate for the thermal diffusion coefficient is significantly reduced as compared with the monotonic q equilibrium. This effect is further increased in the reverse shear region. Simulations performed with GLF23 show that the inclusion of the Shafranov shift in the model has an important stabilizing effect in all the plasma core and, in particular, in the barrier region. However, the Shafranov shift and reverse shear stabilization are not the only mechanisms through which the q profile affects the stability of the system. The local value of q in the barrier region also contributes to the stabilization. Global gyrokinetic and local Gyro-Landau fluid results suggest that the current profile modification alone, with the consequent negative shear and Shafranov shift stabilization on TEM modes, can explain the presence of the ITB in these TCV discharges.

  20. Electronic transport in semiconductor nanowires: physics studies and possible device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Lars

    2007-03-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are attractive for physics as well as for applications due to the highly ideal character of their electronic and structural properties. We grow our III-V nanowires by what can be described as guided self-assembly, by which we can accurately control location as well as dimensions of epitaxially nucleated nanowires. The level of control of growth allows controlled formation of axial as well as radial heterostructures. I will describe studies of charge transport via single, double and multiple quantum dots positioned inside InAs/InP nanowires. Such studies have allowed detailed studies of the addition of electrons one-by-one, from the very first electron into an empty quantum dot to the addition of up to 50 electrons. By replacing the one-dimensional emitter by a small quantum dot in a double-dot configuration, the discrete character of the injecting state allows ever more detailed spectroscopic studies of the charge additions to the second dot. Comparisons will be made with transport through quantum dots defined by tunnel barriers induced via gating techniques. Finally, a recently developed technique for the formation vertical wrap-gate field-effect transistors around InAs nanowires will be described, suggesting interesting opportunities for the realization of high-speed and low-power transistors and circuits. The geometrical design of such nanowire wrap-gate field-effect transistors, offers exciting ways of formation of ultra-short transistor gate-lengths as well as the use of heterostructures to further enhance the performance of such devices.

  1. Unique electron transport in ultrathin black phosphorene: Ab-initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Anurag, E-mail: profanurag@gmail.com [Advanced Materials Research Group, Computational Nanoscience & Technology Lab, ABV-Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management, Gwalior (M.P.) 474010 India (India); Khan, Md. Shahzad [Advanced Materials Research Group, Computational Nanoscience & Technology Lab, ABV-Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management, Gwalior (M.P.) 474010 India (India); Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar [Department of Physics, St. Xavier' s College, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); Pandey, Ravindra [Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: Charge transfer configuration for NH{sub 3} and NO{sub 2} adsorbed 2D black-phospherene. - Highlights: • Ultrathin black phosphorene has been investigated, in terms of its optical and ballistic quantum transport properties. • The device performance subtaintially increases in armchair direction of black phosphorene. • Maximum reflectivity (43%) is observed at 1.85 eV (670 nm) and the reflective spectrum dispersed in visible range. • At low bias semiconducting and higher bias ohmic nature pointing black phospherene a promising material for high perfomrance device applications. • For NO{sub 2} gas, this quasi 2D-black phosphorene surface shows strong affinity followed with substantial charge tranfer. - Abstract: We present first principle structural, electronic, optical and transport analysis of black phosphorene a 2D layered material. The studied configuration shows semiconducting nature and the states around the Fermi energy are mainly contributed by the p-orbitals of atoms. In optical properties, the reflective spectrum is approximately dispersed in visible range suggesting that this 2D-nanostructure can be considered as shielding for visible region. Due to the anisotropy of the electronic structure of black phosphorene, the device performance is subtaintially preferable in armchair direction. Zero-bias transmission shows no conductance channel near Fermi level but in far region prominent spectra for the same is observed for black-phospherene. The studied configurations show non-linear current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. The sensitivity for NH{sub 3} and NO{sub 2} gas molecule is explored using electronic and current–voltage (I–V) characteristics. Investigations show that the black phosphorene has strong affinity for electron seeking NO{sub 2} molecule, thus providing an opportunity for its sensor application.

  2. Layered Chalcogenides beyond Graphene: from Electronic Structure Evolution to the Spin Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongtao

    2014-03-01

    Recent efforts on graphene-like atomic layer materials, aiming at novel electronic properties and quantum phenomena beyond graphene, have attracted much attention for potential electronics/spintronics applications. Compared to the weak spin-orbit-interaction (SOI) in graphene, metal chalcogenides MX2 have heavy 4d/5d elements with strong atomic SOI, providing a unique way for generating spin polarization based on valleytronics physics. Indeed, such a spin-polarized band structure has been demonstrated theoretically and supported by optical investigations. However, despite these exciting progresses, following two important issues in MX2 community remain elusive: 1. the quantitative band structure of MX2 compounds (where are the valleys -band maxima/minima- locating in the BZ) have not been experimentally confirmed. Especially for those cleaved ultrathin mono- and bi-layer flakes hosting most of recently-reported exotic phenomena at the 2D limit, the direct detection for band dispersion becomes of great importance for valleytronics. 2. Spin transports have seldom been reported even though such a strong SOI system can serve as an ideal platform for the spin polarization and spin transport. In this work, we started from the basic electronic structures of representative MX2, obtained by ARPES, and investigated both the band variation between these compounds and their band evolution from bulk to the monolayer limit. After having a systematic understanding on band structures, we reported a giant Zeeman-type spin-polarization generated and modulated by an external electric field in WSe2 electric-double-layer transistors. The non-magnetic approach for realizing such an intriguing spin splitting not only keeps the system time-reversally invariant but also suggests a new paradigm for manipulating the spin-degrees of freedom of electrons. Acknowledge the support from DoE, BES, Division of MSE under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  3. Computation of electron transport and relaxation properties in gases based on improved multi-term approximation of Boltzmann equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X. J.; Wang, X. X.; Zou, X. B.; Lu, Z. W.

    2018-01-01

    An understanding of electron kinetics is of importance in various applications of low temperature plasmas. We employ a series of model and real gases to investigate electron transport and relaxation properties based on improved multi-term approximation of the Boltzmann equation. First, a comparison of different methods to calculate the interaction integrals has been carried out; the effects of free parameters, such as vmax, lmax, and the arbitrary temperature Tb, on the convergence of electron transport coefficients are analyzed. Then, the modified attachment model of Ness et al. and SF6 are considered to investigate the effect of attachment on the electron transport properties. The deficiency of the pulsed Townsend technique to measure the electron transport and reaction coefficients in electronegative gases is highlighted when the reduced electric field is small. In order to investigate the effect of external magnetic field on the electron transport properties, Ar plasmas in high power impulse sputtering devices are considered. In the end, the electron relaxation properties of the Reid model under the influence of electric and magnetic fields are demonstrated.

  4. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES Electronic Transport Calculations Using Maximally-Localized Wannier Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Neng-Ping

    2011-01-01

    I present a method to calculate the ballistic transport properties of atomic-scale structures under bias. The electronic structure of the system is calculated using the Kohn-Sham scheme of density functional theory (DFT). The DFT eigenvectors are then transformed into a set of maximally localized Wannier functions (MLWFs) [N. Marzari and D. Vanderbilt, Phys. Rev. B 56 (1997) 12847]. The MLWFs are used as a minimal basis set to obtain the Hamitonian matrices of the scattering region and the adjacent leads, which are needed for transport calculation using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. The coupling of the scattering region to the semi-infinite leads is described by the self-energies of the leads. Using the nonequilibrium Green's function method, one calculates self-consistently the charge distribution of the system under bias and evaluates the transmission and current through the system. To solve the Poisson equation within the scheme of MLWFs I introduce a computationally efficient method. The method is applied to a molecular hydrogen contact in two transition metal monatomic wires (Cu and Pt). It is found that for Pt the I-V characteristics is approximately linear dependence, however, for Cu the I-V characteristics manifests a linear dependence at low bias voltages and exhibits apparent nonlinearity at higher bias voltages. I have also calculated the transmission in the zero bias voltage limit for a single CO molecule adsorbed on Cu and Pt monatomic wires. While a chemical scissor effect occurs for the Cu monatomic wire with an adsorbed CO molecule, it is absent for the Pt monatomic wire due to the contribution of d-orbitals at the Fermi energy.

  5. Facile synthesis and electron transport properties of NiO nanostructures investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Mallick

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique chemical, thermal, electronic and photonic properties, low -dimensional transition metal oxides, especially NiO, have attracted great deal of attention for potential applications in a wide range of technologies, such as, sensors, electrochromic coatings and self-healing materials. However, their synthesis involves multi-step complex procedures that in addition to being expensive, further introduce impurities. Here we present a low cost facile approach to synthesize uniform size NiO nanoparticles (NPs from hydrothermally grown Ni(OH2. Detailed transmission electron microscopic analysis reveal the average size of NiO NPs to be around 29 nm. The dimension of NiO NP is also corroborated by the small area scanning tunneling microscope (STM measurements. Further, we investigate electron transport characteristics of newly synthesized Ni(OH2 and NiO nanoparticles on p-type Si substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy. The conductivity of Ni(OH2 and NiO are determined to be 1.46x10-3 S/cm and 2.37x10-5 S/cm, respectively. The NiO NPs exhibit a lower voltage window (∼0.7 V electron tunneling than the parent Ni(OH2.

  6. Study of electron transport across the magnetic filter of NIO1 negative ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, P.; Sartori, E.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.; Barbisan, M.; Zaniol, B.

    2017-08-01

    In the framework of the accompanying activities in support to the ITER NBI test facility, a relatively compact radiofrequency (RF) ion source, named NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization, phase 1) was developed in Padua, Italy, in collaboration between Consorzio RFX and INFN. Negative hydrogen ions are formed in a cold, inductively coupled plasma with a 2MHz, 2.5 kW external antenna. A low electron energy is necessary to increase the survival probability of negative ions in the proximity of the extraction area. This goal is accomplished by means of a transversal magnetic field, confining the high energy electrons better than the colder electrons. In NIO1, this filter field can cover different topologies, exploiting different set of magnets and high current paths. In this contribution we study the property of the plasma in the vicinity of the extraction region for two different B field configurations. For this experiment the source was operated in pure volume conditions, in hydrogen and oxygen plasmas. The experimental data, measured by spectroscopic means, is interpreted also with the support of finite element analyses simulations of the magnetic field and a dedicated particle in cell (PIC) numerical model for the electron transport across it, including Coulomb and gas collisions.

  7. Non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microturbulence in TCV electron internal transport barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapillonne, X; Brunner, S; Sauter, O; Villard, L [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Fable, E; Goerler, T; Jenko, F; Merz, F, E-mail: stephan.brunner@epfl.ch [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Using the local (flux-tube) version of the Eulerian code GENE (Jenko et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 1904), gyrokinetic simulations of microturbulence were carried out considering parameters relevant to electron-internal transport barriers (e-ITBs) in the TCV tokamak (Sauter et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 105002), generated under conditions of low or negative shear. For typical density and temperature gradients measured in such barriers, the corresponding simulated fluctuation spectra appears to simultaneously contain longer wavelength trapped electron modes (TEMs, for typically k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} < 0.5, k{sub p}erpendicular being the characteristic perpendicular wavenumber and {rho}{sub i} the ion Larmor radius) and shorter wavelength ion temperature gradient modes (ITG, k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} > 0.5). The contributions to the electron particle flux from these two types of modes are, respectively, outward/inward and may cancel each other for experimentally realistic gradients. This mechanism may partly explain the feasibility of e-ITBs. The non-linear simulation results confirm the predictions of a previously developed quasi-linear model (Fable et al 2010 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 52 015007), namely that the stationary condition of zero particle flux is obtained through the competitive contributions of ITG and TEM. A quantitative comparison of the electron heat flux with experimental estimates is presented as well.

  8. Kelvin probe microscopy and electronic transport measurements in reduced graphene oxide chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehayias, Christopher E.; MacNaughton, Samuel; Sonkusale, Sameer; Staii, Cristian

    2013-06-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is an electronically hybrid material that displays remarkable chemical sensing properties. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of the chemical gating effects in RGO-based chemical sensors. The gas sensing devices are patterned in a field-effect transistor geometry, by dielectrophoretic assembly of RGO platelets between gold electrodes deposited on SiO2/Si substrates. We show that these sensors display highly selective and reversible responses to the measured analytes, as well as fast response and recovery times (tens of seconds). We use combined electronic transport/Kelvin probe microscopy measurements to quantify the amount of charge transferred to RGO due to chemical doping when the device is exposed to electron-acceptor (acetone) and electron-donor (ammonia) analytes. We demonstrate that this method allows us to obtain high-resolution maps of the surface potential and local charge distribution both before and after chemical doping, to identify local gate-susceptible areas on the RGO surface, and to directly extract the contact resistance between the RGO and the metallic electrodes. The method presented is general, suggesting that these results have important implications for building graphene and other nanomaterial-based chemical sensors.

  9. Facile synthesis and electron transport properties of NiO nanostructures investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Govind; Labh, Jyotsna; Giri, Lily; Pandey, Avinash C.; Karna, Shashi P.

    2017-08-01

    Due to their unique chemical, thermal, electronic and photonic properties, low -dimensional transition metal oxides, especially NiO, have attracted great deal of attention for potential applications in a wide range of technologies, such as, sensors, electrochromic coatings and self-healing materials. However, their synthesis involves multi-step complex procedures that in addition to being expensive, further introduce impurities. Here we present a low cost facile approach to synthesize uniform size NiO nanoparticles (NPs) from hydrothermally grown Ni(OH)2. Detailed transmission electron microscopic analysis reveal the average size of NiO NPs to be around 29 nm. The dimension of NiO NP is also corroborated by the small area scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measurements. Further, we investigate electron transport characteristics of newly synthesized Ni(OH)2 and NiO nanoparticles on p-type Si substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy. The conductivity of Ni(OH)2 and NiO are determined to be 1.46x10-3 S/cm and 2.37x10-5 S/cm, respectively. The NiO NPs exhibit a lower voltage window (˜0.7 V) electron tunneling than the parent Ni(OH)2.

  10. Interest in broadband dielectric spectroscopy to study the electronic transport in materials for lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badot, Jean-Claude, E-mail: jc.badot@chimie-paristech.fr [Institut de Recherche de Chimie Paris, UMR CNRS 8247, Réseau sur le Stockage Electrochimique de l' Energie (RS2E), Chimie Paris Tech, PSL*, 11 rue P. et M. Curie, 75231 Cedex 05 Paris (France); Lestriez, Bernard [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, UMR CNRS 6502, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP32229, 44322 Nantes (France); Dubrunfaut, Olivier [GeePs | Group of electrical engineering – Paris, UMR CNRS 8507, CentraleSupélec, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, 3 & 11 rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX, Paris (France)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Broadband dielectric spectroscopy measures the multiscale electronic conductivity from macroscopic to interatomic sizes. • There is an influence of the surface states on the electronic transfer of powdered materials (e.g. thin insulating layer of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} on LiNiO{sub 2} and carbon coating on LiFePO{sub 4}). • Electrical relaxations resulting from the interfacial polarizations at the different scales of the carbon black network are evidenced. - Abstract: Broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) is used to measure complex permittivity and conductivity of conducting materials for lithium batteries at frequencies from a few Hz to several GHz with network and impedance analysers. Under the influence of an electric field, there will be charge density fluctuations in the conductor mainly due to electronic transfer. These fluctuations result in dielectric relaxations for frequencies below 100 GHz. The materials are compacted powders in which each element (particles, agglomerates of particles) can have different sizes and morphologies. In the present review, studies are reported on the influence of surface states in LiNiO{sub 2} (ageing and degradation in air) and LiFePO{sub 4} (carbon coating thin layer), and on a composite electrode based on the lithium trivanadate (Li{sub 1.1}V{sub 3}O{sub 8}) active material. The results have shown that the BDS technique is very sensitive to the different scales of materials architectures involved in electronic transport, from interatomic distances to macroscopic sizes.

  11. Phytoplankton growth and PSII efficiency sensitivity to a glyphosate-based herbicide (Factor 540®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedbol, Élise; Lucotte, Marc; Labrecque, Michel; Lepage, Laurent; Juneau, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    The use of glyphosate-based herbicides in agriculture has increased steadily since the mid 90's and there is now evidence of glyphosate leaching and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide (Factor 540 ® ) on growth and photosynthetic capacity of algae and cyanobacteria. Six algal and three cyanobacterial species/strains, of three different taxonomic groups, were exposed to five glyphosate concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000μgl -1 ) during 48h. All species have significant growth inhibition at concentrations varying between 50 and 500μgl -1 . The photosynthetic response, after glyphosate exposure, varied among species, but a general pattern has emerged. There was an increase in the amount of photons absorbed (ABS/RC), in dissipated (DI O /RC) and trapped (TR O /RC) energy in the photosystem II reaction centers, along with a decreased of the maximum photosystem II quantum yield (F V /F M ) and electron transport per reaction center (ET O /RC). The EC 50 and LOEC values for growth and photosynthesis were calculated and established that growth was the most affected parameter by glyphosate-based herbicide, while parameter TR O /RC was the least affected. All species showed reduced growth at glyphosate concentrations lower than the Canadian standard for the protection of aquatic life, set at 800μgl -1 or the American aquatic life benchmark for acute toxicity in non vascular plants of 12 100μgl -1 questioning the validity of these thresholds in assessing the risks related to the presence of glyphosate and glyphosate-based herbicides in aquatic systems. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electronic transport and magnetoresistivity of La0.4Bi0.1Ca0.5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    10 T. In the high-temperature domain, the electronic transport was observed to be dominated by the variable range hopping mechanism for both the samples, whereas in the low-temperature domain the electrical con- duction of x = 0.1 sample was observed to be contributed by various other electron scattering mechanisms.

  13. Fluorine containing C(60) derivatives for high-performance electron transporting field-effect transistors and integrated circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wobkenberg, Paul H.; Ball, James; Bradley, Donal D. C.; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; Kooistra, Floris; Hummelen, Jan C.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Wöbkenberg, Paul H.

    2008-01-01

    We report on electron transporting organic transistors and integrated ring oscillators based on four different solution processible fluorine containing C(60) derivatives. Electron mobilities up to 0.15 cm(2)/V s are obtained from as-prepared bottom-gate, bottom-contact transistors utilizing gold

  14. Tumor cell death induced by the inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport: The effect of 3-hydroxybakuchiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaña, Fabián [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Faini, Francesca [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Lapier, Michel; Pavani, Mario [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Kemmerling, Ulrike [Anatomy and Developmental Biology Program, ICBM, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Morello, Antonio; Maya, Juan Diego; Jara, José [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Parra, Eduardo [Laboratory of Experimental Biomedicine, University of Tarapaca, Campus Esmeralda, Iquique (Chile); Ferreira, Jorge, E-mail: jferreir@med.uchile.cl [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    Changes in mitochondrial ATP synthesis can affect the function of tumor cells due to the dependence of the first step of glycolysis on mitochondrial ATP. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is responsible for the synthesis of approximately 90% of the ATP in normal cells and up to 50% in most glycolytic cancers; therefore, inhibition of the electron transport chain (ETC) emerges as an attractive therapeutic target. We studied the effect of a lipophilic isoprenylated catechol, 3-hydroxybakuchiol (3-OHbk), a putative ETC inhibitor isolated from Psoralea glandulosa. 3-OHbk exerted cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on the TA3/Ha mouse mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and induced a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the activation of caspase-3, the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transport pore (MPTP) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Additionally, 3-OHbk inhibited oxygen consumption, an effect that was completely reversed by succinate (an electron donor for Complex II) and duroquinol (electron donor for Complex III), suggesting that 3-OHbk disrupted the electron flow at the level of Complex I. The inhibition of OXPHOS did not increase the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but caused a large decrease in the intracellular ATP level. ETC inhibitors have been shown to induce cell death through necrosis and apoptosis by increasing ROS generation. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that 3-OHbk inhibited the ETC and induced apoptosis through an interaction with Complex I. By delivering electrons directly to Complex III with duroquinol, cell death was almost completely abrogated. These results suggest that 3-OHbk has antitumor activity resulting from interactions with the ETC, a system that is already deficient in cancer cells. - Highlights: • We studied the anticancer activity of a natural compound, 3-OHbk, on TA3/Ha cells. • 3-OHbk inhibited mitochondrial electron flow by interacting with Complex I. • Complex I inhibition did

  15. An improved and fully implicit multi-group non-local electron transport model and its validations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijoy, C. D.; Mishra, V.; Chaurasia, S.

    2017-09-01

    The combined effect of thermal flux inhibition and non-local electron heat flux in the radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulation of laser-driven systems can be accurately predicted by using non-local electron transport (NLET) models. These models can avoid commonly used space and time-independent ad-hoc flux-limiting procedures. However, the use of classical electron collision frequency in these models is rigorously valid for high temperature non-degenerate plasmas. In laser-driven systems, the electron thermal energy transport is important in regions between the critical density and ablation surface where the plasma is partially degenerate. Therefore, an improved model for electron collision frequency in this regime is required to accurately predict the thermal energy transport. Previously, we have reported an improved single group non-local electron transport model by using a wide-range electron collision frequency model valid from warm-dense matter (WDM) to fully ionized plasmas. In this work, we have extended this idea into a two-dimensional multi-group non-local electron transport (MG-NLET) model. Moreover, we have used a fully implicit numerical integration scheme in which the models for multi-group thermal radiation transport, laser absorption, electron-ion thermal energy relaxation and ion heat conduction are included in a single step. The performance of this improved MG-NLET model has been assessed by comparing the simulated foil trajectories with the reported experimental data for laser-driven plastic foils. The results indicate that the improved model yields results that are in better agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Effect of tubular chiralities of single-walled ZnO nanotubes on electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qin; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Liping; Yu, Yiqing; Wu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    The electronic transport properties of single-walled ZnO nanotubes with different chiralities are investigated by nonequilibrium Green's function combined with density functional theory. In this paper we consider three representative ZnO nanotubes, namely (3, 3) armchair, (5, 0) zigzag, and (4, 2) chiral, with a similar diameter of about 5.4 Å. Short nanotubes exhibit good conductance behavior. As the tube length increases, the conductance decreases at low bias and the nanotubes indicate semiconducting behavior. The current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes longer than 3 nm depend weakly on the length of the tubes. The armchair and chiral ZnO nanotubes with the same length and diameter have almost overlapped current-voltage curves. The electron transport behaviors are analyzed in terms of the transmission spectra, density of states and charge population of these nanotubes. The results indicate that the resonant peaks above the Fermi level are responsible for electric currents. However, the zigzag ZnO nanotubes exhibit asymmetric current-voltage curves attributed to the built-in polarization field and give larger current than the armchair and chiral nanotubes at the same bias. The features explored here strongly suggest that the ZnO nanotubes are stable, flexible structures, which are valuable in Nano-Electromechanical System.

  17. Electronic and transport properties of Ge nanoparticle pellets structured by focused ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondorf, Andreas; Geller, Martin; Lorke, Axel [Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles are of interest for future electronic and optoelectronic devices, especially low cost, flexible, printable electronics. We investigate here the transport properties (charge carrier concentration and mobility) of Ge nanoparticles, which were synthesized in the gas-phase and pressed into pellets. The nanoparticles inside these pellets sinter into a sponge-like structure, that may exhibit unusual magneto-transport properties similar to the strong magnetoresistance observed in nanoporous gold [Fujita, PRL 101, 166601 (2008)]. The measurements are made on directly contacted macroscopic pellets and on Hall-bar microstructures fabricated by a focused ion beam (FIB). In the FIB fabrication process, a lamella is cut out of a pellet and positioned onto a prestructured substrate with metal contacts. The sample is connected with the contacts by deposition of platinum. Finally the disk is etched by FIB into a Hallbar shape. We use I-V and Hall-measurements and find a very weak but measurable Hall-effect and a negative magnetoresistance of about 0.01% at 2.5 T. At room temperature, Ge nanoparticles show a charge carrier concentration of about 4.10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, comparable to the intrinsic charge carrier concentration in bulk germanium. Ge nanoparticles have a very low mobility of 0.1 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 25 C, which is comparable to the mobility of organic semiconductors, so that Ge nanoparticles may be suitable in some applications which are presently based on organic semiconductors.

  18. Electron tunneling transport across heterojunctions between europium sulfide and indium arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallaher, Raymond L.

    This dissertation presents research done on utilizing the ferromagnetic semiconductor europium sulfide (EuS) to inject spin polarized electrons into the non-magnetic semiconductor indium arsenide (InAs). There is great interest in expanding the functionality of modern day electronic circuits by creating devices that depend not only on the flow of charge in the device, but also on the transport of spin through the device. Within this mindset, there is a concerted effort to establish an efficient means of injecting and detecting spin polarized electrons in a two dimensional electron system (2DES) as the first step in developing a spin based field effect transistor. Thus, the research presented in this thesis has focused on the feasibility of using EuS, in direct electrical contact with InAs, as a spin injecting electrode into an InAs 2DES. Doped EuS is a concentrated ferromagnetic semiconductor, whose conduction band undergoes a giant Zeeman splitting when the material becomes ferromagnetic. The concomitant difference in energy between the spin-up and spin-down energy bands makes the itinerant electrons in EuS highly spin polarized. Thus, in principle, EuS is a good candidate to be used as an injector of spin polarized electrons into non-magnetic materials. In addition, the ability to adjust the conductivity of EuS by varying the doping level in the material makes EuS particularly suited for injecting spins into non-magnetic semiconductors and 2DES. For this research, thin films of EuS have been grown via e-beam evaporation of EuS powder. This growth technique produces EuS films that are sulfur deficient; these sulfur vacancies act as intrinsic electron donors and the resulting EuS films behave like heavily doped ferromagnetic semiconductors. The growth parameters and deposition procedures were varied and optimized in order to fabricate films that have minimal crystalline defects. Various properties and characteristics of these EuS films were measured and compared to

  19. Comparisons of Calculations with PARTRAC and NOREC: Transport of Electrons in Liquid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingfelder, M.; Ritchie, R. H.; Turner, J. E.; Friedland, W.; Paretzke, H. G.; Hamm, R. N.

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo computer models that simulate the detailed, event-by-event transport of electrons in liquid water are valuable for the interpretation and understanding of findings in radiation chemistry and radiation biology. Because of the paucity of experimental data, such efforts must rely on theoretical principles and considerable judgment in their development. Experimental verification of numerical input is possible to only a limited extent. Indirect support for model validity can be gained from a comparison of details between two independently developed computer codes as well as the observable results calculated with them. In this study, we compare the transport properties of electrons in liquid water using two such models, PARTRAC and NOREC. Both use interaction cross sections based on plane-wave Born approximations and a numerical parameterization of the complex dielectric response function for the liquid. The models are described and compared, and their similarities and differences are highlighted. Recent developments in the field are discussed and taken into account. The calculated stopping powers, W values, and slab penetration characteristics are in good agreement with one another and with other independent sources. PMID:18439039

  20. Caloric restriction improves efficiency and capacity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joon-Seok; Choi, Kyung-Mi [College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol-Koo, E-mail: cklee2005@korea.ac.kr [College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Calorie restriction (CR) increases electron transport chain (ETC) at both RNA and protein level. {yields} CR enhances mitochondrial membrane potential, and, regardless of ages, reduces reactive oxygen species. {yields} CR increases both efficiency and capacity of the ETC. {yields} CR induces intensive modulation at mitochondrial ETC where might be a major site leading to extension of lifespan. -- Abstract: Caloric restriction (CR) is known to extend lifespan in a variety of species; however, the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we found that CR potentiated the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Indeed, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was increased by CR, and, regardless of ages, overall reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was decreased by CR. With these changes, overall growth rate of cells was maintained under various CR conditions, just like cells under a non-restricted condition. All of these data support increased efficiency and capacity of the ETC by CR, and this change might lead to extension of lifespan.

  1. The electronic and transport properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides: a complex band structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczesniak, Dominik

    Recently, monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have attracted much attention due to their potential use in both nano- and opto-electronics. In such applications, the electronic and transport properties of group-VIB transition metal dichalcogenides (MX2 , where M=Mo, W; X=S, Se, Te) are particularly important. Herein, new insight into these properties is presented by studying the complex band structures (CBS's) of MX2 monolayers while accounting for spin-orbit coupling effects. By using the symmetry-based tight-binding model a nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problem for CBS's is obtained. An efficient method for solving such class of problems is presented and gives a complete set of physically relevant solutions. Next, these solutions are characterized and classified into propagating and evanescent states, where the latter states present not only monotonic but also oscillatory decay character. It is observed that some of the oscillatory evanescent states create characteristic complex loops at the direct band gaps, which describe the tunneling currents in the MX2 materials. The importance of CBS's and tunneling currents is demonstrated by the analysis of the quantum transport across MX2 monolayers within phase field matching theory. Present work has been prepared within the Qatar Energy and Environment Research Institute (QEERI) grand challenge ATHLOC project (Project No. QEERI- GC-3008).

  2. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  3. Physics of electron and lithium-ion transport in electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musheng, Wu; Bo, Xu; Chuying, Ouyang

    2016-01-01

    The physics of ionic and electrical conduction at electrode materials of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are briefly summarized here, besides, we review the current research on ionic and electrical conduction in electrode material incorporating experimental and simulation studies. Commercial LIBs have been widely used in portable electronic devices and are now developed for large-scale applications in hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and stationary distributed power stations. However, due to the physical limits of the materials, the overall performance of today’s LIBs does not meet all the requirements for future applications, and the transport problem has been one of the main barriers to further improvement. The electron and Li-ion transport behaviors are important in determining the rate capacity of LIBs. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11234013 and 11264014), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 20133ACB21010 and 20142BAB212002), and the Foundation of Jiangxi Education Committee, China (Grant Nos. GJJ14254 and KJLD14024). C. Y. Ouyang is also supported by the “Gan-po talent 555” Project of Jiangxi Province, China.

  4. First-principles calculation method for electron transport based on the grid Lippmann-Schwinger equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Yoshiyuki; Iwase, Shigeru; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Ono, Tomoya; Hirose, Kikuji

    2015-09-01

    We develop a first-principles electron-transport simulator based on the Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation within the framework of the real-space finite-difference scheme. In our fully real-space-based LS (grid LS) method, the ratio expression technique for the scattering wave functions and the Green's function elements of the reference system is employed to avoid numerical collapse. Furthermore, we present analytical expressions and/or prominent calculation procedures for the retarded Green's function, which are utilized in the grid LS approach. In order to demonstrate the performance of the grid LS method, we simulate the electron-transport properties of the semiconductor-oxide interfaces sandwiched between semi-infinite jellium electrodes. The results confirm that the leakage current through the (001 )Si -SiO2 model becomes much larger when the dangling-bond state is induced by a defect in the oxygen layer, while that through the (001 )Ge -GeO2 model is insensitive to the dangling bond state.

  5. Too Hot for Photon-Assisted Transport: Hot-Electrons Dominate Conductance Enhancement in Illuminated Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, E-Dean; Adak, Olgun; Lovat, Giacomo; Scarabelli, Diego; Venkataraman, Latha

    2017-02-08

    We investigate light-induced conductance enhancement in single-molecule junctions via photon-assisted transport and hot-electron transport. Using 4,4'-bipyridine bound to Au electrodes as a prototypical single-molecule junction, we report a 20-40% enhancement in conductance under illumination with 980 nm wavelength radiation. We probe the effects of subtle changes in the transmission function on light-enhanced current and show that discrete variations in the binding geometry result in a 10% change in enhancement. Importantly, we prove theoretically that the steady-state behavior of photon-assisted transport and hot-electron transport is identical but that hot-electron transport is the dominant mechanism for optically induced conductance enhancement in single-molecule junctions when the wavelength used is absorbed by the electrodes and the hot-electron relaxation time is long. We confirm this experimentally by performing polarization-dependent conductance measurements of illuminated 4,4'-bipyridine junctions. Finally, we perform lock-in type measurements of optical current and conclude that currents due to laser-induced thermal expansion mask optical currents. This work provides a robust experimental framework for studying mechanisms of light-enhanced transport in single-molecule junctions and offers tools for tuning the performance of organic optoelectronic devices by analyzing detailed transport properties of the molecules involved.

  6. Low-energy electron and positron transport in gases and soft-condensed systems of biological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R D; Tattersall, W; Boyle, G; Robson, R E; Dujko, S; Petrovic, Z Lj; Bankovic, A; Brunger, M J; Sullivan, J P; Buckman, S J; Garcia, G

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of electron and positron transport in water in both the gaseous and liquid states using a Boltzmann equation analysis and a Monte-Carlo simulation technique. We assess the importance of coherent scattering processes when considering transport of electrons/positrons in dense gases and liquids. We highlight the importance of electron and positron swarm studies and experiments as a test of the accuracy and completeness of cross-sections, as well as a technique for benchmarking Monte-Carlo simulations. The thermalization of low-energy positrons (energy region, and assumptions in the microscopic processes, is considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Approximating the nonlinear density dependence of electron transport coefficients and scattering rates across the gas–liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, N. A.; Boyle, G. J.; Cocks, D. G.; White, R. D.

    2018-02-01

    This study reviews the neutral density dependence of electron transport in gases and liquids and develops a method to determine the nonlinear medium density dependence of electron transport coefficients and scattering rates required for modeling transport in the vicinity of gas–liquid interfaces. The method has its foundations in Blanc’s law for gas-mixtures and adapts the theory of Garland et al (2017 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 26) to extract electron transport data across the gas–liquid transition region using known data from the gas and liquid phases only. The method is systematically benchmarked against multi-term Boltzmann equation solutions for Percus–Yevick model liquids. Application to atomic liquids highlights the utility and accuracy of the derived method.

  8. Fractional quantum Hall effect in suspended graphene: Transport coefficients and electron interaction strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanin, D. A.; Skachko, I.; Du, X.; Andrei, E. Y.; Levitov, L. S.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, fractional-quantized Hall effect was observed in suspended graphene (SG), a free-standing monolayer of carbon, where it was found to persist up to T=10K . The best results in those experiments were obtained on micron-size flakes, on which only two-terminal transport measurements could be performed. Here we address the problem of extracting transport coefficients of a fractional quantum Hall state from the two-terminal conductance. We develop a general method, based on the conformal invariance of two-dimensional magnetotransport, and employ it to analyze the measurements on SG. From the temperature dependence of longitudinal conductivity, extracted from the measured two-terminal conductance, we estimate the energy gap of quasiparticle excitations in the fractional-quantized ν=1/3 state. The gap is found to be significantly larger than in GaAs-based structures, signaling much stronger electron interactions in suspended graphene. Our approach provides a tool for the studies of quantum transport in suspended graphene and other nanoscale systems.

  9. Electron transport and photoemission studies of amorphous CaAl thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, S.A.; Greig, D.; Walker, C.G.H.; Mayeya, F.; Howson, M.A. [Univ. Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Matthew, J.A.D. [Univ. of York (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Norman, D. [DRAL Daresbury Lab., Warrington (Andorra)

    1995-09-01

    Amorphous alloys of the binary system CaAl are known to have highly unusual electron transport properties with resistivities up to 450{micro}{Omega}cm and a Hall coefficient that deviates from free electron values at Ca concentrations higher than 45 atomic percent. For amorphous CaMg alloys, on the other hand, the resistivity is very much less and this great difference between the two sets of alloys is not fully understood. The authors report on the correlation of photoemission and transport measurements made on two sets of amorphous CaAl and CaMg alloys prepared by magnetron sputtering in such a way that they could carry out both sets of measurements within the same UHV system. A special feature of the measurements was that the electrical resistivity was also measured in-situ using a specially designed 4-point probe to check for amorphicity and to compare with transport experiments carried out elsewhere. Photoemission studies were carried out in the energy range 15--50 eV with tunable synchrotron radiation enabling them to examine the Ca 3p-3d photoemission resonance in detail. The main result from the present series of experiments was that whereas in the CaAl alloys the Fermi edge developed a should at high concentrations of Al, this feature was completely absent in CaMg. At the same time the intensity of the Ca 3p-3d photoemission resonance revealed the presence of d-states in both sets of alloys, indicating that the presence of these d-states cannot, by itself, explain the high resistivity of CaAl.

  10. Mechanisms of electron transport and recombination in ZnO nanostructures for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Poot, Alberto G; Macías-Montero, Manuel; Idígoras, Jesus; Borrás, Ana; Barranco, Angel; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustín R; Lizama-Tzec, Francisco I; Oskam, Gerko; Anta, Juan A

    2014-04-14

    ZnO is an attractive material for applications in dye-sensitized solar cells and related devices. This material has excellent electron-transport properties in the bulk but its electron diffusion coefficient is much smaller in mesoporous films. In this work the electron-transport properties of two different kinds of dye-sensitized ZnO nanostructures are investigated by small-perturbation electrochemical techniques. For nanoparticulate ZnO photoanodes prepared via a wet-chemistry technique, the diffusion coefficient is found to reproduce the typical behavior predicted by the multiple-trapping and the hopping models, with an exponential increase with respect to the applied bias. In contrast, in ZnO nanostructured thin films of controlled texture and crystallinity prepared via a plasma chemical vapor deposition method, the diffusion coefficient is found to be independent of the electrochemical bias. This observation suggests a different transport mechanism not controlled by trapping and electron accumulation. In spite of the quite different transport features, the recombination kinetics, the electron-collection efficiency and the photoconversion efficiency are very similar for both kinds of photoanodes, an observation that indicates that surface properties rather than electron transport is the main efficiency-determining factor in solar cells based on ZnO nanostructured photoanodes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Electronic Transport Parameter of Carbon Nanotube Metal-Semiconductor On-Tube Heterojunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukirno

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Nanotubes research is one of the top five hot research topics in physics since 2006 because of its unique properties and functionalities, which leads to wide-range applications. One of the most interesting potential applications is in term of nanoelectronic device. It has been modeled carbon nanotubes heterojunction, which was built from two different carbon nanotubes, that one is metallic and the other one is semiconducting. There are two different carbon nanotubes metal-semiconductor heterojunction. The first one is built from CNT(10,10 as metallic carbon nanotube and CNT (17,0 as semiconductor carbon nanotube. The other one is built from CNT (5,5 as metallic carbon nanotube and CNT (8,0. All of the semiconducting carbon nanotubes are assumed to be a pyridine-like N-doped. Those two heterojunctions are different in term of their structural shape and diameter. It has been calculated their charge distribution and potential profile, which would be useful for the simulation of their electronic transport properties. The calculations are performed by using self-consistent method to solve Non-Homogeneous Poisson’s Equation with aid of Universal Density of States calculation method for Carbon Nanotubes. The calculations are done by varying the doping fraction of the semiconductor carbon nanotubes The electron tunneling transmission coefficient, for low energy region, also has been calculated by using Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB approximation. From the calculation results, it is obtained that the charge distribution as well as the potential profile of this device is doping fraction dependent. It is also inferred that the WKB method is fail to be used to calculate whole of the electron tunneling coefficient in this system. It is expected that further calculation for electron tunneling coefficient in higher energy region as well as current-voltage characteristic of this system will become an interesting issue for this carbon nanotube based

  12. Relativistic electron transport in a solid target: study of heating in the framework of inertial fusion; Transport d'electrons relativistes dans une cible solide: etude du chauffage dans le cadre de l'allumage rapide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinolli, E

    2003-04-15

    This work is dedicated to the study of the energy deposition of fast electrons in matter. This topic is of prime importance for inertial fusion driven by laser since relativistic electrons are produced in laser-matter interaction for a laser operating in ultra-intense regime. This thesis is made up of: a theoretical chapter dealing with the generation and transport of fast electrons, of 2 chapters reporting experimental data obtained with optical and X-rays diagnostics at the laser facilities of LULI in France and RAL in U.K., and of a chapter dedicated to the simulation of electron transport by using a Monte-Carlo code combined to a hybrid collisional-electromagnetic PIC code. A new spectrometer has been designed: the detection of K{alpha} rays coming from a fluorescent layer embedded in the target has allowed us to assess the size of the electron beam and the level of ionisation. (A.C.)

  13. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bakulin, Artem A.

    2015-08-06

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500–1,700 cm−1 region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron–phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials.

  14. Perovskite Solar Cells with ZnO Electron-Transporting Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Jiang; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yafei; Liu, Detao; Chen, Hao; Ji, Long; Liu, Chunhua; Ahmad, Waseem; Chen, Zhi David; Li, Shibin

    2018-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have developed rapidly over the past few years, and the power conversion efficiency of PSCs has exceeded 20%. Such high performance can be attributed to the unique properties of perovskite materials, such as high absorption over the visible range and long diffusion length. Due to the different diffusion lengths of holes and electrons, electron transporting materials (ETMs) used in PSCs play a critical role in PSCs performance. As an alternative to TiO2 ETM, ZnO materials have similar physical properties to TiO2 but with much higher electron mobility. In addition, there are many simple and facile methods to fabricate ZnO nanomaterials with low cost and energy consumption. This review focuses on recent developments in the use of ZnO ETM for PSCs. The fabrication methods of ZnO materials are briefly introduced. The influence of different ZnO ETMs on performance of PSCs is then reviewed. The limitations of ZnO ETM-based PSCs and some solutions to these challenges are also discussed. The review provides a systematic and comprehensive understanding of the influence of different ZnO ETMs on PSCs performance and potentially motivates further development of PSCs by extending the knowledge of ZnO-based PSCs to TiO2 -based PSCs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. High Quality Nanogap Electrodes for Electronic Transport Measurements of Single Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Danvers E.; Strachan, Douglas R.; Guiton, Beth S.; Davies, Peter K.; Park, Tae Hong; Therien, Michael J.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2007-03-01

    Electromigrated metal electrodes and resulting devices have shown great promise in moving towards the realization of single molecule-based electronic devices holding the potential for a wide range of electronic applications. At present, a major concern is that the electronic behavior of such devices may be greatly influenced by residual nanoscale metal particles. We have developed a computer controlled electromigration (CCE) process for creating nanogaps at room temperature which allows us to characterize a bare nanogap before putting a molecule into the nanogap.^1 This is very different from other approaches used in the field where nanogaps are formed at low temperature with molecules already attached to the nanowire by employing a simple ramp up in voltage. Among the bare nanogaps we produced using CCE, tunneling behavior is observed with no indication of transport signatures associated with metal particle formation. Details of molecular measurements utilizing these clean gaps will be discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (NIRT Grant No. 0304531 and MRSEC award DMR05-20020). ^1D. R. Strachan, D. E. Smith, D. E. Johnston et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86 043109 (2005).

  16. The electronic transport properties of B40fullerenes with chalcogens as anchor atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rupendeep; Kaur, Jupinder

    2017-11-22

    Fullerenes are the most popular molecules to use in applications related to molecular electronics because of their superconductive nature. These molecules show a diverse range of properties, including optical, electronic, and structural characteristics. In this work, we focused on the electronic transport properties of molecular devices consisting of the fullerene B 40 or B 40 with different anchor atoms between two gold electrodes in a two-probe configuration. The elements used as anchor atoms in the B 40 molecules were oxygen, selenium, and sulfur, i.e., chalcogens. The current characteristics of these fullerene-based molecular devices were calculated and analyzed. The analysis highlighted the superior electrical conductivity of the pure B 40 device compared to the devices based on its chalcogen-anchored variants. The conductivities of the molecular devices were ranked as follows: pure B 40  > selenium-anchored > sulfur-anchored > oxygen-anchored B 40 . It was also noted that the devices based on B 40 and its chalcogen-anchored variants gave nonzero conductance values at zero bias. These results pave the way for the application of these molecules in future nanodevices utilizing extremely small bias voltages.

  17. Ionic and electronic transport across interfaces in thin electrolyte film, anode supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyung-Tae

    In transport studies in oxygen ion conductors, oxygen chemical potential (muO2) has been usually assumed to be equilibrated across gas/solid electrolyte interfaces. However, since the interfaces exhibit different properties from the bulk, they must have their own ionic and electronic properties. In this study, Pt reference electrodes were embedded within the electrolyte (gadolinia-doped ceria; GDC) in an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell to measure the electrochemical potential of electrons (ϕ) through the bulk electrolyte and its interfaces under fuel cell operating condition. Based on local equilibrium assumption, which leads to relations between electrochemical potentials of charged species and chemical potential of neutral species, the corresponding mu O2 was estimated. When the GDC is protected by a thin layer of a predominantly ionic conductor from reducing atmosphere, the muO2 varied monotonically through the GDC layer, exhibiting a relatively small change across the cathode interface region. By contrast, when the GDC was exposed to hydrogen, it was significantly reduced, resulting in higher electron concentration. The corresponding mu O2 was small through the GDC layer, exhibiting an abrupt change across the cathode interface region. This difference in the muO2 variation depending upon the relative electronic conduction in the electrolyte resulted in a large difference in the cathode overpotential. The direction of ionic/electronic current and the corresponding internal muO2 through the electrolyte can have a profound effect on its stability. If cell imbalance exists in a series-connected fuel cell stack, a "bad" cell characterized by a higher resistance can be operated under a negative voltage. To investigate the SOFC stack failure by simulating abnormal behavior in a single cell test, yttira stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte cells were tested with an applied DC bias. When operating under a negative voltage, rapid degradation occurred

  18. On the Monte Carlo simulation of electron transport in the sub-1 keV energy range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Rowan M; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2011-08-01

    The validity of "classic" Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron and positron transport at sub-1 keV energies is investigated in the context of quantum theory. Quantum theory dictates that uncertainties on the position and energy-momentum four-vectors of radiation quanta obey Heisenberg's uncertainty relation; however, these uncertainties are neglected in "classical" MC simulations of radiation transport in which position and momentum are known precisely. Using the quantum uncertainty relation and electron mean free path, the magnitudes of uncertainties on electron position and momentum are calculated for different kinetic energies; a validity bound on the classical simulation of electron transport is derived. In order to satisfy the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, uncertainties of 5% must be assigned to position and momentum for 1 keV electrons in water; at 100 eV, these uncertainties are 17 to 20% and are even larger at lower energies. In gaseous media such as air, these uncertainties are much smaller (less than 1% for electrons with energy 20 eV or greater). The classical Monte Carlo transport treatment is questionable for sub-1 keV electrons in condensed water as uncertainties on position and momentum must be large (relative to electron momentum and mean free path) to satisfy the quantum uncertainty principle. Simulations which do not account for these uncertainties are not faithful representations of the physical processes, calling into question the results of MC track structure codes simulating sub-1 keV electron transport. Further, the large difference in the scale at which quantum effects are important in gaseous and condensed media suggests that track structure measurements in gases are not necessarily representative of track structure in condensed materials on a micrometer or a nanometer scale.

  19. Electron Transport in Graphene Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistor under Bias and Gate Voltages: Isochemical Potential Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeonghun; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-07-07

    Zigzag graphene nanoribbon (zGNR) of narrow width has a moderate energy gap in its antiferromagnetic ground state. So far, first-principles electron transport calculations have been performed using nonequilibrium Green function (NEGF) method combined with density functional theory (DFT). However, the commonly practiced bottom-gate control has not been studied computationally due to the need to simulate an electron reservoir that fixes the chemical potential of electrons in the zGNR and electrodes. Here, we present the isochemical potential scheme to describe the top/back-gate effect using external potential. Then, we examine the change in electronic state under the modulation of chemical potential and the subsequent electron transport phenomena in zGNR transistor under substantial top-/back-gate and bias voltages. The gate potential can activate the device states resulting in a boosted current. This gate-controlled current-boosting could be utilized for designing novel zGNR field effect transistors (FETs).

  20. First-principles insights on electron transport in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Anurag [Advanced Materials Research Group, Computational Nanoscience and Technology Laboratory, Atal Bihari Vajpayee-Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management, Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh 474015 (India); Chandiramouli, R., E-mail: rcmoulii@gmail.com [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Shanmugha Arts Science Technology and Research Academy (SASTRA) University, Tirumalaisamudram, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu 613 401 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Band structure and electron transport in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanostructure are investigated using density functional theory. • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanostructure exhibits semiconducting behavior. • The electron density is observed to be more in oxygen sites than in vanadium sites. • The electron transport in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} molecular device can be tuned with the applied bias voltage. - Abstract: The present report is on the electron transport properties of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanostructures, investigated using density functional theory. As the band structure of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} exhibits semiconducting nature, the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanostructures are designed as molecular device and the transport properties are studied. The density of electrons is found to be more in the oxygen sites than in vanadium sites. The device density of states shows that the density of electrons in the energy intervals depends on the applied bias voltage. The transmission spectrum gives the insight on the transport property of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} molecular device. The bias voltage drives the electrons across V{sub 2}O{sub 5} scattering region, where the transmission along V{sub 2}O{sub 5} molecular device mainly depends on the bias voltage. The findings of the present work give insights to fine-tune the transport property of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} molecular device upon varying the bias voltage.

  1. Improved efficiency of NiOx-based p-i-n perovskite solar cells by using PTEG-1 as electron transport layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, Bart G. H. M.; Najafi, Mehrdad; Steensma, Bauke; Adjokatse, Sampson; Fang, Hong-Hua; Jahani, Fatemeh; Qiu, Li; ten Brink, Gert H.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    We present efficient p-i-n type perovskite solar cells using NiOx as the hole transport layer and a fulleropyrrolidine with a triethylene glycol monoethyl ether side chain (PTEG-1) as electron transport layer. This electron transport layer leads to higher power conversion efficiencies compared to

  2. Study of the electron heat transport in Tore-Supra tokamak; Etude du transport de la chaleur electronique dans le Tokamak Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harauchamps, E

    2004-07-01

    This work presents analytical solutions to the electron heat transport equation involving a damping term and a convection term in a cylindrical geometry. These solutions, processed by Matlab, allow the determination of the evolution of the radial profile of electron temperature in tokamaks during heating. The modulated injection of waves around the electron cyclotron frequency is an efficient tool to study heat transport experimentally in tokamaks. The comparison of these analytical solutions with experimental results from Tore-Supra during 2 discharges (30550 and 31165) shows the presence of a sudden change for the diffusion and damping coefficients. The hypothesis of the presence of a pinch spread all along the plasma might explain the shape of the experimental temperature profiles. These analytical solutions could be used to determine the time evolution of plasma density as well or of any parameter whose evolution is governed by a diffusion-convection equation. (A.C.)

  3. KM3NeT tower data acquisition and data transport electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolau C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the KM3Net European project, the production stage of a large volume underwater neutrino telescope has started. The forthcoming installation includes 8 towers and 24 strings, that will be installed 100 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy at 3500 m depth. The KM3NeT tower, whose layout is strongly based on the NEMO Phase-2 prototype tower deployed in March 2013, has been re-engineered and partially re-designed in order to optimize production costs, power consumption, and usability. This contribution gives a description of the main electronics, including front-end, data transport and clock distribution system, of the KM3NeT tower detection unit.

  4. Electronic, transport, and optical properties of bulk and mono-layer PdSe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jifeng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Shi, Hongliang [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Siegrist, Theo [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University-Florida State University, 2525 Pottsdamer St., Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Singh, David J., E-mail: singhdj@missouri.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    The electronic and optical properties of bulk and monolayer PdSe{sub 2} are investigated using first-principles calculations. Using the modified Becke-Johnson potential, we find semiconductor behavior for both bulk and monolayer PdSe{sub 2} with indirect gap values of 0.03 eV for bulk and 1.43 eV for monolayer, respectively. Our sheet optical conductivity results support this observation and show similar anisotropic feature in the 2D plane. We further study the thermoelectric properties of the 2D PdSe{sub 2} using Blotzmann transport model and find interestingly high Seebeck coefficients (>200 μV/K) for both p- and n-type up to high doping level (∼2 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2}) with an anisotropic character in an electrical conductivity suggesting better thermoelectric performance along y direction in the plane.

  5. Communication: Master equations for electron transport: The limits of the Markovian limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elenewski, Justin E; Gruss, Daniel; Zwolak, Michael

    2017-10-21

    Master equations are increasingly popular for the simulation of time-dependent electronic transport in nanoscale devices. Several recent Markovian approaches use "extended reservoirs"-explicit degrees of freedom associated with the electrodes-distinguishing them from many previous classes of master equations. Starting from a Lindblad equation, we develop a common foundation for these approaches. Due to the incorporation of explicit electrode states, these methods do not require a large bias or even "true Markovianity" of the reservoirs. Nonetheless, their predictions are only physically relevant when the Markovian relaxation is weaker than the thermal broadening and when the extended reservoirs are "sufficiently large," in a sense that we quantify. These considerations hold despite complete positivity and respect for Pauli exclusion at any relaxation strength.

  6. Electronic transport anisotropy of 2D carriers in biaxial compressive strained germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, C.; Myronov, M.

    2017-11-01

    The anisotropic nature of carrier mobility in simple cubic crystalline semiconductors, such as technologically important silicon and germanium, is well understood as a consequence of effective mass anisotropy arising from a change in band structure along non-identical surface crystal directions. In contrast to this, we show experimentally that this type of anisotropy is not the dominant contribution. Recent advances in epitaxial growth of high quality germanium enabled the appearance of high mobility 2D carriers suitable for such an experiment. A strong anisotropy of 2D carrier mobility, effective mass, quantum, and transport lifetime has been observed, through measurements of quantum phenomena at low temperatures, between the ⟨110⟩ and ⟨100⟩ in-plane crystallographic directions. These results have important consequences for electronic devices and sensor designs and suggest similar effects could be observed in technologically relevant and emerging materials such as SiGe, SiC, GeSn, GeSnSi, and C (Diamond).

  7. A kinetic model for the transport of electrons in a graphene layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fermanian Kammerer, Clotilde, E-mail: Clotilde.Fermanian@u-pec.fr [Laboratoire d' Analyse et de Mathématiques Appliquées, Université Paris Est and CNRS, 61, avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil Cedex (France); Méhats, Florian, E-mail: florian.mehats@univ-rennes1.fr [Institut de Recherche Mathématique de Rennes, IPSO Inria team, Université Rennes 1 and CNRS, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France)

    2016-12-15

    In this article, we propose a new numerical scheme for the computation of the transport of electrons in a graphene device. The underlying quantum model for graphene is a massless Dirac equation, whose eigenvalues display a conical singularity responsible for non-adiabatic transitions between the two modes. We first derive a kinetic model which takes the form of two Boltzmann equations coupled by a collision operator modeling the non-adiabatic transitions. This collision term includes a Landau–Zener transfer term and a jump operator whose presence is essential in order to ensure a good energy conservation during the transitions. We propose an algorithmic realization of the semi-group solving the kinetic model, by a particle method. We give analytic justification of the model and propose a series of numerical experiments studying the influences of the various sources of errors between the quantum and the kinetic models.

  8. Electron Transport Chain Remodeling by GSK3 during Oogenesis Connects Nutrient State to Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Matthew H; Thomsen, Michael B; Spradling, Allan C

    2016-01-28

    Reproduction is heavily influenced by nutrition and metabolic state. Many common reproductive disorders in humans are associated with diabetes and metabolic syndrome. We characterized the metabolic mechanisms that support oogenesis and found that mitochondria in mature Drosophila oocytes enter a low-activity state of respiratory quiescence by remodeling the electron transport chain (ETC). This shift in mitochondrial function leads to extensive glycogen accumulation late in oogenesis and is required for the developmental competence of the oocyte. Decreased insulin signaling initiates ETC remodeling and mitochondrial respiratory quiescence through glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Intriguingly, we observed similar ETC remodeling and glycogen uptake in maturing Xenopus oocytes, suggesting that these processes are evolutionarily conserved aspects of oocyte development. Our studies reveal an important link between metabolism and oocyte maturation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nonequilibrium Green's function theory for nonadiabatic effects in quantum electron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Vincent F; Kosov, Daniel S

    2017-12-14

    We develop nonequilibrium Green's function-based transport theory, which includes effects of nonadiabatic nuclear motion in the calculation of the electric current in molecular junctions. Our approach is based on the separation of slow and fast time scales in the equations of motion for Green's functions by means of the Wigner representation. Time derivatives with respect to central time serve as a small parameter in the perturbative expansion enabling the computation of nonadiabatic corrections to molecular Green's functions. Consequently, we produce a series of analytic expressions for non-adiabatic electronic Green's functions (up to the second order in the central time derivatives), which depend not solely on the instantaneous molecular geometry but likewise on nuclear velocities and accelerations. An extended formula for electric current is derived which accounts for the non-adiabatic corrections. This theory is concisely illustrated by the calculations on a model molecular junction.

  10. Nb2O5 as a new electron transport layer for double junction polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiki, Mahbube K; Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Qiao, Qiquan

    2012-04-14

    Nb(2)O(5) as a new electron transport layer (ETL) was used for double junction polymer solar cells. The Nb(2)O(5) ETL was prepared by spin coating a Nb(2)O(5) sol-gel solution onto the active layer of the optical front subcell. The double junction devices using Nb(2)O(5) ETL exhibit an open circuit voltage (V(oc)) of 1.30 V, which is close to the sum of the s of the individual subcells. The current density-voltage (J-V) simulation showed that the double junction device performance using Nb(2)O(5) as ETL could be significantly increased by reducing the series resistance (R(se)) and matching the current densities of the individual subcells.

  11. Optoelectronic devices, low temperature preparation methods, and improved electron transport layers

    KAUST Repository

    Eita, Mohamed S.

    2016-08-04

    An optoelectronic device such as a photovoltaic device which has at least one layer, such as an electron transport layer, which comprises a plurality of alternating, oppositely charged layers including metal oxide layers. The metal oxide can be zinc oxide. The plurality of layers can be prepared by layer-by-layer processing in which alternating layers are built up step-by-step due to electrostatic attraction. The efficiency of the device can be increased by this processing method compared to a comparable method like sputtering. The number of layers can be controlled to improve device efficiency. Aqueous solutions can be used which is environmentally friendly. Annealing can be avoided. A quantum dot layer can be used next to the metal oxide layer to form a quantum dot heterojunction solar device.

  12. Planar heterojunction perovskite solar cell based on CdS electron transport layer

    KAUST Repository

    Abulikemu, Mutalifu

    2017-07-02

    We report on planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells employing a metal chalcogenide (CdS) electron transport layer with power conversion efficiency up to 10.8%. The CdS layer was deposited via solution-process chemical bath deposition at low-temperature (60°C). Pinhole-free and uniform thin films were obtained with good structural, optical and morphological properties. An optimal layer thickness of 60nm yielded an improved open-circuit voltage and fill factor compared to the standard TiO2-based solar cells. Devices showed a higher reproducibility of the results compared to TiO2-based ones. We also tested the effect of annealing temperature on the CdS film and the effect of CdCl2 treatment followed by high temperature annealing (410°C) that is expected to passivate the surface, thus eliminating eventual trap-states inducing recombination.

  13. Long distance electron transport in marine sediments: Microbial and geochemical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Larsen, Steffen; Pfeffer, Christian

    -structural properties suggesting that they are living electric micro cables. The mode of action of these organisms has major impacts on element cycling by redox processes, pH balances, mineral dissolution/precipitations, and electro migration of ions in marine sediment. The ability of Desulfubulbus filaments to bridge...... redox half-reactions in distant regions of the sediment leads to formation of electrical fields, which modifies ion transport. The local proton producing and proton consuming half reactions induces pH extremes that accelerate dissolution of iron sulphides and calcium carbonates in anoxic layers...... to sulfate, and iron sulphides are the major sources for sulfide in the system. Procaryotes with the ability to perform long distance electron transmission may flourishes in marine sediments exposed to transient oxygen depletion, leaving distinct signatures of such events in the geological record....

  14. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  15. Ionic and electronic transport properties in dense plasmas by orbital-free density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjostrom, Travis; Daligault, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    We validate the application of our recent orbital-free density functional theory (DFT) approach [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 155006 (2014);] for the calculation of ionic and electronic transport properties of dense plasmas. To this end, we calculate the self-diffusion coefficient, the viscosity coefficient, the electrical and thermal conductivities, and the reflectivity coefficient of hydrogen and aluminum plasmas. Very good agreement is found with orbital-based Kohn-Sham DFT calculations at lower temperatures. Because the computational costs of the method do not increase with temperature, we can produce results at much higher temperatures than is accessible by the Kohn-Sham method. Our results for warm dense aluminum at solid density are inconsistent with the recent experimental results reported by Sperling et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 115001 (2015)].

  16. First-principles electron transport with phonon coupling: Large scale at low cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Palsgaard, Mattias L. N.; Stokbro, Kurt; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-10-01

    Phonon-assisted tunneling plays a crucial role for electronic device performance and even more so with future size down-scaling. We show how one can include this effect in large-scale first-principles calculations using a single "special thermal displacement" (STD) of the atomic coordinates at almost the same cost as elastic transport calculations, by extending the recent method of Zacharias et al. [Phys. Rev. B 94, 075125 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.075125] to the important case of Landauer conductance. We apply the method to ultrascaled silicon devices and demonstrate the importance of phonon-assisted band-to-band and source-to-drain tunneling. In a diode the phonons lead to a rectification ratio suppression in good agreement with experiments, while in an ultrathin body transistor the phonons increase off currents by four orders of magnitude, and the subthreshold swing by a factor of 4, in agreement with perturbation theory.

  17. Electronic Transport as a Driver for Self-Interaction-Corrected Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Pertsova, Anna

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. While spintronics often investigates striking collective spin effects in large systems, a very important research direction deals with spin-dependent phenomena in nanostructures, reaching the extreme of a single spin confined in a quantum dot, in a molecule, or localized on an impurity or dopant. The issue considered in this chapter involves taking this extreme to the nanoscale and the quest to use first-principles methods to predict and control the behavior of a few "spins" (down to 1 spin) when they are placed in an interesting environment. Particular interest is on environments for which addressing these systems with external fields and/or electric or spin currents is possible. The realization of such systems, including those that consist of a core of a few transition-metal (TM) atoms carrying a spin, connected and exchanged-coupled through bridging oxo-ligands has been due to work by many experimental researchers at the interface of atomic, molecular and condensed matter physics. This chapter addresses computational problems associated with understanding the behaviors of nano- and molecular-scale spin systems and reports on how the computational complexity increases when such systems are used for elements of electron transport devices. Especially for cases where these elements are attached to substrates with electronegativities that are very different than the molecule, or for coulomb blockade systems, or for cases where the spin-ordering within the molecules is weakly antiferromagnetic, the delocalization error in DFT is particularly problematic and one which requires solutions, such as self-interaction corrections, to move forward. We highlight the intersecting fields of spin-ordered nanoscale molecular magnets, electron transport, and coulomb blockade and highlight cases where self-interaction corrected methodologies can improve our predictive power in this emerging field.

  18. Prioritization of copper for the use in photosynthetic electron transport in developing leaves of hybrid poplar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad eShahbaz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plastocyanin is an essential and abundant copper protein required for photosynthesis in higher plants. Severe copper deprivation has the potential to cause a defect in photosynthetic electron transport due to a lack in plastocyanin. The Cu-microRNAs, which are up-regulated under Cu deficiency, down-regulate the expression of target Cu proteins other than plastocyanin, cytochrome-c oxidase and the ethylene receptors. It has been proposed that this mechanism saves Cu for plastocyanin maturation. We aimed to test how hybrid poplar, a species that has capacity to rapidly expand its photosynthetically active tissue, responds to variations in Cu availability over time. Measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence after Cu depletion revealed a drastic effect on photosynthesis in hybrid poplar. The decrease in photosynthetic capacity was correlated with a reduction in plastocyanin protein levels. Compared to older leaves, plastocyanin decreased more strongly in developing leaves, which also lost more photosynthetic electron transport capacity. The effect of Cu depletion on older and more developed leaves was minor and these leaves maintained much of their photosynthetic capacity. Interestingly, upon resupply of Cu to the medium a very rapid recovery of Cu levels was seen in the younger leaves with a concomitant rise in the expression and activity of plastocyanin. In contrast, the expression of those Cu proteins, which are targets of microRNAs was under the same circumstances delayed. At the same time, Cu resupply had only minor effects on the older leaves. The data suggest a model where rapid recovery of photosynthetic capacity in younger leaves is made possible by a preferred allocation of Cu to plastocyanin in younger leaves, which is supported by Cu-microRNA expression.

  19. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute

  20. Altered gene expression by sedaxane increases PSII efficiency, photosynthesis and growth and improves tolerance to drought in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajigboye, Olubukola O; Lu, Chungui; Murchie, Erik H; Schlatter, Christian; Swart, Gina; Ray, Rumiana V

    2017-04-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDHI) fungicides have been shown to increase PSII efficiency and photosynthesis under drought stress in the absence of disease to enhance the biomass and yield of winter wheat. However, the molecular mechanism of improved photosynthetic efficiency observed in SDHI-treated wheat has not been previously elucidated. Here we used a combination of chlorophyll fluorescence, gas exchange and gene expression analysis, to aid our understanding of the basis of the physiological responses of wheat seedlings under drought conditions to sedaxane, a novel SDHI seed treatment. We show that sedaxane increased the efficiency of PSII photochemistry, reduced non-photochemical quenching and improved the photosynthesis and biomass in wheat correlating with systemic changes in the expression of genes involved in defense, chlorophyll synthesis and cell wall modification. We applied a coexpression network-based approach using differentially expressed genes of leaves, roots and pregerminated seeds from our wheat array datasets to identify the most important hub genes, with top ranked correlation (higher gene association value and z-score) involved in cell wall expansion and strengthening, wax and pigment biosynthesis and defense. The results indicate that sedaxane confers tolerant responses of wheat plants grown under drought conditions by redirecting metabolites from defense/stress responses towards growth and adaptive development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.