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Sample records for psii electron donor

  1. Isolation of novel PSII-LHCII megacomplexes from pea plants characterized by a combination of proteomics and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Pascal; Nield, Jon; Tabares, Jose Alejandro Muñoz; Chiodoni, Angelica; Manfredi, Marcello; Gosetti, Fabio; Marengo, Emilio; Saracco, Guido; Barber, James; Pagliano, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    In higher plants, photosystem II (PSII) is a multi-subunit pigment-protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts, where it is present mostly in dimeric form within the grana. Its light-harvesting antenna system, LHCII, is composed of trimeric and monomeric complexes, which can associate in variable number with the dimeric PSII core complex in order to form different types of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes. Moreover, PSII-LHCII supercomplexes can laterally associate within the thylakoid membrane plane, thus forming higher molecular mass complexes, termed PSII-LHCII megacomplexes (Boekema et al. 1999a, in Biochemistry 38:2233-2239; Boekema et al. 1999b, in Eur J Biochem 266:444-452). In this study, pure PSII-LHCII megacomplexes were directly isolated from stacked pea thylakoid membranes by a rapid single-step solubilization, using the detergent n-dodecyl-α-D-maltoside, followed by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. The megacomplexes were subjected to biochemical and structural analyses. Transmission electron microscopy on negatively stained samples, followed by single-particle analyses, revealed a novel form of PSII-LHCII megacomplexes, as compared to previous studies (Boekema et al.1999a, in Biochemistry 38:2233-2239; Boekema et al. 1999b, in Eur J Biochem 266:444-452), consisting of two PSII-LHCII supercomplexes sitting side-by-side in the membrane plane, sandwiched together with a second copy. This second copy of the megacomplex is most likely derived from the opposite membrane of a granal stack. Two predominant forms of intact sandwiched megacomplexes were observed and termed, according to (Dekker and Boekema 2005 Biochim Biophys Acta 1706:12-39), as (C2S2)4 and (C2S2 + C2S2M2)2 megacomplexes. By applying a gel-based proteomic approach, the protein composition of the isolated megacomplexes was fully characterized. In summary, the new structural forms of isolated megacomplexes and the related modeling performed provide novel insights into

  2. Proteomic characterization and three-dimensional electron microscopy study of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes from higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliano, Cristina; Nield, Jon; Marsano, Francesco; Pape, Tillmann; Barera, Simone; Saracco, Guido; Barber, James

    2014-09-01

    In higher plants a variable number of peripheral LHCII trimers can strongly (S), moderately (M) or loosely (L) associate with the dimeric PSII core (C2) complex via monomeric Lhcb proteins to form PSII-LHCII supercomplexes with different structural organizations. By solubilizing isolated stacked pea thylakoid membranes either with the α or β isomeric forms of the detergent n-dodecyl-D-maltoside, followed by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, we previously showed that PSII-LHCII supercomplexes of types C2S2M2 and C2S2, respectively, can be isolated [S. Barera et al., Phil. Trans. R Soc. B 67 (2012) 3389-3399]. Here we analysed their protein composition by applying extensive bottom-up and top-down mass spectrometry on the two forms of the isolated supercomplexes. In this way, we revealed the presence of the antenna proteins Lhcb3 and Lhcb6 and of the extrinsic polypeptides PsbP, PsbQ and PsbR exclusively in the C2S2M2 supercomplex. Other proteins of the PSII core complex, common to the C2S2M2 and C2S2 supercomplexes, including the low molecular mass subunits, were also detected and characterized. To complement the proteomic study with structural information, we performed negative stain transmission electron microscopy and single particle analysis on the PSII-LHCII supercomplexes isolated from pea thylakoid membranes solubilized with n-dodecyl-α-D-maltoside. We observed the C2S2M2 supercomplex in its intact form as the largest PSII complex in our preparations. Its dataset was further analysed in silico, together with that of the second largest identified sub-population, corresponding to its C2S2 subcomplex. In this way, we calculated 3D electron density maps for the C2S2M2 and C2S2 supercomplexes, approaching respectively 30 and 28Å resolution, extended by molecular modelling towards the atomic level. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. Copyright © 2013. Published by

  3. Stoichiometric relationship between the (Mn){sub 4}-cluster and PSII Ca{sup 2+} necessary for O{sub 2}-evolution. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This report focuses on the following research accomplishments: Stoichiometric relationship between the (Mn){sub 4}-cluster and PSII Ca{sup 2+} necessary for O{sub 2}-evolution; Photodamage of Mn-depleted PSII membranes: Sites and mechanisms of photoinactivation of primary reactions; The photoassembly of the PSII (Mn){sub 4}cluster is modulated by Ca{sup 2+} and DCIP; The natural product sorgoleone inhibits electron transfer at the Q{sub A}/Q{sub B} site of PSII; and Photodamages of Ca{sup 2+}-depleted PSII membranes: Sites and mechanisms of inactivation of donor side reactions.

  4. Cyclic electron flow may provide some protection against PSII photoinhibition in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essemine, Jemaa; Xiao, Yi; Qu, Mingnan; Mi, Hualing; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2017-04-01

    Previously we have shown that a quick down-regulation in PSI activity compares to that of PSII following short-term heat stress for two rice groups including C4023 and Q4149, studied herein. These accessions were identified to have different natural capacities in driving cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI; i.e., low CEF (lcef) and high CEF (hcef) for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these two lines have different mechanisms of protecting photosystem II from photodamage under heat stress. We observed a stepwise alteration in the shape of Chl a fluorescence induction (OJIP) with increasing temperature treatment. The effect of 44°C treatment on the damping in Chl a fluorescence was more pronounced in C4023 than in Q4149. Likewise, we noted a disruption in the I-step, a decline in the Fv due to a strong damping in the Fm, and a slight increase in the F0. Normalized data demonstrated that the I-step seems more susceptible to 44°C in C4023 than in Q4149. We also measured the redox states of plastocyanin (PC) and P700 by monitoring the transmission changes at 820nm (I820), and observed a disturbance in the oxidation/reduction kinetics of PC and P700. The decline in the amplitude of their oxidation was shown to be about 29% and 13% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. The electropotential component (Δφ) of ms-DLE appeared more sensitive to temperature stress than the chemical component (ΔpH), and the impact of heat was more evident and drastic in C4023 than in Q4149. Under heat stress, we noticed a concomitant decline in the primary photochemistry of PSII as well as in both the membrane energization process and the lumen protonation for both accessions, and it is evident that heat affects these parameters more in C4023 than in Q4149. All these data suggest that higher CET can confer higher photoprotection to PSII in rice lines, which can be a desirable trait during rice breeding, especially in the context of a "warming

  5. A biomimetic approach to artificial photosynthesis: Ru(II)-polypyridine photo-sensitisers linked to tyrosine and manganese electron donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Leif; Sun, Licheng; Åkermark, Björn; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2001-09-01

    The paper describes recent advances towards the construction of functional mimics of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II (PSII) that are coupled to photoinduced charge separation. Some key principles of PSII and artificial systems for light-induced charge accumulation are discussed. Systems are described where biomimetic electron donors - manganese complexes and tyrosine - have been linked to a Ru(II)-polypyridine photosensitiser. Oxidation of the donors by intramolecular electron transfer from the photo-oxidised Ru(III) complex has been studied using optical flash photolysis and EPR experiments. A step-wise electron transfer Mn 2(III,III)→tyrosine→Ru(III) has been demonstrated, in analogy to the reaction on the donor side of PSII. Electron transfer from the tyrosine to Ru(III) was coupled to tyrosine deprotonation. This resulted in a large reorganisation energy and thus a slow reaction rate, unless the tyrosine was hydrogen bonded or already deprotonated. A comparison with analogous reactions in PSII is made. Finally, light-induced oxidation of a manganese dimer linked to a Ru(II)-photosensitiser has been observed. Preliminary results suggest the possibility of photo-oxidising manganese dimers in several steps, which is an important advancement towards water oxidation.

  6. Few electron quantum dot coupling to donor implanted electron spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Martin; Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Neilson, Erik; Gamble, John; Muller, Richard; Jacobson, Toby; Ten-Eyck, Greg; Wendt, Joel; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Donor-based Si qubits are receiving increased interest because of recent demonstrations of high fidelity electron or nuclear spin qubits and their coupling. Quantum dot (QD) mediated interactions between donors are of interest for future coupling of two donors. We present experiment and modeling of a polysilicon/Si MOS QD, charge-sensed by a neighboring many electron QD, capable of coupling to one or two donor implanted electron spins (D) while tuned to the few electron regime. The unique design employs two neighboring gated wire FETs and self-aligned implants, which supports many configurations of implanted donors. We can access the (0,1) ⇔(1,0) transition between the D and QD, as well as the resonance condition between the few electron QD and two donors ((0,N,1) ⇔(0,N +1,0) ⇔(1,N,0)). We characterize capacitances and tunnel rate behavior combined with semi-classical and full configuration interaction simulations to study the energy landscape and kinetics of D-QD transitions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Analysis of electron donors in photosystems in oxygenic photosynthesis by photo-CIDNP MAS NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdanova, M; Janssen, G J; de Groot, H J M; Matysik, J; Alia, A

    2015-11-01

    Both photosystem I and photosystem II are considerably similar in molecular architecture but they operate at very different electrochemical potentials. The origin of the different redox properties of these RCs is not yet clear. In recent years, insight was gained into the electronic structure of photosynthetic cofactors through the application of photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) with magic-angle spinning NMR (MAS NMR). Non-Boltzmann populated nuclear spin states of the radical pair lead to strongly enhanced signal intensities that allow one to observe the solid-state photo-CIDNP effect from both photosystem I and II from isolated reaction center of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and duckweed (Spirodela oligorrhiza) and from the intact cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis by (13)C and (15)N MAS NMR. This review provides an overview on the photo-CIDNP MAS NMR studies performed on PSI and PSII that provide important ingredients toward reconstruction of the electronic structures of the donors in PSI and PSII. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hybrid super electron donors – preparation and reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Garnier

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Neutral organic electron donors, featuring pyridinylidene–imidazolylidene, pyridinylidene–benzimidazolylidene and imidazolylidene–benzimidazolylidene linkages are reported. The pyridinylidene–benzimidazolylidene and imidazolylidene–benzimidazolylidene hybrid systems were designed to be the first super electron donors to convert iodoarenes to aryl radicals at room temperature, and indeed both show evidence for significant aryl radical formation at room temperature. The stronger pyridinylidene–imidazolylidene donor converts iodoarenes to aryl anions efficiently under appropriate conditions (3 equiv of donor. The presence of excess sodium hydride base has a very important and selective effect on some of these electron-transfer reactions, and a rationale for this is proposed.

  9. Citric acid wastewater as electron donor for biological sulfate reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Huisman, J.; Garcia Encia, P.A.; Muyzer, G.

    2009-01-01

    Citrate-containing wastewater is used as electron donor for sulfate reduction in a biological treatment plant for the removal of sulfate. The pathway of citrate conversion coupled to sulfate reduction and the microorganisms involved were investigated. Citrate was not a direct electron donor for the

  10. Thermodynamic and Spectrophotometric Studies of Electron Donor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ). The stoichiometry of the complex was 2:1 ... and for assay of active pharmaceutical ingredient. (API) content to ensure efficacy and safety of the ..... alternative assay technique for cephalexin by charge transfer interaction of the donor: ...

  11. In vivo assessment of effect of phytotoxin tenuazonic acid on PSII reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiguo; Strasser, Reto Jörg; Qiang, Sheng

    2014-11-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA), a phytotoxin produced by the fungus Alternaria alternata isolated from diseased croftonweed (Ageratina adenophora), exhibits a strong inhibition in photosystem II (PSII) activity. In vivo chlorophyll fluorescence transients of the host plant croftonweed, show that the dominant effect of TeA is not on the primary photochemical reaction but on the biochemical reaction after QA. The most important action site of TeA is the QB site on the PSII electron-acceptor side, blocking electron transport beyond QA(-) by occupying the QB site in the D1 protein. However, TeA does not affect the antenna pigments, the energy transfer from antenna pigment molecules to reaction centers (RCs), and the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) at the donor side of PSII. TeA severely inactivated PSII RCs. The fraction of non-QA reducing centers and non-QB reducing centers show a time- and concentration-dependent linear increase. Conversely, the amount of active QA or QB reducing centers declined sharply in a linear way. The fraction of non-QB reducing centers calculated from data of fluorescence transients is close to the number of PSII RCs with their QB site filled by TeA. An increase of the step-J level (VJ) in the OJIP fluorescence transients attributed to QA(-) accumulation due to TeA bound to the QB site is a typical characteristic response of the plants leaf with respect to TeA penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Spectroscopic Studies of the Electron Donor-Acceptor Interaction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    base-acid reaction between two or more different chemical constituents, preferably aromatic nucleus–based compounds with electron–rich centers and electron-deficient compounds. The formation of electron-donor- acceptor (EDA) complexes can be rapidly assessed for its validity as a simple quantitative analytical method ...

  13. Citric acid wastewater as electron donor for biological sulfate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stams, Alfons J M; Huisman, Jacco; Garcia Encina, Pedro A; Muyzer, Gerard

    2009-07-01

    Citrate-containing wastewater is used as electron donor for sulfate reduction in a biological treatment plant for the removal of sulfate. The pathway of citrate conversion coupled to sulfate reduction and the microorganisms involved were investigated. Citrate was not a direct electron donor for the sulfate-reducing bacteria. Instead, citrate was fermented to mainly acetate and formate. These fermentation products served as electron donors for the sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate reduction activities of the reactor biomass with acetate and formate were sufficiently high to explain the sulfate reduction rates that are required for the process. Two citrate-fermenting bacteria were isolated. Strain R210 was closest related to Trichococcus pasteurii (99.5% ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence similarity). The closest relative of strain S101 was Veillonella montepellierensis with an rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.7%. Both strains had a complementary substrate range.

  14. Biotechnological aspects of sulfate reduction with methane as electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulepas, R.J.W.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2010-01-01

    Biological sulfate reduction can be used for the removal and recovery of oxidized sulfur compounds and metals from waste streams. However, the costs of conventional electron donors, like hydrogen and ethanol, limit the application possibilities. Methane from natural gas or biogas would be a more

  15. 2012 Gordon Research Conference, Electron donor-acceptor interactions, August 5-10 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCusker, James [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  16. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana A.

    2016-11-30

    The efficiency of photoconversion systems, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, is largely controlled by a series of fundamental photophysical processes occurring at the interface before carrier collection. A profound understanding of ultrafast interfacial charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) is the key determinant to improving the overall performances of photovoltaic devices. The discussion in this dissertation primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in photon absorption, exciton separation, carrier transport, carrier recombination and carrier collection in organic photovoltaic devices. A combination of steady-state and femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopies was used to investigate the photoinduced charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Furthermore, this study was extended to investigate some important factors that influence charge transfer in donor-acceptor systems, such as the morphology, energy band alignment, electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance are found. In this thesis, we explored the significant impacts of ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination at donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces on the performance of a conjugated polymer PTB7-Th device with three fullerene acceptors: PC71BM, PC61BM and IC60BA. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy can illustrate the basis for fabricating solar cell devices with improved performances. In addition, we studied the effects of the incorporation of heavy metals into π-conjugated chromophores on electron transfer by monitoring the triplet state lifetime of the oligomer using transient absorption spectroscopy, as understanding the mechanisms controlling intersystem crossing and

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of lithium donors in monoisotopic silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezhevskii, Alexandr A.; Soukhorukov, Andrey V.; Guseinov, Davud V.; Gusev, Anatoly V.

    2009-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (X-band EPR) spectra are reported for lithium-related donors in monoisotopic silicon. High resolution EPR spectra of lithium donor centers in monoisotopic silicon, enriched by 28Si isotope (99.99%) with very narrow individual lines are observed. In monoisotopic silicon sample (28Si enriched floating zone silicon with low concentration of lithium 1016 cm-3), the trigonal EPR spectrum, with well resolved 7Li hyperfine structure is recorded in the temperature range 3.5-20 K. This spectrum was attributed to LiO complex. At high concentration of lithium (about 1018 cm-3) in monoisotopic silicon two types of spectra are observed. The trigonal one has the same feature as for low concentration of lithium with g-values: g∥=1.9974 and g⊥=1.9989. Another spectrum consists of two lines and has tetragonal symmetry with g∥=1.9992 and g⊥=1.9983. This spectrum is more intensive than the trigonal one and has no resolved hyperfine structure probably due to time averaging of the hyperfine interaction caused by hopping motion of electrons.

  18. Study on Effects of Electron Donors on Phosphine Production from Anaerobic Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Cao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different types and concentrations of electron donors (glucose, starch, methanol and sodium acetate on the formation of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge that has been domesticated for a prolonged period were studied in small batch experiments. The results show that types and concentrations of electron donor have significant effects on the production of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge. Among them, glucose was the most favourable electron donor, whereas sodium acetate was the least favourable electron donor for the removal of phosphorus and the production of phosphine. Higher concentrations of electron donors were more favourable for the reduction of phosphate into phosphine, and supplying more than nine times the amount of electron donor as theoretically required for the reduction of phosphate into phosphine was favourable for the production of phosphine.

  19. Methanol as an alternative electron donor in chain elongation for butyrate and caproate formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.S.; Ye, Y.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Chain elongation is an emerging mixed culture biotechnology converting acetate into valuable biochemicals by using ethanol as an external electron donor. In this study we proposed to test another potential electron donor, methanol, in chain elongation. Methanol can be produced through the

  20. Dithienosilolothiophene: A New Polyfused Donor for Organic Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Schroeder, Bob C.

    2015-08-13

    We report the synthesis of a novel pentacyclic donor moiety, dithienosilolothiophene, and its incorporation into low bandgap semiconducting polymers. The unique geometry of this new donor allowed attaching four solubilizing side chains on the same side of the fused ring system, thus ensuring sufficient solubility when incorporated into conjugated polymers while simultaneously reducing the steric hindrance between adjacent polymer chains. The optoelectronic properties of three new polymers comprising the novel pentacyclic donor were investigated and compared to structurally similar thieno[3,2-b]thienobis(silolothiophene) polymers. Organic solar cells were fabricated in order to evaluate the new materials’ potential as donor polymers in bulk heterojunction solar cells and gain further insight into how the single-sided side-chain arrangement affects the active layer blend morphology.

  1. Significance of Accurate Electronic Structure Calculation Methods in Designing Silicon Donor Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiyaddin, Fahd; Jakowski, Jacek; Huang, Jingsong; Ericson, Milton Nance; Britton, Charles; Curtis, Franklin; Dumitrescu, Eugene; Sumpter, Bobby; Humble, Travis

    Recent demonstrations of long-lived spin qubits with high control fidelity have enhanced the potential of silicon donors in quantum computing. Verifying the design of prototype silicon qubit devices using computational models provides insight into their electrostatic potential landscape, donor electron wave functions, and spin dynamics. Here, we examine the sensitivity of device verification to the underlying electronic structure model used for the donor. Within the context of a computational workflow, we observe a significant discrepancy in the amplitude of the donor wave function computed using density-functional theory versus tight-binding methods for the case of doped silicon nanocrystals. While both methods can be used to match experimental values for the hyperfine coupling, differences in the calculated electronic amplitude at the donor site suggest that more complicated interactions, e.g., electron-exchange, may become unreliable. Hence, an accurate understanding of the donor wave function in the donor vicinity is critical to device design, as it serves as a handle to vital parameters in donor based quantum computer architectures.

  2. Efficient charge separation in Li(+) @C60 supramolecular complexes with electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Yuki; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Lithium-ion-encapsulated fullerene (Li(+) @C60 ) exhibits greatly enhanced reactivity in photoinduced electron-transfer reduction with electron donors compared with pristine C60 . The enhanced reactivity of Li(+) @C60 results from the more positive one-electron reduction potential of Li(+) @C60 (+0.14 V versus a standard calomel electrode (SCE)) than that of C60 (-0.43 V versus SCE), whereas the reorganization energy of electron transfer of Li(+) @C60 (1.01 eV) becomes larger than that of C60 (0.73 eV) because of the change in electrostatic interactions of encapsulated Li(+) upon electron transfer. Li(+) @C60 can form strong supramolecular complexes with various anionic electron donors through electrostatic interactions. Li(+) @C60 can also form strong supramolecular π complexes with various electron donors, such as cyclic porphyrin dimers, corannulene, and crown ether fused monopyrrolotetrathiafulvalenes. Photoinduced electron transfer from electron donors to Li(+) @C60 afforded long-lived charge-separated states of supramolecular complexes between electron donors and Li(+) @C60 . A photoelectrochemical solar cell composed of supramolecular nanoclusters of Li(+) @C60 and zinc sulfonated meso-tetraphenylporphyrin exhibits significant enhancement in the photoelectrochemical performance than that of the reference system containing only a single component. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Qualitative detection of some electron donor drugs on thin-layer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative detection of some electron donor drugs on thin-layer plates: chloranilic acid as ... A chromatographic procedure for the qualitative detection of ... coloration of the different complexes as a basis, it was possible to gain some insight ...

  4. Picosecond laser studies of the charge-transfer reaction of excited triplet diphenylcarbene with electron donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzmann, E. V.; Langan, J.; Eisenthal, K. B.

    1983-12-01

    Evidence of a one-electron transfer process in a carbene reaction has been observed for the first time. The example is the quenching of the photoexcited triplet state of diphenylcarbene ( 3*DPC) by electron donors. Measurement of the fluorescence lifetime as a function of donor concentration yielded the bimolecular rate constant, 3* k. An explanation is offered as to why 3* and 1DPC react efficiently with amines as well as alcohols, whereas the ground triplet, 3DPC, does not.

  5. Electron transfer between physically bound electron donors and acceptors: a fluorescence blob model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Christine Keyes; Duhamel, Jean

    2010-11-11

    The present study reports on the applicability of the fluorescence blob model (FBM) to analyze the complex fluorescence decays obtained with DNA-intercalated ethidium bromide (EB) as it transfers an electron to copper cations bound to the DNA helix. Traditionally, the information retrieved about the electron transfer process taking place between an electron donor intercalated in DNA and an electron acceptor physically and randomly bound to DNA has been limited due to the distribution of distances that quenching can occur over, which leads to a distribution of rate constants resulting in complex fluorescence decays. These complications can be overcome by analyzing the fluorescence data with a fluorescence blob model (FBM) that allows for the study of fluorescence quenching between fluorophores and quenchers randomly spaced along a polymeric backbone. The fluorescence decays obtained for EB intercalated between two DNA base pairs (bp) as it transfers an electron to copper randomly bound to the DNA were well fit with the FBM. In the FBM analysis, electron transfer is characterized by the size of a blob in term of base pairs, N(blob), over which electron transfer occurs, as well as the rate constant of electron transfer inside a blob, k(blob). The present work demonstrates that electron transfer between intercalated EB and randomly bound copper occurs over an average distance that increases with increasing duplex length up to a duplex length of 12 bp, beyond which the distance over which electron transfer occurs remains constant with duplex length and equals 10.8 ± 0.4 bp.

  6. Incorporation of cationic electron donor of Ni-pyridyltetrathiafulvalene with anionic electron acceptor of polyoxometalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunashima, Ryo; Matsumoto, Takumi; Hoshino, Norihisa; Niiho, Wataru; Kimura, Mizuki; Kondo, Kei; Suyama, Yoshihiko; Nishioka, Yukihiro; Kawamata, Jun; Noro, Shin-ichiro; Nakamura, Takayoshi; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Ishiguro, Katsuya

    2012-09-07

    A new salt-[Ni(II)(DMSO)(5)(TTFPy)](2)[α-SiW(12)O(40)] (1)-based on polyoxometalates was prepared by coordinating a cationic electron donor of pyridyltetrathiafulvalene (TTFPy) with Ni(II). Although the TTFPy molecule did not form a salt with the anionic α-[SiW(VI)(12)O(40)](4-) because of the weak charge-transfer (CT) interaction, the coordination of Ni with the pyridyl moiety permitted salt formation driven by electrostatic interaction, giving a single crystal of 1. Crystallographic analysis, UV-vis and IR spectroscopy and electrochemical characterization revealed that the fully oxidized α-[SiW(VI)(12)O(40)](4-) was crystallized with the neutral TTFPy moiety from the acetonitrile solution because of the low electron-withdrawing ability of α-[SiW(VI)(12)O(40)](4-), forming a brown-orange crystal. The crystal colour quickly turned to black by immersing in methanol, due to CT from TTF moiety to α-[SiW(VI)(12)O(40)](4-), which was caused by the solvent effect. Increase in the solvent acceptor number from 18.9 for acetonitrile to 41.3 for methanol resulted in the enhancement of the electron withdrawing ability of α-[SiW(VI)(12)O(40)](4-) by 0.317 V in methanol.

  7. Low aqueous solubility electron donors for the reduction of nitroaromatics in anaerobic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Robin; Steiof, Martin; Zhang, Chunlong; Hughes, Joseph B.

    1999-02-01

    Studies are presented investigating the ability to enhance aryl nitro-reduction processes in sediments through electron donor addition. In particular, high molecular weight (starch and guar gum) and/or low aqueous solubility electron donors (oleic acid) were studied, since they should be less prone to diffusive loss to the water column after addition to contaminated areas. For comparison, complimentary studies were conducted with water-soluble electron donors (acetate and dextrose). The ability to enhance activity was measured by methane production and reduction of either nitrobenzene or 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene to aniline or dinitroaniline. The results demonstrate that all electron donors resulted in increased methane production after a lag phase. The highest level of methane production and the shortest lag phase in uncontaminated sediment microcosms was observed in acetate-fed systems. Sorption studies of all electron donors showed that starch was partitioning the least into the water phase. In microcosms containing nitrobenzene, trinitrobenzene and acetate, methane production did not occur and nitro-reduction was not observed. Conversely, the addition of dextrose or starch yielded methane production and aryl nitro-reduction with each contaminant tested. Neither nitrobenzene nor trinitrobenzene was significantly reduced in HgCl 2-killed controls. From these studies, it appears that starch may be well suited for applications of in-place, anaerobic sediment bioremediation.

  8. Effect of sulfate on anaerobic reduction of nitrobenzene with acetate or propionate as an electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingang; Wen, Yue; Ding, Ning; Xu, Yue; Zhou, Qi

    2012-09-15

    Sulfate is frequently found in wastewaters that contain nitrobenzene. To reveal the effect of sulfate on the reductive transformation of nitrobenzene to aniline--with acetate or propionate as potential electron donors in anaerobic systems--an acetate series (R1-R5) and a propionate series (R6-R10) were set up. Each of these was comprised of five laboratory-scale sequence batch reactors. The two series were amended with the same amount of nitrobenzene and electron donor electron equivalents, whereas with increasing sulfate concentrations. Results indicated that the presence of sulfate could depress nitrobenzene reduction. Such depression is linked to the inhibition of nitroreductase activity and/or the shift of electron flow. In the acetate series, although sulfate did not strongly compete with nitrobenzene for electron donors, noncompetitive inhibition of specific nitrobenzene reduction rates by sulfate was observed, with an inhibition constant of 0.40 mM. Propionate, which can produce intermediate H₂ as preferred reducing equivalent, is a more effective primary electron donor for nitrobenzene reduction as compared to acetate. In the propionate series, sulfate was found to be a preferential electron acceptor as compared to nitrobenzene, resulting in a quick depletion of propionate and then a likely termination of H₂-releasing under higher sulfate concentrations (R9 and R10). In such a situation, nitrobenzene reduction slowed down, occurring two-stage zero-order kinetics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spin relaxation via exchange with donor impurity-bound electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    In the Bir-Aronov-Pikus depolarization process affecting conduction electrons in p-type cubic semiconductors, spin relaxation is driven by exchange with short-lived valence band hole states. We have identified an analogous spin relaxation mechanism in nominally undoped silicon at low temperatures, when many electrons are bound to dilute dopant ion potentials. Inelastic scattering with externally injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions into highly spin-orbit-mixed bound excited states, driving strong spin relaxation of the conduction electrons via exchange interaction. We reveal the consequences of this spin depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold, where conventional charge and spin transport are restored. Based upon: Lan Qing, Jing Li, Ian Appelbaum, and Hanan Dery, Phys Rev. B 91, 241405(R) (2015). We acknowledge support from NSF, DTRA, and ONR.

  10. Single donor electronics and quantum functionalities with advanced CMOS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehl, Xavier; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Sanquer, Marc

    2016-03-16

    Recent progresses in quantum dots technology allow fundamental studies of single donors in various semiconductor nanostructures. For the prospect of applications figures of merits such as scalability, tunability, and operation at relatively large temperature are of prime importance. Beyond the case of actual dopant atoms in a host crystal, similar arguments hold for small enough quantum dots which behave as artificial atoms, for instance for single spin control and manipulation. In this context, this experimental review focuses on the silicon-on-insulator devices produced within microelectronics facilities with only very minor modifications to the current industrial CMOS process and tools. This is required for scalability and enabled by shallow trench or mesa isolation. It also paves the way for real integration with conventional circuits, as illustrated by a nanoscale device coupled to a CMOS circuit producing a radio-frequency drive on-chip. At the device level we emphasize the central role of electrostatics in etched silicon nanowire transistors, which allows to understand the characteristics in the full range from zero to room temperature.

  11. Spin Measurements of an Electron Bound to a Single Phosphorous Donor in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, D. R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S. M.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N. C.; Ten Eyck, G. A.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Carroll, M. S.; Lilly, M. P.

    2014-03-01

    The spin of an electron bound to a single donor implanted in silicon is potentially useful for quantum information processing. We report on our efforts to measure and manipulate the spin of an electron bound to a single P donor in silicon. A low number of P donors are implanted using a self-aligned process into a silicon substrate in close proximity to a single-electron-transistor (SET) defined by lithographically patterned polysilicon gates. The SET is used to sense the occupancy of the electron on the donor and for spin read-out. An adjacent transmission line allows the application of microwave pulses to rotate the spin of the electron. We will present data from various experiments designed to exploit these capabilities. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Carbon monoxide as an electron donor for the biological reduction of sulphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parshina, S.N.; Sipma, J.; Henstra, A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Several strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are able to use carbon monoxide (CO) as a carbon source and electron donor for biological sulphate reduction. These strains exhibit variable resistance to CO toxicity. The most resistant SRB can grow and use CO as an

  13. Qualitative detection of some electron donor drugs on thin-layer plates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The detection reactions, which occurred instantaneously, were found to utilize the complex formation between chloranilic acid acting as the election acceptor and the drugs acting as the electron donors in non-aqueous media. Using the intensity of the purple coloration of the different complexes as a basis, it was possible to ...

  14. Molecular Understanding of Fullerene - Electron Donor Interactions in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-09-13

    Organic solar cells hold promise of providing low-cost, renewable power generation, with current devices providing up to 13% power conversion efficiency. The rational design of more performant systems requires an in-depth understanding of the interactions between the electron donating and electron accepting materials within the active layers of these devices. Here, we explore works that give insight into the intermolecular interactions between electron donors and electron acceptors, and the impact of molecular orientations and environment on these interactions. We highlight, from a theoretical standpoint, the effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of charge carriers at the donor/acceptor interface and in the bulk and how these interactions influence the nature of the charge transfer states as wells as the charge separation and charge transport processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Localization of cyanobacterial photosystem II donor-side subunits by electron microscopy and the supramolecular organization of photosystem II in the thylakoid membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhl, Helena; Rögner, Matthias; Breemen, Jan F.L. van; Boekema, Egbert J.

    1999-01-01

    A large set of electron microscopy projections of photosystem II (PSII) dimers isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus was characterized by single particle image analysis. In addition to previously published maps at lower resolution [Boekema, E.J., Hankamer, B., Bald, D., Kruip, J.,

  16. On controlling the electronic states of shallow donors using a finite-size metal gate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levchuk, E. A., E-mail: liauchuk@bsu.by; Makarenko, L. F. [Belarusian State University (Belarus)

    2016-01-15

    The effect of an external electric field on the states of a shallow donor near a semiconductor surface is numerically simulated. A disk-shaped metal gate is considered as an electric-field source. The wavefunctions and energies of bound states are determined by the finite-element method. The critical characteristics of electron relocation between the donor and gate are determined for various gate diameters and boundary conditions, taking into account dielectric mismatch. The empirical dependences of these characteristics on the geometrical parameters and semiconductor properties are obtained. A simple trial function is proposed, which can be used to calculate the critical parameters using the Ritz variational method.

  17. Biocatalytic photosynthesis with water as an electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jungki; Nam, Dong Heon; Lee, Sahng Ha; Park, Chan Beum

    2014-09-15

    Efficient harvesting of unlimited solar energy and its conversion into valuable chemicals is one of the ultimate goals of scientists. With the ever-increasing concerns about sustainable growth and environmental issues, numerous efforts have been made to develop artificial photosynthetic process for the production of fuels and fine chemicals, thus mimicking natural photosynthesis. Despite the research progress made over the decades, the technology is still in its infancy because of the difficulties in kinetic coupling of whole photocatalytic cycles. Herein, we report a new type of artificial photosynthesis system that can avoid such problems by integrally coupling biocatalytic redox reactions with photocatalytic water splitting. We found that photocatalytic water splitting can be efficiently coupled with biocatalytic redox reactions by using tetracobalt polyoxometalate and Rh-based organometallic compound as hole and electron scavengers, respectively, for photoexcited [Ru(bpy)3](2+). Based on these results, we could successfully photosynthesize a model chiral compound (L-glutamate) using a model redox enzyme (glutamate dehydrogenase) upon in situ photoregeneration of cofactors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Electron transfer in proteins: nonorthogonal projections onto donor-acceptor subspace of the Hilbert space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Paulo C P; Freire, José A

    2004-04-22

    We develop nonorthogonal projectors, called Löwdin projectors, to construct an effective donor-acceptor system composed of localized donor (D) and acceptor (A) states of a long-distance electron transfer problem. When these states have a nonvanishing overlap with the bridge states these projectors are non-Hermitian and there are various possible effective two-level systems that can be built. We show how these can be constructed directly from the Schrödinger or Dyson equation projected onto the D-A subspace of the Hilbert space and explore these equations to determine the connection between Hamiltonian and Green function partitioning. We illustrate the use of these effective two-level systems in estimating the electron transfer rate in the context of a simple electron transfer model. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  19. Charge transfer in the electron donor-acceptor complex BH3NH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong; Song, Lingchun; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Qianer

    2004-03-31

    As a simple yet strongly binding electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex, BH(3)NH(3) serves as a good example to study the electron pair donor-acceptor complexes. We employed both the ab initio valence bond (VB) and block-localized wave function (BLW) methods to explore the electron transfer from NH(3) to BH(3). Conventionally, EDA complexes have been described by two diabatic states: one neutral state and one ionic charge-transferred state. Ab initio VB self-consistent field (VBSCF) computations generate the energy profiles of the two diabatic states together with the adiabatic (ground) state. Our calculations evidently demonstrated that the electron transfer between NH(3) and BH(3) falls in the abnormal regime where the reorganization energy is less than the exoergicity of the reaction. The nature of the NH(3)-BH(3) interaction is probed by an energy decomposition scheme based on the BLW method. We found that the variation of the charge-transfer energy with the donor-acceptor distance is insensitive to the computation levels and basis sets, but the estimation of the amount of electron transferred heavily depends on the population analysis procedures. The recent resurgence of interest in the nature of the rotation barrier in ethane prompted us to analyze the conformational change of BH(3)NH(3), which is an isoelectronic system with ethane. We found that the preference of the staggered structure over the eclipsed structure of BH(3)NH(3) is dominated by the Pauli exchange repulsion.

  20. Lack of a peroxiredoxin suppresses the lethality of cells devoid of electron donors by channelling electrons to oxidized ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, Susanna; Domènech, Alba; Carmona, Mercè; García-Santamarina, Sarela; Bañó, M Carmen; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2017-06-01

    The thioredoxin and glutaredoxin pathways are responsible of recycling several enzymes which undergo intramolecular disulfide bond formation as part of their catalytic cycles such as the peroxide scavengers peroxiredoxins or the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR, the rate-limiting enzyme of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, is an essential enzyme relying on these electron flow cascades for recycling. RNR is tightly regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner at different levels, but little is known about the participation of electron donors in such regulation. Here, we show that cytosolic thioredoxins Trx1 and Trx3 are the primary electron donors for RNR in fission yeast. Unexpectedly, trx1 transcript and Trx1 protein levels are up-regulated in a G1-to-S phase-dependent manner, indicating that the supply of electron donors is also cell cycle-regulated. Indeed, genetic depletion of thioredoxins triggers a DNA replication checkpoint ruled by Rad3 and Cds1, with the final goal of up-regulating transcription of S phase genes and constitutive RNR synthesis. Regarding the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin cascades, one combination of gene deletions is synthetic lethal in fission yeast: cells lacking both thioredoxin reductase and cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin. We have isolated a suppressor of this lethal phenotype: a mutation at the Tpx1-coding gene, leading to a frame shift and a loss-of-function of Tpx1, the main client of electron donors. We propose that in a mutant strain compromised in reducing equivalents, the absence of an abundant and competitive substrate such as the peroxiredoxin Tpx1 has been selected as a lethality suppressor to favor RNR function at the expense of the non-essential peroxide scavenging function, to allow DNA synthesis and cell growth.

  1. Lack of a peroxiredoxin suppresses the lethality of cells devoid of electron donors by channelling electrons to oxidized ribonucleotide reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Boronat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The thioredoxin and glutaredoxin pathways are responsible of recycling several enzymes which undergo intramolecular disulfide bond formation as part of their catalytic cycles such as the peroxide scavengers peroxiredoxins or the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR. RNR, the rate-limiting enzyme of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis, is an essential enzyme relying on these electron flow cascades for recycling. RNR is tightly regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner at different levels, but little is known about the participation of electron donors in such regulation. Here, we show that cytosolic thioredoxins Trx1 and Trx3 are the primary electron donors for RNR in fission yeast. Unexpectedly, trx1 transcript and Trx1 protein levels are up-regulated in a G1-to-S phase-dependent manner, indicating that the supply of electron donors is also cell cycle-regulated. Indeed, genetic depletion of thioredoxins triggers a DNA replication checkpoint ruled by Rad3 and Cds1, with the final goal of up-regulating transcription of S phase genes and constitutive RNR synthesis. Regarding the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin cascades, one combination of gene deletions is synthetic lethal in fission yeast: cells lacking both thioredoxin reductase and cytosolic dithiol glutaredoxin. We have isolated a suppressor of this lethal phenotype: a mutation at the Tpx1-coding gene, leading to a frame shift and a loss-of-function of Tpx1, the main client of electron donors. We propose that in a mutant strain compromised in reducing equivalents, the absence of an abundant and competitive substrate such as the peroxiredoxin Tpx1 has been selected as a lethality suppressor to favor RNR function at the expense of the non-essential peroxide scavenging function, to allow DNA synthesis and cell growth.

  2. Heterogeneous semiconductor photocatalysts for hydrogen production from aqueous solutions of electron donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, E. A.; Parmon, V. N.

    2017-09-01

    Current views on heterogeneous photocatalysts for visible- and near-UV-light-driven production of molecular hydrogen from water and aqueous solutions of inorganic and organic electron donors are analyzed and summarized. Main types of such photocatalysts and methods for their preparation are considered. Particular attention is paid to semiconductor photocatalysts based on sulfides that are known to be sensitive to visible light. The known methods for increasing the quantum efficiency of the target process are discussed, including design of the structure, composition and texture of semiconductor photocatalysts and variation of the medium pH and the substrate and photocatalyst concentrations. Some important aspects of the activation and deactivation of sulfide photocatalysts and the evolution of their properties in the course of hydrogen production processes in the presence of various types of electron donors are analyzed. The bibliography includes 276 references.

  3. Metalated Ylides: A New Class of Strong Donor Ligands with Unique Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The development and design of new ligand systems with special donor properties has been essential for crucial advances made in main-group-element and transition-metal chemistry over the years. This Forum Article focuses on metalated ylides as novel ligand systems. These anionic congeners of bisylides possess likewise two lone pairs of electrons at the central carbon atom and can thus function as X,L-type ligands with strong donor abilities. This article highlights recent efforts in the isolation and application of metalated ylides with a focus on work from this laboratory. We summarize structural and electronic properties and their use in organic synthesis as well as main-group-element and transition-metal chemistry. PMID:28240888

  4. Metalated Ylides: A New Class of Strong Donor Ligands with Unique Electronic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Lennart T; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2017-08-07

    The development and design of new ligand systems with special donor properties has been essential for crucial advances made in main-group-element and transition-metal chemistry over the years. This Forum Article focuses on metalated ylides as novel ligand systems. These anionic congeners of bisylides possess likewise two lone pairs of electrons at the central carbon atom and can thus function as X,L-type ligands with strong donor abilities. This article highlights recent efforts in the isolation and application of metalated ylides with a focus on work from this laboratory. We summarize structural and electronic properties and their use in organic synthesis as well as main-group-element and transition-metal chemistry.

  5. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A., E-mail: jimfield@email.arizona.edu

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Algal biomass can serve as an electron donor to drive reduction of sulfate to sulfide. • Biogenic sulfide precipitates Cu{sup 2+} as stable sulfide mineral. • Cu{sup +2} removal in sulfidogenic bioreactors amended with algal biomass exceeded 99.5%. • Acidity in synthetic acid rock drainage was consumed by sulfate reduction. - Abstract: This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Cu{sup 2+}. Sulfate, sulfide, Cu{sup 2+} and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123 d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7 mg SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} d{sup −1}) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu{sup 2+} removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu{sup 2+} was precipitated with biogenic H{sub 2}S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  6. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-05

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Pseudomonas alcaliphila with an electrode as the sole electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wentao; Zhang, Lixia; Li, Daping; Zhan, Guoqiang; Qian, Junwei; Tao, Yong

    2012-11-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were considered two alternative pathways of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. In this study, we firstly reported that both denitrification and DNRA occurred in Pseudomonas alcaliphila strain MBR with an electrode as the sole electron donor in a double chamber bio-electrochemical system (BES). The initial concentration of nitrate appeared as a factor determining the type of nitrate reduction with electrode as the sole electron donor at the same potential (-500 mV). As the initial concentration of nitrate increased, the fraction of nitrate reduced through denitrification also increased. While nitrite (1.38 ± 0.04 mM) was used as electron acceptor instead of nitrate, the electrons recovery via DNRA and denitrification were 43.06 ± 1.02% and 50.51 ± 1.37%, respectively. The electrochemical activities and surface topography of the working electrode catalyzed by strain MBR were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy. The results suggested that cells of strain MBR were adhered to the electrode, playing the role of electron transfer media for nitrate and nitrite reduction. Thus, for the first time, the results that DNRA and denitrification occurred simultaneously were confirmed by powering the strain with electricity. The study further expanded the range of metabolic reactions and had potential value for the recognization of dissimilatory nitrate reduction in various ecosystems. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Interplay of alternative conjugated pathways and steric interactions on the electronic and optical properties of donor-acceptor conjugated polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Igo T.

    2014-01-01

    Donor-acceptor π-conjugated copolymers are of interest for a wide range of electronic applications, including field-effect transistors and solar cells. Here, we present a density functional theory (DFT) study of the impact of varying the conjugation pathway on the geometric, electronic, and optical properties of donor-acceptor systems. We consider both linear ("in series"), traditional conjugation among the donor-acceptor moieties versus structures where the acceptor units are appended orthogonally to the linear, donor-only conjugated backbone. Long-range-corrected hybrid functionals are used in the investigation with the values of the tuned long-range separation parameters providing an estimate of the extent of conjugation as a function of the oligomer architecture. Considerable differences in the electronic and optical properties are determined as a function of the nature of the conjugation pathway, features that should be taken into account in the design of donor-acceptor copolymers.

  9. Photoinduced electron transfer interaction of anthraquinones with aniline quenchers: Influence of methyl substitution in aniline donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, V.; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Hussein, Yasser H. A.

    2017-02-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer between triplet state of 9,10-anthraquinone (AQ) and its two derivatives: 2-chloro-9,10-anthraquinone (CAQ) and sodium anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and ground state aniline (AN) and its dimethyl substitutions: 2,3-dimethylaniline (2,3-DMA), 2,6-dimethylaniline (2,6-DMA), 3,5-dimethylaniline (3,5-DMA) and N,N-dimethylaniline (N,N-DMA) is studied using nanosecond laser flash photolysis at room temperature. Detection of radical bands of quinone anions and aniline cations along with their formation and/or decay kinetics are used to confirm the electron transfer (ET) process. In MeCN medium, AN quenches the triplet state of CAQ (CAQT) but not the triplets AQT or AQST. However in aqueous medium, AN quenches AQST and forms radical ion pair. All the DMAs can react through ET with all the triplet quinones at different degrees of efficiency in MeCN medium. Noticeably, the ring substituted DMAs are less efficient in electron donation to AQT or AQST while the N,N-DMA shows high efficiency in donating electron to all triplet quinones in MeCN medium. Charge distribution of donor molecules, in MeCN medium is calculated using density functional theory (DFT), and shows an enhancement of electron density of the ring of N,N-DMA, making it an ideal electron donor for ET studies compared to other DMAs. This systematic selection and usage of anilines with electrochemically tunable quinones can be viewed as a working model of donor-acceptor system that can be utilized in photoinduced ET applications.

  10. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage (ARD) in permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor (e-donor) for sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). Lipid extracted algae (LEA), residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an e-donor to promote SRB activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a basal-medium containing H2SO4 and Cu2+. SO42−, S2−, Cu2+ and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123 d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7 mg SO42− d−1) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5 %) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu2+ removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu2+ was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Confirmation of the resulting CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of e- donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry in PRBs. PMID:27318730

  11. Ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of silicon nanocrystals doped with shallow donors (Li, P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurova, N. V., E-mail: kurova_natasha@mail.ru; Burdov, V. A. [Lobachevskii Nizhni Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    The results of ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of Si nanocrystals doped with shallow donors (Li, P) are reported. It is shown that phosphorus introduces much more significant distortions into the electronic structure of the nanocrystal than lithium, which is due to the stronger central cell potential of the phosphorus ion. It is found that the Li-induced splitting of the ground state in the conduction band of the nanocrystal into the singlet, doublet, and triplet retains its inverse structure typical for bulk silicon.

  12. High performance p-type molecular electron donors for OPV applications via alkylthiophene catenation chromophore extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Geraghty

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of key 4-alkyl-substituted 5-(trimethylsilylthiophene-2-boronic acid pinacol esters 3 allowed a simplified alkylthiophene catenation process to access bis-, ter-, quater-, and quinquethiophene π-bridges for the synthesis of acceptor–π-bridge-donor– π-bridge-acceptor (A–π-D–π-A electron donor molecules. Based on the known benzodithiophene-terthiophene-rhodanine (BTR material, the BXR series of materials, BMR (X = M, monothiophene, BBR (X = B, bithiophene, known BTR (X = T, terthiophene, BQR (X = Q, quaterthiophene, and BPR (X = P(penta, quinquethiophene were synthesised to examine the influence of chromophore extension on the device performance and stability for OPV applications. The BTxR (x = 4, butyl, and x = 8, octyl series of materials were synthesised by varying the oligothiophene π-bridge alkyl substituent to examine structure–property relationships in OPV device performance. The devices assembled using electron donors with an extended chromophore (BQR and BPR are shown to be more thermally stable than the BTR containing devices, with un-optimized efficiencies up to 9.0% PCE. BQR has been incorporated as a secondary donor in ternary blend devices with PTB7-Th resulting in high-performance OPV devices with up to 10.7% PCE.

  13. Correlation between proteinuria level and renal morphology with special reference to electron microscopy in kidney donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacar, Ahmet; Karabay, Gülten; Unlükal, Nejat; Yazici, Canan; Ozdemir, Handan

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether there is a correlation between protein level in urine and renal morphology in kidney transplant donors, as well as to detect the role of electron microscopy. For this purpose, kidney biopsies of 10 donors with urine protein levels were evaluated. Seven patients were female and three were male. Two had physiologic proteinuria (150 mg/24h), four had non-significant proteinuria (150-300 mg/24h), and three had significant (> 300 mg/24h) proteinuria. Serum creatinine levels were in normal ranges in all patients except for one who had a slight increase (1.76 mg/dL). Seven cases were reported to have normal or nonspecific light microscopic findings. Two of those seven cases had physiologic proteinuria, three had non-significant proteinuria, and two had significant proteinuria. One case had IgA nephropathy with significant proteinuria. One donor had early stage focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with non-significant proteinuria, and one donor had focal interstitial fibrosis with normal urine protein level. There was no statistically significant difference between score means of ultrastructural morphology of the six patients with same patients' light microscopic results and score means of light microscopic results with urine protein levels of all patients. However, there was a significant difference between score means of ultrastructural morphology with urine protein levels of those six patients. In conclusion, urine protein levels and light microscopic findings did not always reflect the detailed morphology alone and together. Therefore, combining with electron microscopic examination could be more beneficial in relieving problems occurring in long-term prognoses.

  14. Domain organization of photosystem II in membranes of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 investigated by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Aro, Eva-Mari; Boekema, Egbert J.

    2008-01-01

    The supramolecular organization of photosystem II (PSII) complexes in the photosynthetic membrane of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803 was studied by electron microscopy. After mild detergent solubilization, crystalline PSII arrays were extracted in which dimeric PSII particles associate in

  15. Sequence-specific electron injection into DNA from an intermolecular electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Hironobu; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Hashiya, Fumitaka; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    Electron transfer in DNA has been intensively studied to elucidate its biological roles and for applications in bottom-up DNA nanotechnology. Recently, mechanisms of electron transfer to DNA have been investigated; however, most of the systems designed are intramolecular. Here, we synthesized pyrene-conjugated pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PPIs) to achieve sequence-specific electron injection into DNA in an intermolecular fashion. Electron injection from PPIs into DNA was detected using 5-bromouracil as an electron acceptor. Twelve different 5-bromouracil-containing oligomers were synthesized to examine the electron-injection ability of PPI. Product analysis demonstrated that the electron transfer from PPIs was localized in a range of 8 bp from the binding site of the PPIs. These results demonstrate that PPIs can be a useful tool for sequence-specific electron injection.

  16. Sequence-specific electron injection into DNA from an intermolecular electron donor

    OpenAIRE

    Morinaga, Hironobu; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Hashiya, Fumitaka; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer in DNA has been intensively studied to elucidate its biological roles and for applications in bottom-up DNA nanotechnology. Recently, mechanisms of electron transfer to DNA have been investigated; however, most of the systems designed are intramolecular. Here, we synthesized pyrene-conjugated pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PPIs) to achieve sequence-specific electron injection into DNA in an intermolecular fashion. Electron injection from PPIs into DNA was detected using 5-bro...

  17. Identifying electron transfer coordinates in donor-bridge-acceptor systems using mode projection analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xunmo; Keane, Theo; Delor, Milan; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Weinstein, Julia; Bittner, Eric R.

    2017-02-01

    We report upon an analysis of the vibrational modes that couple and drive the state-to-state electronic transfer branching ratios in a model donor-bridge-acceptor system consisting of a phenothiazine-based donor linked to a naphthalene-monoimide acceptor via a platinum-acetylide bridging unit. Our analysis is based upon an iterative Lanczos search algorithm that finds superpositions of vibronic modes that optimize the electron/nuclear coupling using input from excited-state quantum chemical methods. Our results indicate that the electron transfer reaction coordinates between a triplet charge-transfer state and lower lying charge-separated and localized excitonic states are dominated by asymmetric and symmetric modes of the acetylene groups on either side of the central atom in this system. In particular, we find that while a nearly symmetric mode couples both the charge-separation and charge-recombination transitions more or less equally, the coupling along an asymmetric mode is far greater suggesting that IR excitation of the acetylene modes preferentially enhances charge-recombination transition relative to charge-separation.

  18. Donor-acceptor conjugated polymers used as electron acceptors in bulk heterojunction photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Christopher; Taylor, Barney; Mei, Jianguo; Reynolds, John; Henderson, John; Leever, Benjamin; Durstock, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Synthetic control over the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) and Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (LUMO) has been of significant importance in organic photovoltaics due to the nature of charge separation in donor/acceptor blends. One technique for obtaining tunability of the HOMO and LUMO levels with polymer synthesis is to combine electron donating and electron accepting moieties separated by a conjugated linkage unit. This technique has been utilized to produce highly efficient devices reaching power conversion efficiencies above 8% in polymer/fullerene blends. In this work, we report the characterization of poly(2,7-divinylene fluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F10DVBT), and performs best as an electron acceptor when mixed with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with an open circuit voltage of 1.2V. A combination of morphological and photo-physical studies highlights interesting properties of this material and its interactions with P3HT. The donor-acceptor conjugated structure of F10DVBT appears to strongly affect the photocurrent of these devices, and may result from the interactions between intramolecular and intermolecular charge transfer processes.

  19. Structure and reactivity in neutral organic electron donors derived from 4-dimethylaminopyridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Garnier

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects on the redox properties of modifying the molecular skeleton of neutral bis-2-(4-dimethylaminopyridinylidene electron donors, derived from 4-dimethylaminopyridine (4-DMAP, have been explored, by varying two parameters: (i the length of a polymethylene chain linking the two pyridine-derived rings and (ii the nature of the nitrogen substituents on the 4 and 4′ positions of the precursor pyridines. Restricting the bridge length to two methylene units significantly altered the redox profile, while changes in the nitrogen-substituents at the 4 and 4′ positions led to only slight changes in the redox potentials.

  20. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  1. Evaluation of sustained release polylactate electron donors for removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, E.L.; Joyner, D. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Conrad, M. E.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Mork, B.; Willet, A.; Koenigsberg, S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M. K.; Hazen, T. C.; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

  2. Electron Donor-Acceptor Interaction of 8-Hydroxyquinoline with Citric Acid in Different Solvents: Spectroscopic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demelash Jado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charge transfer complex formation between 8-hydroxyquinoline as the electron donor and citric acid as the electron acceptor has been studied spectrophotometrically in ethanol and methanol solvents at room temperature. Absorption band due to charge transfer complex formation was observed near 320 and 325 nm in ethanol and methanol, respectively. The stoichiometric ratio of the complex has been found 3 : 1 by using Job’s and conductometric titration methods. Benesi-Hildebrand equation has been applied to estimate the formation constant and molecular extinction coefficient. It was found that the value of formation constant was larger in ethanol than in methanol. The physical parameters, ionization potential, and standard free energy change of the formed complex were determined and evaluated in the ethanol and methanol solvents.

  3. Photosystem I from plants as a bacterial cytochrome P450 surrogate electron donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz de

    2012-01-01

    The ability of cytochrome P450 enzymes to catalyze highly regio- and stereospecific hydroxylations makes them attractive alternatives to approaches based on chemical synthesis but they require expensive cofactors, e.g. NAD(P)H, which limits their commercial potential. Ferredoxin (Fdx) is a multif......The ability of cytochrome P450 enzymes to catalyze highly regio- and stereospecific hydroxylations makes them attractive alternatives to approaches based on chemical synthesis but they require expensive cofactors, e.g. NAD(P)H, which limits their commercial potential. Ferredoxin (Fdx......) is a multifunctional electron carrier that in plants accepts electrons from photosystem I (PSI) and facilitates photoreduction of NADP+ to NADPH mediated by ferredoxin-NAD(P)H oxidoreductase (FdR). In bacteria, the electron flow is reversed and Fdx accepts electrons from NADPH via FdR and serves as the direct electron...... donor to bacterial P450s. By combining the two systems, we demonstrate that irradiation of PSI can drive the activity of a bacterial P450, CYP124 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The substitution of the costly cofactor NADPH with sunlight illustrates the potential of the light-driven hydroxylation...

  4. Application of solution processable squaraine dyes as electron donors for organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B Ananda; Yesudas, K; Kumar, G Siva; Bhanuprakash, K; Rao, V Jayathirtha; Sharma, G D; Singh, S P

    2013-09-01

    New low bandgap small molecules based on a squaraine (SQ) chromophore, bis[4-(2,6-di-tert-butyl)vinylpyrylium]squaraine (TBU-SQ), bis[2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-(prop-1-en-2-yl)pyrylium]squaraine (MeTBU-SQ) and bis[4-(but-1-en-2-yl)-2,6-di-tert-butylpyrylium]squaraine (EtTBU-SQ), were synthesized and used as electron donors along with PC70BM for their application in solution processed organic bulk-heterojunction (OBHJ) solar cell (SC). The long wavelength of these SQ dyes are located in between 650-750 nm in thin films and the optical bandgaps are about 1.64, 1.52 and 1.48 eV, respectively. The electrochemical properties of these SQ dyes indicate that they are well suited for the fabrication of OBHJSCs as electron donors along with fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors. The OBHJ photovoltaic (PV) devices fabricated with the blend of TBU-SQ:PC70BM, MeTBU-SQ:PC70BM and EtTBU-SQ:PC70BM cast from chloroform (CF) solvent exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.71%, 2.15%, and 1.89%, respectively. The PCE of the OBHJSCs based on MeTBU-SQ:PC70BM blends cast from DIO-THF (DIO = 1,8-diiodooctane) additive solvent and cast from DIO-THF with subsequent thermal annealing have been further improved up to 2.73% and 3.14%, respectively. This enhancement in the PCE is attributed to the improvement in the crystalline nature of the blend and more balanced charge transport resulting from the higher hole mobility. All these results have been supported by the quantum chemical calculations.

  5. Application of acetate, lactate, and fumarate as electron donors in microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria as the catalysts to oxidize organic and inorganic matter and generate current. Up to now, several classes of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms have been elucidated for various microorganisms. Shewanellaceae and Geobacteraceae families include the most of model exoelectrogenic microorganisms. Desulfuromonas acetoxidans bacterium inhabits aquatic sedimental sulfur-containing environments and is philogenetically close to representatives of Geobacteraceae family. Two chamber microbial fuel cell (0.3 l volume) was constructed with application of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 as anode biocatalyst. Acetic, lactic and fumaric acids were separately applied as organic electron donors for bacterial growth in constructed MFC. Bacterial cultivation in MFC was held during twenty days. Lactate oxidation caused electric power production with the highest value up to 0.071 mW on 64 hour of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 growth. Addition of acetic and fumaric acids into bacterial growth medium caused maximal power production up to 0.075 and 0.074 mW respectively on the 40 hour of their growth. Increasing of incubation time up to twentieth day caused decrease of generated electric power till 0.018 mW, 0.042 mW and 0.047 mW under usage of lactic, acetic and fumaric acids respectively by investigated bacteria. Power generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 was more stabile and durable under application of acetic and fumaric acids as electron donors in constructed MFC, than under addition of lactic acid in the same concentration into the growth medium.

  6. The impact of alkali metal halide electron donor complexes in the photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khuzwayo, Z., E-mail: zack.khuzwayo@up.ac.za; Chirwa, E.M.N

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Facilitation of photocatalysis using simple metal-halides as VB hole scavengers. • Recombination prevention by coupled valence and conduction band approaches. • Determination of anions critical levels beyond which process retardation occurs. • Determination of the photocatalytic process rate of reaction kinetics. - Abstract: The performance of photocatalytic oxidation of chemical pollutants is subjected to the presence of anion complexes in natural waters. This study investigated the influence of alkali metal (Na{sup +} (sodium), K{sup +} (potassium)) halides (Cl{sup −} (chloride), Br{sup −} (bromide), F{sup −} (fluoride)) as inorganic ion sources in the photocatalytic degradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in batch systems. It was found that the exclusive presence of halides in the absence of an electron acceptor adequately facilitated the photocatalyst process below critical levels of anion populations, where beyond the critical point the process was significantly hindered. Below the determined critical point, the performance in some cases near matches that of the facilitation of the photocatalytic process by exclusive oxygen, acting as an electron scavenger. The coupling of halide ions and oxygenation presented significantly improved photo-oxidation of PCP, this was confirmed by the inclusion of formic acid as a comparative electron donor. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic expression was used to calculate the performance rate kinetics. The probable impact of the halide anions was discussed with regards to the process of electron hole pair recombination prevention.

  7. Type IV pili of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can transfer electrons from extracellular electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongquan; Li, Hongyu

    2014-03-01

    Studies on Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans accepting electrons from Fe(II) have previously focused on cytochrome c. However, we have discovered that, besides cytochrome c, type IV pili (Tfp) can transfer electrons. Here, we report conduction by Tfp of A. ferrooxidans analyzed with a conducting-probe atomic force microscope (AFM). The results indicate that the Tfp of A. ferrooxidans are highly conductive. The genome sequence of A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 contains two genes, pilV and pilW, which code for pilin domain proteins with the conserved amino acids characteristic of Tfp. Multiple alignment analysis of the PilV and PilW (pilin) proteins indicated that pilV is the adhesin gene while pilW codes for the major protein element of Tfp. The likely function of Tfp is to complete the circuit between the cell surface and Fe(II) oxides. These results indicate that Tfp of A. ferrooxidans might serve as biological nanowires transferring electrons from the surface of Fe(II) oxides to the cell surface. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiujun; Wang, Guangce; Pan, Guanghua; Gao, Shan; Xu, Pu; Zhu, Jianyi

    2010-04-28

    Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta). Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks). During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII) activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within the young germling, the hetero-distribution of PSII

  9. Variations in morphology and PSII photosynthetic capabilities during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Shan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Red algae are primitive photosynthetic eukaryotes, whose spores are ideal subjects for studies of photosynthesis and development. Although the development of red alga spores has received considerable research attention, few studies have focused on the detailed morphological and photosynthetic changes that occur during the early development of tetraspores of Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi Papenfuss (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta. Herein, we documented these changes in this species of red algae. Results In the tetraspores, we observed two types of division, cruciate and zonate, and both could develop into multicellular bodies (disks. During the first 84 hours, tetraspores divided several times, but the diameter of the disks changed very little; thereafter, the diameter increased significantly. Scanning electron microscopy observations and analysis of histological sections revealed that the natural shape of the disk remains tapered over time, and the erect frond grows from the central protrusion of the disk. Cultivation of tissue from excised disks demonstrated that the central protrusion of the disk is essential for initiation of the erect frond. Photosynthetic (i.e., PSII activities were measured using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis. The results indicated that freshly released tetraspores retained limited PSII photosynthetic capabilities; when the tetraspores attached to a substrate, those capabilities increased significantly. In the disk, the PSII activity of both marginal and central cells was similar, although some degree of morphological polarity was present; the PSII photosynthetic capabilities in young germling exhibited an apico-basal gradient. Conclusions Attachment of tetraspores to a substrate significantly enhanced their PSII photosynthetic capabilities, and triggered further development. The central protrusion of the disk is the growth point, may have transfer of nutritive material with the marginal cells. Within

  10. Electron transfer in multiply bridged donor-acceptor molecules: Dephasing and quantum coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Randall H; Wasielewski, Michael R; Ratner, Mark A

    2006-10-19

    We present a simple theoretical treatment of nonadiabatic electron transfer in multiply bridged donor-bridge-acceptor molecules using the density matrix formalism. Destructive interference can result from different signed couplings between bridge sites, with the simplest system being a four-site Joachim-type molecular interferometer. Previous work has shown that deposition of energy on the bridge sites erases the interference and recovers transport. We show that pure local dephasing, a completely elastic process, is also capable of eliminating destructive interference and regaining transport. Destructive interference as a result of system connectivity can explain the familiar ortho-meta-para reactivity of benzene bridges. We also show that pure dephasing can yield a coalescence of ortho, meta, and para effective coupling strengths and suggest a system to observe this effect experimentally.

  11. Effect of electron donors on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by a marine Desulfovibrio sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Min Sub; Ono, Shuhei; Donovan, Katie; Templer, Stefanie P.; Bosak, Tanja

    2011-08-01

    Sulfur isotope effects produced by microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction are used to reconstruct the coupled cycling of carbon and sulfur through geologic time, to constrain the evolution of sulfur-based metabolisms, and to track the oxygenation of Earth's surface. In this study, we investigate how the coupling of carbon and sulfur metabolisms in batch and continuous cultures of a recently isolated marine sulfate reducing bacterium DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio sp ., influences the fractionation of sulfur isotopes. DMSS-1 grown in batch culture on seven different electron donors (ethanol, glycerol, fructose, glucose, lactate, malate and pyruvate) fractionates 34S/ 32S ratio from 6‰ to 44‰, demonstrating that the fractionations by an actively growing culture of a single incomplete oxidizing sulfate reducing microbe can span almost the entire range of previously reported values in defined cultures. The magnitude of isotope effect correlates well with cell specific sulfate reduction rates (from 0.7 to 26.1 fmol/cell/day). DMSS-1 grown on lactate in continuous culture produces a larger isotope effect (21-37‰) than the lactate-grown batch culture (6‰), indicating that the isotope effect also depends on the supply rate of the electron donor and microbial growth rate. The largest isotope effect in continuous culture is accompanied by measurable changes in cell length and cellular yield that suggest starvation. The use of multiple sulfur isotopes in the model of metabolic fluxes of sulfur shows that the loss of sulfate from the cell and the intracellular reoxidation of reduced sulfur species contribute to the increase in isotope effects in a correlated manner. Isotope fractionations produced during sulfate reduction in the pure culture of DMSS-1 expand the previously reported range of triple sulfur isotope effects ( 32S, 33S, and 34S) by marine sulfate reducing bacteria, implying that microbial sulfur disproportionation may have a smaller 33S isotopic fingerprint

  12. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene DNAPL source zones: source zone architecture versus electron donor availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, M.; Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    The persistence of dense-non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface has led practitioners and regulatory agencies to turn towards low-maintenance, low-cost remediation methods. Biological degradation has been suggested as a possible solution, based on the well-proven ability of certain microbial species to break down dissolved chlorinated ethenes under favorable conditions. However, the biodegradation of pure phase chlorinated ethenes is subject to additional constraints: the continuous release of electron acceptor at a rate governed by mass transfer kinetics, and the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of DNAPL source zones which leads to spatially and temporally variable availability of the reactants for reductive dechlorination. In this work, we investigate the relationship between various DNAPL source zone characteristics and reaction kinetics using COMPSIM, a multiphase groundwater model that considers non-equilibrium mass transfer and Monod-type kinetics for reductive dechlorination. Numerical simulations are performed for simple, homogeneous trichloroethene DNAPL source zones to demonstrate the effect of single source zone characteristics, as well as for larger, more realistic heterogeneous source zones. It is shown that source zone size, and mass transfer kinetics may have a decisive effect on the predicted bio-enhancement. Finally, we evaluate the performance of DNAPL bioremediation for realistic, thermodynamically constrained, concentrations of electron donor. Our results indicate that the latter may be the most important limitation for the success of DNAPL bioremediation, leading to reduced bio-enhancement and, in many cases, comparable performance with water flooding.

  13. Longitudinal spin relaxation of donor-bound electrons in direct band-gap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linpeng, Xiayu; Karin, Todd; Durnev, M. V.; Barbour, Russell; Glazov, M. M.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Watkins, S. P.; Seto, Satoru; Fu, Kai-Mei C.

    2016-09-01

    We measure the donor-bound electron longitudinal spin-relaxation time (T1) as a function of magnetic field (B ) in three high-purity direct band-gap semiconductors: GaAs, InP, and CdTe, observing a maximum T1 of 1.4, 0.4, and 1.2 ms, respectively. In GaAs and InP at low magnetic field, up to ˜2 T, the spin-relaxation mechanism is strongly density and temperature dependent and is attributed to the random precession of the electron spin in hyperfine fields caused by the lattice nuclear spins. In all three semiconductors at high magnetic field, we observe a power-law dependence T1∝B-ν with 3 ≲ν ≲4 . Our theory predicts that the direct spin-phonon interaction is important in all three materials in this regime in contrast to quantum dot structures. In addition, the "admixture" mechanism caused by Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling combined with single-phonon processes has a comparable contribution in GaAs. We find excellent agreement between high-field theory and experiment for GaAs and CdTe with no free parameters, however a significant discrepancy exists for InP.

  14. Effect of high electron donor supply on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways in a bioreactor for nitrate removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Anna; Tarre, Sheldon; Beliavski, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The possible shift of a bioreactor for NO3- removal from predominantly denitrification (DEN) to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by elevated electron donor supply was investigated. By increasing the C/NO3- ratio in one of two initially identical reactors, the production of high ...

  15. Functional pyruvate formate lyase pathway expressed with two different electron donors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at aerobic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiming; Dai, Zongjie; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    Pyruvate formate lyase (PFL) is characterized as an enzyme functional at anaerobic conditions, since the radical in the enzyme's active form is sensitive to oxygen. In this study, PFL and its activating enzyme from Escherichia coli were expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain lacking pyruvate decarboxylase and having a reduced glucose uptake rate due to a mutation in the transcriptional regulator Mth1, IMI076 (Pdc(-) MTH1-ΔT ura3-52). PFL was expressed with two different electron donors, reduced ferredoxin or reduced flavodoxin, respectively, and it was found that the coexpression of either of these electron donors had a positive effect on growth under aerobic conditions, indicating increased activity of PFL. The positive effect on growth was manifested as a higher final biomass concentration and a significant increase in transcription of formate dehydrogenases. Among the two electron donors reduced flavodoxin was found to be a better electron donor than reduced ferredoxin. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, J.H. de; Hunneman, P.; Doddema, H.J.; Janssen, D.B.; Harder, W.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 μM) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were

  17. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of another electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Best, JH; Hunneman, P; Doddema, HJ; Janssen, DB; Harder, W; Doddema, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (52 mu M) was biodegraded for more than 72% in an anaerobic packed-bed reactor without addition of an external electron donor. The chloride mass balance demonstrated that all carbon tetrachloride transformed was completely dechlorinated. Chloroform and dichloromethane were

  18. Recalcitrant Carbonaceous Material: A Source of Electron Donors for Anaerobic Microbial Metabolisms in the Subsurface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, S. L.; Montgomery, W.; Sephton, M. A.; Cockell, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    More than 90% of organic material on Earth resides in sedimentary rocks in the form of kerogens; fossilized organic matter formed through selective preservation of high molecular weight biopolymers under anoxic conditions. Despite its prevalence in the subsurface, the extent to which this material supports microbial metabolisms is unknown. Whilst aerobic microorganisms are known to derive energy from kerogens within shales, utilization in anaerobic microbial metabolisms that proliferate in the terrestrial subsurface, such as microbial iron reduction, has yet to be demonstrated. Data are presented from microbial growth experiments in which kerogens and shales were supplied as the sole electron donor source for microbial iron reduction by an enrichment culture. Four well-characterized kerogens samples (representative of Types I-IV, classified by starting material), and two shale samples, were assessed. Organic analysis was carried out to investigate major compound classes present in each starting material. Parallel experiments were conducted to test inhibition of microbial iron reduction in the presence of each material when the culture was supplied with a full redox couple. The results demonstrate that iron-reducing microorganisms in this culture were unable to use kerogens and shales as a source of electron donors for energy acquisition, despite the presence of compound classes known to support this metabolism. Furthermore, the presence of these materials was found to inhibit microbial iron reduction to varying degrees, with some samples leading to complete inhibition. These results suggest that recalcitrant carbonaceous material in the terrestrial subsurface is not available for microbial iron reduction and similar metabolisms, such as sulphate-reduction. Further research is needed to investigate the inhibition exerted by these materials, and to assess whether these findings apply to other microbial consortia. These results may have significant implications for

  19. Rice Photosynthetic Productivity and PSII Photochemistry under Nonflooded Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibing He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM, furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN, and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI. Compared with the conventional flooding (CF treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN, lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm, and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII. And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC. Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation.

  20. Eight-Electron Silver and Mixed Gold/Silver Nanoclusters Stabilized by Selenium Donor Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wan-Ting; Lee, Po-Yi; Liao, Jian-Hong; Chakrahari, Kiran Kumarvarma; Kahlal, Samia; Liu, Yu-Chiao; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Liu, C W

    2017-08-14

    The first atomically and structurally precise silver-nanoclusters stabilized by Se-donor ligands, [Ag 20 {Se 2 P(O i Pr) 2 } 12 ] (3) and [Ag 21 {Se 2 P(OEt) 2 } 12 ] + (4), were isolated by ligand replacement reaction of [Ag 20 {S 2 P(O i Pr) 2 } 12 ] (1) and [Ag 21 {S 2 P(O i Pr) 2 } 12 ] + (2), respectively. Furthermore, doping reactions of 4 with Au(PPh 3 )Cl resulted in the formation of [AuAg 20 {Se 2 P(OEt) 2 } 12 ] + (5). Structures of 3, 4, and 5 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The anatomy of cluster 3 with an Ag 20 core having C 3 symmetry is very similar to that of its dithiophosphate analogue 1. Clusters 4 and 5 exhibit an Ag 21 and Au@Ag 20 core of O h symmetry composed of eight silver capping atoms in a cubic arrangement and encapsulating an Ag 13 and Au@Ag 12 centered icosahedron, respectively. Both ligand exchange and heteroatom doping result in significant changes in optical and emissive properties for chalcogen-passivated silver nanoparticles, which have been theoretically confirmed as 8-electron superatoms. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. An effective Hamiltonian approach for Donor-Bridge-Acceptor electronic transitions: Exploring the role of bath memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Bittner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present here a formally exact model for electronic transitions between an initial (donor and final (acceptor states linked by an intermediate (bridge state. Our model incorporates a common set of vibrational modes that are coupled to the donor, bridge, and acceptor states and serves as a dissipative bath that destroys quantum coherence between the donor and acceptor. Taking the memory time of the bath as a free parameter, we calculate transition rates for a heuristic 3-state/2 mode Hamiltonian system parameterized to represent the energetics and couplings in a typical organic photovoltaic system. Our results indicate that if the memory time of the bath is of the order of 10-100 fs, a two-state kinetic (i.e., incoherent hopping model will grossly underestimate overall transition rate.

  2. Changing the electron donor improves azoreductase dye degrading activity at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jingxian; Paul, Caroline E; Hollmann, Frank; Tischler, Dirk

    2017-05-01

    The oxygen-insensitive azoreductase AzoRo originating from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP was found to be most active at low pH (ca. 4) and high temperature (ca. 50°C). AzoRo is not an efficient biocatalyst when used at low pH due to stability problems. To overcome this issue, we discovered that AzoRo accepts an alternative electron donor, 1-benzyl-1,4-dihydronicotinamide (BNAH), which allows fast turnover at neutral pH. In order to screen this nicotinamide coenzyme mimic as a source of electrons, AzoRo-catalysed reactions were run under neutral conditions, under which typically slow rates are observed with NADH. For the reduction of 1 azo bond by azoreductases 2mol nicotinamide coenzyme are needed. AzoRo displayed Methyl Red (MR) reduction activities with NADH and NADPH of 5.49±0.14Umg-1 and 4.96±0.25Umg-1, respectively, whereas with BNAH it displayed 17.01±0.74Umg-1 (following BNAH oxidation) and 7.16±0.06Umg-1 (following MR reduction). Binding of BNAH to AzoRo was determined with a Km of 18.75±2.45μM (BNAH oxidation) and 12.45±0.47μM (MR reduction). In order to show applicability of this system an upscaled reaction was performed using 78.6μg of purified AzoRo to convert 2.96μmol of MR (total reaction volume: 40ml) within a 1h reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydrogen bond interactions of the pheophytin electron acceptor and its radical anion in photosystem II as revealed by Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Yuichi; Takahashi, Ryouta; Okubo, Tatsunori; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Sugiura, Miwa; Noguchi, Takumi

    2010-01-26

    The primary electron acceptor pheophytin (Pheo(D1)) plays a crucial role in regulation of forward and backward electron transfer in photosystem II (PSII). It is known that some cyanobacteria control the Pheo(D1) potential in high-light acclimation by exchanging the D1 proteins from different copies of the psbA genes. To clarify the mechanism of the potential control of Pheo(D1), we studied the hydrogen bond interactions of Pheo(D1) in the neutral and anionic states using light-induced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy. FTIR difference spectra of Pheo(D1) upon its photoreduction were obtained using three different PSII preparations, PSII core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus possessing PsbA1 as a D1 subunit (PSII-PsbA1), those with PsbA3 (PSII-PsbA3), and PSII membranes from spinach. The D1-Gln130 side chain, which is hydrogen bonded to the 13(1)-keto C=O group of Pheo(D1) in PSII-PsbA1, is replaced by Glu in PSII-PsbA3 and spinach PSII. The spectrum of PSII-PsbA1 exhibited 13(1)-keto C=O bands at 1682 and 1605 cm(-1) in neutral Pheo(D1) and its anion, respectively, while the corresponding bands were observed at frequencies lower by 1-3 and 18-19 cm(-1), respectively, in the latter two preparations. This larger frequency shift in Pheo(D1)(-) than Pheo(D1) by the change of the hydrogen bond donor was well reproduced by density functional theory (DFT) calculations for the Pheo models hydrogen bonded with acetamide and acetic acid. The DFT calculations also exhibited a higher redox potential for Pheo reduction in the model with acetic acid than that with acetamide, consistent with previous observations for the D1-Gln130Glu mutant of Synechocystis. It is thus concluded that a stronger hydrogen bond effect on the Pheo(-) anion than the neutral Pheo causes the shift in the redox potential, which is utilized in the photoprotection mechanism of PSII.

  4. Abilities of different electron donors (D) to engage in a P···D noncovalent interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Steve; Adhikari, Upendra

    2011-10-13

    Previous work has documented the ability of the P atom to form a direct attractive noncovalent interaction with a N atom, based in large measure on the charge transfer from the N lone pair into the σ* antibonding orbital of the P-H that is turned away from the N atom. The present work considers whether other atoms, namely, O and S, can also participate as electron donors, and in which bonding environments. Also considered are the π-systems of multiply bonded C atoms. Unlike an earlier observation that the interaction is unaffected by the nature of the electron-acceptor atom, there is strong sensitivity to the donor. The P···D binding energy diminishes in the order D = NH(3) > H(2)CO > H(2)CS > H(2)O > H(2)S, different from the patterns observed in both H and halogen bonds. The P···D interactions are comparable to, and in some cases stronger than, the analogous H-bonds formed by HOH as proton donor. The carbon π systems form surprisingly strong P···D complexes, augmented by the back-donation from the P lone pair to the C-C π* antibond, which surpass the strengths of H-bonds, even some with HF as proton donor.

  5. Joint electrical, photophysical, and photovoltaic studies on truxene dye-sensitized solar cells: impact of arylamine electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Liang, Mao; Wang, He; Wang, Peng; Cheng, Fangyi; Sun, Zhe; Song, Xue

    2014-03-01

    The judicious design of electron donors is one of the viable tactics to improve the efficiency of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) employing outer-sphere redox couples. Herein, a hexahexyltruxene-substituted 4-(hexyloxy)-N-phenylaniline (HT-HPA) segment is constructed and employed as the electron donor in two organic push-pull dyes (M28 and M29) with high molar absorption coefficient values. Relative to its congener (C241) possessing the dihexyloxy-substituted triphenylamine electron donor, M29 exhibits red-shifted absorption as well as enhanced maximum molar absorption coefficient values. A thorough comparison with M29 and C241 demonstrates that the HT-HPA segment adequately insulates the TiO2 surface from the electrolyte, which prevents back-recombination and prolongs electron lifetime in the semiconductor. The diminishment of charge recombination not only enables attainment of strikingly high photovoltages (approaching 1 V), but also overcompensates the disadvantageous impact of lower dye-load amounts. As a result, the dye transformation from C241 to M29 brings forth an efficiency improvement from 7.3 % to 8.5 % at the 100 mW cm(-2) simulated AM1.5 conditions. Our work should shed light on the future design of more powerful push-pull organic photosensitizers for iodine-free DSCs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Investigation of electron and hydrogenic-donor states confined in a permeable spherical box using B-splines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Nikbakht

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   Effects of quantum size and potential shape on the spectra of an electron and a hydrogenic-donor at the center of a permeable spherical cavity have been calculated, using linear variational method. B-splines have been used as basis functions. By extensive convergence tests and comparing with other results given in the literature, the validity and efficiency of the method were confirmed.

  7. The effects of electron donor and granular iron on nitrate transformation rates in sediments from a municipal water supply aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, J. F.; Eedy, R.; Butler, B. J.

    2000-11-01

    A municipal water supply well for the town of Baden, located about 10 km southwest of Waterloo, ON, Canada, was forced to close due to unacceptably high concentrations of nitrate in the groundwater. Stimulated in situ denitrification was considered a possible solution to the problem. In advance of a planned field test, the effectiveness of various electron donors (acetate, hydrogen gas, elemental sulphur, thiosulphate, aqueous ferrous iron and pyrite) at stimulating denitrification was compared in microcosm experiments involving sediment from the Baden aquifer. All electron donors tested, with the possible exception of pyrite, stimulated nitrate removal from solution. Acetate was found to be the substance that stimulated the quickest initial removal rates, and denitrification was confirmed as the mechanism using the acetylene block technique. Nitrite accumulation was minimal in most systems, although the local water quality guideline limit of 1.0 mg/l NO 2--N was briefly and temporarily exceeded (maximum value was 1.2 mg/l) in some of the acetate amended microcosms. Granular iron was also considered as an electron donor or abiotic reducing agent, but was found to reduce nitrate predominantly to ammonium, in a neutral pH solution buffered with pyrite. In mixed granular iron aquifer sediment systems, where several electron donors were present (hydrogen, ferrous iron and pyrite) that could have supported denitrification, the abiotic reaction with the granular iron appeared to dominate other transformation pathways, and ammonium was again the major product. Based on the testing completed as part of this project, the aquifer at Baden is considered a good candidate for acetate-stimulated in situ denitrification for the removal of nitrate from the groundwater near the municipal water supply well.

  8. FTIR spectroscopy of the reaction center of Chloroflexus aurantiacus: photooxidation of the primary electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabelin, A A; Shkuropatova, V A; Shuvalov, V A; Shkuropatov, A Ya

    2012-02-01

    Photochemical oxidation of the primary electron donor P in reaction centers (RCs) of the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus (C.) aurantiacus was examined by light-induced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy at 95 K in the spectral range of 4000-1200 cm(-1). The light-induced P(+)Q(A)(-)/PQ(A) IR spectrum of C. aurantiacus RCs is compared to the well-characterized FTIR difference spectrum of P photooxidation in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter (R.) sphaeroides R-26 RCs. The presence in the P(+)Q(A)(-)/PQ(A) FTIR spectrum of C. aurantiacus RCs of specific low-energy electronic transitions at ~2650 and ~2200 cm(-1), as well as of associated vibrational (phase-phonon) bands at 1567, 1481, and 1294-1285 cm(-1), indicates that the radical cation P(+) in these RCs has dimeric structure, with the positive charge distributed between the two coupled bacteriochlorophyll a molecules. The intensity of the P(+) absorbance band at ~1250 nm (upon chemical oxidation of P at room temperature) in C. aurantiacus RCs is approximately 1.5 times lower than that in R. sphaeroides R-26 RCs. This fact, together with the decreased intensity of the absorbance band at ~2650 cm(-1), is interpreted in terms of the weaker coupling of bacteriochlorophylls in the P(+) dimer in C. aurantiacus compared to R. sphaeroides R-26. In accordance with the previous (pre)resonance Raman data, FTIR measurements in the carbonyl stretching region show that in C. aurantiacus RCs (i) the 13(1)-keto C=O groups of P(A) and P(B-) molecules constituting the P dimer are not involved in hydrogen bonding in either neutral or photooxidized state of P and (ii) the 3(1)-acetyl C=O group of P(B) forms a hydrogen bond (probably with tyrosine M187) absorbing at 1635 cm(-1). Differential signals at 1757(+)/1749(-) and 1741(+)/1733(-) cm(-1) in the FTIR spectrum of C. aurantiacus RCs are attributed to the 13(3)-ester C=O groups of P in different environments.

  9. Carbenes as Electron-Pair Donors for P⋅⋅⋅C Pnicogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bene, Janet E; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2017-06-20

    Ab initio MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ calculations were performed on the P⋅⋅⋅C pnicogen-bonded complexes of the singlet carbene molecules C(NH2 )2 , C(OH)2 , and cyclic C(OCH)2 [OHC] with H2 XP molecules, with X=F, Cl, NC, OH, CH3 , CN, CCH, and H. The H2 XP:C(NH2 )2 and H2 XP:C(OH)2 complexes have Cs symmetry and two different structures: one in which the symmetry plane of the complex and the local symmetry plane of the carbene are non-coplanar, and the other in which they are coplanar. The non-coplanar H2 XP:C(NH2 )2 and H2 XP:C(OH)2 complexes arise only when X is one of the more electronegative substituents. Coplanar H2 XP:C(NH2 )2 complexes form when X is one of the more electropositive substituents, whereas coplanar H2 XP:C(OH)2 complexes exist for all X. H2 XP:C(NH2 )2 and H2 XP:C(OH)2 are stabilized by covalent P-C bonds or P⋅⋅⋅C pnicogen bonds, but co-planar H2 (CH3 )P:C(OH)2 and H3 P:C(OH)2 are stabilized by O-H⋅⋅⋅P hydrogen bonds. The H2 XP:OHC complexes have non-coplanar structures that are also stabilized by P-C covalent bonds or pnicogen bonds. The H2 (CH3 )P:OHC and H3 P:OHC complexes in which the symmetry plane of the complex and the local symmetry plane of the carbene are perpendicular are stabilized by P⋅⋅⋅π bonds with P acting as the electron-pair donor to the OHC π system. The H2 XP:C(NH2 )2 , H2 XP:C(OH)2 , and H2 XP:OHC complexes are described in terms of their binding energies, charge-transfer energies, electron density properties, and equation-of-motion coupled cluster singles and doubles spin-spin coupling constants. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Excess-electron injection and transfer in terthiophene-modified DNA: terthiophene as a photosensitizing electron donor for thymine, cytosine, and adenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Man Jae; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Kawai, Kiyohiko; Majima, Tetsuro

    2012-02-13

    Excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has attracted wide attention owing to its close relation to DNA repair and nanowires. To clarify the dynamics of EET in DNA, a photosensitizing electron donor that can donate an excess electron to a variety of DNA sequences has to be developed. Herein, a terthiophene (3T) derivative was used as the photosensitizing electron donor. From the dyad systems in which 3T was connected to a single nucleobase, it was revealed that (1) 3T* donates an excess electron efficiently to thymine, cytosine, and adenine, despite adenine being a well-known hole conductor. The free-energy dependence of the electron-transfer rate was explained on the basis of the Marcus theory. From the DNA hairpins, it became clear that (1) 3T* can donate an excess electron not only to the adjacent nucleobase but also to the neighbor one nucleobase further along and so on. From the charge-injection rate, the possibilities of smaller β value and/or charge delocalization were discussed. In addition, EET through consecutive cytosine nucleobases was suggested. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Halogen Bonding Involving CO and CS with Carbon as the Electron Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Del Bene

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available MP2/aug’-cc-pVTZ calculations have been carried out to investigate the halogen-bonded complexes formed when CO and CS act as electron-pair donors through C to ClF, ClNC, ClCl, ClOH, ClCN, ClCCH, and ClNH2. CO forms only complexes stabilized by traditional halogen bonds, and all ClY molecules form traditional halogen-bonded complexes with SC, except ClF which forms only an ion-pair complex. Ion-pair complexes are also found on the SC:ClNC and SC:ClCl surfaces. SC:ClY complexes stabilized by traditional halogen bonds have greater binding energies than the corresponding OC:ClY complexes. The largest binding energies are found for the ion-pair SC–Cl+:−Y complexes. The transition structures which connect the complex and the ion pair on SC:ClNC and SC:ClCl potential surfaces provide the barriers for inter-converting these structures. Charge-transfer from the lone pair on C to the σ-hole on Cl is the primary charge-transfer interaction stabilizing OC:ClY and SC:ClY complexes with traditional halogen bonds. A secondary charge-transfer occurs from the lone pairs on Cl to the in-plane and out-of-plane π antibonding orbitals of ClY. This secondary interaction assumes increased importance in the SC:ClNH2 complex, and is a factor leading to its unusual structure. C–O and C–S stretching frequencies and 13C chemical shieldings increase upon complex formation with ClY molecules. These two spectroscopic properties clearly differentiate between SC:ClY complexes and SC–Cl+:−Y ion pairs. Spin–spin coupling constants 1xJ(C–Cl for OC:ClY complexes increase with decreasing distance. As a function of the C–Cl distance, 1xJ(C–Cl and 1J(C–Cl provide a fingerprint of the evolution of the halogen bond from a traditional halogen bond in the complexes, to a chlorine-shared halogen bond in the transition structures, to a covalent bond in the ion pairs.

  12. 2004 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Conference - August 8-13, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GUILFORD JONES; S ST

    2005-09-14

    The 2004 Gordon Conference on Donor/Acceptor Interactions will take place at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island on August 8-13, 2004. The conference will be devoted to the consequences of charge interaction and charge motion in molecular and materials systems.

  13. Structure of PSI, PSII and antennae complexes from yellow-green alga Xanthonema debile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardian, Zdenko; Tichý, Josef; Vácha, František

    2011-05-01

    Photosynthetic carbon fixation by Chromophytes is one of the significant components of a carbon cycle on the Earth. Their photosynthetic apparatus is different in pigment composition from that of green plants and algae. In this work we report structural maps of photosystem I, photosystem II and light harvesting antenna complexes isolated from a soil chromophytic alga Xanthonema debile (class Xanthophyceae). Electron microscopy of negatively stained preparations followed by single particle analysis revealed that the overall structure of Xanthophytes' PSI and PSII complexes is similar to that known from higher plants or algae. Averaged top-view projections of Xanthophytes' light harvesting antenna complexes (XLH) showed two groups of particles. Smaller ones that correspond to a trimeric form of XLH, bigger particles resemble higher oligomeric form of XLH.

  14. Bimolecular electron transfer reactions in coumarin amine systems: Donor acceptor orientational effect on diffusion-controlled reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, A. K.; Nath, S.; Kumbhakar, M.; Maity, D. K.; Senthilkumar, S.; Pal, H.

    2008-04-01

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions between excited coumarin dyes and different aliphatic amine (AlA) and aromatic amine (ArA) donors have been investigated in acetonitrile solution using steady-state (SS) and time-resolved (TR) fluorescence quenching measurements. No ground state complex or emissive exciplex formation has been indicated in these systems. SS and TR measurements give similar quenching constants ( kq) for each of the coumarin-amine pairs, suggesting dynamic nature of interaction in these systems. On correlating kq values with the free energy changes (Δ G0) of the ET reactions show the typical Rehm-Weller type of behavior as expected for bimolecular ET reactions under diffusive condition, where kq increases with -Δ G0 at the lower exergonicity (-Δ G0) region but ultimately saturate to a diffusion-limited value (kqDC) at the higher exergonicity region. It is, however, interestingly observed that the kqDC values vary largely depending on the type of the amines used. Thus, kqDC is much higher with ArAs than AlAs. Similarly, the kqDC for cyclic monoamine 1-azabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (ABCO) is distinctly lower and that for cyclic diamine 1,4-diazabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (DABCO) is distinctly higher than the kqDC value obtained for other noncyclic AlAs. These differences in the kqDC values have been rationalized on the basis of the differences in the orientational restrictions involved in the ET reactions with different types of amines. As understood, n-type donors (AlAs) introduce large orientational restriction and thus significantly reduces the ET efficiency in comparison to the π-type donors (ArAs). Structural constrains are inferred to be the reason for the differences in the kqDC values involving ABCO, DABCO donors in comparison to other noncyclic AlAs. Supportive evidence for the orientational restrictions involving different types of amines donors has also been obtained from DFT based quantum chemical calculations on the molecular orbitals of

  15. Functional pyruvate formate lyase pathway expressed with two different electron donors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae at aerobic growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yiming; Dai, Zongjie; Krivoruchko, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate formate lyase (PFL) is characterized as an enzyme functional at anaerobic conditions, since the radical in the enzyme's active form is sensitive to oxygen. In this study, PFL and its activating enzyme from Escherichia coli were expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain lacking...... of either of these electron donors had a positive effect on growth under aerobic conditions, indicating increased activity of PFL. The positive effect on growth was manifested as a higher final biomass concentration and a significant increase in transcription of formate dehydrogenases. Among the two...

  16. Spectrophotometric and spectroscopic studies of charge transfer complex of 1-Naphthylamine as an electron donor with picric acid as an electron acceptor in different polar solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neeti; Ahmad, Afaq

    2010-08-01

    The charge transfer complex of 1-Naphthylamine as a donor with π-acceptor picric acid has been studied spectrophotometrically in different solvents at room temperature. The results indicate that the formation of charge transfer complex is high in less polar solvent. The stoichiometry of the complex was found to be 1:1 by straight line method. The data are analysed in terms of formation constant ( KCT), molar extinction coefficient ( ɛCT), standard free energy (Δ G o), oscillator strength ( ƒ), transition dipole moment ( μ EN), resonance energy ( R N) and ionization potential ( I D). It is concluded that the formation constant ( KCT) of the complex is found to be depends upon the nature of both electron acceptor and donor and also on the polarity of solvents. Further the charge transfer molecular complex between picric acid and 1-Naphthylamine is stabilized by hydrogen bonding.

  17. The electronic structure of the primary electron donor of reaction centers of purple bacteria at atomic resolution as observed by photo-CIDNP 13C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviso, Eugenio; Prakash, Shipra; Alia, A; Gast, Peter; Neugebauer, Johannes; Jeschke, Gunnar; Matysik, Jörg

    2009-12-29

    Composed of the two bacteriochlorophyll cofactors, P(L) and P(M), the special pair functions as the primary electron donor in bacterial reaction centers of purple bacteria of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Under light absorption, an electron is transferred to a bacteriopheophytin and a radical pair is produced. The occurrence of the radical pair is linked to the production of enhanced nuclear polarization called photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP). This effect can be used to study the electronic structure of the special pair at atomic resolution by detection of the strongly enhanced nuclear polarization with laser-flash photo-CIDNP magic-angle spinning NMR on the carotenoid-less mutant R26. In the electronic ground state, P(L) is strongly disturbed, carrying a slightly negative charge. In the radical cation state, the ratio of total electron spin densities between P(L) and P(M) is 2:1, although it is 2.5:1 for the pyrrole carbons, 2.2:1 for all porphyrinic carbons, and 4:1 for the pyrrole nitrogen. It is shown that the symmetry break between the electronic structures in the electronic ground state and in the radical cation state is an intrinsic property of the special pair supermolecule, which is particularly attributable to a modification of the structure of P(L). The significant difference in electron density distribution between the ground and radical cation states is explained by an electric polarization effect of the nearby histidine.

  18. 2008 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference-August 3-8, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, Malcolm [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gray, Nancy Ryan [Gordon Research Conferences, West Kingston, RI (United States)

    2009-09-19

    The conference presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer and Transport in Molecular and Nano-scale Systems. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices.

  19. Suitability of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a feed batch operating bio-electrochemical system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Fermoso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil washing water derived from the two-phase manufacturing process was assessed as an electron donor in a bio-electrochemical system (BES operating at 35 ºC. Start-up was carried out by using acetate as a substrate for the BES, reaching a potential of around +680 mV. After day 54, BES was fed with olive oil washing water. The degradation of olive oil washing water in the BES generated a maximum voltage potential of around +520 mV and a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD removal efficiency of 41%. However, subsequent loads produced a decrease in the COD removal, while current and power density diminished greatly. The deterioration of these parameters could be a consequence of the accumulation of recalcitrant or inhibitory compounds, such as phenols. These results demonstrated that the use of olive oil washing water as an electron donor in a BES is feasible, although it has to be further investigated in order to make it more suitable for a real application.

  20. Impact of Temperature and Non-Gaussian Statistics on Electron Transfer in Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waskasi, Morteza M; Newton, Marshall D; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2017-03-30

    A combination of experimental data and theoretical analysis provides evidence of a bell-shaped kinetics of electron transfer in the Arrhenius coordinates ln k vs 1/T. This kinetic law is a temperature analogue of the familiar Marcus bell-shaped dependence based on ln k vs the reaction free energy. These results were obtained for reactions of intramolecular charge shift between the donor and acceptor separated by a rigid spacer studied experimentally by Miller and co-workers. The non-Arrhenius kinetic law is a direct consequence of the solvent reorganization energy and reaction driving force changing approximately as hyperbolic functions with temperature. The reorganization energy decreases and the driving force increases when temperature is increased. The point of equality between them marks the maximum of the activationless reaction rate. Reaching the consistency between the kinetic and thermodynamic experimental data requires the non-Gaussian statistics of the donor-acceptor energy gap described by the Q-model of electron transfer. The theoretical formalism combines the vibrational envelope of quantum vibronic transitions with the Q-model describing the classical component of the Franck-Condon factor and a microscopic solvation model of the solvent reorganization energy and the reaction free energy.

  1. Rationalizing the photophysical properties of BODIPY laser dyes via aromaticity and electron-donor-based structural perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, Paul G.; Liu, Xiaogang; Zhao, Teng; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-05-01

    The absorption and fluorescence properties of six boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) laser dyes with simple non-aromatic substituents are rationalized by relating them to observable structural perturbations within the molecules of the dyes. An empirical relationship involving the structure and the optical properties is derived using a combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, quantum chemical calculations and electronic constants: i.e. the tendency of the pyrrole bond lengths towards aromaticity and the UV-vis absorption and fluorescence wavelengths correlating with the electron-donor properties of the substituents. The effect of molecular conformation on the solid-state optical properties of the dyes is also discussed. The findings in this study also demonstrate the usefulness and limitations of using crystal structure data to develop structure-property relationships in this class of optical materials, contributing to the growing effort to design optoelectronic materials with tunable properties via molecular engineering.

  2. Investigation of the electronic structure of the primary electron donor in bacterial photosynthesis. Measurements of the anisotropy of the electronic G-tensor using high-field/high-frequency EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, M. [Institut fuer Organische Chemie, FU Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Toerring, J.T.; Plato, M.; Moebius, K. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, FU Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Fink, U.; Lubitz, W. [Max-Volmer Institut, TU Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Feick, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie, Martinsried (Germany); Schenck, C.C. [Department of Biochemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cation radicals of the primary electron donor (D{sup +}) in bacterial photosynthesis were investigated by high field, high frequency (95 GHz) EPR. Measurements on frozen solutions of D{sup +}, a dimeric {pi}-cation radical, of various organisms (Rps. viridis, Rb. sphaeroides, Chloroflexus aurantiacus and a heterodimer mutant) are reported, revealing differences in the principal values of the G-tensor. Elements of a theory relating the magnitudes of G principal values to the electronic structure are discussed

  3. Complete bromate and nitrate reduction using hydrogen as the sole electron donor in a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Yao, Fubing; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Jianwei; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-04-15

    Simultaneous reduction of bromate and nitrate was investigated using a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor (RBER) with graphite carbon (GC) rods as anode and activated carbon fiber (ACF) bonded with steel ring as cathode. In RBER, the community of denitrifying bacteria immobilized on the cathode surface could completely utilize hydrogen (H2) as the electron donor, which was internally produced by the electrolysis of water. The short-term test confirmed that the RBER system could reduce 150-800μg/L bromate to below 10μg/L under autotrophic conditions. The reduced bromate was considered to be roughly equivalent to the amount of bromide in effluent, indicating that bromate was completely reduced to bromide without accumulation of by-products. The long-term test (over 120 days) showed that the removal fluxes of bromate and nitrate could be improved by increasing the electric current and decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT). But nitrite in effluent was significantly accumulated when the electric current was beyond 10mA and the HRT was less than 6h. The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12μg/Lh when the electric current was 10mA and HRT was 12h. It was proposed that the electron transfer process in RBER produced H2 on the surface of the ACF cathode, and the microbial cultures attached closely on the cathode which could completely utilize H2 as electron donors for reduction of bromate and nitrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental and theoretical investigations on the high-electron donor character of pyrido-annelated N-heterocyclic carbenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Nonnenmacher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rh(CO2Cl(NHC complexes of dipyrido-annelated N-heterocyclic carbenes were prepared. From the C–H coupling constant of the respective imidazolium salts and the N–C–N angle of the N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC, a weaker σ-donor character than that of typical unsaturated NHCs is expected. However, the IR stretching frequencies of their Rh(CO2Cl complexes suggest an electron-donor character even stronger than that of saturated NHCs. We ascribe this to the extremely weak π-acceptor character of the dipyrido-annelated NHCs caused by the conjugated 14 πe− system that thus allows for an enhanced Rh–CO backbonding. This extremely low π-acceptor ability is also corroborated by the 77Se NMR chemical shift of −55.8 ppm for the respective selenourea, the lowest value ever measured for imidazole derived selenoureas. DFT-calculations of the free carbene confirm the low σ-donor character by the fact that the σ-orbital of the carbene is the HOMO−1 that lies 0.58 eV below the HOMO which is located at the π-system. Natural population analysis reveals the lowest occupation of the pπ-orbital for the saturated carbene carbon atom and the highest for the pyrido-annelated carbene. Going from the free carbene to the Rh(CO2Cl(NHC complexes, the increase in occupancy of the complete π-system of the carbene ligand upon coordination is lowest for the pyrido-annelated carbene and highest for the saturated carbene.

  5. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Parker, Jack C [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  6. Time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of photoexcited triplet states of electron-donor-acceptor complexes in frozen solution: Methylated benzenes and chlorinated phthalic anhydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Hisao; Minami, Masashi; I'Haya, Yasumasa J.

    1994-09-01

    Phthalic anhydride (PA) and chlorinated PAs in frozen methyl substituted benzenes provided the time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) spectra of the electron-donor-acceptor (EDA) complexes. The chlorine substitution of PA reduced the zero-field splitting parameters, D, due to the contribution of the spin-orbit interaction caused by heavy atoms such as chlorine. The increase of the number of methyl group on benzene, which apparently reduced the ionization potential, worked to decrease the D value of the EDA complex. The charge-transfer (CT) ratios were measured more exactly by the absolute value of (Delta m(sub s)) = 1 transition of the triplet states. The major axes of these systems were also safely presumed. The sign of the 100% charge transferred EDA complex was found negative because of the CT ratio plots and the spin-polarization pattern of the TREPR spectra.

  7. Organic photovoltaic devices based on graphene as an electron-acceptor material and P3OT as a donor material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiteng; He, Dawei; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Zhiyong; Wu, Hongpeng; Wang, Jigang [Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing (China)

    2011-10-15

    We present the fabrication and performance studies of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices with bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structure that use organic solution-processable functionalized graphene (SPFGraphene) as an electron-acceptor material and poly(3-octylthiophene) (P3OT) as a donor material. The structural configuration of the device is ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3OT:PCBM-SPFGraphene/LiF/Al. After mixing graphene into the device, the performance enhanced significantly. Given illumination at 100 mW/cm{sup 2} AM1.5 and P3OT/PCBM (1:1) mixture with 9 wt% of SPFGraphene, we recorded the best performances. The open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) is 0.67 V. The short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) is 4.6 mA/cm{sup 2}. The FF is 0.37. And the power conversion efficiency is 1.14%. In the P3OT:PCBM-SPFGraphene composite, the SPFGraphene acts as exciton dissociation sites and provides the transport pathway of LUMO-graphene-Al. Adding SPFGraphene into P3OT produces an appropriate energetic distance between the HOMO and the LUMO of the donor/acceptor, which leads to a high open-circuit voltage. Besides, doping SPFGraphene provides a higher exciton dissociation volume mobility of carrier transport, which leads to a large short-circuit current density. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. DFT Study of Electronic and Optical Properties of Small Oligothiophenes Based on Terthiophene End-capped by Several Donor Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Alamy Aziz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Eight small molecules based on terthiophene end-capped by several donor groups have been carried out using density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent (TDDFT methods in neutral and doped states. The theoretical ground-state geometry, electronic structure and optical properties of the studied molecules were obtained by the DFT and TD-DFT methods at the B3LYP level with 6-31G(d basis set. Theoretical knowledge of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO energy levels the gap energy (Eg and the open-circuit voltage (Voc of the studied compounds are calculated and discussed. The effects of the donor group substituents on the geometries and optoelectronic properties of these materials are discussed to investigate the relationship between molecular structure and optoelectronic properties. The results of this work suggest some of these materials as a good candidate for organic solar cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i3.995

  9. Photosystem II-cyclic electron flow powers exceptional photoprotection and record growth in the microalga Chlorella ohadii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananyev, Gennady; Gates, Colin; Kaplan, Aaron; Dismukes, G Charles

    2017-11-01

    The desert microalga Chlorella ohadii was reported to grow at extreme light intensities with minimal photoinhibition, tolerate frequent de/re-hydrations, yet minimally employs antenna-based non-photochemical quenching for photoprotection. Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms by measuring Photosystem II charge separation yield (chlorophyll variable fluorescence, Fv/Fm) and flash-induced O2 yield to measure the contributions from both linear (PSII-LEF) and cyclic (PSII-CEF) electron flow within PSII. Cells grow increasingly faster at higher light intensities (μE/m2/s) from low (20) to high (200) to extreme (2000) by escalating photoprotection via shifting from PSII-LEF to PSII-CEF. This shifts PSII charge separation from plastoquinone reduction (PSII-LEF) to plastoquinol oxidation (PSII-CEF), here postulated to enable proton gradient and ATP generation that powers photoprotection. Low light-grown cells have unusually small antennae (332 Chl/PSII), use mainly PSII-LEF (95%) and convert 40% of PSII charge separations into O2 (a high O2 quantum yield of 0.06mol/mol PSII/flash). High light-grown cells have smaller antenna and lower PSII-LEF (63%). Extreme light-grown cells have only 42 Chl/PSII (no LHCII antenna), minimal PSII-LEF (10%), and grow faster than any known phototroph (doubling time 1.3h). Adding a synthetic quinone in excess to supplement the PQ pool fully uncouples PSII-CEF from its natural regulation and produces maximum PSII-LEF. Upon dark adaptation PSII-LEF rapidly reverts to PSII-CEF, a transient protection mechanism to conserve water and minimize the cost of antenna biosynthesis. The capacity of the electron acceptor pool (plastoquinone pool), and the characteristic times for exchange of (PQH2)B with PQpool and reoxidation of (PQH2)pool were determined. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B.; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J.; Fierro, José Luis G.; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an

  11. Effect of high electron donor supply on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways in a bioreactor for nitrate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Anna; Tarre, Sheldon; Beliavski, Michael; Green, Michal; Klatt, Judith; de Beer, Dirk; Stief, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The possible shift of a bioreactor for NO3(-) removal from predominantly denitrification (DEN) to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by elevated electron donor supply was investigated. By increasing the C/NO3(-) ratio in one of two initially identical reactors, the production of high sulfide concentrations was induced. The response of the dissimilatory NO3(-) reduction processes to the increased availability of organic carbon and sulfide was monitored in a batch incubation system. The expected shift from a DEN- towards a DNRA-dominated bioreactor was not observed, also not under conditions where DNRA would be thermodynamically favorable. Remarkably, the microbial community exposed to a high C/NO3(-) ratio and sulfide concentration did not use the most energy-gaining process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sulfide as an alternative electron donor to glucose for power generation in mediator-less microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Sakine; Ghoreyshi, Ali A; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Darzi, Ghasem Najafpour; Pant, Deepak

    2017-10-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the power generation in a dual-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC). As one of the effective parameters, glucose concentration was studied in the range of 100-1000 mg/L. At the optimum concentration of 500 mg/L of glucose, maximum power generation was 186 mW/m2. As an alternative, sulfide was used as an electron donor and maximum power output was 401 mW/m2 at the concentration of 100 mg/L; which was more than twice of power produced using glucose. Moreover, sulfide removal efficiencies of 70%, 66%, 60%, and 64% were obtained when initial sulfide concentrations of 10, 20, 80, and 100 mg/L were used, respectively.

  13. Complete bromate and nitrate reduction using hydrogen as the sole electron donor in a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Qi, E-mail: yangqi@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang, Dongbo [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, QLD 4072 (Australia); Yao, Fubing [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmli@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhao, Jianwei; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: Main mechanism of simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal in the RBER. - Highlights: • Cathode of RBER was designed to automatically rotate. • Simultaneous bromate and nitrate removal was achieved by auto-hydrogenotrophic reduction. • The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h. • An electron transfer process and main reaction mechanism in RBER was explored. - Abstract: Simultaneous reduction of bromate and nitrate was investigated using a rotating biofilm-electrode reactor (RBER) with graphite carbon (GC) rods as anode and activated carbon fiber (ACF) bonded with steel ring as cathode. In RBER, the community of denitrifying bacteria immobilized on the cathode surface could completely utilize hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as the electron donor, which was internally produced by the electrolysis of water. The short-term test confirmed that the RBER system could reduce 150–800 μg/L bromate to below 10 μg/L under autotrophic conditions. The reduced bromate was considered to be roughly equivalent to the amount of bromide in effluent, indicating that bromate was completely reduced to bromide without accumulation of by-products. The long-term test (over 120 days) showed that the removal fluxes of bromate and nitrate could be improved by increasing the electric current and decreasing the hydraulic retention time (HRT). But nitrite in effluent was significantly accumulated when the electric current was beyond 10 mA and the HRT was less than 6 h. The maximum bromate reduction rate estimated by the Monod equation was 109.12 μg/L h when the electric current was 10 mA and HRT was 12 h. It was proposed that the electron transfer process in RBER produced H{sub 2} on the surface of the ACF cathode, and the microbial cultures attached closely on the cathode which could completely utilize H{sub 2} as electron donors for reduction of bromate and nitrate.

  14. The impact of driving force on electron transfer rates in photovoltaic donor-acceptor blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Alexander J; Ruseckas, Arvydas; Kareem, Mohanad Mousa; Ebenhoch, Bernd; Serrano, Luis A; Al-Eid, Manal; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Rotello, Vincent M; Cooke, Graeme; Samuel, Ifor D W

    2015-04-17

    The effect of acceptor energy level on electron transfer rate in blends of the polymer solar-cell material poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

  15. Supramolecular donor-acceptor hybrids of porphyrins/phthalocyanines with fullerenes/carbon nanotubes: electron transfer, sensing, switching, and catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Francis; Ito, Osamu

    2009-09-07

    Since the three-dimensional electron-accepting fullerene has been found to be an excellent building block for self-assembled supramolecular systems, we have investigated photoinduced electron transfer processes in supramolecular fullerene systems with porphyrins and phthalocyanines as electron donors to mimic natural photosynthesis. We have successfully formed self-assembled supramolecular dyads and triads via metal-ligand coordination, crown-ether inclusion, ion pairing, hydrogen-bonding, or pi-pi stacking interactions. Although the single mode of binding gives usually flexible supramolecular structures, the newly developed strategy of multiple modes of binding results in conjugates of defined distance and orientation between the donor and acceptor entities, which influences the overall electron transfer reactions. In these conjugates, we observe the anticipated acceleration of the charge separation process and deceleration of the charge recombination process. Applications of these supramolecular systems for reversible photoswitching of inter- and intramolecular electron transfer events open up new opportunities in the area of photosensors. Extension of the self-assembly approaches to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) results in SWNT-porphyrin/phthalocyanine nanohybrids capable of undergoing photoinduced electron transfer. These photochemical processes lead to photocatalytic reactions accumulating redox active substances of electron acceptor/mediator entities with the help of a sacrificial electron donor. Studies on these self-assembled supramolecular dyads, triads, tetrads, etc., are only in the beginning stages and future studies anticipate involvement of more complex systems targeted for better performances in light-driven devices.

  16. Modulation of photosynthetic electron transport in the absence of terminal electron acceptors: characterization of the rbcL deletion mutant of tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Mamedov, Fikret; Mäenpää, Pirkko; Vass, Imre; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2005-08-15

    Tobacco rbcL deletion mutant, which lacks the key enzyme Rubisco for photosynthetic carbon assimilation, was characterized with respect to thylakoid functional properties and protein composition. The Delta rbcL plants showed an enhanced capacity for dissipation of light energy by non-photochemical quenching which was accompanied by low photochemical quenching and low overall photosynthetic electron transport rate. Flash-induced fluorescence relaxation and thermoluminescence measurements revealed a slow electron transfer and decreased redox gap between Q(A) and Q(B), whereas the donor side function of the Photosystem II (PSII) complex was not affected. The 77 K fluorescence emission spectrum of Delta rbcL plant thylakoids implied a presence of free light harvesting complexes. Mutant plants also had a low amount of photooxidisible P700 and an increased ratio of PSII to Photosystem I (PSI). On the other hand, an elevated level of plastid terminal oxidase and the lack of F0 'dark rise' in fluorescence measurements suggest an enhanced plastid terminal oxidase-mediated electron flow to O2 in Delta rbcL thylakoids. Modified electron transfer routes together with flexible dissipation of excitation energy through PSII probably have a crucial role in protection of PSI from irreversible protein damage in the Delta rbcL mutant under growth conditions. This protective capacity was rapidly exceeded in Delta rbcL mutant when the light level was elevated resulting in severe degradation of PSI complexes.

  17. Charge transfer in the electron donor-acceptor complexes of a meso-phenol BODIPY dye with chloranils and fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Animesh; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Mula, Soumyaditya; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2015-02-25

    UV-Vis spectral investigations of electron donor-acceptor complexes of laser dye 2,6-Diethyl-4,4-difluoro-1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-8-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indecene (1c) with chloranils and fullerenes are reported in toluene medium. Well defined charge transfer (CT) absorption bands have been located in the visible region. Oscillator strengths, transition dipole and resonance energies of the CT complexes have been estimated. Vertical ionization potential of 1c has been determined utilizing Mulliken's equation. A possible mechanism for the interaction between electronic subsystems of chloranils, [60]- and [70]fullerenes with three different BODIPY dyes (1a, 1b and 1c shown in Fig. 1) have been discussed in comparing the parameters like degree of charge transfer and binding constant in nonpolar toluene. Comparison of 1c complexes is done with DFT/B3LYP/6-31G optimized gas phase geometries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tellurium rings as electron pair donors in cluster compounds and coordination polymers; Tellurringe als Elektronenpaardonoren in Clusterverbindungen und Koordinationspolymeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Anja

    2011-11-08

    In this dissertation novel and already known molecular tellurium rings are presented in cluster compounds and quasi-one-dimensional coordination polymers. The cyclic, homonuclear units are always stabilized by coordination to electron-rich transition metal atoms, with the coordinating tellurium atoms acting as two-electron donors. As a synthesis route, the solid-state reaction in quartz glass vials was used uniformly. In addition to structural determination, the focus was on the characterization of the resulting compounds. For this purpose, resistance measurements were carried out on selected compounds, the magnetic behavior and the thermal degradation reactions were investigated and accompanying quantum chemical calculations were carried out. [German] In dieser Dissertation werden neuartige sowie bereits bekannte molekulare Tellurringe in Clusterverbindungen und quasi-eindimensionalen Koordinationspolymeren vorgestellt. Die Stabilisierung der zyklischen, homonuklearen Einheiten erfolgt dabei stets durch die Koordination an elektronenreiche Uebergangsmetallatome, wobei die koordinierenden Telluratome gegenueber diesen als Zwei-Elektronendonoren fungieren. Als Syntheseroute wurde dabei einheitlich auf die Festkoerperreaktion in Quarzglasampullen zurueckgegriffen. Neben der Strukturaufklaerung stand die Charakterisierung der erhaltenden Verbindungen im Fokus der Arbeit. Dazu wurden an ausgewaehlten Verbindungen Widerstandsmessungen durchgefuehrt, das magnetische Verhalten sowie die thermischen Abbaureaktionen untersucht und begleitende quantenchemische Rechnungen durchgefuehrt.

  19. Magnetic field enhanced electroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes based on electron donor-acceptor exciplex blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniya, Sangita; Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; McLaughlin, Ryan; Vardeny, Zeev Valy

    2016-03-01

    A useful process for light harvesting from injected electron-hole pairs in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) is the transfer from triplet excitons (T) to singlet excitons (S) via reverse intersystem crossing (RISC). This process adds a delayed electro-luminescence (EL) emission component that is known as thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). We have studied electron donor (D)/acceptor(A) blends that form an exciplex manifold in which the energy difference, ΔEST between the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) levels is relatively small (field of 50 mT at ambient. Moreover the MEL response is activated with activation energy similar that of the EL emission. This suggests that the large magneto-EL originates from an additional spin-mixing channel between singlet and triplet states of the generated exciplexes, which is due to TADF. We will report on the MEL dependencies on the temperature, bias voltage, and D-A materials for optimum OLED performance. Supported by SAMSUNG Global Research Outreach (GRO) program, and also by the NSF-Material Science & Engineering Center (MRSEC) program at the University of Utah (DMR-1121252).

  20. Sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrification corresponding to different electron donors and microbial profiling in anoxic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Huijuan; Bai, Yaohui; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-11-15

    Sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrifying anoxic fluidized bed membrane bioreactors (AnFB-MBR) were developed for the treatment of nitrate-contaminated groundwater with minimized sulfate production. The nitrate removal rates obtained in the methanol- and ethanol-fed mixotrophic denitrifying AnFB-MBRs reached 1.44-3.84 g NO3 -N/L reactor d at a hydraulic retention time of 0.5 h, which were significantly superior to those reported in packed bed reactors. Compared to methanol, ethanol was found to be a more effective external carbon source for sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrification due to lower sulfate and total organic carbon concentrations in the effluent. Using pyrosequencing, the phylotypes of primary microbial groups in the reactor, including sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifiers, methanol- or ethanol-supported heterotrophic denitrifiers, were investigated in response to changes in electron donors. Principal component and heatmap analyses indicated that selection of electron donating substrates largely determined the microbial community structure. The abundance of Thiobacillus decreased from 45.1% in the sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying reactor to 12.0% and 14.2% in sulfur-based methanol- and ethanol-fed mixotrophic denitrifying bioreactors, respectively. Heterotrophic Methyloversatilis and Thauera bacteria became more dominant in the mixotrophic denitrifying bioreactors, which were possibly responsible for the observed methanol- and ethanol-associated denitrification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Challenges regarding the start-up of an anaerobic biological sulphate reactor using H2 and CO2 as electron donor and carbon sources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, SP

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available and energy source. Synthesis gas, comprise of H2 the preferred electron donor of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB), CO2 a carbon source and CO and is available from coal-burning processes. Biological sulphate reduction technology using synthesis gas should...

  2. Coexistence of physiologically similar sulfate reducing bacteria in a full-scale sulfidogenic bioreactor fed with a single organic electron donor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dar, S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Kuenen, J.G.; Muyzer, G.

    2007-01-01

    A combination of culture-dependent and independent methods was used to study the co-existence of different sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor treating sulfate-rich wastewater. The wastewater was fed with ethanol as an external electron donor. Twenty six strains

  3. Electron donor concentrations in sediments and sediment properties at the agricultural chemicals team research site near New Providence, Iowa, 2006-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, Bijesh; Korom, Scott F.; Smith, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of electron donors in aquifer sediments are important to the understanding of the fate and transport of redox-sensitive constituents in groundwater, such as nitrate. For a study by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 50 sediment samples were collected from below the water table from 11 boreholes at the U.S. Geological Survey Agricultural Chemicals Team research site near New Providence, Iowa, during 2006-07. All samples were analyzed for gravel, sand (coarse, medium, and fine), silt, clay, Munsell soil color, inorganic carbon content, and for the following electron donors: organic carbon, ferrous iron, and inorganic sulfide. A subset of 14 sediment samples also was analyzed for organic sulfur, but all of these samples had concentrations less than the method detection limit; therefore, the presence of this potential electron donor was not considered further. X-ray diffraction analyses provided important semi-quantitative information of well-crystallized dominant minerals within the sediments that might be contributing electron donors.

  4. An Effort to Increase Organ Donor Registration Through Intergroup Competition and Electronic Word of Mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sandi W; Hitt, Rose; Park, Hee Sun; Walther, Joseph; Liang, Yuhua Jake; Hsieh, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The effort to increase Web organ donation registrations in Michigan by enhancing 2 types of university campaigns with social media strategies informed by social identity theory is the focus of this research. The two campaigns focused on either ingroup or rivalry outgroup social identification, and each was enhanced with individually focused social media in the first year of the campaign and with electronic word of mouth in Year 2 of the campaign. Results indicated that individually focused social media such as Facebook ads worked well in rivalry campaigns (in which registrations increased two times over baseline) but not in ingroup identification campaigns (in which registrations decreased significantly over baseline when ads were introduced in the first year of each type of campaign). Electronic word-of-mouth strategies worked well in both ingroup identification campaigns (in which registrations increased two times over baseline) and rivalry campaigns (in which registrations rose almost eight times over baseline, when strategies were introduced in the second year of each type of campaign).

  5. Ammonia synthesis using a stable electride as an electron donor and reversible hydrogen store

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Masaaki; Inoue, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Youhei; Hayashi, Fumitaka; Kanbara, Shinji; Matsuishi, Satoru; Yokoyama, Toshiharu; Kim, Sung-Wng; Hara, Michikazu; Hosono, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Industrially, the artificial fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia is carried out using the Haber-Bosch process, but this process requires high temperatures and pressures, and consumes more than 1% of the world's power production. Therefore the search is on for a more environmentally benign process that occurs under milder conditions. Here, we report that a Ru-loaded electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e-)4 (Ru/C12A7:e-), which has high electron-donating power and chemical stability, works as an efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis. Highly efficient ammonia synthesis is achieved with a catalytic activity that is an order of magnitude greater than those of other previously reported Ru-loaded catalysts and with almost half the reaction activation energy. Kinetic analysis with infrared spectroscopy reveals that C12A7:e- markedly enhances N2 dissociation on Ru by the back donation of electrons and that the poisoning of ruthenium surfaces by hydrogen adatoms can be suppressed effectively because of the ability of C12A7:e- to store hydrogen reversibly.

  6. Solventless migratory-insertion reactions of substituted cyclopentadienyl iron complexes induced by electron donor ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apollinaire Munyaneza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Reaction between solid (C5H5Fe(CO 2CH3 and a range of solid phosphine ligands, L (L = PPh3, P(m-CH3C6H43, P(p-CH3C6H43, P(p-FC6H43, P(p-ClC6H43, PCy3 occurred in the absence of solvent in the melt phase to give the migratory-insertion products, (C5H5Fe(CO(COCH3(L. The reaction was more rapid with small electron withdrawing ligands. Insertion reaction between (RC5H4Fe(CO 2 R’ (R = H, CH3; R’ = CH3, CH2Ph and gaseous ligands such as SO2 and CO were also studied. The insertion of SO2 occurred readily for all the substrates investigated, but CO insertion did not occur (< 1 % using the solventless reaction condition.

  7. Effect of the ferredoxin electron donor on sunflower (Helianthus annuus) desaturases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas-Calerón, M; Youssar, L; Salas, J J; Garcés, R; Martínez-Force, E

    2009-08-01

    Ferredoxins are proteins that participate in photosynthesis and in other processes that require reducing equivalents, such as the reduction of nitrogen or fatty acid desaturation. Two classes of ferredoxins have been described in plants: light-regulated photosynthetic ferredoxins and heterotrophic ferredoxins whose activity is not influenced by light. Genes encoding the two forms of ferredoxin have been cloned and characterized in developing sunflower cotyledons. Here, these genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and they were purified by ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography to study their capacity to supply electrons to two different sunflower desaturases: soluble stearoyl-ACP desaturase from sunflower cotyledons, and membrane bound desaturase FAD7 expressed in yeast. In both cases photosynthetic ferredoxin was the form that promoted the strongest desaturase activity.

  8. [Potential Carbon Fixation Capability of Non-photosynthetic Microbial Community at Different Depth of the South China Sea and Its Response to Different Electron Donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Feng; Wang, Lei; Xi, Xue-fei; Hu, Jia-jun; Fu, Xiao-hua; Lu, Bing; Xu, Dian-sheng

    2015-05-01

    The seawater samples collected from many different areas with different depth in the South China Sea were cultivated using different electron donors respectively. And the variation in the potential carbon fixation capability ( PCFC ) of non-photosynthetic microbial community (NPMC) in seawater with different depth was determined after a cycle of cultivation through the statistic analysis. In addition, the cause for the variation was clarified through analyzing key gene abundance regarding CO2 fixation and characteristics of seawater with different depth. The result showed that the PCFCs of NPMC in seawater with different depth were generally low and had no significant difference when using NaNO2 as the electron donor. The PCFC of NPMC in surface seawater was higher than that in deep seawater when using H2 as the electron donor, on the contrary, the PCFC of NPMC in deep seawater was higher than that in surface seawater when using Na2S2O3 as the electron donor. The abundance of the main CO2 fixation gene cbbL in surface seawater was higher than that in deep seawater while the cbbM gene abundance in deep seawater was higher than that in surface seawater. Most hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria had the cbbL gene, and most sulfur bacteria had the cbbM gene. The tendency of seawater cbbL/cbbM gene abundance with the change of depth revealed that there were different kinds of bacteria accounting for the majority in NPMC fixing CO2 at different depth of ocean, which led to different response of PCFC of NPMC at different depth of the sea to different electron donors. The distributions of dissolved oxygen and inorganic carbon concentration with the change of the depth of the sea might be an important reason leading to the difference of NPMC structure and even the difference of PCFC at different depth of the sea.

  9. Complexation and Electronic Communication between Corannulene-Based Buckybowls and a Curved Truxene-TTF Donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, María; Calbo, Joaquín; Krick Calderon, Rafael M; Pla, Paula; Hsieh, Ya-Chu; Pérez, Emilio M; Wu, Yao-Ting; Ortí, Enrique; Guldi, Dirk M; Martín, Nazario

    2017-03-13

    The association behavior of an electron-donating, bowl-shaped, truxene-based tetrathiafulvalene (truxTTF) with two corannulene-based fullerene fragments, C32 H12 and C38 H14 , is investigated in several solvents. Formation of 1:1 complexes is followed by absorption titrations and complemented by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The binding constants are in the range log Ka =2.9-3.5. DFT calculations reveal that the most stable arrangement is the conformation in which the 1,3-dithiole ring of truxTTF is placed inside the concave cavity of the corannulene derivative. This arrangement is confirmed experimentally by NMR measurements, and implies that a combination of π-π and CH-π interactions is the driving force for association. Time-dependent DFT calculations reproduce the experimental UV/Vis titrations and provide a detailed understanding of the spectral changes observed. Femtosecond transient absorption studies reveal the processes occurring after photoexcitation of either C32 H12 or C38 H14 and their supramolecular associates with truxTTF. In the case of truxTTF⋅C38 H14 , photoexcitation yields the charge-separated state truxTTF(.+) ⋅C38 H14(.-) with a lifetime of approximately 160 ps. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Donor-Like Surface Traps on Two-Dimensional Electron Gas and Current Collapse of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-hui Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of donor-like surface traps on two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG and drain current collapse of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs has been investigated in detail. The depletion of 2DEG by the donor-like surface states is shown. The drain current collapse is found to be more sensitive to the addition of positive surface charges. Surface trap states with higher energy levels result in weaker current collapse and faster collapse process. By adopting an optimized backside doping scheme, the electron density of 2DEG has been improved greatly and the current collapse has been greatly eliminated. These results give reference to the improvement in device performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs.

  11. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoqing [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting. The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.

  12. Effects of the buffer layer inserted between the transparent conductive oxide anode and the organic electron donor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godoy, A.; Kouskoussa, B.; Benchouk, K.; Khelil, A. [Facultad Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Diego Portales, Ejercito 141, Santiago de Chile (Chile); Cattin, L.; Soto, G.M. [Universite de Nantes, Nantes Atlantique Universites, Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN)-CNRS, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, Nantes F-44000 (France); Toumi, L. [LPCM2E, Universite d' Oran Es-Senia, LPCM2E (Algeria); Diaz, F.R.; del Valle, M.A. [Laboratorio de Polimeros, Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Correo 22, Santiago (Chile); Morsli, M.; Bernede, J.C. [Universite de Nantes, Nantes Atlantique Universites, LAMP, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, Nantes F-44000 (France)

    2010-04-15

    In optoelectronic devices, the work function of the transparent conductive oxide, which is used as anode, does not match well the highest occupied molecular orbital of the organic material, which induces the formation of a barrier opposed to hole exchange at this interface. Therefore a thin buffer layer is often used to achieve good matching of the band structure at the interface. From experimental results it can be deduced that the main effects of the buffer layer consist in a better matching of the band structure at the interface anode/organic material and in a more homogeneous organic layer growth. We show that, whatever the nature of the buffer layer-metal, oxide, organic material - the classical Schottky-Mott model allows to anticipate, at least roughly, the behaviour of the contact, even if some dipole effect are often present. A good correlation between the ''metal/buffer layer'' work function and the barrier {phi}{sub b} for hole exchange at anode/organic electron donor interfaces is obtained, as expected by the model. (author)

  13. The electronic structure and second-order nonlinear optical properties of donor-acceptor acetylenes - A detailed investigation of structure-property relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiegman, A. E.; Graham, Eva; Khundkar, Lutfur R.; Perry, Joseph W.; Cheng, L.-T.; Perry, Kelly J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of donor-acceptor acetylene compounds was synthesized in which systematic changes in both the conjugation length and the donor-acceptor strength were made. The effect of these structural changes on the spectroscopic and electronic properties of the molecules and, ultimately, on the measured second-order molecular hyperpolarizabilities (beta) was investigated. It was found that increases in the donor-acceptor strength resulted in increases in the magnitude of beta. For this class of molecules, the increase is dominated by the energy of the intramolecular charge-transfer transition, while factors such as the ground to excited-state dipole moment change and the transition-moment integral are much less important. Increasing the conjugation length from one to two acetylene linkers did not result in an increase in the value of beta; however, beta increased sharply in going from two acetylenes to three. This increase is attributed to the superposition of several nearly isoenergetic excited states.

  14. First principles study for the key electronic, optical and nonlinear optical properties of novel donor-acceptor chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Shabbir; Al-Sehemi, Abdullah G; Su, Zhongmin; Xu, Hongliang; Irfan, Ahmad; Chaudhry, Aijaz Rasool

    2017-03-01

    Using first-principle methods, several key electronic, optical and nonlinear optical properties are calculated for two recently synthesized chalcone derivatives i.e. (2E)-3-(4-methylphenyl)-1-(3-nitrophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (comp.1) and (2E)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-1-(3-nitrophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (comp.2). The calculation of dipole moment, polarizability , anisotropy of polarizability as well as second hyperpolarizability (usually considered as a signature for two photon absorption phenomenon) are performed using density functional theory methods at PBE0/6-311G** level of theory. The linear average polarizability for comp.1 and comp.2 are found to be 32.15×10-24 and 38.76×10-24esu, respectively. Similarly, the second hyperpolarizability amplitudes of comp.1 and comp.2 are found to be reasonably larger mounting to 79.31×10-36 and 181.36×10-36esu, respectively. The importance of donor end is determined by comparing p-methylphenyl group of comp.1 with that of N,N-dimethylaniline group of comp.2 that results a remarkable increase in its amplitude, which is ∼2 times larger as compared with that of comp.1 owing to the stronger donor-acceptor configuration of comp.2. Interestingly, a comparison of average static third-order nonlinear polarizabilities shows that amplitudes of comp.1 and comp.2 are ∼13 times and ∼29 times larger than that of para-nitroaniline (a typical standard push-pull NLO-phore) at the same PBE0/6-311G** level of theory, which indicates a real time NLO application of our titled compounds. Time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations along with frontier molecular orbitals, density of states (DOS), second hyperpolarizability density analysis and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) diagrams are used to trace the origin of electro-optical as well as structure property relationships. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lead induced changes in phosphorylation of PSII proteins in low light grown pea plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wioleta, Wasilewska; Anna, Drożak; Ilona, Bacławska; Kamila, Kąkol; Elżbieta, Romanowska

    2015-02-01

    Light-intensity and redox-state induced thylakoid proteins phosphorylation involved in structural changes and in regulation of protein turnover. The presence of heavy metal ions triggers a wide range of cellular responses including changes in plant growth and photosynthesis. Plants have evolved a number of mechanisms to protect photosynthetic apparatus. We have characterized the effect of lead on PSII protein phosphorylation in pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants grown in low light conditions. Pb ions affected only slightly photochemical efficiency of PSII and had no effect on organization of thylakoid complexes. Lead activated strongly phosphorylation of PSII core D1 protein and dephosphorylation of this protein did not proceed in far red light. D1 protein was also not degraded in this conditions. However, phosphorylation of LHCII proteins was not affected by lead. These results indicate that Pb(2+) stimulate the phosphorylation of PSII core proteins and by disturbing the disassembly of supercomplexes play a role in PSII repair mechanism. LHCII phosphorylation could control the distribution of energy between the photosystems in low light conditions. This demonstrates that plants may respond to heavy metals by induction different pathways responsible for protein protection under stress conditions.

  16. Chloroplast movement provides photoprotection to plants by redistributing PSII damage within leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Phillip A; Hangarter, Roger P

    2012-09-01

    Plants use light to fix carbon through the process of photosynthesis but light also causes photoinhibition, by damaging photosystem II (PSII). Plants can usually adjust their rate of PSII repair to equal the rate of damage, but under stress conditions or supersaturating light-intensities damage may exceed the rate of repair. Light-induced chloroplast movements are one of the many mechanisms plants have evolved to minimize photoinhibition. We found that chloroplast movements achieve a measure of photoprotection to PSII by altering the distribution of photoinhibition through depth in leaves. When chloroplasts are in the low-light accumulation arrangement a greater proportion of PSII damage occurs near the illuminated surface than for leaves where the chloroplasts are in the high-light avoidance arrangement. According to our findings chloroplast movements can increase the overall efficiency of leaf photosynthesis in at least two ways. The movements alter light profiles within leaves to maximize photosynthetic output and at the same time redistribute PSII damage throughout the leaf to reduce the amount of inhibition received by individual chloroplasts and prevent a decrease in photosynthetic potential.

  17. Denitrification potential in stream sediments impacted by acid mine drainage: Effects of pH, various electron donors, and iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeseman, J.L.; Smith, R.L.; Silverstein, J.

    2006-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) contaminates thousands of kilometers of stream in the western United States. At the same time, nitrogen loading to many mountain watersheds is increasing because of atmospheric deposition of nitrate and increased human use. Relatively little is known about nitrogen cycling in acidic, heavy-metal-laden streams; however, it has been reported that one key process, denitrification, is inhibited under low pH conditions. The objective of this research was to investigate the capacity for denitrification in acidified streams. Denitrification potential was assessed in sediments from several Colorado AMD-impacted streams, ranging from pH 2.60 to 4.54, using microcosm incubations with fresh sediment. Added nitrate was immediately reduced to nitrogen gas without a lag period, indicating that denitrification enzymes were expressed and functional in these systems. First-order denitrification potential rate constants varied from 0.046 to 2.964 day-1. The pH of the microcosm water increased between 0.23 and 1.49 pH units during denitrification. Additional microcosm studies were conducted to examine the effects of initial pH, various electron donors, and iron (added as ferrous and ferric iron). Decreasing initial pH decreased denitrification; however, increasing pH had little effect on denitrification rates. The addition of ferric and ferrous iron decreased observed denitrification potential rate constants. The addition of glucose and natural organic matter stimulated denitrification potential. The addition of hydrogen had little effect, however, and denitrification activity in the microcosms decreased after acetate addition. These results suggest that denitrification can occur in AMD streams, and if stimulated within the environment, denitrification might reduce acidity. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  18. Fe2+, Mn2+ and H2S as electron donors for benthic N-processes in lacustrine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojean, Adeline; Zopfi, Jakob; Robertson, Elizabeth; Thamdrup, Bo; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2017-04-01

    Intensive human activities have led to the increase of fixed N concentrations in many aquatic environments. Microorganisms help to mitigate N-loading in lakes by eliminating reactive nitrogen, mostly through anaerobic N2 production within lacustrine sediments where bacterial densities are particularly high. The most important N sinks in lakes that transform fixed N (e.g. NO{^-_3, NO{^-_2, NH{^+_4) to N2 are denitrification and anammox. In contrast, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) retains bioavailable N within the system. The relative partitioning between nitrogen removal through denitrification and/or anammox, and its recycling via DNRA is an important modulator of internal eutrophication, and highly relevant for N balances in lakes. During canonical denitrification and DNRA, microorganisms use mainly organic matter for reducing nitrate, yet H_2S, Fe2+, and/or Mn2+ are potential alternative electron donors. Recent work on DNRA in estuarine sediments has revealed the coupling of nitrate reduction and iron oxidation, but the importance of Fe2+-dependent DNRA in lacustrine sediments remains uncertain. Similarly, sulfide-dependent nitrate reduction has been found to occur in freshwater sediments, though this process remains under-investigated. To our knowledge, there is no clear evidence for nitrate reduction in association with the oxidation of reduced manganese in lakes. The goal of this study was to quantify benthic NO{^-3 reduction pathways in the lacustrine sediments of eutrophic Lake Lugano, and to investigate if, and to what extent, H_2S, Fe2+, and/or Mn2+ control denitrification, anammox and DNRA. Laboratory incubation experiments were conducted with benthic microbial biomass from the sediments, 15NO_3- (100

  19. Arsenite as an Electron Donor for Anoxygenic Photosynthesis: Description of Three Strains of Ectothiorhodospira from Mono Lake, California and Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Hoeft McCann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Three novel strains of photosynthetic bacteria from the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae were isolated from soda lakes of the Great Basin Desert, USA by employing arsenite (As(III as the sole electron donor in the enrichment/isolation process. Strain PHS-1 was previously isolated from a hot spring in Mono Lake, while strain MLW-1 was obtained from Mono Lake sediment, and strain BSL-9 was isolated from Big Soda Lake. Strains PHS-1, MLW-1, and BSL-9 were all capable of As(III-dependent growth via anoxygenic photosynthesis and contained homologs of arxA, but displayed different phenotypes. Comparisons were made with three related species: Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii DSM 2111, Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii DSM 243T, and Halorhodospira halophila DSM 244. All three type cultures oxidized arsenite to arsenate but did not grow with As(III as the sole electron donor. DNA–DNA hybridization indicated that strain PHS-1 belongs to the same species as Ect. shaposhnikovii DSM 2111 (81.1% sequence similarity, distinct from Ect. shaposhnikovii DSM 243T (58.1% sequence similarity. These results suggest that the capacity for light-driven As(III oxidation is a common phenomenon among purple photosynthetic bacteria in soda lakes. However, the use of As(III as a sole electron donor to sustain growth via anoxygenic photosynthesis is confined to novel isolates that were screened for by this selective cultivation criterion.

  20. Arsenite as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis: Description of three strains of Ectothiorhodospria from Mono Lake, California, and Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Shelley; Boren, Alison; Hernandez-Maldonado, Jaime; Stoneburner, Brendon; Saltikov, Chad W; Stolz, John F.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2017-01-01

    Three novel strains of photosynthetic bacteria from the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae were isolated from soda lakes of the Great Basin Desert, USA by employing arsenite (As(III)) as the sole electron donor in the enrichment/isolation process. Strain PHS-1 was previously isolated from a hot spring in Mono Lake, while strain MLW-1 was obtained from Mono Lake sediment, and strain BSL-9 was isolated from Big Soda Lake. Strains PHS-1, MLW-1, and BSL-9 were all capable of As(III)-dependent growth via anoxygenic photosynthesis and contained homologs of arxA, but displayed different phenotypes. Comparisons were made with three related species: Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii DSM 2111, Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii DSM 243T, and Halorhodospira halophila DSM 244. All three type cultures oxidized arsenite to arsenate but did not grow with As(III) as the sole electron donor. DNA–DNA hybridization indicated that strain PHS-1 belongs to the same species as Ect. shaposhnikovii DSM 2111 (81.1% sequence similarity), distinct from Ect. shaposhnikovii DSM 243T (58.1% sequence similarity). These results suggest that the capacity for light-driven As(III) oxidation is a common phenomenon among purple photosynthetic bacteria in soda lakes. However, the use of As(III) as a sole electron donor to sustain growth via anoxygenic photosynthesis is confined to novel isolates that were screened for by this selective cultivation criterion.

  1. Faster photoinduced electron transfer in a diluted mixture than in a neat donor solvent: effect of excited-state H-bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Nabajeet; Singha, Debabrata; Sahu, Kalyanasis

    2014-04-07

    In a neat electron-donating solvent (in this case aniline), photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from the solvent to an excited acceptor (e.g. a coumarin fluorophore) may be anticipated to be the most efficient because of the close contact of the acceptor with many donors. Addition of an inert component would most likely retard the PET process by replacing some donors from the neighbourhood of the acceptors. Surprisingly, we found dramatic acceleration of PET (6-10 fold enhancement compared to neat aniline), for coumarin 102 (C102) dissolved in a binary mixture of aniline and an inert solvent (cyclohexane or toluene). The PET induced fluorescence follows an anomalous trend against the mole fraction of aniline (XAN); first quenches up to certain XAN (0.075 for cyclohexane; 0.13 for toluene), thereafter, enhances with increase in XAN. Although the non-interacting component cannot directly participate in the PET process, it may modulate C102-aniline H-bonding association by changing the polarity of the medium or by disrupting the aniline-aniline H-bond. The study clearly illustrates the dominant role of hydrogen bonding in activating the electron transfer rate where standard thermodynamics predicts very weak donor-acceptor interaction.

  2. Correlating excited state and charge carrier dynamics with photovoltaic parameters of perylene dye sensitized solar cells: influences of an alkylated carbazole ancillary electron-donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Junting; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Min; Dong, Xiandui; Wang, Peng

    2017-01-18

    Two perylene dyes characteristic of electron-donors phenanthrocarbazole (PC) and carbazyl functionalized PC are selected to study the complicated dynamics of excited states and charge carriers, which underlie the photovoltaic parameters of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). We have combined femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion and time-resolved single-photon counting techniques to probe the wavelength-dependent photoluminescence dynamics of dye molecules not only dissolved in THF but also grafted on the surface of oxide nanoparticles. Excited state relaxation and electron injection both occur on a similar timescale, resulting in a very distributive kinetics of electron injection. It is also found that the carbazyl ancillary electron-donor causes a faster electron injection, which over-compensates the adverse impact of a slightly shorter lifetime of the equilibrium excited state. Nanosecond transient absorption and transient photovoltage decay measurements have shown that conjugating carbazyl to PC can effectively slow down the kinetics of charge recombination of electrons in titania with both photo-oxidized dye molecules and triiodide anions, improving the cell photovoltage.

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer in hydrogen bonded donor--acceptor systems. Free energy and distance dependence studies and an analysis of the role of diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, M A; Prasad, E; Gopidas, K R

    2001-02-14

    The free energy dependence of electron transfer in a few small-molecule donor--acceptor systems having hydrogen-bonding appendages was studied to evaluate the role of diffusion in masking the inverted region in bimolecular PET reactions. A small fraction of the probe molecules associate and this led to the simultaneous observation of unimolecular and diffusion-mediated quenching of the probe fluorescence. Free energy dependence studies showed that the unimolecular electron transfer obeys Marcus behavior and the diffusion-mediated electron transfer obeys Rehm--Weller behavior. The absence of an inverted region in bimolecular PET reactions is thus attributed to diffusion. The results of the free energy dependence studies suggest that distance dependence of electron transfer plays a role in masking the inverted region. To ascertain this aspect we have carried out a study of the distance dependence of electron transfer in the hydrogen-bonded donor--acceptor systems. For a system in the normal region an exponential rate decrease was observed. For a system in the inverted region it was observed that the rate depends very feebly on distance. Thus distance dependence studies did not confirm the prediction of enhanced rates at larger distances in the inverted region.

  4. Light dependence of quantum yields for PSII charge separation and oxygen evolution in eucaryotic algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flameling, I.A.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum yields of photosystem II (PSII) charge separation (Phi(P)) and oxygen production (Phi(O2)) were determined by simultaneous measurements of oxygen production and variable fluorescence in four different aquatic microalgae representing three different taxonomic groups: the freshwater alga

  5. Oxyradicals and PSII activity in maize leaves in the absence of UV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... oxyradicals invoked higher activity of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase and peroxidase under ambient UV, they also imposed limitation on the photosynthetic efficiency of PSII. Exclusion of UV components (UV-B 280–315 nm; UV-A 315–400 nm) translated to enhanced photosynthesis, growth and biomass.

  6. Spectrophotometric study of the charge transfer complexation of some amino acid derivative drugs as electron donors with 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Yun Li

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Charge transfer (CT complexes of some drugs of amino acid derivatives, such as carbocysteine, aminobutyric acid, and levodopa, as electron donors with 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ as electron acceptor have been studied. The spectra obtained for carbocysteine/TCNQ, aminobutyric acid/TCNQ, and levodopa/TCNQ systems show the maximum absorption bands at wavelengths of 422, 415, and 417 nm, respectively. The formation of such complexes was also confirmed by infrared measurements. The stoichiometry of the complexes was found to be 1:1 between the donor and the acceptor. The possible reaction mechanisms were explored. The thermodynamic standard reaction quantities of the complexes between donors and acceptor were estimated. Different variables affecting the reaction were carefully studied and optimized. At the optimum reaction conditions, Beer’s law was obeyed in a concentration limit of 1–30, 1–10, and 2–50 μg mL−1 for carbocysteine, aminobutyric acid, and levodopa, respectively. The limits of detection ranged from 0.3 to 0.8 μg mL−1. The developed methods could be applied successfully for the determination of the studied compounds in their pharmaceutical dosage forms with a good precision and accuracy compared to official and reported methods as revealed by t- and F-tests.

  7. The Donor-Stabilized Silylene Bis[N,N´-diisopropylbenzamidinato(–)]silicon(ii): Synthesis, Electronic Structure, and Reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junold, K.; Nutz, M.; Baus, J.A.; Burschka, C.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.; Tacke, R.

    2014-01-01

    A convenient and robust synthesis of bis[N,N′- diisopropylbenzamidinato(-)]silicon(II) (1), a donor-stabilized silylene, has been developed (35 g scale). To get further information about the reactivity profile of 1, a series of oxidative addition reactions were studied. Treatment of 1 with PhSe-SePh

  8. Overexpressed Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Act Synergistically to Protect the Repair of PSII during Photoinhibition in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Tang, Penporn; Hihara, Yukako; Yumoto, Isao; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2016-09-01

    The repair of PSII under strong light is particularly sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, and these ROS are efficiently scavenged by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. In the present study, we generated transformants of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 that overexpressed an iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803; a highly active catalase (VktA) from Vibrio rumoiensis; and both enzymes together. Then we examined the sensitivity of PSII to photoinhibition in the three strains. In cells that overexpressed either Fe-SOD or VktA, PSII was more tolerant to strong light than it was in wild-type cells. Moreover, in cells that overexpressed both Fe-SOD and VktA, PSII was even more tolerant to strong light. However, the rate of photodamage to PSII, as monitored in the presence of chloramphenicol, was similar in all three transformant strains and in wild-type cells, suggesting that the overexpression of these ROS-scavenging enzymes might not protect PSII from photodamage but might protect the repair of PSII. Under strong light, intracellular levels of ROS fell significantly, and the synthesis de novo of proteins that are required for the repair of PSII, such as the D1 protein, was enhanced. Our observations suggest that overexpressed Fe-SOD and VktA might act synergistically to alleviate the photoinhibition of PSII by reducing intracellular levels of ROS, with resultant protection of the repair of PSII from oxidative inhibition. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Acetate, lactate, propionate, and isobutyrate as electron donors for iron and sulfate reduction in Arctic marine sediments, Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finke, Niko; Vandieken, Verona; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2007-01-01

    . Inhibition of sulfate reduction with selenate resulted in the accumulation of acetate, propionate, and isobutyrate. The acetate turnover rates determined by radiotracer and accumulation after inhibition were similar. VFA turnover accounted for 21% and 52% of the mineralization through sulfate reduction...... by alternative e--donors. The accumulation of VFA in the selenate-inhibited 0-2 cm slurry did not enhance iron reduction, indicating that iron reducers were not limited by VFA availability....

  10. Copolymerization of Ethylene and Propylene Using 4th Generation Ziegler- Natta Catalyst: Influence of Cocatalyst, External Electron Donor and Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mehtarani

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Copolymerization of ethylene and propylene was investigated using a 4th generation phthalate Ziegler-Natta catalyst in normal hexane in a Buchi reactor. The effects of different mole fractions of [Al]/[Ti], [Si]/[Al] and various amounts of hydrogen on productivity and weight percent of ethylene on the product, were studied. In the copolymerization reactions, tri-isobutyl aluminum (TiBAl was used as cocatalyst instead of triethyl aluminum (TEAl because TiBAl produced a more amorphous copolymer. In molar ratio [TiBAl]/[Ti] = 480 the catalyst activity was at maximum and ethylene content in this ratio was at minimum. Cyclohexyl-methyldimethoxy silane was used as external donor. In molar ratio [Si]/[TiBAl] = 0.05, the copolymer showed more amorphous behavior. In this molar ratio, the external donor decreased the productivity of the catalyst and a further increase of external donor concentration increased the productivity. Hydrogen increased the productivity of the catalyst and decreased the ethylene content of the copolymer in low concentration. In high concentration, however, hydrogen decreased the productivity and increased the ethylene content of the copolymer. Hydrogen as a chain transfer agent decreased the viscosity average molecular weight.

  11. Assessing the additive risks of PSII herbicide exposure to the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephen E; Schaffelke, Britta; Shaw, Melanie; Bainbridge, Zoë T; Rohde, Ken W; Kennedy, Karen; Davis, Aaron M; Masters, Bronwyn L; Devlin, Michelle J; Mueller, Jochen F; Brodie, Jon E

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide residues have been measured in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon at concentrations which have the potential to harm marine plant communities. Monitoring on the Great Barrier Reef lagoon following wet season discharge show that 80% of the time when herbicides are detected, more than one are present. These herbicides have been shown to act in an additive manner with regards to photosystem-II inhibition. In this study, the area of the Great Barrier Reef considered to be at risk from herbicides is compared when exposures are considered for each herbicide individually and also for herbicide mixtures. Two normalisation indices for herbicide mixtures were calculated based on current guidelines and PSII inhibition thresholds. The results show that the area of risk for most regions is greatly increased under the proposed additive PSII inhibition threshold and that the resilience of this important ecosystem could be reduced by exposure to these herbicides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Deletion of CGLD1 Impairs PSII and Increases Singlet Oxygen Tolerance of Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiale Xing

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a key model organism for studying photosynthesis and oxidative stress in unicellular eukaryotes. Using a forward genetics approach, we have identified and characterized a mutant x32, which lacks a predicted protein named CGLD1 (Conserved in Green Lineage and Diatom 1 in GreenCut2, under normal and stress conditions. We show that loss of CGLD1 resulted in minimal photoautotrophic growth and PSII activity in the organism. We observed reduced amount of PSII complex and core subunits in the x32 mutant based on blue-native (BN/PAGE and immunoblot analysis. Moreover, x32 exhibited increased sensitivity to high-light stress and altered tolerance to different reactive oxygenic species (ROS stress treatments, i.e., decreased resistance to H2O2/or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH and increased tolerance to neutral red (NR and rose bengal (RB that induce the formation of singlet oxygen, respectively. Further analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR indicated that the increased singlet-oxygen tolerance of x32 was largely correlated with up-regulated gene expression of glutathione-S-transferases (GST. The phenotypical and physiological implications revealed from our experiments highlight the important roles of CGLD1 in maintaining structure and function of PSII as well as in protection of Chlamydomonas under photo-oxidative stress conditions.

  13. Attaching naphthalene derivatives onto BODIPY for generating excited triplet state and singlet oxygen: Tuning PET-based photosensitizer by electron donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Fu; Feng, Nan

    2018-01-01

    meso-Naphthalene substituted BODIPY compounds were prepared in a facile one pot reaction. The naphthalene functionalization of BODIPY leads up to a 5-fold increase in the formation efficiency of excited triplet state and singlet oxygen in polar solvents. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence, laser flash photolysis, and quantum chemistry methods were used to reveal the mechanism. All measured data and quantum chemical results suggest that these systems can be viewed as electron donor-acceptor (D-A) pair (BODIPY acts as the acceptor), photoinduced charge transfer (PCT) or photoinduced electron transfer (PET) occurs upon photo excitation (D-A + hν → Dδ +-Aδ -, 0 PET-based photosensitizers (PSs) show different features from traditional PSs, such as the strong tunability by facile structural modification and good selectivity upon medium polarity. The new character for this type of PSs can lead to important applications in organic oxygenation reactions and photodynamic therapy of tumors.

  14. Copolymer semiconductors comprising thiazolothiazole or benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazole electron acceptor subunits, and electron donor subunits, and their uses in transistors and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenekhe, Samson A; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Ahmed, Eilaf; Xin, Hao; Kim, Felix Sunjoo

    2014-10-28

    The inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to copolymers comprising copolymers comprising electron accepting A subunits that comprise thiazolothiazole, benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazoles rings, and electron donating subunits that comprise certain heterocyclic groups. The copolymers are useful for manufacturing organic electronic devices, including transistors and solar cells. The invention also relates to certain synthetic precursors of the copolymers. Methods for making the copolymers and the derivative electronic devices are also described.

  15. Merging Structural Information from X-ray Crystallography, Quantum Chemistry, and EXAFS Spectra: The Oxygen-Evolving Complex in PSII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Rossini, Emanuele; Galstyan, Artur; Dau, Holger; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2016-10-12

    of the OEC for the most recent high-resolution crystal structure of PSII are determined. We find that the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) structure is indeed not significantly affected by exposure to XFEL pulses and thus results in a radiation-damage-free model of the OEC.

  16. Long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated organic donor-acceptor layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Furukawa, Taro; Morimoto, Kei; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells, and the tightly bound electron-hole pair forming an exciton is normally assumed to be localized on an organic semiconducting molecule. We report the observation of long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules across a 10-nanometers-thick spacer layer. We found that the exciton energy can be tuned over 100 megaelectron volts and the fraction of delayed fluorescence can be increased by adjusting the spacer-layer thickness. Furthermore, increasing the spacer-layer thickness produced an organic light-emitting diode with an electroluminescence efficiency nearly eight times higher than that of a device without a spacer layer. Our results demonstrate the first example of a long-range coupled charge-transfer state between electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules in a working device. PMID:26933691

  17. Donor Tag Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donor Community > Games > Donor Tag Game Donor Tag Game This feature requires version 6 or later of ... of Needles LGBTQ+ Donors Blood Donor Community SleevesUp Games Facebook Avatars and Badges Banners eCards Make a ...

  18. Strontium Titanate Based Artificial Leaf Loaded with Reduction and Oxidation Cocatalysts for Selective CO2 Reduction Using Water as an Electron Donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Shusaku; Yamaguchi, Akira; Sakai, Etsuo; Miyauchi, Masahiro

    2017-06-21

    Thin film of SrTiO3 nanorods loaded with reduction and oxidation cocatalysts drove the selective reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) into carbon monoxide (CO), as well as caused the production of equivalent oxygen molecules through water oxidation under UV irradiation. The described film functioned as a free-standing plate without any bias potential application, similar to a natural leaf. The film was facilely fabricated by a simple hydrothermal and annealing treatment of a titanium substrate to produce the SrTiO3 nanorod film (STO film) followed by two steps of loading the reduction and oxidation cocatalysts onto the surface of the STO. As a reduction cocatalyst, a CuxO nanocluster was chosen to achieve selective reduction of CO2 into CO, whereas a cobalt- and phosphate-based cocatalyst (CoPi) facilitated oxidation on the STO surface to promote oxygen generation. For the photocatalysis test, a wireless film was simply set into an aqueous solution bubbled with CO2 in a reactor, and CO production was observed in the headspace of the reactor under UV irradiation. Compared to the bare STO film, the dual cocatalyst-loaded STO film exhibited 2.5 times higher CO generation. H2 production was very limited in our system, and the amount of molecules generated by the reduction reaction was almost twice that of the generated oxygen molecules, proving that water molecules acted as electron donors. Our artificial leaf consists of abundant and nontoxic natural elements and represents the first achievement of stoichiometric CO2 reduction using water as an electron donor by a free-standing natural leaflike plate form.

  19. Biogeochemical Modeling of In Situ U(VI) Reduction and Immobilization with Emulsified Vegetable Oil as the Electron Donor at a Field Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G.; Parker, J.; Wu, W.; Schadt, C. W.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.; Orifrc Team

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive biogeochemical model was developed to quantitatively describe the coupled hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological processes that occurred following injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor to immobilize U(VI) at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site (ORIFRC) in Tennessee. The model couples the degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, hydrogen and acetate, reduction of nitrate, manganese, ferrous iron, sulfate and uranium, and methanoganesis with growth of multiple microbial groups. The model describes the evolution of geochemistry and microbial populations not only in the aqueous phase as typically observed, but also in the mineral phase and therefore enables us to evaluate the applicability of rates from the literature for field scale assessment, estimate the retention and degradation rates of EVO and LCFA, and assess the influence of the coupled processes on fate and transport of U(VI). Our results suggested that syntrophic bacteria or metal reducers might catalyze LCFA oxidation in the downstream locations when sulfate was consumed, and competition between methanogens and others for electron donors and slow growth of methanogen might contribute to the sustained reducing condition. Among the large amount of hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological parameter values, the initial biomass, and the interactions (e.g., inhibition) of the microbial functional groups, and the rate and extent of Mn and Fe oxide reduction appear as the major sources of uncertainty. Our model provides a platform to conduct numerical experiments to study these interactions, and could be useful for further iterative experimental and modeling investigations into the bioreductive immobiliztion of radionuclide and metal contaminants in the subsurface.

  20. Influence of temperature on properties of nitrogen plasma source ion implantation (N-PSII) of Ti6A14V alloy

    CERN Document Server

    Geng Man; Zhao Qing

    2001-01-01

    Specimens of Ti6Al4V alloy were implanted with nitrogen plasma source ion implantation (N-PSII) at temperatures between 100 degree C and 600 degree C to a ion dose of 4 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was used to determine the nitrogen concentration depth profiles. Microhardness measurements and pin-on-disk wear test were performed to evaluate the improvements of the surface modification. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) was employed to determine the phases presented in the surface modified layer. The thickness of implanted layer increased by about an order of magnitude when the temperature was elevated from 100 degree C to 600 degree C. Higher surface hardness and wear resistance was also obtained at higher temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed distinct microstructural changes and the presence of titanium nitrides in the implanted surface

  1. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Brevibacterium casei: azo dye as electron donor for chromate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Cai, Qinhong; Wong, Chong-Kim; Chow, Alex T; Wong, Po-Keung

    2010-10-15

    Chromate [Cr(VI)] and azo dyes are common pollutants which may co-exist in some industrial effluents. Hence studies of biological treatment of industrial wastewater should include investigation of the co-removal of these two pollutants. Brevibacterium casei, which can reduce Cr(VI) in the presence of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) under nutrient-limiting condition, was isolated from a sewage sludge sample of a dyeing factory. Response surface methodology, which is commonly used to optimize growth conditions for food microorganisms to maximize product(s) yield, was used to determine the optimal conditions for chromate reduction and dye decolourization by B. casei. The optimal conditions were 0.24 g/L glucose, 3.0 g/L (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and 0.2 g/L peptone at pH 7 and 35 degrees C. The predicted maximum chromate reduction efficiencies and dye decolourization were 83.4+/-0.6 and 40.7+/-1.7%, respectively. A new mechanism was proposed for chromate reduction coupling with AO7 decolourization by B. casei. Under nutrient-limiting condition, AO7 was used as an e(-) donor by the reduction enzyme(s) of B. casei for the reduction of Cr(VI). The resulted Cr(III) then complexed with the oxidized AO7 to form a purple coloured intermediate. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Brevibacterium casei: Azo dye as electron donor for chromate reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Cai Qinhong [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Wong, Chong-Kim [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Chow, Alex T. [Department of Biosystems Engineering, Clemson University, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Clemson University, SC 29634 (United States); Wong, Po-Keung, E-mail: pkwong@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Biology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Environmental Science Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong)

    2010-10-15

    Chromate [Cr(VI)] and azo dyes are common pollutants which may co-exist in some industrial effluents. Hence studies of biological treatment of industrial wastewater should include investigation of the co-removal of these two pollutants. Brevibacterium casei, which can reduce Cr(VI) in the presence of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) under nutrient-limiting condition, was isolated from a sewage sludge sample of a dyeing factory. Response surface methodology, which is commonly used to optimize growth conditions for food microorganisms to maximize product(s) yield, was used to determine the optimal conditions for chromate reduction and dye decolourization by B. casei. The optimal conditions were 0.24 g/L glucose, 3.0 g/L (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and 0.2 g/L peptone at pH 7 and 35 deg. C. The predicted maximum chromate reduction efficiencies and dye decolourization were 83.4 {+-} 0.6 and 40.7 {+-} 1.7%, respectively. A new mechanism was proposed for chromate reduction coupling with AO7 decolourization by B. casei. Under nutrient-limiting condition, AO7 was used as an e{sup -} donor by the reduction enzyme(s) of B. casei for the reduction of Cr(VI). The resulted Cr(III) then complexed with the oxidized AO7 to form a purple coloured intermediate.

  3. C–H arylation of unsubstituted furan and thiophene with acceptor bromides: access to donor–acceptor–donor-type building blocks for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsidik, Rukiya; Martin, Johannes; Schmidt, Simon; Obermayer, Johannes; Lombeck, Florian; Nübling, Fritz; Komber, Hartmut; Fazzi, Daniele; Sommer, Michael

    2015-01-16

    Pd-catalyzed direct arylation (DA) reaction conditions have been established for unsubstituted furan (Fu) and thiophene (Th) with three popular acceptor building blocks to be used in materials for organic electronics, namely 4,7-dibromo-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (BTBr2), N,N′-dialkylated 2,6-dibromonaphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide) (NDIBr2), and 1,4-dibromotetrafluorobenzene (F4Br2). Reactions with BTBr2, F4Br2, and NDIBr2 require different solvents to obtain high yields. The use of dimethylacetamide (DMAc) is essential for the successful coupling of BTBr2 and F4Br2, but detrimental for NDIBr2, as the electron-deficient NDI core is prone to nucleophilic core substitution in DMAc as solvent but not in toluene. NDIFu2 is much more planar compared to NDITh2, resulting in an enhanced charge-transfer character, which makes it an interesting building block for conjugated systems designed for organic electronics. This study highlights direct arylation as a simple and inexpensive method to construct a series of important donor–acceptor–donor building blocks to be further used for the preparation of a variety of conjugated materials.

  4. Effects of donor-acceptor groups on the structural and electronic properties of 4-(methoxymethyl)-6-methyl-5-nitro-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, Hacer Pir; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-11-11

    Quantum chemical calculations on the geometric parameters, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts values of 4-(methoxymethyl)-6-methyl-5-nitro-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile [C9H9N3O4] molecule in ground state were performed using the ab initio HF and density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The results of optimized molecular structure were presented and compared with X-ray diffraction results. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts values were compared with experimental values of the investigated molecule. The observed and calculated values were found to be in good agreement. Since the title compound contains different electron-donor and -acceptor groups as well as lone pair electrons, and multiple bonds, the effects of these groups on the structural and electronic properties are found out. In addition, conformational, natural bond orbital (NBO), nonlinear optical (NLO) analysis, frontier molecular orbital energies, molecular surfaces, Mulliken charges and atomic polar tensor based charges were investigated using HF and DFT methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Photoinduced electron donor/acceptor processes in colloidal II-VI semiconductor quantum dots and nitroxide free radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Poulami

    Electron transfer (ET) processes are one of the most researched topics for applications ranging from energy conversion to catalysis. An exciting variation is utilizing colloidal semiconductor nanostructures to explore such processes. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a novel class of light harvesting, emitting and charge-separation materials for applications such as solar energy conversion. Detailed knowledge of the quantitative dissociation of the photogenerated excitons and the interfacial charge- (electron/hole) transfer is essential for optimization of the overall efficiency of many such applications. Organic free radicals are the attractive counterparts for studying ET to/from QDs because these undergo single-electron transfer steps in reversible fashion. Nitroxides are an exciting class of stable organic free radicals, which have recently been demonstrated to be efficient as redox mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells, making them even more interesting for the aforementioned studies. This dissertation investigates the interaction between nitroxide free radicals TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), 4-amino-TEMPO (4-amino- 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and II-VI semiconductor (CdSe and CdTe) QDs. The nature of interaction in these hybrids has been examined through ground-state UV-Vis absorbance, steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, transient absorbance, upconversion photoluminescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The detailed analysis of the PL quenching indicates that the intrinsic charge transfer is ultrafast however, the overall quenching is still limited by the lower binding capacities and slower diffusion related kinetics. Careful analysis of the time resolved PL decay kinetics reveal that the decay rate constants are distributed and that the trap states are involved in the overall quenching process. The ultrafast hole transfer from CdSe QDs to 4-Amino TEMPO observed

  6. Species dependence of the redox potential of the primary electron donor p700 in photosystem I of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms revealed by spectroelectrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Akimasa; Suzawa, Tomoyuki; Kato, Yuki; Watanabe, Tadashi

    2011-05-01

    The redox potential of the primary electron donor P700, E(m)(P700/P700(+)), of Photosystem I (PSI) has been determined for 10 oxygenic photosynthesis organisms, ranging from cyanobacteria, red algae, green algae to higher plants, by spectroelectrochemistry with an optically transparent thin-layer electrode (OTTLE) cell to elucidate the scattering by as much as 150 mV in reported values of E(m)(P700/P700(+)). The E(m)(P700/P700(+)) values determined within error ranges of ± 1-4 mV exhibited a significant species dependence, with a span >70 mV, from +398 to +470 mV vs. the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE). The E(m)(P700/P700(+)) value appears to change systematically in going from cyanobacteria and primitive eukaryotic red algae, then to green algae and higher plants. From an evolutionary point of view, this result suggests that the species believed to appear later in evolution of photosynthetic organisms exhibit higher values of E(m)(P700/P700(+)). Further, the species dependence of E(m)(P700/P700(+)) seems to originate in the species-dependent redox potentials of soluble metalloproteins, Cyt c(6) and plastocyanin, which re-reduce the oxidized P700 in the electron transfer chain.

  7. An electronic spectroscopic study of micellisation of surfactants and solvation of homomicelles formed by cationic or anionic surfactants using a solvatochromic electron donor acceptor dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Niraja; Sarkar, Amrita; Purkayastha, Pradipta; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2014-10-15

    Solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence bands of a donor-acceptor dye have been utilised for following the micellisation and for probing the polarity of the aqueous homomicellar phase provided separately by cationic (cetyltrimethylammonimum bromide, CTAB and dodecyltrimethylammonimum bromide, DTAB) and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) surfactant. Results indicate that for a low concentration of surfactant (below cmc) the dye forms a dimer in aqueous solution. In a micellar media, however, the dye exists as monomers. A strong dye-micelle interaction, as indicated by the shift of the solvatochromic intramolecular charge transfer band of the dye, has also been indicated. The absorption and fluorescence parameters of the dye have been utilised for studying the onset of aggregation of the surfactants. An iterative procedure has been developed for the estimation of cmc and the distribution coefficient (KD) of the dye between the aqueous and the micellar phase. All the parameters provide convergent values of cmc. A high value of KD indicates that the dye exists predominantly in the micellar phase. The solvatochromic parameters characterising the dipolarity-polarisability (π(*)) and H-bond donation ability (α) of modes of solvation interaction in different micellar media have been estimated. The dye is found to distribute itself between two regions in a catanionic vesicle formed by surfactants SDS and DTAB, one being relatively polar than other. The distribution coefficients have been found out using the fluorescence data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electron and excitation energy transfers in covalently linked donor-acceptor dyads: mechanisms and dynamics revealed using quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Giannini, Samuele; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2017-12-20

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET), hole transfer (HT), charge recombination (CR) and energy transfer (EET) are fundamental mechanisms, which occur in both natural and artificial light harvesting systems. Here, we present a computational strategy which determines ET, HT, CR and EET rates in a consistent way and merges them in a kinetic model to reproduce the net excited state dynamics. The effects of the solvent are included in all steps of the calculations making the present strategy a useful tool for a rational design of charge and energy transfer processes in complex systems. An application to covalently linked zinc and free-base porphyrin-naphthalenediimide dyads is presented. For each of the two systems, ultrafast optical spectroscopy experiments have shown a specific photophysics with different processes taking place simultaneously. The model reveals that such a diversity is mainly due to the different relative stability of the charge-separated state, while the electronic couplings for charge and energy transfer processes are quite similar in the two dyads.

  9. Solar UV-B effects on PSII performance in Betula nana are influenced by PAR level and reduced by EDU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    2012-01-01

    The long-term and diurnal responses of photosystem II (PSII) performance to near-ambient UV-B radiation were investigated in High Arctic Betula nana. We conducted an UV exclusion experiment with five replicated blocks consisting of open control (no filter), photosynthetic active radiation and UV...... the effects of UV-B. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction curves were used for analysis of OJIP test parameters. Near-ambient UV-B radiation reduced across season maximum quantum yield (TRo /ABS = Fv /Fm ), approximated number of active PSII reaction center (RC/ABS) and the performance index (PIABS ), despite...... in reduced UV-B compared to near-ambient UV-B. This demonstrates current solar UV-B to reduce the PSII performance both on a daily as well as a seasonal basis in this High Arctic species....

  10. Antagonism between elevated CO2, nighttime warming, and summer drought reduces the robustness of PSII performance to freezing events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Boesgaard, Kristine Stove; Ro-Poulsen, Helge

    2013-01-01

    out in the CLIMAITE multifactor experiment, which includes the combined impact of elevated CO2 (free air carbon enrichment; CO2), warming (passive nighttime warming; T) and summer drought (rain-excluding curtains; D) in a temperate heath ecosystem. PSII performance was probed by the effective quantum...... in the wavy hair-grass, Deschampsia flexuosa, and in the evergreen dwarf shrub common heather, Calluna vulgaris, and following freezing events the PItotal and Fv′/Fm′ were reduced even more. Contrary to expected, indirect effects of the previous summer drought reduced PSII performance before freezing events......, particularly in Calluna. In combinations with elevated CO2 interactive effects with drought, D×CO2 and warming, T×D×CO2, were negatively skewed and caused the reduction of PSII performance in both species after occurrence of freezing events. Neither passive nighttime warming nor elevated CO2 as single factors...

  11. Dynamics of the cascade capture of electrons by charged donors in GaAs and InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Gavrilenko, L. V.

    2016-08-01

    The times for the cascade capture of an electron by a charged impurity have been calculated for pulsed and stationary excitations of impurity photoconductivity in GaAs and InP. The characteristic capture times under pulsed and continuous excitations are shown to differ noticeably both from each other and from the value given by the Abakumov-Perel-Yassievich formula for a charged impurity concentration greater than 1010 cm-3. The cause of this difference has been established. The Abakumov-Perel-Yassievich formula for the cascade capture cross section in the case of stationary excitation has been generalized. The dependences of the cascade capture rate on the charged impurity concentration in GaAs and InP have been found for three temperatures in the case of pulsed excitation.

  12. Tracing the role of endogenous carbon in denitrification using wine industry by-product as an external electron donor: Coupling isotopic tools with mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrey, R; Rodríguez-Escales, P; Soler, A; Otero, N

    2018-02-01

    Nitrate removal through enhanced biological denitrification (EBD), consisting of the inoculation of an external electron donor, is a feasible solution for the recovery of groundwater quality. In this context, liquid waste from wine industries (wine industry by-products, WIB) may be feasible for use as a reactant to enhance heterotrophic denitrification. To address the feasibility of WIB as electron donor to promote denitrification, as well as to evaluate the role of biomass as a secondary organic C source, a flow-through experiment was carried out. Chemical and isotopic characterization was performed and coupled with mathematical modeling. Complete nitrate attenuation with no nitrite accumulation was successfully achieved after 10 days. Four different C/N molar ratios (7.0, 2.0, 1.0 and 0) were tested. Progressive decrease of the C/N ratio reduced the remaining C in the outflow and favored biomass migration, producing significant changes in dispersivity in the reactor, which favored efficient nitrate degradation. The applied mathematical model described the general trends for nitrate, ethanol, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations. This model shows how the biomass present in the system is degraded to dissolved organic C (DOC en ) and becomes the main source of DOC for a C/N ratio between 1.0 and 0. The isotopic model developed for organic and inorganic carbon also describes the general trends of δ 13 C of ethanol, DOC and DIC in the outflow water. The study of the evolution of the isotopic fractionation of organic C using a Rayleigh distillation model shows the shift in the organic carbon source from the WIB to the biomass and is in agreement with the isotopic fractionation values used to calibrate the model. Isotopic fractionations (ε) of C-ethanol and C-DOC en were -1‰ and -5‰ (model) and -3.3‰ and -4.8‰ (Rayleigh), respectively. In addition, an inverse isotopic fractionation of +10‰ was observed for

  13. Ambient UV-B radiation reduces PSII performance and net photosynthesis in high Arctic Salix arctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2011-01-01

    Ambient ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation potentially impacts the photosynthetic performance of high Arctic plants. We conducted an UV-B exclusion experiment in a dwarf shrub heath in NE Greenland (74°N), with open control, filter control, UV-B filtering and UV-AB filtering, all in combination...... was characterized by simultaneous gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements and the PSII performance through the growing season was investigated with fluorescence measurements. Leaf harvest towards the end of the growing season was done to determine the specific leaf area and the content of carbon......, nitrogen and UV-B absorbing compounds. Compared to a 60% reduced UV-B irradiance, the ambient solar UV-B reduced net photosynthesis in Salix arctica leaves fixed in the 45° position which exposed leaves to maximum natural irradiance. Also a reduced Calvin Cycle capacity was found, i.e. the maximum rate...

  14. Effect of leaf dehydration duration and dehydration degree on PSII photochemical activity of papaya leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meijun; Zhang, Zishan; Gao, Huiyuan; Yang, Cheng; Fan, Xingli; Cheng, Dandan

    2014-09-01

    Although the effect of dehydration on photosynthetic apparatus has been widely studied, the respective effect of dehydration duration and dehydration degree was neglected. This study showed that, when leaves dehydrated in air, the PSII activities of leaves decreased with the decline of leaf relative water content (RWC). Unexpectedly, when leaves dehydrated to same RWC, the decreases in Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm were lower in leaves dehydrating at 43 °C than those at 25 °C. However, to reach the same RWC, leaves dehydrating at 43 °C experienced 1/6 of the dehydration duration for leaves dehydrating at 25 °C. To distinguish the respective effect of dehydration degree and dehydration duration on photosynthetic apparatus, we studied the PSII activities of leaves treated with different concentration of PEG solutions. Increasing dehydration degree aggravated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with the same dehydration duration, while prolonging the dehydration duration also exacerbated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with identical dehydration degree. With the same dehydration degree and duration, high temperature enhanced the decrease of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in the leaves. When leaves dehydrated in air, the effect of high temperature was underestimated due to reduction of dehydration duration. The results demonstrated that, dehydration degree and duration both play important roles in damage to photosynthetic apparatus. We suggest that, under combined stresses, the effects of dehydration degree and duration on plants should be considered comprehensively, otherwise, partial or incorrect results may be obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Membrane-bound cytochrome c is an alternative electron donor for cytochrome aa3 in Nitrobacter winogradskyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, T; Fukumori, Y; Yamanaka, T

    1993-07-01

    We purified membrane-bound cytochrome c-550 [cytochrome c-550(m)] to an electrophoretically homogeneous state from Nitrobacter winogradskyi. The cytochrome showed peaks at 409 and 525 nm in the oxidized form and peaks at 416, 521, and 550 nm in the reduced form. The molecular weight of the cytochrome was estimated to be 18,400 on the basis of protein and heme c contents and 18,600 by gel filtration. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of cytochrome c-550(m) was determined to be A-P-T-S-A-A-D-A-E-S-F-N-K-A-L-A-S-A-?-A-E-?-G-A-?-L-V-K-P. We previously purified soluble cytochrome c-550 cytochrome c-550(s)] from N. winogradskyi and determined its complete amino acid sequence (Y. Tanaka, Y. Fukumori, and T. Y. Yamanaka, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 707:14-20, 1982). Although the sequence of cytochrome c-550(m) was completely different from that of cytochrome c-550(s), ferrocytochrome c-550(m) was rapidly oxidized by the cytochrome c oxidase of the bacterium. Furthermore, the liposomes into which nitrite cytochrome c oxidoreductase, cytochrome c oxidase, and nitrite were incorporated showed nitrite oxidase activity in the presence of cytochrome c-550(m). These results suggest that cytochrome c-550(m) may be an alternative electron mediator between nitrite cytochrome c oxidoreductase and cytochrome c oxidase.

  16. Photodynamic therapy with decacationic [60]fullerene monoadducts: effect of a light absorbing electron-donor antenna and micellar formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Rui; Wang, Min; Huang, Ying-Ying; Huang, Huang-Chiao; Avci, Pinar; Chiang, Long Y; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis and anticancer photodynamic properties of two new decacationic fullerene (LC14) and red light-harvesting antenna-fullerene conjugated monoadduct (LC15) derivatives. The antenna of LC15 was attached covalently to C60> with distance of only <3.0 Ǻ to facilitate ultrafast intramolecular photoinduced-electron-transfer (for type-I photochemistry) and photon absorption at longer wavelengths. Because LC15 was hydrophobic we compared formulation in CremophorEL micelles with direct dilution from dimethylacetamide. LC14 produced more 1O2 than LC15, while LC15 produced much more HO· than LC14 as measured by specific fluorescent probes. When delivered by DMA, LC14 killed more HeLa cells than LC15 when excited by UVA light, while LC15 killed more cells when excited by white light consistent with the antenna effect. However LC15 was more effective than LC14 when delivered by micelles regardless of the excitation light. Micellar delivery produced earlier apoptosis and damage to the endoplasmic reticulum as well as to lysosomes and mitochondria. PMID:24333585

  17. Controlling electron transfer through the manipulation of structure and ligand-based torsional motions: a computational exploration of ruthenium donor-acceptor systems using density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylemans, Heather A; Damrauer, Niels H

    2009-12-07

    Computational studies using density functional theory (DFT) are reported for a series of donor-acceptor (DA) transition metal complexes and related excited-state and electron transfer (ET) photoproduct models. Three hybrid Hartree-Fock/DFT (HF/DFT) functionals, B3LYP, B3PW91, and PBE1PBE, are employed to characterize structural features implicated in the dynamical control of productive forward and energy wasting back ET events. Energies and optimized geometries are reported for the lowest energy singlet state in [Ru(dmb)(2)(bpy-phi-MV)](4+) (DA1), [Ru(dmb)(2)(bpy-o-tolyl-MV)](4+) (DA2), [Ru(dmb)(2)(bpy-2,6-Me(2)-phi-MV)](4+) (DA3), and [Ru(tmb)(2)(bpy-2,6-Me(2)-phi-MV)](4+) (DA3'), where dmb is 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, tmb is 4,4',5,5'-tetramethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, MV is methyl viologen, and phi is a phenylene spacer. These indicate that the dihedral angle theta(1) between the aryl substituent and the bipyridine fragment to which it is bound, systematically increases with the addition of steric bulk. Energies, optimized geometries, and unpaired electron spin densities are also reported for the lowest energy triplet state of [Ru(dmb)(2)(4-p-tolyl-2,2'-bipyridine)](2+) (D1*), [Ru(dmb)(2)(4-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)-2,2'-bipyridine)](2+) (D2*), [Ru(dmb)(2)(4-mesityl-2,2'-bipyridine)](2+) (D3*), and [Ru(tmb)(2)(4-mesityl-2,2'-bipyridine)](2+) (D3'*). Each of these serves as a model of a reactant excited state in the forward electron-transfer photochemistry allowing us to qualify and quantify the role of excited-state intraligand electron delocalization in driving substantial geometry changes (especially with respect to theta(1)) relative to its respective DA counterpart. Next, energies, optimized geometries, and spin densities are reported for the lowest energy triplet of each DA species: (3)DA1, (3)DA2, (3)DA3, and (3)DA3'. These are used to model the ET photoproduct and they indicate that theta(1) increases following ET, thus, verifying switch-like properties

  18. Impacts of nitrate and electron donor on perchlorate reduction and microbial community composition in a biologically activated carbon reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanping; Wu, Min; Gao, Naiyun; Chu, Wenhai; Wang, Shuaifeng

    2016-12-01

    The sensitivity of perchlorate reduction and microbial composition to varied nitrate and acetate loadings was studied in a biologically activated carbon reactor with perchlorate loading and empty bed contact time fixed at 5 mg/L and 226 min, respectively. In stage 1, the sole electron acceptor ClO4- realized complete removal with ≥21.95 mg C/L of acetate supply. As nitrate loading gradually increased to 5 mg/L (stage 2), perchlorate reduction was slightly promoted and both ClO4- and NO3- were completely removed at an acetate loading of 29.7 mg C/L. When nitrate loading continued increasing to 10-60 mg/L (stage 3), perchlorate reduction converted to be inhibited, along with nondetectable NO3- and approximately exhausted DOC in effluent. When acetate loading increased to 43.9 mg C/L in stage 4, both ClO4- and NO3- were again removed, though lags still existed in perchlorate reduction. β-Proteobacteria accounted for about 60%, 55%, 58%, 61% and 12% in samples from the base and top of the filter in stage 1 and those from the base, middle and top in stage 4, respectively. These findings implied that ratio of NO3- to ClO4- loadings and acetate loading were two key factors impacting ClO4- reduction and microbial structure along the filter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@mail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  20. Analyses of Levofloxacin Adsorption on Pretreated Barley Straw with Respect to Temperature: Kinetics, π-π Electron-Donor-Acceptor Interaction and Site Energy Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bei; Niu, Catherine Hui; Wang, Jian

    2017-07-18

    Levofloxacin, representative of an important class of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, has been considered to be one of the emerging pollutants in various water sources. In this paper, adsorption of levofloxacin from artificial contaminated water was done by pretreated barley straw adsorbent obtained from raw barley straw after modification by H3PO4 impregnation and microwave heating. The adsorption kinetics was investigated at various temperatures and levofloxacin concentrations, and the activation energy was determined. In addition, site energy distribution of the pretreated barley straw for levofloxacin adsorption was estimated based on the equilibrium adsorption data. The average site energy and standard deviation of the distribution were determined and applied to analyze the interaction strength between the adsorbent and adsorbate, and adsorption site heterogeneity. The π-π electron-donor-acceptor interactions between the π* aromatic C═C of pretreated barley straw adsorbent and π* carbon atom in benzene ring attached to fluorine of levofloxacin was investigated by C K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. The results and methodologies in this work could be transferrable to investigate extended systems of water treatment.

  1. The solution structure of the soluble form of the lipid-modified azurin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the electron donor of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Cláudia S; Saraiva, Ivo H; Carreira, Cíntia; Devreese, Bart; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2016-02-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae colonizes the genitourinary track, and in these environments, especially in the female host, the bacteria are subjected to low levels of oxygen, and reactive oxygen and nitrosyl species. Here, the biochemical characterization of N. gonorrhoeae Laz is presented, as well as, the solution structure of its soluble domain determined by NMR. N. gonorrhoeae Laz is a type 1 copper protein of the azurin-family based on its spectroscopic properties and structure, with a redox potential of 277±5 mV, at pH7.0, that behaves as a monomer in solution. The globular Laz soluble domain adopts the Greek-key motif, with the copper center located at one end of the β-barrel coordinated by Gly48, His49, Cys113, His118 and Met122, in a distorted trigonal geometry. The edge of the His118 imidazole ring is water exposed, in a surface that is proposed to be involved in the interaction with its redox partners. The heterologously expressed Laz was shown to be a competent electron donor to N. gonorrhoeae cytochrome c peroxidase. This is an evidence for its involvement in the mechanism of protection against hydrogen peroxide generated by neighboring lactobacilli in the host environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Coupling of metal-based light-harvesting antennas and electron-donor subunits: Trinuclear Ruthenium(II) complexes containing tetrathiafulvalene-substituted polypyridine ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagna, Sebastiano; Serroni, Scolastica; Puntoriero, Fausto

    2002-01-01

    as light-harvesting antennas and the tetrathiafulvalene electron donors can induce charge separation. The absorption spectra, redox behavior, and luminescence properties (both at room temperature in acetonitrile and at 77 K in a rigid matrix of butyronitrile) of the trinuclear metal complexes have been......(mu-2,3-dpp)}(2)Ru(bpy-TTF1)](PF6)(6) (9; bpy=2,2'-bipyridine; 2,3-dpp = 2,3-bis(2'-pyridyl)pyrazine) and [{(bpy)(2)Ru(mu-2,3-dpp)}(2)Ru(bpy-TTF2)](PF6)(6) (10). These compounds can be viewed as coupled antennas and charge-separation systems, in which the multichromophoric trinuclear metal subunits act......+) (4,4'-Mebpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) and [{(bpy)(2)Ru(mu-2,3-dpp)}(2)Ru(bpy)](6+). The absorption spectra and redox behavior of all the new metal compounds can be interpreted by a multicomponent approach, in which specific absorption features and redox processes can be assigned to specific...

  3. The effect of permodified cyclodextrins encapsulation on the photophysical properties of a polyfluorene with randomly distributed electron-donor and rotaxane electron-acceptor units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurica Farcas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis as well as the optical, electrochemical and morphological properties of two polyrotaxanes (4a and 4b, which consist of electron-accepting 9,9-dicyanomethylenefluorene 1 as an inclusion complex in persilylated β- or γ-cyclodextrin (TMS-β-CD, TMS-γ-CD (1a, 1b and methyltriphenylamine as an electron-donating molecule. They are statistically distributed into the conjugated chains of 9,9-dioctylfluorene 3 and compared with those of the corresponding non-rotaxane 4 counterpart. Rotaxane formation results in improvements of the solubility, the thermal stability, and the photophysical properties. Polyrotaxanes 4a and 4b exhibited slightly red-shifted absorption bands with respect to the non-rotaxane 4 counterpart. The fluorescence lifetimes of polyrotaxanes follow a mono-exponential decay with a value of τ = 1.14 ns compared with the non-rotaxane, where a bi-exponential decay composed of a main component with a relative short time of τ1 = 0.88 (57.08% and a minor component with a longer lifetime of τ2 = 1.56 ns (42.92% were determined. The optical and electrochemical band gaps (ΔEg as well as the ionization potential and electronic affinity characterized by smaller values compared to the values of any of the constituents. AFM reveals that the film surface of 4a and 4b displays a granular morphology with a lower dispersity supported by a smaller roughness exponent compared with the non-rotaxane counterpart.

  4. Carotenoids as electron or excited-state energy donors in artificial photosynthesis: an ultrafast investigation of a carotenoporphyrin and a carotenofullerene dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Smitha; Ravensbergen, Janneke; Antoniuk-Pablant, Antaeres; Sherman, Benjamin D; van Grondelle, Rienk; Frese, Raoul N; Moore, Thomas A; Gust, Devens; Moore, Ana L; Kennis, John T M

    2013-04-07

    Photophysical investigations of molecular donor-acceptor systems have helped elucidate many details of natural photosynthesis and revealed design principles for artificial photosynthetic systems. To obtain insights into the factors that govern the partition between excited-state energy transfer (EET) and electron transfer (ET) processes among carotenoids and tetrapyrroles and fullerenes, we have designed artificial photosynthetic dyads that are thermodynamically poised to favor ET over EET processes. The dyads were studied using transient absorption spectroscopy with ∼100 femtosecond time resolution. For dyad , a carotenoporphyrin, excitation to the carotenoid S2 state induces ultrafast ET, competing with internal conversion (IC) to the carotenoid S1 state. In addition, the carotenoid S1 state gives rise to ET. In contrast with biological photosynthesis and many artificial photosynthetic systems, no EET at all was detected for this dyad upon carotenoid S2 excitation. Recombination of the charge separated state takes place in hundreds of picoseconds and yields a triplet state, which is interpreted as a triplet delocalized between the porphyrin and carotenoid moieties. In dyad , a carotenofullerene, excitation of the carotenoid in the S2 band results in internal conversion to the S1 state, ET and probably EET to fullerene on ultrafast timescales. From the carotenoid S1 state EET to fullerene occurs. Subsequently, the excited-state fullerene gives rise to ET from the carotenoid to the fullerene. Again, the charge separated state recombines in hundreds of picoseconds. The results illustrate that for a given rate of EET, the ratio of ET to EET can be controlled by adjusting the driving force for electron transfer.

  5. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopies for Probing Electronic Structure and Charge Transfer: Applications to Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-11-22

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water, making the elucidation of its design principles critical for our fundamental understanding of photosynthesis and for our ability to mimic PSII’s remarkable properties. This report discusses progress towards addressing key open questions about the PSII RC. It describes new spectroscopic methods that were developed to answer these questions, and summarizes the outcomes of applying these methods to study the PSII RC. Using 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D electronic Stark spectroscopy, models for the PSII RC were tested and refined. Work is ongoing to use the collected data to elucidate the charge separation mechanism in the PSII RC. Coherent dynamics were also observed in the PSII RC for the first time. Through extensive characterization and modeling we have assigned these coherences as vibronic in nature, and believe that they reflect resonances between key vibrational pigment modes and electronic energy gaps that may facilitate charge separation. Work is ongoing to definitively test the functional relevance of electronic-vibrational resonances.

  6. Bacterial communities in haloalkaliphilic sulfate-reducing bioreactors under different electron donors revealed by 16S rRNA MiSeq sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiemin [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Xuemei; Li, Yuguang [101 Institute, Ministry of Civil Affairs, Beijing 100070 (China); Xing, Jianmin, E-mail: jmxing@ipe.ac.cn [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Bacterial communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors were investigated. • MiSeq was first used in analysis of communities of haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. • Electron donors had significant effect on bacterial communities. - Abstract: Biological technology used to treat flue gas is useful to replace conventional treatment, but there is sulfide inhibition. However, no sulfide toxicity effect was observed in haloalkaliphilic bioreactors. The performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was better than that of lactate-, glucose-, and formate-fed bioreactor, respectively. To support this result strongly, Illumina MiSeq paired-end sequencing of 16S rRNA gene was applied to investigate the bacterial communities. A total of 389,971 effective sequences were obtained and all of them were assigned to 10,220 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at a 97% similarity. Bacterial communities in the glucose-fed bioreactor showed the greatest richness and evenness. The highest relative abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was found in the ethanol-fed bioreactor, which can explain why the performance of the ethanol-fed bioreactor was the best. Different types of SRB, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, and sulfur-reducing bacteria were detected, indicating that sulfur may be cycled among these microorganisms. Because high-throughput 16S rRNA gene paired-end sequencing has improved resolution of bacterial community analysis, many rare microorganisms were detected, such as Halanaerobium, Halothiobacillus, Desulfonatronum, Syntrophobacter, and Fusibacter. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of these bacteria would provide more functional and phylogenetic information about the bacterial communities.

  7. Electron transfer interaction of dihydroxyquinones with amine quenchers: dependence of the quenching kinetics on the aliphatic and aromatic nature of the amine donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhakar, M; Nath, S; Rath, M C; Mukherjee, T; Pal, H

    2004-01-01

    Studies on the electron transfer (ET) interaction of 1,4-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone and 6,11-dihydroxy-5,12-naphthacenequinone with aliphatic and aromatic amine (AlA and ArA, respectively) donors have been investigated in acetonitrile solutions. Steady-state (SS) measurements show quenching of the quinone fluorescence by amines, without indicating any change in the shape of the fluorescence spectra. No significant change in the absorption spectra of the quinones is also observed in the presence of the amines. For all the quinone-amine pairs, the bimolecular quenching constants (kq) estimated from SS and time-resolved measurements are found to be similar. Variation in the kq values with the oxidation potentials of the amines indicates the involvement of the ET mechanism for the quenching process. A reasonably good correlation between the kq values and the free energy changes (deltaG0) for the ET reactions following Marcus' outer-sphere ET theory also supports this mechanism. It is seen that for both the quinone-ArA and quinone-AlA systems, the kq values initially increase and then get saturated at some diffusion-controlled limiting values (kqDC) as deltaG0 values gradually become more negative. Interestingly, however, it is seen that the kqDC value for the quinone-AlA systems is substantially lower than that for quinone-ArA systems. Such a large difference in the kqDC values between quinone-AlA and quinone-ArA systems is quite unusual. Present results have been rationalized based on the assumption that an orientational restriction is imposed for the encounter complexes in quinone-AlA systems to undergo ET reactions, which arises because of the localized (at amino nitrogen) shapes of the highest-occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO) of AlA in comparison to the pi-like HOMO of the ArA.

  8. Carotenoids as electron or excited-state energy donors in artificial photosynthesis: an ultrafast investigation of a carotenoporphyrin and a carotenofullerene dyad

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillai, S.; Ravensbergen, J.; Antoniuk-Pablant, A.; Sherman, B.D.; van Grondelle, R.; Frese, R.N.; Moore, T.A.; Gust, D.; Moore, A.L.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Photophysical investigations of molecular donor-acceptor systems have helped elucidate many details of natural photosynthesis and revealed design principles for artificial photosynthetic systems. To obtain insights into the factors that govern the partition between excited-state energy transfer

  9. Influence of the Terminal Electron Donor in D-D-π-A Organic Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole versus Bis(amine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Panpan; Yang, Lin; Liang, Mao; Dong, Huanhuan; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Chunyao; Sun, Zhe; Xue, Song

    2015-10-14

    With respect to the electron-withdrawing acceptors of D-A-π-A organic dyes, reports on the second electron-donating donors for D-D-π-A organic dyes are very limited. Both of the dyes have attracted significant attention in the field of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). In this work, four new D-D-π-A organic dyes with dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole (DTP) or bis(amine) donor have been designed and synthesized for a investigation of the influence of the terminal electron donor in D-D-π-A organic dye-sensitized solar cells. It is found that DTP is a promising building block as the terminal electron donor when introduced in the dithiophenepyrrole direction, but not just a good bridge, which exhibits several characteristics: (i) efficiently increasing the maximum molar absorption coefficient and extending the absorption bands; (ii) showing stronger charge transfer interaction as compared with the pyrrole direction; (iii) beneficial to photocurrent generation of DSCs employing cobalt electrolytes. DSCs based on M45 with the Co-phen electrolyte exhibit good light-to-electric energy conversion efficiencies as high as 9.02%, with a short circuit current density (JSC) of 15.3 mA cm(-2), open circuit voltage (VOC) of 867 mV and fill factor (FF) of 0.68 under AM 1.5 illumination (100 mW cm(-2)). The results demonstrate that N,S-heterocycles such as DTP unit could be promising candidates for application in highly efficient DSCs employing cobalt electrolyte.

  10. Rational Design of High-Performance Wide-Bandgap (≈2 eV) Polymer Semiconductors as Electron Donors in Organic Photovoltaics Exhibiting High Open Circuit Voltages (≈1 V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chochos, Christos L; Katsouras, Athanasios; Gasparini, Nicola; Koulogiannis, Chrysanthos; Ameri, Tayebeh; Brabec, Christoph J; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos

    2017-01-01

    Systematic optimization of the chemical structure of wide-bandgap (≈2.0 eV) "donor-acceptor" copolymers consisting of indacenodithiophene or indacenodithieno[3,2-b]thiophene as the electron-rich unit and thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione as the electron-deficient moiety in terms of alkyl side chain engineering and distance of the electron-rich and electron-deficient monomers within the repeat unit of the polymer chain results in high-performance electron donor materials for organic photovoltaics. Specifically, preliminary results demonstrate extremely high open circuit voltages (V oc s) of ≈1.0 V, reasonable short circuit current density (J sc ) of around 11 mA cm-2 , and moderate fill factors resulting in efficiencies close to 6%. All the devices are fabricated in an inverted architecture with the photoactive layer processed by doctor blade equipment, showing the compatibility with roll-to-roll large-scale manufacturing processes. From the correlation of the chemical structure-optoelectronic properties-photovoltaic performance, a rational guide toward further optimization of the chemical structure in this family of copolymers, has been achieved. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Temperature-sensitive PSII: a novel approach for sustained photosynthetic hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayro-Kaiser, Vinzenz; Nelson, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    The need for energy and the associated burden are ever growing. It is crucial to develop new technologies for generating clean and efficient energy for society to avoid upcoming energetic and environmental crises. Sunlight is the most abundant source of energy on the planet. Consequently, it has captured our interest. Certain microalgae possess the ability to capture solar energy and transfer it to the energy carrier, H2. H2 is a valuable fuel, because its combustion produces only one by-product: water. However, the establishment of an efficient biophotolytic H2 production system is hindered by three main obstacles: (1) the hydrogen-evolving enzyme, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, is highly sensitive to oxygen; (2) energy conversion efficiencies are not economically viable; and (3) hydrogen-producing organisms are sensitive to stressful conditions in large-scale production systems. This study aimed to circumvent the oxygen sensitivity of this process with a cyclic hydrogen production system. This approach required a mutant that responded to high temperatures by reducing oxygen evolution. To that end, we randomly mutagenized the green microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to generate mutants that exhibited temperature-sensitive photoautotrophic growth. The selected mutants were further characterized by their ability to evolve oxygen and hydrogen at 25 and 37 °C. We identified four candidate mutants for this project. We characterized these mutants with PSII fluorescence, P700 absorbance, and immunoblotting analyses. Finally, we demonstrated that these mutants could function in a prototype hydrogen-producing bioreactor. These mutant microalgae represent a novel approach for sustained hydrogen production.

  12. Modeling Groundwater-Quality Data from In-Situ Mesocosms Using PHREEQC to Provide Insights into the Electron Donors Involved in Denitrification in the Karlsruhe Aquifer, ND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korom, S. F.; Tesfay, T.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater nitrate concentrations in the Karlsruhe aquifer in north-central North Dakota increased in the mid-1990s. In response, state regulators developed a remediation plan that included research into the natural denitrifying capabilities of the aquifer, including the analysis of aquifer sediment samples and the installation of a pair of in-situ mesocosms (ISMs) below the water table to study denitrification reactions. Sediment analysis showed concentrations of the potential electron donors ferrous iron, inorganic sulfide, and organic carbon (OC). X-ray diffraction showed the dominant minerals are quartz, plagioclase feldspar, alkali feldspar, calcite, and dolomite, with lesser amounts of ferrous-iron silicates (chlorite, hornblende, biotite) and pyrite. In the ISMs tracer tests were initiated by pumping groundwater from them, amending it with sodium nitrate and sodium bromide (Br was used as a tracer for nitrate), and pumping the amended water back into the ISMs. The large size of the ISMs (> 180 L of aquifer sediments) allowed large samples (> 1 L) to be taken from the ISMs about every two months for over two years. Samples were analyzed for major ions and saturation indices [SI = log (ion activity product/equilibrium constant)] computed. Any loss of nitrate beyond that attributable to dilution, based on the Br tracer, was considered denitrified. Major sulfate minerals were undersaturated in the ISMs; therefore, any increase in sulfate was attributed to the oxidation of pyrite. PHREEQC was used to determine if the remaining nitate lost to denitrification could be explained best by a reaction with ferrous-iron silicate (as grunerite), organic carbon (as CH2O), or a 50/50 stoichiometric mix of both. After each simulation, the modeled groundwater was “equilibrated” with quartz, albite, anorthite, calcite, dolomite, chlorite, and magnesite, such that the modeled groundwater and the actual groundwater had the same SI values for these minerals. Simulated

  13. Cold-acclimation limits low temperature induced photoinhibition by promoting a higher photochemical quantum yield and a more effective PSII restoration in darkness in the Antarctic rather than the Andean ecotype of Colobanthus quitensis Kunt Bartl (Cariophyllaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bascuñán-Godoy Luisa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecotypes of Colobanthus quitensis Kunt Bartl (Cariophyllaceae from Andes Mountains and Maritime Antarctic grow under contrasting photoinhibitory conditions, reaching differential cold tolerance upon cold acclimation. Photoinhibition depends on the extent of photodamage and recovery capability. We propose that cold acclimation increases resistance to low-temperature-induced photoinhibition, limiting photodamage and promoting recovery under cold. Therefore, the Antarctic ecotype (cold hardiest should be less photoinhibited and have better recovery from low-temperature-induced photoinhibition than the Andean ecotype. Both ecotypes were exposed to cold induced photoinhibitory treatment (PhT. Photoinhibition and recovery of photosystem II (PSII was followed by fluorescence, CO2 exchange, and immunoblotting analyses. Results The same reduction (25% in maximum PSII efficiency (Fv/Fm was observed in both cold-acclimated (CA and non-acclimated (NA plants under PhT. A full recovery was observed in CA plants of both ecotypes under dark conditions, but CA Antarctic plants recover faster than the Andean ecotype. Under PhT, CA plants maintain their quantum yield of PSII, while NA plants reduced it strongly (50% and 73% for Andean and Antarctic plants respectively. Cold acclimation induced the maintenance of PsaA and Cyt b6/f and reduced a 41% the excitation pressure in Antarctic plants, exhibiting the lowest level under PhT. xCold acclimation decreased significantly NPQs in both ecotypes, and reduced chlorophylls and D1 degradation in Andean plants under PhT. NA and CA plants were able to fully restore their normal photosynthesis, while CA Antarctic plants reached 50% higher photosynthetic rates after recovery, which was associated to electron fluxes maintenance under photoinhibitory conditions. Conclusions Cold acclimation has a greater importance on the recovery process than on limiting photodamage. Cold acclimation determined the

  14. Synthesis of a modified PC{sub 70}BM and its application as an electron acceptor with poly(3-hexylthiophene) as an electron donor for efficient bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Surya Prakash; Kumar, C. Pavan [Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Tarnaka, Hyderabad (India); Sharma, G.D. [R and D Centre for Engineering and Science, Jaipur Engineering College, Kukas, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India); Kurchania, Rajnish [Department of Physics, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology (MANIT), Bhopal (India); Roy, M.S. [Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (Rajasthan) (India)

    2012-10-10

    A simple and effective modification of phenyl-C{sub 70}-butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 70}BM) is carried out in a single step after which the material is used as electron acceptor for bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells (PSCs). The modified PC{sub 70}BM, namely CN-PC{sub 70}BM, showed broader and stronger absorption in the visible region (350-550 nm) of the solar spectrum than PC{sub 70}BM because of the presence of a cyanovinylene 4-nitrophenyl segment. The lowest unoccupied molecular energy level (LUMO) of CN-PC{sub 70}BM is higher than that of PC{sub 70}BM by 0.15 eV. The PSC based on the blend (cast from tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution) consists of P3HT as the electron donor and CN-PC{sub 70}BM as the electron acceptor and shows a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.88%, which is higher than that of devices based on PC{sub 70}BM as the electron acceptor (3.23%). The higher PCE of the solar cell based on P3HT:CN-PC{sub 70}BM is related to the increase in both the short circuit current (J{sub sc}) and the open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}). The increase in J{sub sc} is related to the stronger light absorption of CN-PC{sub 70}BM in the visible region of the solar spectrum as compared to that of PC{sub 70}BM. In other words, more excitons are generated in the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) active layer. On the other hand, the higher difference between the LUMO of CN-PC{sub 70}BM and the HOMO of P3HT causes an enhancement in the V{sub oc}. The addition of 2% (v/v) 1-chloronapthalene (CN) to the THF solvent during film deposition results in an overall improvement of the PCE up to 5.83%. This improvement in PCE can be attributed to the enhanced crystallinity of the blend (particularly of P3HT) and more balanced charge transport in the device. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Effects of acute O3 stress on PSII and PSI photochemistry of sensitive and resistant snap bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), probed by prompt chlorophyll "a" fluorescence and 820 nm modulated reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Elisabetta; Fusaro, Lina; Strasser, Reto J; Bussotti, Filippo; Manes, Fausto

    2015-12-01

    The response of PSII and PSI photochemistry to acute ozone (O3) stress was tested in a "model plant system", namely the O3 sensitive (S156) and O3 resistant (R123) genotype pairs of Phaseolus vulgaris L., during a phenological phase of higher O3 sensitivity (pod formation). The modulation of the photosynthetic activity during O3 stress was analysed by measuring gas exchanges, Prompt Fluorescence (PF, JIP-test) and 820 nm Modulated Reflectance (MR), a novel techniques which specifically detects the changes in the redox state of P700 and plastocyanin. The results showed that, coherently with genotypic-specific O3 sensitivity, the response of the two snap bean genotypes differed for the intensity and time of onset of the considered physiological changes. In fact, despite leaf injury and gas exchanges reduction appeared concurrently in both genotypes, S156 showed a PSII down regulation already after the first day of fumigation (DOF), and an enhancement of Cyclic Electron Flow of PSI after the second DOF, whereas R123 showed only slight adjustments until the third DOF, when the activity of both photosystems was down-regulated. Despite these differences, it is possible to distinguish in both genotypes an early O3 response of the photochemical apparatus, involving PSII only, and a following response, in which PSI activity and content are also modulated. The measurement of the MR signal, performed simultaneously with the PF measurements and the JIP-test analysis, has allowed a better understanding of the role that PSI plays in the O3 stress response of the S156/R123 model plant system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Computer modeling of electron and proton transport in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Alexander N; Vershubskii, Alexey V

    2014-07-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the most important biological processes in biosphere, which provides production of organic substances from atmospheric CO2 and water at expense of solar energy. In this review, we contemplate computer models of oxygenic photosynthesis in the context of feedback regulation of photosynthetic electron transport in chloroplasts, the energy-transducing organelles of the plant cell. We start with a brief overview of electron and proton transport processes in chloroplasts coupled to ATP synthesis and consider basic regulatory mechanisms of oxygenic photosynthesis. General approaches to computer simulation of photosynthetic processes are considered, including the random walk models of plastoquinone diffusion in thylakoid membranes and deterministic approach to modeling electron transport in chloroplasts based on the mass action law. Then we focus on a kinetic model of oxygenic photosynthesis that includes key stages of the linear electron transport, alternative pathways of electron transfer around photosystem I (PSI), transmembrane proton transport and ATP synthesis in chloroplasts. This model includes different regulatory processes: pH-dependent control of the intersystem electron transport, down-regulation of photosystem II (PSII) activity (non-photochemical quenching), the light-induced activation of the Bassham-Benson-Calvin (BBC) cycle. The model correctly describes pH-dependent feedback control of electron transport in chloroplasts and adequately reproduces a variety of experimental data on induction events observed under different experimental conditions in intact chloroplasts (variations of CO2 and O2 concentrations in atmosphere), including a complex kinetics of P700 (primary electron donor in PSI) photooxidation, CO2 consumption in the BBC cycle, and photorespiration. Finally, we describe diffusion-controlled photosynthetic processes in chloroplasts within the framework of the model that takes into account complex architecture of

  17. Photocatalytic CO2 reduction using water as an electron donor by a powdered Z-scheme system consisting of metal sulfide and an RGO-TiO2 composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Tomoaki; Sato, Ko; Fujimura, Takehiro; Kojima, Yuki; Iwase, Akihide; Kudo, Akihiko

    2017-06-02

    CuGaS2, (AgInS2)x-(ZnS)2-2x, Ag2ZnGeS4, Ni- or Pb-doped ZnS, (ZnS)0.9-(CuCl)0.1, and ZnGa0.5In1.5S4 showed activities for CO2 reduction to form CO and/or HCOOH in an aqueous solution containing K2SO3 and Na2S as electron donors under visible light irradiation. Among them, CuGaS2 and Ni-doped ZnS photocatalysts showed relatively high activities for CO and HCOOH formation, respectively. CuGaS2 was applied in a powdered Z-scheme system combining with reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-incorporated TiO2 as an O2-evolving photocatalyst. The powdered Z-scheme system produced CO from CO2 in addition to H2 and O2 due to water splitting. Oxygen evolution with an almost stoichiometric amount indicates that water was consumed as an electron donor in the Z-schematic CO2 reduction. Thus, we successfully demonstrated CO2 reduction of artificial photosynthesis using a simple Z-scheme system in which two kinds of photocatalyst powders (CuGaS2 and an RGO-TiO2 composite) were only dispersed in water under 1 atm of CO2.

  18. Altered gene expression by sedaxane increases PSII efficiency, photosynthesis and growth and improves tolerance to drought in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajigboye, Olubukola O; Lu, Chungui; Murchie, Erik H; Schlatter, Christian; Swart, Gina; Ray, Rumiana V

    2017-04-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDHI) fungicides have been shown to increase PSII efficiency and photosynthesis under drought stress in the absence of disease to enhance the biomass and yield of winter wheat. However, the molecular mechanism of improved photosynthetic efficiency observed in SDHI-treated wheat has not been previously elucidated. Here we used a combination of chlorophyll fluorescence, gas exchange and gene expression analysis, to aid our understanding of the basis of the physiological responses of wheat seedlings under drought conditions to sedaxane, a novel SDHI seed treatment. We show that sedaxane increased the efficiency of PSII photochemistry, reduced non-photochemical quenching and improved the photosynthesis and biomass in wheat correlating with systemic changes in the expression of genes involved in defense, chlorophyll synthesis and cell wall modification. We applied a coexpression network-based approach using differentially expressed genes of leaves, roots and pregerminated seeds from our wheat array datasets to identify the most important hub genes, with top ranked correlation (higher gene association value and z-score) involved in cell wall expansion and strengthening, wax and pigment biosynthesis and defense. The results indicate that sedaxane confers tolerant responses of wheat plants grown under drought conditions by redirecting metabolites from defense/stress responses towards growth and adaptive development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Detection of herbicide effects on pigment composition and PSII photochemistry in Helianthus annuus by Raman spectroscopy and chlorophyll a fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítek, Petr; Novotná, Kateřina; Hodaňová, Petra; Rapantová, Barbora; Klem, Karel

    2017-01-01

    The effects of herbicides from three mode-of-action groups - inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (carfentrazone-ethyl), inhibitors of carotenoid biosynthesis (mesotrione, clomazone, and diflufenican), and inhibitors of acetolactate synthase (amidosulfuron) - were studied in sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus). Raman spectroscopy, chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) imaging, and UV screening of ChlF were combined to evaluate changes in pigment composition, photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry, and non-photochemical quenching in plant leaves 6 d after herbicide application. The Raman signals of phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and chlorophyll were evaluated and differences in their intensity ratios were observed. Strongly augmented relative content of phenolic compounds was observed in the case of amidosulfuron-treated plants, with a simultaneous decrease in the chlorophyll/carotenoid intensity ratio. The results were confirmed by in vivo measurement of flavonols using UV screening of ChlF. Herbicides from the group of carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitors significantly decreased both the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII and non-photochemical quenching as determined by ChlF. Resonance Raman imaging (mapping) data with high resolution (150,000-200,000 spectra) are presented, showing the distribution of carotenoids in H. annuus leaves treated by two of the herbicides acting as inhibitors of carotenoid biosynthesis (clomazone or diflufenican). Clear signs were observed that the treatment induced carotenoid depletion within sunflower leaves. The depletion spatial pattern registered differed depending on the type of herbicide applied.

  20. Lung donor selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, John; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward; van Berkel, Victor

    2014-08-01

    The criteria that define acceptable physiologic and social parameters for lung donation have remained constant since their empiric determination in the 1980s. These criteria include a donor age between 25-40, a arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2 ratio greater than 350, no smoking history, a clear chest X-ray, clean bronchoscopy, and a minimal ischemic time. Due to the paucity of organ donors, and the increasing number of patients requiring lung transplant, finding a donor that meets all of these criteria is quite rare. As such, many transplants have been performed where the donor does not meet these stringent criteria. Over the last decade, numerous reports have been published examining the effects of individual acceptance criteria on lung transplant survival and graft function. These studies suggest that there is little impact of the historical criteria on either short or long term outcomes. For age, donors should be within 18 to 64 years old. Gender may relay benefit to all female recipients especially in male to female transplants, although results are mixed in these studies. Race matched donor/recipients have improved outcomes and African American donors convey worse prognosis. Smoking donors may decrease recipient survival post transplant, but provide a life saving opportunity for recipients that may otherwise remain on the transplant waiting list. No specific gram stain or bronchoscopic findings are reflected in recipient outcomes. Chest radiographs are a poor indicator of lung donor function and should not adversely affect organ usage aside for concerns over malignancy. Ischemic time greater than six hours has no documented adverse effects on recipient mortality and should not limit donor retrieval distances. Brain dead donors and deceased donors have equivalent prognosis. Initial PaO2/FiO2 ratios less than 300 should not dissuade donor organ usage, although recruitment techniques should be implemented with intent to transplant.

  1. Síntesis de materiales moleculares a partir de donadores electrónicos orgánicos y aceptores electrónicos inorgánicos. // Synthesis of molecular materials starting from organic electronic donors and inorganic electronic receivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cázares Sánchez

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Los materiales moleculares están formados por un donador electrónico y un aceptor electrónico condensados en una fase.La síntesis de nuevos materiales moleculares se puede realizar por electrosíntesis o por síntesis química convencional. Eneste trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos de la síntesis de nuevos materiales moleculares por electrosíntesis a partirde los donadores electrónicos orgánicos: BETS y BEDT; y aceptores electrónicos inorgánicos de fierro y cobalto. Laposibilidad de síntesis de los materiales a partir de los donadores y aceptores utilizados fue analizada con voltametríacíclica; mientras que los materiales fueron caracterizados mediante espectrometría infrarroja (IR y por microscopioelectrónico de barrido (MEB.Palabras claves: Donador electrónico, aceptor electrónico, electrosíntesis, material molecular.____________________________________________________________________________Abstract.Molecular materials are constituted of an electronic donor and an aceptor organized in a condensed phase. A synthetizednew molecular material is posible using electrosynthesis or conventional chemistry synthesis. In this job, we reported theresults to the synthesis of new molecular materials that have been prepared by electrosynthesis from organics electronicsdonors: BETS and BEDT; and inorganics electronics aceptors of iron and cobalt. The possibility to sinthetizes the materialsfrom the donors and aceptors used was analized with ciclic voltametry; while the materials were characteryzed with thehelp of infrared spectrometry and scanning electronic microscopy.Key words: electronic donor, electronic aceptor, electrosynthesis, molecular material.

  2. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Nitin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the various options for patients with end stage renal disease, kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a suitable patient. The kidney for transplantation is retrieved from either a cadaver or a live donor. Living donor nephrectomy has been developed as a method to address the shortfall in cadaveric kidneys available for transplantation. Laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN, by reducing postoperative pain, shortening convalescence, and improving the cosmetic outcome of the donor nephrectomy, has shown the potential to increase the number of living kidney donations further by removing some of the disincentives inherent to donation itself. The technique of LLDN has undergone evolution at different transplant centers and many modifications have been done to improve donor safety and recipient outcome. Virtually all donors eligible for an open surgical procedure may also undergo the laparoscopic operation. Various earlier contraindications to LDN, such as right donor kidney, multiple vessels, anomalous vasculature and obesity have been overcome with increasing experience. Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy can be done transperitoneally or retroperitoneally on either side. The approach is most commonly transperitoneal, which allows adequate working space and easy dissection. A review of literature and our experience with regards to standard approach and the modifications is presented including a cost saving model for the developing countries. An assessment has been made, of the impact of LDN on the outcome of donor and the recipient.

  3. Bicarbonate stimulates the electron donation from Mn²⁺ to P₆₈₀⁺ in isolated D1/D2/cytochrome b559 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharmukhamedov, S K; Allakhverdiev, S I; Smolova, T N; Klimov, V V

    2013-12-05

    Influence of bicarbonate on the efficiency of the electron donation from Mn(2+) to P₆₈₀(+) in isolated D1/D2/cytochrome b559 complex was investigated. All the experiments were carried out in a medium depleted of HCO₃(-)/CO₂. Kinetics of photoinduced absorbance changes (ΔA) at different wavelengths and decrease of chlorophyll fluorescence yield (-ΔF) related to photoaccumulation of reduced pheophytin, the intermediary electron acceptor of photosystem II (PSII), in the presence of Mn(2+) under anaerobic conditions were measured. Addition of bicarbonate (1 mM) increased the amplitude of these ΔA and -ΔF at least by a factor of 3. Measurements of the photoinduced ΔA, related to photooxidation of the primary electron donor of PSII, chlorophyll P₆₈₀, were done in the presence of silicomolybdate as electron acceptor. These results show that the addition of 0.05 mM Mn(2+) alone or jointly with 1 mM bicarbonate induces a 20% and 70%-decrease of the magnitude of the ΔA at 680 nm. The effect of Mn(2+) (in the presence and absence of bicarbonate) was completely eliminated by the addition of 12 mM EDTA. All these bicarbonate effects were not observed if MgCl₂ or formate were used instead of MnCl₂ and bicarbonate, respectively. In the absence of Mn(2+), bicarbonate induced none of the mentioned above effects (increase of photoaccumulation of reduced pheophytin and decrease of photooxidation of P680). The presented data suggest that bicarbonate stimulates the electron donation from Mn(2+) to D1/D2/cyt b559 reaction center evidently due to formation of easily oxidizable Mn-bicarbonate complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. 2,3-Dipentyldithieno[3,2-f:2',3'-h]quinoxaline-Based Organic Dyes for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Effect of π-Bridges and Electron Donors on Solar Cell Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zu-Sheng; Zang, Xu-Feng; Hua, Tao; Wang, Lingyun; Meier, Herbert; Cao, Derong

    2015-09-16

    Five novel metal-free organic dyes DQ1-5 containing a dipentyldithieno[3,2-f:2',3'-h]quinoxaline (DPQ) unit were synthesized and applied in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), where DPQ was employed as a π-spacer for the first time. Their photophysical, electrochemical, and theoretical calculations and photovoltaic properties were systematically investigated. All the five dyes show broad photoresponse. Especially the absorption edges of DQ3-5 extend to 800 nm on the TiO2 films. The inserted electron-rich unit 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene or electron-withdrawing group benzothiadiazole (BTD) in DPQ-based dyes can greatly influence the optoelectronic properties of the dyes. In addition, the different electron donors also significantly affect the performance of the DSSCs. Under standard global AM 1.5 solar light conditions, the DQ5 sensitized solar cell obtained a power conversion efficiency of 7.12%. The result indicates that the rigid DPQ-based organic dye is a promising candidate for efficient DSSCs.

  5. Efficient photosensitized splitting of the thymine dimer/oxetane unit on its modifying beta-cyclodextrin by a binding electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen-Jian; Song, Qin-Hua; Wang, Hong-Bo; Yu, Jing-Yu; Guo, Qing-Xiang

    2006-07-07

    Two modified beta-cyclodextrins (beta-CDs) with a thymine dimer and a thymine oxetane adduct respectively, TD-CD and Ox-CD, have been prepared, and utilized to bind an electron-rich chromophore, indole or N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA), to form a supramolecular complex. We have examined the photosensitized splitting of the dimer/oxetane unit in TD-CD/Ox-CD by indole or DMA via an electron-transfer pathway, and observed high splitting efficiencies of the dimer/oxetane unit. On the basis of measurements of fluorescence spectra and splitting quantum yields, it is suggested that the splitting reaction occurs in a supramolecular complex by an inclusion interaction between the modified beta-CDs and DMA or indole. The back electron transfer, which leads low splitting efficiencies for the covalently-linked chromophore-dimer/oxetane compounds, is suppressed in the non-covalently-bound complex, and the mechanism has been discussed.

  6. Dealing with Donor Anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Mike

    1995-01-01

    Techniques that reduce donors' resistance to college fund-raising requests, either direct mail or telephone solicitations, are offered. These include: respecting the prospects' concerns about privacy; offering nonintrusive giving options; honesty and clarity of communication; reinforcing donor sense of control; connecting with prospects'…

  7. Donor acceptor complexes of noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mück, Leonie Anna; Timoshkin, Alexey Y; von Hopffgarten, Moritz; Frenking, Gernot

    2009-03-25

    Donor-acceptor (DA) complexes of noble gases (Ng) of the general type A noble gas, a lone pair of the donor molecule and a vacant orbital of the acceptor molecule. Detailed bonding analysis of the model compounds F(3)Al-Ng-NH(3) reveals that Ng-ammonia interaction is repulsive due to Pauli repulsion. Bonding interaction between Ng and N is mostly electrostatic. In contrast, strong orbital interactions are responsible for the attractive interactions between Ng and AlF(3). Due to the repulsive interactions with the donor molecule and a sizable reorganization energy of the acceptor molecule, optimization attempts of the A noble gases. These are the first examples of the thermodynamically stable Ar and Kr compounds. Application of the push-pull cryptand ligands featuring multiple (two and three) donor-acceptor induced chemical bonds is expected to yield stable complexes with virtually any electron-rich element in the periodic table.

  8. Modulation of Electron Injection Dynamics of Ru-Based Dye/TiO2 System in the Presence of Three Different Organic Solvents: Role of Solvent Dipole Moment and Donor Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanta, Subrata; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Takurou N; Katoh, Ryuzi; Matsumoto, Hajime; Furube, Akihiro

    2015-06-08

    In the present work, femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (fs-TAS) has been employed to investigate the electron injection efficiency (EIE) both from the singlet and triplet excited states of a well-known ruthenium dye (N719) to the conduction band (CB) of nanostructured TiO(2) in presence of three different organic solvents [γ-butylactone (GBL), 3-methoxypropionitrile (MPN), and dimethylformamide (DMF)] with different donor numbers (DNs) and dipole moments (DMs). The DM and DN of a solvent modulates the CB edge energy of TiO(2), and this effect reflects well in the fs-TAS results, which shows an EIE trend following the order GBL≥MPN≫DMF, that is, highest in GBL and lowest in DMF solvent environments. Fs-TAS results indicate a lower contribution of electron injection from both the singlet and triplet states in DMF, for which the dominant adsorption of DMF molecules on the TiO(2) surface seems to play an important role in the mechanism. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The willed body donor interview project: medical student and donor expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Michael; Holman, Alexis; Mueller, Dean A; Gruppen, Larry D; Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    The Anatomical Donations Program at the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) has begun a multiphase project wherein interviews of donors will be recorded and later shown to medical students who participate in the anatomical dissection course. The first phase of this project included surveys of both current UMMS medical students and donors concerning their perceptions of such a program. A five-question survey administered via Qualtrics software was electronically mailed to all current medical students at UMMS, and a survey was mailed to registered and potential donors requesting information from the UMMS on anatomical donations. A total of 224 medical student responses (response rate 33%) and 54 donor responses (response rate 27%) were received. Seventy-four percent of students and 81% of donors reported they would participate in this program if it existed. Students and donors supported the implementation of this program for varying reasons, though many felt strongly they would not want to participate in a donor interview program. These qualitative results support those of previous studies that show a majority of students desire a closer personal relationship with the donor, and these are the first results to be reported on donor perceptions of a donor interview program. Although many students and donors are in favor of instituting this program, others feel strongly that such an experience could be traumatic. The causes of these differing reactions need to be further explored, and the opinions of those who object to this study will be respected by maintaining voluntary participation in future phases of this study. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. Cyclic electron flow plays an important role in photoprotection of tropical trees illuminated at temporal chilling temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Shi-Bao; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2011-02-01

    Our previous study indicated that PSII is more sensitive to chilling and light stress than PSI in tropical trees, and Erythrophleum guineense is more sensitive to chilling stress than Dalbergia odorifera and Khaya ivorensis, but the underlying physiological mechanisms are unclear. Although recent studies have reported that cyclic electron flow (CEF) plays an important role in photoprotection, the role of CEF in protecting PSI and PSII of tropical tree species remains unclear. We investigated the effect of temporal chilling temperature on energy distribution in PSII, the redox state of P700 and CEF in the above-mentioned tropical evergreen tree species grown in an open field. Our results indicated that the overclosure of PSII reaction centers at chilling temperature led to excess excitation pressure in PSII. At the temporal chilling temperature under low light, PSI acceptor side limitation [Y(NA)] was lower than those at 25°C for all species. Although the effective quantum yield of CEF [Y(CEF)] was not significantly stimulated in E. guineense and K. ivorensis under temporal chilling at low light levels, the ratio of Y(CEF) to the effective quantum yield of PSII [Y(II)] significantly increased. Under chilling conditions Y(CEF)/Y(II) was stimulated much more in K. ivorensis and D. odorifera compared with that in the chilling-sensitive E. guineense. These results suggested that stimulation of Y(CEF)/Y(II) plays an important role in protecting PSI and PSII from photoinhibition caused by chilling stress.

  11. Dynamics of transfer of electron excitation in a donor-acceptor system with a carbon chain and ways of its relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Sevryukova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties and dynamics of transport of electron excitation and the ways of its relaxation in the supramolecular D–π–A complex on the basis of merocyanines have been investigated. There have been found two components in the transfer of charge: fast and slow, which correspond to different conformational states of the carbon chain in merocyanines. It was found that the main photoluminescence of the studied molecular solutions of merocyanines by its nature is similar to the exciplex luminescence, as a manifestation of resonant and charge transfer interaction in an excited state. The lifetime in this state is about 2000 ps.

  12. The blood donor identity survey: a multidimensional measure of blood donor motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Christopher R; Kowalsky, Jennifer M; France, Janis L; Himawan, Lina K; Kessler, Debra A; Shaz, Beth H

    2014-08-01

    Evidence indicates that donor identity is an important predictor of donation behavior; however, prior studies have relied on diverse, unidimensional measures with limited psychometric support. The goals of this study were to examine the application of self-determination theory to blood donor motivations and to develop and validate a related multidimensional measure of donor identity. Items were developed and administered electronically to a sample of New York Blood Center (NYBC) donors (n=582) and then to a sample of Ohio University students (n=1005). Following initial confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on the NYBC sample to identify key items related to self-determination theory's six motivational factors, a revised survey was administered to the university sample to reexamine model fit and to assess survey reliability and validity. Consistent with self-determination theory, for both samples CFAs indicated that the best fit to the data was provided by a six-motivational-factor model, including amotivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, integrated regulation, and intrinsic regulation. The Blood Donor Identity Survey provides a psychometrically sound, multidimensional measure of donor motivations (ranging from unmotivated to donate to increasing levels of autonomous motivation to donate) that is suitable for nondonors as well as donors with varying levels of experience. Future research is needed to examine longitudinal changes in donor identity and its relationship to actual donation behavior. © 2014 AABB.

  13. Marginal kidney donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Gopalakrishnan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for a medically eligible patient with end stage renal disease. The number of renal transplants has increased rapidly over the last two decades. However, the demand for organs has increased even more. This disparity between the availability of organs and waitlisted patients for transplants has forced many transplant centers across the world to use marginal kidneys and donors. We performed a Medline search to establish the current status of marginal kidney donors in the world. Transplant programs using marginal deceased renal grafts is well established. The focus is now on efforts to improve their results. Utilization of non-heart-beating donors is still in a plateau phase and comprises a minor percentage of deceased donations. The main concern is primary non-function of the renal graft apart from legal and ethical issues. Transplants with living donors outnumbered cadaveric transplants at many centers in the last decade. There has been an increased use of marginal living kidney donors with some acceptable medical risks. Our primary concern is the safety of the living donor. There is not enough scientific data available to quantify the risks involved for such donation. The definition of marginal living donor is still not clear and there are no uniform recommendations. The decision must be tailored to each donor who in turn should be actively involved at all levels of the decision-making process. In the current circumstances, our responsibility is very crucial in making decisions for either accepting or rejecting a marginal living donor.

  14. A novel aerobic-anoxic biological filter for nitrogen removal from UASB effluent using biogas compounds as electron donors for denitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Rodríguez Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo evaluar una nueva configuración de filtro biológico, aerobio, para obtener la nitrificación y desnitrificación del efluente de un reactor UASB que trata agua residual doméstica. El filtro biológico estuvo compuesto por dos compartimientos, uno superior aerobio nitrificante simulando un filtro percolador y uno inferior anóxico desnitrificante con medio de soporte sumergido. Adicionalmente, fue evaluada la factibilidad de usar el biogás producido en el reactor UASB como donador de electrones para la desnitrificación. Para una carga hidráulica aplicada de 5.6 m3 m-2 d-1, una carga orgánica aplicada de 0.26 kg DQO m-3 d-1 y una carga aplicada de nitrógeno amoniacal de 0.08 kg m-3 d-1 se obtuvo una transformación del nitrógeno amoniacal entre el 60 y 74%, con concentraciones efluentes menores de 13 mg L-1. A pesar de la presencia de oxígeno disuelto en el compartimiento de desnitrificación, se alcanzaron concentraciones de nitrato efluente menores de 10 mg L-1. Los resultados obtenidos indican que el metano presente en el biogás, fue el principal donador de electrones para la desnitrificación.

  15. Phytoplankton growth and PSII efficiency sensitivity to a glyphosate-based herbicide (Factor 540®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedbol, Élise; Lucotte, Marc; Labrecque, Michel; Lepage, Laurent; Juneau, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    The use of glyphosate-based herbicides in agriculture has increased steadily since the mid 90's and there is now evidence of glyphosate leaching and contamination of aquatic ecosystems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide (Factor 540 ® ) on growth and photosynthetic capacity of algae and cyanobacteria. Six algal and three cyanobacterial species/strains, of three different taxonomic groups, were exposed to five glyphosate concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500 and 1000μgl -1 ) during 48h. All species have significant growth inhibition at concentrations varying between 50 and 500μgl -1 . The photosynthetic response, after glyphosate exposure, varied among species, but a general pattern has emerged. There was an increase in the amount of photons absorbed (ABS/RC), in dissipated (DI O /RC) and trapped (TR O /RC) energy in the photosystem II reaction centers, along with a decreased of the maximum photosystem II quantum yield (F V /F M ) and electron transport per reaction center (ET O /RC). The EC 50 and LOEC values for growth and photosynthesis were calculated and established that growth was the most affected parameter by glyphosate-based herbicide, while parameter TR O /RC was the least affected. All species showed reduced growth at glyphosate concentrations lower than the Canadian standard for the protection of aquatic life, set at 800μgl -1 or the American aquatic life benchmark for acute toxicity in non vascular plants of 12 100μgl -1 questioning the validity of these thresholds in assessing the risks related to the presence of glyphosate and glyphosate-based herbicides in aquatic systems. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Meet the donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olejaz, Maria; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, gross anatomy teaching and anatomical dissection have been fundamental elements in the training of medical doctors and surgeons across the world. Anatomy education and research rely on a stable and reliable supply of bodies in order to take place. Based on qualitative in-depth inte......For centuries, gross anatomy teaching and anatomical dissection have been fundamental elements in the training of medical doctors and surgeons across the world. Anatomy education and research rely on a stable and reliable supply of bodies in order to take place. Based on qualitative in......-depth interviews with 13 whole body donors in Denmark, this article explores what donors think about donation and thus offers a supplement to previous primarily quantitative work on donor motivation. The article presents how interviewed donors relate to three topics: their body, their social relations...

  17. Ultrafast, Light-Induced Electron Transfer in a Perylene Diimide Chromophore-Donor Assembly on TiO 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennaman, M. Kyle; Norris, Michael R.; Gish, Melissa K.; Grumstrup, Erik M.; Alibabaei, Leila; Ashford, Dennis L.; Lapides, Alexander M.; Papanikolas, John M.; Templeton, Joseph L.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2015-12-03

    Surface-bound, perylenediimide (PDI)-based molecular assemblies have been synthesized on nanocrystalline TiO2 by reaction of a dianhydride with a surface-bound aniline and succinimide bonding. In a second step, the Fe(II) polypyridyl complex [FeII(tpy-PhNH2)2]2+ was added to the outside of the film, also by succinimide bonding. Ultrafast transient absorption measurements in 0.1 M HClO4 reveal that electron injection into TiO2 by 1PDI* does not occur, but rather leads to the ultrafast formation of the redox-separated pair PDI•+,PDI•–, which decays with complex kinetics (τ1 = 0.8 ps, τ2 = 15 ps, and τ3 = 1500 ps). With the added Fe(II) polypyridyl complex, rapid (<25 ps) oxidation of Fe(II) by the PDI•+,PDI•– redox pair occurs to give Fe(III),PDI•– persisting for >400 μs in the film environment.

  18. Fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of norfloxacin and N-donor mixed-ligand ternary copper(II) complexes: Stability and interaction with SDS micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoli Muniz, Gabriel S.; Incio, Jimmy Llontop; Alves, Odivaldo C.; Krambrock, Klaus; Teixeira, Letícia R.; Louro, Sonia R. W.

    2018-01-01

    The stability of ternary copper(II) complexes of a heterocyclic ligand, L (L being 2,2‧-bipyridine (bipy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)) and the fluorescent antibacterial agent norfloxacin (NFX) as the second ligand was studied at pH 7.4 and different ionic strengths. Fluorescence quenching upon titration of NFX with the binary complexes allowed to obtain stability constants for NFX binding, Kb, as a function of ionic strength. The Kb values vary by more than two orders of magnitude when buffer concentration varies from 0.5 to 100 mM. It was observed that previously synthesized ternary complexes dissociate in buffer according with the obtained stability constants. This shows that equimolar solutions of NFX and binary complexes are equivalent to solutions of synthesized ternary complexes. The interaction of the ternary copper complexes with anionic SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) micelles was studied by fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Titration of NFX-loaded SDS micelles with the complexes Cu:L allowed to determine the stability constants inside the micelles. Fluorescence quenching demonstrated that SDS micelles increase the stability constants by factors around 50. EPR spectra gave details of the copper(II) local environment, and demonstrated that the structure of the ternary complexes inside SDS micelles is different from that in buffer. Mononuclear ternary complexes formed inside the micelles, while in buffer most ternary complexes are binuclear. The results show that anionic membrane interfaces increase formation of copper fluoroquinolone complexes, which can influence bioavailability, membrane diffusion, and mechanism of action of the antibiotics.

  19. Hydrogen bond, electron donor-acceptor dimer, and residence dynamics in supercritical CO(2)-ethanol mixtures and the effect of hydrogen bonding on single reorientational and translational dynamics: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Guardia, Elvira; Samios, Jannis

    2010-07-07

    The hydrogen bonding and dynamics in a supercritical mixture of carbon dioxide with ethanol as a cosolvent (X(ethanol) approximately 0.1) were investigated using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The results obtained reveal that the hydrogen bonds formed between ethanol molecules are significantly more in comparison with those between ethanol-CO(2) molecules and also exhibit much larger lifetimes. Furthermore, the residence dynamics in the solvation shells of ethanol and CO(2) have been calculated, revealing much larger residence times for ethanol molecules in the ethanol solvation shell. These results support strongly the ethanol aggregation effects and the slow local environment reorganization inside the ethanol solvation shell, reported in a previous publication of the authors [Skarmoutsos et al., J. Chem. Phys. 126, 224503 (2007)]. The formation of electron donor-acceptor dimers between the ethanol and CO(2) molecules has been also investigated and the calculated lifetimes of these complexes have been found to be similar to those corresponding to ethanol-CO(2) hydrogen bonds, exhibiting a slightly higher intermittent lifetime. However, the average number of these dimers is larger than the number of ethanol-CO(2) hydrogen bonds in the system. Finally, the effect of the hydrogen bonds formed between the individual ethanol molecules on their reorientational and translational dynamics has been carefully explored showing that the characteristic hydrogen bonding microstructure obtained exhibits sufficiently strong influence upon the behavior of them.

  20. Deceased donor uterine transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyckt, Rebecca; Kotlyar, Alexander; Arian, Sara; Eghtesad, Bijan; Falcone, Tommaso; Tzakis, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    To share our experience in performing the first-ever deceased-donor uterine transplant in the United States. This video uses an animation and footage from a uterine transplantation procedure to review the steps and techniques involved in performing a uterine transplant. Academic, multisite medical center. A reproductive-age patient with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome. Transplantation of a viable uterus from a deceased donor. Assessment of posttransplantation uterine graft viability. This video article describes the essential steps in the uterine transplant process, including selecting an appropriate donor with no history of infertility or uterine malformations. Furthermore, a deceased donor should exhibit brain death but not cardiac death. We also review our inclusion criteria for suitable recipients. In this video we outline the key steps in a uterine transplantation procedure and demonstrate footage from an actual transplant procedure. These steps include establishing bilateral end-to-side vascular anastomoses between the donor uterine artery and vein and the recipient's external iliac vessels. Once this has been completed and reperfusion noted of the donor uterus, connection to the recipient vaginal cuff is then performed. Uterine transplantation, although currently experimental, has gained the potential to become the first true treatment for uterine factor infertility. This procedure can become a promising option for the approximately 1.5 million women worldwide for whom pregnancy is not possible because of the absence of the uterus or presence of a nonfunctional uterus. Deceased donor uterine transplantation will further serve to broaden accessibility for this procedure. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Selective control of the radical-scavenging activity of poly(phenols) in aqueous media in terms of their electron-donor properties, using a stable organic radical as chemical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Juan Antonio; Torres, Josep Lluís; Juliá, Luis

    2012-11-15

    The tri-potassium salt of tris(2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-4-hydroxysulphonylphenyl)methyl radical, 3K(+) TSPTM(3-), is a good chemical sensor of the radical-scavenging activity of poly(phenols) in aqueous media. Its water solubility and its stability at all pH values facilitates the study of the influence of the pH of the medium on the activity of poly(phenols). The radical-scavenging activity of three flavonoids of the catechol and pyrogallol type and the activity of catechol, pyrogallol and methyl gallate at pH values 7 and 8 which are close to physiological pH value (7.4) have been measured. This radical species reacts exclusively by an electron transfer mechanism against the reducing poly(phenols). Therefore, the experiments to determine the radical-scavenging activity of poly(phenols) with 3K(+) TSPTM(3-) are related to their ionization potentials (IP). As IP is a function of the pH of the medium, the electron donor ability of a poly(phenol) depends on the acidity or basicity of the fluid in question. The radical-scavenging activity of poly(phenols) 1-6 is higher at pH 8 than at pH 7. 3K(+) TSPTM(3-) is able to discriminate between catecholic and pyrogallolic moieties of poly(phenols) in water solutions by taking measurements at different pH values. By adjusting the pH of the medium 3K(+) TSPTM(3-) will easily detect those moieties (e.g. pyrogallol) most prone to elicit prooxidant effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A comparative study of the influence of N,N'-dialkyl vs. N,N'-diaryl-based electron donor ancillary ligands on photocurrent and photovoltage in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Saba; Yildirim, Erol; Akhtar, Javeed; Siddiqi, Humaira M; El-Shafei, Ahmed

    2017-08-09

    In this study, we report the synthesis of a novel heteroleptic Ru(ii)-sensitizer, (Ru(2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid)-4,4'-bis(4-piperidin-1-yl)phenyl ethenyl)-(2,2'-bipyridine) (NCS)2, denoted as SD-1; moreover, its photophysical, electrochemical, and photovoltaic performances were compared with those of N719 and K77-7 (N,N'-diaryl Ru-sensitizer, namely Ru(2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylic-acid)-4,4'-bis(2-(4-N,N'-diphenylaminophenyl)ethenyl)-2,2'-bipyridine (NCS)2). The photovoltaic performance of SD-1 outperformed those of N-719 and K77-7, particularly in the red region, and the overall efficiency of SD-1 was 8.5% as compared to 8.0% of K77-7 and 7.7% of N719 under the same experimental device conditions. The superior light harvesting efficiency of SD-1 can be attributed to the strong electron donor sp3-nitrogen, which is attached to two sp3-carbons (dialkyl), whereas in the case of K77-7, all carbon atoms attached to the sp3-nitrogen are sp2, which decrease the electron density on the latter and minimize the electron-donating power of the ancillary ligand in K77-7. To gain a quantitative understanding of the electron density on nitrogen in SD-1 and K77-7, first-principle calculations using molecular and thermodynamic descriptors, such as frontier molecular orbitals, ground-state oxidation potential (GSOP), excited-state oxidation potential (ESOP), optical gap (E0-0), and charge distributions, were conducted in solution. In addition, for understanding the anchored structures of dyes on Ti24O48, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) were utilized. Results of computational studies are in excellent agreement with the experimental results, which can be used as a screening tool for the design of more efficient molecular motifs for DSSCs.

  3. Relationships between PSII-independent hydrogen bioproduction and starch metabolism as evidenced from isolation of starch catabolism mutants in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochois, Vincent; Constans, Laure; Beyly, Audrey; Soliveres, Melanie; Peltier, Gilles; Cournac, Laurent [CEA, DSV, IBEB, Laboratoire de Bioenergetique et Biotechnologie des Bacteries and Microalgues, Saint Paul Lez Durance, F-13108 (France); CNRS, UMR Biologie Vegetale and Microbiologie Environnementales, Saint Paul lez Durance, F-13108 (France); Aix-Marseille Universite, Saint Paul lez Durance, F-13108 (France); Dauvillee, David; Ball, Steven [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); USTL, UGSF, F-59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); CNRS, UMR 8576, F-59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2010-10-15

    Sulfur deprivation, which is considered as an efficient way to trigger long-term hydrogen photoproduction in unicellular green algae has two major effects: a decrease in PSII which allows anaerobiosis to be reached and carbohydrate (starch) storage. Starch metabolism has been proposed as one of the major factors of hydrogen production, particularly during the PSII-independent (or indirect) pathway. While starch biosynthesis has been characterized in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, little remains known concerning starch degradation. In order to gain a better understanding of starch catabolism pathways and identify those steps likely to limit the starch-dependent hydrogen production, we have designed a genetic screening procedure aimed at isolating mutants of the green alga C. reinhardtii affected in starch mobilization. Using two different screening protocols, the first one based on aerobic starch degradation in the dark and the second one on anaerobic starch degradation in the light, eighteen mutants were isolated among a library of 15,000 insertion mutants, eight (std1-8) with the first screen and ten (sda1-10) with the second. Most of the mutant strains isolated in this study showed a reduction or a delay in the PSII-independent hydrogen production. Further characterization of these mutants should allow the identification of molecular determinants of starch-dependent hydrogen production and supply targets for future biotechnological improvements. (author)

  4. A Biomimetic Manganese Model for Artificial Photosynthesis : Q-band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of a Novel Mn2(II,III) Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Kiflemariam, Jordanos

    2005-01-01

    In natural oxygen-producing photosynthesis solar energy is stored as chemical energy, in carbohydrates, fats and amino acids, using water as electron source. The large transmembrane protein complex, PSII, is the key enzyme in the light-driven reactions. Water oxidation is accomplished by a triad in PSII in which the Mn-cluster plays an important role. In the artificial photosynthetic system, nature’s photosynthesis will be mimicked such that hydrogen, a sustainable energy source, can be produ...

  5. Nyretransplantation med levende donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Løkkegaard, H; Rasmussen, F

    2000-01-01

    with only few complications. The long-term outcome for kidney donors is good without increase in mortality or risk for development of hypertension and renal failure; proteinuria may be seen. Living kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment of end-stage renal disease with better graft survival than...

  6. National Marrow Donor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    replacement business analyst to continue working on business and system requirements for HapLogic Phase III ! 100f2l National Marrow Donor Program® NOOOO...NOOOO 14-1 0-1-0204 IID.I. Task 3: Expand Immuno - biology Research QUARTER PROGRESS REPORT Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response

  7. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion Sanguine of Geneva will be held at CERN on Tuesday 13 March 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  8. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion d'Annemasse will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  9. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Tuesday 19 March 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion sanguine of Geneva If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  10. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Wednesday 13 November 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs will be held a blood donors campaign, organized by the Etablissement de Transfusion de Haute-Savoie If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  11. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Établissement de Transfusion de Rhône-Alpes will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2000 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  12. Microwave assisted synthesis of bithiophene based donor-acceptor-donor oligomers and their optoelectronic performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathula, Chinna; Buruga, Kezia; Lee, Sang Kyu; Khazi, Imtiyaz Ahmed M.; Kang, Youngjong

    2017-07-01

    In this article we present the synthesis of two novel bithiophene based symmetrical π conjugated oligomers with donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) structures by microwave assisted PdCl2(dppf) catalyzed Suzuki coupling reaction. These molecules contain electron rich bithiophene as a donor, dithienothiadiazole[3,4-c]pyridine and phthalic anhydride units as acceptors. The shorter reaction time, excellent yields and easy product isolation are the advantages of this method. The photophysical prerequisites for electronic application such as strong and broad optical absorption, thermal stability, and compatible energy levels were determined for synthesized oligomers. Optical band gap for the oligomers is found to be 1.72-1.90 eV. The results demonstrated the novel oligomers to be promising candidates in organic optoelectronic applications.

  13. Thermodynamic and Spectrophotometric Studies of Electron Donor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermodynamic results show that as temperature changed from 30 to 70 °C, enthalpy change (ÄH) was steady at -0.254 kcal.mol-1 while the free energy (ÄG) changed from -3.904 to -4.450 kcal.mol-1. The complex appeared to be more stable at the slightly elevated temperature of 50 °C with a value of 757.14 mol-1.

  14. Two-step photoinduced charge separation and unexpectedly fast one-step charge recombination in a linked Donor2-Donor1-Acceptor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, S.I.; Wiering, P.G.; van Staveren, R.; van Ramesdonk, H.J.; Brouwer, A.M.; Verhoeven, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Photoinduced sequential two-step electron transfer occurs upon excitation of the 1,3-diphenylpropanedioato boron oxalate electron acceptor in a novel trichromophoric donor2-donor1-acceptor (D2-D1-A) system. The D2-D+1-A- state is fluorescent, while the D+2-D1-A- state is observed by transient

  15. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know FAQ Living donation What is living donation? Organs Types Being a living donor First steps Being ... for blood transfusions Medication side effects Abdominal hernia Death Potential long-term organ specific donor complications blank - ...

  16. National Marrow Donor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-17

    radiological exposure event. Period 8 Activity: • Attended a meeting with the EBMT Nuclear Accident Committee Ulm, Germany from June 30 to July 1st... nuclear Safety, Bonn o Cullen Case United States National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, Minnesota o Nelson Chao... radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses o Dieter Graessle, Dipl.- Math. Oec. Germany Radiation Medicine Research Group, Ulm

  17. Facile and Promising Method for Michael Addition of Indole and Pyrrole to Electron-Deficient trans-β-Nitroolefins Catalyzed by a Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalyst Feist’s Acid and Preliminary Study of Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. A. Al Majid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of cooperative hydrogen-bonding effects has been demonstrated using novel 3-methylenecyclopropane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (Feist’s acid (FA as hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the addition of indole and pyrrole to trans-β-nitrostyrene derivatives. Because of the hydrogen bond donor (HBD ability, Feist’s acid (FA has been introduced as a new class of hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the activation of nitroolefin towards nucleophilic substitution reaction. It has effectively catalyzed the Michael addition of indoles and pyrrole to β-nitroolefins under optimum reaction condition to furnish the corresponding Michael adducts in good to excellent yields (up to 98%. The method is general, atom-economical, convenient, and eco-friendly and could provide excellent yields and regioselectivities. Some newly synthesized compounds were for examined in vitro antimicrobial activity and their preliminary results are reported.

  18. C lostridium difficile surface proteins are anchored to the cell wall using CWB2 motifs that recognise the anionic polymer PSII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willing, Stephanie E.; Candela, Thomas; Shaw, Helen Alexandra; Seager, Zoe; Mesnage, Stéphane; Fagan, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gram‐positive surface proteins can be covalently or non‐covalently anchored to the cell wall and can impart important properties on the bacterium in respect of cell envelope organisation and interaction with the environment. We describe here a mechanism of protein anchoring involving tandem CWB2 motifs found in a large number of cell wall proteins in the Firmicutes. In the Clostridium difficile cell wall protein family, we show the three tandem repeats of the CWB2 motif are essential for correct anchoring to the cell wall. CWB2 repeats are non‐identical and cannot substitute for each other, as shown by the secretion into the culture supernatant of proteins containing variations in the patterns of repeats. A conserved Ile Leu Leu sequence within the CWB2 repeats is essential for correct anchoring, although a preceding proline residue is dispensable. We propose a likely genetic locus encoding synthesis of the anionic polymer PSII and, using RNA knock‐down of key genes, reveal subtle effects on cell wall composition. We show that the anionic polymer PSII binds two cell wall proteins, SlpA and Cwp2, and these interactions require the CWB2 repeats, defining a new mechanism of protein anchoring in Gram‐positive bacteria. PMID:25649385

  19. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  20. donor-acceptor reactions: good bye to the laboratory jargon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temechegn

    Fig. 5: Mental model of proton transfer between electron clouds [9]. ALTERNATIVE MENTAL MODELS OF DONOR-ACCEPTOR REACTIONS. The figures 1-4 suggest independently co-existing protons and electrons that move from one particle to another. This mental model should be preliminary for the learners in Piaget's.

  1. Donor attention to reading materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S F; Osmond, L; Choquet, K; Yi, Q-L; Goldman, M

    2015-11-01

    Mandatory predonation reading materials inform donors about risk factors for transmissible disease, possible complications of donation and changes to the donation process. We aimed to assess the attention to predonation reading materials and factors which may affect attention. A national survey in 2008 of 18,108 blood donors asked about self-assessed attention to reading the materials. In face-to-face interviews, 441 donors completed additional questions about reading the materials and a literacy test. Qualitative interviews of 27 donors assessed their approach to reading. In the national survey, most of the first-time donors said they read all or most of the materials (90.9% first-time vs. 57.6% repeat donors, P reading them carefully (P read materials carefully, skimmed or did not read, most knew that donors are informed of positive transmissible disease test results (97.1%, 95.5, 98.0 P > 0.05), but fewer recalled seeing the definition of sex (77.2%, 56.9, 24.2 P read materials carefully, skimmed or did not read were compared (P > 0.05). Qualitative interviews showed that donors are reluctant to read any more than necessary and decide based on perceived importance or relevance. Attention to predonation reading materials tends to be better among first-time donors. The effectiveness is limited by low motivation to read, especially for repeat donors, as well as poor literacy. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  2. Coherent coupling between a quantum dot and a donor in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Jacobson, N Tobias; Rudolph, Martin; Dominguez, Jason; Ten Eyck, Gregory A; Wendt, Joel R; Pluym, Tammy; Gamble, John King; Lilly, Michael P; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; Carroll, Malcolm S

    2017-10-18

    Individual donors in silicon chips are used as quantum bits with extremely low error rates. However, physical realizations have been limited to one donor because their atomic size causes fabrication challenges. Quantum dot qubits, in contrast, are highly adjustable using electrical gate voltages. This adjustability could be leveraged to deterministically couple donors to quantum dots in arrays of qubits. In this work, we demonstrate the coherent interaction of a 31P donor electron with the electron of a metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dot. We form a logical qubit encoded in the spin singlet and triplet states of the two-electron system. We show that the donor nuclear spin drives coherent rotations between the electronic qubit states through the contact hyperfine interaction. This provides every key element for compact two-electron spin qubits requiring only a single dot and no additional magnetic field gradients, as well as a means to interact with the nuclear spin qubit.

  3. [Haemovigilance donors: methods and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebibo, Danielle; Danic, Bruno

    2007-05-01

    There is no official definition of haemovigilance donors. However, it concerns the observation and management of Serious Adverse Events observed in blood donors (SAEDs), Post Donation Informations (PDI), and donor epidemiologic survey. The French Decree of 1 February 2006 imposes the declaration of the SAEDs. In 2006, 196 SAEDs were notified for 2599978 donations (7.5/100,000 donations). The incidence of the SAEDs was of 7/100,000 whole blood donations and 10.7/100,000 aphaeresis donations. Donors that are more susceptible to present a SAED are: women, women under 30, repeat donor and aphaeresis donor. For 2/3 of donors having presented a SAED, a medical consultation was prescribed and 1/3 was hospitalized. Vasovagal reaction is the most frequent category. Seven thousand three hundred and sixty one PDI were notified in 2005. The risks of infection represented the principal cause (mainly ENT). Concerning donor epidemiologic survey, the viral residual risk clearly decreased since 1992 and for the period of 2003-2005 it 1/2600000 for HIV, 1/6500000 for HCV and 1/1000000 for HBV. The first national data already give useful information. This information will permit a better care of blood donors and of blood component recipients as well.

  4. Donor-derived infections among Chinese donation after cardiac death liver recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qi-Fa; Zhou, Wei; Wan, Qi-Quan

    2017-08-21

    To investigate blood cultures of deceased donors and report the confirmed transmission of bacterial infection from donors to liver recipients. We retrospectively studied the results of blood cultures among our donation after cardiac death (DCD) donors and calculated the donor-derived bacterial infection rates among liver recipients. Study participants underwent liver transplantation between January 1, 2010 and February 1, 2017. The study involved a total of 67 recipients of liver grafts from 67 DCD donors. We extracted the data of donors' and patients' characteristics, culture results and clinical outcomes, especially the post-transplant complications in liver recipients, from electronic medical records. We analyzed the characteristics of the donors and the corresponding liver recipients with emphasis put on donor-derived infections. Head trauma was the most common origin of death among our 67 DCD donors (46.3%). Blood taken prior to the procurement operation was cultured for 53 of the donors, with 17 episodes of bloodstream infections developing from 13 donors. The predominant organism isolated from the blood of donors was Gram-positive bacteria (70.6%). Only three (4.5%) of 67 liver recipients developed confirmed donor-derived bacterial infections, with two isolates of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and one isolate of multidrug-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes. The liver recipients with donor-derived infections showed relation to higher crude mortality and graft loss rates (33.3% each) within 3 mo post transplantation, as compared to those without donor-derived infections (9.4% and 4.7%, respectively). All three liver recipients received appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Liver recipients have high occurrence of donor-derived infections. The liver recipients with donor-derived multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infections can have good outcome if appropriate antimicrobial therapy is given.

  5. Which Donor for Uterus Transplants: Brain-Dead Donor or Living Donor? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoué, Vincent; Vigneau, Cécile; Duros, Solène; Boudjema, Karim; Levêque, Jean; Piver, Pascal; Aubard, Yves; Gauthier, Tristan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate and compare the pros and cons of using living donors or brain-dead donors in uterus transplantation programs, 2 years after the first worldwide live birth after uterus transplantation. The Medline database and the Central Cochrane Library were used to locate uterine transplantation studies carried out in human or nonhuman primates. All types of articles (case reports, original studies, meta-analyses, reviews) in English or French were considered for inclusion. Overall, 92 articles were screened and 44 were retained for review. Proof of concept for human uterine transplantation was demonstrated in 2014 with a living donor. Compared with a brain-dead donor strategy, a living donor strategy offers greater possibilities for planning surgery and also decreases cold ischemia time, potentially translating into a higher success rate. However, this approach poses ethical problems, given that the donor is exposed to surgery risks but does not derive any direct benefit. A brain-dead donor strategy is more acceptable from an ethical viewpoint, but its feasibility is currently unproven, potentially owing to a lack of compatible donors, and is associated with a longer cold ischemia time and a potentially higher rejection rate. The systematic review demonstrates that uterine transplantation is a major surgical innovation for the treatment of absolute uterine factor infertility. Living and brain-dead donor strategies are not mutually exclusive and, in view of the current scarcity of uterine grafts and the anticipated future rise in demand, both will probably be necessary.

  6. Transport Measurements on Si Nanostructures with Counted Sb Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Garratt, Elias; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Bishop, Nathaniel; Wendt, Joel; Luhman, Dwight; Carroll, Malcolm; Lilly, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Donor based spin qubits are a promising platform for quantum computing. Single qubits using timed implant of donors have been demonstrated.1 Extending this to multiple qubits requires precise control over the placement and number of donors. Such control can be achieved by using a combination of low-energy heavy-ion implants (to reduce depth straggle), electron-beam lithography (to define position), focused ion beam (to localize implants to one lithographic site) and counting the number of implants with a single ion detector.2 We report transport measurements on MOS quantum dots implanted with 5, 10 and 20 Sb donors using the approach described above. A donor charge transition is identified by a charge offset in the transport characteristics. Correlation between the number of donors and the charge offsets is studied. These results are necessary first steps towards fabricating donor nanostructures for two qubit interactions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1J. J. Pla et al., Nature 496, 334 (2013) 2J. A. Seamons et al., APL 93, 043124 (2008).

  7. Urinary biomarkers after donor nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendijk-van den Akker, Judith M; Warlé, Michiel C; van Zuilen, Arjan D.; Kloke, Heinrich J; Wever, Kim E; d'Ancona, Frank C H; Ӧzdemir, Denise M D; Wetzels, Jack F M; Hoitsma, Andries J

    2015-01-01

    As the beginning of living-donor kidney transplantation, physicians have expressed concern about the possibility that unilateral nephrectomy can be harmful to a healthy individual. To investigate whether the elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) during laparoscopic donor nephrectomy causes early

  8. Spatially resolving valley quantum interference of a donor in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salfi, J; Mol, J A; Rahman, R; Klimeck, G; Simmons, M Y; Hollenberg, L C L; Rogge, S

    2014-06-01

    Electron and nuclear spins of donor ensembles in isotopically pure silicon experience a vacuum-like environment, giving them extraordinary coherence. However, in contrast to a real vacuum, electrons in silicon occupy quantum superpositions of valleys in momentum space. Addressable single-qubit and two-qubit operations in silicon require that qubits are placed near interfaces, modifying the valley degrees of freedom associated with these quantum superpositions and strongly influencing qubit relaxation and exchange processes. Yet to date, spectroscopic measurements have only probed wavefunctions indirectly, preventing direct experimental access to valley population, donor position and environment. Here we directly probe the probability density of single quantum states of individual subsurface donors, in real space and reciprocal space, using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. We directly observe quantum mechanical valley interference patterns associated with linear superpositions of valleys in the donor ground state. The valley population is found to be within 5% of a bulk donor when 2.85 ± 0.45 nm from the interface, indicating that valley-perturbation-induced enhancement of spin relaxation will be negligible for depths greater than 3 nm. The observed valley interference will render two-qubit exchange gates sensitive to atomic-scale variations in positions of subsurface donors. Moreover, these results will also be of interest for emerging schemes proposing to encode information directly in valley polarization.

  9. Estimating chlorophyll content and photochemical yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements at different growing stages of attached leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubuxin, Bayaer; Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran, Parinaz; Ginnan, Yusaku; Hosoi, Fumiki; Omasa, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    This paper illustrates the possibility of measuring chlorophyll (Chl) content and Chl fluorescence parameters by the solar-induced Chl fluorescence (SIF) method using the Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle, and compares the results with the standard measurement methods. A high-spectral resolution HR2000+ and an ordinary USB4000 spectrometer were used to measure leaf reflectance under solar and artificial light, respectively, to estimate Chl fluorescence. Using leaves of Capsicum annuum cv. 'Sven' (paprika), the relationships between the Chl content and the steady-state Chl fluorescence near oxygen absorption bands of O2B (686nm) and O2A (760nm), measured under artificial and solar light at different growing stages of leaves, were evaluated. The Chl fluorescence yields of ΦF 686nm/ΦF 760nm ratios obtained from both methods correlated well with the Chl content (steady-state solar light: R(2) = 0.73; artificial light: R(2) = 0.94). The SIF method was less accurate for Chl content estimation when Chl content was high. The steady-state solar-induced Chl fluorescence yield ratio correlated very well with the artificial-light-induced one (R(2) = 0.84). A new methodology is then presented to estimate photochemical yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII) from the SIF measurements, which was verified against the standard Chl fluorescence measurement method (pulse-amplitude modulated method). The high coefficient of determination (R(2) = 0.74) between the ΦPSII of the two methods shows that photosynthesis process parameters can be successfully estimated using the presented methodology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. Structured near-infrared Magnetic Circular Dichroism spectra of the Mn4CaO5 cluster of PSII in T. vulcanus are dominated by Mn(IV) d-d 'spin-flip' transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Jennifer; Chrysina, Maria; Craig, Vincent S J; Akita, Fusamichi; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cox, Nicholas; Shen, Jian-Ren; Krausz, Elmars

    2018-02-01

    Photosystem II passes through four metastable S-states in catalysing light-driven water oxidation. Variable temperature variable field (VTVH) Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) spectra in PSII of Thermosynochococcus (T.) vulcanus for each S-state are reported. These spectra, along with assignments, provide a new window into the electronic and magnetic structure of Mn4CaO5. VTVH MCD spectra taken in the S2 state provide a clear g=2, S=1/2 paramagnetic characteristic, which is entirely consistent with that known by EPR. The three features, seen as positive (+) at 749nm, negative (-) at 773nm and (+) at 808nm are assigned as 4A→2E spin-flips within the d3 configuration of the Mn(IV) centres present. This assignment is supported by comparison(s) to spin-flips seen in a range of Mn(IV) materials. S3 exhibits a more intense (-) MCD peak at 764nm and has a stronger MCD saturation characteristic. This S3 MCD saturation behaviour can be accurately modelled using parameters taken directly from analyses of EPR spectra. We see no evidence for Mn(III) d-d absorption in the near-IR of any S-state. We suggest that Mn(IV)-based absorption may be responsible for the well-known near-IR induced changes induced in S2 EPR spectra of T. vulcanus and not Mn(III)-based, as has been commonly assumed. Through an analysis of the nephelauxetic effect, the excitation energy of S-state dependent spin-flips seen may help identify coordination characteristics and changes at each Mn(IV). A prospectus as to what more detailed S-state dependent MCD studies promise to achieve is outlined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fine structure of granal thylakoid membrane organization using cryo electron tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouril, Roman; Oostergetel, Gert T.; Boekema, Egbert J.

    The architecture of grana membranes from spinach chloroplasts was studied by cryo electron tomography. Tomographic reconstructions of ice-embedded isolated grana stacks enabled to resolve features of photosystem II (PSII) in the native membrane and to assign the absolute orientation of individual

  12. Voluntary whole-blood donors, and compensated platelet donors and plasma donors: motivation to donate, altruism and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmel, Michael; Lattacher, Helene; Janda, Monika

    2005-10-01

    To establish if voluntary whole-blood donors and compensated platelet donors and plasma donors may differ in their motivation to donate, altruism, aggression and autoaggression. Whole-blood (n=51), platelet (n=52) and plasma donors (n=48) completed a battery of validated questionnaires while waiting to donate. Bivariate and multivariate analyses of variance and t-tests were performed to detect differences between groups as noted. Altruism (mean=40.2) was slightly higher in whole-blood donors than in platelet (mean=38.3) and plasma donors (mean=39.1) (p=0.07). Blood donors (mean=2.8) scored lower in the spontaneous aggression measure than platelet (mean=4.1) and plasma donors (mean=4.4) (p=0.01). Plasma donors (mean=4.9) had higher auto-aggression than whole-blood donors and platelet donors (mean for both groups=3.4) (p=0.01). Differences between the three groups were mediated by sociodemographic variables (MANCOVA). Whole-blood donors donated to help others, platelet and plasma donors mostly to receive the compensation. However, those platelet and plasma donors, who would continue to donate without compensation were similar in altruism and aggression to whole-blood donors. While most platelet donors and plasma donors were motivated by the compensation, those who stated that they would continue to donate without compensation had altruism and aggression scores similar to voluntary whole-blood donors.

  13. Properties of Excitons Bound to Ionized Donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben; Suffczynski, M.; Gorzkowski, W.

    1971-01-01

    Binding energies, interparticle distances, oscillator strengths, and exchange corrections are calculated for the three-particle complex corresponding to an exciton bound to an ionized donor. The results are given as functions of the mass ratio of the electron and hole. Binding of the complex...... is obtained for mass ratios up to 0.426. The interparticle distances are up to 50 times larger than the corresponding exciton radius. The oscillator strengths are about 104 times greater than those of free excitons, while the exchange corrections for the complex are comparable to those of free excitions...

  14. Donor milk: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliani F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Giuliani,1 Ilaria Rovelli,1 Chiara Peila,1 Stefania Alfonsina Liguori,2 Enrico Bertino,1 Alessandra Coscia1 1SCDU Neonatologia, Dipartimento di Scienze Pediatriche e dell'Adolescenza, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy; 2SC Neonatologia, Ospedale Maria Vittoria, Torino, Italy Abstract: Mother's own milk is widely recognized as the optimal feeding for term infants, but increasing evidence exists of its benefits also for sick and preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units. However, the nutritional needs for appropriate growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes of such a particular population of infants should be attentively evaluated, considering also the indication to an appropriate fortification of human milk. The target is to achieve growth potential for preterm newborns while ensuring good metabolic outcomes and normal neurological development. When mother's milk is unavailable or in short supply, donor human milk (DHM represents the second best choice and, although somewhat modified by the Holder pasteurization process, it preserves many benefits when compared to formula, as documented by more and more reports, randomized controlled trials, and meta-analyses published in the past few years. Evidence exists of the protection exerted by DHM from necrotizing enterocolitis, while further studies are required to look at possible beneficial effects regarding infections, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, long-term cardiovascular risk factors, feeding tolerance, neurological outcome, and allergy. Finally, the concern that the use of DHM might decrease preterm infant breastfeeding is being raised. Conversely, publications exist showing that the use of DHM in the neonatal unit increases breastfeeding rates at discharge for infants of very low birth weight. Keywords: human milk, preterm infant feeding, milk bank, breast milk, mother's own milk, pasteurized human milk, fortification

  15. The cytochrome b6f complex at the crossroad of photosynthetic electron transport pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Alexander N

    2014-08-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic electron transport at the level of the cytochrome b6f complex provides efficient performance of the chloroplast electron transport chain (ETC). In this review, after brief overview of the structural organization of the chloroplast ETC, the consideration of the problem of electron transport control is focused on the plastoquinone (PQ) turnover and its interaction with the b6f complex. The data available show that the rates of plastoquinol (PQH2) formation in PSII and its diffusion to the b6f complex do not limit the overall rate of electron transfer between photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI). Analysis of experimental and theoretical data demonstrates that the rate-limiting step in the intersystem chain of electron transport is determined by PQH2 oxidation at the Qo-site of the b6f complex, which is accompanied by the proton release into the thylakoid lumen. The acidification of the lumen causes deceleration of PQH2 oxidation, thus impeding the intersystem electron transport. Two other mechanisms of regulation of the intersystem electron transport have been considered: (i) "state transitions" associated with the light-induced redistribution of solar energy between PSI and PSII, and (ii) redistribution of electron fluxes between alternative pathways (noncyclic electron transport and cyclic electron flow around PSI). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. [Long live the kidney donor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fijter, Johan W; Meinders, Arend E

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplantation offers longer life expectancy and improves quality of life in selected patients with end-stage renal failure. The availability of living donors is critical, particularly to meet the increasing demand and potentially pre-emptive transplantation. In addition, living donor transplantation is associated with better outcomes on comparison with dialysis or transplants from deceased donors. The major disadvantage of living donation is that complications may occur both directly perioperatively and in the long-term. Two recent studies confirmed that the risk of renal failure among selected living donors is extremely low. This implies that there is no need to alter the existing positive attitude towards living donation. Finding a comparable long-term control group with relevant genetic and non-genetic risk factors remains a challenge to studies looking at long-term effects.

  17. Iron deficiency among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, A. S.; Pedersen, O. B.; Magnussen, K.

    2017-01-01

    and menopausal status are the strongest predictors of iron deficiency. Only little information on the health effects of iron deficiency in blood donors exits. Possibly, after a standard full blood donation, a temporarily reduced physical performance for women is observed. However, iron deficiency among blood...... donors is not reflected in a reduced self-perceived mental and physical health. In general, the high proportion of iron-deficient donors can be alleviated either by extending the inter-donation intervals or by guided iron supplementation. The experience from Copenhagen, the Capital Region of Denmark......, is that routine ferritin measurements and iron supplementation are feasible and effective ways of reducing the proportion of donors with low haemoglobin levels....

  18. Electrical Manipulation of Donor Spin Qubits in Silicon and Germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigillito, Anthony James

    Many proposals for quantum information devices rely on electronic or nuclear spins in semiconductors because of their long coherence times and compatibility with industrial fabrication processes. One of the most notable qubits is the electron spin bound to phosphorus donors in silicon, which offers coherence times exceeding seconds at low temperatures. These donors are naturally isolated from their environments to the extent that silicon has been coined a "semiconductor vacuum". While this makes for ultra-coherent qubits, it is difficult to couple two remote donors so quantum information proposals rely on high density arrays of qubits. Here, single qubit addressability becomes an issue. Ideally one would address individual qubits using electric fields which can be easily confined. Typically these schemes rely on tuning a donor spin qubit onto and off of resonance with a magnetic driving field. In this thesis, we measure the electrical tunability of phosphorus donors in silicon and use the extracted parameters to estimate the effects of electric-field noise on qubit coherence times. Our measurements show that donor ionization may set in before electron spins can be sufficiently tuned. We therefore explore two alternative options for qubit addressability. First, we demonstrate that nuclear spin qubits can be directly driven using electric fields instead of magnetic fields and show that this approach offers several advantages over magnetically driven spin resonance. In particular, spin transitions can occur at half the spin resonance frequency and double quantum transitions (magnetic-dipole forbidden) can occur. In a second approach to realizing tunable qubits in semiconductors, we explore the option of replacing silicon with germanium. We first measure the coherence and relaxation times for shallow donor spin qubits in natural and isotopically enriched germanium. We find that in isotopically enriched material, coherence times can exceed 1 ms and are limited by a

  19. Arabidopsis plants lacking PsbQ and PsbR subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex show altered PSII super-complex organization and short-term adaptive mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Suorsa, Marjaana; Rossi, Fabio; Pavesi, Andrea; Kater, Martin M; Antonacci, Alessia; Tadini, Luca; Pribil, Mathias; Schneider, Anja; Wanner, Gerhard; Leister, Dario; Aro, Eva-Mari; Barbato, Roberto; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen-evolving complex of eukaryotic photosystem II (PSII) consists of four extrinsic subunits, PsbO (33 kDa), PsbP (23 kDa), PsbQ (17 kDa) and PsbR (10 kDa), encoded by seven nuclear genes, PsbO1 (At5g66570), PsbO2 (At3g50820), PsbP1 (At1g06680), PsbP2 (At2g30790), PsbQ1 (At4g21280), PsbQ2 (At4g05180) and PsbR (At1g79040). Using Arabidopsis insertion mutant lines, we show that PsbP1, but not PsbP2, is essential for photoautotrophic growth, whereas plants lacking both forms of PsbQ and/or PsbR show normal growth rates. Complete elimination of PsbQ has a minor effect on PSII function, but plants lacking PsbR or both PsbR and PsbQ are characterized by more pronounced defects in PSII activity. Gene expression and immunoblot analyses indicate that accumulation of each of these proteins is highly dependent on the presence of the others, and is controlled at the post-transcriptional level, whereas PsbO stability appears to be less sensitive to depletion of other subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex. In addition, comparison of levels of the PSII super-complex in wild-type and mutant leaves reveals the importance of the individual subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex for the supramolecular organization of PSII and their influence on the rate of state transitions. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effect of laser irradiation of donor blood on erythrocyte shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baibekov, I M; Ibragimov, A F; Baibekov, A I

    2012-04-01

    Changes in erythrocyte shape in donor blood during storage and after irradiation with He-Ne laser and infrared laser were studied by scanning electron microscopy, thick drop express-method, and morphometry. It was found that laser irradiation delayed the appearance of erythrocytes of pathological shapes (echinocytes, stomatocytes, etc.) in the blood; He-Ne laser produced a more pronounced effect.

  1. Metal selective co-ordinative self-assembly of -donors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... and Ag+. With different fluorescent response for metal complexes, we essentially obtained similar 1-D assemblies suggesting similar binding modes for all of them. Supramolecular approach through which morphology of an electron donor moiety can be engineered by metal ions can be a new tool in nanoelectronics.

  2. Syntheses of donor-acceptor-functionalized dihydroazulenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, Søren Lindbæk; Jevric, Martyn; Bond, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The dihydroazulene (DHA)/vinylheptafulvene (VHF) photo/thermoswitch has been of interest for use in molecular electronics and advanced materials. The switching between the two isomers has previously been found to depend strongly on the presence of donor and acceptor groups. The fine-tuning of opt......The dihydroazulene (DHA)/vinylheptafulvene (VHF) photo/thermoswitch has been of interest for use in molecular electronics and advanced materials. The switching between the two isomers has previously been found to depend strongly on the presence of donor and acceptor groups. The fine......-tuning of optical and switching properties relies on ready access to new derivatives via efficient synthetic protocols. The central DHA core is conveniently prepared in a four-step synthesis starting from acetophenone and tropylium substrates. Here, the outcome of this reaction as a function of the nature...... of the substituent group on the phenyl unit of acetophenone is investigated in detail. A wide variety of functional groups (nitro, cyano, halo, alkyl, amido, and thioether) was tolerated, and the route provided access to a large selection of substituted DHA derivatives (position 2 of DHA). These compounds were...

  3. Quality of life of liver donors following donor hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Biju; Bharathan, Viju Kumar; Shaji Mathew, Johns; Amma, Binoj Sivasankara Pillai Thankamony; Gopalakrishnan, Unnikrishnan; Balakrishnan, Dinesh; Menon, Ramachandran Narayana; Dhar, Puneet; Vayoth, Sudheer Othiyil; Surendran, Sudhindran

    2017-03-01

    Although morbidity following living liver donation is well characterized, there is sparse data regarding health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of donors. HRQOL of 200 consecutive live liver donors from 2011-2014 performed at an Indian center were prospectively collected using the SF-36 version 2, 1 year after surgery. The effect of donor demographics, operative details, post-operative complications (Clavien-Dindo and 50-50 criteria), and recipient mortality on the quality-of-life (QOL) scoring was analyzed. Among 200 donors (female/male=141:59), 77 (38.5%) had complications (14.5%, 16.5%, 4.5%, and 3.5%, Clavien-Dindo grades I-IV, respectively). The physical composite score (PCS) of donors 1 year after surgery was less than ideal (48.75±9.5) while the mental composite score (MCS) was good (53.37±6.16). Recipient death was the only factor that showed a statistically significant correlation with both PCS (prepent the decision to donate.

  4. Philanthropic Motivations of Community College Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Linnie S.; Duggan, Molly H.

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study surveyed current, lapsed, and major gift donors to explore the impact of college communications on donors' decisions to contribute to the college, the likelihood of donor financial support for various college projects, and the philanthropic motivation profiles of the donors of a midsized, multicampus community college in…

  5. Kidney transplant outcomes from older deceased donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pippias, Maria; Jager, Kitty J; Caskey, Fergus

    2018-01-01

    As the median age of deceased kidney donors rises, updated knowledge of transplant outcomes from older deceased donors in differing donor-recipient age groups is required. Using ERA-EDTA Registry data we determined survival outcomes of kidney allografts donated from the same older deceased donor ...

  6. [Kidney transplantation from living donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laca, L; Grandtnerová, B; Lacková, E

    2000-10-01

    From Jan. 1, 1994 till August 31, 1999 in the Transplantation Centre of the F. D. Roosevelt Hospital and Policlinic 202 transplantations of the kidneys were made, incl. 11 from live donors. The survival of patients and renal grafts in our group is 100%, i.e. all transplanted kidneys are so far functional. In transplantations of kidneys from dead donors the one-year survival of grafts was 85% and the 5-year survival only 70%. During removal of kidneys from live donors we had only one minor complication--a surface infection of the surgical wound. The authors describe their own experience with assessing the indication criteria, criteria for selection of the most suitable donor-recipient pair. Consistently with work of authors from abroad, they consider transplantations of the kidneys from live donors as one of the best alternatives how to increase the number and quality of renal transplantations and to prevent thus an increase of the number of patients on the waiting list.

  7. Healthy donor effect: its magnitude in health research among blood donors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atsma, F.; Veldhuizen, I.; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Kort, W. de; Vegt, F. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The healthy donor effect has been mentioned as a methodologic problem in blood donor health research. The aim of this study was to investigate different elements of the healthy donor effect. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: First, recent donors (<4 years registered as a donor) were compared

  8. Organic electronic devices with multiple solution-processed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.

    2015-08-04

    A method of fabricating a tandem organic photosensitive device involves depositing a first layer of an organic electron donor type material film by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a first solvent; depositing a first layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the first layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process; depositing a conductive layer over the interim stack by a dry deposition process; depositing a second layer of the organic electron donor type material over the conductive layer by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a second solvent, wherein the organic electron acceptor type material and the conductive layer are insoluble in the second solvent; depositing a second layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the second layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process, resulting in a stack.

  9. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications.

  10. The use of neoplastic donors to increase the donor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaschetti, P; Pretagostini, R; Stabile, D; Peritore, D; Oliveti, A; Gabbrielli, F; Cenci, S; Ricci, A; Vespasiano, F; Grigioni, W F

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the experience of the Centre-Sud Transplant Organization (OCST) area using cadaveric donor with neoplastic diseases to evaluate the possibility of transmission to recipients. From January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2010, the neoplastic risk has been reported to be 5.4% (377/4654 referred donors). In 2003, the number of donors with a tumor and their mean age were respectively: 60 (10.3%) and 59.6 ± 19.9; 2004: 33 (5.2%) and 61.4 ± 15.9; 2005: 32 (6%) and 62.8 ± 15.5; 2006: 46 (7%) and 60.7 ± 19.1; 2007: 51 (7%) and 58.9 ± 16; in 2008: 58 (7%) and 59.7 ± 19.6; 2009: 47 (7%) and 57 ± 26; 2010: 49 (7%) and 64 ± 16. The organ most affected by tumor has been the central nervous system (18%). The tumor was diagnosed before in 325 (86%) cases, versus during organ retrieval in 48 (12.7%) donor operations but before, which four cases (1%) occured after transplantation. According to the histological types and grades, 28 evaluated donors (8.2%) were suitable for transplantation. The histological types were: thyroid carcinoma (n = 3); prostate carcinoma (n = 8), renal clear cell carcinoma (n = 7), oncocytoma (n = 1), meningiomas (n = 2), dermofibrosarcoma (n = 1); verrucous carcinoma of the vulva (n = 1), colon adenocarcinoma (n = 1), grade II astrocytoma (n = 1), adrenal gland tumor (n = 1), gastric GIST (n = 1), oligodendroglioma (n = 1). Forty-five organs were retrieved (22 livers, 19 kidneys, 3 hearts, and 1 pancreas) and transplanted into 44 recipients with 1 liver-kidney combined transplantation. Four recipients died due to causes not related to the tumor. No donor-transmitted tumor was detected among the recipients. Donation is absolutely not indicated in cases of tumors with high metastatic potential and high grades. Performing an accurate evaluation of the donor, taking into account the histological grade, currently can allow, organ retrieval and transplantation with an acceptable risk. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier

  11. Correlated behavior of the EPR signal of cytochrome b-559 heme Fe(III) ligated by OH- and the multiline signal of the Mn cluster in PS-II membrane fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, R; Shuvalov, V A

    1996-05-27

    EPR signals of Cyt b-559 heme Fe(III) ligated by OH- and the multiline signal of the Mn cluster in PS-II membrane fragments have been investigated. In 2,3-dicyano-5,6-dichloro-p-benzoquinone-oxidized PS-II membrane fragments the light-induced decrease of the EPR signal of the heme Fe(III)-OH- is accompanied by the appearance of the EPR multiline signal of the Mn cluster. Addition of F- ions, which act as a stronger ligand for heme Fe(III) than OH-, decreases to the same extent the dark- and light-induced signal of the heme Fe(III)-OH- and the light-induced multiline signal of the Mn cluster. These results are discussed in terms of the light-induced formation of a bound OH' radical shared between the Cyt b-559 heme Fe and the Mn cluster as a first step of water oxidation.

  12. Improved UV-B screening capacity does not prevent negative effects of ambient UV irradiance on PSII performance in High Arctic plants. Results from a six year UV exclusion study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term responses of ambient solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation were investigated on Salix arctica and Vaccinium uliginosum in a High Arctic heath ecosystem in Zackenberg, northeast Greenland. Over a period of six years, UV exclusion was conducted in the growing season by means of filters: 60% UV......-B reduction, 90% UV-B + UV-A reduction, UV transparent filter control, and an open control without filter. Plant responses were evaluated using specific leaf area, leaf content of UV-B absorbing compounds and PSII performance parameters derived from chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction curves. Based...... increased TRo/ABS = FV/FM and REo/ETo. These results demonstrate the current level of ambient UV-B to decrease PSII performance significantly in these High Arctic plants. It appears that the two plant species both have improved their UV-screening capacity, but through different strategies, although this did...

  13. Liver transplant using octogenarian donors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferla, Fabio; De Carlis, Riccardo; Mariani, Anna; De Carlis, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    ... that liver transplantations (LTs) from octogenarian donors increased constantly between 2001 (3.5%) and 2010 (16.1%); this result is consistent with data from Spain and from the European Liver Transplant Registry. In our series (1571 liver transplants performed between December 1985 and December 2015), the first LT with an octogenarian do...

  14. DONOR-TRANSMITTED CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. L. Mironkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate opportunities, prospects and safety of using heart transplants from aged donors who are at high risk of coronary atherosclerosis.Materials and methods. Over the period from March 1987 to May 2014450 heart transplantations (HTx were performed in V.I.Shumakov Federal Research Center of Transplantology and Artifi cial Organs. During the fi rst month after HTx coronarography was made to 152 (37,8% recipients inorder to exclude/confi rm donor-transmitted coronary atherosclerosis (DTCA and to identify tactics of treatment. Coronary atherosclerosis was detected among 16 patients (3,6% of total number of HTx, 15 (93,8% men and 1 (6,2% women. Mean age of recipients with DTCA at the moment of HTx was 48,3 ± 13,1 years.Results. Hemodynamically relevant coronary atherosclerosis was not detected and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI was not made in the group of patients with the mean age of 42,24 ± 8,91 years. Using heart transplants from aged donors is connected with increasing risk of DTCA among the recipients. DTCA-dependent PCI is not connected with coronary mortality. Actuarial survival rate of patients who underwent PCI is comparable with the same one in the total population of HTx recipients and is equal to 87,5% at 5 years and less.Conclusion. Hearts from aged donors (older than 50 years may be used for HTx with suffi cient level of safety. Due to high level of DTCA using of hearts from such donors is preferable for completing urgent HTx to recipients 1А–В UNOS.

  15. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, M; Mochtar, M H; de Melker, A A; van der Veen, F; Repping, S; Gerrits, T

    2016-05-01

    What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial counselling at the time that donor-offspring actually sought contact. Most studies on sperm donors are on anonymous donors and focus on recruitment, financial compensation, anonymity and motivations. There is limited knowledge on the value that identifiable sperm donors place on psychosocial counselling and what their needs are in this respect. We performed a qualitative study from March until June 2014 with 25 identifiable sperm donors, who were or had been a donor at the Centre for Reproductive Medicine of the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam any time between 1989 and 2014. We held semi-structured in-depth interviews with identifiable sperm donors with an average age of 44 years. The interviews were fully transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method of grounded theory. Twelve out of 15 donors (former donors ITALIC! n = 8, active donors ITALIC! n = 7) who had received a counselling session during their intake procedure found it important that they had been able to talk about issues such as the emotional consequences of donation, disclosure to their own children, family and friends, future contact with donor-offspring and rules and regulations. Of the 10 former donors who had received no counselling session, 8 had regretted the lack of intensive counselling. In the years following their donation, most donors simply wanted to know how many offspring had been born using their sperm and had no need for further counselling. Nevertheless, they frequently mentioned that they were concerned about the well-being of 'their' offspring. In addition, they would value the availability of psychosocial counselling in the event that donor-offspring actually sought contact. A limitation of our study is its

  16. Associations of health status with subsequent blood donor behavior-An alternative perspective on the Healthy Donor Effect from Donor InSight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hurk, Katja; Zalpuri, Saurabh; Prinsze, Femmeke J.; Merz, Eva-Maria; de Kort, Wim L. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    In donor health research, the 'Healthy Donor Effect' (HDE) often biases study results and hampers their interpretation. This refers to the fact that donors are a selected 'healthier' subset of a population due to both donor selection procedures and self-selection. Donors with long versus short donor

  17. Photosynthetic water oxidation in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803: mutations D1-E189K, R and Q are without influence on electron transfer at the donor side of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J; Winkler, S; Hays, A M; Hundelt, M; Debus, R J; Junge, W

    2001-11-01

    The oxygen-evolving manganese cluster (OEC) of photosynthesis is oxidised by the photochemically generated primary oxidant (P(+*)(680)) of photosystem II via a tyrosine residue (Y(Z), Tyr161 on the D1 subunit of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803). The redox span between these components is rather small and probably tuned by protonic equilibria. The very efficient electron transfer from Y(Z) to P(+*)(680) in nanoseconds requires the intactness of a hydrogen bonded network involving Y(Z), D1-His190, and presumably D1-Glu189. We studied photosystem II core particles from photoautotrophic mutants where the residue D1-E189 was replaced by glutamine, arginine and lysine which were expected to electrostatically differ from the glutamate in the wild-type (WT). Surprisingly, the rates of electron transfer from Y(Z) to P(+*)(680) as well as from the OEC to Y(ox)(Z) were the same as in the WT. With the generally assumed proximity between D1-His190 (and thus D1-Glu189) and Y(Z), the lack of any influence on the electron transfer around Y(Z) straightforwardly implies a strongly hydrophobic environment forcing Glu (acid) and Lys, Arg (basic) at position D1-189 into electro-neutrality. As one alternative, D1-Glu189 could be located at such a large distance from the OEC, Y(Z) and P(+*)(680) that a charge on D1-189X does not influence the electron transfer. This seems less likely in the light of the drastic influence of its direct neighbour, D1-His190, on Y(Z) function. Another alternative is that D1-Glu189 is negatively charged, but is located in a cluster of acid/base groups that compensates for an alteration of charge at position 189, leaving the overall net charge unchanged in the Gln, Lys, and Arg mutants.

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... free Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  19. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  20. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  1. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a ...

  2. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Mochtar, M.H.; de Melker, A.A.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.; Gerrits, T.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? SUMMARY ANSWER: Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial

  3. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? Cancel Unsubscribe ... considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? ... 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of ...

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from NCIcancertopics? ... 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of ...

  6. Tele-recruitment for Donor Retention

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Amit; Tiwari, A.

    2012-01-01

    Blood transfusion services are the integral part of health care system and these services have safe blood transfusion as the major goal. Voluntary blood donation is the key to safe blood and this safety is further enhanced when the voluntary blood donors become repeat/regular donors. Retention of donors is therefore a very crucial strategy to ensure enhanced blood safety. Tele-recruitment is an effective medium of recruiting and more importantly retaining donors via means of telephone/Short M...

  7. The water-water cycle in leaves is not a major alternative electron sink for dissipation of excess excitation energy when CO2 assimilation is restricted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driever, S.M.; Baker, N.R.

    2011-01-01

    Electron flux from water via photosystem II (PSII) and PSI to oxygen (water–water cycle) may provide a mechanism for dissipation of excess excitation energy in leaves when CO2 assimilation is restricted. Mass spectrometry was used to measure O2 uptake and evolution together with CO2 uptake in leaves

  8. Artificial corneas versus donor corneas for repeat corneal transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpek, Esen K; Alkharashi, Majed; Hwang, Frank S; Ng, Sueko M; Lindsley, Kristina

    2014-11-05

    Individuals who have failed one or more full thickness penetrating keratoplasties (PKs) may be offered repeat corneal surgery using an artificial or donor cornea. An artificial or prosthetic cornea is known as a keratoprosthesis. Both donor and artificial corneal transplantations involve removal of the diseased and opaque recipient cornea (or the previously failed cornea) and replacement with another donor or prosthetic cornea. To assess the effectiveness of artificial versus donor corneas in individuals who have had one or more failed donor corneal transplantations. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2013, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to November 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to November 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to November 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 27 November 2013. Two review authors independently assessed reports from the electronic searches to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or controlled clinical trials (CCTs). We resolved discrepancies by discussion or consultation with a third review author. For discussion purposes, we assessed findings from observational cohort studies and non-comparative case series. No data synthesis was performed. We did not identify any RCTs or CCTs comparing artificial corneas with donor corneas for repeat corneal transplantations. The optimal management for those individuals who have failed a conventional corneal transplantation is not known

  9. Artificial corneas versus donor corneas for repeat corneal transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpek, Esen K; Alkharashi, Majed; Hwang, Frank S; Ng, Sueko M; Lindsley, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals who have failed one or more full thickness penetrating keratoplasties (PKs) may be offered repeat corneal surgery using an artificial or donor cornea. An artificial or prosthetic cornea is known as a keratoprosthesis. Both donor and artificial corneal transplantations involve removal of the diseased and opaque recipient cornea (or the previously failed cornea) and replacement with another donor or prosthetic cornea. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of artificial versus donor corneas in individuals who have had one or more failed donor corneal transplantations. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2013, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to November 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to November 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to November 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 27 November 2013. Selection criteria Two review authors independently assessed reports from the electronic searches to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or controlled clinical trials (CCTs). We resolved discrepancies by discussion or consultation with a third review author. Data collection and analysis For discussion purposes, we assessed findings from observational cohort studies and non-comparative case series. No data synthesis was performed. Main results We did not identify any RCTs or CCTs comparing artificial corneas with donor corneas for repeat corneal transplantations. Authors

  10. Blood donor: nursing care plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Zapata Sampedro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The standardized nursing care plan can be used as a means through which the nurse will assess and identify the particular needs of the blood donor.To draw up the care plan, we have conducted the evaluation on the basis of the Marjory Gordon’s functional health patterns.The more prevailing diagnosis according to the NANDA taxonomy have been identified, results have been established according to the NOC (Nursing Outcomes Classification taxonomy, and nursing interventions have been suggested according to the NIC (Nursing Interventions Classification taxonomy. Also, certain potential complications, which are infrequent, must be observed and controlled in the blood donation process. Our main aim with this article has been to offer to professionals resources that grant to the caring activity scientific rigor, professional recognition and an unique and valid tool to evaluate the assistance with the best levels of quality for the blood donor.

  11. Cancer in the organ donor

    OpenAIRE

    DETRY, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Organ Donation and Cancer Pr Olivier Detry, Dpt of Abdominal Surgery and Transplantation, University of Liege The risk of transmission of cancer with the transplanted organ has been known since the pioneering years of solid organ transplantation, and is enhanced by immunosuppression and particularly the calcineurin inhibitors. Therefore, classically, potential organ donors with past history of cancer are excluded from donation, with the exception of low-grade malignant tumours of the...

  12. Hyperbilirubinemia in normal healthy donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Veena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out in B.A.R.C. Hospital Blood Bank over a span of five years, and includes 2734 donors. All the bags were screened for HIV, HBsAg, HCV and VDRL and the plasma in the pilot tubes of the blood bags was observed to detect any abnormality in color. In 27 cases plasma was found to be icteric and liver function tests were carried out on these samples. Two donors showed higher SGPT level, and were excluded. No significant increases in liver enzymes were recorded in the others. Causes of icteric plasma in these apparently healthy donors are discussed. Differential diagnosis includes Gilbert′s disease, hemolytic anemia, drug-induced anemia and other hepatic causes of hyperbilirubinemia, of which Gilbert′s disease is most probable cause with a prevalence of 0.91% in our population. As there are no studies to document the safety of the recipients receiving such abnormal colored plasma as well as to document the hazards in its transfusion, the question arises whether to transfuse such units or not. This study highlights this dilemma. A reassessment of existing policies and regulations is merited.

  13. α,β-Unsubstituted meso-Positioning Thienyl BODIPY: A Promising Electron Deficient Building Block for the Development of Near Infrared (NIR) p-type Donor-Acceptor (D-A) Conjugated Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Squeo, Benedetta

    2018-02-27

    It is demonstrated that α,β-unsubstituted meso-positioning thienyl BODIPY is an electron deficient unit that leads to the development of ultra low optical band gap (Egopt < 1 eV) π-conjugated D-A quarterthiophene polymers. Furthermore, it is revealed that the optoelectronic, electrochemical and charge transporting properties of the resulting α,β-unsubstituted meso-positioning thienyl BODIPY quaterthiophene-based polymers are alkyl side chain positioning dependent. Tail-to-tail (TT) positioning of the alkyl side chains at the two central thiophenes of the quaterthiophene segment results to lower Egopt, higher energy levels and increased hole mobility as compared to head-to-head (HH) positioning. Finally, even though the synthesized polymers exhibit high electron affinity, higher even to that of the fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM), they present only p-type behaviour in field effect transistors (FETs) independent to the alkyl side chain positioning.

  14. Mental health status after living donor hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Szu-Han; Lin, Ping-Yi; Wang, Jiun-Yi; Huang, Mei-Feng; Lin, Hui-Chuan; Hsieh, Chia-En; Hsu, Ya-Lan; Chen, Yao-Li

    2017-05-01

    Donor safety and preservation of donor health after living liver donation are of paramount importance. In addition, the preoperative mental state of a donor is an important factor in determining the psychological impact of donor hepatectomy. Thus, we aimed to explore the mental health status of living liver donors after hepatectomy. We enrolled 60 donors who were scheduled to undergo living donor hepatectomy during the period January 2014 to March 2015 at a single medical center. Mental health status was measured before and 3 months after surgery using 3 self-report questionnaires, namely the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) to assess depressive symptoms, the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire to measure quality of life, and the Chinese Health Questionnaire (CHQ) to screen for minor psychiatric disorders. A comparison of the pre- and postdonation CES-D scores revealed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms after surgery (P = .031). There were significant improvements in the physical health domain (P = .031), the psychological health domain (P = .005), the social relationships domain (P = .005), and the environmental health domain (P = .010) of the WHOQOL-BREF. There were no significant changes in CHQ scores after donor hepatectomy (P = .136). All donors reported that they would donate again if required. Approximately one-third (33.3%) of donors experienced more pain than they had anticipated in the immediate postoperative period, and 20.0% of donors had complications after donor hepatectomy. Donor mental health status tended to improve as donors regained physical function during the 1st 3 months of recovery. Long-term monitoring of living donors' mental health is needed to minimize the adverse psychological outcomes of living liver donation.

  15. Organic Metals. Systematic Molecular Modifications of Hexamethylenetetraheterofulvalene Donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engler, E. M.; Patel, V. V.; Andersen, Jan Rud

    1978-01-01

    Two synthetic approaches for modifying hexamethylenetetraheterofulvalene donors are described for the purpose of perturbing in a systematic way the interesting solid state properties of the TCNQ salts of the parent systems. The first approach consists of a steric modification in which a methyl gr...... group is introduced into the outer five-membered rings of the parent molecules. The second type of modification involves an electronic perturbation in which the outer five-membered alkyl rings are replaced with fused thiophene derivatives...

  16. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. "Batavia" (green) and cv. "Lollo Rossa" (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m(-2) s(-1) for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent.

  17. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theoharis eOuzounis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. ’Batavia’ (green and cv. ‘Lollo Rossa’ (red] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T lamps yielding 90 (±10 µmol m-2 s-1 for up to 20 hr, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED light treatments were Control (no blue addition, 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 µmol m-2 s-1 from 06:00 to 08:00, 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 µmol m-2 s-1 from 21:00 to 08:00, 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 µmol m-2 s-1 from 17:00 to 19:00, and (1B 17-19 Blue at 45 µmol m-2 s-1from 17:00 to 19:00. Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent.

  18. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. “Batavia” (green) and cv. “Lollo Rossa” (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m−2 s−1 for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m−2 s−1 from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent. PMID:25767473

  19. Electronic, cyclic voltammetry, IR and EPR spectral studies of copper(II) complexes with 12-membered N 4, N 2O 2 and N 2S 2 donor macrocyclic ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sulekh; Kumar, Rajiv

    2005-01-01

    A new series of copper(II) complexes have been synthesized with macrocyclic ligands having three different donating atoms in the macrocyclic ring. It has been shown that the stereochemistry of complexes is dependent on the coordinated anions. These complexes are characterized by various physicochemical techniques, viz. elemental analysis, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, IR, electronic, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. Cyclic voltammetric behavior of the complexes has also been discussed. The observed anisotropic g-values indicate that the chloro and acetato complexes are six-coordinate tetragonal. Whereas the sulfato and nitrato complexes are found to have five-coordinate square-pyramidal and four-coordinate square-planar geometry, respectively.

  20. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V.; Giani, Anette S.; Hofmann, Jan A.; Schmidt, Alexander H.

    2016-02-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors.

  1. Donor impurity incorporation during layer growth of Zn II-VI semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    The maximum halogen donor concentration in Zn II-VI semiconductors during layer growth is studied using a standard model from statistical mechanics. Here the driving force for incorporation is an increase in entropy upon mixing of the donor impurity into the available anion lattice sites in the host binary. A formation energy opposes this increase and thus equilibrium is attained at some maximum concentration. Considering the halogen donor impurities within the Zn II-VI binary semiconductors ZnO, ZnS, ZnSe and ZnTe, a heat of reaction obtained from reported diatomic bond strengths is shown to be directly proportional to the log of maximum donor concentration. The formation energy can then be estimated and an expression for maximum donor concentration derived. Values for the maximum donor concentration with each of the halogen impurities, within the Zn II-VI compounds, are computed. This model predicts that the halogens will serve as electron donors in these compounds in order of increasing effectiveness as: F, Br, I, Cl. Finally, this result is taken to be equivalent to an alternative model where donor concentration depends upon impurity diffusion and the conduction band energy shift due to a depletion region at the growing crystal's surface. From this, we are able to estimate the diffusion activation energy for each of the impurities mentioned above. Comparisons are made with reported values and relevant conclusions presented.

  2. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar I. Mitre

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the initial experience of videolaparoscopic nephrectomy in live renal donor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the period from April 2000 to August 2003, 50 left nephrectomies in live donor were performed by videolaparoscopy for transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were male (56% and 22 female (44%. Mean age was 37.2 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI was 27.1 kg/m². RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 179.5 minutes, and warm ischemia time of the graft was 3.79 minutes. The mean estimated bleeding was 141 mL. There was no need of blood transfusion or conversion to open surgery. In 42 cases (84%, the vascular portion of the graft was considered good by the recipient's surgical team and in all cases, the ureter was considered of proper size, though in one of them (2% its vascularization was considered improper. The transplanted kidneys produced urine still in the surgical room in 46 of the 50 transplantations considered. In only 2 cases opioid was required for analgesia. In average, 3.1 doses of dipyrone were used for each patient during hospital stay, and hospital discharge occurred, in average, after 3.2 days post-operatively. Two patients required re-operations and one of them evolved to death. CONCLUSIONS: The laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor for renal transplantation is an alternative to conventional open surgery. In relation to the graft, no alteration, either anatomic or functional, was detected. Though there is already a large documentation in the international literature regarding this procedure, in our setting a prospective randomized study with the usual surgical study is still necessary in order to prove the advantages and disadvantages of the method.

  3. Laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitre Anuar I.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present the initial experience of videolaparoscopic nephrectomy in live renal donor. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the period from April 2000 to August 2003, 50 left nephrectomies in live donor were performed by videolaparoscopy for transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were male (56% and 22 female (44%. Mean age was 37.2 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI was 27.1 kg/m². RESULTS: Mean surgical time was 179.5 minutes, and warm ischemia time of the graft was 3.79 minutes. The mean estimated bleeding was 141 mL. There was no need of blood transfusion or conversion to open surgery. In 42 cases (84%, the vascular portion of the graft was considered good by the recipient's surgical team and in all cases, the ureter was considered of proper size, though in one of them (2% its vascularization was considered improper. The transplanted kidneys produced urine still in the surgical room in 46 of the 50 transplantations considered. In only 2 cases opioid was required for analgesia. In average, 3.1 doses of dipyrone were used for each patient during hospital stay, and hospital discharge occurred, in average, after 3.2 days post-operatively. Two patients required re-operations and one of them evolved to death. CONCLUSIONS: The laparoscopic nephrectomy in live donor for renal transplantation is an alternative to conventional open surgery. In relation to the graft, no alteration, either anatomic or functional, was detected. Though there is already a large documentation in the international literature regarding this procedure, in our setting a prospective randomized study with the usual surgical study is still necessary in order to prove the advantages and disadvantages of the method.

  4. Non-invasive assessment of the donor corneal endothelium using ocular redox fluorometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimazaki, J; Laing, R A; Tsubota, K; Kenyon, K R

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the usefulness of ocular redox fluorometry for evaluating donor corneal endothelial viability. METHODS: Corneas from 42 recipients of penetrating keratoplasty and four donor corneas were examined by ocular redox fluorometry. Autofluorescence from reduced pyridine nucleotides (PN) and oxidised flavoproteins (Fp) of the human corneal endothelium were measured non-invasively, and the PN/Fp ratio was used as a tissue metabolic indicator. Specular microscopy and electron micro...

  5. Family donor care management: principles and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Walraven, S M; Nicoloso-de Faveri, G; Axdorph-Nygell, U A I; Douglas, K W; Jones, D A; Lee, S J; Pulsipher, M; Ritchie, L; Halter, J; Shaw, B E

    2010-08-01

    The World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA) is an international organization fostering collaboration in clinical transplantation and promoting the interests of unrelated stem cell donors. The WMDA has developed standards for the recruitment, counseling, work-up and subsequent donations to protect the interests of donors. Although the care of family donors has been carefully considered and managed in transplant centers (TCs) internationally over numerous years (and increasingly TCs are facing accreditation programs, which address this issue) there is currently a lack of standardized guidelines for the management of family donors. The underlying principles of family donor care are in many ways identical to those concerning unrelated donors, although key ethical considerations differ. Although the WMDA is primarily involved in the field of unrelated donors, we believe that it is important to collaborate with those involved with family donors, to standardize the care. This document hopes to encourage increased collaboration between those caring for related and unrelated donors, and build on the extensive work, which has already been undertaken in this field to homogenize care. We recognize that there will be financial, regulatory and logistic differences in different countries and that the manner in which these principles are achieved may vary.

  6. Living kidney donors: current state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Connie L

    2009-07-01

    Living kidney donation continues as the cornerstone of transplantation. In order to determine with ever-renewing assurance that living donation is safe for the donor, we need to periodically review the literature, review the United Network for Organ Sharing database for donor characteristics that may put them in danger, and scour databases for donors starting dialysis and/or listed for transplant. Additionally, we must encourage financing studies that follow large diverse cohorts of donors over their entire lifetimes in order to detect key characteristics that influence outcomes. Currently, it can be stated that living donation is, on the whole, safe, with few perioperative deaths, complications, or long-term medical issues. Additionally, the living donor reflects the demographics of the general population including increased rates of obesity with some donors having hypertension and low-grade proteinuria. In the long run, death rates (for the white donor) are no different than for the general population, whereas end-stage renal disease rates are slightly increased over the general population, ranging from 0.1% to 1.1%. The higher risk is especially notable in the black donor. Preeclampsia in female donors may also be marginally greater than in those with 2 kidneys. Thus, the new health age brings a rejuvenated responsibility of the medical community and those in governance to design systems that allow more complete and continued follow-up of the living kidney donor, especially those of color.

  7. N -annulated perylene as an efficient electron donor for porphyrin-based dyes: Enhanced light-harvesting ability and high-efficiency Co(II/III)-based dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Jie

    2014-01-08

    Porphyrin-based dyes recently have become good candidates for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). However, the bottleneck is how to further improve their light-harvesting ability. In this work, N-annulated perylene (NP) was used to functionalize the Zn-porphyrin, and four "push-pull"-type NP-substituted and fused porphyrin dyes with intense absorption in the visible and even in the near-infrared (NIR) region were synthesized. Co(II/III)-based DSC device characterizations revealed that dyes WW-5 and WW-6, in which an ethynylene spacer is incorporated between the NP and porphyrin core, showed pantochromatic photon-to-current conversion efficiency action spectra in the visible and NIR region, with a further red-shift of about 90 and 60 nm, respectively, compared to the benchmark molecule YD2-o-C8. As a result, the short-circuit current density was largely increased, and the devices displayed power conversion efficiencies as high as 10.3% and 10.5%, respectively, which is comparable to that of the YD2-o-C8 cell (η = 10.5%) under the same conditions. On the other hand, the dye WW-3 in which the NP unit is directly attached to the porphyrin core showed a moderate power conversion efficiency (η = 5.6%) due to the inefficient π-conjugation, and the NP-fused dye WW-4 exhibited even poorer performance due to its low-lying LUMO energy level and nondisjointed HOMO/LUMO profile. Our detailed physical measurements (optical and electrochemical), density functional theory calculations, and photovoltaic characterizations disclosed that the energy level alignment, the molecular orbital profile, and dye aggregation all played very important roles on the interface electron transfer and charge recombination kinetics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. MULTIFACTORIAL ASSESSMENT OF POSTMORTEM LUNG DONOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Khubutiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate evaluation and the development of special measures to protect donor lungs are important factors for successful lung transplantation. Aim. To develop and determine the effectiveness of the protocol of morpho- functional assessment of potential lung donor. Methods and results. During the period from May, 2011 to May, 2012, 37 donors with diagnoses of brain death were surveyed. 5 bilateral lung transplantations were performed only in 2 cases donors have been evaluated as «ideal». In the majority of recipients early postoperative period was evaluated as satisfactory. Conclusion. Designed multivariate algorithm of donor with brain death assess- ment, effectively implemented through the selection of donors for lung transplantation with satisfactory results in the early postoperative period. However, compliance with ideal criteria will not allow to effectively provide care for patients with terminal lung disease under conditions of continuous growth of «waiting list». 

  9. Preferential inhibition of the plasma membrane NADH oxidase (NOX) activity by diphenyleneiodonium chloride with NADPH as donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    The cell-surface NADH oxidase (NOX) protein of plant and animal cells will utilize both NADH and NADPH as reduced electron donors for activity. The two activities are distinguished by a differential inhibition by the redox inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). Using both plasma membranes and cells, activity with NADPH as donor was markedly inhibited by DPI at submicromolar concentrations, whereas with NADH as donor, DPI was much less effective or had no effect on the activity. The possibility of the inhibition being the result of two different enzymes was eliminated by the use of a recombinant NOX protein. The findings support the concept that NOX proteins serve as terminal oxidases for plasma membrane electron transport involving cytosolic reduced pyridine nucleotides as the natural electron donors and with molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor.

  10. Donor risk factors for graft failure in the cornea donor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Joel; Montoya, Monty; Dontchev, Mariya; Tanner, Jean Paul; Beck, Roy; Gal, Robin; Gallagher, Shawn; Gaster, Ronald; Heck, Ellen; Holland, Edward J; Kollman, Craig; Malling, Jackie; Mannis, Mark J; Woody, Jason

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between donor factors and 5-year corneal graft survival in the Cornea Donor Study. Donor corneas met criteria established by the Eye Bank Association of America, had an endothelial cell density of 2300 to 3300/mm, and were determined to be of good to excellent quality by the eye banks. Donor corneas were assigned using a random approach and surgeons were masked to information about the donor cornea including donor age. Surgery and postoperative care were performed according to the surgeons' usual routines and subjects were followed for 5 years. Donor and donor cornea factors were evaluated for their association with graft failure, which was defined as a regraft or a cloudy cornea that was sufficiently opaque to compromise vision for a minimum of 3 consecutive months. Graft failure was not significantly associated with the type of tissue retrieval (enucleation versus in situ), processing factors, timing of use of the cornea, or characteristics of the donor or the donor cornea. Adjusting for donor age did not affect the results. Donor and donor cornea characteristics do not impact graft survival rates for corneas comparable in quality to those used in this study.

  11. Psychiatric approach to the living kidney donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Correia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kidney transplantation is considered the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. Living donor transplantation has increased because of the shortage, the needs of cadaver donors.Based on existing literature the authors address ethical issues and major psychiatric aspects involved in the evaluation of living donor kidney transplant, and the interference of this procedure on quality of life for donors, and their contraindications. The authors further describe the evaluation procedures used in the Hospital S. João, as well as data related to the 32 patients evaluated in the Department of Psychiatry since 2004.

  12. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF...... transistors (Part 2). The synthetic protocols rely on stepwise Sonogashira coupling reactions. Conductivity studies on various OPE-based molecular wires reveal that mere OPE compounds have a higher electrical resistance compared to the cruciform based wires (up to 9 times higher). The most spectacular result...... be potential candidates for future molecular electronics Synthesis of a new donor-acceptor chromophore based on a benzoquinone- TTF motif (QuinoneDTF) is also described herein (Part 2). Reaction of this molecule with acid induces a colour change from purple to orange. The purple colour can be restored...

  13. Impact of Thermal Annealing on Organic Photovoltaic Cells Using Regioisomeric Donor-Acceptor-Acceptor Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Han, Han; Zou, Yunlong; Lee, Ying-Chi; Oshima, Hiroya; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Holmes, Russell J

    2017-08-02

    We report a promising set of donor-acceptor-acceptor (D-A-A) electron-donor materials based on coplanar thieno[3,2-b]/[2,3-b]indole, benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole, and dicyanovinylene, which are found to show broadband absorption with high extinction coefficients. The role of the regioisomeric electron-donating thienoindole moiety on the physical and structural properties is examined. Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) based on the thieno[2,3-b]indole-based electron donor NTU-2, using C70 as an electron acceptor, show a champion power conversion efficiency of 5.2% under AM 1.5G solar simulated illumination. This efficiency is limited by a low fill factor (FF), as has previously been the case in D-A-A systems. In order to identify the origin of the limited FF, further insight into donor layer charge-transport behavior is realized by examining planar heterojunction OPVs, with emphasis on the evolution of film morphology with thermal annealing. Compared to as-deposited OPVs that exhibit insufficient donor crystallinity, crystalline OPVs based on annealed thin films show an increase in the short-circuit current density, FF, and power conversion efficiency. These results suggest that that the crystallization of D-A-A molecules might not be realized spontaneously at room temperature and that further processing is needed to realize efficient charge transport in these materials.

  14. BLOODR: blood donor and requester mobile application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatikonda, Vamsi Krishna; El-Ocla, Hosam

    2017-01-01

    With rapid increase in the usage of social networks sites across the world, there is also a steady increase in blood donation requests as being noticed in the number of posts on these sites such as Facebook and twitter seeking blood donors. Finding blood donor is a challenging issue in almost every country. There are some blood donor finder applications in the market such as Blood app by Red Cross and Blood Donor Finder application by Neologix. However, more reliable applications that meet the needs of users are prompted. Several software technologies including languages and framework are used to develop our blood-donor web application known as BLOODR application. These technologies comprise Ruby programming language (simply known as Ruby) along with JavaScript and PostgreSQL for database are used. Ruby on Rails (simply known as Rails) is an open source Web framework that makes it possible to quickly and easily create data-based web applications. We show screenshots for the BLOODR application for different types of users including requester, donor, and administrator. Various features of the application are described and their needs of use are analyzed. If a patient needs a blood at a clinic, blood donors in vicinity can be contacted through using a clinic management service provided in this application. Registered donors will get notification for the blood requests only if their blood group is compatible with the requested blood type and in the same city/region. Then matching blood donors can go to the requesting clinic and donate. BLOODR application provides a reliable platform to connect local blood donors with patients. BLOODR creates a communication channel through authenticated clinics whenever a patient needs blood donation. It is a useful tool to find compatible blood donors who can receive blood request posts in their local area. Clinics can use this web application to maintain the blood donation activity. Future improvement of the BLOODR is explained.

  15. Two-Electron Transfer Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaxing; Balamurugan, D; Zhang, Peng; Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N

    2015-06-18

    The frontiers of electron-transfer chemistry demand that we develop theoretical frameworks to describe the delivery of multiple electrons, atoms, and ions in molecular systems. When electrons move over long distances through high barriers, where the probability for thermal population of oxidized or reduced bridge-localized states is very small, the electrons will tunnel from the donor (D) to acceptor (A), facilitated by bridge-mediated superexchange interactions. If the stable donor and acceptor redox states on D and A differ by two electrons, it is possible that the electrons will propagate coherently from D to A. While structure-function relations for single-electron superexchange in molecules are well established, strategies to manipulate the coherent flow of multiple electrons are largely unknown. In contrast to one-electron superexchange, two-electron superexchange involves both one- and two-electron virtual intermediate states, the number of virtual intermediates increases very rapidly with system size, and multiple classes of pathways interfere with one another. In the study described here, we developed simple superexchange models for two-electron transfer. We explored how the bridge structure and energetics influence multielectron superexchange, and we compared two-electron superexchange interactions to single-electron superexchange. Multielectron superexchange introduces interference between singly and doubly oxidized (or reduced) bridge virtual states, so that even simple linear donor-bridge-acceptor systems have pathway topologies that resemble those seen for one-electron superexchange through bridges with multiple parallel pathways. The simple model systems studied here exhibit a richness that is amenable to experimental exploration by manipulating the multiple pathways, pathway crosstalk, and changes in the number of donor and acceptor species. The features that emerge from these studies may assist in developing new strategies to deliver multiple

  16. Travel behavior and deferral of Dutch blood donors : Consequences for donor availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout-Krikke, Ryanne W.; Oei, Welling; Habets, Karin; Pasker-De Jong, Pieternel C M

    2015-01-01

    Background Donors returning from areas with outbreaks of infectious diseases may donate infectious blood back home. Geographic donor deferral is an effective measure to ensure the blood safety, but donor deferral may pose a threat for the blood supply especially after holiday seasons. Insight into

  17. Perylene-Diimide Based Donor-Acceptor-Donor Type Small-Molecule Acceptors for Solution-Processable Organic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesamoorthy, Ramasamy; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan; Sakthivel, Pachagounder

    2017-12-01

    Development of nonfullerene acceptors plays an important role in the commercial availability of plastic solar cells. We report herein synthesis of bay-substituted donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D)-type perylene diimide (PDI)-based small molecules (SM-1 to SM-4) by Suzuki coupling method and their use as acceptors in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells (BHJ-OSCs) with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) polymer donor. We varied the number of electron-rich thiophene units and the solubilizing side chains and also evaluated the optical and electrochemical properties of the small molecules. The synthesized small molecules were confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and high-resolution mass spectroscopy (HR-MS). The small molecules showed extensive and strong absorption in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) region up to 750 nm, with bandgap (E_{{g}}^{{opt}} ) reduced below energy levels of small molecules SM-1 to SM-4 were suitable for use as electron-accepting materials. The small molecules showed good thermal stability up to 300°C. BHJ-OSCs with SM-1 and P3HT polymer donor showed maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.19% with V oc of 0.30 V, J sc of 1.72 mA cm-2, and fill factor (FF) of 37%. The PCE decreased with the number of thiophene units. The PCE of SM-2 was lower than that of SM-1. This difference in PCE can be explained by the higher aggregation tendency of the bithiophene compared with the thiophene unit. Introduction of the solubilizing group in the bay position increased the aggregation property, leading to much lower PCE than for the small molecules without solubilizing group.

  18. Is Signature Size Associated With Organ Donor Designation on Driver's Licenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, N K R; Sullivan, C; Scallan, C; Figueroa, M; Pencak, J A; Kirkland, J; Scott, K; Thornton, J D

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that large signature size is associated with narcissistic characteristics. By contrast, organ donation is an indicator of altruism. Because altruism and narcissism may be viewed as opposites, we sought to determine if smaller signature size is associated with willingness to be an organ donor. Using a cross-sectional study design, we reviewed the health records of 571 randomly selected primary care patients at a large urban safety-net medical system to obtain their demographic and medical characteristics. We also examined driver's licenses that were scanned into electronic health records as part of the patient registration process. We measured signature sizes and obtained the organ donor designation from these driver's licenses. Overall, 256 (45%) patients were designated as donors on their driver's licenses. Signature size averaged 113.3 mm(2) but varied greatly across patients (10th percentile 49.1 mm(2), 90th percentile 226.1 mm(2)). On multivariate analysis, donor designation was positively associated with age 18-34 years, non-black race, having private insurance, and not having any comorbid conditions. However, signature size was not associated with organ donor designation. Signature size is not associated with verified organ donor designation. Further work is needed to understand the relationship between personality types and willingness to be an organ donor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. FORUM Paediatric living donor liver transplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the definitive treatment for children with end-stage liver disease (ESLD). The greatest limitation for LT is scarcity of deceased donor organs. This is particularly critical for smaller children (weighing <10 kg). Living donor liver transplantation. (LDLT) has emerged over the last 2 decades as a viable ...

  20. Factors Influencing Donor Partnership Effectiveness | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-11-03

    Nov 3, 2010 ... This paper, published in the peer-reviewed journal of philanthropy The Foundation Review, discusses the development and use of this new tool as well as various aspects of internal and inter-institutional communication as it pertains to donor collaboration. Download the PDF : Factors Influencing Donor ...

  1. Normothermic machine perfusion for donor liver preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolboom, H.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, liver transplantation is the only treatment for end-stage liver failure. Unfortunately, a sever shortage of donor organs causes significant mortality amongst patients awaiting transplantation. The donor organ shortage could be alleviated by using organs that are normally not accepted for

  2. Tele-recruitment for Donor Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Tiwari, A

    2014-03-01

    Blood transfusion services are the integral part of health care system and these services have safe blood transfusion as the major goal. Voluntary blood donation is the key to safe blood and this safety is further enhanced when the voluntary blood donors become repeat/regular donors. Retention of donors is therefore a very crucial strategy to ensure enhanced blood safety. Tele-recruitment is an effective medium of recruiting and more importantly retaining donors via means of telephone/Short Message Service. This study was carried out at a standalone blood bank during the period from January to December 2011 with objectives of donor retention, relationship management with the support of personnel with good communication skills, Donor data base, Integrated software and communication facility. For Initial 4 months there was no tele-recruiter, then for 2 months two tele-recruiter and for next 6 months three tele-recruiter were dedicated. Only impact of tele-recruitment on in-house donation was taken into consideration. 2,091 donors were recruited through tele-recruitment in this eight-month period. This was 63 % of in-house donations and 13 % of total donations. In other words out of every five in-house donations, three donations were from people contacted through tele-recruitment. Repeat voluntary blood donation is the safest donation. Tele-recruitment does this by converting 'first-time' donors into repeat/regular donors. Simple intervention like reminder calls on telephone can be highly effective tool to retain donors. Tele-recruitment helped the blood center establish relationships with individual donors, and, maybe, even the society at large. Tele-recruitment is a very low-cost model which can be easily replicated in all kind of blood banks, be it standalone, or a hospital based. Even the blood centers which are largely dependent on replacement donors can possibly have good results and convert replacement donors into repeat/regular voluntary blood donors.

  3. Potential organ donor audit in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegarty, M

    2010-11-01

    As increasing demand for organs is a challenge for transplant services worldwide it is essential to audit the process of organ donation. To address this, a national audit of potential organ donors was undertaken across hospitals with Intensive Care Units (N = 36). Questionnaires were returned on all patients (n = 2073) who died in these units from 1\\/9\\/07-31\\/8\\/08; 200 (10%) of these patients were considered for Brain Stem Testing (BST), 158 patients (79%) were diagnosed Brain Stem Dead (BSD) and 138 patients (87%) became potential donors. Consent for donation was given by 92 (69%) next of kin and 90 potential donors (65%) became organ donors. There was no evidence of a large number of potential organ donors being missed. Recommendations included completion of BSTs on all appropriate patients, development of support on BST, referral of all BSD patients to the Organ Procurement Service; enhanced co-ordination within hospitals and sustained information\\/education campaigns.

  4. PATHOMORPHOLOGY OF ZERO BIOPSIES OF DONOR KIDNEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Arefjev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is well known fact that kidney transplants from Extended Criteria Donors may increase risk of De- layed Graft Function and Primary Non-Function of transplants. We have collected and tested 65 «zero» kidney biopsies from cadaver donors aged from 19 to 71 years old. In the pool of elderly donors who died from cerebrovascular accident the frequency of nephrosclerosis presentation was higher than in donors of yonger age who died from craniocephalic trauma. Nevertheless in the general donor pool the number of sclerosed glomeruli was no more than 12%. We did not meet at all in the whole volume of material any bi- opsy with the severe degree of arteriosclerosis. The «zero» biopsies of cadaver kidneys is quite usable and unexpensive tool to measure the degree of nephrosclerosis in order to exclude kidneys which are not fitable for transplantation. 

  5. Bis(pyrrolo)tetrathiafulvalene - An Efficient Pi-Donor in Supramolecular Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Jesper; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted; Thorup, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The synthesis of three novel macrocycles 3-5 based on the two electron donors bis(2,5-dimethyl- pyrrolo)[3,4-d]tetrathiafulvalene (1) and 1,4-hydroquinone is presented. Their abilities to include the electron acceptor paraquat (6) have been investigated by UV/Vis and sup 1 H NMR spectroscopy and ......, the preferred position of the cyclic acceptor 7 in the catenanes around either the pyrrolo-annelated TTF or around the hydroquinone donor relies on a fine balance between all the individual noncovalent forces acting in cooperation....

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Dyes Containing Various Donors and Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzi-Yi; Tsao, Ming-Hsiu; Chen, Fu-Lin; Su, Shyh-Gang; Chang, Cheng-Wen; Wang, Hong-Paul; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Ou-Yang, Wen-Chung; Sun, I-Wen

    2010-01-01

    New organic dyes comprising carbazole, iminodibenzyl, or phenothiazine moieties, respectively, as the electron donors, and cyanoacetic acid or acrylic acid moieties as the electron acceptors/anchoring groups were synthesized and characterized. The influence of heteroatoms on carbazole, iminodibenzyl and phenothiazine donors, and cyano-substitution on the acid acceptor is evidenced by spectral, electrochemical, photovoltaic experiments, and density functional theory calculations. The phenothiazine dyes show solar-energy-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 3.46–5.53%, whereas carbazole and iminodibenzyl dyes show η of 2.43% and 3.49%, respectively. PMID:20162019

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Dyes Containing Various Donors and Acceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chung Ou-Yang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New organic dyes comprising carbazole, iminodibenzyl, or phenothiazine moieties, respectively, as the electron donors, and cyanoacetic acid or acrylic acid moieties as the electron acceptors/anchoring groups were synthesized and characterized. The influence of heteroatoms on carbazole, iminodibenzyl and phenothiazine donors, and cyano-substitution on the acid acceptor is evidenced by spectral, electrochemical, photovoltaic experiments, and density functional theory calculations. The phenothiazine dyes show solar-energy-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η of 3.46–5.53%, whereas carbazole andiminodibenzyl dyesshow η of 2.43% and 3.49%, respectively.

  8. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-07

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects.

  9. Fundamental Electronic Properties of Donor-Type Graphite Intercalated Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    0019 MOORE SCHOOL OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING E UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA T 1 1984 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. 84 09 25 151...SECURITY CLASS. (Of UN. ope) UNCLASSIFIED ISa DECL ASSI FICATION/ DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 15. OISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of des flelpt) Approved for public...actulbndsbecauseofthe slight inaccu- of -0.09eOV. Thisis close but too low to give a racy of the fit which was, weighted to more acca - realistic Fermi

  10. Spectroscopic Studies of the Electron Donor-Acceptor Interaction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conformity with Beer\\'s law was evident over the concentration range 0.8 – 8.0 mg/100 ml of chloroquine phosphate; thus making it possible for an accurate quantitative determination of the drug. Conclusion: The studied complexation phenomenon formed a basis for the quantitative determination of both pure samples and ...

  11. Orthogonal interactions between nitryl derivatives and electron donors: pnictogen bonds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sanchez-Sanz, Goar; Trujillo, Cristina; Solimannejad, M.; Alkorta, I.; Elguero, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 34 (2013), s. 14310-14318 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : center-dot-N * perturbation-theory approach * pnicogen bonds * noncovalent interactions * hydrogen-bonds Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.198, year: 2013

  12. Donor Conception and "Passing," or; Why Australian Parents of Donor-Conceived Children Want Donors Who Look Like Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Karen-Anne

    2017-03-01

    This article explores the processes through which Australian recipients select unknown donors for use in assisted reproductive technologies and speculates on how those processes may affect the future life of the donor-conceived person. I will suggest that trust is an integral part of the exchange between donors, recipients, and gamete agencies in donor conception and heavily informs concepts of relatedness, race, ethnicity, kinship, class, and visibility. The decision to be transparent (or not) about a child's genetic parentage affects recipient parents' choices of donor, about who is allowed to "know" children's genetic backgrounds, and how important it is to be able to "pass" as an unassisted conception. In this way, recipients must trust the process, institutions, and individuals involved in their treatment, as well as place trust in the future they imagine for their child. The current market for donor gametes reproduces normative conceptions of the nuclear family, kinship, and relatedness by facilitating "matching" donors to recipients by phenotype and cultural affinities. Recipient parents who choose not to prioritize "matching," and actively disclose the process of children's conceptions, may embark on a project of queering heteronormative family structures and place great trust in both their own children and changing social attitudes to reduce stigma and generate acceptance for non-traditional families.

  13. DONOR CRITERIA FOR LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION - A COMPARATIVE-STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF DONOR LIVER SELECTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PRUIM, J; TENVERGERT, EM; DEKEMPENAER, MGV; BONSEL, GJ; SLOOFF, MJH

    1993-01-01

    In a case-control study, the relevance of donor parameters used for donor selection on final transplant outcome was studied. Two matched groups of 17 donors were created: one group of 'ideal' donors and a control group not meeting the criteria for 'ideal' donors. Recipients of livers from both

  14. Higher organ donation consent rates by relatives of potential uncontrolled donors versus potential controlled donors after death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, J.; Mook, W.N. van; Willems, M.E.; Heurn, L.W. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Refusal to consent to organ donation is an important cause of the persisting gap between the number of potential organ donors and effectuated donors. In the Netherlands, organ donors include both uncontrolled donors: donors who die unexpectedly after cardiac death (DCD), after failed

  15. Swedish sperm donors are driven by altruism, but shortage of sperm donors leads to reproductive travelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerhovd, Erling; Faurskov, Anders; Werner, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    Swedish legislation requires that sperm donors are identifiable to offspring. In Denmark sperm donors remain anonymous. The aim of this study was to examine sperm donation in Sweden by identifying socio-demographic backgrounds, motivations and attitudes among donors and to describe options and plans of sperm recipients. Furthermore, the willingness of Swedish health care providers to assist in treatment abroad, where sperm from an anonymous donor were to be used, was assessed. The extent of travelling to Denmark for reproductive purposes was also examined. Thirty Swedish sperm donors completed a questionnaire and were interviewed about their backgrounds, motivations and attitudes. Thirty couples where the infertility workup had shown azoospermia were interviewed about their options for achieving parenthood. The willingness to assist in fertility treatment abroad and the extent of reproductive cross border travelling were assessed by interviewing health care providers and by contacting Danish clinics. Almost all donors were Caucasian. The main motivation for sperm donors was to help others. Owing to shortage of sperm donors many Caucasian recipients intended to have treatment abroad. For most non-Caucasian recipients sperm from a donor of appropriate ethnicity were not available in Sweden. Whether the sperm donor was anonymous or identifiable was not of major importance to most sperm recipients. Health care providers expressed unanimous willingness to assist in treatment with sperm from an anonymous donor. Our inquiry indicated that more than 250 Swedish sperm recipients travel to Denmark annually. Identifiable sperm donors are driven by altruistic motives, but shortage of sperm donors leads to reproductive travelling. Recruitment strategies to increase the number of sperm donors in Sweden are therefore warranted.

  16. Fourier transform infrared difference and time-resolved infrared detection of the electron and proton transfer dynamics in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic water oxidation, which provides the electrons necessary for CO₂ reduction and releases O₂ and protons, is performed at the Mn₄CaO₅ cluster in photosystem II (PSII). In this review, studies that assessed the mechanism of water oxidation using infrared spectroscopy are summarized focusing on electron and proton transfer dynamics. Structural changes in proteins and water molecules between intermediates known as Si states (i=0-3) were detected using flash-induced Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy. Electron flow in PSII and proton release from substrate water were monitored using the infrared changes in ferricyanide as an exogenous electron acceptor and Mes buffer as a proton acceptor. Time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy provided information on the dynamics of proton-coupled electron transfer during the S-state transitions. In particular, a drastic proton movement during the lag phase (~200μs) before electron transfer in the S3→S0 transition was detected directly by monitoring the infrared absorption of a polarizable proton in a hydrogen bond network. Furthermore, the proton release pathways in the PSII proteins were analyzed by FTIR difference measurements in combination with site-directed mutagenesis, isotopic substitutions, and quantum chemical calculations. Therefore, infrared spectroscopy is a powerful tool for understanding the molecular mechanism of photosynthetic water oxidation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Observation of a universal donor-dependent vibrational mode in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, A V; Verbitskiy, N I; Haberer, D; Struzzi, C; Petaccia, L; Usachov, D; Vilkov, O Y; Vyalikh, D V; Fink, J; Knupfer, M; Büchner, B; Grüneis, A

    2014-01-01

    Electron-phonon coupling and the emergence of superconductivity in intercalated graphite have been studied extensively. Yet, phonon-mediated superconductivity has never been observed in the 2D equivalent of these materials, doped monolayer graphene. Here we perform angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to try to find an electron donor for graphene that is capable of inducing strong electron-phonon coupling and superconductivity. We examine the electron donor species Cs, Rb, K, Na, Li, Ca and for each we determine the full electronic band structure, the Eliashberg function and the superconducting critical temperature Tc from the spectral function. An unexpected low-energy peak appears for all dopants with an energy and intensity that depend on the dopant atom. We show that this peak is the result of a dopant-related vibration. The low energy and high intensity of this peak are crucially important for achieving superconductivity, with Ca being the most promising candidate for realizing superconductivity in graphene.

  18. Organic Donor-Acceptor Complexes as Novel Organic Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Xu, Wei; Sheng, Peng; Zhao, Guangyao; Zhu, Daoben

    2017-07-18

    Organic donor-acceptor (DA) complexes have attracted wide attention in recent decades, resulting in the rapid development of organic binary system electronics. The design and synthesis of organic DA complexes with a variety of component structures have mainly focused on metallicity (or even superconductivity), emission, or ferroelectricity studies. Further efforts have been made in high-performance electronic investigations. The chemical versatility of organic semiconductors provides DA complexes with a great number of possibilities for semiconducting applications. Organic DA complexes extend the semiconductor family and promote charge separation and transport in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In OFETs, the organic complex serves as an active layer across extraordinary charge pathways, ensuring the efficient transport of induced charges. Although an increasing number of organic semiconductors have been reported to exhibit good p- or n-type properties (mobilities higher than 1 or even 10 cm2 V-1 s-1), critical scientific challenges remain in utilizing the advantages of existing semiconductor materials for more and wider applications while maintaining less complicated synthetic or device fabrication processes. DA complex materials have revealed new insight: their unique molecular packing and structure-property relationships. The combination of donors and acceptors could offer practical advantages compared with their unimolecular materials. First, growing crystals of DA complexes with densely packed structures will reduce impurities and traps from the self-assembly process. Second, complexes based on the original structural components could form superior mixture stacking, which can facilitate charge transport depending on the driving force in the coassembly process. Third, the effective use of organic semiconductors can lead to tunable band structures, allowing the operation mode (p- or n-type) of the transistor to be

  19. Non-intrusive Assessment of Photosystem II and Photosystem I in Whole Coral Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milán Szabó

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Reef building corals (phylum Cnidaria harbor endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (genus Symbiodinium that generate photosynthetic products to fuel their host's metabolism. Non-invasive techniques such as chlorophyll (Chl fluorescence analyses of Photosystem II (PSII have been widely used to estimate the photosynthetic performance of Symbiodinium in hospite. However, since the spatial origin of PSII chlorophyll fluorescence in coral tissues is uncertain, such signals give limited information on depth-integrated photosynthetic performance of the whole tissue. In contrast, detection of absorbance changes in the near infrared (NIR region integrates signals from deeper tissue layers due to weak absorption and multiple scattering of NIR light. While extensively utilized in higher plants, NIR bio-optical techniques are seldom applied to corals. We have developed a non-intrusive measurement method to examine photochemistry of intact corals, based on redox kinetics of the primary electron donor in Photosystem I (P700 and chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics (Fast-Repetition Rate fluorometry, FRRf. Since the redox state of P700 depends on the operation of both PSI and PSII, important information can be obtained on the PSII-PSI intersystem electron transfer kinetics. Under moderate, sub-lethal heat stress treatments (33°C for ~20 min, the coral Pavona decussata exhibited down-regulation of PSII electron transfer kinetics, indicated by slower rates of electron transport from QA to plastoquinone (PQ pool, and smaller relative size of oxidized PQ with concomitant decrease of a specifically-defined P700 kinetics area, which represents the active pool of PSII. The maximum quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm and functional absorption cross-section of PSIIPSII remained unchanged. Based on the coordinated response of P700 parameters and PSII-PSI electron transport properties, we propose that simple P700 kinetics parameters as employed here serve as indicators of

  20. RETROPERITONEOSCOPIC DONOR NEPHRECTOMY: EXPERIENCE WITH TEN OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Perlin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We modified the method of retroperitoneoscopic live donor nephrectomy and evaluated results of first 10 pro- cedures. We performed four left- and six right-sided donor nephrectomy. There were no conversions to open or hand-assisted surgery. All organs have been successfully transplanted. Retroperitoneoscopic live donor nephrec- tomy is safe and feasible. The method has three main advantages over conventional laparoscopic nephrectomy: the absence of contact with bowel, spleen, liver and other intra-abdominal structures, more comfortable access to the renal artery, absence of intraperitoneal pressure elevation. 

  1. Donor policy rules and aid effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars

    2008-01-01

    policy choices, aid disbursements may lead to faster transitional growth, stagnation or cyclical growth. Moreover, the analysis also suggests that donor policies may be part of the reason why foreign aid is not found to be uniformly effective in raising long-run productivity across recipients......The present paper examines the macroeconomic impact of aid, by introducing endogenous aid allocations into a neoclassical growth framework. On this basis it is shown that donor policies can have important implications for the trajectory of recipients' GDP per capita. Depending on specific donor...

  2. Human decellularized bone scaffolds from aged donors show improved osteoinductive capacity compared to young donor bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Smith

    Full Text Available To improve the safe use of allograft bone, decellularization techniques may be utilized to produce acellular scaffolds. Such scaffolds should retain their innate biological and biomechanical capacity and support mesenchymal stem cell (MSC osteogenic differentiation. However, as allograft bone is derived from a wide age-range, this study aimed to determine whether donor age impacts on the ability an osteoinductive, acellular scaffold produced from human bone to promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSC. BM-MSCs from young and old donors were seeded on acellular bone cubes from young and old donors undergoing osteoarthritis related hip surgery. All combinations resulted in increased osteogenic gene expression, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP enzyme activity, however BM-MSCs cultured on old donor bone displayed the largest increases. BM-MSCs cultured in old donor bone conditioned media also displayed higher osteogenic gene expression and ALP activity than those exposed to young donor bone conditioned media. ELISA and Luminex analysis of conditioned media demonstrated similar levels of bioactive factors between age groups; however, IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP1 concentration was significantly higher in young donor samples. Additionally, structural analysis of old donor bone indicated an increased porosity compared to young donor bone. These results demonstrate the ability of a decellularized scaffold produced from young and old donors to support osteogenic differentiation of cells from young and old donors. Significantly, the older donor bone produced greater osteogenic differentiation which may be related to reduced IGFBP1 bioavailability and increased porosity, potentially explaining the excellent clinical results seen with the use of allograft from aged donors.

  3. Research Award: Donor Partnerships Division

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Deadline: August 7, 2013. Please note that all applicafions must be sent electronically. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial.

  4. Perylene-Diimide Based Donor-Acceptor-Donor Type Small-Molecule Acceptors for Solution-Processable Organic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesamoorthy, Ramasamy; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan; Sakthivel, Pachagounder

    2017-08-01

    Development of nonfullerene acceptors plays an important role in the commercial availability of plastic solar cells. We report herein synthesis of bay-substituted donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D)-type perylene diimide (PDI)-based small molecules (SM-1 to SM-4) by Suzuki coupling method and their use as acceptors in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells (BHJ-OSCs) with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) polymer donor. We varied the number of electron-rich thiophene units and the solubilizing side chains and also evaluated the optical and electrochemical properties of the small molecules. The synthesized small molecules were confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and high-resolution mass spectroscopy (HR-MS). The small molecules showed extensive and strong absorption in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) region up to 750 nm, with bandgap (E_{{g}}^{{opt}} ) reduced below polymer donor showed maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 0.19% with V oc of 0.30 V, J sc of 1.72 mA cm-2, and fill factor (FF) of 37%. The PCE decreased with the number of thiophene units. The PCE of SM-2 was lower than that of SM-1. This difference in PCE can be explained by the higher aggregation tendency of the bithiophene compared with the thiophene unit. Introduction of the solubilizing group in the bay position increased the aggregation property, leading to much lower PCE than for the small molecules without solubilizing group.

  5. Donor-acceptor conjugated polymers based on multifused ladder-type arenes for organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jhong-Sian; Cheng, Sheng-Wen; Cheng, Yen-Ju; Hsu, Chain-Shu

    2015-03-07

    Harvesting solar energy from sunlight to generate electricity is considered as one of the most important technologies to address the future sustainability of humans. Polymer solar cells (PSCs) have attracted tremendous interest and attention over the past two decades due to their potential advantage to be fabricated onto large area and light-weight flexible substrates by solution processing at a lower cost. PSCs based on the concept of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) configuration where an active layer comprises a composite of a p-type (donor) and an n-type (acceptor) material represents the most useful strategy to maximize the internal donor-acceptor interfacial area allowing for efficient charge separation. Fullerene derivatives such as [6,6]-phenyl-C61 or 71-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) are the ideal n-type materials ubiquitously used for BHJ solar cells. The major effort to develop photoactive materials is numerously focused on the p-type conjugated polymers which are generally synthesized by polymerization of electron-rich donor and electron-deficient acceptor monomers. Compared to the development of electron-deficient comonomers (acceptor segments), the development of electron-rich donor materials is considerably flourishing. Forced planarization by covalently fastening adjacent aromatic and heteroaromatic subunits leads to the formation of ladder-type conjugated structures which are capable of elongating effective conjugation, reducing the optical bandgap, promoting intermolecular π-π interactions and enhancing intrinsic charge mobility. In this review, we will summarize the recent progress on the development of various well-defined new ladder-type conjugated materials. These materials serve as the superb donor monomers to prepare a range of donor-acceptor semi-ladder copolymers with sufficient solution-processability for solar cell applications.

  6. RESULTS OF THE SPECIAL BLOOD DONOR DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    Responding to the HUG (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève) hospitals’ urgent appeal for blood donations during this summer season, the CERN medical staff organised a day of blood donations for the Swiss bloodbank CTS on 30 July. They were supported by NOVAE (Restaurant No. 1), who provided donors with a free snack. This specially arranged campaign was a success, as the 135 volunteers included 66 first-time donors, and a total of 99 standard bags of blood were collected. (Swiss hospitals need 1300 bags every day!) The CTS and CERN’s medical staff wish to thank the donors and all others who helped make the event a success. Upcoming blood donor days at CERN: 12 November 2008 and 10 March 2009.

  7. RESULTS OF THE SPECIAL BLOOD DONOR DAY

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    Responding to the HUG (Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève) hospitals’ urgent appeal for blood donations during this summer season, the CERN medical staff organised a day of blood donations for the Swiss bloodbank CTS on 30 July. They were supported by NOVAE (Restaurant No. 1), who provided donors with a free snack. This specially arranged campaign was a success, as the 135 volunteers included 66 first-time donors, and a total of 99 standard bags of blood was collected. (Swiss hospitals need 1300 bags every day!) The CTS and CERN’s medical staff want to thank the donors and all others who helped make the event a success. Upcoming blood donor days at CERN: 12 November 2008 and 10 March 2009.

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Loading... Close Yeah, keep it Undo Close This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue Watch Queue ... Queue __count__/__total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Loading... Unsubscribe from ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2:30. credihealth 146 views 2:30 Pain Control: Support for ... Jeff, peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 29,377 ...

  10. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  11. The dead donor rule: a defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Samuel C M

    2013-08-01

    Miller, Truog, and Brock have recently argued that the "dead donor rule," the requirement that donors be determined to be dead before vital organs are procured for transplantation, cannot withstand ethical scrutiny. In their view, the dead donor rule is inconsistent with existing life-saving practices of organ transplantation, lacks a cogent ethical rationale, and is not necessary for maintenance of public trust in organ transplantation. In this paper, the second of these claims will be evaluated. (The first and third are not addressed.) The claim that the dead donor rule lacks a cogent ethical rationale will be shown to be an expression of the contemporary rejection of the moral significance of the traditional distinction between killing and allowing to die. The moral significance of this traditional distinction, and the associated norm that doctors should not kill their patients, will be defended, and this critique of it shown to be unsuccessful.

  12. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

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  13. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  15. Psychiatric history in living kidney donor candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Katsuji; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Ishigooka, Jun

    2012-04-01

    To critically discuss recent studies of living kidney donor candidates with a past or current psychiatric history and to offer guidance for the psychosocial evaluation of such donors. A global consensus has been developed that active, significant mental illness and substance abuse are absolute contraindications to organ donation due to diminished ability to make a well informed, rational decision about donation or to maintain health status after donation. However, to date, there has been little information published on the suitability for donation and the long-term psychosocial and medical outcomes after donation in donors with mental health issues, especially relatively milder psychiatric disorders, or past significant psychiatric history. To resolve the ethical dilemma of whether living donor candidates with mental health issues should be allowed to donate as is their right or be considered a vulnerable group in need of protection, we need more information. Information should include careful evaluation, possible intervention and follow-up to optimize donation.

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... employee, Serena Marshall, as she takes you through her blood stem cell donation experience at the National ... 31,594 views 10:58 AML Survivor meets her German stem cell donor for the first time ...

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have ... 11 12 videos Play all exercise cassie shipman Leukemia Survivor Meets Bone Marrow Donor - Duration: 4:47. ...

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... on the use of BMT and PBSCT, see http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/fa... If you are ... registry of volunteers willing to be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard ...

  19. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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  1. Alginate dressing as a donor site haemostat.

    OpenAIRE

    Groves, A. R.; Lawrence, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    An alginate fibre dressing has been used to reduce blood loss from skin graft donor sites. Significant haemostasis has been achieved in the immediate post surgery phase and no adverse reactions observed.

  2. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy increases the supply of living donor kidneys: a center-specific microeconomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, P C; Johnson, L B

    2000-05-27

    A tenet of microeconomics is that new technology will shift the supply curve to the right. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) is a new technique for removal of living donor kidneys. Centers performing this procedure have noted an increased number of patients presenting for donor evaluation. This has not been previously studied. The records of all LDN performed from May 1998 to February 1999 were reviewed. The following variables were examined: sex, age, related vs. unrelated donation, estimated blood loss, i.v. analgesia, length of stay, and time out of work. Donors undergoing traditional open donor nephrectomy during January 1997 to May 1998 served as the control group. A composite cost index was constructed. LDN significantly decreased length of stay, pain, and time out of work; the supply function shifted to the right. Telephone interviews revealed that 47% donated solely because of the LDN procedure. LDN increases the supply of living donor kidneys.

  3. Donor-Derived Myeloid Sarcoma in Two Kidney Transplant Recipients from a Single Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amudha Palanisamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the rare occurrence of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma in two kidney transplant patients who received organs from a single deceased donor. There was no evidence of preexisting hematologic malignancy in the donor at the time of organ recovery. Both recipients developed leukemic involvement that appeared to be limited to the transplanted organ. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and molecular genotyping analyses confirmed that the malignant cells were of donor origin in each patient. Allograft nephrectomy and immediate withdrawal of immunosuppression were performed in both cases; systemic chemotherapy was subsequently administered to one patient. Both recipients were in remission at least one year following the diagnosis of donor-derived myeloid sarcoma. These cases suggest that restoration of the immune system after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy and allograft nephrectomy may be sufficient to control HLA-mismatched donor-derived myeloid sarcoma without systemic involvement.

  4. Nitric oxide donors for treating preterm labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckitt, Kirsten; Thornton, Steve; O'Donovan, Oliver P; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-05-08

    A number of tocolytics have been advocated for the treatment of threatened preterm labour in order to delay birth. The rationale is that a delay in birth may be associated with improved neonatal morbidity or mortality. Nitric oxide donors, such as nitroglycerin, have been used to relax the uterus. This review addresses their efficacy, adverse effects and influence on neonatal outcome. To determine whether nitric oxide donors administered in threatened preterm labour are associated with a delay in birth, adverse effects or improved neonatal outcome. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (1 December 2013). Randomised controlled trials of nitric oxide donors administered for tocolysis. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Twelve trials, including a total of 1227 women at risk of preterm labour, contributed data to this updated review. The methodological quality of trials was mixed; trials comparing nitric oxide donors with other types of tocolytics were not blinded and this may have had an impact on findings.Three studies compared nitric oxide donors (glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)) with placebo. There was no significant evidence that nitric oxide donors prolonged pregnancy beyond 48 hours (average risk ratio (RR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74 to 1.90, two studies, 186 women), and although for most adverse effects there was no significant difference between groups, women in the active treatment group in one study were at higher risk of experiencing a headache. For infant outcomes there was no significant evidence that nitric oxide donors reduced the risk of neonatal death or serious morbidity (stillbirth RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.01 to 8.59, one study, 153 infants; neonatal death RR 0.43, 95% CI 0.06 to 2.89, two studies, 186 infants). One study, using a composite outcome, reported a reduced risk of serious adverse outcomes for infants in the GTN group which approached statistical significance (RR

  5. Iron status of regular voluntary blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahida Vilsu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our blood bank is a regional blood transfusion centre, which accepts blood only from voluntary donors. Aim: The aim is to study iron status of regular voluntary donors who donated their blood at least twice in a year. Materials and Methods: Prior to blood donation, blood samples of 220 male and 30 female voluntary donors were collected. Control included 100 each male and female healthy individuals in the 18- to 60-year age group, who never donated blood and did not have any chronic infection. In the study and control groups, about 10% subjects consumed non-vegetarian diet. After investigation, 85 males and 56 females having haemoglobin (Hb levels above 12.5 g/dl were selected as controls. Donors were divided into ≤10, 11-20, 21-50 and> 50 blood donation categories. Majority of the donors in> 50 donation category donated blood four times in a year, whereas the remaining donors donated two to three times per year. Haematological parameters were measured on fully automatic haematology analyzer, serum iron and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC by biochemical methods, ferritin using ELISA kits and transferrin using immunoturbidometry kits. Iron/TIBC ratio x 100 gave percentage of transferrin saturation value. Statistical Analysis: Statistical evaluation was done by mean, standard deviation, pair t -test, χ2 and anova ( F -test. Results: Preliminary analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the iron profile of vegetarian and non-vegetarian subjects or controls and the donors donating < 20 times. Significant increase or decrease was observed in mean values of various haematological and iron parameters in donors who donated blood for> 20 times ( P < 0.001, compared to controls. Anaemia, iron deficiency and depletion of iron stores were more prevalent in female donors ( P < 0.05 compared to males and especially in those male donors who donated their blood for more than 20 times. Conclusion: Regular voluntary blood

  6. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study (REDS-III): A research program striving to improve blood donor and transfusion recipient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Steven; Busch, Michael P; Murphy, Edward L; Shan, Hua; Ness, Paul; Glynn, Simone A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study -III (REDS-III) is a 7-year multicenter transfusion safety research initiative launched in 2011 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Study design The domestic component involves 4 blood centers, 12 hospitals, a data coordinating center, and a central laboratory. The international component consists of distinct programs in Brazil, China, and South Africa which involve US and in-country investigators. Results REDS-III is using two major methods to address key research priorities in blood banking/transfusion medicine. First, there will be numerous analyses of large “core” databases; the international programs have each constructed a donor/donation database while the domestic program has established a detailed research database that links data from blood donors and their donations, the components made from these donations, and data extracts from the electronic medical records of the recipients of these components. Secondly, there are more than 25 focused research protocols involving transfusion recipients, blood donors, or both that are either in progress or scheduled to begin within the next 3 years. Areas of study include transfusion epidemiology and blood utilization; transfusion outcomes; non-infectious transfusion risks; HIV-related safety issues (particularly in the international programs); emerging infectious agents; blood component quality; donor health and safety; and other donor issues. Conclusions It is intended that REDS-III serve as an impetus for more widespread recipient and linked donor-recipient research in the US as well as to help assure a safe and available blood supply in the US and in international locations. PMID:24188564

  7. Blood donation mobile applications: are donors ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shan; Chang, Shelley; Uyeno, Kasie; Almquist, Gay; Wang, Shirong

    2016-03-01

    The rapid rise of mobile communication technologies has the potential to dramatically change and improve blood donor recruitment and retention efforts. E-mail invitations were sent to blood donors in a large metropolitan area to participate in a Web-based survey designed to gauge their readiness and interest level for a blood donation mobile application ("app"). A total of 982 ethnically diverse respondents of various age groups and prior donation experiences were surveyed. Among the respondents, 87.3% had ready access to smart phones. E-mail was chosen by 62.1% as the currently preferred method when contacted by the blood center, followed by texting (10.1%). App features desired by most respondents were the abilities to request appointments 24/7 (76.8%) and to receive appointment confirmations quickly (81.3%). Many were concerned about receiving too many alerts or messages (64.1%) or insufficient protection for personal information (53.5%). Overall, 67.7% of respondents indicated that they were likely to use a blood donation mobile app. Likelihood was not significantly different by sex or ethnicity, and the impact of education level was limited. Donors who currently made donation appointments via telephone or a website were equally likely to use such an app. However, donors older than 45 years were less likely than younger donors (p = 0.001), and donors with more than five lifetime donations were more likely than less frequent donors to use such an app (p = 0.02). In a metropolitan area, donors are very receptive to using a mobile app to manage their donations. © 2015 AABB.

  8. Role of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain in electrogenic activity of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciotta, John M; Zou, Yongjin; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2011-07-01

    Certain anaerobic bacteria, termed electrogens, produce an electric current when electrons from oxidized organic molecules are deposited to extracellular metal oxide acceptors. In these heterotrophic "metal breathers", the respiratory electron transport chain (R-ETC) works in concert with membrane-bound cytochrome oxidases to transfer electrons to the extracellular acceptors. The diversity of bacteria able to generate an electric current appears more widespread than previously thought, and aerobic phototrophs, including cyanobacteria, possess electrogenic activity. However, unlike heterotrophs, cyanobacteria electrogenic activity is light dependent, which suggests that a novel pathway could exist. To elucidate the electrogenic mechanism of cyanobacteria, the current studies used site-specific inhibitors to target components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain (P-ETC) and cytochrome oxidases. Here, we show that (1) P-ETC and, particularly, water photolysed by photosystem II (PSII) is the source of electrons discharged to the environment by illuminated cyanobacteria, and (2) water-derived electrons are transmitted from PSII to extracellular electron acceptors via plastoquinone and cytochrome bd quinol oxidase. Two cyanobacterial genera (Lyngbya and Nostoc) displayed very similar electrogenic responses when treated with P-ETC site-specific inhibitors, suggesting a conserved electrogenic pathway. We propose that in cyanobacteria, electrogenic activity may represent a form of overflow metabolism to protect cells under high-intensity light. This study offers insight into electron transfer between phototrophic microorganisms and the environment and expands our knowledge into biologically based mechanisms for harnessing solar energy.

  9. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 3 presents studies that discuss findings in the various aspects of electron chemistry. The book is comprised of four chapters; each chapter reviews a work that tackles an issue in electron transfer chemistry. Chapter 1 discusses the photoinduced electron transfer in flexible biaryl donor-acceptor molecules. Chapter 2 tackles light-induced electron transfer in inorganic systems in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. The book also covers internal geometry relaxation effects on electron transfer rates of amino-centered systems. The sequential elec

  10. The Roles of Biofilm Conductivity and Donor Substrate Kinetics in a Mixed-Culture Biofilm Anod

    Science.gov (United States)

    We experimentally assessed kinetics and thermodynamics of electron transfer (ET) from the donor substrate (acetate) to the anode for a mixed-culture biofilm anode. We interpreted the results with a modified biofilm-conduction model consisting of three ET steps: (1) intracellular...

  11. How intermolecular geometrical disorder affects the molecular doping of donor-acceptor copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Nuzzo, D.; Fontanesi, C.; Jones, R.; Allard, S; Dumsch, I.; Scherf, U.; von Hauff, E.L.; Schumacher, S.; Da Como, E.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular doping of conjugated polymers represents an important strategy for improving organic electronic devices. However, the widely reported low efficiency of doping remains a crucial limitation to obtain high performance. Here we investigate how charge transfer between dopant and donor-acceptor

  12. Organic Materials in the Undergraduate Laboratory: Microscale Synthesis and Investigation of a Donor-Acceptor Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappenfus, Ted M.; Schliep, Karl B.; Dissanayake, Anudaththa; Ludden, Trevor; Nieto-Ortega, Belen; Lopez Navarrete, Juan T.; Ruiz Delgado, M. Carmen; Casado, Juan

    2012-01-01

    A series of experiments for undergraduate courses (e.g., organic, physical) have been developed in the area of small molecule organic materials. These experiments focus on understanding the electronic and redox properties of a donor-acceptor molecule that is prepared in a convenient one-step microscale reaction. The resulting intensely colored…

  13. 75 FR 22813 - Guidance for Industry: Requalification Method for Reentry of Blood Donors Deferred Because of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... Administration, 1401 Rockville Pike, suite 200N, Rockville, MD 20852- 1448. Send one self-addressed adhesive... otherwise suitable donors are indefinitely deferred because of their anti-HBc test results even though... copy of electronic comments or two paper copies of any mailed comments, except that individuals may...

  14. Expanding the live kidney donor pool: ethical considerations regarding altruistic donors, paired and pooled programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shaneel Rajendra; Chadha, Priyanka; Papalois, Vassilios

    2011-06-01

    In renal transplant, there is a well-known deficiency in organ supply relative to demand. Live donation provides superior results when compared with deceased donation including a better rate of graft success and fewer immunologic complications. This deficiency in organs leads to significant morbidity and mortality rates. Alternative avenues have been extensively explored that may expand the live donor pool. They include altruistic donation as well as paired and pooled exchange programs. Altruistic donation is a truly selfless act from a donor unknown to the recipient. Kidney paired donation involves 2 incompatible donor-recipient pairs swapping donors to produce compatibility. Pooled donation involves at least 2 pairs, and can take the form of domino chains in which altruistic input sets up a chain of transplants, in which each recipient's incompatible donor makes a donation for the next recipient. Despite application of these various methods, there lie extensive ethical issues surrounding them. Misconceptions frequently occur; for instance, the perceived benefit that donating an organ to a loved one is greater for a related donor than for an altruistic one. Additionally, it is frequently believed that immunologic incompatibility offers coerced donors liberation from surgery, and that overcoming these barriers by introducing exchange programs provides vulnerable donors less protection. This article explores these and other complex ethical issues surrounding the various methods of expanding the donor pool. The authors offer opinions that challenge the ethical issues and attempt to overcome those views that hinder progress in the field.

  15. Impact of the Cornea Donor Study (CDS) on Acceptance of Corneas from Older Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Alan; Montoya, Monty M.; Beck, Roy; Cowden, John W.; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L.; Kollman, Craig; Malling, Jackie; Mannis, Mark J.; Tennant, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate retrospectively whether findings from the Cornea Donor Study (CDS) led to changes in the transplantation of corneas from older donors. Methods United States eye banks provided complete data on donor age and placement (domestic or international) for 86,273 corneas from 1998 to 2009. The data were analyzed by 3 time periods: preceding CDS (1998–1999), during CDS (2000–2007) and after publication of CDS 5 year results (2008–2009), and separately for corneas placed within vs. outside the United States. Results For corneal tissues transplanted in the United States, the percentage of donors ≥66 years old increased from 19% before CDS to 21% during CDS and 25% after CDS (pcorneas distributed outside the United States with the percentage of donors ≥66 years old decreasing from 56% to 42% to 34%, respectively. Donor age trends over time varied by eye bank. Conclusions There was a modest overall increase in the donor age of corneas transplanted in the United States from 1998 to 2009, but the retrospective nature of the study limits our ability to attribute this change to the CDS. The modest increases in the donor age of corneas transplanted is a positive finding, but wider acceptance of older corneal donor tissue should be encouraged based on the five-year evidence generated by the CDS. PMID:22262218

  16. Impact of the cornea donor study on acceptance of corneas from older donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Alan; Montoya, Monty M; Beck, Roy; Cowden, John W; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L; Kollman, Craig; Malling, Jackie; Mannis, Mark J; Tennant, Bradley

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate retrospectively whether the findings from the Cornea Donor Study (CDS) led to changes in the transplantation of corneas from older donors. Eye banks in United States provided complete data on donor age and placement (domestic or international) for 86,273 corneas from 1998 to 2009. The data were analyzed by 3 periods, preceding CDS (1998-1999), during CDS (2000-2007), and after publication of CDS 5-year results (2008-2009), and separately for corneas placed within versus outside the United States. For corneal tissues transplanted in the United States, the percentage of donors who were 66 years or older increased from 19% before CDS to 21% during CDS and 25% after CDS (Pcorneas distributed outside the United States, with the percentage of donors 66 years and older decreasing from 56% to 42% to 34%, respectively. Donor age trends over time varied by eye bank. There was a modest overall increase in the donor age of corneas transplanted in the United States from 1998 to 2009, but the retrospective nature of the study limits our ability to attribute this change to the CDS. The modest increases in the donor age of corneas transplanted is a positive finding, but wider acceptance of older corneal donor tissue should be encouraged based on the 5-year evidence generated by the CDS.

  17. Device fabrication and transport measurements of FinFETs built with 28Si SOI wafers towards donor qubits in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Cheuk Chi; Persaud, Arun; Dhuey, Scott; Olynick, Deirdre; Borondics, Ferenc; Martin, Michael C.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Bokor, Jeffrey; Schenkel, Thomas

    2009-06-10

    We report fabrication of transistors in a FinFET geometry using isotopically purified silicon-28 -on-insulator (28-SOI) substrates. Donor electron spin coherence in natural silicon is limited by spectral diffusion due to the residual 29Si nuclear spin bath, making isotopically enriched nuclear spin-free 28Si substrates a promising candidate for forming spin quantum bit devices. The FinFET architecture is fully compatible with single-ion implant detection for donor-based qubits, and the donor spin-state readout through electrical detection of spin resonance. We describe device processing steps and discuss results on electrical transport measurements at 0.3 K.

  18. Device fabrication and transport measurements of FinFETs built with 28Si SOI wafers toward donor qubits in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Cheuk Chi; Persaud, Arun; Dhuey, Scott; Olynick, Deirdre; Borondics, Ferenc; Martin, Michael C.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Bokor, Jeffrey; Schenkel, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    We report on the fabrication of transistors in a FinFET geometry using isotopically purified silicon-28-on-insulator (28-SOI) substrates. Donor electron spin coherence in natural silicon is limited by spectral diffusion due to the residual 29Si nuclear spin bath, making isotopically enriched nuclear spin-free 28Si substrates a promising candidate for forming spin quantum bit devices. The FinFET architecture is fully compatible with single-ion implant detection for donor-based qubits and the donor spin-state readout through electrical detection of spin resonance. We describe device processing steps and discuss results on electrical transport measurements at 0.3 K.

  19. Device fabrication and transport measurements of FinFETs built with 28Si SOI wafers towards donor qubits in silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Cheuk Chi

    2009-01-01

    We report fabrication of transistors in a FinFET geometry using isotopically purified silicon-28 -on-insulator (28-SOI) substrates. Donor electron spin coherence in natural silicon is limited by spectral diffusion due to the residual 29Si nuclear spin bath, making isotopically enriched nuclear spin-free 28Si substrates a promising candidate for forming spin quantum bit devices. The FinFET architecture is fully compatible with single-ion implant detection for donor-based qubits, and the donor ...

  20. Retroperitoneoscopic live donor nephrectomy: Review of the first 50 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Changing from an open to a laparoscopic live renal donor programme poses challenges and may affect donor and graft outcomes. Objectives. To evaluate donor safety and graft outcomes for the first 50 retroperitoneoscopic live donor nephrectomies performed at Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.

  1. Prevalence of malaria parasitaemia among blood donors in Owerri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia among blood donors in the Federal Medical Centre, Owerri, Imo State, was carried out between December, 2003 and April, 2004. A total of 500 blood samples were collected from blood donors consisting of 262 commercial donors and 238 relation-donors, using ...

  2. Device fabrication and transport measurements of FinFETs built with $^{28}$Si SOI wafers towards donor qubits in silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, CC; Persaud, A.; Dhuey, S; Olynick, D.; Borondics, F.; Martin, MC; Bechtel, HA; Bokor, J.; Schenkel, T.

    2009-01-01

    We report fabrication of transistors in a FinFET geometry using isotopically purified silicon-28 -on-insulator (28-SOI) substrates. Donor electron spin coherence in natural silicon is limited by spectral diffusion due to the residual $^{29}$Si nuclear spin bath, making isotopically enriched nuclear spin-free $^{28}$Si substrates a promising candidate for forming spin quantum bit devices. The FinFET architecture is fully compatible with single-ion implant detection for donor-based qubits, and ...

  3. Sperm donor anonymity and compensation: an experiment with American sperm donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Glenn; Coan, Travis; Ottey, Michelle; Boyd, Christina

    2016-12-01

    Most sperm donation that occurs in the USA proceeds through anonymous donation. While some clinics make the identity of the sperm donor available to a donor-conceived child at age 18 as part of 'open identification' or 'identity release programs,' no US law requires clinics to do so, and the majority of individuals do not use these programs. By contrast, in many parts of the world, there have been significant legislative initiatives requiring that sperm donor identities be made available to children after a certain age (typically when the child turns 18). One major concern with prohibiting anonymous sperm donation has been that the number of willing sperm donors will decrease leading to shortages, as have been experienced in some of the countries that have prohibited sperm donor anonymity. One possible solution, suggested by prior work, would be to pay current anonymous sperm donors more per donation to continue to donate when their anonymity is removed. Using a unique sample of current anonymous and open identity sperm donors from a large sperm bank in the USA, we test that approach. As far as we know, this is the first attempt to examine what would happen if the USA adopted a prohibition on anonymous sperm donation that used the most ecologically valid population, current sperm donors. We find that 29% of current anonymous sperm donors in the sample would refuse to donate if the law changed such that they were required to put their names in a registry available to donor-conceived children at age 18. When we look at the remaining sperm donors who would be willing to participate, we find that they would demand an additional $60 per donation (using our preferred specification). We also discuss the ramifications for the industry.

  4. All-electric control of donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigillito, Anthony J.; Tyryshkin, Alexei M.; Schenkel, Thomas; Houck, Andrew A.; Lyon, Stephen A.

    2017-10-01

    The electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom of donor impurities in silicon form ultra-coherent two-level systems that are potentially useful for applications in quantum information and are intrinsically compatible with industrial semiconductor processing. However, because of their smaller gyromagnetic ratios, nuclear spins are more difficult to manipulate than electron spins and are often considered too slow for quantum information processing. Moreover, although alternating current magnetic fields are the most natural choice to drive spin transitions and implement quantum gates, they are difficult to confine spatially to the level of a single donor, thus requiring alternative approaches. In recent years, schemes for all-electrical control of donor spin qubits have been proposed but no experimental demonstrations have been reported yet. Here, we demonstrate a scalable all-electric method for controlling neutral 31P and 75As donor nuclear spins in silicon. Using coplanar photonic bandgap resonators, we drive Rabi oscillations on nuclear spins exclusively using electric fields by employing the donor-bound electron as a quantum transducer, much in the spirit of recent works with single-molecule magnets. The electric field confinement leads to major advantages such as low power requirements, higher qubit densities and faster gate times. Additionally, this approach makes it possible to drive nuclear spin qubits either at their resonance frequency or at its first subharmonic, thus reducing device bandwidth requirements. Double quantum transitions can be driven as well, providing easy access to the full computational manifold of our system and making it convenient to implement nuclear spin-based qudits using 75As donors.

  5. Donor-transmitted, donor-derived, and de novo cancer after liver transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Jeremy R; Lynch, Stephen V

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is the third most common cause of death (after cardiovascular disease and infection) for patients who have a functioning kidney allograft. Kidney and liver transplant recipients have similar cancer risks because of immunosuppression but different risks because of differences in primary diseases that cause renal and hepatic failure and the inherent behavior of cancers in the liver. There are 4 types of cancer that may develop in liver allograft recipients: (1) recurrent cancer, (2) donor-transmitted cancer, (3) donor-derived cancer, and (4) de novo cancer. Identification of potential donor cancer transmission may occur at postmortem examination of a deceased donor or when a probable donor-transmitted cancer is identified in another recipient. Donor-transmitted cancer after liver transplant is rare in Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Aging of the donor pool may increase the risk of subclinical cancer in donors. Liver transplant recipients have a greater risk of de novo cancer than the general population, and risk factors for de novo cancer in liver transplant recipients include primary sclerosing cholangitis, alcoholic liver disease, smoking, and increased age. Liver transplant recipients may benefit from cancer screening because they have a high risk, are clearly identifiable, and are under continuous medical supervision.

  6. DETERMINATION OF A MAXIMUM NUMBER OF ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATIONS BY DONOR CHILDREN PER SPERM DONOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, A; Oosterwijk, JC; RIGTERSARIS, CAE

    Objective: To determine a safe maximum number of artificial insemination (donor insemination [DI]) children per anonymous sperm donor. Design: Multiparameter calculation model of contribution of DI to inbreeding. Setting: Data of the collaborative DI centers and demographic population data of The

  7. Does size matter? Kidney transplant donor size determines kidney function among living donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhamurthy, Meenakshi; Smith, Lachlan M.; Machan, Jason T.; Reinert, Steven E.; Gohh, Reginald Y.; Dworkin, Lance D.; Merhi, Basma; Patel, Nikunjkumar; Beland, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Kidney donor outcomes are gaining attention, particularly as donor eligibility criteria continue to expand. Kidney size, a useful predictor of recipient kidney function, also likely correlates with donor outcomes. Although donor evaluation includes donor kidney size measurements, the association between kidney size and outcomes are poorly defined. Methods We examined the relationship between kidney size (body surface area-adjusted total volume, cortical volume and length) and renal outcomes (post-operative recovery and longer-term kidney function) among 85 kidney donors using general linear models and time-to-chronic kidney disease data. Results Donors with the largest adjusted cortical volume were more likely to achieve an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 over a median 24-month follow-up than those with smaller cortical volumes (P kidney donors were more likely to achieve an eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 with renal recovery over a shorter duration due to higher pre-donation and initial post-nephrectomy eGFRs. PMID:28638611

  8. Oocyte cryopreservation for donor egg banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Ana; Remohí, José; Chang, Ching-Chien; Nagy, Zsolt Peter

    2011-09-01

    Oocyte donation is an efficient alternative to using own oocytes in IVF treatment for different indications. Unfortunately, 'traditional' (fresh) egg donations are challenged with inefficiency, difficulties of synchronization, very long waiting periods and lack of quarantine measures. Given the recent improvements in the efficiency of oocyte cryopreservation, it is reasonable to examine if egg donation through oocyte cryopreservation has merits. The objective of the current manuscript is to review existing literature on this topic and to report on the most recent outcomes from two established donor cryobank centres. Reports on egg donation using slow freezing are scarce and though results are encouraging, outcomes are not yet comparable to a fresh egg donation treatment. Vitrification on the other hand appears to provide high survival rates (90%) of donor oocytes and comparable fertilization, embryo development, implantation and pregnancy rates to traditional (fresh) egg donation. Besides the excellent outcomes, the ease of use for both donors and recipients, higher efficiency, lower cost and avoiding the problem of synchronization are all features associated with the benefit of a donor egg cryobank and makes it likely that this approach becomes the future standard of care. Oocyte donation is one of the last resorts in IVF treatment for couples challenged with infertility problems. However, traditional (fresh) egg donation, as it is performed today, is not very efficient, as typically all eggs from one donor are given to only one recipient, it is arduous as it requires an excellent synchronization between the donor and recipient and there are months or years of waiting time. Because of the development of an efficient oocyte cryopreservation technique, it is now possible to cryo-store donor (as well as non-donor) eggs, maintaining their viability and allowing their use whenever there is demand. Therefore, creating a donor oocyte cryobank would carry many advantages

  9. 78 FR 66366 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Use of Donor Screening Tests To Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products for Infection With... entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Use of Donor Screening Tests to Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and... ``Guidance for Industry: Eligibility Determination for Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and...

  10. Donor-acceptor interactions between resonance-excited silver nanoparticles and halide ions in water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinova, E. I.; Tikhomirova, N. S.; Samusev, I. G.; Slezhkin, V. A.; Bryukhanov, V. V.

    2017-10-01

    Donor-acceptor interactions between silver nanoparticles (NPs), resonance-excited by optical quanta of light, and halide ions are studied in aqueous solutions. It is shown that deactivation of the plasmon excitation of Ag NP proceeds according to the exchange mechanism of electron transfer. Plasmon excitation quenching constants are determined and a correlation between quenching and the donor properties of halide ions is found. The efficiency of electrostatic interaction between resonantly-excited Ag NPs and halide ions is studied, and their dipole moment is determined.

  11. [Is syphilis test necessary in blood donors?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-López, María Rebeca F; Arenas-Esqueda, Alfonso; Ambriz-Fernández, Raúl

    2009-01-01

    A syphilis test is performed in blood donors because the national transfusion law makes it mandatory, nevertheless the blood has not been found as an important vehicle of transmission for Treponema pallidum infection. Our objective was to know the prevalence of syphilis in blood donors. we reviewed tests from blood donors of the "Banco Central de Sangre del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI" in two periods, the first from July 2001 to April 2003, and the second from March 2005 to June 2006. Both groups went through screening tests, such as VDRL or USR. and a second test for confirmation, FTA-ABS for the first group and TPHA for the second group. in the first group 111 030 blood donors were included. In this group the positive results from VDRL or USR tests were 471 (0.42 %). One hundred and ninety six were confirmed (0.17 %) with FTA-ABS. In the second group results from 80 578 blood donors were included; the positive results from VDRL or USR tests were 279 (0.34 %). In this group, only 0.08 % were confirmed for a syphilis infection.

  12. Blood donation and blood donor mortality after adjustment for a healthy donor effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus; Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have repeatedly demonstrated that blood donors experience lower mortality than the general population. While this may suggest a beneficial effect of blood donation, it may also reflect the selection of healthy persons into the donor population. To overcome this bias, we...... and Transfusion database (SCANDAT), we assessed the association between annual number of donations in 5-year windows and donor mortality by means of Poisson regression analysis. The analyses included adjustment for demographic characteristics and for an internal healthy donor effect, estimated among elderly...... donation (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.8%-20.4%). After additional adjustment for the internal healthy donor effect, each additional annual donation was associated with a 7.5% decreased mortality risk 7.5% (95% CI, 5.7%-9.4%). CONCLUSION: We observed an inverse relationship between donation frequency...

  13. Ex-vivo partial nephrectomy after living donor nephrectomy: Surgical technique for expanding kidney donor pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw A Nyame

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation has profound improvements in mortality, morbidity, and overall quality of life compared to renal replacement therapy. This report aims to illustrate the use of ex-vivo partial nephrectomy in a patient with a renal angiomyolipoma prior to living donor transplantation. The surgical outcomes of the donor nephrectomy and recipient transplantation are reported with 2 years of follow-up. Both the donor and recipient are healthy and without any significant comorbidities. In conclusion, urologic techniques such as partial nephrectomy can be used to expand the living donor pool in carefully selected and well informed transplant recipients. Our experience demonstrated a safe and positive outcome for both the recipient and donor, and is consistent with other reported outcomes in the literature.

  14. Blood Donor Deferrals by Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorace, James M.; Berman, Jules J.; Brown, Lawrence A.; Moore, G. William

    1990-01-01

    Blood collection facilities have recently witnessed a substantial increase in the number of different tests used to detect infectious disease in donor populations. These facilities are also experiencing an increasingly stringent regulatory effort on the part of the Food and Drug Administration to determine the validity of the software used to handle this information. This report describes a precedence-based inference program (PRELOG) and a modular expert system used to determine a donor's suitability for continued donations (donor deferrals), and whether the donated unit can be released for transfusion. PRELOG accepts ternary logic input, in which test results are allowed to be positive, negative, or undetermined; and allows one to assign precedence values to the logic rules. These features enable programs to be written in a shorter, more error-resistant manner. A comparison between PRELOG and PROLOG is included, and the utility of this approach in producing and validating blood bank software is discussed.

  15. Compensatory Hypertrophy After Living Donor Nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K W; Wu, M W F; Chen, Z; Tai, B C; Goh, Y S B; Lata, R; Vathsala, A; Tiong, H Y

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that kidney volume enhances the estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in kidney donors. This study aimed to describe the phenomenon of compensatory hypertrophy after donor nephrectomy as measured on computerized tomographic (CT) scans. An institutional Domain Specific Review Board (DSRB)-approved study involved approaching kidney donors to have a follow up CT scan from 6 months to 1 year after surgery; 29 patients participated; 55% were female. Clinical chart review was performed, and the patient's remaining kidney volume was measured before and after surgery based on CT scans. eGFR was determined with the use of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Mean parenchymal volume of the remaining kidney for this population (mean age, 44.3 ± 8.5 y) was 204.7 ± 82.5 cc before surgery and 250.5 ± 113.3 cc after donor nephrectomy. Compensatory hypertrophy occurred in 79.3% of patients (n = 23). Mean increase in remaining kidney volume was 22.4 ± 23.2% after donor nephrectomy in healthy individuals. Over a median follow-up of 52.9 ± 19.8 months, mean eGFR was 68.9 ± 12.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), with 24.1% of patients (n = 7) in chronic kidney disease grade 3. Absolute and relative change in kidney volume was not associated with sex, race, surgical approach, or background of hypertension (P = NS). There was a trend of decreased hypertrophy with increasing age (P = .5; Spearman correlation, -0.12). In healthy kidney donors, compensatory hypertrophy of the remaining kidney occurs in 79.3% of the patients, with an average increment of about 22.4%. Older patients may have a blunted compensatory hypertrophy response after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of acid-base status in brain dead donors and the impact of metabolic acidosis on organ retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Kim, M S; Na, S; Koh, S O; Sim, J; Choi, Y S

    2013-09-01

    Pathophysiologic changes after brain death can lead to acid-base disturbances. The primary aim of this study was to clarify the acid-base state and its source in brain dead donors using Stewart's approach. Additionally, we investigated whether the presence of metabolic acidosis affected the number of organs retrieved from donors. A retrospective review of electronic medical records was performed for brain dead donors who had undergone organ harvesting during the past 5 years in a tertiary medical center. The parameters related to acid-base disturbance and the number of organs retrieved from the donors was assessed. Sixty one brain dead donors were evaluated in this study. Twenty three (37.7%) of these patients had metabolic acidosis at the initial diagnosis of brain death. Metabolic acidosis resulted from hyperchloremia and a large strong ion gap. The severity of metabolic acidosis was masked by hypernatremia and hypoalbuminemia. In addition, donors without metabolic acidosis also showed mixed acid-base disturbances in which metabolic acidosis induced by significant hyperchloremia was combined with metabolic alkalosis caused by hypoalbuminemia and hypernatremia. Although more organs were retrieved from the donors without metabolic acidosis than those with metabolic acidosis (P=0.012), serum albumin level (P=0.010) and donor age (Pmetabolic acid-base disturbances, significantly correlated with the number of organs retrieved in multivariate regression analysis. Most brain dead donors exhibited metabolic acid-base disturbances. However, rather than metabolic acidosis, serum albumin level and donor age were well correlated with the number of organs retrieved.

  17. Elderly donors double kidney transplantation (DKT)

    OpenAIRE

    Méndez-Chacón, Pedro; Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM. Lima, Perú; Servicio Nefrología. Servicio de Patología. Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins. Lima, Perú; Vidalón, Armando; Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM. Lima, Perú; Servicio Nefrología. Servicio de Patología. Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins. Lima, Perú; Medina, Mario; Servicio Nefrología. Servicio de Patología. Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins. Lima, Perú; Camacho, Miguel; Servicio Nefrología. Servicio de Patología. Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins. Lima, Perú; Somocurcio, José; Servicio Nefrología. Servicio de Patología. Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins. Lima, Perú

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To use both kidneys of an elderly donor in the same receptor and remark the importance of kidney histology as selector method. Materials and Methods: We evaluate the selection and surveillance of 11 patients who received double kidney of cadaver elderly donors. The ten donors’ mean serum creatinine was 1,3 mg/dL, and the mean age was 63 years old (range 56 to 73 years), the receptor’s mean age 53 years. Both kidneys were examined by frozen wedge biopsy. Quantification of damaged ti...

  18. Predictors of hemoglobin in Danish blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotzé, Sebastian R; Pedersen, Ole B; Petersen, Mikkel S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that blood donors are at increased risk of iron deficiency and subsequent development of iron deficiency anemia. We aimed to investigate the effect of factors influencing hemoglobin (Hb) levels. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Initiated in 2010, the Danish Blood Donor Study...... for the prediction of Hb. RESULTS: The strongest predictors of Hb and risk of low Hb were low ferritin (iron supplementation (yes/no). No dietary factors were found to be consistently significant in multivariable models predicting Hb levels, risk of having low Hb, or risk of a decrease...

  19. Robust Two-Qubit Gates for Donors in Silicon Controlled by Hyperfine Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachpon Kalra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present two strategies for performing two-qubit operations on the electron spins of an exchange-coupled pair of donors in silicon, using the ability to set the donor nuclear spins in arbitrary states. The effective magnetic detuning of the two electron qubits is provided by the hyperfine interaction when the two nuclei are prepared in opposite spin states. This can be exploited to switch SWAP operations on and off with modest tuning of the electron exchange interaction. Furthermore, the hyperfine detuning enables high-fidelity conditional rotation gates based on selective resonant excitation. The latter requires no dynamic tuning of the exchange interaction at all and offers a very attractive scheme to implement two-qubit logic gates under realistic experimental conditions.

  20. Nitric Oxide Donor-Based Cancer Therapy: Advances and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhangjian; Fu, Junjie; Zhang, Yihua

    2017-09-28

    The increasing understanding of the role of nitric oxide (NO) in cancer biology has generated significant progress in the use of NO donor-based therapy to fight cancer. These advances strongly suggest the potential adoption of NO donor-based therapy in clinical practice, and this has been supported by several clinical studies in the past decade. In this review, we first highlight several types of important NO donors, including recently developed NO donors bearing a dinitroazetidine skeleton, represented by RRx-001, with potential utility in cancer therapy. Special emphasis is then given to the combination of NO donor(s) with other therapies to achieve synergy and to the hybridization of NO donor(s) with an anticancer drug/agent/fragment to enhance the activity or specificity or to reduce toxicity. In addition, we briefly describe inducible NO synthase gene therapy and nanotechnology, which have recently entered the field of NO donor therapy.

  1. Decision Making in Kidney Paired Donation Programs with Altruistic Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijiang; Song, Peter X-K; Leichtman, Alan B; Rees, Michael A; Kalbfleisch, John D

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, kidney paired donation (KPD) has been extended to include living non-directed or altruistic donors, in which an altruistic donor donates to the candidate of an incompatible donor-candidate pair with the understanding that the donor in that pair will further donate to the candidate of a second pair, and so on; such a process continues and thus forms an altruistic donor-initiated chain. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy to sequentially allocate the altruistic donor (or bridge donor) so as to maximize the expected utility; analogous to the way a computer plays chess, the idea is to evaluate different allocations for each altruistic donor (or bridge donor) by looking several moves ahead in a derived look-ahead search tree. Simulation studies are provided to illustrate and evaluate our proposed method.

  2. Decision Making in Kidney Paired Donation Programs with Altruistic Donors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijiang; Song, Peter X.-K.; Leichtman, Alan B.; Rees, Michael A.; Kalbfleisch, John D.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, kidney paired donation (KPD) has been extended to include living non-directed or altruistic donors, in which an altruistic donor donates to the candidate of an incompatible donor-candidate pair with the understanding that the donor in that pair will further donate to the candidate of a second pair, and so on; such a process continues and thus forms an altruistic donor-initiated chain. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy to sequentially allocate the altruistic donor (or bridge donor) so as to maximize the expected utility; analogous to the way a computer plays chess, the idea is to evaluate different allocations for each altruistic donor (or bridge donor) by looking several moves ahead in a derived look-ahead search tree. Simulation studies are provided to illustrate and evaluate our proposed method. PMID:25309603

  3. Tissue banking: relationship with blood donor and organ donor card status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Kenneth D; Fitzpatrick, Patricia E; Sheehan, John D

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationships among altruistic health acts may serve to aid therapeutic research advances. In this paper, we report on the links between two such behaviours-donating blood and carrying an organ donor card-and willingness to donate urological tissue to a tissue bank. Reasons for the differential willingness to do so are examined in this paper. A systematic sample of 259 new and returning attendees at a tertiary urology referral clinic in Ireland completed a self-report questionnaire in an outpatient setting. In addition to demographic details, details of known diagnosis of malignancy and family history of cancer; attitudes to tissue donation for research purposes were gauged using a 5-point Likert scale. Both blood donors and organ donor card carriers were more likely to be willing to donate tissue for research purposes. Blood donors were more likely want to know their overall results in comparison to nonblood donors and want their samples to be used for nonprofit research. Our hypothesis that being a blood donor would be a better predictor to donate urological tissue than being an organ donor card carrier borne out by the trends reported above.

  4. Peer-to-peer milk donors' and recipients' experiences and perceptions of donor milk banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Karleen D

    2013-07-01

    To explore the intersection of peer-to-peer milk sharing and donor milk banks. A descriptive survey design containing closed and open-ended questions was used to examine women's perceptions of peer-to-peer milk sharing and milk banking. Closed-ended questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics and conventional qualitative content analysis was used to analyze open-ended responses. Participants were recruited via the Facebook sites of two online milk-sharing networks (Human Milk 4 Human Babies and Eats on Feet). Ninety-eight milk donors and 41 milk recipients who had donated or received breast milk in an arrangement that was facilitated via the Internet. One half of donor recipients could not donate to a milk bank because there were no banks local to them or they did not qualify as donors. Other respondents did not donate to a milk bank because they viewed the process as difficult, had philosophical objections to milk banking, or had a philosophical attraction to peer sharing. Most donor respondents felt it was important to know the circumstances of their milk recipients. No recipient respondents had obtained milk from a milk bank; it was recognized that they would not qualify for banked milk or that banked milk was cost prohibitive. Peer-to-peer milk donors and recipients may differ from milk bank donors and recipients in significant ways. Cooperation between milk banks and peer sharing networks could benefit both groups. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  5. Frequency and risk factors for donor reactions in an anonymous blood donor survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mindy; Osmond, Lori; Yi, Qi-Long; Cameron-Choi, Keltie; O'Brien, Sheila F

    2013-09-01

    Adverse donor reactions can result in injury and decrease the likelihood of donor return. Reaction reports captured in the blood center's database provide an incomplete picture of reaction rates and risk factors. We performed an anonymous survey, mailed to 40,000 donors in 2008, including questions about symptoms, height, weight, sex, and donation status. Reaction rates were compared to those recorded in our database. Possible risk factors were assessed for various reactions. The response rate was 45.5%. A total of 32% of first-time and 14% of repeat donors reported having any adverse symptom, most frequently bruising (84.9 per 1000 donors) or feeling faint or weak (66.2 per 1000). Faint reactions were two to eight times higher than reported in our database, although direct comparison was difficult. Younger age, female sex, and first-time donation status were risk factors for systemic and arm symptoms. In females, low estimated blood volume (EBV) was a risk factor for systemic symptoms. Only 51% of donors who consulted an outside physician also called Canadian Blood Services. A total of 10% of first-time donors with reactions found adverse effects information inadequate. This study allowed us to collect more information about adverse reactions, including minor symptoms and delayed reactions. Based on our findings of the risk factors and frequency of adverse reactions, we are implementing more stringent EBV criteria for younger donors and providing more detailed information to donors about possible adverse effects and their management. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  6. Single molecule-level study of donor-acceptor interactions and nanoscale environment in blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Nicole; Grollman, Rebecca; Rath, Jeremy; Robertson, Alex; Haley, Michael; Anthony, John; Ostroverkhova, Oksana

    2017-02-01

    Organic semiconductors have attracted considerable attention due to their applications in low-cost (opto)electronic devices. The most successful organic materials for applications that rely on charge carrier generation, such as solar cells, utilize blends of several types of molecules. In blends, the local environment strongly influences exciton and charge carrier dynamics. However, relationship between nanoscale features and photophysics is difficult to establish due to the lack of necessary spatial resolution. We use functionalized fluorinated pentacene (Pn) molecule as single molecule probes of intermolecular interactions and of the nanoscale environment in blends containing donor and acceptor molecules. Single Pn donor (D) molecules were imaged in PMMA in the presence of acceptor (A) molecules using wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Two sample configurations were realized: (i) a fixed concentration of Pn donor molecules, with increasing concentration of acceptor molecules (functionalized indenflouorene or PCBM) and (ii) a fixed concentration of acceptor molecules with an increased concentration of the Pn donor. The D-A energy transfer and changes in the donor emission due to those in the acceptor- modified polymer morphology were quantified. The increase in the acceptor concentration was accompanied by enhanced photobleaching and blinking of the Pn donor molecules. To better understand the underlying physics of these processes, we modeled photoexcited electron dynamics using Monte Carlo simulations. The simulated blinking dynamics were then compared to our experimental data, and the changes in the transition rates were related to the changes in the nanoscale environment. Our study provides insight into evolution of nanoscale environment during the formation of bulk heterojunctions.

  7. Donor-Acceptor Block Copolymers: Synthesis and Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Nakabayashi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fullerene derivatives have been widely used for conventional acceptor materials in organic photovoltaics (OPVs because of their high electron mobility. However, there are also considerable drawbacks for use in OPVs, such as negligible light absorption in the visible-near-IR regions, less compatibility with donor polymeric materials and high cost for synthesis and purification. Therefore, the investigation of non-fullerene acceptor materials that can potentially replace fullerene derivatives in OPVs is increasingly necessary, which gives rise to the possibility of fabricating all-polymer (polymer/polymer solar cells that can deliver higher performance and that are potentially cheaper than fullerene-based OPVs. Recently, considerable attention has been paid to donor-acceptor (D-A block copolymers, because of their promising applications as fullerene alternative materials in all-polymer solar cells. However, the synthesis of D-A block copolymers is still a challenge, and therefore, the establishment of an efficient synthetic method is now essential. This review highlights the recent advances in D-A block copolymers synthesis and their applications in all-polymer solar cells.

  8. Non-fullerene electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenekhe, Samson A.; Li, Haiyan; Earmme, Taeshik; Ren, Guoqiang

    2017-11-07

    Non-fullerene electron acceptors for highly efficient organic photovoltaic devices are described. The non-fullerene electron acceptors have an extended, rigid, .pi.-conjugated electron-deficient framework that can facilitate exciton and charge derealization. The non-fullerene electron acceptors can physically mix with a donor polymer and facilitate improved electron transport. The non-fullerene electron acceptors can be incorporated into organic electronic devices, such as photovoltaic cells.

  9. Compliance with donor age recommendations in oocyte donor recruitment advertisements in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta, Hillary B; Berry, Roberta M; Levine, Aaron D

    2013-04-01

    IVF using donated oocytes offers benefits to many infertile patients, yet the technique also raises a number of ethical concerns, including worries about potential physical and psychological risks to oocyte donors. In the USA, oversight of oocyte donation consists of a combination of federal and state regulations and self-regulatory guidelines promulgated by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. This study assesses compliance with one of these self-regulatory guidelines - specifically, ASRM's preferred minimum age for donors of 21. To assess compliance, 539 oocyte donor recruitment advertisements from two recruitment channels (Craigslist and college newspapers) were collected and evaluated. Of these, 61% in the Craigslist dataset and 43% in the college newspaper dataset listed minimum ages between 18 and 20, which is inconsistent with ASRM's preferred minimum age recommendation of 21. Advertisements placed by oocyte donor recruitment agencies were more likely than advertisements placed by clinics to specify minimum ages between 18 and 20. These results indicate that ASRM should evaluate and consider revising its donor age guidelines. IVF using donated human eggs can help many patients who have difficulty having children. However, the technique also raises ethical concerns, including concerns about potential physical and psychological harms to egg donors. In the USA, oversight of egg donation relies on a combination of federal and state regulation and professional self-regulation. Governmental regulations address only limited aspects of egg donation, such as the potential spread of infectious diseases and the reporting of success rates, leaving voluntary guidelines developed by an association of medical professionals to address most issues, including ethical concerns raised by the practice. One of these voluntary guidelines recommends that egg donors should be at least 21 years of age. In this article, we analysed 539 egg donor recruitment advertisements

  10. Study of the Contributions of Donor and Acceptor Photoexcitations to Open Circuit Voltage in Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Yeboah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the key parameters in determining the power conversion efficiency (PCE of bulk heterojunction (BHJ organic solar cells (OSCs is the open circuit voltage . The processes of exciting the donor and acceptor materials individually in a BHJ OSC are investigated and are found to produce two different expressions for . Using the contributions of electron and hole quasi-Fermi levels and charge carrier concentrations, the two different expressions are derived as functions of the energetics of the donor and acceptor materials and the photo-generated charge carrier concentrations, and calculated for a set of donor-acceptor blends. The simultaneous excitation of both the donor and acceptor materials is also considered and the corresponding , which is different from the above two, is derived. The calculated from the photoexcitation of the donor is found to be somewhat comparable with that obtained from the photoexcitation of the acceptor in most combinations of the donor and acceptor materials considered here. It is also found that the calculated from the simultaneous excitations of donor and acceptor in BHJ OSCs is also comparable with the other two . All three thus derived produce similar results and agree reasonably well with the measured values. All three depend linearly on the concentration of the photoexcited charge carriers and hence incident light intensity, which agrees with experimental results. The outcomes of this study are expected to help in finding materials that may produce higher and hence enhanced PCE in BHJ OSCs.

  11. Electrostatically defined silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M., E-mail: msingh@sandia.gov; Luhman, D. R.; Lilly, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87175 (United States); Pacheco, J. L.; Perry, D.; Garratt, E.; Ten Eyck, G.; Bishop, N. C.; Wendt, J. R.; Manginell, R. P.; Dominguez, J.; Pluym, T.; Bielejec, E.; Carroll, M. S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. In this work, a focused ion beam is used to implant antimony donors in 100 nm × 150 nm windows straddling quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of donors implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. In low-temperature transport measurements, regular Coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization are also observed in devices with counted donor implants.

  12. Donor vigilance: what are we doing about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersum-Osselton, Johanna C; Marijt-van der Kreek, Tanneke; de Kort, Wim L A M

    2012-05-01

    Donor vigilance is the systematic monitoring of adverse reactions and incidents in blood donor care with a view to improving quality and safety for blood donors. Standard international definitions are available for surveillance purposes. In recent years advances have been made in determining risk factors for vasovagal and other adverse reactions to blood donation as well as in evaluating preventive measures. Blood establishments should record all adverse reactions in blood donors. Besides its use for individual donor care, this information can be reviewed within and between organisations to guide policy decisions and research for improving donor care. Copyright © 2011 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Benzyne arylation of oxathiane glycosyl donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Fascione

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The arylation of bicyclic oxathiane glycosyl donors has been achieved using benzyne generated in situ from 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT and lead tetraacetate. Following sulfur arylation, glycosylation of acetate ions proceeded with high levels of stereoselectivity to afford α-glycosyl acetates in a ‘one-pot’ reaction, even in the presence of alternative acceptor alcohols.

  14. prevalence of cytomegalovirus antibodies in blood donors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... 86 (Supplement) December 2009. PREVALENCE OF CYTOMEGALOVIRUS ANTIBODIES IN BLOOD DONORS AT THE NATIONAL BLOOD. TRANSFUSION CENTRE, NAIROBI. D. G. Njeru, MBChB, MMed (Path), Dip. Forensic Med (SA), Registrar, Department of Human Pathology, W. O. Mwanda,. MBChB ...

  15. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood stem cell (PBSC) donor, explains the donation process - Duration: 3:28. Be The Match 29,949 ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign ...

  16. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... DOUBLE STEMCELL (Hindi) 09039139777 - Duration: 4:26. Pharma Science 116,753 views 4:26 Stem Cell Basics - ...

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... About Cord Blood Banking - Duration: 49:19. Children's Health 38,921 views 49:19 Myelodysplastic Syndrome | Dr. ...

  18. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... commonly used in the treatment of cancers like leukemia and lymphoma to restore stem cells that have ... 3:35. hemaquebec1998 8,944 views 3:35 Leukemia Survivor Meets Bone Marrow Donor - Duration: 4:47. ...

  19. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 7,934 views 32:25 Stem Cell Basics - How Blood is Made. - Duration: 10:58. Vernon Louw ... 19. Children's Health 40,015 views 49:19 How to become a potential blood stem cell donor ...

  20. [The blood donors' haemovigilance in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounnoughene, N; Sandid, I; Carlier, M; Joussemet, M; Ferry, N

    2013-05-01

    This work aim to present the descriptive analysis of serious adverse reactions in donors (dSAR's), which were notified in 2010 and 2011 in the French national haemovigilance database "e-FIT" (Internet secured haemovigilance reporting system). Some data, which are necessary for this analysis, also come from the regional haemovigilance coordinators' reports (RHC). The other parts of haemovigilance in the context of donation, without donors adverse reactions, such as post-donation information (PDI), adverse events occurred in the blood collection steps of the transfusion chain and epidemiology are not subject to this work analysis. This work shows that the quality of the data gradually improved since the setting up of the notification system of dSAR's. These data are particularly rich in learning lessons, but are still improving. It allows us to confirm that donor's safety, blood components quality, while preserving the blood components self-sufficiency in France, remains a priority. For these reasons, it is important to continue this haemovigilance awareness and to implement necessary actions that would be required for the protection of the donor's health and comfort during donation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. Evaluation of homocysteine in blood bank donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Rosa

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the use of plasma homocysteine levelsin blood bank donors as a risk marker for the development ofcardiovascular diseases in healthy individuals. Methods: Thirtynineblood donors were evaluated and a correlation was establishedbetween the plasma homocysteine levels and the different ageand gender groups. Results: The values of homocysteine levelswere found to be within the normal range, as expected for a healthypopulation. Only three male donors, aged between 40 and 60years, presented hyperhomocysteinemia within the risk rangefor developing cardiovascular disease. Comparing females andmales with regard to homocysteine levels, the values presentedstatistically significant differences, however of little relevance.Variance analysis did not show significant differences betweenthe considered age groups, regardless of gender, but there was aclear increase in homocysteine concentration in males betweenthe 5th and 6th decades of life. Conclusions: It was not possible tosuggest the use of plasma homocysteine levels as an early markerfor the development of cardiovascular diseases in healthy bloodbank donors, but one can speculate about a critical homocysteinelevel to be defined as a cutoff point, above which there wouldbe an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

  2. BLOOD DONOR HAEMATOLOGY PARAMETERS IN TWO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2005-03-03

    Mar 3, 2005 ... blood transfusion states that a donor's blood pressure, .... Differences between Nairobi and Kisumu obtained with independent samples t-test. ns, not significant (p>0.05). Table 2. Statistical analysis and comparisons of leukocyte and platelet parameters for 1394 donated units from two regional blood banks ...

  3. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... be donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show ... A 60 Minutes investigation - Duration: 16:11. CBS News 361,590 views 16:11 Pain Control: Support ...

  4. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... has been rented. This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. Published on Jul 19, 2011 Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former NCI employee, Serena Marshall, as she takes you through her ...

  5. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ... YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign in to add this ...

  6. Research Award: Donor Partnership Division | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Deadline: September 7, 2016 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. ... the production of information related to donor partnerships, participating in partnership development, monitoring and evaluation, communication and learning activities, and preparing internal and external reports.

  7. Organ Donor Recognition: Practical and Ethical Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.J. de Groot (Yorick)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe brain dead patient is the ideal multiorgan donor. Conditions that can lead to the state of brain death are limited. A subarachnoid haemorrhage, intracerebral haemorrhage or traumatic brain injury precede in 83% of the cases the state of brain death. Because of better prevention and

  8. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... her German stem cell donor for the first time in Germany. #priceless - Duration: 1:04. Jacque Brohawn ... Bone Marrow Transplant Patient Information: Chapter 3 - What Are Stem Cells - Duration: 3:58. HenryFordTV 20,159 ...

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

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    Full Text Available ... video will automatically play next. Up next Stem cell donation: Step by step - Duration: 3:35. hemaquebec1998 8,779 views 3:35 My Friend the Stem Cell Donor - Duration: 4:41. Annabelle Monks 6,482 ...

  10. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  11. Donor-acceptor type blends composed of black phosphorus and C60 for solid-state optical limiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Makai; Huang, Shutong; Dong, Ningning; Liu, Zhiwei; Gan, Fan; Wang, Jun; Chen, Yu

    2017-12-15

    Novel donor-acceptor blends composed of black phosphorus (BP) as an electron donor and C60 as an electron acceptor have been prepared and successfully embedded into a non-optically active poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) matrix producing a BP:C60/PMMA film. In contrast to C60, BP and non-annealed BP:C60 blends, annealed BP:C60 blends show a significantly enhanced optical limiting response due to the thermal-induced intermolecular charge transfer effect between BP and C60.

  12. Incorporation of phosphorus donors in (110)-textured polycrystalline diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazea, A.; Barjon, J.; D'Haen, J.; Mortet, V.; D'Olieslaeger, M.; Haenen, K.

    2009-04-01

    The incorporation efficiency of phosphorus was studied as a function of the surface orientation of grains in (110)-textured polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited diamond. Cathodoluminescence mapping of such films exhibits large local differences in relative intensities stemming from P-bound and free excitons. Combined with electron backscattering diffraction mapping, these data allow assessing of the donor concentration as a function of the grain orientation. While [P] can vary between 1015 and >1018 cm-3 within one film, misorientation angles of more than 10° with respect to the exact [110] axis assure an enhanced incorporation of P with concentrations surpassing 5×1017 cm-3. The role of the surface morphology in the observation of these large incorporation differences is explained.

  13. Intensification of donor interviewing procedures: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhenen, D J; Molijn, M H; Gorgels, J; van der Linden, J M; Ko, L K

    1996-02-01

    To determine the feasibility and acceptability for the blood donor of an intensified blood donor interviewing procedure on high-risk factors for infectious diseases. To answer the question whether an intensified blood donor interviewing procedure would lead to an unacceptable loss of blood donors. Feasibility study. Red Cross Bloodbank Rotterdam. DONORS: Study group of 240 first-time donors. Intensified donor interviewing techniques by direct questioning and workload assessment. Intensified interviewing was welcomed by 88-91% of first-time donors and rejected by 2-5%. On the question whether the intensified interviewing procedure should be the standard approach of the blood bank the answer was positive in 76-82% of first-time donors and negative in 11-14%. No blood donors indicated that this would be a reason to withdraw from blood donation. The workload for the blood bank physician increased by approximately 30%. The approach of intensified donor interviewing techniques in first-time donors is acceptable both to the donors and the blood bank workload.

  14. Seropositive abdominal and thoracic donor organs are largely underutilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, R M; Pietroski, R E; Hagan, M; Eisenbrey, A B; Fontana, R J

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology and utilization of anti-hepatitis B core protein(+) and anti-hepatitis C virus(+) organ donor referrals in a large organ procurement organization. Between 1995 and 2006, 3,134 deceased organ donor referrals were tested for anti-HBc and anti-HCV using commercial assays. The prevalence of anti-HCV(+) organ donor referrals significantly increased from 3.4% in 1994-1996 to 8.1% in 2003-2005 (P < .001), whereas the prevalence of anti-HBc(+) organ donor referrals remained unchanged at 3%-4% (P = .20). The 112 anti-HBc(+) (3.5%) and 173 anti-HCV(+) (5.5%) organ donor referrals were significantly older and more likely to be noncaucasian than seronegative organ donor referrals (P < .02). The procurement and utilization rates of seropositive thoracic and abdominal donor organs were significantly lower compared with seronegative organ donors (P < .0001). However, liver utilization rates significantly increased from anti-HBc(+) donors over time (21% vs 46%; P = .026), whereas utilization of anti-HCV(+) liver donors remained unchanged over time (5% vs 18%; P = .303). In summary, the proportion of anti-HCV(+) organ donor referrals has significantly increased and the proportion of anti-HBc(+) organ donor referrals has remained stable. Both thoracic and abdominal organs from seropositive donors are largely underutilized. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recruitment of Live Donors by Candidates for Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Peter P.; Shea, Judy A.; Berns, Jeffrey S.; Simon, Maureen K.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Bloom, Roy D.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about efforts that renal transplant candidates make to recruit live donors. It was hypothesized that preference for live donor kidney transplantation and greater knowledge about live donor transplantation are associated with candidates’ initiating conversations about donation with potential donors. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A cross-sectional study of renal transplant candidates was performed at initial transplant evaluation. Candidates completed a questionnaire that specified whether they had initiated conversations about donation with any potential donors. The questionnaire also measured preference for live donor transplantation, knowledge about transplantation, concern about donor harm, willingness to ask for help in coping with kidney disease, and social support. Results: Ninety-six candidates participated. Forty-nine (51%) reported initiating a conversation with at least one potential donor. In multivariable logistic regression, domains associated with initiating a conversation included: preference for live donor transplantation, willingness to ask for help, and female gender. Older age was associated with a lower odds of initiating a conversation. Knowledge, concern about donor harm, social support, and ethnicity were not associated with initiating a conversation with a donor. Conclusions: Attempts at donor recruitment by kidney transplant candidates are common. These findings suggest that interventions that influence preferences about transplantation and willingness to ask others for help are logical targets to enhance access to live donor transplantation. PMID:18385392

  16. Donor spectroscopy at large hydrostatic pressures and transport studies in compound semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Leonardo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In the first part of this work, the author describes studies of donors in AlSb and in GaAs at large hydrostatic pressures, two materials in which the conduction band minimum is not parabolic, but has a camel`s back shape. These donors were found to display only one or two absorption lines corresponding to ground to bound excited state transitions. It is shown that due to the non-parabolic dispersion, camel's back donors may have as few as one bound excited state and that higher excited states are auto-ionized. Thus, it is possible that transitions to these other states may be lost in the continuum. In the second part, calculations of mobilities in GaN and other group III-Nitride based structures were performed. GaN is interesting in that the carriers in nominally undoped material are thought to originate from impurities which have an ionization energy level resonant with the conduction band, rather than located in the forbidden gap. These donors have a short range potential associated with them which can be effective in scattering electrons in certain situations. It was found that effects of these resonant donors can be seen only at high doping levels in III-Nitride materials and in AlxGa1-xN alloys, where the defect level can be pushed into the forbidden gap. Calculations were also performed to find intrinsic mobility limits in AlxGa1-xN/GaN modulation doped heterostructures. Theoretical predictions show that electron mobilities in these devices are capable of rivaling those found in the best AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterostructures structures today. However, the currently available nitride heterostructures, while displaying mobilities superior to those in bulk material, have sheet carrier concentrations too large to display true two-dimensional electron gas behavior.

  17. Single ion implantation for single donor devices using Geiger mode detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielejec, E.; Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic devices that are designed to use the properties of single atoms such as donors or defects have become a reality with recent demonstrations of donor spectroscopy, single photon emission sources, and magnetic imaging using defect centers in diamond. Ion implantation, an industry standard for atom placement in materials, requires augmentation for single ion capability including a method for detecting a single ion arrival. Integrating single ion detection techniques with the single donor device construction region allows single ion arrival to be assured. Improving detector sensitivity is linked to improving control over the straggle of the ion as well as providing more flexibility in lay-out integration with the active region of the single donor device construction zone by allowing ion sensing at potentially greater distances. Using a remotely located passively gated single ion Geiger mode avalanche diode (SIGMA) detector we have demonstrated 100% detection efficiency at a distance of >75 µm from the center of the collecting junction. This detection efficiency is achieved with sensitivity to ~600 or fewer electron-hole pairs produced by the implanted ion. Ion detectors with this sensitivity and integrated with a thin dielectric, for example a 5 nm gate oxide, using low energy Sb implantation would have an end of range straggle of 98% for counting one and only one ion for a false count probability of 10-4 at an average ion number per gated window of 0.015.

  18. Fullerene C{sub 70} as a p-type donor in organic photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Taojun; Wang, Xiao-Feng, E-mail: charles1976110@hotmail.com, E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu, E-mail: kid@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp; Sano, Takeshi; Kido, Junji, E-mail: charles1976110@hotmail.com, E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu, E-mail: kid@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Organic Device Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, and Research Center for Organic Electronics (ROEL), Yamagata University, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan); Hong, Ziruo, E-mail: charles1976110@hotmail.com, E-mail: zrhong@ucla.edu, E-mail: kid@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Organic Device Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, and Research Center for Organic Electronics (ROEL), Yamagata University, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California-Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Li, Gang; Yang, Yang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California-Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Fullerenes and their derivatives have been widely used as n-type materials in organic transistor and photovoltaic devices. Though it is believed that they shall be ambipolar in nature, there have been few direct experimental proofs for that. In this work, fullerene C{sub 70}, known as an efficient acceptor, has been employed as a p-type electron donor in conjunction with 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile as an electron acceptor in planar-heterojunction (PHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. High fill factors (FFs) of more than 0.70 were reliably achieved with the C{sub 70} layer even up to 100 nm thick in PHJ cells, suggesting the superior potential of fullerene C{sub 70} as the p-type donor in comparison to other conventional donor materials. The optimal efficiency of these unconventional PHJ cells was 2.83% with a short-circuit current of 5.33 mA/cm{sup 2}, an open circuit voltage of 0.72 V, and a FF of 0.74. The results in this work unveil the potential of fullerene materials as donors in OPV devices, and provide alternative approaches towards future OPV applications.

  19. Influence of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy level of the donor material on the effectiveness of the anode buffer layer in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernede, J.C.; Leriche, P.; Roncali, J. [UNAM, Moltech Anjou, CNRS, UMR 6200, Groupe Systemes Conjugues Lineaires, Angers (France); Cattin, L. [UNAM, Institut Jean Rouxel (IMN), UMR 6502, Nantes (France); Djobo, S. Ouro; Morsli, M. [Universite de Nantes, LAMP, EA 3825, Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, Nantes (France); Kanth, S.R.B.; Patil, S. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India); Godoy, A. [University San Sebastian, Prog. Bachiller, Cs. Biolog. Qcas, Bellavista (Chile); Diaz, F.R.; Del Valle, M.A. [University Catolica Chile, Fac. Quimica, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-08-15

    Efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells based on organic electron donor/organic electron acceptor junctions can be strongly improved when the transparent conductive Anode is coated with a Buffer Layer (ABL). Here, the effects of a metal (gold) or oxide (molybdenum oxide) ABL are reported, as a function of the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) of different electron donors. The results indicate that a good matching between the work function of the anode and the highest occupied molecular orbital of the donor material is the major factor limiting the hole transfer efficiency. Indeed, gold is efficient as ABL only when the HOMO of the organic donor is close to its work function {phi}{sub Au}. Therefore we show that the MoO{sub 3} oxide has a wider field of application as ABL than gold. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Blinking fluorescence of single donor-acceptor pairs: important role of "dark'' states in resonance energy transfer via singlet levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osad'ko, I S; Shchukina, A L

    2012-06-01

    The influence of triplet levels on Förster resonance energy transfer via singlet levels in donor-acceptor (D-A) pairs is studied. Four types of D-A pair are considered: (i) two-level donor and two-level acceptor, (ii) three-level donor and two-level acceptor, (iii) two-level donor and three-level acceptor, and (iv) three-level donor and three-level acceptor. If singlet-triplet transitions in a three-level acceptor molecule are ineffective, the energy transfer efficiency E=I_{A}/(I_{A}+I_{D}), where I_{D} and I_{A} are the average intensities of donor and acceptor fluorescence, can be described by the simple theoretical equation E(F)=FT_{D}/(1+FT_{D}). Here F is the rate of energy transfer, and T_{D} is the donor fluorescence lifetime. In accordance with the last equation, 100% of the donor electronic energy can be transferred to an acceptor molecule at FT_{D}≫1. However, if singlet-triplet transitions in a three-level acceptor molecule are effective, the energy transfer efficiency is described by another theoretical equation, E(F)=F[over ¯](F)T_{D}/[1+F[over ¯](F)T_{D}]. Here F[over ¯](F) is a function of F depending on singlet-triplet transitions in both donor and acceptor molecules. Expressions for the functions F[over ¯](F) are derived. In this case the energy transfer efficiency will be far from 100% even at FT_{D}≫1. The character of the intensity fluctuations of donor and acceptor fluorescence indicates which of the two equations for E(F) should be used to find the value of the rate F. Therefore, random time instants of photon emission in both donor and acceptor fluorescence are calculated by the Monte Carlo method for all four types of D-A pair. Theoretical expressions for start-stop correlators (waiting time distributions) in donor and acceptor fluorescence are derived. The probabilities w_{N}^{D}(t) and w_{N}^{A}(t) of finding N photons of donor and acceptor fluorescence in the time interval t are calculated for various values of the energy

  1. Preservation of donor hearts using hypothermic oxygenated perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Sebastian G; La Muraglia, Glenn M; Madariaga, Maria Lucia L; Titus, James S; Selig, Martin K; Farkash, Evan A; Allan, James S; Anderson, Lisa M; Madsen, Joren C

    2014-08-20

    Hypothermic machine perfusion of donor hearts enables continuous aerobic metabolism and washout of toxic metabolic byproducts. We evaluated the effect of machine perfusion on cardiac myocyte integrity in hearts preserved for 4 h in a novel device that provides pulsatile oxygenated hypothermic perfusion (Paragonix Sherpa Perfusion™ Cardiac Transport System). Pig hearts were harvested and stored in Celsior® solution for 4 h using either conventional cold storage on ice (4-h CS, n=6) or the Sherpa device (4-h pulsatile perfusion (PP), n=6). After cold preservation, hearts were evaluated using a non-working heart Langendorff system. Controls (n=3) were reperfused immediately after organ harvest. Biopsies were taken from the apex of the left ventricle before storage, after storage, and after reperfusion to measure ATP content and endothelin-1 in the tissue. Ultrastructural analysis using electron microscopy was performed. Four-hour CS, 4-h PP, and control group did not show any significant differences in systolic or diastolic function (+dP/dt, -dP/dt, EDP). Four-hour PP hearts showed significantly more weight gain than 4-h CS after preservation, which shows that machine perfusion led to myocardial edema. Four-hour CS led to higher endothelin-1 levels after preservation, suggesting more endothelial dysfunction compared to 4-h PP. Electron microscopy revealed endothelial cell rupture and damaged muscle fibers in the 4-h CS group after reperfusion, but the cell structures were preserved in the 4-h PP group. Hypothermic pulsatile perfusion of donor hearts leads to a better-preserved cell structure compared to the conventional cold storage method. This may lead to less risk of primary graft failure after orthotopic heart transplantation.

  2. ِAnalysis of donor motivations in living donor liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham eAbdeldayem

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The introduction of the living donor liver transplantation (LDLT in Egypt as in elsewhere, has raised important psychological conflicts and ethical questions. The objective of this study was to get better understanding of the potential donors’ motives towards LDLT.Methods:This study was conducted on consecutive 193 living –liver donors who underwent partial hepatectomy as donors for LDLT during the period between April 2003 and January 2013, at the National Liver Institute Menoufeyia University, Egypt. Potential donors were thoroughly evaluated preoperatively through a screening questionnaire and interviews as regard their demographic data, relationship to the potential recipient and motives towards proceeding to surgery. They were assured that the information shared between them and the transplant centre is confidential. Results.The donors’ mean age was 25.53± 6.39 years with a range of 18-45 years. Males represented 64.7 % and females were 35.3%. The most common donors (32.1%, n_62, were sons and daughters to their parents (sons: n_43, daughters: n_19 while parents to their offsprings represent 15% (mothers: n_21, fathers: n_8. Brothers and sisters represent 16.5 % (brothers: n_22, sisters: n_10. Nephews & nieces giving their uncles or aunts were 14%. The number of wives donating to their husbands was 11 (5.7%. Interestingly, there was no single husband who donated his wife. Among the remaining donors, there were 11 cousins & one uncle. Unrelated donors were 20 (10.4%. Several factors seemed to contribute to motivation for donation: the seriousness of the potential recipient condition, the relationship and personal history of the donor to the potential recipient, the religious beliefs, the trust in the health care system, and family dynamics and obligations.Conclusions. Absolute absence of coercion on the living-liver donor’s motives may not be realistic because of the serious condition of the potential recipient. It is

  3. Donor-Acceptor Properties of a Single-Molecule Altered by On-Surface Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Tobias; Pawlak, Rémy; Kawai, Shigeki; Geng, Yan; Liu, Xunshan; Decurtins, Silvio; Hapala, Prokop; Baratoff, Alexis; Liu, Shi-Xia; Jelínek, Pavel; Meyer, Ernst; Glatzel, Thilo

    2017-08-22

    Electron donor-acceptor molecules are of outstanding interest in molecular electronics and organic solar cells for their intramolecular charge transfer controlled via electrical or optical excitation. The preservation of their electronic character in the ground state upon adsorption on a surface is cardinal for their implementation in such single-molecule devices. Here, we investigate by atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy a prototypical system consisting of a π-conjugated tetrathiafulvalene-fused dipyridophenazine molecule adsorbed on thin NaCl films on Cu(111). Depending on the adsorption site, the molecule is found either in a nearly undisturbed free state or in a bound state. In the latter case, the molecule adopts a specific adsorption site, leading to the formation of a chelate complex with a single Na(+) alkali cation pulled out from the insulating film. Although expected to be electronically decoupled, the charge distribution of the complex is drastically modified, leading to the loss of the intrinsic donor-acceptor character. The chelate complex formation is reversible with respect to lateral manipulations, enabling tunable donor-acceptor molecular switches activated by on-surface coordination.

  4. How to reverse first time donors to become regular donors? A questionnaire survey in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerus, P; Kullaste, R; Pungas, K; Aavik, T; Lang, K

    2017-11-01

    Donating blood in Estonia is non-remunerated and voluntary. Estonian Blood Service system has four independent regional blood centres that are responsible for blood collection, processing, screening and distribution of blood components to hospitals for clinical use. This research was carried out as a questionnaire survey. A questionnaire was developed to study lapsing first time donors' (FTD) blood donation experience, intention and willingness to donate again. A thousand five hundred and forty-six questionnaires were posted to donors who had one successful donation in 2010 and who had not returned to second donation till the year 2012. For data analysis routine statistical methods were used. To evaluate the most appropriate number of classes, based on previous experience and future expectations, latent class analysis was used. There were 453 respondents (29.3%). For the majority of aspects of blood donation experience the emotions were positive. Results of the study suggested that blood collection agencies should intervene to bolster donors' attitudes, perceived control, and identity as a donor during this crucial post-first donation period. First blood donation seems to have been a positive experience. Reasons leading to stopping blood donation should be studied further. Establishing a donor registry for Estonia would be essential to keep track of donors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Computer Algorithms in the Search for Unrelated Stem Cell Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Steiner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a medical procedure in the field of hematology and oncology, most often performed for patients with certain cancers of the blood or bone marrow. A lot of patients have no suitable HLA-matched donor within their family, so physicians must activate a “donor search process” by interacting with national and international donor registries who will search their databases for adult unrelated donors or cord blood units (CBU. Information and communication technologies play a key role in the donor search process in donor registries both nationally and internationaly. One of the major challenges for donor registry computer systems is the development of a reliable search algorithm. This work discusses the top-down design of such algorithms and current practice. Based on our experience with systems used by several stem cell donor registries, we highlight typical pitfalls in the implementation of an algorithm and underlying data structure.

  6. TRANSLOCATION OF BACTERIA AND ENDOTOXIN IN ORGAN DONORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; Rosman, C; Kooi, K; Wubbels, GH; Bleichrodt, RP

    1994-01-01

    Objective: To determine if bacterial translocation and endotoxin absorption occur in organ donors with an anatomically intact gastrointestinal tract. Design: Case series. Setting: Intensive care units in general and university hospitals. Patients: Twenty-one (multiple) organ donors. Intervention:

  7. Living Kinship Trouble: Danish Sperm Donors' Narratives of Relatedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Danish sperm donors face a particular kind of kinship trouble: they find themselves in a cultural and organizational context that offers different and contrary ways of how to make connections to donor-conceived individuals meaningful. Whereas Danish sperm banks and Danish law want sperm donors to regard these connections as contractual issues, the dominant kinship narrative in Denmark asks sperm donors to also consider them as family and kinship relations. Based on interviews with Danish sperm donors and participant observation at Danish sperm banks, I argue that Danish sperm donors make sense of connections to donor-conceived individuals as a particular kind of relatedness that cannot be reduced to either contractual or kinship relations. Making sense of these connections, sperm donors negotiate their social significance and thereby participate in opening a space which offers avenues for new kinds of sociality.

  8. Anaesthesia and peri-operative care for laparoscopic donor nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.R.A.M. Mertens Zur Borg (Ingrid)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractA successful renal transplant for patients with kidney failure reduces mortality rate when compared to patients who continue dialysis. Organ donation from living donors has significant better results over organ donation from deceased donors. Traditionally the surgical

  9. Easy come, easy go. Retention of blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, A

    2015-08-01

    Retention of blood donors has benefits over recruitment of new blood donors. Retention is defined as preventing donors from lapsing and eventually becoming inactive. This review paper discusses literature on the importance of efforts to retain donors, specifically new donors, since lapsing is most common before the fifth donation. Studies have found that intention to donate, attitudes towards blood donation and self-efficacy (does one feel capable of donating blood) are predictors of blood donation. Feelings of 'warm glow' predict donation behaviour better than altruism. The existing literature further suggests that first time donors can be retained by paying extra attention to adverse events (vasovagal reactions and fatigue). These events could be reduced by drinking water and muscle tension exercises. Feelings of anxiety (in regular donors) and stress can further prevent donors from returning. Planning donations amongst busy lives can help retention, and suggestions are given on which interventions might be helpful. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  10. Thermodynamic, kinetic and electronic structure aspects of a charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our recent work on charge transfer in the electronically push-pull dimethylaminoazobenzene-fullerene C60 donor-bridge-acceptor dyad through orbital picture revealed charge displacement from the n(N=N) (non-bonding) and (N=N) type orbitals centred on the donor part to the purely fullerene centred LUMOs and ...

  11. Blood donor to inactive donor transition in the Basel region between 1996 and 2011: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volken, T; Buser, A; Holbro, A; Bart, T; Infanti, L

    2015-08-01

    For the prevention of blood shortages, it is essential for blood banks to design and implement donor recruitment and donor retention strategies that take into account the determinants of donor return. We studied the behaviour of first-time blood donors in the region of Basel, Switzerland, between 1996 and 2011 and described factors associated with transition from active to inactive donor in two successive first-time donor cohorts (1996-2002, 2003-2008). The risk of becoming an inactive donor was associated with being younger and female, not being a 0-negative donor and living in an urban area. Over time, hazards of becoming an inactive donor were converging for individuals living in non-urban and urban areas as were those of younger and older donors. After their first donation, 73.6% and 67.5% of males in the 1996-2002 and 2003-2008 cohorts, respectively, donated at least once in the following 24 months. The proportion of returning female donors was 71.8% and 65.4%, respectively. The increased volatility of first-time blood donors suggests that marketing actions and strategies aimed at increasing return rates should be reinforced, especially for younger and female blood donors. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  12. Imaging in Lung Transplantation: Surgical Considerations of Donor and Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhus, Leah M; Mulligan, Michael S; Ha, Richard; Shriki, Jabi E; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2016-03-01

    Modifications in recipient and donor criteria and innovations in donor management hold promise for increasing rates of lung transplantation, yet availability of donors remains a limiting resource. Imaging is critical in the work-up of donor and recipient including identification of conditions that may portend to poor posttransplant outcomes or necessitate modifications in surgical technique. This article describes the radiologic principles that guide selection of patients and surgical procedures in lung transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Kidney Exchange with Good Samaritan Donors: A Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Tayfun Sönmez; M. Utku Ünver

    2006-01-01

    We analyze mechanisms to kidney exchange with good samaritan donors where exchange is feasible not only among donor-patient pairs but also among such pairs and non-directed alturistic donors. We show that you request my donor-I get your turn mechanism (Abdulkadiroglu and Sonmez [1999]) is the only mechanism that is Pareto efficient, individually rational, strategy-proof, weakly neutral and consistent.

  14. 21 CFR 640.73 - Reporting of fatal donor reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting of fatal donor reactions. 640.73 Section 640.73 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... donor reactions. If a donor has a fatal reaction which, in any way, may be associated with...

  15. 21 CFR 640.66 - Immunization of donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunization of donors. 640.66 Section 640.66 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.66 Immunization of donors. If specific immunization of a donor is to be performed, the selection and scheduling of the injection of the...

  16. Quality of life of elderly live kidney donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, K.W.; Dols, L.F.; Weimar, W.; Dooper, I.; Ijzermans, J.N.M.; Kok, N.F.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Expanding the use of elderly live donors may help meet the demand for kidney transplants. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of the surgical procedure on the quality of life (QOL) of elderly donors compared with younger donors. METHODS: Alongside three prospective studies

  17. Exploring the Mental Health of Living Kidney Donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Timmerman (Lotte)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Living donor kidney transplantation is the best option for extending and improving the lives of patients with end-stage renal disease. The benefits for the donor are less straightforward: a donor is a healthy person who undergoes a surgery in the first place for the

  18. Prediction models for hemoglobin deferral in whole blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Each year, a relevant proportion of the invited blood donors is eventually deferred from donation because of low hemoglobin (Hb) levels. Deferrals are meant to protect donors from developing iron deficiency anemia after a blood donation, however, they may increase the risk of donor lapse, even

  19. Donors and archives a guidebook for successful programs

    CERN Document Server

    Purcell, Aaron D

    2015-01-01

    Donors and Archives: A Guidebook for Successful Programs highlights the importance of development and fundraising for archives, while focusing on the donor and potential donor. Their interest, their support, their enthusiasm, and their stuff are vital to the success of archival programs.

  20. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  1. South Korea as an emerging donor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chun, Hong-Min; Munyi, Elijah Nyaga; Lee, Heejin

    2010-01-01

    like the objective of ODA, positioning of Korea's ODA as an emerging donor and the nature of aid to North Korea. We also argue that a shift of ODA policy is required to promote reform, based on a thorough reflection on the role of ODA in the alleviation of poverty and promoting sustainable development......South Korea's official development assistance (ODA) has been increasing rapidly and will continue to do so. Korea is one of the few countries which have successfully transitioned from a recipient to a donor. It became a member of DAC (development assistance committee), OECD in November 2009. Korea......'s ODA policy, along with its growth in quantity, is at a crossroads for the enhancement of its quality. Discussions and debates are going on regarding the reforms in Korea's ODA activities, and this paper examines key issues raised. It first reviews the past and present of Korea's ODA, and identifies...

  2. Diet and Asthma: Vitamins and Methyl Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yueh-Ying; Blatter, Josh; Brehm, John M.; Forno, Erick; Litonjua, Augusto A; Celedón, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Dietary changes may partly explain the high burden of asthma in industrialized nations. Experimental studies have motivated a significant number of observational studies of the relation between vitamins (A, C, D, and E) or nutrients acting as methyl donors (folate, vitamin B12, and choline) and asthma. Because observational studies are susceptible to several sources of bias, well-conducted randomized controlled trials (RCTs) remain the “gold standard” to determine whether a vitamin or nutrient has an effect on asthma. Evidence from observational studies and/or relatively few RCTs most strongly justify ongoing and future RCTs of: 1) vitamin D to prevent or treat asthma, 2) choline supplementation as adjuvant treatment for asthma, and 3) vitamin E to prevent the detrimental effects of air pollution in subjects with asthma. At this time, there is insufficient evidence to recommend supplementation with any vitamin or nutrient acting as a methyl donor to prevent or treat asthma. PMID:24461761

  3. Electroluminescence from charge transfer states in Donor/Acceptor solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherafatipour, Golenaz; Madsen, Morten

    Charge photocurrent generation is a key process in solar energy conversion systems. Effective dissociation of the photo-generated electron-hole pairs (excitons) has a strong influence on the efficiency of the organic solar cells. Charge dissociation takes place at the donor/acceptor interface via...... charge transfer (CT) excitons, which is Coulombically bound interfacial electron- hole pairs residing at the donor/acceptor heterojunctions. The CT state represents an intermediate state between the exciton dissociation and recombination back to the ground state. Since the recombination of photo-generated...... charges is a major limitation for the efficiency of the organic solar cells, a thorough understanding of this loss mechanism is crucial to improve the performance of the devices. Furthermore, examining this interfacial state is of great importance in order to maximize open-circuit voltage and photocurrent...

  4. Hemochromatosis Patients as Voluntary Blood Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara E Power

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate hemochromatosis patients' suitability as blood donors as well as their perceptions and experience with the current public donation system. Participants were gathered from a list of current hemochromatosis patients (n=120 and members of the Canadian Hemochromatosis Society (n=1000. Of the 1120 surveys mailed out to these groups, 801 surveys were returned completed. The sample respondents had a mean age of 57.44 years (SD=12.73; range 19 to 87 years, and 57% were men. It was found that 20% (160 of the respondents have donated blood since their diagnosis; however, only 12% of the respondents indicated that they use voluntary blood donation as a means of maintaining their iron levels. Forty per cent of the respondents indicated that they had been refused from voluntary donation. Despite the fact that in May 2001 the Canadian Blood Services, in collaboration with the Canadian Hemochromatosis Society, began a promotion campaign to encourage hemochromatosis patients to become voluntary blood donors, the present study found that 15% of the respondents reported having been refused from the voluntary blood donation service due to the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. With respect to quality of life, it was found that individuals who donate blood were generally healthier with respect to physical functioning and bodily pain, however, these findings may indicate that hemochromatosis patients who are healthier are better able to donate at public blood banks, rather than that voluntary blood donation has an effect on the donors' physical functioning over phlebotomy clinic users. These study findings suggest that although there may be other medical factors limiting individuals from donating, hemochromatosis patients are interested in being voluntary blood donors and this potential resource is currently under-used.

  5. [Ethics and kidney transplants with living donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamzer Bruneel, Marie-France

    2016-12-01

    The ethical debate surrounding transplant practices questions our societies. International recommendations set out numerous precautions which must be taken to ensure that donors act with their free will. While in most countries, including France, organ donation is a voluntary and non-commercial act, a black market exists in the world resulting in the trafficking of organs and tragic transplant tourism. Copyright © 2016. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. External validation of the Donor Risk Index and the Eurotransplant Donor Risk Index on the French liver transplantation registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Audrey; Féray, Cyrille; Audureau, Etienne; Écochard, René; Jacquelinet, Christian; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Duvoux, Christophe; Daurès, Jean-Pierre; Landais, Paul

    2017-08-01

    A major limitation to liver transplantation is organ shortage leading to the use of non-optimal liver grafts. The Donor Risk Index has been validated and recommended to select donors/organs. The Eurotransplant Donor Risk Index was derived from the Donor Risk Index. The objective of our study was to perform an external validation of both Donor Risk Index and Eurotransplant-Donor Risk Index against the French liver transplantation Cristal registry according to recommendations of the Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis. Liver transplantations performed in France between 2009 and 2013 were used to perform the validation study for the Donor Risk Index and the Eurotransplant-Donor Risk Index respectively. We applied on the French data the models used to construct the Donor Risk Index and the Eurotransplant-Donor Risk Index respectively. Neither the Donor Risk Index nor the Eurotransplant-Donor Risk Index were validated against this dataset. Discrimination and calibration of these scores were not preserved according to our data. Important donor and candidates differences between our dataset and the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network or the Eurotransplant datasets may explain why the Donor Risk Index and the Eurotransplant-Donor Risk Index appeared unadapted to the French transplant registry. Neither of these risk indexes were suitable to optimize the French liver allocation system. Thus, our next step will be to propose a general adaptive model for a Donor Risk Index. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Higher organ donation consent rates by relatives of potential uncontrolled donors versus potential controlled donors after death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Jentina; van Mook, Walther N K A; Willems, Monique E C; van Heurn, L W Ernest

    2012-11-01

    Refusal to consent to organ donation is an important cause of the persisting gap between the number of potential organ donors and effectuated donors. In the Netherlands, organ donors include both uncontrolled donors: donors who die unexpectedly after cardiac death (DCD), after failed resuscitation and donors in whom death can be expected and donors after brain death, and controlled DCD donors: those who die after the withdrawal of treatment. Different donor type implies a different setting in which relatives are requested to consent to organ donation. It is unknown whether the setting influences the eventual decision for donation or not. Therefore, we compared the consent rate in potential donors who died unexpectedly (UD group) and in whom death was expected. A total of 523 potential organ donors between 2003 and 2011 in the 715-bed Maastricht University Medical Centre, the Netherlands were included. Both the patients' registration in the national donor register (DR) and the relatives' refusal rate in the two groups were retrospectively assessed using data from the donation application database. There were 109 unexpected and 414 expected potential donors The potential donors in the UD group were younger (mean age 52 versus 55 years, P = 0.032) and more often male (68 versus 52%, P = 0.003). There were no significant differences in registration in the DR between the groups. The relatives' consent rate in non-registered potential donors, or those who mandated the relatives for that decision, was higher in the UD group (53 versus 29%, P organ donation. The relatives of potential donors who died unexpectedly consented more often to donation than those in whom death was expected.

  8. Cardiovascular and demographic characteristics in whole blood and plasma donors: results from the Donor InSight study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsma, Femke; Veldhuizen, Ingrid; de Vegt, Femmie; Doggen, Carine; de Kort, Wim

    2011-02-01

    Within blood establishments little comparative information is available about donors versus the general population. In this study, a description of the donor pool was made in terms of demographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors. The general Dutch population was used as a reference group. The Donor InSight study provided information on donors. Extensive information has been gathered by a self-administered questionnaire addressing various topics, like demographics, lifestyle, and health. Aggregated donor responses were compared with general population summary data. The study population consisted of 15,076 donors. The median age was 46.3 years and 47.3% were men. Donors were more likely to be highly educated (34.6%), married (71.7%), and of Dutch origin (97.4%), when compared to the general population. Donors were less often smokers (donors, 17.1%; general population, 31.8%), more often moderate drinkers (donors, 82.8%; general population, 74.7%), and physically more active (donors, 2.0 hr/week; general population, 1.0 hr/week). Male donors were more often moderately overweight (47.7%) than men from the general population (39.9%). In donors, 0.9% reported to have Type 2 diabetes versus 1.9% in the general population. In donors, 3.4% reported high cholesterol versus 4.6% in the general population. The study provided important knowledge about demographic distributions and cardiovascular risk factors within donors. A proper understanding of demographic characteristics of donors will help us to focus recruitment and retention strategies. The reported beneficial cardiovascular profile suggests a need for further research on the role of blood donation in cardiovascular risk reduction. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. Donor safety in living donor liver transplantation: The Korean organ transplantation registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Geun; Lee, Kwang-Woong; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Chu, Chong Woo; Kim, Bong-Wan; Choi, Dong Lak; You, Young Kyoung; Kim, Dong-Sik; Nah, Yang Won; Kang, Koo Jeong; Choi, In Soek; Yu, Hee Chul; Hong, Geun; Han, Ho-Seong; Hwang, Shin; Kim, Myoung Soo

    2017-08-01

    Major concerns about donor safety cause controversy and limit the use of living donor liver transplantation to overcome organ shortages. The Korean Organ Transplantation Registry established a nationwide organ transplantation registration system in 2014. We reviewed the prospectively collected data of all 832 living liver donors who underwent procedures between April 2014 and December 2015. We allocated the donors to a left lobe group (n = 59) and a right lobe group (n = 773) and analyzed the relations between graft types and remaining liver volumes and complications (graded using the Clavien 5-tier grading system). The median follow-up was 19 months (range, 10-31 months). During the study period, 553 men and 279 women donated livers, and there were no deaths after living liver donation. The overall, biliary, and major complication (grade ≥ III) rates were 9.3%, 1.7%, and 1.9%, respectively. The graft types and remaining liver volume were associated with significantly different overall, biliary, and major complication rates. Of the 16 patients with major complications, 9 (56.3%) involved biliary complications (2 biliary strictures [12.5%] and 7 bile leakages [43.8%]). Among the 832 donors, the mean aspartate transaminase, alanine aminotransferase, and total bilirubin levels were 23.9 ± 8.1 IU/L, 20.9 ± 11.3 IU/L, and 0.8 ± 0.4 mg/dL, respectively, 6 months after liver donation. In conclusion, biliary complications were the most common types of major morbidity in living liver donors. Donor hepatectomy can be performed successfully with minimal and easily controlled complications. Our study shows that prospective, nationwide cohort data provide an important means of investigating the safety in living liver donation. Liver Transplantation 23 999-1006 2017 AASLD. © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. The effect of World Blood Donor Day on digital information seeking and donor recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranenburg, Floris J; Kreuger, Aukje L; Arbous, M Sesmu; Laeijendecker, Daphne; van Kraaij, Marian G J

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of World Blood Donor Day (WBDD) is to raise awareness for the importance of blood donation. The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of WBDD on digital information seeking and donor recruitment. Google Trends data were used to quantify seeking behavior on "blood donation" and "blood donor." Differences in relative search volume (RSV) between the 3 weeks surrounding WBDD and the rest of the year were calculated. Second, mean differences in RSV were compared to assess the additional effect of hosting using translated search terms. Third, we compared the period around WBDD with the control period regarding page views of the Sanquin website and Facebook likes and number of newly registered donors in 2016. The mean RSV for "blood donation" in the period of interest was 78.6, compared to 72.1 in the control period (difference, 6.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.2-11.8). For "blood donor" this was 78.9 compared to 65.9 (difference, 12.9; 95% CI, 8.1-17.8). We found no additional effect of hosting. In the period of interest, the website of Sanquin was visited 6862 times a day and 4293 times in the control period (difference, 2569; 95% CI, 1687-3451). In June 2016, 54.6% (95% CI, 53.0-56.2) more new donors were registered compared to the control period. An international campaign like WBDD raises the awareness of blood donation and is effective in convincing people to register as blood donors. © 2017 AABB.

  11. Factors predicting the usefulness of deceased donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, H P; Yang, J D; Yu, H C; Cho, B H; Kwon, K S; Park, S K; Lee, S

    2013-10-01

    Preoperative management for deceased donation is important. Deceased donation can failed for several reasons. We analyzed the clinical data of deceased donation after consent for cadaveric donation to evaluate the reasons of failure of organ procurement. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 112 deceased donors in a single institution between January 1998 and September 2012. There were no organs from cardiac death donors. Of 112 deceased donors, 51 (45.5%) were traumatic brain deaths and 33 (29.5%), nontraumatic brain hemorrhages. The overall mean age was 37.2 (±16.6) years with 35 (30.7%) of female gender. There were 15 (13.3%) donation failures for all organs. Significant factors for failure were histories of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (odds ratio [OR], 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-0.58; P = .005), cardiac arrest (OR, 0.03; 95% CI, 0.006-0.14; P donation was associated with cardiac arrest while awaiting organ procurement and the presence of an history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation or presence of acute renal failure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Higher refusal rates for organ donation among older potential donors in the Netherlands: impact of the donor register and relatives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leiden, H.A. van; Jansen, N.E.; Haase-Kromwijk, B.J.; Hoitsma, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The availability of donor organs is considerably reduced by relatives refusing donation after death. There is no previous large-scale evaluation of the influence of the Donor Register (DR) consultation and the potential donor's age on this refusal in The Netherlands. METHODS: This study

  13. Fluorinated arene, imide and unsaturated pyrrolidinone based donor acceptor conjugated polymers: Synthesis, structure-property and device studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Arawwawala Don Thilanga

    After the discovery of doped polyacetylene, organic semiconductor materials are widely studied as high impending active components in consumer electronics. They have received substantial consideration due to their potential for structural tailoring, low cost, large area and mechanically flexible alternatives to common inorganic semiconductors. To acquire maximum use of these materials, it is essential to get a strong idea about their chemical and physical nature. Material chemist has an enormous role to play in this novel area, including development of efficient synthetic methodologies and control the molecular self-assembly and (opto)-electronic properties. The body of this thesis mainly focuses on the substituent effects: how different substituents affect the (opto)-electronic properties of the donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated polymers. The main priority goes to understand, how different alkyl substituent effect to the polymer solubility, crystallinity, thermal properties (e.g.: glass transition temperature) and morphological order. Three classes of D-A systems were extensively studied in this work. The second chapter mainly focuses on the synthesis and structure-property study of fluorinated arene (TFB) base polymers. Here we used commercially available 1,4-dibromo-2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzene (TFB) as the acceptor material and prepare several polymers using 3,3'-dialkyl(3,3'-R2T2) or 3,3'-dialkoxy bithiophene (3,3'-RO2T2) units as electron donors. A detail study was done using 3,3'-bithiophene donor units incorporating branched alkoxy-functionalities by systematic variation of branching position and chain length. The study allowed disentangling the branching effects on (i) aggregation tendency, intermolecular arrangement, (iii) solid state optical energy gaps, and (iv) electronic properties in an overall consistent picture, which might guide future polymer synthesis towards optimized materials for opto-electronic applications. The third chapter mainly focused on

  14. Energies and wave functions of an off-centre donor in hemispherical quantum dot: Two-dimensional finite difference approach and ritz variational principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakra Mohajer, Soukaina; El Harouny, El Hassan [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abdelmalek Essaadi, B.P. 2121 M’Hannech II, 93030 Tétouan (Morocco); Ibral, Asmaa [Equipe d’Optique et Electronique du Solide, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida Principale, El Jadida (Morocco); Laboratoire d’Instrumentation, Mesure et Contrôle, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Chouaïb Doukkali, B. P. 20 El Jadida Principale, El Jadida (Morocco); El Khamkhami, Jamal [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Abdelmalek Essaadi, B.P. 2121 M’Hannech II, 93030 Tétouan (Morocco); and others

    2016-09-15

    Eigenvalues equation solutions of a hydrogen-like donor impurity, confined in a hemispherical quantum dot deposited on a wetting layer and capped by an insulating matrix, are determined in the framework of the effective mass approximation. Conduction band alignments at interfaces between quantum dot and surrounding materials are described by infinite height barriers. Ground and excited states energies and wave functions are determined analytically and via one-dimensional finite difference approach in case of an on-center donor. Donor impurity is then moved from center to pole of hemispherical quantum dot and eigenvalues equation is solved via Ritz variational principle, using a trial wave function where Coulomb attraction between electron and ionized donor is taken into account, and by two-dimensional finite difference approach. Numerical codes developed enable access to variations of donor total energy, binding energy, Coulomb correlation parameter, spatial extension and radial probability density with respect to hemisphere radius and impurity position inside the quantum dot.

  15. Accepting Hearts From Hepatitis C-Positive Donor: Can We Expand the Donor Pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Jonathan; Lourenco, Laura M; Te, Helen S; Renz, John F; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Uriel, Nir

    2017-10-01

    Until recently, transplantation from hepatitis C-positive donors was relatively contraindicated as eradication of active hepatitis C previously required an interferon-based regimen that has been associated with rejection in solid organ transplantation. New interferon-free treatment regimens for hepatitis C have fewer adverse events and higher cure rates than interferon-based regimens. Interferon-free regimens have been shown to be safe in the liver transplantation literature, but little is known about the safety and efficacy of treatment in heart transplantation. Here we report a case of successful eradication of hepatitis C with a non-interferon-based regimen using ledipasvir-sofosbuvir following combined orthotopic heart and liver transplantation. Based on the prevalence of hepatitis C in the general population, inclusion of hepatitis C-positive donors for heart transplantation can expand this component of the donor pool 3- to 6-fold. In carefully selected patients and recipients, inclusion of hepatitis C-positive donors may allow for expansion of the donor pool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The donor advocacy team: a risk management program for living organ, tissue, and cell transplant donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Susumu; Soyama, Akihiko; Nagai, Kazuhiro; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Kurihara, Shintaro; Hidaka, Masaaki; Ono, Shinichiro; Adachi, Tomohiko; Natsuda, Koji; Hara, Takanobu; Fujita, Fumihiko; Kanetaka, Kengo; Takatsuki, Mistuhisa

    2017-08-01

    Although the incidence of living donor death is low in Japan, statistics show one living liver donor death in more than 7000 living liver transplants. Thus, medical transplant personnel must recognize that the death of a living organ or tissue transplant donor can occur and develop an appropriate risk management program. We describe how Nagasaki University Hospital established and implemented a Donor Advocacy Team (DAT) program: a risk management program for initiation in the event of serious, persistent, or fatal impairment of an organ, tissue, or cell transplantation from a living donor. The purposes of the DAT program are as follows: 1. To disclose official information without delay. 2. To provide physical and psychological care to the patient experiencing impairment and their family. 3. To provide psychological care to the medical staff in charge of the transplant. 4. To standardize the responses of the diagnosis and treatment department staff and other hospital staff. 5. To minimize the damage that the whole medical transplantation system may suffer and leverage the occurrence for improvement. To address (1) and (5), actions, such as reporting and responses to the government, mass media, transplant-related societies, and organ transplant networks, have been established to ensure implementation.

  17. Donor-acceptor complex formation in evaporated small molecular organic photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susarova, Diana K.; Troshin, Pavel A.; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N.; Razumov, Vladimir F. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, Semenov Prospect 1, Chernogolovka, Moscow 142432 (Russian Federation); Hoeglinger, Doris; Koeppe, Robert; Serdar Sariciftci, N. [Linz Institute for Organic Solar Cells (LIOS), Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Babenko, Sergey D. [Institute for Energy Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Branch), Semenov Prospect 1/10, Chernogolovka, Moscow 142432 (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15

    Novel perylene diimide Py-PDI and naphthalene diimide Py-NDI possessing chelating pyridyl groups have been synthesized. The materials are comparatively investigated as electron acceptors in small molecular photovoltaic cells comprising zinc phthalocyanine ZnPc as an electron donor component. It was shown that these compounds form self-assembled coordination complexes with ZnPc in solution and co-evaporated solid blends. Py-PDI and Py-NDI used as electron acceptor materials in photovoltaic cells with donor ZnPc significantly outperform the reference materials, i.e. perylene and naphthalene diimides that possess no chelating pyridyl groups. Superior photovoltaic performance of Py-PDI and Py-NDI is explained by a complex formation between these compounds and ZnPc. Such interactions of donor and acceptor materials strongly improve photoinduced charge carrier generation. This gives great advantages not just for the construction of organic solar cells but also for organic photodetectors. The devices fabricated in this study are also useful as fast and highly sensitive photodetectors with response times of less than 10 microseconds as well as a strong photoconductive behavior under forward bias. (author)

  18. Computer applications in the search for unrelated stem cell donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Carlheinz R

    2002-08-01

    The majority of patients which are eligible for a blood stem cell transplantation from an allogeneic donor do not have a suitable related donor so that an efficient unrelated donor search is a prerequisite for this treatment. Currently, there are over 7 million volunteer donors in the files of 50 registries in the world and in most countries the majority of transplants are performed from a foreign donor. Evidently, computer and communication technology must play a crucial role in the complex donor search process on the national and international level. This article describes the structural elements of the donor search process and discusses major systematic and technical issues to be addressed in the development and evolution of the supporting telematic systems. The theoretical considerations are complemented by a concise overview over the current state of the art which is given by describing the scope, relevance, interconnection and technical background of three major national and international computer appliances: The German Marrow Donor Information System (GERMIS) and the European Marrow Donor Information System (EMDIS) are interoperable business-to-business e-commerce systems and Bone Marrow Donors World Wide (BMDW) is the basic international donor information desk on the web.

  19. Profile of Heart Donors from the Human Valve Bank of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Curitiba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Renata Maria; da Costa, Marise Teresinha Brenner Affonso; Canciglieri Junior, Osiris; Sant'Anna, Ângelo Márcio Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Human heart valves are used as replacement valves and have satisfactory functional results compared with conventional prostheses. Characterize the profile of effective heart donors from the human valve bank of the santa casa de misericórdia de curitiba and analyze the association between the profile variables. It consists of a retrospective and quantitative study of electronic medical records from heart donors for heart valves. every heart donation made to the bank between january 2004 and december 2014 was studied. 2,149 donations were analyzed, from donors aged 0 to 71 years old, with an average of 34.9 ± 15.03 years old. most donors were male 65.7% (n=1,411) and 34.3% (n=738) were female. among the most frequent causes of the donors' death are trauma at 53% (n=1,139) and cerebral vascular accident at 34.2% (n=735). there was significant statistical association between the analyzed variables. There has been an improvement in brazil's donation rate, being essential that the tissue banks work together with the state and federal district centers for notification, procurement and distribution of organs in order to increase the number of donors.

  20. Profile of Heart Donors from the Human Valve Bank of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Curitiba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Renata Maria; da Costa, Marise Teresinha Brenner Affonso; Canciglieri Junior, Osiris; Sant'Anna, Ângelo Márcio Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Human heart valves are used as replacement valves and have satisfactory functional results compared with conventional prostheses. Objective Characterize the profile of effective heart donors from the human valve bank of the santa casa de misericórdia de curitiba and analyze the association between the profile variables. Methods It consists of a retrospective and quantitative study of electronic medical records from heart donors for heart valves. every heart donation made to the bank between january 2004 and december 2014 was studied. Results 2,149 donations were analyzed, from donors aged 0 to 71 years old, with an average of 34.9 ± 15.03 years old. most donors were male 65.7% (n=1,411) and 34.3% (n=738) were female. among the most frequent causes of the donors' death are trauma at 53% (n=1,139) and cerebral vascular accident at 34.2% (n=735). there was significant statistical association between the analyzed variables. Conclusion There has been an improvement in brazil's donation rate, being essential that the tissue banks work together with the state and federal district centers for notification, procurement and distribution of organs in order to increase the number of donors. PMID:27556322

  1. Control of electric field strength and orientation at the donor-acceptor interface in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A.; Zhao, S.; Wu, J. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Rim, S.B. [Electrical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Koenemann, M.; Erk, P. [BASF GmbH, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Peumans, P.

    2008-03-05

    Electrical doping is essential to achieve efficient photocurrent extraction in small-molecular-weight organic solar cells. It is shown that such doping creates strong electric fields at the donor-acceptor interface that prevent geminate electron-hole recombination. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. AIEE Active Donor-Acceptor-Donor-Based Hexaphenylbenzene Probe for Recognition of Aliphatic and Aromatic Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Subhamay; Deol, Harnimarta; Bhalla, Vandana; Kumar, Manoj

    2017-10-30

    In the present investigation, an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and aggregation induced emission enhancement (AIEE) active donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) system 5 having fumaronitrile as the acceptor and hexaphenylbenzene (HPB) as the donor moieties joined through rotatable phenyl rings has been designed and synthesized that is highly emissive in the solid state and exhibits stimuli-responsive reversible piezochromic behavior upon grinding and heating. Because of its AIEE characteristics, HPB derivative 5 undergoes aggregation to form fluorescent aggregates in mixed aqueous media that exhibit ratiometric fluorescence response toward aliphatic amines (primary/secondary/tertiary) and turn-off response toward aromatic amines and hence differentiates between them. Further, the solution-coated portable paper strips of derivative 5 showed pronounced and sensitive response toward aromatic and aliphatic amines with a detection limit in the range of picogram and nanogram level, respectively.

  3. Formula milk versus donor breast milk for feeding preterm or low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, M A; Henderson, G; Anthony, M Y; McGuire, W

    2007-10-17

    When sufficient maternal breast milk is not available, the alternative sources of enteral nutrition for preterm or low birth weight infants are donor breast milk or artificial formula milk. Feeding preterm or low birth weight infants with formula milk might increase nutrient input and growth rates. However, since feeding with formula milk may be associated with a higher incidence of feeding intolerance and necrotising enterocolitis, this may adversely affect growth and development. To determine the effect of formula milk compared with donor human breast milk on growth and development in preterm or low birth weight infants. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2007), MEDLINE (1966 - May 2007), EMBASE (1980 - May 2007), CINAHL (1982 - May 2007), conference proceedings, and previous reviews. Randomised controlled trials comparing feeding with formula milk versus donor breast milk in preterm or low birth weight infants. Data were extracted using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group, with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by two reviewer authors, and synthesis of data using relative risk, risk difference and weighted mean difference. Eight trials fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Only one trial used nutrient-fortified donor breast milk. Enteral feeding with formula milk compared with donor breast milk resulted in higher rates of growth in the short term. There was no evidence of an effect on long-term growth rates or neurodevelopmental outcomes. Meta-analysis of data from five trials demonstrated a statistically significantly higher incidence of necrotising enterocolitis in the formula fed group: typical relative risk 2.5 (95% confidence interval 1.2, 5.1); typical risk difference: 0.03 (95% confidence interval 0.01, 0.06; number needed to harm: 33 (95

  4. Why search for a sperm donor online? The experiences of women searching for and contacting sperm donors on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadva, Vasanti; Freeman, Tabitha; Tranfield, Erika; Golombok, Susan

    2017-04-28

    Whilst studies have examined the experiences of women who use clinic donors, to date there has been limited research investigating women's motivations and experiences of searching for a sperm donor online. A total of 429 women looking for a sperm donor on Pride Angel (a website that facilitates contact between donors and recipients) completed an online survey. Fifty-eight percent (249) saw advantages of obtaining donated sperm online with the most common advantage reported as being able to connect with and meet the donor (n = 50 (24%)). A third (n = 157 (37%)) of the participants gave disadvantages, the most common reported was encountering 'dishonest donors' (n = 63 (40%)). Most recipients (n = 181 (61%)) wanted the donor to be 'just a donor' (i.e. to provide sperm and have no further contact). Whilst it was important for recipients to know the identity of the donor, some did not see this as important for the child and thus the level of information that parents have about the donor, and that which the child has, can differ. Finding a donor online blurs the distinction between categories of 'anonymous', 'known' and 'identity release' donations. Whilst the survey had a large sample size, the representativeness of the sample is not known.

  5. CO2 assimilation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport probed by the JIP-test, of tea leaves in response to phosphorus supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zheng-He; Chen, Li-Song; Chen, Rong-Bing; Zhang, Fang-Zhou; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Tang, Ning

    2009-04-21

    Although the effects of P deficiency on tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) growth, P uptake and utilization as well as leaf gas exchange and Chl a fluorescence have been investigated, very little is known about the effects of P deficiency on photosynthetic electron transport, photosynthetic enzymes and carbohydrates of tea leaves. In this study, own-rooted 10-month-old tea trees were supplied three times weekly for 17 weeks with 500 mL of nutrient solution at a P concentration of 0, 40, 80, 160, 400 or 1000 microM. This objective of this study was to determine how P deficiency affects CO2 assimilation, Rubisco, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport in tea leaves to understand the mechanism by which P deficiency leads to a decrease in CO2 assimilation. Both root and shoot dry weight increased as P supply increased from 0 to 160 microM, then remained unchanged. P-deficient leaves from 0 to 80 muM P-treated trees showed decreased CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, but increased intercellular CO2 concentration. Both initial and total Rubisco activity, contents of Chl and total soluble protein in P-deficient leaves decreased to a lesser extent than CO2 assimilation. Contents of sucrose and starch were decreased in P-deficient leaves, whereas contents of glucose and fructose did not change significantly except for a significant increase in the lowest P leaves. OJIP transients from P-deficient leaves displayed a rise at the O-step and a depression at the P-step, accompanied by two new steps at about 150 mus (L-step) and at about 300 mus (K-step). RC/CSo, TRo/ABS (or Fv/Fm), ETo/ABS, REo/ABS, maximum amplitude of IP phase, PIabs and PItot, abs were decreased in P-deficient leaves, while VJ, VI and dissipated energy were increased. P deficiency decreased photosynthetic electron transport capacity by impairing the whole electron transport chain from the PSII donor side up to the PSI, thus decreasing ATP content which limits RuBP regeneration, and

  6. CO2 assimilation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport probed by the JIP-test, of tea leaves in response to phosphorus supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Rong-Bing

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the effects of P deficiency on tea (Camellia sinensis (L. O. Kuntze growth, P uptake and utilization as well as leaf gas exchange and Chl a fluorescence have been investigated, very little is known about the effects of P deficiency on photosynthetic electron transport, photosynthetic enzymes and carbohydrates of tea leaves. In this study, own-rooted 10-month-old tea trees were supplied three times weekly for 17 weeks with 500 mL of nutrient solution at a P concentration of 0, 40, 80, 160, 400 or 1000 μM. This objective of this study was to determine how P deficiency affects CO2 assimilation, Rubisco, carbohydrates and photosynthetic electron transport in tea leaves to understand the mechanism by which P deficiency leads to a decrease in CO2 assimilation. Results Both root and shoot dry weight increased as P supply increased from 0 to 160 μM, then remained unchanged. P-deficient leaves from 0 to 80 μM P-treated trees showed decreased CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, but increased intercellular CO2 concentration. Both initial and total Rubisco activity, contents of Chl and total soluble protein in P-deficient leaves decreased to a lesser extent than CO2 assimilation. Contents of sucrose and starch were decreased in P-deficient leaves, whereas contents of glucose and fructose did not change significantly except for a significant increase in the lowest P leaves. OJIP transients from P-deficient leaves displayed a rise at the O-step and a depression at the P-step, accompanied by two new steps at about 150 μs (L-step and at about 300 μs (K-step. RC/CSo, TRo/ABS (or Fv/Fm, ETo/ABS, REo/ABS, maximum amplitude of IP phase, PIabs and PItot, abs were decreased in P-deficient leaves, while VJ, VI and dissipated energy were increased. Conclusion P deficiency decreased photosynthetic electron transport capacity by impairing the whole electron transport chain from the PSII donor side up to the PSI, thus decreasing

  7. Non-donors' attitudes towards sperm donation and their willingness to donate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provoost, Veerle; Van Rompuy, Florence; Pennings, Guido

    2017-09-11

    The aim of this article is to study attitudes about sperm donation and willingness to donate sperm in students who have never shown an interest in sperm donation. The method used in this study is an electronic survey of 1012 male students. Only one third of the respondents (34.3%) would consider donating sperm. Overall, 85.7% indicated a positive attitude towards sperm donation while 14.3% indicated a neutral or negative attitude. The highest scored barriers to donating were the lack of practical information and the fear that the partner would not agree. Almost 40% of the respondents feared that the donation might have a negative impact on their current or future relationship. The majority (83.6%) of those who considered donating thought donors should receive a financial compensation. Money was also one of the main motivators. About 85% of the students thought positively about sperm donation but several factors such as perceived negative views by the social environment, especially the partner, may deter students from donating. This study indicates that the effect of strong incentives, for instance in monetary terms, on a donor pool consisting of students could be limited and that relational factors and donor's perceptions of the views of the wider social network should be taken into account when recruiting donors.

  8. Donor binding energies in a GaN/ZnGeN2 quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Hasan

    2017-11-01

    Binding energies of a donor atom within a GaN/ZnGeN2 quantum well structure have been investigated. Hydrogenic type wave functions are assumed and the Schrödinger and Poisson's equations are solved self-consistently. The binding energies of the donor states 1 s and 2p± associated with the first subband in the quantum well and the transition energies between them are represented as a function of the quantum well width, the donor position and the external magnetic field. The ground state 1 s and the excited states 2p± have maximum binding energies as much as 64 and 11 meV, occurring in quantum wells of widths 10 and 18 Å, respectively. The binding energies are found to be an asymmetric function of the donor position with respect to the quantum well center because of the asymmetry in the band profile introduced by the built-in electric field in the structure. An external magnetic field up to 10 T is included into the calculations and it is seen that the excited states show a small Zeeman splitting, very close to the bulk GaN value, because of the heavy effective mass of electron.

  9. Protocol for a national blood transfusion data warehouse from donor to recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeven, Loan R; Hooftman, Babette H; Janssen, Mart P; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Vooght, Karen M K; Kemper, Peter; Koopman, Maria M W

    2016-08-04

    Blood transfusion has health-related, economical and safety implications. In order to optimise the transfusion chain, comprehensive research data are needed. The Dutch Transfusion Data warehouse (DTD) project aims to establish a data warehouse where data from donors and transfusion recipients are linked. This paper describes the design of the data warehouse, challenges and illustrative applications. Quantitative data on blood donors (eg, age, blood group, antibodies) and products (type of product, processing, storage time) are obtained from the national blood bank. These are linked to data on the transfusion recipients (eg, transfusions administered, patient diagnosis, surgical procedures, laboratory parameters), which are extracted from hospital electronic health records. Expected scientific contributions are illustrated for 4 applications: determine risk factors, predict blood use, benchmark blood use and optimise process efficiency. For each application, examples of research questions are given and analyses planned. The DTD project aims to build a national, continuously updated transfusion data warehouse. These data have a wide range of applications, on the donor/production side, recipient studies on blood usage and benchmarking and donor-recipient studies, which ultimately can contribute to the efficiency and safety of blood transfusion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Loss of volunteer blood donors because of unconfirmed enzyme immunoassay screening results. Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownby, H E; Korelitz, J J; Busch, M P; Williams, A E; Kleinman, S H; Gilcher, R O; Nourjah, P

    1997-02-01

    Blood donors who test repeatably reactive on enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and are not confirmed as positive are a continuing problem for blood banks. Units are discarded and donors are deferred, in spite of multiple studies indicating that such donors are very rarely infected with the transmissible agents. Few data are available, however, with which to evaluate whether the discarded units are more likely to come from particular demographic subgroups. The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study database of over 2 million allogeneic whole-blood donations collected in the years 1991 through 1993 was utilized. The prevalence of false-positive and indeterminate test results within demographic subgroups was computed for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and human T-lymphotropic virus (anti-HIV, anti-HCV, anti-HTLV, respectively) and hepatitis B surface antigen (false-positive only) as the proportion of donations that were repeatably reactive on EIA but negative or indeterminate on the confirmatory or supplemental test. Several demographic groups with increased prevalence of false-positive and indeterminate anti-HIV results were the same females, younger age groups, blacks, and first-time donors. Likewise, many of the demographic subgroups with increased prevalence of false-positive and indeterminate anti-HCV results were similar: older age groups, non-whites, lower education levels, first-time donors, donors making directed donations, and donors who had received transfusions. For anti-HTLV, by contrast, the oldest group had the highest prevalence of false-positive results but the lowest prevalence of indeterminate results: blacks had the lowest prevalence of false positive results but the highest prevalence of indeterminate results. If units that test repeatably reactive on EIA but that are not confirmed as positive are almost always from individuals not infected with the virus in question, then these results indicate that there may be sex-, race

  11. Synthesis of Donor-Acceptor Conjugated Polymers by "CLICK" Polymerization for OPV applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Rasmus Guldbæk; Yu, Donghong

    The intent of this study was to utilize the Copper(I)-catalyzed Azide Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC) as a polymerization technique (“Click” Polymerization) for synthesizing novel π-conjugated low band gap polymers for organic photovoltaic applications (OPV). The chosen approach was to synthesize...... an alternating electron donating (donor, D) and electron withdrawing (acceptor, A) co-polymer. The chosen monomers were well known units, and the novelty lies in using the monomer units with the click methodology. An insoluble alternating copolymer consisting of 2,7-diazido-9,9-dioctyl-9Hflourene and 1...

  12. Polaronic effects on the off-center donor impurity in AlAs/GaAs/SiO2 spherical core/shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haouari, M.; Feddi, E.; Dujardin, F.; Restrepo, R. L.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-11-01

    The ground state of a conduction electron coupled to an off-center impurity donor in a AlAS/GaAs spherical core/shell quantum dot is investigated theoretically. The image-charge effect and the influence of the electron-polar-LO-phonon interaction are considered. The electron-impurity binding energy is calculated via a variational procedure and is reported both as a function of the shell width and of the radial position of the donor atom. The polaronic effects on this quantity are particularly discussed.

  13. Photoinduced multistep charge separation in a heteroleptic Cu(I) bis(phenanthroline)-based donor-chromophore-acceptor triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazorski, Megan S; Gest, Riley H; Elliott, C Michael

    2012-10-24

    A molecular triad assembly consisting of an electron donor, a bis(phenanthroline)copper(I) chromophore, and an electron acceptor has been prepared. Under visible-light excitation, this assembly undergoes efficient (ca. 50%) photoinduced, multistep formation of a diradical cation charge-separated state that has a lifetime of >100 ns and stores >1.0 eV of energy. This system constitutes an earth-abundant functional analogue of related Ru(bpy)(3) triad systems.

  14. Donor Safety and Recipient Liver Function After Right-Lobe Liver Transplantation From Living Donors With Gilbert Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, W H; Hwang, S; Song, G W; Jung, D H; Kim, K H; Park, G C; Ha, T Y; Ahn, C S; Moon, D B; Yoon, Y I; Shin, M H; Kim, W J; Kim, S H; Lee, S G

    2015-12-01

    Donor safety is the most important aspect in living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Gilbert syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition that is a common cause of isolated unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, and its prevalence is not negligibly low in the general population. This study intended to assess donor safety and recipient liver function after LDLT with the use of right liver grafts from living donors with Gilbert syndrome. Among 2,140 right liver transplantations performed from January 2002 to December 20113 at our institution, we identified 12 living donors (0.6%) who showed a preoperative serum total bilirubin level of ≥2 mg/dL. These donors were clinically diagnosed with Gilbert syndrome. The clinical outcomes of these donors and their recipients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean donor age was 24.6 ± 7.1 years, and 11 donors were male. All subjects met the preoperative evaluation conditions for right liver donation except for the level of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The mean serum total bilirubin level of the donors was 2.23 ± 0.20 mg/dL before and 1.79 ± 0.61 mg/dL 1 year after right liver donation. The preoperative donor direct bilirubin level was 0.43 ± 0.19 mg/dL. The preoperative indocyanine green retention rate at 15 minutes was 8.2 ± 2.8%. All donors and recipients recovered uneventfully and were alive at the time of writing. The recipient serum total bilirubin level was 1.29 ± 0.47 mg/dL 1 year after LDLT. We suggest that LDLT with living donors with Gilbert syndrome can be safely performed, but that a meticulous preoperative evaluation is vital to maximize donor safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Communicating identifiability risks to biobank donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, T. J.; Gjerris, Mickey; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2018-01-01

    can track individuals across multiple databases. This article focuses on the communication of identifiability risks in the process of obtaining consent for donation and research. Most ethical discussions of identifiability risks have focused on the severity of the risk and how it might be mitigated......, and what precisely is at stake in pervasive data sharing. However, there has been little discussion of whether and how to communicate the risk to potential donors. We review the ethical arguments behind favoring different types of risk communication in the consent process, and outline how identifiability...... concerns can be incorporated into either a detailed or a simplified method of communicating risks during the consent process....

  16. Structures of Thermal Double Donors in Silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Pesola, M.; Joo Lee, Young; von Boehm, J.; Kaukonen, M.; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2000-01-01

    Accurate total-energy calculations are used to study the structures and formation energies of oxygen chains as models for thermal double donors (TDD's) in Si. We find that the first three TDD's (TDD0–TDD2) consist of one four-member ring, with one or two adjacent interstitial O atoms. These metastable TDD's form bistable negative-U systems with the corresponding stable, electrically inactive staggered structures. The TDD3-TDD7 structures are found to consist of four-member rings with adjacent...

  17. A comparison of donor and control group quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Makmor; Abdul Talib Abdul Mutalib, Muzalwana; Mohd Satar, Nurulhuda; Abdullah, Nawi; Chong, Chin-Sieng; Ng, Kok-Peng; Lim, Soo-Kun

    2014-03-03

    Informed consent of prospective donors should include information about the quality of life (QoL) of existing donors, especially those within the relevant country. This study aimed to provide information on Malaysian organ donors' QoL relative to a control group. Using a shorter version of the SF-36, QoL of 80 donors from the University of Malaya Medical Center (UMMC), Malaysia was surveyed and compared to QoL of 80 selected healthy individuals. ANOVA and General Linear Model (GLM) procedure were each applied for the QoL comparison, which was based on gender and age. Donors recorded a better QoL relative to the control group. Comparison across gender revealed that differences are more obvious for males than females. Donor/control comparison across age groups reveals that donors aged 56 and above reported significantly better QoL in most domains relative to other age groups. Information on donor QoL should be made available to the public to present a comprehensive picture of the consequences of organ donation. Nonetheless, we also argue that, despite the merits of organ donation, caution is required before concluding that donors have better QoL because the present research outcomes may reflect a self-selection bias in which respondents only included donors engaging in regular follow-ups.

  18. Liver transplantation in children using organs from young paediatric donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herden, Uta; Ganschow, Rainer; Briem-Richter, Andrea; Helmke, Knut; Nashan, Bjoern; Fischer, Lutz

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays, most paediatric liver transplant recipients receive a split or other technical variant graft from adult deceased or live donors, because of a lack of available age- and size matched paediatric donors. Few data are available, especially for liver grafts obtained from very young children (transplantations between 1989 and 2009. Recipients were divided into five groups (1-5) depending on donor age (transplantations from deceased donors were performed; 1- and 5-year graft survival rates were 75%, 80%, 78%, 81%, 74% and 75%, 64%, 70%, 67%, 46%, and 1- and 5-year patient survival rates were 88%, 91%, 90%, 89%, 78% and 88%, 84%, 84%, 83%, 63% for groups 1-5, respectively, without significant difference. Eight children received organs from donors younger than 1 year and 45 children received organs from donors between 1 and 6 years of age. Overall, vascular complications occurred in 13.2% of patients receiving organs from donors younger than 6 years. Analysis of our data revealed that the usage of liver grafts from donors younger than 6 years is a safe procedure. The outcome was comparable with grafts from older donors with excellent graft and patient survival, even for donors younger than 1 year. © 2011 The Authors. Transplant International © 2011 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  19. Brain-Dead Donors on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchard, Régis; Durand, Louise; Legeai, Camille; Cohen, Johana; Guerrini, Patrice; Bastien, Olivier

    2017-10-01

    To describe donors after brain death with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and to analyze the outcome of organs transplanted from these donors. Retrospective analysis of the national information system run by the French Biomedicine Agency (CRISTAL database). National registry data of all donors after brain death in France and their organ recipients between 2007 and 2013. Donors after brain death and their organ recipients. None. During the study period, there were 22,270 brain-dead patients diagnosed in France, of whom 161 with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Among these patients, 64 donors on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and 10,805 donors without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation had at least one organ retrieved. Donors on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were significantly younger and had more severe intensive care medical conditions (hemodynamic, biological, renal, and liver insults) than donors without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. One hundred nine kidneys, 37 livers, seven hearts, and one lung were successfully transplanted from donors on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. We found no significant difference in 1-year kidney graft survival (p = 0.24) and function between recipients from donors on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (92.7% [85.9-96.3%]) and matching recipients from donors without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (95.4% [93.0-97.0%]). We also found no significant difference in 1-year liver recipient survival (p = 0.91): 86.5% (70.5-94.1) from donors on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation versus 80.7% (79.8-81.6) from donors without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Brain-dead patients with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation have more severe medical conditions than those without extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. However, kidney graft survival and function were no different than usual. Brain-dead patients with ongoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are suitable for organ procurement.

  20. Electron Bifurcation: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Two-Electron Brokering in Biological Redox Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng; Yuly, Jonathon L.; Lubner, Carolyn E. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Mulder, David W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; King, Paul W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Peters, John W. [Institute; Beratan, David N. [Department

    2017-08-23

    How can proteins drive two electrons from a redox active donor onto two acceptors at very different potentials and distances? And how can this transaction be conducted without dissipating very much energy or violating the laws of thermodynamics? Nature appears to have addressed these challenges by coupling thermodynamically uphill and downhill electron transfer reactions, using two-electron donor cofactors that have very different potentials for the removal of the first and second electron. Although electron bifurcation is carried out with near perfection from the standpoint of energy conservation and electron delivery yields, it is a biological energy transduction paradigm that has only come into focus recently. This Account provides an exegesis of the biophysical principles that underpin electron bifurcation.