WorldWideScience

Sample records for psi compression pressure

  1. PSY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Astrid

    Plant must adapt to changing environmental factors and coordinate their growth and development accordingly. This is accomplished with effective cell communication that includes signaling molecules and receptors to perceive the signal. Plasma membrane proton pumps are key plant proteins...... activation of the pump. Plants exposed to exogenously applied PSY1 showed an increased level of phosphorylated T881 as well as rapid proton efflux from roots. The physiological effect of this proton pump activation was demonstrated to initiate cell elongation. The activation mechanism of PSY1R involved...

  2. Improved fireman's compressed air breathing system pressure vessel development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, H. A.; Morris, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Prototype high pressure glass filament-wound, aluminum-lined pressurant vessels suitable for use in a fireman's compressed air breathing system were designed, fabricated, and acceptance tested in order to demonstrate the feasibility of producing such high performance, lightweight units. The 4000 psi tanks have a 60 standard cubic foot (SCF) air capacity, and have a 6.5 inch diamter, 19 inch length, 415 inch volume, weigh 13 pounds when empty, and contain 33 percent more air than the current 45 SCF (2250 psi) steel units. The current steel 60 SCF (3000 psi) tanks weigh approximately twice as much as the prototype when empty, and are 2 inches, or 10 percent shorter. The prototype units also have non-rusting aluminum interiors, which removes the hazard of corrosion, the need for internal coatings, and the possibility of rust particles clogging the breathing system.

  3. High pressure apparatus for hydrogen isotopes to pressures of 345 MPa (50,000 psi) and temperatures of 12000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakner, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    A functional new high pressure, high temperature apparatus for hydrogen isotopes uses an internally heated pressure vessel within a larger pressure vessel. The pressure capability is 345 MPa (50 K psi) at 1200 0 C. The gas pressure inside the internal vessel is balanced with gas pressure in the external vessel. The internal vessel is attached to a closure and is also the sample container. Our design allows thin-walled internal vessel construction and keeps the sample from ''seeing'' the furnace or other extraneous environment. The sample container together with the closure can easily be removed and loaded under argon using standard glove-box procedures. The small volume of the inner vessel permits small volumes of gas to be used, thus increasing the sensitivity during pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) work

  4. Microfluidic pressure sensing using trapped air compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Burns, Mark A

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a microfluidic method for measuring the fluid pressure head experienced at any location inside a microchannel. The principal component is a microfabricated sealed chamber with a single inlet and no exit; the entrance to the single inlet is positioned at the location where pressure is to be measured. The pressure measurement is then based on monitoring the movement of a liquid-air interface as it compresses air trapped inside the microfabricated sealed chamber and calculating the pressure using the ideal gas law. The method has been used to measure the pressure of the air stream and continuous liquid flow inside microfluidic channels (d approximately 50 microm). Further, a pressure drop has also been measured using multiple microfabricated sealed chambers. For air pressure, a resolution of 700 Pa within a full-scale range of 700-100 kPa was obtained. For liquids, pressure drops as low as 70 Pa were obtained in an operating range from 70 Pa to 10 kPa. Since the method primarily uses a microfluidic sealed chamber, it does not require additional fabrication steps and may easily be incorporated in several lab-on-a-chip fluidic applications for laminar as well as turbulent flow conditions.

  5. Successful continuous injection of coal into gasification and PFBC system operating pressures exceeding 500 psi - DOE funded program results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, T.; Aldred, D.; Rutkowski, M. [Stamet Inc., North Holywood, CA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The current US energy program is focussed towards commercialisation of coal-based power and IGCC technologies that offer significant improvements in efficiency and reductions in emissions. For gasification and pressurised fluidized bed combustors to be widely accepted, certain operational components need to be significantly improved. One of the most pressing is provision of reliable, controlled and cost-effective solid fuel feeding into the pressure environment. The US Department of Energy has funded research to develop the unique Stamet 'Posimetric{reg_sign} Solids Pump' to be capable of feeding coal into current gasification and PFBC operating pressures. The research objective is a mechanical rotary device able to continuously feed and meter coal into pressured environments of at least 34 bar (500 psi). The research program comprised an initial design and testing phase to feed coal into 20 bar (300 psi) and a second phase for feeding into 34 bar (500 psi). The first phase target was achieved in December 2003. Following modification and optimization, in January 2005, the Stamet Pump achieved a world-record pressure level for continuous injection of coal of 38 bar (560 psi). Research is now targeting 69 bar (1000 psi). The paper reviews the successful pump design, optimisations and results of the testing. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Study of System Pressure Dependence on n-TiO2/p-Si Hetrostructure for Photovoltaic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramezani Sani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the fabrication of n-TiO2/p-Si hetrojunction by deposition of TiO2nanowires on p-Si substrate. The effect of system pressure and the current-voltage (I-V characteristics of n-TiO2/p-si hetrojunction were studied. The morphology of the samples was investigated by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM which confirms formation of TiO2 nanowires that their diameters increase with increasing the pressure of system. The I-V characteristics were measured to investigate the hetrojunction effects of under forward and reverse biases at different system pressure by sweeping in the voltage from 0 to +6 V, then to -6 V, and finally reaching 0 V. TiO2/Si diodes   in the system pressure 60 mbar and 30 mbar indicated that a p-n junction formed in the n-TiO2/p-Si hetrojunction. But as the system pressure increased to 1000 mbar, the I-V characteristics became inversed. This treatment can be scribed by the change of the energy band structure of TiO2.

  7. Pressure correction schemes for compressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheriji, W.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development of semi-implicit fractional step schemes, for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations; these schemes are part of the class of the pressure correction methods. The chosen spatial discretization is staggered: non conforming mixed finite elements (Crouzeix-Raviart or Rannacher-Turek) or the classic MA C scheme. An upwind finite volume discretization of the mass balance guarantees the positivity of the density. The positivity of the internal energy is obtained by discretizing the internal energy balance by an upwind finite volume scheme and b y coupling the discrete internal energy balance with the pressure correction step. A special finite volume discretization on dual cells is performed for the convection term in the momentum balance equation, and a renormalisation step for the pressure is added to the algorithm; this ensures the control in time of the integral of the total energy over the domain. All these a priori estimates imply the existence of a discrete solution by a topological degree argument. The application of this scheme to Euler equations raises an additional difficulty. Indeed, obtaining correct shocks requires the scheme to be consistent with the total energy balance, property which we obtain as follows. First of all, a local discrete kinetic energy balance is established; it contains source terms winch we somehow compensate in the internal energy balance. The kinetic and internal energy equations are associated with the dual and primal meshes respectively, and thus cannot be added to obtain a total energy balance; its continuous counterpart is however recovered at the limit: if we suppose that a sequence of discrete solutions converges when the space and time steps tend to 0, we indeed show, in 1D at least, that the limit satisfies a weak form of the equation. These theoretical results are comforted by numerical tests. Similar results are obtained for the baro-tropic Navier-Stokes equations. (author)

  8. Compression garments and exercise: no influence of pressure applied.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliard, Samuel; Chauveau, Michel; Moscatiello, Timothée; Cros, François; Ecarnot, Fiona; Becker, François

    2015-03-01

    Compression garments on the lower limbs are increasingly popular among athletes who wish to improve performance, reduce exercise-induced discomfort, and reduce the risk of injury. However, the beneficial effects of compression garments have not been clearly established. We performed a review of the literature for prospective, randomized, controlled studies, using quantified lower limb compression in order to (1) describe the beneficial effects that have been identified with compression garments, and in which conditions; and (2) investigate whether there is a relation between the pressure applied and the reported effects. The pressure delivered were measured either in laboratory conditions on garments identical to those used in the studies, or derived from publication data. Twenty three original articles were selected for inclusion in this review. The effects of wearing compression garments during exercise are controversial, as most studies failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect on immediate or performance recovery, or on delayed onset of muscle soreness. There was a trend towards a beneficial effect of compression garments worn during recovery, with performance recovery found to be improved in the five studies in which this was investigated, and delayed-onset muscle soreness was reportedly reduced in three of these five studies. There is no apparent relation between the effects of compression garments worn during or after exercise and the pressures applied, since beneficial effects were obtained with both low and high pressures. Wearing compression garments during recovery from exercise seems to be beneficial for performance recovery and delayed-onset muscle soreness, but the factors explaining this efficacy remain to be elucidated. Key pointsWe observed no relationship between the effects of compression and the pressures applied.The pressure applied at the level of the lower limb by compression garments destined for use by athletes varies widely between

  9. Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A.H.; Sonnergaard, Jørn; Hovgaard, L.

    2005-01-01

    Low-pressure compression of pharmaceutical powders using small amounts of sample (50 mg) was evaluated as an alternative to traditional bulk powder characterization by tapping volumetry. Material parameters were extrapolated directly from the compression data and by fitting with the Walker...

  10. Wireless Capacitive Pressure Sensor Operating up to 400 Celcius from 0 to 100 psi Utilizing Power Scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Ponchak, George E.; Harsh, Kevin; Mackey, Jonathan A.; Meredith, Roger D.; Zorman, Christian A.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Dynys, Frederick W.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a wireless capacitive pressure sensor developed for the health monitoring of aircraft engines has been demonstrated. The sensing system is composed of a Clapp-type oscillator that operates at 131 MHz. The Clapp oscillator is fabricated on a alumina substrate and consists of a Cree SiC (silicon carbide) MESFET (Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors), this film inductor, Compex chip capacitors and Sporian Microsystem capacitive pressure sensor. The resonant tank circuit within the oscillator is made up of the pressure sensor and a spiral thin film inductor, which is used to magnetically couple the wireless pressure sensor signal to a coil antenna placed over 1 meter away. 75% of the power used to bias the sensing system is generated from thermoelectric power modules. The wireless pressure sensor is operational at room temperature through 400 C from 0 to 100 psi and exhibits a frequency shift of over 600 kHz.

  11. Compression under a mechanical counter pressure space suit glove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldie, James M A.; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Tourbier, Dietmar; Webb, Paul; Jarvis, Christine W.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Current gas-pressurized space suits are bulky stiff shells severely limiting astronaut function and capability. A mechanical counter pressure (MCP) space suit in the form of a tight elastic garment could dramatically improve extravehicular activity (EVA) dexterity, but also be advantageous in safety, cost, mass and volume. The purpose of this study was to verify that a prototype MCP glove exerts the design compression of 200 mmHg, a pressure similar to the current NASA EVA suit. Methods: Seven male subjects donned a pressure measurement array and MCP glove on the right hand, which was placed into a partial vacuum chamber. Average compression was recorded on the palm, the bottom of the middle finger, the top of the middle finger and the dorsum of the hand at pressures of 760 (ambient), 660 and 580 mmHg. The vacuum chamber was used to simulate the pressure difference between the low breathing pressure of the current NASA space suits (approximately 200 mmHg) and an unprotected hand in space. Results: At ambient conditions, the MCP glove compressed the dorsum of the hand at 203.5 +/- 22.7 mmHg, the bottom of the middle finger at 179.4 +/- 16.0 mmHg, and the top of the middle finger at 183.8 +/- 22.6 mmHg. The palm compression was significantly lower (59.6 +/- 18.8 mmHg, pglove compression with the chamber pressure reductions. Conclusions: The MCP glove compressed the dorsum of the hand and middle finger at the design pressure.

  12. Density ratios in compressions driven by radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that in the cannonball scheme of laser compression the pellet may be considered to be compressed by the 'brute force' of the radiation pressure. For such a radiation-driven compression, an energy balance method is applied to give an equation fixing the radius compression ratio K which is a key parameter for such intense compressions. A shock model is used to yield specific results. For a square-pulse driving power compressing a spherical pellet with a specific heat ratio of 5/3, a density compression ratio Γ of 27 is computed. Double (stepped) pulsing with linearly rising power enhances Γ to 1750. The value of Γ is not dependent on the absolute magnitude of the piston power, as long as this is large enough. Further enhancement of compression by multiple (stepped) pulsing becomes obvious. The enhanced compression increases the energy gain factor G for a 100 μm DT pellet driven by radiation power of 10 16 W from 6 for a square pulse power with 0.5 MJ absorbed energy to 90 for a double (stepped) linearly rising pulse with absorbed energy of 0.4 MJ assuming perfect coupling efficiency. (author)

  13. Relationship between medical compression and intramuscular pressure as an explanation of a compression paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, J-F; Benigni, J-P; Cornu-Thenard, A; Fournier, J; Blin, E

    2015-06-01

    Using standing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we recently showed that medical compression, providing an interface pressure (IP) of 22 mmHg, significantly compressed the deep veins of the leg but not, paradoxically, superficial varicose veins. To provide an explanation for this compression paradox by studying the correlation between the IP exerted by medical compression and intramuscular pressure (IMP). In 10 legs of five healthy subjects, we studied the effects of different IPs on the IMP of the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The IP produced by a cuff manometer was verified by a Picopress® device. The IMP was measured with a 21G needle connected to a manometer. Pressure data were recorded in the prone and standing positions with cuff manometer pressures from 0 to 50 mmHg. In the prone position, an IP of less than 20 did not significantly change the IMP. On the contrary, a perfect linear correlation with the IMP (r = 0.99) was observed with an IP from 20 to 50 mmHg. We found the same correlation in the standing position. We found that an IP of 22 mmHg produced a significant IMP increase from 32 to 54 mmHg, in the standing position. At the same time, the subcutaneous pressure is only provided by the compression device, on healthy subjects. In other words, the subcutaneous pressure plus the IP is only a little higher than 22 mmHg-a pressure which is too low to reduce the caliber of the superficial veins. This is in accordance with our standing MRI 3D anatomical study which showed that, paradoxically, when applying low pressures (IP), the deep veins are compressed while the superficial veins are not. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Compressed air injection technique to standardize block injection pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ban C H; Li, Lisa X Y; Pillay, Jennifer J

    2006-11-01

    Presently, no standardized technique exists to monitor injection pressures during peripheral nerve blocks. Our objective was to determine if a compressed air injection technique, using an in vitro model based on Boyle's law and typical regional anesthesia equipment, could consistently maintain injection pressures below a 1293 mmHg level associated with clinically significant nerve injury. Injection pressures for 20 and 30 mL syringes with various needle sizes (18G, 20G, 21G, 22G, and 24G) were measured in a closed system. A set volume of air was aspirated into a saline-filled syringe and then compressed and maintained at various percentages while pressure was measured. The needle was inserted into the injection port of a pressure sensor, which had attached extension tubing with an injection plug clamped "off". Using linear regression with all data points, the pressure value and 99% confidence interval (CI) at 50% air compression was estimated. The linearity of Boyle's law was demonstrated with a high correlation, r = 0.99, and a slope of 0.984 (99% CI: 0.967-1.001). The net pressure generated at 50% compression was estimated as 744.8 mmHg, with the 99% CI between 729.6 and 760.0 mmHg. The various syringe/needle combinations had similar results. By creating and maintaining syringe air compression at 50% or less, injection pressures will be substantially below the 1293 mmHg threshold considered to be an associated risk factor for clinically significant nerve injury. This technique may allow simple, real-time and objective monitoring during local anesthetic injections while inherently reducing injection speed.

  15. Shock tubes: compressions in the low pressure chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schins, H.; Giuliani, S.

    1986-01-01

    The gas shock tube used in these experiments consists of a low pressure chamber and a high pressure chamber, divided by a metal-diaphragm-to-rupture. In contrast to the shock mode of operation, where incident and reflected shocks in the low pressure chamber are studied which occur within 3.5 ms, in this work the compression mode of operation was studied, whose maxima occur (in the low pressure chamber) about 9 ms after rupture. Theoretical analysis was done with the finite element computer code EURDYN-1M, where the computation was carried out to 30 ms

  16. Excessive pressure in multichambered cuffs used for sequential compression therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P; Belgrado, JP; Leduc, A; Leduc, O; Verdonck, P

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Pneumatic compression devices, used as part of the therapeutic strategy for lymphatic drainage, often have cuffs with multiple chambers that are, inflated sequentially. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the relationship between cuff chamber pressure

  17. Interactions Of Binder, Disintegrant And Compression Pressure In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Binders, disintegrants and compression pressures play important roles in producing good tablets. The interactions between these three factors were analyzed to observe how they contribute to tablet properties. The concentration levels of the factors were determined using 23 factorial study designs by wet granulation ...

  18. Optimization of binder, disintegrant and compression pressure for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was done by studying the contributions of variable factors of binder concentration, disintegrant concentration and compression pressure to tablet friability, hardness and disintegration time under factor combinations given by 23 factorial experimental designs. The effect of every factor was determined by finding the ...

  19. Confounding compression: the effects of posture, sizing and garment type on measured interface pressure in sports compression clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy-Williams, Ned; Driller, Matthew William; Shing, Cecilia Mary; Fell, James William; Halson, Shona Leigh; Halson, Shona Louise

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to measure the interface pressure exerted by lower body sports compression garments, in order to assess the effect of garment type, size and posture in athletes. Twelve national-level boxers were fitted with sports compression garments (tights and leggings), each in three different sizes (undersized, recommended size and oversized). Interface pressure was assessed across six landmarks on the lower limb (ranging from medial malleolus to upper thigh) as athletes assumed sitting, standing and supine postures. Sports compression leggings exerted a significantly higher mean pressure than sports compression tights (P sports compression garments is significantly affected by garment type, size and posture assumed by the wearer.

  20. Measurements of the Exerted Pressure by Pelvic Circumferential Compression Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knops, Simon P; van Riel, Marcel P.J.M; Goossens, Richard H.M; van Lieshout, Esther M.M; Patka, Peter; Schipper, Inger B

    2010-01-01

    Background: Data on the efficacy and safety of non-invasive Pelvic Circumferential Compression Devices (PCCDs) is limited. Tissue damage may occur if a continuous pressure on the skin exceeding 9.3 kPa is sustained for more than two or three hours. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the pressure build-up at the interface, by measuring the PCCD-induced pressure when applying pulling forces to three different PCCDs (Pelvic Binder® , SAM-Sling ® and T-POD® ) in a simplified model. Methods: The resulting exerted pressures were measured at four ‘anatomical’ locations (right, left, posterior and anterior) in a model using a pressure measurement system consisting of pressure cuffs. Results: The exerted pressure varied substantially between the locations as well as between the PCCDs. Maximum pressures ranged from 18.9-23.3 kPa and from 19.2-27.5 kPa at the right location and left location, respectively. Pressures at the posterior location stayed below 18 kPa. At the anterior location pressures varied markedly between the different PCCDs. Conclusion: The circumferential compression by the different PCCDs showed high pressures measured at the four locations using a simplified model. Difference in design and functional characteristics of the PCCDs resulted in different pressure build-up at the four locations. When following the manufacturer’s instructions, the exerted pressure of all three PCCDs tested exceeded the tissue damaging level (9.3 kPa). In case of prolonged use in a clinical situation this might put patients at risk for developing tissue damage. PMID:20361001

  1. Pressure and compressibility factor of bidisperse magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minina, Elena S.; Blaak, Ronald; Kantorovich, Sofia S.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the pressure and compressibility factors of bidisperse magnetic fluids with relatively weak dipolar interactions and different granulometric compositions. In order to study these properties, we employ the method of diagram expansion, taking into account two possible scenarios: (1) dipolar particles repel each other as hard spheres; (2) the polymer shell on the surface of the particles is modelled through a soft-sphere approximation. The theoretical predictions of the pressure and compressibility factors of bidisperse ferrofluids at different granulometric compositions are supported by data obtained by means of molecular dynamics computer simulations, which we also carried out for these systems. Both theory and simulations reveal that the pressure and compressibility factors decrease with growing dipolar correlations in the system, namely with an increasing fraction of large particles. We also demonstrate that even if dipolar interactions are too weak for any self-assembly to take place, the interparticle correlations lead to a qualitative change in the behaviour of the compressibility factors when compared to that of non-dipolar spheres, making the dependence monotonic.

  2. 30 CFR 56.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 56.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels...

  3. 30 CFR 57.13015 - Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection of compressed-air receivers and...-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Compressed Air and Boilers § 57.13015 Inspection of compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure vessels. (a) Compressed-air receivers and other unfired pressure...

  4. A comparison of inferface pressures of three compression bandage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Richard; Bohbot, Serge; Connolly, Nicki

    To measure and compare the interface pressures achieved with two compression bandage systems - a four-layer system (4LB) and a two-layer short-stretch system (SSB) - with a new two-layer system (2LB), which uses an etalonnage (performance indicator) to help achieve the correct therapeutic pressure for healing venous leg ulcers - recommended as 40 mmHg. 32 nurses with experience of using compression bandages applied each of the three systems to a healthy female volunteer in a sitting position. The interface pressures and time taken to apply the systems were measured. A questionnaire regarding the concept of the new system and its application in comparison to the existing two systems was then completed by the nurses. The interface pressures achieved show that many nurses applied very high pressures with the 4LB (25% achieving pressures > 50 mmHg) whereas the majority of the nurses (75%) achieved a pressure of pressure of 30-50 mmHg was achieved with the new 2LB. The SSB took the least time to be applied (mean: 1 minute 50 seconds) with the 4LB the slowest (mean: 3 minutes 46 seconds). A mean time of 2 minutes 35 seconds was taken to apply the 2LB. Over 63% of the nurses felt the 2LB was very easy to apply. These results suggest that the 2LB achieves the required therapeutic pressure necessary for the management of venous leg ulcers, is easy to apply and may provide a suitable alternative to other multi-layer bandage systems.

  5. Experimental Compressibility of Molten Hedenbergite at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, C. B.; Barnett, R. G.; Guo, X.; Lange, R. A.; Waller, C.; Asimow, P. D.

    2010-12-01

    Experiments using the sink/float method have bracketed the density of molten hedenbergite (CaFeSi2O6) at high pressures and temperatures. The experiments are the first of their kind to determine the compressibility of molten hedenbergite at high pressure and are part of a collaborative effort to establish a new database for an array of silicate melt compositions, which will contribute to the development of an empirically based predictive model that will allow calculation of silicate liquid density and compressibility over a wide range of P-T-X conditions where melting could occur in the Earth. Each melt composition will be measured using: (i) double-bob Archimedean method for melt density and thermal expansion at ambient pressure, (ii) sound speed measurements on liquids to constrain melt compressibility at ambient pressure, (iii) sink/float technique to measure melt density to 15 GPa, and (iv) shock wave measurements of P-V-E equation of state and temperature between 10 and 150 GPa. Companion abstracts on molten fayalite (Waller et al., 2010) and liquid mixes of hedenbergite-diopside and anorthite-hedenbergite-diopside (Guo and Lange, 2010) are also presented at this meeting. In the present study, the hedenbergite starting material was synthesized at the Experimental Petrology Lab, University of Michigan, where melt density, thermal expansion, and sound speed measurements were also carried out. The starting material has also been loaded into targets at the Caltech Shockwave Lab, and experiments there are currently underway. We report here preliminary results from static compression measurement performed at the Department of Petrology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, and the High Pressure Lab, Institute of Meteoritics, University of New Mexico. Experiments were carried out in Quick Press piston-cylinder devices and a Walker-style multi-anvil device. Sink/float marker spheres implemented were gem quality synthetic forsterite (Fo100), San Carlos olivine (Fo90), and

  6. Pressure mapping with textile sensors for compression therapy monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldoli, Ilaria; Mazzocchi, Tommaso; Paoletti, Clara; Ricotti, Leonardo; Salvo, Pietro; Dini, Valentina; Laschi, Cecilia; Francesco, Fabio Di; Menciassi, Arianna

    2016-08-01

    Compression therapy is the cornerstone of treatment in the case of venous leg ulcers. The therapy outcome is strictly dependent on the pressure distribution produced by bandages along the lower limb length. To date, pressure monitoring has been carried out using sensors that present considerable drawbacks, such as single point instead of distributed sensing, no shape conformability, bulkiness and constraints on patient's movements. In this work, matrix textile sensing technologies were explored in terms of their ability to measure the sub-bandage pressure with a suitable temporal and spatial resolution. A multilayered textile matrix based on a piezoresistive sensing principle was developed, calibrated and tested with human subjects, with the aim of assessing real-time distributed pressure sensing at the skin/bandage interface. Experimental tests were carried out on three healthy volunteers, using two different bandage types, from among those most commonly used. Such tests allowed the trends of pressure distribution to be evaluated over time, both at rest and during daily life activities. Results revealed that the proposed device enables the dynamic assessment of compression mapping, with a suitable spatial and temporal resolution (20 mm and 10 Hz, respectively). In addition, the sensor is flexible and conformable, thus well accepted by the patient. Overall, this study demonstrates the adequacy of the proposed piezoresistive textile sensor for the real-time monitoring of bandage-based therapeutic treatments. © IMechE 2016.

  7. Pressurizer safety valve serviceability enhancement by spring compression stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratiu, M.D.; Moisidis, N.T. [California Consulting Engineering and Technology (CALCET), San Leandro, California (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The proactive maintenance of the spring-loaded-self-actuated Pressurizer Safety Valve (PSV) has caused frequent concerns pertaining the spring self actuated reliability due to set point drift, spurious openings, and seat leakage. The exhaustive testing performed on a Crosby PSV model 6M6 has revealed that the principal cause of these malfunctions is the spring compression elastic instability during service. The spring lateral deformations measurements performed validated the analytical shapes for spring compression: symmetrical bending - for coaxial supported ends - restraining any support displacement, and asymmetrical bending induced by the potential misalignment of the supported top end. The source of the spring compression instability appears on the tested Crosby PSV induced by the top end lateral displacement during long term operation. The testing with restrained displacement at the spring top has shown consistent set-point reproducibility, less than +/- 1 per cent. To eliminate the asymmetrical spring buckling, a design review of the PSV is proposed including the guided fixture at the top and the decrease of spring coil slenderness ratio H/D, corresponding to the general analytical elastic stability for the asymmetrical compression. (authors)

  8. Pressurizer safety valve serviceability enhancement by spring compression stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratiu, M.D.; Moisidis, N.T.

    2007-01-01

    The proactive maintenance of the spring-loaded-self-actuated Pressurizer Safety Valve (PSV) has caused frequent concerns pertaining the spring self actuated reliability due to set point drift, spurious openings, and seat leakage. The exhaustive testing performed on a Crosby PSV model 6M6 has revealed that the principal cause of these malfunctions is the spring compression elastic instability during service. The spring lateral deformations measurements performed validated the analytical shapes for spring compression: symmetrical bending - for coaxial supported ends - restraining any support displacement, and asymmetrical bending induced by the potential misalignment of the supported top end. The source of the spring compression instability appears on the tested Crosby PSV induced by the top end lateral displacement during long term operation. The testing with restrained displacement at the spring top has shown consistent set-point reproducibility, less than +/- 1 per cent. To eliminate the asymmetrical spring buckling, a design review of the PSV is proposed including the guided fixture at the top and the decrease of spring coil slenderness ratio H/D, corresponding to the general analytical elastic stability for the asymmetrical compression. (authors)

  9. PSI: Upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The accelerator complex at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen near Zurich (PSI - formed in 1988 by combining the Federal Institute for Reactor Research and the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research) is in the throes of a major and lengthy upgrade

  10. PSI: Upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-09-15

    The accelerator complex at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen near Zurich (PSI - formed in 1988 by combining the Federal Institute for Reactor Research and the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research) is in the throes of a major and lengthy upgrade.

  11. Bulk characterization of pharmaceutical powders by low-pressure compression II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagsten Sørensen, A.; Sonnergaard, Jørn; Hovgaard, L.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of punch and die diameter, sample size, compression speed, and particle size on two low-pressure compression-derived parameters; the compressed density and the Walker w parameter. The excellent repeatability of the low-pressure compressio...

  12. Fast response, 2.5K psi (17.24 MPa) transducer for measurement of gas pressure in PWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piper, T.C.

    1976-09-01

    A strain gage pressure transducer of 2,500 psi (17.24 MPa) range for operation in a 650 0 F environment is described. Specific design parameters are given along with the calibration results obtained from typical transducers. Appendices delineate the bridge output to be expected and the actual open circuit value of a strain gage calculated from measurements taken with the bridge completed

  13. Compressed natural gas transportation by utilizing FRP composite pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, S.C. [Trans Ocean Gas Inc., St. John' s, NF (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper discussed the Trans Ocean Gas (TOG) method for transporting compressed natural gas (CNG). As demand for natural gas increases and with half of the world's reserves considered stranded, a method to transport natural gas by ship is needed. CNG transportation is widely viewed as a viable method. Transported as CNG, stranded gas reserves can be delivered to existing markets or can create new natural gas markets not applicable to liquefied natural gas (LNG). In contrast to LNG, compressed gas requires no processing to offload. TOG proposes that CNG be transported using fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) pressure vessels which overcome all the deficiencies of proposed steel-based systems. FRP pressure vessels have been proven safe and reliable through critical applications in the national defense, aerospace, and natural gas vehicle industries. They are light-weight, highly reliable, have very safe failure modes, are corrosion resistant, and have excellent low temperature characteristics. Under TOG's scheme, natural gas can be stored at two thirds the density of LNG without costly processing. TOG's proposed design and testing of a CNG system was reviewed in detail. 1 fig.

  14. Design and construction of a prestressed concrete pressure vessel for a working pressure of 69N/mm2 (10,000 p.s.i)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.

    1977-01-01

    Construction is nearing completion of a pressure vessel with a chamber 9.15 m (30 ft.) high and 3.05 m (10 ft.) internal diameter for hydraulic tests on marine components up to 69 N/mm 2 (10,000 p.s.i.) working pressure. The chamber comprises a steel cylinder, with independent end plates contained within a prestressed concrete structure. The cylinder is constructed in two halves, each consisting of three forged rings, 170 mm thick, shrink-fitted onto a 90 mm thick liner. It rests on a 100 mm thick bottom plate, provided with a band of hard-facing overlay on which the cylinder slides in response to changes of test medium pressure. Models to be tested within the chamber are hung from a removeable 150 mm thick top plate. A central elliptical hatch provides access into the chamber. Special sealing assemblies are fitted at the junction of the cylinder sections and between the cylinder and end plates. These seals are capable of accepting radial expansion of the cylinder and corresponding vertical movements at the upper seal arising from elastic movements of the enclosing structure. The top plate is restrained by a wire-wound prestressed concrete closure plug, itself located by twelve bifurcated inclined steel struts which transfer the load on the top plate into the concrete structure. The struts are retractable to allow removal of the closure plug and top plate. The enclosing concrete structure is 25 m (82 ft.) high and 11 m (36 ft.) diameter. It is vertically prestressed by 180 no. 540 Tonne tendons and circumferentially prestressed by 5 mm wire laid under tension in pre-cast concrete channels by the Taylor Woodrow Wire-Winding System. The structure was analysed, using limit state principles, by computerised elastic and non-elastic dynamic relaxation techniques. The results were evaluated against triaxial stress criteria established from relevant research work and experience obtained from nuclear prestressed concrete pressure vessels

  15. An experimental investigation of forced convection burnout in high pressure water. Part IV, Large diameter tubes at about 1600 p.s.i

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.H.

    1966-11-01

    The report presents 727 burnout results for tubes with uniform and non-uniform axial heat flux profiles. Most of the data are at 1600 p.s.i, although there are a limited number at 1250 and 1800 p.s.i. Tube diameters ranged from 0.5 to 1.8 inches. A new correlation for uniform flax data at these pressures is presented, having R.M.S. errors between 4 and 6%. A table of constant terms for this new uniform flux correlation is given, together with Macbeth's values for pressures of 560, 1000 and 2000 p.s.i. Experimental and predicted burnout powers for non-uniform axial heat fluxes are compared and the existing methods of prediction are found to be in error by up to 20%. A new method for predicting burnout with non-uniform axial heat flux is developed which correlates all published data to an R.M.S. error of 6.7%. (author)

  16. Impact of multilayered compression bandages on sub-bandage interface pressure: a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khaburi, J; Nelson, E A; Hutchinson, J; Dehghani-Sanij, A A

    2011-03-01

    Multi-component medical compression bandages are widely used to treat venous leg ulcers. The sub-bandage interface pressures induced by individual components of the multi-component compression bandage systems are not always simply additive. Current models to explain compression bandage performance do not take account of the increase in leg circumference when each bandage is applied, and this may account for the difference between predicted and actual pressures. To calculate the interface pressure when a multi-component compression bandage system is applied to a leg. Use thick wall cylinder theory to estimate the sub-bandage pressure over the leg when a multi-component compression bandage is applied to a leg. A mathematical model was developed based on thick cylinder theory to include bandage thickness in the calculation of the interface pressure in multi-component compression systems. In multi-component compression systems, the interface pressure corresponds to the sum of the pressures applied by individual bandage layers. However, the change in the limb diameter caused by additional bandage layers should be considered in the calculation. Adding the interface pressure produced by single components without considering the bandage thickness will result in an overestimate of the overall interface pressure produced by the multi-component compression systems. At the ankle (circumference 25 cm) this error can be 19.2% or even more in the case of four components bandaging systems. Bandage thickness should be considered when calculating the pressure applied using multi-component compression systems.

  17. Compressed-tube pressure cell for optical studies at ocean pressures: Application to glucose mutarotation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamelas, F J

    2016-12-01

    A self-contained compressed-tube pressure cell is tested to 25 MPa. The cell is very simple to construct and offers stable pressure control with optical access to fluid samples. The physical path length of light through the cell is large enough to measure optical activity. The entire system is relatively small and portable, and it is vibration-free, since a compressor is not used. Operation of the cell is demonstrated by measuring the mutarotation rate of aqueous glucose solutions at 25 °C. A logarithmic plot of the rate constant vs. pressure yields an activation volume for mutarotation of -22 cm 3 /mol, approximately twice the value measured previously at higher pressures.

  18. Effects of water compressibility on the pressure fluctuation prediction in pump turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, J L; Wang, D Z; Wang, L Q; Wu, Y L; Wei, X Z

    2012-01-01

    The compressible effect of water is a key factor in transient flows. However, it is always neglected in the unsteady simulations for hydraulic machinery. In light of this, the governing equation of the flow is deduced to combine the compressibility of water, and then simulations with compressible and incompressible considerations to the typical unsteady flow phenomenon (Rotor stator interaction) in a pump turbine model are carried out and compared with each other. The results show that water compressibility has great effects on the magnitude and frequency of pressure fluctuation. As the operating condition concerned, the compressibility of water will induce larger pressure fluctuation, which agrees better with measured data. Moreover, the lower frequency component of the pressure signal can only be captured with the combination of water compressibility. It can be concluded that water compressibility is a fatal factor, which cannot be neglected in the unsteady simulations for pump turbines.

  19. Intradiscal pressure depends on recent loading and correlates with disc height and compressive stiffness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergroesen, P.P.A.; van der Veen, A.J.; van Royen, B.J.; Kingma, I.; Smit, T.H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Intervertebral discs exhibit time-dependent deformation (creep), which could influence the relation between applied stress and intradiscal pressure. This study investigates the effect of prolonged dynamic loading on intradiscal pressure, disc height and compressive stiffness, and examines

  20. Loss of interface pressure in various compression bandage systems over seven days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protz, Kerstin; Heyer, Kristina; Verheyen-Cronau, Ida; Augustin, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturers' instructions of multi-component compression bandage systems inform that these products can remain up to 7 days during the therapy of venous leg ulcer. This implies that the pressure needed will be sustained during this time. The present research investigated the persistence of pressure of compression systems over 7 days. All 6 compression systems available in Germany at the time of the trial were tested on 35 volunteering persons without signs of venous leg disease. Bandaging with short-stretch bandages was included for comparison. Pressure was measured by using PicoPress®. Initially, all products showed sufficient resting pressure of 40 mm Hg checked with a pressure monitor, except for one system in which the pressure fell by at least 23.8%, the maximum being 47.5% over a period of 7 days. The currently available compression systems are not fit to keep the required pressure. Optimized products need to be developed.

  1. Experimental investigation of dynamic compression and spallation of Cerium at pressures up to 6 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubareva, A. N.; Kolesnikov, S. A.; Utkin, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    In this study the experiments on one-dimensional dynamic compression of Cerium (Ce) samples to pressures of 0.5 to 6 GPa using various types of explosively driven generators were conducted. VISAR laser velocimeter was used to obtain Ce free surface velocity profiles. The isentropic compression wave was registered for γ-phase of Ce at pressures lower than 0.76 GPa that corresponds to γ-α phase transition pressure in Ce. Shock rarefaction waves were also registered in several experiments. Both observations were the result of the anomalous compressibility of γ-phase of Ce. On the basis of our experimental results the compression isentrope of Ce γ-phase was constructed. Its comparison with volumetric compression curves allowed to estimate the magnitude of shear stress at dynamic compression conditions for Ce. Spall strength measurements were also conducted for several samples. They showed a strong dependence of the spall strength of Ce on the strain rate.

  2. Experimental investigation of dynamic compression and spallation of cerium at pressures up to 6 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubareva, A N; Kolesnikov, S A; Utkin, A V

    2014-01-01

    In this study the experiments on one-dimensional dynamic compression of Cerium (Ce) samples to pressures of 0.5 to 6 GPa using various types of explosively driven generators were conducted. VISAR laser velocimeter was used to obtain Ce free surface velocity profiles. The isentropic compression wave was registered for γ-phase of Ce at pressures lower than 0.76 GPa that corresponds to γ-α phase transition pressure in Ce. Shock rarefaction waves were also registered in several experiments. Both observations were the result of the anomalous compressibility of γ-phase of Ce. On the basis of our experimental results the compression isentrope of Ce γ-phase was constructed. Its comparison with volumetric compression curves allowed to estimate the magnitude of shear stress at dynamic compression conditions for Ce. Spall strength measurements were also conducted for several samples. They showed a strong dependence of the spall strength of Ce on the strain rate.

  3. Decay of psi (3684) into psi (3095)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, G.S.; Briggs, D.D.; Chinowsky, W.; Friedberg, C.E.; Goldhaber, G.; Kadyk, J.A.; Litke, A.M.; Lulu, B.A.; Pierre, F.M.; Sadoulet, B.; Trilling, G.H.; Whitaker, J.S.; Wiss, J.E.; Zipse, J.E.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Feldman, G.J.; Fischer, G.E.; Fryberger, D.; Hanson, G.; Jean-Marie, B.; Larsen, R.R.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.L.; Lyon, D.; Morehouse, C.C.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Tanenbaum, W.; Vannucci, F.

    1975-01-01

    We observe psi (3684) to decay into psi (3095) with a branching ratio of 0.57plus-or-minus0.08. The branching ratio for the particular decay mode psi (3095)+π + +π - is measured to be 0.32plus-or-minus0.04. Remaining decays leading to psi (3095) are largely, but not entirely, accounted for by the mode psi (3095)+π 0 +π 0 if the two pions in this decay are in a state of zero isospin

  4. Dependence of compressive strength of green compacts on pressure, density and contact area of powder particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.; Akram, M.; Shahid, K.A.; Javed, M.; Zaidi, S.M.

    1994-08-01

    The relationship between green compressive strength and compacting pressure as well as green density has been investigated for uniaxially pressed aluminium powder compacts in the range 0 - 520 MPa. Two linear relationships occurred between compacting pressure and green compressive strength which corresponded to powder compaction stages II and III respectively, increase in strength being large during stage II and quite small in stage III with increasing pressure. On the basis of both, the experimental results and a previous model on cold compaction of powder particles, relationships between green compressive strength and green density and interparticle contact area of the compacts has been established. (author) 9 figs

  5. Developments in time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction using rapid compression and decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Lin, Chuanlong; Rod, Eric; Bai, Ligang; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    Complementary advances in high pressure research apparatus and techniques make it possible to carry out time-resolved high pressure research using what would customarily be considered static high pressure apparatus. This work specifically explores time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction with rapid compression and/or decompression of a sample in a diamond anvil cell. Key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment are presented, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell

  6. A new device to noninvasively estimate the intraocular pressure produced during ocular compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korenfeld MS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael S Korenfeld,1,2 David K Dueker3 1Comprehensive Eye Care, Ltd., 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Washington, MO, USA; 3Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Purpose: To describe a noninvasive instrument that estimates intraocular pressure during episodes of external globe compression and to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this device by comparing it to the intraocular pressures simultaneously and manometrically measured in cannulated eyes. Methods: A thin fluid-filled bladder was constructed from flexible and inelastic plastic sheeting and was connected to a pressure transducer with high pressure tubing. The output of the pressure transducer was sent to an amplifier and recorded. This device was validated by measuring induced pressure in the fluid-filled bladder while digital pressure was applied to one surface, and the other surface was placed directly against a human cadaver eye or in vivo pig eye. The human cadaver and in vivo pig eyes were each cannulated to provide a manometric intraocular pressure control. Results: The measurements obtained with the newly described device were within ~5% of simultaneously measured manometric intraocular pressures in both a human cadaver and in vivo pig eye model for a pressure range of ~15–100 mmHg. Conclusion: This novel noninvasive device is useful for estimating the intraocular pressure transients induced during any form of external globe compression; this is a clinical setting where no other devices can be used to estimate intraocular pressure. Keywords: glaucoma, intraocular pressure, tonometer, ocular compression

  7. Pressure and compressibility of a quantum plasma in a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp, L.G.

    1993-01-01

    The equilibrium pressure tensor that occurs in the momentum balance equation for a quantum plasma in a magnetic field is shown to be anisotropic. Its relation to the pressure that follows from thermodynamics is elucidated. A general proof of the compressibility rule for a magnetized quantum plasma

  8. Firefighter's compressed air breathing system pressure vessel development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    The research to design, fabricate, test, and deliver a pressure vessel for the main component in an improved high-performance firefighter's breathing system is reported. The principal physical and performance characteristics of the vessel which were required are: (1) maximum weight of 9.0 lb; (2) maximum operating pressure of 4500 psig (charge pressure of 4000 psig); (3) minimum contained volume of 280 in. 3; (4) proof pressure of 6750 psig; (5) minimum burst pressure of 9000 psig following operational and service life; and (6) a minimum service life of 15 years. The vessel developed to fulfill the requirements described was completely sucessful, i.e., every category of performence was satisfied. The average weight of the vessel was found to be about 8.3 lb, well below the 9.0 lb specification requirement.

  9. Optimization of injection pressure for a compression ignition engine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    injection and atomization and contributes to incomplete combustion, nozzle clogging, ... this non edible oil may be an appropriate substitute for diesel fuel. ... The effect of injector opening pressure on the performance of a jatropha oil fuelled ...

  10. Compressibility of Ir-Os alloys under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusenko, Kirill V.; Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim; Gromilov, Sergey A.; Kurnosov, Alexander V.; Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Hanfland, Michael; Smaalen, Sander van; Margadonna, Serena; Dubrovinsky, Leonid S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • fcc- and hcp-Ir-Os alloys were prepared from single-source precursors. • Their atomic volumes measured at ambient conditions using powder X-ray diffraction follow nearly linear dependence. • Compressibility of alloys have been studied up to 30 GPa at room temperature in diamond anvil cells. • Their bulk moduli increase with increasing osmium content. - Abstract: Several fcc- and hcp-structured Ir-Os alloys were prepared from single-source precursors in hydrogen atmosphere at 873 K. Their atomic volumes measured at ambient conditions using powder X-ray diffraction follow nearly linear dependence as a function of composition. Alloys have been studied up to 30 GPa at room temperature by means of synchrotron-based X-ray powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells. Their bulk moduli increase with increasing osmium content and show a deviation from linearity. Bulk modulus of hcp-Ir 0.20 Os 0.80 is identical to that of pure Os (411 GPa) within experimental errors. Peculiarities on fcc-Ir 0.80 Os 0.20 compressibility curve indicate possible changes of its electronic properties at ∼20 GPa

  11. Theory of adiabatic pressure-gradient soliton compression in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Roberts, John

    2009-01-01

    Adiabatic soliton compression by means of a pressure gradient in a hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber is investigated theoretically and numerically. It is shown that the dureation of the compressed pulse is limited mainly by the interplay between third-order dispersion and the Raman-induced soliton...... frequency shift. Analytical expressions for this limit are derived and compared with results of detailed numerical simulations for a realistic fiber structure....

  12. Influence of breast compression pressure on the performance of population-based mammography screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Katharina; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Mann, Ritse M; den Heeten, Gerard J; van Gils, Carla H; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2017-11-28

    In mammography, breast compression is applied to reduce the thickness of the breast. While it is widely accepted that firm breast compression is needed to ensure acceptable image quality, guidelines remain vague about how much compression should be applied during mammogram acquisition. A quantitative parameter indicating the desirable amount of compression is not available. Consequently, little is known about the relationship between the amount of breast compression and breast cancer detectability. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of breast compression pressure in mammography on breast cancer screening outcomes. We used digital image analysis methods to determine breast volume, percent dense volume, and pressure from 132,776 examinations of 57,179 women participating in the Dutch population-based biennial breast cancer screening program. Pressure was estimated by dividing the compression force by the area of the contact surface between breast and compression paddle. The data was subdivided into quintiles of pressure and the number of screen-detected cancers, interval cancers, false positives, and true negatives were determined for each group. Generalized estimating equations were used to account for correlation between examinations of the same woman and for the effect of breast density and volume when estimating sensitivity, specificity, and other performance measures. Sensitivity was computed using interval cancers occurring between two screening rounds and using interval cancers within 12 months after screening. Pair-wise testing for significant differences was performed. Percent dense volume increased with increasing pressure, while breast volume decreased. Sensitivity in quintiles with increasing pressure was 82.0%, 77.1%, 79.8%, 71.1%, and 70.8%. Sensitivity based on interval cancers within 12 months was significantly lower in the highest pressure quintile compared to the third (84.3% vs 93.9%, p = 0.034). Specificity was lower in the

  13. SU-E-J-190: Development of Abdominal Compression & Respiratory Guiding System Using Gas Pressure Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T; Kim, D; Kang, S; Cho, M; Kim, K; Shin, D; Suh, T; Kim, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Abdominal compression is known to be effective but, often makes external-marker-based monitoring of breathing motion not feasible. In this study, we developed and evaluated a system that enables both abdominal compression and monitoring of residual abdominal motion simultaneously. The system can also provide visual-biofeedback capability. Methods: The system developed consists of a compression belt, an abdominal motion monitoring sensor (gas pressure sensor) and a visual biofeedback device. The compression belt was designed to be able to compress the frontal side of the abdomen. The pressure level of the belt is controlled by air volume and monitored in real time using the gas pressure sensor. The system displays not only the real-time monitoring curve but also a guiding respiration model (e.g., a breath hold or shallow breathing curve) simultaneously on the head mounted display to help patients keep their breathing pattern as consistent as possible. Three healthy volunteers were enrolled in this pilot study and respiratory signals (pressure variations) were obtained both with and without effective abdominal compression to investigate the feasibility of the developed system. Two guidance patterns, breath hold and shallow breathing, were tested. Results: All volunteers showed smaller abdominal motion with compression (about 40% amplitude reduction compared to without compression). However, the system was able to monitor residual abdominal motion for all volunteers. Even under abdominal compression, in addition, it was possible to make the subjects successfully follow the guide patterns using the visual biofeedback system. Conclusion: The developed abdominal compression & respiratory guiding system was feasible for residual abdominal motion management. It is considered that the system can be used for a respiratory motion involved radiation therapy while maintaining the merit of abdominal compression. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R

  14. SU-E-J-190: Development of Abdominal Compression & Respiratory Guiding System Using Gas Pressure Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T; Kim, D; Kang, S; Cho, M; Kim, K; Shin, D; Suh, T [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Abdominal compression is known to be effective but, often makes external-marker-based monitoring of breathing motion not feasible. In this study, we developed and evaluated a system that enables both abdominal compression and monitoring of residual abdominal motion simultaneously. The system can also provide visual-biofeedback capability. Methods: The system developed consists of a compression belt, an abdominal motion monitoring sensor (gas pressure sensor) and a visual biofeedback device. The compression belt was designed to be able to compress the frontal side of the abdomen. The pressure level of the belt is controlled by air volume and monitored in real time using the gas pressure sensor. The system displays not only the real-time monitoring curve but also a guiding respiration model (e.g., a breath hold or shallow breathing curve) simultaneously on the head mounted display to help patients keep their breathing pattern as consistent as possible. Three healthy volunteers were enrolled in this pilot study and respiratory signals (pressure variations) were obtained both with and without effective abdominal compression to investigate the feasibility of the developed system. Two guidance patterns, breath hold and shallow breathing, were tested. Results: All volunteers showed smaller abdominal motion with compression (about 40% amplitude reduction compared to without compression). However, the system was able to monitor residual abdominal motion for all volunteers. Even under abdominal compression, in addition, it was possible to make the subjects successfully follow the guide patterns using the visual biofeedback system. Conclusion: The developed abdominal compression & respiratory guiding system was feasible for residual abdominal motion management. It is considered that the system can be used for a respiratory motion involved radiation therapy while maintaining the merit of abdominal compression. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R

  15. Pressure mapping and performance of the compression bandage/garment for venous leg ulcer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S; Mukhopadhyay, A; Sikka, M; Nagla, K S

    2008-08-01

    A study has been conducted on the commercially available compression bandages as regards their performance with time. Pressure mapping of these bandages has been done using a fabricated pressure-measuring device on a mannequin leg to see the effect on pressure due to creep, fabric friction and angle of bandaging. The results show that the creep behavior, frictional behavior and the angle of bandaging have a significant effect on the pressure profile generated by the bandages during application. The regression analysis shows that the surface friction restricts the slippage in a multilayer system. Also the diameters of the limb and the amount of stretch given to the bandage during application have definite impact on the bandage pressure. In case of compression garments, washing improves the pressure generated but not to the extent of the pressure of a virgin garment. Comparing the two compression materials i.e. bandage and garment, it is found that the presence of higher percentage of elastomeric material and a highly close construction in case of garment provides better holding power and a more homogeneous pressure distribution.

  16. Dynamic compressive properties obtained from a split Hopkinson pressure bar test of Boryeong shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minju; Cho, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang Gon; Park, Jaeyeong; Jeong, Myeong-Sik; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic compressive properties of a Boryeong shale were evaluated by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar, and were compared with those of a Hwangdeung granite which is a typical hard rock. The results indicated that the dynamic compressive loading reduced the resistance to fracture. The dynamic compressive strength was lower in the shale than in the granite, and was raised with increasing strain rate by microcracking effect as well as strain rate strengthening effect. Since the number of microcracked fragments increased with increasing strain rate in the shale having laminated weakness planes, the shale showed the better fragmentation performance than the granite at high strain rates. The effect of transversely isotropic plane on compressive strength decreased with increasing strain rate, which was desirable for increasing the fragmentation performance. Thus, the shale can be more reliably applied to industrial areas requiring good fragmentation performance as the striking speed of drilling or hydraulic fracturing machines increased. The present dynamic compressive test effectively evaluated the fragmentation performance as well as compressive strength and strain energy density by controlling the air pressure, and provided an important idea on which rock was more readily fragmented under dynamically processing conditions such as high-speed drilling and blasting.

  17. Optimum injection pressure of a cavitating jet on introduction of compressive residual stress into stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyama, Hitoshi; Nagasaka, Kazuya; Takakuwa, Osamu; Naito, Akima

    2011-01-01

    In order to mitigate stress corrosion cracking of components used for nuclear power plants, introduction of compressive residual stress into sub-surface of the components is an effective maintenance method. The introduction of compressive residual stress using cavitation impact generated by injecting a high speed water jet into water was proposed. Water jet peening is now applying to reduce stress corrosion cracking of shrouds in the nuclear power plants. However, accidental troubles such as dropping off the components and cutting of the pipes by the jet occurred at the maintenance. In order to peen by the jet without damage, optimum injection pressure of the jet should be revealed. In the case of 'cavitation peening', cavitation is generated by injecting the high speed water jet into water. As working pressure at the cavitation peening is the pressure at cavitation bubble collapse, the injection pressure of the jet is not main parameter. The cavitation impact is increasing with the scale of the jet, i.e., scaling effect of the cavitation. It was revealed that the large scale jet at low injection pressure can introduce compressive residual stress into stainless steel comparing with the small scale jet at high injection pressure. As expected, a water jet at high injection pressure might make damage of the components. Namely, in order to avoid damage of the components, the jet at the low injection pressure will be suit for the introduction of compressive residual stress. In the present paper, in order to make clear optimum injection pressure of the cavitating jet for the introduction of compressive residual stress without damage, the residual stress of stainless steel treated by the jet at various injection pressure was measured by using an X-ray diffraction method. The injection pressure of the jet p 1 was varied from 5 MPa to 300 MPa. The diameter of the nozzle throat of the jet d was varied from 0.35 mm to 2.0 mm. The residual stress changing with depth was

  18. Compression Stockings and Pressure Ulcers: Case Series of a Neglected Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Farooq A; Ahmad, Faria; Khan, Omer J

    2017-10-10

    Pressure ulcers develop in patients who endure long periods of immobilization, often caused by conditions such as musculoskeletal and neurological diseases. Pressure ulcers adversely affect the patient and increase caregiver burden and healthcare costs. Typical sites for these ulcers include the sacrum, trochanters, and heels; they also occur on the nape of the neck, penis, nostrils, helix of the ear, and upper back. Compression stockings are commonly used to prevent and stop the progression of venous disorders, including deep vein thrombosis, but their role in the development of pressure ulcers is not well known. We describe three case reports of pressure ulcer development due to prolonged application of compression stockings. In each case, the nursing staff who were primarily responsible for the prevention of pressure ulcers applied the stockings continuously without any intermittent relief. Moreover, the stockings did not include manufacturer instructions, such as recommended exposure times and applications. We recommend that nursing staff be trained in pressure relief and prevention of pressure ulcers, including rare occurrences, and that manufacturers give detailed guidance regarding the safe use of compression stockings.

  19. Effect of Pressure and Heat Treatments on the Compressive Strength of Reactive Powder Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmi Masdar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the corresponding compressive strength of RPC with variable pressure combined with heating rate, heating duration, and starting time of heating. The treatments applied were 8 MPa static pressure on fresh RPC prims and heat curing at 240 °C in an oven. The compressive strength test was conducted at 7-d and 28-d. The images of RPC morphology were captured on the surface of a fractured specimen using Scanning Electron Microscopy in Secondary Electron detector mode to describe pore filing mechanism after treatments. The results show that a heating rate at 50 °C/hr resulted in the highest compressive strength about 40 % more than those at 10 or 100 °C/hr. A heating duration of 48 hours led to the maximum compressive strength. Heat curing applied 2 days after casting resulted in the maximum compressive. Heat curing had a signicant effect on the compresssive strength due to the acceleration of both reactions (hydration and pozzolanic and the degree of transformation from tobermorite to xonotlite. It is concluded that the optimum condition of treatments is both pressure and heat curing at 2-day after casting with a rate of 50 °C/hr for 48 hours.

  20. Pressure Regulators as Valves for Saving Compressed Air and their Influence on System Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure regulators in the field of pneumatic mechanisms can be used as valves for saving compressed air. For example it can be used to reduce the pressure when the piston rod is retracting unloaded and thus it is possible to save some energy. However the problem is that saving valve can significantly affect the dynamics of the pneumatic system. The lower pressure in the piston rod chamber causes extension of time for retraction of the piston rod. This article compare the air consumption experimentally determined and calculated, measured curves of pressure in cylinder chambers and piston speed when saving valve is set up differently.

  1. Pressure Regulators as Valves for Saving Compressed Air and their Influence on System Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Fojtášek, Kamil

    2015-05-01

    Pressure regulators in the field of pneumatic mechanisms can be used as valves for saving compressed air. For example it can be used to reduce the pressure when the piston rod is retracting unloaded and thus it is possible to save some energy. However the problem is that saving valve can significantly affect the dynamics of the pneumatic system. The lower pressure in the piston rod chamber causes extension of time for retraction of the piston rod. This article compare the air consumption experimentally determined and calculated, measured curves of pressure in cylinder chambers and piston speed when saving valve is set up differently.

  2. Dynamic Increase Factors for High Performance Concrete in Compression using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Benjamin; Ngo, Tuan; Mendis, Priyan

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides dynamic increase factors (DIF) in compression for two different High Performance Concretes (HPC), 100 MPa and 160 MPa, respectively. In the experimental investigation 2 different Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars are used in order to test over a wide range of strain rates, 100 sec1...... to 700 sec-1. The results are compared with the CEB Model Code and the Spilt Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique is briefly de-scribed....

  3. An audit of pressure sores caused by intermittent compression devices used to prevent venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Joanna; Thomas, Sunil

    2011-12-01

    When intermittent compression devices (ICDs) are used to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) they can cause pressure sores in a selected group of women, undergoing long operations. A prospective audit pre and post intervention showed a reduced risk with an alternative device, without increasing the risk of VTE.

  4. A blended pressure/density based method for the computation of incompressible and compressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossow, C.-C.

    2003-01-01

    An alternative method to low speed preconditioning for the computation of nearly incompressible flows with compressible methods is developed. For this approach the leading terms of the flux difference splitting (FDS) approximate Riemann solver are analyzed in the incompressible limit. In combination with the requirement of the velocity field to be divergence-free, an elliptic equation to solve for a pressure correction to enforce the divergence-free velocity field on the discrete level is derived. The pressure correction equation established is shown to be equivalent to classical methods for incompressible flows. In order to allow the computation of flows at all speeds, a blending technique for the transition from the incompressible, pressure based formulation to the compressible, density based formulation is established. It is found necessary to use preconditioning with this blending technique to account for a remaining 'compressible' contribution in the incompressible limit, and a suitable matrix directly applicable to conservative residuals is derived. Thus, a coherent framework is established to cover the discretization of both incompressible and compressible flows. Compared with standard preconditioning techniques, the blended pressure/density based approach showed improved robustness for high lift flows close to separation

  5. Anomalous anisotropic compression behavior of superconducting CrAs under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenhai; Wu, Wei; Hu, Qingyang; Zhao, Jinggeng; Li, Chunyu; Yang, Ke; Cheng, Jinguang; Luo, Jianlin; Wang, Lin; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2015-01-01

    CrAs was observed to possess the bulk superconductivity under high-pressure conditions. To understand the superconducting mechanism and explore the correlation between the structure and superconductivity, the high-pressure structural evolution of CrAs was investigated using the angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The structure of CrAs remains stable up to 1.8 GPa, whereas the lattice parameters exhibit anomalous compression behaviors. With increasing pressure, the lattice parameters a and c both demonstrate a nonmonotonic change, and the lattice parameter b undergoes a rapid contraction at ∼0.18−0.35 GPa, which suggests that a pressure-induced isostructural phase transition occurs in CrAs. Above the phase transition pressure, the axial compressibilities of CrAs present remarkable anisotropy. A schematic band model was used to address the anomalous compression behavior of CrAs. The present results shed light on the structural and related electronic responses to high pressure, which play a key role toward understanding the superconductivity of CrAs. PMID:26627230

  6. Apparatus to measure vapor pressure, differential vapor pressure, liquid molar volume, and compressibility of liquids and solutions to the critical point. Vapor pressures, molar volumes, and compressibilities of protiobenzene and deuteriobenzene at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooner, Z.S.; Van Hook, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus designed to measure vapor pressure differences between two similar liquids, such as isotopic isomers, or between a solution and its reference solvent at temperatures and pressures extending to the critical point is described. Vapor-phase volume is minimized and pressure is transmitted to the transducer through the liquid, thereby avoiding several experimental difficulties. Liquid can be injected into the heated part of the system by volumetrically calibrated screw injectors, thus permitting measurements of liquid molar volume, compressibility, and expansivity. The addition of a high-pressure circulating pump and injection valve allows the apparatus to be employed as a continuous dilution differential vapor pressure apparatus for determining partial molar free energies of solution. In the second part of the paper data on the vapor pressure, molar volume, compressibility, and expansivity and their isotope effects for C 6 H 6 and C 6 D 6 from room temperature to near the critical temperature are reported

  7. Increasing the compression pressure in an engine by using a long intake pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Robertson; Gardiner, Arthur W

    1924-01-01

    During some tests of a one-cylinder engine, using gas oil (diesel engine oil, specific gravity 0.86 at 60 F) with solid injection and compression ignition, it was found to be necessary to increase either the jacket water temperature or the compression pressure in order to start the engine. It was found that a sufficient increase in compression pressure could be obtained simply by attaching a long pipe to the inlet flange of the cylinder. However, since no data were available giving the values of the increase in compression pressure that might be expected from such a step-up, an investigation was made covering some engine speeds between 500 r.p.m. and 1800 r.p.m. The data obtained are included here in the form of curves. Although this data is not strictly applicable to another engine, it should give indications of what might be expected with such a set-up on an engine operating at similar speeds. The engine used was a single cylinder Liberty, 5-inch bore and 7-inch stroke, having standard cylinder, cams, valves, and valve timing and operating on a four-stroke cycle.

  8. PSI annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the research performed in 1990 at PSI Villigen in the fields of nuclear and particle physics, biosciences, condensed matter and material sciences, nuclear energy and general energy, including the research performed at PSI Zuerich. Selected projects are described in more detail. figs

  9. PSI annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the research performed in 1992 at PSI Villigen in the fields of nuclear and particle physics, biosciences, condensed matter and material sciences, nuclear energy and general energy, including the research performed at PSI Zuerich. Selected project are described in more detail. figs.,

  10. Experimental review of the spectroscopy of PSI and PSI' resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Hote, D.

    1976-12-01

    Review of the experimental results concerning the resonances PSI and PSI' produced by e + e - annihilation: their decay modes, partial width and quantum numbers. The identification of PSI and PSI' to bound states of charmonium leads to the prediction of other bound states with different quantum numbers. Presentation of experiments providing an evidence for those states (Psub(c), KHI, X(2.8) in the decay products of PSI and PSI' [fr

  11. Compressed-air work is entering the field of high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Péchon, J Cl; Gourdon, G

    2010-01-01

    Since 1850, compressed-air work has been used to prevent shafts or tunnels under construction from flooding. Until the 1980s, workers were digging in compressed-air environments. Since the introduction of tunnel boring machines (TBMs), very little digging under pressure is needed. However, the wearing out of cutter-head tools requires inspection and repair. Compressed-air workers enter the pressurized working chamber only occasionally to perform such repairs. Pressures between 3.5 and 4.5 bar, that stand outside a reasonable range for air breathing, were reached by 2002. Offshore deep diving technology had to be adapted to TBM work. Several sites have used mixed gases: in Japan for deep shaft sinking (4.8 bar), in The Netherlands at Western Scheldt Tunnels (6.9 bar), in Russia for St. Petersburg Metro (5.8 bar) and in the United States at Seattle (5.8 bar). Several tunnel projects are in progress that may involve higher pressures: Hallandsås (Sweden) interventions in heliox saturation up to 13 bar, and Lake Mead (U.S.) interventions to about 12 bar (2010). Research on TBMs and grouting technologies tries to reduce the requirements for hyperbaric works. Adapted international rules, expertise and services for saturation work, shuttles and trained personnel matching industrial requirements are the challenges.

  12. Observation of a New High-Pressure Solid Phase in Dynamically Compressed Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsin, D. N.

    2017-10-01

    Aluminum is ideal for testing theoretical first-principles calculations because of the relative simplicity of its atomic structure. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that Al transforms from an ambient-pressure, face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystal to the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) and body-centered-cubic (bcc) structures as it is compressed. Laser-driven experiments performed at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) ramp compressed Al samples to pressures up to 540 GPa without melting. Nanosecond in-situ x-ray diffraction was used to directly measure the crystal structure at pressures where the solid-solid phase transformations of Al are predicted to occur. Laser velocimetry provided the pressure in the Al. Our results show clear evidence of the fcc-hcp and hpc-bcc transformations at 216 +/- 9 GPa and 321 +/- 12 GPa, respectively. This is the first experimental in-situ observation of the bcc phase in compressed Al and a confirmation of the fcc-hcp transition previously observed under static compression at 217 GPa. The observations indicate these solid-solid phase transitions occur on the order of tens of nanoseconds time scales. In the fcc-hcp transition we find the original texture of the sample is preserved; however, the hcp-bcc transition diminishes that texture producing a structure that is more polycrystalline. The importance of this dynamic is discussed. The NIF results are the first demonstration of x-ray diffraction measurements at two different pressures in a single laser shot. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. Reduced injection pressures using a compressed air injection technique (CAIT): an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ban C H; Knezevich, Mark P; Pillay, Jennifer J

    2008-01-01

    High injection pressures have been associated with intraneural injection and persistent neurological injury in animals. Our objective was to test whether a reported simple compressed air injection technique (CAIT) would limit the generation of injection pressures to below a suggested 1,034 mm Hg limit in an in vitro model. After ethics board approval, 30 consenting anesthesiologists injected saline into a semiclosed system. Injection pressures using 30 mL syringes connected to a 22 gauge needle and containing 20 mL of saline were measured for 60 seconds using: (1) a typical "syringe feel" method, and (2) CAIT, thereby drawing 10 mL of air above the saline and compressing this to 5 mL prior to and during injections. All anesthesiologists performed the syringe feel method before introduction and demonstration of CAIT. Using CAIT, no anesthesiologist generated pressures above 1,034 mm Hg, while 29 of 30 produced pressures above this limit at some time using the syringe feel method. The mean pressure using CAIT was lower (636 +/- 71 vs. 1378 +/- 194 mm Hg, P = .025), and the syringe feel method resulted in higher peak pressures (1,875 +/- 206 vs. 715 +/- 104 mm Hg, P = .000). This study demonstrated that CAIT can effectively keep injection pressures under 1,034 mm Hg in this in vitro model. Animal and clinical studies will be needed to determine whether CAIT will allow objective, real-time pressure monitoring. If high pressure injections are proven to contribute to nerve injury in humans, this technique may have the potential to improve the safety of peripheral nerve blocks.

  14. Compression stockings for treating venous leg ulcers: measurement of interface pressure under a new ulcer kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsch, B; Partsch, H

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the interface pressure of a newly designed two-layer compression stocking (Mediven ulcer kit Medi QMBH, Bayreuth, Germany) in different body positions and to compare the values with those obtained with another two-layer product. Interface pressure was measured on the distal medial leg in 16 legs of volunteers, with the basic layer alone and with the whole stocking kit in the supine, sitting and standing position for both stocking systems. The literature concerning ulcer-healing rates is reviewed. Mediven ulcerkit produced statistically significant higher pressure values than the ulcer stocking with a median resting value of 35.5 mmHg in the supine and 42.5 mmHg in the standing position. The pressure while standing comes close to values exerted by bandages. The basic layer alone applies a pressure of 20.5 mmHg. Especially designed compression stockings exerting sufficient interface pressure may be indicated in patients with small ulcers of short duration.

  15. Comparison of the compressive yield response of aggregated suspensions: Pressure filtration, centrifugation, and osmotic consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.T.; Melant, R.M.; Zukoski, C.F.

    1996-01-01

    The compressive rheological responses of suspensions containing flocculated kaolin, alumina (average particle sizes of 0.2 and 0.5 microm), and hydrous zirconia (average particle sizes of 8, 57, and 139 nm) particles have been measured using three different techniques: pressure filtration, volume fraction profile during centrifugation, and sediment height during centrifugation at multiple spinning speeds. While the volume fraction profile technique appears to be experimentally most robust, equivalent responses are found using the different techniques, indicating that the compressive yield stress is a material property of a given suspension. The compressive yield stress of each suspension increases rapidly with volume fraction but cannot be generally described using simple power-law or exponential fits. The compressive yield stress also increases with the inverse square of particle size. The packing behavior of the suspensions undergoing osmotic consolidation is compared with the mechanical compressive yield response. Some suspensions exhibited the same packing behavior as in the mechanical techniques, while others consistently packed to higher densities during osmotic consolidation. Although equivalent osmotic and mechanical loads do not always result in the same volume fractions, the similar increases in volume fraction with applied driving force suggest that both the osmotic and mechanical techniques are controlled by the force needed to rearrange the particle network

  16. Rare psi decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, R.

    1986-01-01

    Slightly more than ten years have passed since the psi was discovered, yet the study of psi decays continues to be an active and fruitful area of research. One reason for such longevity is that each successive experiment has increased their sensitivity over previous experiments either by improving detection efficiency or by increasing statistics. This has allowed the observation and, in some cases, detailed studies of rare psi decays. Branching ratios of ≅10-/sup 4/ are now routinely studied, while certain decay channels are beginning to show interesting effects at the 10-/sup 5/ level. Future experiments at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC) have the potential for increasing sensitivities by one or two orders of magnitude, thus enabling many interesting studies impossible with current data samples. The author first examines the extent to which psi decays can be used to study electroweak phenomena. The remainder of this work is devoted to the more traditional task of using the psi to study quarks, gluons, and the properties of the strong interaction. Of particular interest is the study of radioactive psi decays, where a number of new particles have been discovered. Recent results regarding two of these particles, the θ(1700) and iota(1450), are discussed, as well as a study of the quark content of the eta and eta' using decays of the psi to vector-pseudoscalar final states

  17. Theoretical x-ray absorption investigation of high pressure ice and compressed graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, Dawn M; Tse, John S

    2007-01-01

    The x-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of high pressure ices II, VIII, and IX have been computed with the Car-Parrinello plane wave pseudopotential method. XAS for the intermediate structures obtained from uniaxial compression of hexagonal graphite along the c-axis are also studied. Whenever possible, comparisons to available experimental results are made. The reliability of the computational methods for the XAS for these structures is discussed

  18. Using an artificial neural network to predict carbon dioxide compressibility factor at high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohagheghian, Erfan [Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s (Canada); Zafarian-Rigaki, Habiballah; Motamedi-Ghahfarrokhi, Yaser; Hemmati-Sarapardeh, Abdolhossein [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Carbon dioxide injection, which is widely used as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method, has the potential of being coupled with CO{sub 2} sequestration and reducing the emission of greenhouse gas. Hence, knowing the compressibility factor of carbon dioxide is of a vital significance. Compressibility factor (Z-factor) is traditionally measured through time consuming, expensive and cumbersome experiments. Hence, developing a fast, robust and accurate model for its estimation is necessary. In this study, a new reliable model on the basis of feed forward artificial neural networks is presented to predict CO{sub 2} compressibility factor. Reduced temperature and pressure were selected as the input parameters of the proposed model. To evaluate and compare the results of the developed model with pre-existing models, both statistical and graphical error analyses were employed. The results indicated that the proposed model is more reliable and accurate compared to pre-existing models in a wide range of temperature (up to 1,273.15 K) and pressure (up to 140MPa). Furthermore, by employing the relevancy factor, the effect of pressure and temprature on the Z-factor of CO{sub 2} was compared for below and above the critical pressure of CO{sub 2}, and the physcially expected trends were observed. Finally, to identify the probable outliers and applicability domain of the proposed ANN model, both numerical and graphical techniques based on Leverage approach were performed. The results illustrated that only 1.75% of the experimental data points were located out of the applicability domain of the proposed model. As a result, the developed model is reliable for the prediction of CO{sub 2} compressibility factor.

  19. Prevalence of graduated compression stocking-associated pressure injuries in surgical intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Deborah B; Chang, Tracy Y; Aboagye, Jonathan K; Lau, Brandyn D; Shihab, Hasan M; Fisher, Betsy; Young, Samantha; Sujeta, Nancy; Shaffer, Dauryne L; Popoola, Victor O; Kraus, Peggy S; Knorr, Gina; Farrow, Norma E; Streiff, Michael B; Haut, Elliott R

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of static graduated compression stocking (sGCS)-associated pressure injury among patients in surgical intensive care units (ICUs). We retrospectively reviewed data from wound care rounds between April 2011 and June 2012 at 3 surgical ICUs at an urban, tertiary care hospital. Patients with sGCS-associated pressure injury were identified and descriptive analysis was performed on their demographic, perioperative, and postoperative characteristics. We examined 1787 individual patients during 2391 patient encounters. A total of 129 (7.2%) of patients developed pressure injuries. Forty patients (2.2%) developed sGCS-associated pressure injury. Static GCS-associated pressure injury accounted for 31% (40/129) of all pressure injuries and 74% (40/54) of all medical device-related pressure injury. Eighteen (45%) and 6 (15%) developed stage 1 and 2 pressure injury, respectively, and 16 (40%) developed deep tissue injuries. The mean age of our patients was 64.7 years, about half (47.5%) were male, and their mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 18.8. Many had comorbid conditions, including obesity (44.5%) and diabetes (42.5%), and required mechanical ventilation (45%). Pressure injuries are a notable complication of sGCS in surgical ICU patients. Appropriate measures are required to help avoid this potentially preventable harm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ligands in PSI structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Abhinav; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Morse, Andrew; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Deacon, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    A survey of the types and frequency of ligands that are bound to PSI structures is analyzed as well as their utility in functional annotation of previously uncharacterized proteins. Approximately 65% of PSI structures report some type of ligand(s) that is bound in the crystal structure. Here, a description is given of how such ligands are handled and analyzed at the JCSG and a survey of the types, variety and frequency of ligands that are observed in the PSI structures is also compiled and analyzed, including illustrations of how these bound ligands have provided functional clues for annotation of proteins with little or no previous experimental characterization. Furthermore, a web server was developed as a tool to mine and analyze the PSI structures for bound ligands and other identifying features

  1. Energy and pressure requirements for compression of swine solid fraction compost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niccolò Pampuro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The excessive amount of pig slurry spread on soil has contributed to nitrate water pollution both in surface and in ground waters, especially in areas classified as vulnerable zones to nitrate in accordance with European Regulation (91/676/CEE. Several techniques have been developed to manage livestock slurries as cheaply and conveniently as possible and to reduce potential risks of environmental pollution. Among these techniques, solid-liquid separation of slurry is a common practice in Italy. The liquid fraction can be used for irrigation and the solid fraction, after aerobic stabilization, produces an organic compost rich in humic substances. However, compost derived from swine solid fraction is a low density material (bulk density less than 500 kgm–3. This makes it costly to transport composted swine solid fraction from production sites to areas where it could be effectively utilized for value-added applications such as in soil fertilization. Densification is one possible way to enhance the storage and transportation of the compost. This study therefore investigates the effect of pressure (20- 110 MPa and pressure application time (5-120 s on the compaction characteristics of compost derived from swine solid fraction. Two different types of material have been used: composted swine solid fraction derived from mechanical separation and compost obtained by mixing the first material with wood chips. Results obtained showed that both the pressure applied and the pressure application time significantly affect the density of the compacted samples; while the specific compression energy is significantly affected only by the pressure. Best predictor equations were developed to predict compact density and the specific compression energy required by the densification process. The specific compression energy values based on the results from this study (6-32 kJkg–1 were significantly lower than the specific energy required to manufacture pellets from

  2. Use of customised pressure-guided elastic bandages to improve efficacy of compression bandaging for venous ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermsathanasawadi, Nuttawut; Chatjaturapat, Choedpong; Pianchareonsin, Rattana; Puangpunngam, Nattawut; Wongwanit, Chumpol; Chinsakchai, Khamin; Ruangsetakit, Chanean; Mutirangura, Pramook

    2017-08-01

    Compression bandaging is a major treatment of chronic venous ulcers. Its efficacy depends on the applied pressure, which is dependent on the skill of the individual applying the bandage. To improve the quality of bandaging by reducing the variability in compression bandage interface pressures, we changed elastic bandages into a customised version by marking them with circular ink stamps, applied when the stretch achieves an interface pressure between 35 and 45 mmHg. Repeated applications by 20 residents of the customised bandage and non-marked bandage to one smaller and one larger leg were evaluated by measuring the sub-bandage pressure. The results demonstrated that the target pressure range is more often attained with the customised bandage compared with the non-marked bandage. The customised bandage improved the efficacy of compression bandaging for venous ulcers, with optimal sub-bandage pressure. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. High pressure phase transitions and compressibilities of Er2Zr2O7 and Ho2Zr2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. X.; Lang, M.; Becker, U.; Ewing, R. C.; Lian, J.

    2008-01-01

    Phase stability and compressibility of rare earth zirconates with the defect-fluorite structure were investigated by in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. A sluggish defect-fluorite to a cotunnitelike phase transformation occurred at pressures of ˜22 and ˜30GPa for Er2Zr2O7 and Ho2Zr2O7, respectively. Enhanced compressibility was found for the high pressure phase as a result of increasing cation coordination number and cation-anion bond length.

  4. High Pressure Phase Transitions and Compressibilities of Er2Zr2O7 and Ho2Zr2O7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang,F.; Lang, M.; Becker, U.; Ewing, R.; Lian, J.

    2008-01-01

    Phase stability and compressibility of rare earth zirconates with the defect-fluorite structure were investigated by in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. A sluggish defect-fluorite to a cotunnitelike phase transformation occurred at pressures of {approx} 22 and {approx} 30 GPa for Er2Zr2O7 and Ho2Zr2O7, respectively. Enhanced compressibility was found for the high pressure phase as a result of increasing cation coordination number and cation-anion bond length.

  5. Pressure and Compressibility of Conformal Field Theories from the AdS/CFT Correspondence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. Dolan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The equation of state associated with N = 4 supersymmetric Yang–Mills in four dimensions, for S U ( N in the large N limit, is investigated using the AdS/CFT correspondence. An asymptotically AdS black-hole on the gravity side provides a thermal background for the Yang–Mills theory on the boundary in which the cosmological constant is equivalent to a volume. The thermodynamic variable conjugate to the cosmological constant is a pressure, and the P - V diagram of the quark-gluon plasma is studied. It is known that there is a critical point where the heat capacity diverges, and this is reflected in the isothermal compressibility. Critical exponents are derived and found to be mean field in the large N limit. The same analysis applied to three- and six-dimensional conformal field theories again yields mean field exponents associated with the compressibility at the critical point.

  6. Comparison of 4-Layer Bandages and an Adaptive Compression Therapy Device on Intended Pressure Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrovitz, Harvey N; Partsch, Hugo; Vanscheidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    To characterize and compare interface pressure profiles of an adaptive compression therapy (ACT) device and a traditional 4-layer bandage (4LB) system. A prospective, randomized, open-label, 1-arm, active controlled study. The sample comprised 12 healthy volunteers. Subjects wore both devices for 8 hours on 3 consecutive days. Treatments were randomized to left and right legs. One clinician performed all applications and was experienced in the clinical use of both devices. Pressures were measured in seated and standing positions at the lower, mid, and upper calf immediately post application and after 1, 4, and 8 hours. Pressures achieved with the ACT were closer to targeted 40/30/20 mmHg graduated pressure values and were significantly less than the 4LB for corresponding sites/postures (P pressures (mean ± SD) for the ACT were 36.9 ± 4.9, 30.5 ± 4.5, and 21.0 ± 3.6 mmHg. Corresponding interface pressures for the 4LB were 52.5 ± 8.4, 57.5 ± 10.3, and 53.5 ± 12.9 mmHg. In the standing position, initial interface pressures for the ACT were 40.7 ± 4.8, 35.6 ± 4.5, and 21.1 ± 4.6 compared to 54.6 ± 12.5, 64.4 ± 10.9, and 53.7 ± 14.3 for the 4LB. At 1, 4, and 8 hours after application, the 4LB showed a significant progressive decline in interface pressure in both seated and standing positions (P pressures than the 4LB and the pressures achieved were consistent with contemporary venous ulcer therapy standards.

  7. PSI Paul Scherrer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefrancois, M.; Pladys, D.

    2008-05-01

    From research activities focused on civil and military uses of nuclear energy and developed after the second world war, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) has been able to diversify its activities following 2 axis. First, the Gantry proton-therapy that is characterized by a compact equipment and an accurate 3-dimensional treatment of tumors (more than 260 patients have been treated by Gantry from 1996 to 2005). Secondly, new technologies in the fields of energy and transport. Nevertheless, PSI has been able to keep a high of valuation of its staff in nuclear engineering and materials that are the core of its activities. The main equipment of PSI are: -) SLS (Swiss Light Source): a synchrotron radiation source that is both a microscope and an X-ray source; -) SINQ: a neutron source based on spallation reactions; -)SμS: a muon source; and -) the Philips accelerator that is used in radiochemistry and the production of isotopes used for the treatment of eye tumors. PSI has established a large cooperation with French research laboratories on issues like: nuclear reactor safety, synchrotron radiation, the transmutation of nuclear wastes, the design of a source of ultra-cold neutrons, or the development of a hydrogen-fueled light vehicle. The total budget of PSI for 2007 reached 174.2 million euros. (A.C.)

  8. Review of external ocular compression: clinical applications of the ocular pressure estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korenfeld MS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael S Korenfeld,1,2 David K Dueker3 1Comprehensive Eye Care, Ltd. Washington, MO, USA; 2Washington University Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, St Louis, MO, USA; 3Ophthalmology, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Purpose: The authors have previously validated an Ocular Pressure Estimator (OPE that can estimate the intraocular pressure (IOP during external ocular compression (EOC. The authors now apply the OPE in clinical states where EOC is clinically important. The original work is described for two periods of risk: during sleep and during the digital ocular massage (DOM maneuver used by surgeons after trabeculectomy to keep the operation functional. Other periods of risk for external ocular compression are then reviewed.Methods: The first protocol estimated the IOP in the dependent eye during simulated sleep. Subjects had their IOPs initially measured in an upright-seated position, immediately upon assuming a right eye dependent side sleeping position (with nothing contacting the eye, and then 5 minutes later while still in this position. While maintaining this position, the fluid filled bladder of the OPE was then placed between the subject’s closed eye and a pillow during simulated sleep. The IOP was continuously estimated in this position for 5 minutes. The subjects then had the IOP measured in both eyes in an upright-seated position. The second protocol determined if a larger vertical cup-to-disc ratio was more common on the side that patients reported they preferred to sleep on. The hypothesis was that chronic asymmetric, compression induced, elevations of IOP during sleep would be associated with otherwise unexplained asymmetry of the vertical cup-to-disc ratio. The third protocol assessed the IOP during DOM. The OPE was used to characterize the IOP produced during the DOM maneuver of five glaucoma surgeons. After this, 90 mmHg was chosen as a target pressure for DOM. The surgeons were then verbally coached

  9. Stages of destruction and elastic compression of granular nanoporous carbon medium at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Ledenyov, O.P.; Bobrova, N.B.; Chupikov, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    The granular nanoporous carbon medium, made of the cylindrical coal granules of the adsorbent of CKT-3, at an influence by the high pressures from 1 MPa to 3 GPa has been researched. The eight consecutive stages of the material's specific volume change, which is characterized by a certain dependence of the volume change on the pressure change, have been registered. It is shown that there is a linear dependence on the double log-log plot of the material's specific volume change on the pressure for an every stage of considered process. The two stages are clearly distinguished: a stage of material's mechanical destruction, and a stage of elastic compression of material without the disintegration of structure at a nano-scale. The hysteresis dependence of the material's specific volume change on the pressure change at the pressure decrease is observed. The small disperse coal dust particles jettisoning between the high pressure cell and the base plate was observed, resulting in the elastic stress reduction in relation to the small disperse coal dust particles volume. The obtained research data can be used to improve the designs of air filters for the radioactive chemical elements absorption at the NPP with the aims to protect the environment

  10. Measurement and calculation of gas compressibility factor for condensate gas and natural gas under pressure up to 116 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Ke-Le; Liu, Huang; Sun, Chang-Yu; Ma, Qing-Lan; Chen, Guang-Jin; Shen, De-Ji; Xiao, Xiang-Jiao; Wang, Hai-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Volumetric properties of two reservoir fluid samples were measured with pressure up to 116 MPa. • Dew point pressures at four temperatures for condensate gas sample are obtained. • Correlations and thermodynamic model for describing gas compressibility factor under high pressure were compared. • The thermodynamic model recommended is most suitable for fluids produced from reservoirs with a wide pressure range. -- Abstract: The volumetric properties of two reservoir fluid samples collected from one condensate gas well and one natural gas well were measured under four groups of temperatures, respectively, with pressure up to 116 MPa. For the two samples examined, the experimental results show that the gas compressibility factor increases with the increase of pressure. But the influence of the temperature is related to the range of the experimental pressure. It approximately decreases with the increase of temperature when the pressure is larger than (45 to 50) MPa, while there is the opposite trend when the pressure is lower than (45 to 50) MPa. The dew point pressure was also determined for the condensate gas sample, which decreases with the increase of temperature. The capabilities of four empirical correlations and a thermodynamic model based on equation of state for describing gas compressibility factor of reservoir fluids under high pressure were investigated. The comparison results show that the thermodynamic model recommended is the most suitable for fluids whatever produced from high-pressure reservoirs or conventional mild-pressure reservoirs

  11. Integrated LTCC pressure/flow/temperature multisensor for compressed air diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  12. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues. PMID:22163518

  13. Generalization of the Bogoliubov-Zubarev Theorem for Dynamic Pressure to the Case of Compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudoi, Yu. G.

    2018-01-01

    We present the motivation, formulation, and modified proof of the Bogoliubov-Zubarev theorem connecting the pressure of a dynamical object with its energy within the framework of a classical description and obtain a generalization of this theorem to the case of dynamical compressibility. In both cases, we introduce the volume of the object into consideration using a singular addition to the Hamiltonian function of the physical object, which allows using the concept of the Bogoliubov quasiaverage explicitly already on a dynamical level of description. We also discuss the relation to the same result known as the Hellmann-Feynman theorem in the framework of the quantum description of a physical object.

  14. Experimental study of tensile strength of pharmaceutical tablets: effect of the diluent nature and compression pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juban Audrey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the pharmaceutical field, tablets are the most common dosage form for oral administration in the world. Among different manufacturing processes, direct compression is widely used because of its economics interest and it is a process which avoids the steps of wet granulation and drying processes. Tablets are composed of at least two ingredients: an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API which is mixed with a diluent. The nature of the powders and the processing conditions are crucial for the properties of the blend and, consequently, strongly influence the mechanical characteristics of tablets. Moreover, tablets have to present a suitable mechanical strength to avoid crumbling or breaking when handling, while ensuring an appropriate disintegration after administration. Accordingly, this mechanical property is an essential parameter to consider. Experimental results showed that proportion of the diluent, fragmentary (DCPA or plastic (MCC, had a large influence on the tensile strength evolution with API content as well as the compression load applied during tableting process. From these results a model was developed in order to predict the tensile strength of binary tablets by knowing the compression pressure. The validity of this model was demonstrated for the two studied systems and a comparison was made with two existing models.

  15. Experimental study of tensile strength of pharmaceutical tablets: effect of the diluent nature and compression pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juban, Audrey; Briançon, Stéphanie; Puel, François; Hoc, Thierry; Nouguier-Lehon, Cécile

    2017-06-01

    In the pharmaceutical field, tablets are the most common dosage form for oral administration in the world. Among different manufacturing processes, direct compression is widely used because of its economics interest and it is a process which avoids the steps of wet granulation and drying processes. Tablets are composed of at least two ingredients: an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) which is mixed with a diluent. The nature of the powders and the processing conditions are crucial for the properties of the blend and, consequently, strongly influence the mechanical characteristics of tablets. Moreover, tablets have to present a suitable mechanical strength to avoid crumbling or breaking when handling, while ensuring an appropriate disintegration after administration. Accordingly, this mechanical property is an essential parameter to consider. Experimental results showed that proportion of the diluent, fragmentary (DCPA) or plastic (MCC), had a large influence on the tensile strength evolution with API content as well as the compression load applied during tableting process. From these results a model was developed in order to predict the tensile strength of binary tablets by knowing the compression pressure. The validity of this model was demonstrated for the two studied systems and a comparison was made with two existing models.

  16. Condensed argon isentropic compression with ultrahigh magnetic field pressure: Experimental design. Post-shot report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, A.I.; Boriskov, G.V.; Dolotenko, M.I. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This report continues the series of work devoted to experimental study of a high-dense condensed argon state. Remember that according to work of Kwon et. al., hexagonal close-packed structure is profitable in terms of energy rather than face-centered argon structure (stable with zero pressure). What is most interesting and intriguing here is the issue of possible argon metallization, when it is compressed up to the densities more than 9.17 g/cm{sup 3}. In the experiment of 1995 (the arrangement and data are described in a cited reference) the authors recorded appearance of conductivity in argon, which is non-conductive in the initial state, when it is compressed more than a factor of four. The peak value of argon specific conductivity recorded in this experiment did not exceed 10 (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. This value of conductivity is characteristic of semiconductors, but not metals, which have 10{sup 4} (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. At this stage of the work the main attention is paid to recording of argon conductive state and studying the possibilities of multiframed radiography of the sample in the compressed state.

  17. Determination of mean pressure from PIV in compressible flows using the Reynolds-averaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gent, Paul L.; van Oudheusden, Bas W.; Schrijer, Ferry F. J.

    2018-03-01

    The feasibility of computing the flow pressure on the basis of PIV velocity data has been demonstrated abundantly for low-speed conditions. The added complications occurring for high-speed compressible flows have, however, so far proved to be largely inhibitive for the accurate experimental determination of instantaneous pressure. Obtaining mean pressure may remain a worthwhile and realistic goal to pursue. In a previous study, a Reynolds-averaging procedure was developed for this, under the moderate-Mach-number assumption that density fluctuations can be neglected. The present communication addresses the accuracy of this assumption, and the consistency of its implementation, by evaluating of the relevance of the different contributions resulting from the Reynolds-averaging. The methodology involves a theoretical order-of-magnitude analysis, complemented with a quantitative assessment based on a simulated and a real PIV experiment. The assessments show that it is sufficient to account for spatial variations in the mean velocity and the Reynolds-stresses and that temporal and spatial density variations (fluctuations and gradients) are of secondary importance and comparable order-of-magnitude. This result permits to simplify the calculation of mean pressure from PIV velocity data and to validate the approximation of neglecting temporal and spatial density variations without having access to reference pressure data.

  18. Mammographic compression after breast conserving therapy: Controlling pressure instead of force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, J. E. de; Branderhorst, W.; Grimbergen, C. A.; Broeders, M. J. M.; Heeten, G. J. den

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray mammography is the primary tool for early detection of breast cancer and for follow-up after breast conserving therapy (BCT). BCT-treated breasts are smaller, less elastic, and more sensitive to pain. Instead of the current force-controlled approach of applying the same force to each breast, pressure-controlled protocols aim to improve standardization in terms of physiology by taking breast contact area and inelasticity into account. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential for pressure protocols to reduce discomfort and pain, particularly the number of severe pain complaints for BCT-treated breasts. Methods: A prospective observational study including 58 women having one BCT-treated breast and one untreated nonsymptomatic breast, following our hospital's 18 decanewton (daN) compression protocol was performed. Breast thickness, applied force, contact area, mean pressure, breast volume, and inelasticity (mean E-modulus) were statistically compared between the within-women breast pairs, and data were used as predictors for severe pain, i.e., scores 7 and higher on an 11-point Numerical Rating Scale. Curve-fitting models were used to estimate how pressure-controlled protocols affect breast thickness, compression force, and pain experience. Results: BCT-treated breasts had on average 27% smaller contact areas, 30% lower elasticity, and 30% higher pain scores than untreated breasts (allp 2 decrease in contact area, as well as increased pain sensitivity, BCT-breasts had on average 5.3 times higher odds for severe pain than untreated breasts. Model estimations for a pressure-controlled protocol with a 10 kPa target pressure, which is below normal arterial pressure, suggest an average 26% (range 10%–36%) reduction in pain score, and an average 77% (range 46%–95%) reduction of the odds for severe pain. The estimated increase in thickness is +6.4% for BCT breasts. Conclusions: After BCT, women have hardly any choice in avoiding an annual

  19. Enhanced acoustic sensing through wave compression and pressure amplification in anisotropic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Reilly, Michael; Bae, Hyungdae; Yu, Miao

    2014-10-15

    Acoustic sensors play an important role in many areas, such as homeland security, navigation, communication, health care and industry. However, the fundamental pressure detection limit hinders the performance of current acoustic sensing technologies. Here, through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, we show that anisotropic acoustic metamaterials can be designed to have strong wave compression effect that renders direct amplification of pressure fields in metamaterials. This enables a sensing mechanism that can help overcome the detection limit of conventional acoustic sensing systems. We further demonstrate a metamaterial-enhanced acoustic sensing system that achieves more than 20 dB signal-to-noise enhancement (over an order of magnitude enhancement in detection limit). With this system, weak acoustic pulse signals overwhelmed by the noise are successfully recovered. This work opens up new vistas for the development of metamaterial-based acoustic sensors with improved performance and functionalities that are highly desirable for many applications.

  20. Shock Compression of Liquid Noble Gases to Multi-Mbar Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth

    2011-10-01

    The high pressure - high temperature behavior of noble gases is of considerable interest because of their use in z-pinch liners for fusion studies and for understanding astrophysical and planetary evolution. However, our understanding of the equation of state (EOS) of the noble gases at extreme conditions is limited. A prime example of this is the liquid xenon Hugoniot. Previous EOS models rapidly diverged on the Hugoniot above 1 Mbar because of differences in the treatment of the electronic contribution to the free energy. Similar divergences are observed for krypton EOS. Combining shock compression experiments and density functional theory (DFT) simulations, we can determine the thermo-physical behavior of matter under extreme conditions. The experimental and DFT results have been instrumental to recent developments in planetary astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Shock compression experiments are performed using Sandia's Z-Accelerator to determine the Hugoniot of liquid xenon and krypton in the Mbar regime. Under strong pressure, krypton and xenon undergo an insulator to metal transition. In the metallic state, the shock front becomes reflective allowing for a direct measurement of the sample's shock velocity using laser interferometry. The Hugoniot state is determined using a Monte Carlo analysis method that accounts for systematic error in the standards and for correlations. DFT simulations at these extreme conditions show good agreement with the experimental data - demonstrating the attention to detail required for dealing with elements with relativistic core states and d-state electrons. The results from shock compression experiments and DFT simulations are presented for liquid xenon to 840 GPa and for liquid krypton to 800 GPa, decidedly increasing the range of known behavior of both gases. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company

  1. A Novel Constant-Pressure Pumped Hydro Combined with Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erren Yao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As intermittent renewable energy is receiving increasing attention, the combination of intermittent renewable energy with large-scale energy storage technology is considered as an important technological approach for the wider application of wind power and solar energy. Pumped hydro combined with compressed air energy storage system (PHCA is one of the energy storage systems that not only integrates the advantages but also overcomes the disadvantages of compressed air energy storage (CAES systems and pumped hydro energy storage systems to solve the problem of energy storage in China’s arid regions. Aiming at the variable working conditions of PHCA system technology, this study proposes a new constant-pressure PHCA. The most significant characteristics of this system were that the water pump and hydroturbine work under stable conditions and this improves the working efficiency of the equipment without incurring an energy loss. In addition, the constant-pressure PHCA system was subjected to energy and exergy analysis, in expectation of exploring an attractive solution for the large-scale storage of existing intermittent renewable energy.

  2. PSI annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report, on the second year since the foundation of PSI, gives information on its organisation and management and is as well a short, generally comprehensible presentation of the activities and results of the areas of research. Supplementarily, newsletters of each of the five areas of research appear in the form of annexes I to V, addressed to professionals. 66 figs., 7 tabs

  3. PSI annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the research performed in 1993 at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen and Wuerenlingen, in the fields of nuclear and particle physics, biosciences, condensed matter and material sciences, nuclear and general energy. The SLS (=Synchrotron Lichtquelle Schweiz) project is briefly described. figs., tabs

  4. PSI Scientific report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnicki, P.

    2010-04-01

    This annual report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland takes a look at work done at the institute in the year 2009. In particular, the SwissFEL X-ray Laser facility that will allow novel investigations of femtosecond molecular dynamics in chemical, biochemical and condensed-matter systems and permit coherent diffraction imaging of individual nanostructures is commented on. Potential scientific applications of the SwissFEL are noted. Further, the institute's research focus and its findings are commented on. Synchrotron light is looked at and results obtained using neutron scattering and muon spin resonance are reported on. Work done in the micro and nano-technology, biomolecular research and radiopharmacy areas is also reported on Work performed in the biology, general energy and environmental sciences area is also reported on. The institute's comprehensive research facilities are reviewed and the facilities provided for users from the national and international scientific community, in particular regarding condensed matter, materials science and biology research are noted. In addition to the user facilities at the accelerators, other PSI laboratories are also open to external users, e.g. the Hot Laboratory operated by the Nuclear Energy and Safety Department that allows experiments to be performed on highly radioactive samples. The Technology Transfer Office at PSI is also reported on. This department assists representatives from industry in their search for opportunities and sources of innovation at the PSI. Further, an overview is presented of the people who work at the PSI, how the institute is organised and how the money it receives is distributed and used. Finally, a comprehensive list of publications completes the report

  5. Cation-dependent anomalous compression of gallosilicate zeolites with CGS topology: A high-pressure synchrotron powder diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yongjae; Lee, Hyun-Hwi; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Kim, Sun Jin; Kao, Chi-chang

    2008-01-01

    The high-pressure compression behaviour of 3 different cation forms of gallosilicate zeolite with CGS topology has been investigated using in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and a diamond-anvil cell technique. Under hydrostatic conditions mediated by a nominally penetrating pressure-transmitting medium, unit-cell lengths and volume compression is modulated by different degrees of pressure-induced hydration and accompanying channel distortion. In a Na-exchanged CGS (Na 10 Ga 10 Si 22 O 64 .16H 2 O), the unit-cell volume expands by ca. 0.6% upon applying hydrostatic pressure to 0.2 GPa, whereas, in an as-synthesized K-form (K 10 Ga 10 Si 22 O 64 .5H 2 O), this initial volume expansion is suppressed to ca. 0.1% at 0.16 GPa. In the early stage of hydrostatic compression below ∼1 GPa, relative decrease in the ellipticity of the non-planar 10-rings is observed, which is then reverted to a gradual increase in the ellipticity at higher pressures above ∼1 GPa, implying a change in the compression mechanism. In a Sr-exchanged sample (Sr 5 Ga 10 Si 22 O 64 .19H 2 O), on the other hand, no initial volume expansion is observed. Instead, a change in the slope of volume contraction is observed near 1.5 GPa, which leads to a 2-fold increase in the compressibility. This is interpreted as pressure-induced rearrangement of water molecules to facilitate further volume contraction at higher pressures. - Graphical abstract: Three different cation forms of gallosilicate CGS zeolites have been investigated using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and a diamond-anvil cell. Under hydrostatic conditions, unit-cell lengths and volume show anomalous compression behaviours depending on the non-framework cation type and initial hydration level, which implies different modes of pressure-induced hydration and channel distortion

  6. Structural Phase Transition and Compressibility of CaF2 Nanocrystals under High Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingshu Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The structural phase transition and compressibility of CaF2 nanocrystals with size of 23 nm under high pressure were investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement. A pressure-induced fluorite to α-PbCl2-type phase transition starts at 9.5 GPa and completes at 20.2 GPa. The phase-transition pressure is lower than that of 8 nm CaF2 nanocrystals and closer to bulk CaF2. Upon decompression, the fluorite and α-PbCl2-type structure co-exist at the ambient pressure. The bulk modulus B0 of the 23 nm CaF2 nanocrystals for the fluorite and α-PbCl2-type phase are 103(2 and 78(2 GPa, which are both larger than those of the bulk CaF2. The CaF2 nanocrystals exhibit obviously higher incompressibility compare to bulk CaF2. Further analysis demonstrates that the defect effect in our CaF2 nanocrystals plays a dominant role in the structural stability.

  7. Cell-like pressure sensors reveal increase of mechanical stress towards the core of multicellular spheroids under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolega, M E; Delarue, M; Ingremeau, F; Prost, J; Delon, A; Cappello, G

    2017-01-27

    The surrounding microenvironment limits tumour expansion, imposing a compressive stress on the tumour, but little is known how pressure propagates inside the tumour. Here we present non-destructive cell-like microsensors to locally quantify mechanical stress distribution in three-dimensional tissue. Our sensors are polyacrylamide microbeads of well-defined elasticity, size and surface coating to enable internalization within the cellular environment. By isotropically compressing multicellular spheroids (MCS), which are spherical aggregates of cells mimicking a tumour, we show that the pressure is transmitted in a non-trivial manner inside the MCS, with a pressure rise towards the core. This observed pressure profile is explained by the anisotropic arrangement of cells and our results suggest that such anisotropy alone is sufficient to explain the pressure rise inside MCS composed of a single cell type. Furthermore, such pressure distribution suggests a direct link between increased mechanical stress and previously observed lack of proliferation within the spheroids core.

  8. Virtual arterial blood pressure feedback improves chest compression quality during simulated resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, Horst; Rieke, Martin; Gado, Samkon K; Nietert, Paul J; Field, Larry C; Clark, Carlee A; Furse, Cory M; McEvoy, Matthew D

    2013-11-01

    Quality chest compressions (CC) are the most important factor in successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Adjustment of CC based upon an invasive arterial blood pressure (ABP) display would be theoretically beneficial. Additionally, having one compressor present for longer than a 2-min cycle with an ABP display may allow for a learning process to further maximize CC. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that CC can be improved with a real-time display of invasively measured blood pressure and with an unchanged, physically fit compressor. A manikin was attached to an ABP display derived from a hemodynamic model responding to parameters of CC rate, depth, and compression-decompression ratio. The area under the blood pressure curve over time (AUC) was used for data analysis. Each participant (N=20) performed 4 CPR sessions: (1) No ABP display, exchange of compressor every 2 min; (2) ABP display, exchange of compressor every 2 min; (3) no ABP display, no exchange of the compressor; (4) ABP display, no exchange of the compressor. Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Significance was set at a p-valueAUC for cycles without ABP display was 5201 mm Hgs (95% confidence interval (CI) of 4804-5597 mm Hgs), and for cycles with ABP display 6110 mm Hgs (95% CI of 5715-6507 mm Hgs) (pAUC increase with ABP display for each participant was 20.2±17.4% 95 CI (p<0.0001). Our study confirms the hypothesis that a real-time display of simulated ABP during CPR that responds to participant performance improves achieved and sustained ABP. However, without any real-time visual feedback, even fit compressors demonstrated degradation of CC quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Precision measurements of branching fractions for psi ' -> pi(0)J/psi and eta J/Psi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Albayrak, O.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Coccetti, F.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    We present a precision study of the psi' -> pi(0)J/Psi and eta J/Psi decay modes. The measurements are obtained using 106 x 10(6) psi' events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e(+)e(-) collider operating at a center-of-mass energy corresponding to the psi' mass. We obtain B(psi' ->

  10. Contribution of proteoglycan osmotic swelling pressure to the compressive properties of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, EunHee; Chen, Silvia S; Klisch, Stephen M; Sah, Robert L

    2011-08-17

    The negatively charged proteoglycans (PG) provide compressive resistance to articular cartilage by means of their fixed charge density (FCD) and high osmotic pressure (π(PG)), and the collagen network (CN) provides the restraining forces to counterbalance π(PG). Our objectives in this work were to: 1), account for collagen intrafibrillar water when transforming biochemical measurements into a FCD-π(PG) relationship; 2), compute π(PG) and CN contributions to the compressive behavior of full-thickness cartilage during bovine growth (fetal, calf, and adult) and human adult aging (young and old); and 3), predict the effect of depth from the articular surface on π(PG) in human aging. Extrafibrillar FCD (FCD(EF)) and π(PG) increased with bovine growth due to an increase in CN concentration, whereas PG concentration was steady. This maturation-related increase was amplified by compression. With normal human aging, FCD(EF) and π(PG) decreased. The π(PG)-values were close to equilibrium stress (σ(EQ)) in all bovine and young human cartilage, but were only approximately half of σ(EQ) in old human cartilage. Depth-related variations in the strain, FCD(EF), π(PG), and CN stress profiles in human cartilage suggested a functional deterioration of the superficial layer with aging. These results suggest the utility of the FCD-π(PG) relationship for elucidating the contribution of matrix macromolecules to the biomechanical properties of cartilage. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of lower leg compression in vivo: recommendations for the performance of measurements of interface pressure and stiffness: consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partsch, Hugo; Clark, Michael; Bassez, Sophie; Benigni, Jean-Patrick; Becker, Francis; Blazek, Vladimir; Caprini, Joseph; Cornu-Thénard, André; Hafner, Jürg; Flour, Mieke; Jünger, Michael; Moffatt, Christine; Neumann, Martino

    2006-02-01

    Interface pressure and stiffness characterizing the elastic properties of the material are the parameters determining the dosage of compression treatment and should therefore be measured in future clinical trials. To provide some recommendations regarding the use of suitable methods for this indication. This article was formulated based on the results of an international consensus meeting between a group of medical experts and representatives from the industry held in January 2005 in Vienna, Austria. Proposals are made concerning methods for measuring the interface pressure and for assessing the stiffness of a compression device in an individual patient. In vivo measurement of interface pressure is encouraged when clinical and experimental outcomes of compression treatment are to be evaluated.

  12. PSI scientific highlights 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnicki, P.; Dury, T.

    2013-05-01

    This comprehensive report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) reviews research in various areas carried out by the institute in 2012. Also, the various facilities to be found at the institute are described. Research focus and highlights are discussed. These include work done using synchrotron light, neutrons and muons as well as work done in the particle physics, microtechnology and nanotechnology areas. Further areas of research include biomolecular research, radiopharmacy, radiochemistry and environmental chemistry. Other areas covered include general energy research and work done at the Competence Center for Energy and Mobility CCEM, work done on nuclear energy safety as well as systems analysis in the environmental and energy areas. The report is concluded with facts and figures on the PSI, its Advisory Board and its organisational structures

  13. Statistical analysis of the hydrodynamic pressure in the near field of compressible jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camussi, R.; Di Marco, A.; Castelain, T.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Statistical properties of pressure fluctuations retrieved through wavelet analysis • Time delay PDFs approximated by a log-normal distribution • Amplitude PDFs approximated by a Gamma distribution • Random variable PDFs weakly dependent upon position and Mach number. • A general stochastic model achieved for the distance dependency - Abstract: This paper is devoted to the statistical characterization of the pressure fluctuations measured in the near field of a compressible jet at two subsonic Mach numbers, 0.6 and 0.9. The analysis is focused on the hydrodynamic pressure measured at different distances from the jet exit and analyzed at the typical frequency associated to the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability. Statistical properties are retrieved by the application of the wavelet transform to the experimental data and the computation of the wavelet scalogram around that frequency. This procedure highlights traces of events that appear intermittently in time and have variable strength. A wavelet-based event tracking procedure has been applied providing a statistical characterization of the time delay between successive events and of their energy level. On this basis, two stochastic models are proposed and validated against the experimental data in the different flow conditions

  14. Carbon dioxide reforming of methane by atmospheric pressure pulsed glow discharge: The effect of pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbanzadeh, A.; Modarresi, H.

    2006-01-01

    Methane reforming by carbon dioxide in atmospheric pressure pulsed glow discharge was examined. The pulse duration of plasma was compressed to ∼50 ns or lower. This compression allowed working at higher frequencies, more than 3 k Hz, without glow to arc transition. The main outlet gases were synthetic gases (H 2 , CO) and C 2 (ethylene, ethane, and acetylene) products. At equal reactants proportion CO 2 /CH 4 =1, about 42 p ercent o f plasma energy went to chemical dissociation while reactant conversions were relatively high, i.e. near 55 p ercent % (CH 4 ) and 42 p ercent ( CO 2 ). At this point, the energy expenditure was less than 3.8 eV per each converted molecule. The reactor energy performance even gets better at higher CO 2 /CH 4 proportions. At CO 2 /CH 4 =5, The conversions of about 65 p ercent a nd 45 p ercent w ere obtained for methane and carbon dioxide respectively, while energy efficiency reached near 45 p ercent . It is discussed that high nonequilibrium state of vibrational energy at short pulses, especially in carbon dioxide, leads to this improvement.

  15. Measurement of the decays psi'→etaJ/psi and psi'→π0J/psi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreglia, M.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Chestnut, R.; Gaiser, J.; Godfrey, G.; Kiesling, C.; Partridge, R.; Peck, C.; Porter, F.; Kollmann, W.; Richardson, M.; Strauch, K.; Wacker, K.; Aschman, D.; Burnett, T.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyne, D.; Sadrozinski, H.; Hofstadter, R.; Kirkbride, I.; Kolanoski, H.; Liberman, A.; O'Reilly, J.; Tompkins, J.

    1980-01-01

    The Crystal Ball detector at SPEAR has been used to investigate the decays psi'→etaJ/psi and psi'→π 0 J/psi resulting from production of 776 000 psi'. Our measurement for the branching ratio of the eta mode is (2.18 +- 0.14 +- 0.35)%, where the first error results from statistics and acceptance uncertainties, and the second error is systematic; this is almost a factor of 2 smaller than found in early experiments. For the isospin-nonconserving π 0 mode, a branching ratio (0.09 +- 0.02 +- 0.01)% is obtained

  16. Ultimate uniaxial compressive strength of stiffened panel with opening under lateral pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Li Yu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper concentrated on the ultimate uniaxial compressive strength of stiffened panel with opening under lateral load and also studied the design-oriented formulae. For this purpose, three series of well executed experiments on longitudinal stiffened panel with rectangular opening subjected to the combined load have been selected as test models. The finite element analysis package, ABAQUS, is used for simulation with considering the large elasticplastic deflection behavior of stiffened panels. The feasibility of the numerical procedure is verified by a good agreement of experimental results and numerical results. More cases studies are executed employing nonlinear finite element method to analyze the influence of design variables on the ultimate strength of stiffened panel with opening under combined pressure. Based on data, two design formulae corresponding to different opening types are fitted, and accuracy of them is illustrated to demonstrate that they could be applied to basic design of practical engineering structure.

  17. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Craquelin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  18. PSI Scientific Report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaepfer-Miller, J.

    2007-04-01

    Selected highlights in this years report include muon spin studies and investigations of polymer films, the chemical properties of element 112 and the antitumour effects of radionuclides. In its fifth year of operation, results from the SLS include shedding light on superconductivity and understanding magnetism at the nanoscale. From the energy research departments we hear that progress has been achieved in the conversion of biomass to methane fuel, and towards the generation of hydrogen by solar thermochemistry. Combustion research, among other themes, focused on efficiency in gas turbine processes. Neutronic studies dealt with safety aspects of present nuclear reactors, thermal hydraulics with reactors of the future. safety is also the issue in how ions migrate in waste repositories or in the operation of the MEGAPIE liquid metal target. The Competence Center Energy and Mobility of the ETH domain, for which PSI acts as he facilitator, started operation at the beginning of 2006, and several projects have been successfully launched. The reports in this volume are only a fraction of the varied research undertaken at PSI in the past year; for more information visit our website www.psi.ch. (author)

  19. PSI scientific report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnicki, P.

    2009-01-01

    This annual report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland takes a look at work done at the institute in the year 2008. The institute's findings around the topics of superconductivity and magnetism revealed using neutron scattering and muon spin resonance are reported on. The use of the high spatial resolution of synchrotron light at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) made it possible to create new nano-structures and reveal microscopic details of the functioning of photo-catalysts, fuel cells and bio-molecules. Work performed in the biology, energy, and environmental sciences area is reported on. The dating of glacier ice, the enhancement of the NMR sensitivity for potential medical diagnosis, the development of efficient SPECT tracers and the assessment of long-term safety of radioactive waste repositories are dealt with. On the operational side of the PSI accelerators, two world records are noted. New facilities such as the X-ray Free Electron Laser planned at the PSI are discussed. Further topics discussed include user facilities and technology transfer. Finally, a comprehensive list of publications completes the report

  20. PSI Scientific report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capper, S [ed.

    2008-04-15

    This comprehensive report published by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) on work done in 2007 presents selected highlights including work done on muon spin studies and investigations of polymer films, the chemical properties of element 112 as well as the anti-tumour effects of radionuclides. In its fifth year of operation, results from the SLS (Swiss Light Source) reported on include shedding light on superconductivity and understanding magnetism at the nanoscale level. In the energy research departments, progress is reported on that has been achieved in the conversion of biomass to methane fuel and work leading towards the generation of hydrogen by solar thermochemistry. Combustion research is reported on which, among other themes, focused on efficiency in gas turbine processes. Neutron studies deal with safety aspects of present nuclear reactors and thermal hydraulics with aspects concerning reactors of the future. Safety is also the issue as far as how ions migrate in waste repositories or in the operation of the MEGAPIE liquid metal target. The Competence Center Energy and Mobility of the ETH domain, for which PSI acts as the facilitator, started operation at the beginning of 2006, and several projects have been successfully launched. The reports in this volume represent only a fraction of the research undertaken at PSI in 2007. The report also deals with know-how transfer and includes a list of publications on the work done in the various areas of research.

  1. PSI scientific report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwnicki, P [ed.

    2009-07-01

    This annual report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland takes a look at work done at the institute in the year 2008. The institute's findings around the topics of superconductivity and magnetism revealed using neutron scattering and muon spin resonance are reported on. The use of the high spatial resolution of synchrotron light at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) made it possible to create new nano-structures and reveal microscopic details of the functioning of photo-catalysts, fuel cells and bio-molecules. Work performed in the biology, energy, and environmental sciences area is reported on. The dating of glacier ice, the enhancement of the NMR sensitivity for potential medical diagnosis, the development of efficient SPECT tracers and the assessment of long-term safety of radioactive waste repositories are dealt with. On the operational side of the PSI accelerators, two world records are noted. New facilities such as the X-ray Free Electron Laser planned at the PSI are discussed. Further topics discussed include user facilities and technology transfer. Finally, a comprehensive list of publications completes the report.

  2. PSI Scientific report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capper, S.

    2008-04-01

    This comprehensive report published by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) on work done in 2007 presents selected highlights including work done on muon spin studies and investigations of polymer films, the chemical properties of element 112 as well as the anti-tumour effects of radionuclides. In its fifth year of operation, results from the SLS (Swiss Light Source) reported on include shedding light on superconductivity and understanding magnetism at the nanoscale level. In the energy research departments, progress is reported on that has been achieved in the conversion of biomass to methane fuel and work leading towards the generation of hydrogen by solar thermochemistry. Combustion research is reported on which, among other themes, focused on efficiency in gas turbine processes. Neutron studies deal with safety aspects of present nuclear reactors and thermal hydraulics with aspects concerning reactors of the future. Safety is also the issue as far as how ions migrate in waste repositories or in the operation of the MEGAPIE liquid metal target. The Competence Center Energy and Mobility of the ETH domain, for which PSI acts as the facilitator, started operation at the beginning of 2006, and several projects have been successfully launched. The reports in this volume represent only a fraction of the research undertaken at PSI in 2007. The report also deals with know-how transfer and includes a list of publications on the work done in the various areas of research

  3. PSI Scientific Report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaepfer-Miller, J [ed.

    2007-04-15

    Selected highlights in this years report include muon spin studies and investigations of polymer films, the chemical properties of element 112 and the antitumour effects of radionuclides. In its fifth year of operation, results from the SLS include shedding light on superconductivity and understanding magnetism at the nanoscale. From the energy research departments we hear that progress has been achieved in the conversion of biomass to methane fuel, and towards the generation of hydrogen by solar thermochemistry. Combustion research, among other themes, focused on efficiency in gas turbine processes. Neutronic studies dealt with safety aspects of present nuclear reactors, thermal hydraulics with reactors of the future. safety is also the issue in how ions migrate in waste repositories or in the operation of the MEGAPIE liquid metal target. The Competence Center Energy and Mobility of the ETH domain, for which PSI acts as he facilitator, started operation at the beginning of 2006, and several projects have been successfully launched. The reports in this volume are only a fraction of the varied research undertaken at PSI in the past year; for more information visit our website www.psi.ch. (author)

  4. PSI scientific report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwnicki, P. (ed.)

    2009-07-01

    This annual report issued by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland takes a look at work done at the institute in the year 2008. The institute's findings around the topics of superconductivity and magnetism revealed using neutron scattering and muon spin resonance are reported on. The use of the high spatial resolution of synchrotron light at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) made it possible to create new nano-structures and reveal microscopic details of the functioning of photo-catalysts, fuel cells and bio-molecules. Work performed in the biology, energy, and environmental sciences area is reported on. The dating of glacier ice, the enhancement of the NMR sensitivity for potential medical diagnosis, the development of efficient SPECT tracers and the assessment of long-term safety of radioactive waste repositories are dealt with. On the operational side of the PSI accelerators, two world records are noted. New facilities such as the X-ray Free Electron Laser planned at the PSI are discussed. Further topics discussed include user facilities and technology transfer. Finally, a comprehensive list of publications completes the report.

  5. The optimum intermediate pressure of two-stages vapor compression refrigeration cycle for Air-Conditioning unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, H.; Sihombing, H. V.

    2018-03-01

    Vapor compression cycle is mainly employed as a refrigeration cycle in the Air-Conditioning (AC) unit. In order to save energy, the Coefficient of Performance (COP) of the need to be improved. One of the potential solutions is to modify the system into multi-stages vapor compression cycle. The suitable intermediate pressure between the high and low pressures is one of the design issues. The present work deals with the investigation of an optimum intermediate pressure of two-stages vapor compression refrigeration cycle. Typical vapor compression cycle that is used in AC unit is taken into consideration. The used refrigerants are R134a. The governing equations have been developed for the systems. An inhouse program has been developed to solve the problem. COP, mass flow rate of the refrigerant and compressor power as a function of intermediate pressure are plotted. It was shown that there exists an optimum intermediate pressure for maximum COP. For refrigerant R134a, the proposed correlations need to be revised.

  6. Macroscopic Expressions of Molecular Adiabatic Compressibility of Methyl and Ethyl Caprate under High Pressure and High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuxi Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular compressibility, which is a macroscopic quantity to reveal the microcompressibility by additivity of molecular constitutions, is considered as a fixed value for specific organic liquids. In this study, we introduced two calculated expressions of molecular adiabatic compressibility to demonstrate its pressure and temperature dependency. The first one was developed from Wada’s constant expression based on experimental data of density and sound velocity. Secondly, by introducing the 2D fitting expressions and their partial derivative of pressure and temperature, molecular compressibility dependency was analyzed further, and a 3D fitting expression was obtained from the calculated data of the first one. The third was derived with introducing the pressure and temperature correction factors based on analogy to Lennard-Jones potential function and energy equipartition theorem. In wide range of temperatures (293pressures (0.1

    pressure and temperature of molecular compressibility was certified.

  7. Operational design and pressure response of large-scale compressed air energy storage in porous formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid growth of energy production from intermittent renewable sources like wind and solar power plants, large-scale energy storage options are required to compensate for fluctuating power generation on different time scales. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous formations is seen as a promising option for balancing short-term diurnal fluctuations. CAES is a power-to-power energy storage, which converts electricity to mechanical energy, i.e. highly pressurized air, and stores it in the subsurface. This study aims at designing the storage setup and quantifying the pressure response of a large-scale CAES operation in a porous sandstone formation, thus assessing the feasibility of this storage option. For this, numerical modelling of a synthetic site and a synthetic operational cycle is applied. A hypothetic CAES scenario using a typical anticline structure in northern Germany was investigated. The top of the storage formation is at 700 m depth and the thickness is 20 m. The porosity and permeability were assumed to have a homogenous distribution with a value of 0.35 and 500 mD, respectively. According to the specifications of the Huntorf CAES power plant, a gas turbine producing 321 MW power with a minimum inlet pressure of 43 bars at an air mass flowrate of 417 kg/s was assumed. Pressure loss in the gas wells was accounted for using an analytical solution, which defines a minimum bottom hole pressure of 47 bars. Two daily extraction cycles of 6 hours each were set to the early morning and the late afternoon in order to bypass the massive solar energy production around noon. A two-year initial filling of the reservoir with air and ten years of daily cyclic operation were numerically simulated using the Eclipse E300 reservoir simulator. The simulation results show that using 12 wells the storage formation with a permeability of 500 mD can support the required 6-hour continuous power output of 321MW, which corresponds an energy output of 3852 MWh per

  8. High-pressure behavior of intermediate scapolite: compressibility, structure deformation and phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Paolo; Comboni, Davide; Merlini, Marco; Hanfland, Michael

    2018-05-01

    Scapolites are common volatile-bearing minerals in metamorphic rocks. In this study, the high-pressure behavior of an intermediate member of the scapolite solid solution series (Me47), chemical formula (Na1.86Ca1.86K0.23Fe0.01)(Al4.36Si7.64)O24[Cl0.48(CO3)0.48(SO4)0.01], has been investigated up to 17.79 GPa, by means of in situ single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The isothermal elastic behavior of the studied scapolite has been described by a III-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, which provided the following refined parameters: V 0 = 1110.6(7) Å3, {K_{{V_0}}} = 70(2) GPa ({β _{{V_0}}} = 0.0143(4) GPa-1) and {K_{{V}}^' = 4.8(7). The refined bulk modulus is intermediate between those previously reported for Me17 and Me68 scapolite samples, confirming that the bulk compressibility among the solid solution increases with the Na content. A discussion on the P-induced structure deformation mechanisms of tetragonal scapolite at the atomic scale is provided, along with the implications of the reported results for the modeling of scapolite stability. In addition, a single-crystal to single-crystal phase transition, which is displacive in character, has been observed toward a triclinic polymorph at 9.87 GPa. The high-pressure triclinic polymorph was found to be stable up to the highest pressure investigated.

  9. Influence of breast compression pressure on the performance of population-based mammography screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holland, Katharina; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Mann, Ritse M.; Den Heeten, Gerard J.; van Gils, Carla H.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2017-01-01

    Background: In mammography, breast compression is applied to reduce the thickness of the breast. While it is widely accepted that firm breast compression is needed to ensure acceptable image quality, guidelines remain vague about how much compression should be applied during mammogram acquisition. A

  10. Pressure-Induced Changes in Inter-Diffusivity and Compressive Stress in Chemically Strengthened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Mouritz Nolsøe; Thirion, Lynn M.; Youngman, Randall E.

    chamber to compress bulk glass samples isostatically up to 1 GPa at elevated temperature before or after the ion exchange treatment of an industrial sodium-magnesium aluminosilicate glass. Compression of the samples prior to ion exchange leads to a decreased Na+-K+ inter-diffusivity, increased compressive...

  11. Investigation the effects of injection pressure and compressibility and nozzle entry in diesel injector nozzle’s flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed mohammadjavad Zeidi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigating nozzle’s orifice flow is challenging both experimentally and theoretically. This paper focuses on simulating flow inside diesel injector nozzle via Ansys fluent v15. Validation is performed with experimental results from Winkhofler et al (2001. Several important parameters such as mass flow rate, velocity profiles and pressure profiles are used for this validation. Results include the effects of contraction inside nozzle’s orifice, effect of compressibility; effect of injection pressures and several orifice entries are also simulated in this study. For considering the effect of compressibility a user defined function used in this simulation. Cavitation model which is used in this simulation is Singhal et al. cavitation model. Presto discretization method is used for Pressure equation and second upwind discretization method is used for Momentum equation. Converging Singhal et al. cavitation model is very challenging and it needs several efforts and simulations.

  12. Low-pressure sequential compression of lower limbs enhances forearm skin blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amah, Guy; Voicu, Sebastian; Bonnin, Philippe; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    We investigated whether forearm skin blood flow could be improved when a multilayer pulsatile inflatable suit was applied at a low pressure to the lower limbs and abdomen. We hypothesized that a non-invasive purely mechanical stimulation of the lower limbs could induce remote forearm blood flow modifications. The pulsatile suit induced a sequential compartmentalized low compression (65 mmHg), which was synchronized with each diastole of the cardiac cycle with each phase evolving centripetally (lower limbs to abdomen). Modifications of the forearm skin blood flow were continuously recorded by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) at baseline and during the pulsatile suit application. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilations of the forearm skin microcirculation were measured by LDF in response to a local transdermal iontophoretic application of acetylcholine (ACh-test) and to hyperthermia (hyperT- test). Twenty-four healthy volunteers, 12 men and 12 women (43±14 years) were included in the study. LDF responses increased 1) under pulsatile suit (97±106%, p.

  13. High Pressure Compression-Molding of α-Cellulose and Effects of Operating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Rouilly

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Commercial α-cellulose was compression-molded to produce 1A dog-bone specimens under various operating conditions without any additive. The resulting agromaterials exhibited a smooth, plastic-like surface, and constituted a suitable target as replacement for plastic materials. Tensile and three-points bending tests were conducted according to ISO standards related to the evaluation of plastic materials. The specimens had strengths comparable to classical petroleum-based thermoplastics. They also exhibited high moduli, which is characteristic of brittle materials. A higher temperature and higher pressure rate produced specimens with higher mechanical properties while low moisture content produced weaker specimens. Generally, the strong specimen had higher specific gravity and lower moisture content. However, some parameters did not follow the general trend e.g., thinner specimen showed much higher Young’s Modulus, although their specific gravity and moisture content remained similar to control, revealing a marked skin-effect which was confirmed by SEM observations.

  14. PSI scientific report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-04-01

    This comprehensive report on the activities at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Switzerland reviews work done in 2010. Apart from reports on several projects being carried out at PSI, particular attention is given to the realization of the new Free-Electron Laser facility (SwissFEL) whose core was put into operation in 2010. The ability of the SwissFEL to rapidly initiate a catalytic process will allow the characterization of short-lived intermediate states and will aid in the development of more efficient catalysts. The various component parts of the facility are discussed in detail. Initial operation of the system and examples of the future use of the facility are discussed. The report goes on to report on research foci and selected highlights of work done. These include the Swiss Synchrotron Light Source which has seen another year of many highlights. Increasing experimental capabilities based on resonant soft X-ray absorption are described and four-dimensional measurements of the interface-kinetics of solid-liquid mixtures during coarsening are reported on. The handling of nano-volume crystallisation drops in the macromolecular crystallography beamline is described and the use of X-rays and neutrons at the micrometre scale to elucidate a metal artefact from the Bronze Age is discussed, as is the investigation of newly discovered iron-based superconductors with muons and neutrons. Neutron grating interferometry is reported on and over 14 years of successful operation of SINQ, PSI's Spallation Neutron Source, is looked back on, Fundamental muon physics is discussed and emergent magnetic monopoles that have been directly observed in a two-dimensional array of nanoscale magnets arranged in a honeycomb geometry is reported on. Nano field-emitter arrays as high-brightness electron beam sources are described. G protein-coupled receptors, the largest group of trans-membrane signal transducers in the human genome, as targets for pharmaceutical intervention are looked

  15. PSI annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dury, T.V.

    1993-01-01

    Most of the nuclear energy research carried out in Switzerland takes place in the research department of the same name at the Paul Scherrer Institut. The year 1992 was characterized by the commissioning of new experimental facilities and the realization of new projects, which have been conceived over the past few years. Along with work in the traditional fields of safety (including safety-related operational fields) of nuclear power plants, disposal of radioactive waste, and safety features of future reactor concepts, a new, interdisciplinary project for the global assessment of energy systems (with regard to safety, economics, and environmental impact) was initiated together with the General Energy Research Department of PSI and with ETH in Zuerich. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  16. PSI annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The report at hand renders an account of the first year of PSI, which arose from the fusion of EIR and SIN, at the beginning of 1988. The since then more wide-spread field of activity makes a new form for the annual report necessary, because - specially in the case of the SIN reports - a relatively detailed, scientifically technical presentation would be too extensive and not of interest to all its readers. Therefore, a shorter and generally comprehensive report on the activities in each area of research - abridged by relevant information of administrative nature about the institute, is given. Additionally, each of the five areas of research are to submit, in leisurely sequence, a newsletter addressed to professionals. 64 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Effects of patient-controlled abdominal compression on standing systolic blood pressure in adults with orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Juan J; Singer, Wolfgang; Sandroni, Paola; Sletten, David M; Gehrking, Tonette L; Gehrking, Jade A; Low, Phillip; Basford, Jeffrey R

    2015-03-01

    To assess the effects of patient-controlled abdominal compression on postural changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) associated with orthostatic hypotension (OH). Secondary variables included subject assessments of their preferences and the ease-of-use. Randomized crossover trial. Clinical research laboratory. Adults with neurogenic OH (N=13). Four maneuvers were performed: moving from supine to standing without abdominal compression; moving from supine to standing with either a conventional or an adjustable abdominal binder in place; application of subject-determined maximal tolerable abdominal compression while standing; and while still erect, subsequent reduction of abdominal compression to a level the subject believed would be tolerable for a prolonged period. The primary outcome variable included postural changes in SBP. Secondary outcome variables included subject assessments of their preferences and ease of use. Baseline median SBP in the supine position was not affected by mild (10mmHg) abdominal compression prior to rising (without abdominal compression: 146mmHg; interquartile range, 124-164mmHg; with the conventional binder: 145mmHg; interquartile range, 129-167mmHg; with the adjustable binder: 153mmHg, interquartile range, 129-160mmHg; P=.85). Standing without a binder was associated with an -57mmHg (interquartile range, -40 to -76mmHg) SBP decrease. Levels of compression of 10mmHg applied prior to rising with the conventional and adjustable binders blunted these drops to -50mmHg (interquartile range, -33 to -70mmHg; P=.03) and -46mmHg (interquartile range, -34 to -75mmHg; P=.01), respectively. Increasing compression to subject-selected maximal tolerance while standing did not provide additional benefit and was associated with drops of -53mmHg (interquartile range, -26 to -71mmHg; P=.64) and -59mmHg (interquartile range, -49 to -76mmHg; P=.52) for the conventional and adjustable binders, respectively. Subsequent reduction of compression to more

  18. Observation of the decay psi (3684) →psi (3095) eta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanenbaum, W.; Abrams, G.S.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Chinowsky, W.; Feldman, G.J.; Friedberg, C.E.; Fryberger, D.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hartill, D.L.; Jean-Marie, B.; Kadyk, J.A.; Larsen, R.R.; Litke, A.M.; Luke, D.; Lulu, B.A.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.L.; Morehouse, C.C.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Pierre, F.M.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Sadoulet, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Trilling, G.H.; Vannucci, F.; Whitaker, J.S.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Wiss, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The decay psi (3684) →psi (3095) eta has been observed to have a branching fraction of (4.3+-0.8) %. This measurement, together with previous measurements of psi (3684) →psi (3095)+ anything, psi (3684) →psi (3095) π + π - , and psi (3684) →psi (3095) γγ, indicates that isospin is conserved in the decay psi (3684) →psi (3095) ππ and establishes the isospin and G parity of the psi (3684) to be I/subG/=0 -

  19. Comparison of the compressive strength of impregnated and nonimpregnated eucalyptus subjected to two different pressures and impregnation times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemir Rodrigues

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The durability of wood is affected by several factors. For this reason, much research has been done on a variety of chemical compounds for impregnating wood, aimed at preserving it while simultaneously improving its properties. Recent studies of the properties of impregnated wood have demonstrated the possibility of substantially improving its mechanical characteristics. Thus, the purpose of this work was to compare the strength to parallel compression of wooden fibers (Eucalyptus grandis, both nonimpregnated and impregnated with a monocomponent resin, from the standpoint of pressure and impregnation time, aiming at its structural utilization. The results demonstrate that the compressive strength of impregnated test specimens is greater than that of nonimpregnated ones, indicating that monocomponent polyurethane resin can be considered suitable for impregnating wood, since it increases the compressive strength of eucalyptus.

  20. Synthetic lead bromapatite: X-ray structure at ambient pressure and compressibility up to about 20 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Fleet, Michael E.; Shieh, Sean R.; He, Qiang

    2011-05-01

    Lead bromapatite [Pb10(PO4)6Br2] has been synthesized via solid-state reaction at pressures up to 1.0 GPa, and its structure determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at ambient temperature and pressure. The large bromide anion is accommodated in the c-axis channel by lateral displacements of structural elements, particularly of Pb2 cations and PO4 tetrahedra. The compressibility of bromapatite was also investigated up to about 20.7 GPa at ambient temperature, using a diamond-anvil cell and synchrotron X-ray radiation. The compressibility of lead bromapatite is significantly different from that of lead fluorapatite. The pressure-volume data of lead bromapatite ( P < 10 GPa) fitted to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation yield an isothermal bulk modulus ( K T ) of 49.8(16) GPa and first pressure derivative ( KT^' } ) of 10.1(10). If KT^' } is fixed at 4, the derived K T is 60.8(11) GPa. The relative difference of the bulk moduli of these two lead apatites is thus about 12%, which is about two times the relative difference of the bulk moduli (~5%) of the calcium apatites fluorapatite [Ca10(PO4)6F2], chlorapatite [Ca10(PO4)6Cl2] and hydroxylapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2]. Another interesting feature apparently related to the replacement of F by Br in lead apatite is the switch in the principle axes of the strain ellipsoid: the c-axis is less compressible than the a-axis in lead bromapatite but more compressible in lead fluorapatite.

  1. The influence of channel anion identity on the high-pressure crystal structure, compressibility, and stability of apatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Richard; Walker, Andrew M.

    2018-03-01

    The material properties of the common phosphate mineral apatite are influenced by the identity of the channel anion, which is usually F-, Cl-, or (OH)-. Density functional theory calculations have been used to determine the effect of channel anion identity on the compressibility and structure of apatite. Hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite are found to have similar zero pressure bulk moduli, of 79.2 and 82.1 GPa, respectively, while chlorapatite is considerably more compressible, with K 0 = 55.0 GPa. While the space groups of hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite do not change between 0 and 25 GPa, symmetrization of the Cl- site in chlorapatite at 7.5 GPa causes the space group to change from P2 1 /b to P6 3 /m. Examination of the valence electron density distribution in chlorapatite reveals that this symmetry change is associated with a change in the coordination of the Cl- anion from threefold to sixfold coordinated by Ca. We also calculate the pressure at which apatite decomposes to form tuite, a calcium orthophosphate mineral, and find that the transition pressure is sensitive to the identity of the channel anion, being lowest for fluorapatite (13.8 GPa) and highest for chlorapatite (26.9 GPa). Calculations are also performed within the DFT-D2 framework to investigate the influence of dispersion forces on the compressibility of apatite minerals.

  2. Computerized Cuff Pressure Algometry as Guidance for Circumferential Tissue Compression for Wearable Soft Robotic Applications: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermavnar, Tjaša; Power, Valerie; de Eyto, Adam; O'Sullivan, Leonard W

    2018-02-01

    In this article, we review the literature on quantitative sensory testing of deep somatic pain by means of computerized cuff pressure algometry (CPA) in search of pressure-related safety guidelines for wearable soft exoskeleton and robotics design. Most pressure-related safety thresholds to date are based on interface pressures and skin perfusion, although clinical research suggests the deep somatic tissues to be the most sensitive to excessive loading. With CPA, pain is induced in deeper layers of soft tissue at the limbs. The results indicate that circumferential compression leads to discomfort at ∼16-34 kPa, becomes painful at ∼20-27 kPa, and can become unbearable even below 40 kPa.

  3. The influence of different sub-bandage pressure values on venous leg ulcers healing when treated with compression therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Dragan J; Zivic, Sasa S; Bogdanovic, Dragan C; Jovanovic, Milan M; Jankovic, Radmilo J; Milosevic, Zoran D; Stamenkovic, Dragan M; Trenkic, Marija S

    2010-03-01

    Venous leg ulcers (VLU) have a huge social and economic impact. An estimated 1.5% of European adults will suffer a venous ulcer at some point in their lives. Despite the widespread use of bandaging with high pressure in the treatment of this condition, recurrence rates range between 25% to 70%. Numerous studies have suggested that the compression system should provide sub-bandage pressure values in the range from 35 mm Hg to 45 mm Hg in order to achieve the best possible healing results. An open, randomized, prospective, single-center study was performed in order to determine the healing rates of VLU when treated with different compression systems and different sub-bandage pressure values. One hundred thirty-one patients (72 women, 59 men; mean age, 59-years-old) with VLU (ulcer surface >3 cm(2); duration >3 months) were randomized into three groups: group A - 42 patients who were treated using an open-toed, elastic, class III compression device knitted in tubular form (Tubulcus, Laboratoires Innothera, Arcueil, France); group B - 46 patients treated with the multi-component bandaging system comprised of Tubulcus and one elastic bandage (15 cm wide and 5 cm long with 200% stretch, Niva, Novi Sad, Serbia); and group C - forty-three patients treated with the multi-component bandaging system comprised of Tubulcus and two elastic bandages. Pressure measurements were taken with the Kikuhime device (TT MediTrade, Soro, Denmark) at the B1 measuring point in the supine, sitting, and standing positions under the three different compression systems. The median resting values in the supine and standing positions in examined study groups were as follows: group A - 36.2 mm Hg and 43.9 mm Hg; group B - 53.9 mm Hg and 68.2 mm Hg; group C - 74.0 mm Hg and 87.4 mm Hg. The healing rate during the 26-week treatment period was 25% (13/42) in group A, 67.4% (31/46) in group B, and 74.4% (32/43) in group C. The success of compression treatment in group A was strongly associated with the

  4. Liquid return from gas pressurization of grouted waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, W.J.; Benny, H.L.

    1994-05-01

    The ability to force pore liquids out of a simulated waste grout matrix using air pressure was measured. Specimens cured under various conditions were placed in a permeameter and subjected to increasing air pressure. The pressure was held constant for 24 hours and then stepped up until either liquid was released or 150 psi was reached. One specimen was taken to 190 psi with no liquid release. Permeability to simulated tank waste was then measured. Compressive strength was measured following these tests. This data is to assess the amount of fluid that might be released from grouted waste resulting from the buildup of radiolytically generated hydrogen and other gasses within the waste form matrix. A plot of the unconfined compressive strength versus breakthrough pressures identifies a region of ''good'' grout, which will resist liquid release

  5. PSI scientific highlights 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnicki, P.

    2012-04-01

    This comprehensive report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the major highlights of the work done at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, in 2011. According to the institute's director, work was concerned with the design and analysis of advanced materials with new functionalities, for application in fields as diverse as communications and energy technology, transportation, construction and medicine. Of particular topical interest are research projects on materials for application in the field of energy, for example for improving batteries for future electrically powered vehicles. Another example is in the field of catalysts. Environmentally harmful compounds, such as nitrogen oxide and sulphur dioxide produced in an engine, are transformed into nontoxic gases through catalytic conversion. Work progress on the SwissFEL installation is noted, including a breakthrough for SwissFEL main Linac C-band accelerating systems. Further topics in relation to the SwissFEL system are noted. Planning of the initial set of experimental stations at the SwissFEL is discussed and close collaboration with growing number of user communities is noted. Cross-Correlation Scattering, and a theoretical framework for this method is being developed and experimentally verified, using artificial nanostructures and synchrotron radiation. Highlights of further research work are discussed, including topics such as Synchrotron light, work done on neutrons and muons, particle physics, micro and nanotechnology as well as on biomolecular research and radiopharmacy. Large research facilities are discussed as is the PSI proton therapy installation. General energy topics are looked at, as are nuclear energy and safety aspects and environmental and energy systems analysis. Various further work includes factors causing glacier retreat and aerosols. User facilities are listed, including accelerators, the SLS light source, the SINQ neutron source, the UCN ultra-cold neutron source

  6. Important role of vertical migration of compressed gas, oil and water in formation of AVPD (abnormally high pressure gradient) zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikiyev, K.A.

    1980-01-01

    The principal role of vertical migration of compressed gases, gas-saturated petroleum and water during formation of abnormally high pressure gradients (AVPD) is confirmed by extensive factual data on gas production, grifons, blowouts and gushers that accompany drilling formations with AVPD from early history to the present time; the sources of vertical migration of compressed fluids, in accordance with geodynamic AVPD theory, are the deep degasified centers of the earth mantle. Among the various types of AVPD zones especially notable are the large (often massive or massive-layer) deposits and the intrusion aureoles that top them in the overlapping covering layers. Prediction of AVPD zones and determining their field and energy potential must be based on field-baric simulation of the formations being drilled in light of laws regarding the important role of the vertical migration of compressed fluids. When developing field-baric models, it is necessary to utilize the extensive and valuable data on grifons, gas production and blowouts that has been collected and categorized by drilling engineers and production geologists. To further develop data on field-baric conditions of the earth, it is necessary to collect and study signals of AVPD. First of all, there is a need to evaluate potential elastic resources of compressed fluids which can move from the bed into the well. Thus it is necessary to study and standardize intrusion aureoles and other AVPD zones within the aspect of fieldbaric modeling.

  7. Numerical Analysis on the Compressible Flow Characteristics of Supersonic Jet Caused by High-Pressure Pipe Rupture Using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jong-Kil; Yoon, Jun-Kyu [Gachon Univ., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Chu [KEPCO-E& C, Kimchun (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    A rupture in a high-pressure pipe causes the fluid in the pipe to be discharged in the atmosphere at a high speed resulting in a supersonic jet that generates the compressible flow. This supersonic jet may display complicated and unsteady behavior in general . In this study, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to investigate the compressible flow generated by a supersonic jet ejected from a high-pressure pipe. A Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model was selected to analyze the unsteady nature of the flow, which depends upon the various gases as well as the diameter of the pipe. In the CFD analysis, the basic boundary conditions were assumed to be as follows: pipe of diameter 10 cm, jet pressure ratio of 5, and an inlet gas temperature of 300 K. During the analysis, the behavior of the shockwave generated by a supersonic jet was observed and it was found that the blast wave was generated indirectly. The pressure wave characteristics of hydrogen gas, which possesses the smallest molecular mass, showed the shortest distance to the safety zone. There were no significant difference observed for nitrogen gas, air, and oxygen gas, which have similar molecular mass. In addition, an increase in the diameter of the pipe resulted in the ejected impact caused by the increased flow rate to become larger and the zone of jet influence to extend further.

  8. Muscle Performance Investigated With a Novel Smart Compression Garment Based on Pressure Sensor Force Myography and Its Validation Against EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belbasis, Aaron; Fuss, Franz Konstantin

    2018-01-01

    Muscle activity and fatigue performance parameters were obtained and compared between both a smart compression garment and the gold-standard, a surface electromyography (EMG) system during high-speed cycling in seven participants. The smart compression garment, based on force myography (FMG), comprised of integrated pressure sensors that were sandwiched between skin and garment, located on five thigh muscles. The muscle activity was assessed by means of crank cycle diagrams (polar plots) that displayed the muscle activity relative to the crank cycle. The fatigue was assessed by means of the median frequency of the power spectrum of the EMG signal; the fractal dimension (FD) of the EMG signal; and the FD of the pressure signal. The smart compression garment returned performance parameters (muscle activity and fatigue) comparable to the surface EMG. The major differences were that the EMG measured the electrical activity, whereas the pressure sensor measured the mechanical activity. As such, there was a phase shift between electrical and mechanical signals, with the electrical signals preceding the mechanical counterparts in most cases. This is specifically pronounced in high-speed cycling. The fatigue trend over the duration of the cycling exercise was clearly reflected in the fatigue parameters (FDs and median frequency) obtained from pressure and EMG signals. The fatigue parameter of the pressure signal (FD) showed a higher time dependency ( R 2 = 0.84) compared to the EMG signal. This reflects that the pressure signal puts more emphasis on the fatigue as a function of time rather than on the origin of fatigue (e.g., peripheral or central fatigue). In light of the high-speed activity results, caution should be exerted when using data obtained from EMG for biomechanical models. In contrast to EMG data, activity data obtained from FMG are considered more appropriate and accurate as an input for biomechanical modeling as they truly reflect the mechanical muscle

  9. Muscle Performance Investigated With a Novel Smart Compression Garment Based on Pressure Sensor Force Myography and Its Validation Against EMG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Belbasis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Muscle activity and fatigue performance parameters were obtained and compared between both a smart compression garment and the gold-standard, a surface electromyography (EMG system during high-speed cycling in seven participants. The smart compression garment, based on force myography (FMG, comprised of integrated pressure sensors that were sandwiched between skin and garment, located on five thigh muscles. The muscle activity was assessed by means of crank cycle diagrams (polar plots that displayed the muscle activity relative to the crank cycle. The fatigue was assessed by means of the median frequency of the power spectrum of the EMG signal; the fractal dimension (FD of the EMG signal; and the FD of the pressure signal. The smart compression garment returned performance parameters (muscle activity and fatigue comparable to the surface EMG. The major differences were that the EMG measured the electrical activity, whereas the pressure sensor measured the mechanical activity. As such, there was a phase shift between electrical and mechanical signals, with the electrical signals preceding the mechanical counterparts in most cases. This is specifically pronounced in high-speed cycling. The fatigue trend over the duration of the cycling exercise was clearly reflected in the fatigue parameters (FDs and median frequency obtained from pressure and EMG signals. The fatigue parameter of the pressure signal (FD showed a higher time dependency (R2 = 0.84 compared to the EMG signal. This reflects that the pressure signal puts more emphasis on the fatigue as a function of time rather than on the origin of fatigue (e.g., peripheral or central fatigue. In light of the high-speed activity results, caution should be exerted when using data obtained from EMG for biomechanical models. In contrast to EMG data, activity data obtained from FMG are considered more appropriate and accurate as an input for biomechanical modeling as they truly reflect the mechanical

  10. High-precision measurements of the compressibility of chalcogenide glasses at a hydrostatic pressure up to 9 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazhkin, V. V., E-mail: brazhkin@hppi.troitsk.ru [Vereshchagin Institute of High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation); Bychkov, E. [Universite du Littoral, LPCA, UMR 8101 CNRS (France); Tsiok, O. B. [Vereshchagin Institute of High-Pressure Physics (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The volumes of glassy germanium chalcogenides GeSe{sub 2}, GeS{sub 2}, Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83}, and Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} are precisely measured at a hydrostatic pressure up to 8.5 GPa. The stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} and GeS{sub 2} glasses exhibit elastic behavior in the pressure range up to 3 GPa, and their bulk modulus decreases at pressures higher than 2–2.5 GPa. At higher pressures, inelastic relaxation processes begin and their intensity is proportional to the logarithm of time. The relaxation rate for the GeSe{sub 2} glasses has a pronounced maximum at 3.5–4.5 GPa, which indicates the existence of several parallel structural transformation mechanisms. The nonstoichiometric glasses exhibit a diffuse transformation and inelastic behavior at pressures above 1–2 GPa. The maximum relaxation rate in these glasses is significantly lower than that in the stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} glasses. All glasses are characterized by the “loss of memory” of history: after relaxation at a fixed pressure, the further increase in the pressure returns the volume to the compression curve obtained without a stop for relaxation. After pressure release, the residual densification in the stoichiometric glasses is about 7% and that in the Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83} glasses is 1.5%. The volume of the Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} glass returns to its initial value within the limits of experimental error. As the pressure decreases, the effective bulk moduli of the Ge{sub 17}Se{sub 83} and Ge{sub 8}Se{sub 92} glasses coincide with the moduli after isobaric relaxation at the stage of increasing pressure, and the bulk modulus of the stoichiometric GeSe{sub 2} glass upon decreasing pressure noticeably exceeds the bulk modulus after isobaric relaxation at the stage of increasing pressure. Along with the reported data, our results can be used to draw conclusions regarding the diffuse transformations in glassy germanium chalcogenides during compression.

  11. The Effect of PFSA Membrane Compression on the Predicted Performance of a High Pressure PEM Electrolysis Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a non-equilibrium formulation of a compression dependent water uptake model has been implemented in a two-dimensional, two-phase, multi-component and non-isothermal high pressure PEM electrolysis model. The non-equilibrium formulation of the water uptake model was chosen in order...... to account for interfacial transport kinetics between each fluid phase and the perfluorinated sulfonic acid membrane. Besides modeling water uptake, the devised membrane model accounts for water transport through diffusion and electro-osmotic drag in the electrolyte phase, and hydraulic permeation...... in the liquid phase. Charge transport and electrochemistry are likewise included. The obtained model is validated against experimental measurements. In order to investigate the effect of membrane compression, a parametric study is carried. Results underline that the predicted water uptake and cell voltage...

  12. Effects of Friction and Anvil Design on Plastic Deformation during the Compression Stage of High-Pressure Torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yuepeng; Chen, Miaomiao; Xu, Baoyan; Guo, Jing; Xu, Lingfeng; Wang, Zheng [Mechanical and Electronic Engineering College, Tai’an (China); Gao, Dongsheng [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Horticultural Machineries and Equipments, Tai’an (China); Kim, Hyoung Seop [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Herein, we report the results of our investigation on the effect of friction and anvil design on the heterogeneous plastic-deformation characteristics of copper during the compressive stage of high-pressure torsion (HPT), using the finite element method. The results indicate that the friction and anvil geometry play important roles in the homogeneity of the deformation. These variables affect the heterogeneous level of strain in the HPT compressed disks, as well as the flash in the disk edge region. The heterogeneous plastic deformation of the disks becomes more severe with the increasing depth of the cavity, as anvil angle and friction coefficient increase. However, the homogeneity increases with increases in the wall angle. The length of flash and the area of the dead metal zone increase with the depth of the cavity, while they decrease at a wall angle of 180°.

  13. PSI Paul Scherrer Institute; PSI Institut Paul Scherrer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefrancois, M.; Pladys, D

    2008-05-15

    From research activities focused on civil and military uses of nuclear energy and developed after the second world war, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) has been able to diversify its activities following 2 axis. First, the Gantry proton-therapy that is characterized by a compact equipment and an accurate 3-dimensional treatment of tumors (more than 260 patients have been treated by Gantry from 1996 to 2005). Secondly, new technologies in the fields of energy and transport. Nevertheless, PSI has been able to keep a high of valuation of its staff in nuclear engineering and materials that are the core of its activities. The main equipment of PSI are: -) SLS (Swiss Light Source): a synchrotron radiation source that is both a microscope and an X-ray source; -) SINQ: a neutron source based on spallation reactions; -)S{mu}S: a muon source; and -) the Philips accelerator that is used in radiochemistry and the production of isotopes used for the treatment of eye tumors. PSI has established a large cooperation with French research laboratories on issues like: nuclear reactor safety, synchrotron radiation, the transmutation of nuclear wastes, the design of a source of ultra-cold neutrons, or the development of a hydrogen-fueled light vehicle. The total budget of PSI for 2007 reached 174.2 million euros. (A.C.)

  14. Ammonia-lithium nitrate absorption chiller with an integrated low-pressure compression booster cycle for low driving temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventas, R.; Lecuona, A.; Zacarias, A.; Venegas, M.

    2010-01-01

    Single-effect absorption refrigeration hybridized with mechanical vapor compression in a vapor circuit is known as the absorption cycle with an integrated booster compressor. In this study, the compressor is located between the evaporator and the absorber. This paper presents a numerical model of this cycle with ammonia-lithium nitrate solution as the working pair. It is based on UA-ΔT lm models for separate regions of plate-type heat exchangers. The results are offered as a function of external circuit flow parameters. Different pressure ratios of the compressor were tested for a wide range of hot water driving temperatures (55-95 deg. C), showing that low values are more beneficial. This cycle allows for working at lower driving temperatures than the single-effect cycle, with low electricity consumption. At the same driving temperature, the capacity is augmented with an increased compressor pressure ratio, thus allowing for demand matching of the cooling. This cycle, operating with hot water at 67 deg. C with a pressure ratio of 2.0, has the capacity of a single-effect absorption cycle at 94 deg. C. The electrical COP was found to be higher than that in an ammonia vapor compression cycle for comprehensive working conditions.

  15. Study of the reactions psi' → γγpsi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreglia, M.J.

    1980-12-01

    A large solid angle array (the Crystal Ball detector) of NaI(Tl) crystals, together with spark and multiwire proportional chambers for charged particle tracking, is used to study the decays of the psi' meson. Cascade reactions of the form psi' → γchi, chi → γpsi, psi → (e + e - or μ + μ - ) are used in this experiment to observe the intermediate chi states and to measure their spin by analyzing the angular correlations among the final-state particles. In addition, the multipole coefficients describing the individual radiative transitions are measured using the angular correlations. Values of J = 2 and J = 1 are obtained for the chi states with masses of 3.55 and 3.51 GeV, respectively. Radiative transitions to and from the chi states are found to be dominantly E1 in nature. The well-established J = 0 chi(3.41) state is observed in a cascade reaction, with a branching ratio BR(psi' → γchi → γγpsi) = (0.06 +- 0.02 +- 0.01)%; the first error describes uncertainties arising from statistics and acceptance corrections, while the second error is systematic. Branching ratios of (1.26 +- 0.08 +- 0.20)% for chi(3.55) and (2.38 +- 0.12 +- 0.38)% for chi(3.51) are consistent with those obtained in previous experiments. Natural line-widths of (4 +- 1) MeV for chi(3.55) and a full width consistent with the resolution of the apparatus for chi(3.51) are obtained

  16. Solid hydrogen and deuterium. II. Pressure and compressibility calculated by a lowest-order constrained-variation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, G.; Ostgaard, E.

    1988-01-01

    The pressure and the compressibility of solid H 2 and D 2 are obtained from ground-state energies calculated by means of a modified variational lowest order constrained-variation (LOCV) method. Both fcc and hcp structures are considered, but results are given for the fcc structure only. The pressure and the compressibility are calculated or estimated from the dependence of the ground-state energy on density or molar volume, generally in a density region of 0.65σ -3 to 1.3σ -3 , corresponding to a molar volume of 0.65σ -3 to 1.3σ -3 , corresponding to a molar volume of 12-24 cm 3 mole, where σ = 2.958 angstrom, and the calculations are done for five different two-body potentials. Theoretical results for the pressure are 340-460 atm for solid H 2 at a particle density of 0.82σ -3 or a molar volume of 19 cm 3 /mole, and 370-490 atm for solid 4 He at a particle density of 0.92σ -3 or a molar volume of 17 cm 3 /mole. The corresponding experimental results are 650 and 700 atm, respectively. Theoretical results for the compressibility are 210 times 10 -6 to 260 times 10 -6 atm -1 for solid H 2 at a particle density of 0.82σ -3 or a molar volume of 19 cm 3 /mole, and 150 times 10 -6 to 180 times 10 -6 atm -1 for solid D 2 at a particle density of 0.92σ -3 or a molar volume of 17 cm 3 mole. The corresponding experimental results are 180 times 10 -6 and 140 times 10 -6 atm -1 , respectively. The agreement with experimental results is better for higher densities

  17. Low Pressure Storage of Natural Gas for Vehicular Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tim Burchell; Mike Rogers

    2000-01-01

    Natural gas is an attractive fuel for vehicles because it is a relatively clean-burning fuel compared with gasoline. Moreover, methane can be stored in the physically adsorbed state[at a pressure of 3.5 MPa (500 psi)] at energy densities comparable to methane compressed at 24.8 MPa (3600 psi). Here we report the development of natural gas storage monoliths[1]. The monolith manufacture and activation methods are reported along with pore structure characterization data. The storage capacities of these monoliths are measured gravimetrically at a pressure of 3.5 MPa (500 psi) and ambient temperature, and storage capacities of and gt;150 V/V have been demonstrated and are reported

  18. Psi-calculi in Isabelle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtson, Jesper; Parrow, Joachim; Weber, Tjark

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a mechanisation of psi-calculi, a parametric framework for modelling various dialects of process calculi including (but not limited to) the pi-calculus, the applied pi-calculus, and the spi calculus. Psi-calculi are significantly more expressive, yet their semantics is as simple......, an interactive proof assistant designed to facilitate formal reasoning about calculi with binders. Our main contributions are twofold. First, we have developed techniques that allow efficient reasoning about calculi that bind multiple names in Nominal Isabelle. Second, we have adopted these techniques...... to mechanise substantial results from the meta-theory of psi-calculi, including congruence properties of bisimilarity and the laws of structural congruence. To our knowledge, this is the most extensive formalisation of process calculi mechanised in a proof assistant to date....

  19. Introduction of small velocity and pressure variation into a stationary compressible fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trancong, Ton [Defence Science and Technology Organisation Australia, Fishermens Bend (Australia). Aeronautical Research Lab.

    1992-06-01

    This work formulates the aerodynamic time-dependent Coulomb and Biot-Savart laws with inherent transmission retardation. It generalizes the theory by Baskin et al. (for only the isentropic propagation of small vortex disturbances) to deal with the propagation of small disturbances caused by a distributed system of both vortices and variation in specific entropy of a thermodynamically simple compressible fluid. The proof here uses an alternative, more appealing derivation with the help of a novel wave-cone transformation (which changes Kirchhoff's retarded potentials into Newtonian potentials). The results suggest the possibility of using a focused laser spot to simulate the effect of a source in a compressible fluid; the source may even move at a supersonic speed to create a shock wave. They also suggest a time-dependent, three-dimensional formula for lifts caused by small disturbances that is in agreement with Blasius' formula for two-dimensional, time-independent, inviscid flows. (orig.).

  20. In vitro protocol for validating interface pressure sensors for therapeutic compression garments: Importance of sphygmomanometer placement and initial cuff diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inhwa Jung

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An optimal protocol is needed to validate the performance of future interface pressure sensors for compression garments when using a sphygmomanometer. PicoPress® was used on a rigid plastic cylinder (r=4 cm. An FDA-cleared aneroid sphygmomanometer was used to apply pressures from 10-60 mmHg with a diameter of 8 cm or 12 cm placed either beneath the sphygmomanometer’s airbag or fabric cuff. A two-tail t-test was performed (P<0.05 for significance for all applied pressures. PicoPress® outputs vary with sensor placement (airbag vs fabric cuff and the initial cuff diameter. Sensor placement overlying the sphygmomanometer’s fabric cuff compared to the airbag led to significantly higher pressures (37%-135% depending on the cuff diameter size. These differences were nearly all statistically significant (P<0.05. Validation of new interface pressure sensors deploying a sphygmomanometer for calibration should specify the location of sensor placement location and initial diameter with a preference for placement under the airbag.

  1. Pressure-induced phase transformation in ZrW2O8 - Compressibility and thermal expansion of the orthorhombic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Z.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Teslic, S.; Short, S.; Argyriou, D.N.

    1997-01-01

    In situ neutron powder diffraction has been used to show that the application of hydrostatic pressure at room temperature produces a transformation of ZrW 2 O 8 from the cubic to an orthorhombic phase beginning at 2.1 kbar and completed by 3.1 kbar, with a 5% reduction in volume. After release of pressure, the orthorhombic phase is retained at room temperature. Its thermal expansion is negative below room temperature, but is positive above room temperature with a transformation back to the cubic phase at about 390 K. The WO 4 groups are found to play the dominant role in both phase transformations. The volume compressibilities of the cubic and orthorhombic phases are 1.38 x 10 -3 and 1.53 x 10 -3 kbar -1 , respectively. (orig.)

  2. High-pressure resistivity technique for quasi-hydrostatic compression experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundu, C R; Ćuk, T; Greene, R L; Shen, Z-X; Hemley, Russell J; Struzhkin, V V

    2013-06-01

    Diamond anvil cell techniques are now well established and powerful methods for measuring materials properties to very high pressure. However, high pressure resistivity measurements are challenging because the electrical contacts attached to the sample have to survive to extreme stress conditions. Until recently, experiments in a diamond anvil cell were mostly limited to non-hydrostatic or quasi-hydrostatic pressure media other than inert gases. We present here a solution to the problem by using focused ion beam ultrathin lithography for a diamond anvil cell loaded with inert gas (Ne) and show typical resistivity data. These ultrathin leads are deposited on the culet of the diamond and are attaching the sample to the anvil mechanically, therefore allowing for measurements in hydrostatic or nearly hydrostatic conditions of pressure using noble gases like Ne or He as pressure transmitting media.

  3. Compressibility of the high-pressure rocksalt phase of ZnO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recio, J.M.; Blanco, M.A.; Luana, V.

    1998-01-01

    We report the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation on the stability and the volume behavior under hydrostatic pressure of the rocksalt (B1) phase of ZnO. Synchrotron-radiation x-ray powder-diffraction data are obtained from 0 to 30 GPa. Static simulations of the ZnO B1...... phase are performed using the ab initio perturbed ion method and the local and nonlocal approximations to the density-functional theory. After the pressure induced transition from the wurtzite phase, we have found that a large fraction of the B1 high-pressure phase is retained when pressure is released....... The metastability of this ZnO polymorph is confirmed through the theoretical evaluation of the Hessian eigenvalues of a nine-parameter potential energy surface. This allows us to treat the experimental and theoretical pressure-volume data on an equal basis. In both cases, we have obtained values of the bulk modulus...

  4. An investigation of the ability to produce a defined 'target pressure' using the PressCise compression bandage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklander, Kerstin; Andersson, Annette Erichsen; Källman, Ulrika

    2016-12-01

    Compression therapy is the cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of leg ulcers related to chronic venous insufficiency. The application of optimal high pressure is essential for a successful outcome, but the literature has reported difficulty applying the intended pressure, even among highly skilled nurses. The PressCise bandage has a novel design, with both longitudinal and horizontal reference points for correct application. In the current experimental study, the results for the general linear model, where the data set is treated optimally, showed that all 95% confidence intervals of the expected values for pressure were, at most, 5 mmHg from the target value of 50 mmHg, independent of the position on the leg and the state of activity. Moreover, even nurses with limited experience were consistently able to reach the targeted pressure goal. Future studies are needed to determine how well the bandage works on legs of different shapes, the optimal way of using the bandage (day only or both day and night) and whether the bandage should be combined with an outer bandage layer. In addition, special attention should be paid to subjective patient experiences in relation to the treatment as pain, discomfort and bulk are factors that can compromise patients' willingness to adhere to the treatment protocol and thereby prolong the healing process. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Stretchable Optomechanical Fiber Sensors for Pressure Determination in Compressive Medical Textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandt, Joseph D; Moudio, Marie; Clark, J Kenji; Hardin, James; Argenti, Christian; Carty, Matthew; Lewis, Jennifer A; Kolle, Mathias

    2018-05-29

    Medical textiles are widely used to exert pressure on human tissues during treatment of post-surgical hematoma, burn-related wounds, chronic venous ulceration, and other maladies. However, the inability to dynamically sense and adjust the applied pressure often leads to suboptimal pressure application, prolonging treatment or resulting in poor patient outcomes. Here, a simple strategy for measuring sub-bandage pressure by integrating stretchable optomechanical fibers into elastic bandages is demonstrated. Specifically, these fibers possess an elastomeric photonic multilayer cladding that surrounds an extruded stretchable core filament. They can sustain repetitive strains of over 100%, and respond to deformation with a predictable and reversible color variation. Integrated into elastic textiles, which apply pressure as a function of their strain, these fibers can provide instantaneous and localized pressure feedback. These colorimetric fiber sensors are well suited for medical textiles, athletic apparel, and other smart wearable technologies, especially when repetitive, large deformations are required. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Effect of Diesel Engine Converted to Sequential Port Injection Compressed Natural Gas Engine on the Cylinder Pressure vs Crank Angle in Variation Engine Speeds

    OpenAIRE

    Semin; Abdul R. Ismail; Rosli A. Bakar

    2009-01-01

    The diesel engine converted to compressed natural gas (CNG) engine effect is lower in performance. Problem statement: The hypothesis is that the lower performance of CNG engine is caused by the effect of lower in engine cylinder pressure. Are the CNG engine is lower cylinder pressure than diesel engine? This research is conducted to investigate the cylinder pressure of CNG engine as a new engine compared to diesel engine as a baseline engine. Approach: The research approach in this study is b...

  7. Interest in PSI across Sixteen Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamal, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether interest in the personalized system of instruction (PSI) in the behavioral sciences has waned since 1968, conference papers and poster presentations dealing with PSI were surveyed. The number of papers and posters devoted to PSI peaked in the years 1972-1979 and has since clearly declined. (RM)

  8. The linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eck, van H.J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER) has built the new experimental research facility Magnum-PSI. In Magnum-PSI, Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI) research for the nuclear fusion reactor ITER and reactors beyond ITER will be carried out. As such, it is essential that the

  9. Contact Behavior of Composite CrTiSiN Coated Dies in Compressing of Mg Alloy Sheets under High Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hard coatings have been adopted in cutting and forming applications for nearly two decades. The major purpose of using hard coatings is to reduce the friction coefficient between contact surfaces, to increase strength, toughness and anti-wear performance of working tools and molds, and then to obtain a smooth work surface and an increase in service life of tools and molds. In this report, we deposited a composite CrTiSiN hard coating, and a traditional single-layered TiAlN coating as a reference. Then, the coatings were comparatively studied by a series of tests. A field emission SEM was used to characterize the microstructure. Hardness was measured using a nano-indentation tester. Adhesion of coatings was evaluated using a Rockwell C hardness indentation tester. A pin-on-disk wear tester with WC balls as sliding counterparts was used to determine the wear properties. A self-designed compression and friction tester, by combining a Universal Testing Machine and a wear tester, was used to evaluate the contact behavior of composite CrTiSiN coated dies in compressing of Mg alloy sheets under high pressure. The results indicated that the hardness of composite CrTiSiN coating was lower than that of the TiAlN coating. However, the CrTiSiN coating showed better anti-wear performance. The CrTiSiN coated dies achieved smooth surfaces on the Mg alloy sheet in the compressing test and lower friction coefficient in the friction test, as compared with the TiAlN coating.

  10. Contact Behavior of Composite CrTiSiN Coated Dies in Compressing of Mg Alloy Sheets under High Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T S; Yao, S H; Chang, Y Y; Deng, J H

    2018-01-08

    Hard coatings have been adopted in cutting and forming applications for nearly two decades. The major purpose of using hard coatings is to reduce the friction coefficient between contact surfaces, to increase strength, toughness and anti-wear performance of working tools and molds, and then to obtain a smooth work surface and an increase in service life of tools and molds. In this report, we deposited a composite CrTiSiN hard coating, and a traditional single-layered TiAlN coating as a reference. Then, the coatings were comparatively studied by a series of tests. A field emission SEM was used to characterize the microstructure. Hardness was measured using a nano-indentation tester. Adhesion of coatings was evaluated using a Rockwell C hardness indentation tester. A pin-on-disk wear tester with WC balls as sliding counterparts was used to determine the wear properties. A self-designed compression and friction tester, by combining a Universal Testing Machine and a wear tester, was used to evaluate the contact behavior of composite CrTiSiN coated dies in compressing of Mg alloy sheets under high pressure. The results indicated that the hardness of composite CrTiSiN coating was lower than that of the TiAlN coating. However, the CrTiSiN coating showed better anti-wear performance. The CrTiSiN coated dies achieved smooth surfaces on the Mg alloy sheet in the compressing test and lower friction coefficient in the friction test, as compared with the TiAlN coating.

  11. Application of a two-dimensional model for predicting the pressure-flow and compression properties during column packing scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Justin T; Cecchini, Douglas; Chu, Cathy; Liu, Wei-Han; Spann, Andrew

    2007-03-23

    A two-dimensional model was formulated to describe the pressure-flow behavior of compressible stationary phases for protein chromatography at different temperatures and column scales. The model was based on the assumption of elastic deformation of the solid phase and steady-state Darcy flow. Using a single fitted value for the empirical modulus parameters, the model was applied to describe the pressure-flow behavior of several adsorbents packed using both fluid flow and mechanical compression. Simulations were in agreement with experimental data and accurately predicted the pressure-flow and compression behavior of three adsorbents over a range of column scales and operating temperatures. Use of the described theoretical model potentially improves the accuracy of the column scale-up process, allowing the use of limited laboratory scale data to predict column performance in large scale applications.

  12. Study of the reaction psi'→γγJ/psi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreglia, M.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.; Chestnut, R.; Gaiser, J.; Godfrey, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lockman, W.; Scharre, D.L.; Partridge, R.; Peck, C.; Porter, F.C.; Antreasyan, D.; Gu, Y.; Kollmann, W.; Richardson, M.; Strauch, K.; Wacker, K.; Aschman, D.; Burnett, T.; Newman, C.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyne, D.; Sadrozinski, H.; Hofstadter, R.; Kirkbride, I.; Kolanoski, H.; Koenigsmann, K.; Liberman, A.; O'Reilly, J.; Pollack, B.; Tompkins, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Crystal Ball detector at SPEAR has been used to investigate the decays psi'→γγJ/psi, J/psi→(e + e - or μ + μ - ) resulting from production of 8 x 10 5 psi'. From this selection of the data we measure the branching ratios for the processes psi'→(eta or π 0 )J/psi and psi'→γchi, chi→γJ/psi. An analysis of the angular correlations in the latter process furnishes measurements of the chi(3.55) and chi(3.51) spins and of the multipole structure of the radiative transitions

  13. Efficacy of Feed Forward and Feedback Signaling for Inflations and Chest Compression Pressure During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in a Newborn Mannequin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriessen, Peter; Oetomo, Sidarto Bambang; Chen, Wei; Feijs, Loe MG

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to evaluate a device that supports professionals during neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The device features a box that generates an audio-prompted rate guidance (feed forward) for inflations and compressions, and a transparent foil that is placed over the chest with marks for inter nipple line and sternum with LED’s incorporated in the foil indicating the exerted force (feedback). Methods Ten pairs (nurse/doctor) performed CPR on a newborn resuscitation mannequin. All pairs initially performed two sessions. Thereafter two sessions were performed in similar way, after randomization in 5 pairs that used the device and 5 pairs that performed CPR without the device (controls). A rhythm score was calculated based on the number of CPR cycles that were performed correctly. Results The rhythm score with the device improved from 85 ± 14 to 99 ± 2% (P CPR device compared to the controls. Conclusion Feed forward and feedback signaling leads to a more constant rhythm and chest compression pressure during CPR. PMID:22870175

  14. Quasi-isentropic compressibility of a strongly nonideal deuterium plasma at pressures of up to 5500 GPa: Nonideality and degeneracy effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochalov, M. A., E-mail: postmaster@ifv.vniief.ru; Il’kaev, R. I. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russia Research Institute for Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Mikhailov, A. L.; Blikov, A. O.; Ogorodnikov, V. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russia Research Institute for Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Gryaznov, V. K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics (Russian Federation); Iosilevskii, I. L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    We report on the experimental results on the quasi-isentropic compressibility of a strongly nonideal deuterium plasma that have been obtained on setups of cylindrical and spherical geometries in the pressure range of up to P ≈ 5500 GPa. We describe the characteristics of experimental setups, as well as the methods for the diagnostics and interpretation of the experimental results. The trajectory of metal shells that compress the deuterium plasma was detected using powerful pulsed X-ray sources with a maximal electron energy of up to 60 MeV. The values of the plasma density, which varied from ρ ≈ 0.8 g/cm{sup 3} to ρ ≈ 6 g/cm{sup 3}, which corresponds to pressure P ≈ 5500 GPa (55 Mbar), were determined from the measured value of the shell radius at the instant that it was stopped. The pressure of the compressed plasma was determined using gasdynamic calculations taking into account the actual characteristics of the experimental setups. We have obtained a strongly compressed deuterium plasma in which electron degeneracy effects under the conditions of strong interparticle interaction are significant. The experimental results have been compared with the theoretical models of a strongly nonideal partly degenerate plasma. We have obtained experimental confirmation of the plasma phase transition in the pressure range near 150 GPa (1.5 Mbar), which is in keeping with the conclusion concerning anomaly in the compressibility of the deuterium plasma drawn in [1].

  15. Experimental and theoretical analyses of compression induced muscle damage : aetiological factors in pressure ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuls, R.G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Pressure ulcers form a major problem in health care. They often occur when patients are bedridden, wheelchair bound or wearing prostheses. The ulcers can be very painful for the patient and often lead to prolonged hospitalization. In addition, the huge costs involved with treatment and prevention

  16. Evidence for the Direct Two-Photon Transition from psi to J/psi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. B.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M. B.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Calcaterra, A. C.; Cao, G. F.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, Kun; Liu, Kai; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales, C. Morales; Motzko, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S. P.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Ulrich, M. U.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M. W.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A. Z.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. G.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.

    2012-01-01

    The two-photon transition psi(3686) -> gamma gamma J/psi is studied in a sample of 1.06 x 10(8) psi(3686) decays collected by the BESIII detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (3.1 +/- 0.6(stat)(-1.0)(+0.8)(syst)) x 10(-4) using J/psi -> e(+)e(-) and J/psi -> mu(+)mu(-) decays, and its

  17. Wellhead compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Joe [Sertco Industries, Inc., Okemah, OK (United States); Vazquez, Daniel [Hoerbiger Service Latin America Inc., Deerfield Beach, FL (United States); Jacobs, Denis Richard [Hoerbiger do Brasil Industria de Equipamentos, Cajamar, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Over time, all wells experience a natural decline in oil and gas production. In gas wells, the major problems are liquid loading and low downhole differential pressures which negatively impact total gas production. As a form of artificial lift, wellhead compressors help reduce the tubing pressure resulting in gas velocities above the critical velocity needed to surface water, oil and condensate regaining lost production and increasing recoverable reserves. Best results come from reservoirs with high porosity, high permeability, high initial flow rates, low decline rates and high total cumulative production. In oil wells, excessive annulus gas pressure tends to inhibit both oil and gas production. Wellhead compression packages can provide a cost effective solution to these problems by reducing the system pressure in the tubing or annulus, allowing for an immediate increase in production rates. Wells furthest from the gathering compressor typically benefit the most from wellhead compression due to system pressure drops. Downstream compressors also benefit from higher suction pressures reducing overall compression horsepower requirements. Special care must be taken in selecting the best equipment for these applications. The successful implementation of wellhead compression from an economical standpoint hinges on the testing, installation and operation of the equipment. Key challenges and suggested equipment features designed to combat those challenges and successful case histories throughout Latin America are discussed below.(author)

  18. Proton therapy project at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, K.; Akanuma, A.; Karasawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    Particle radiation which might present steeper dose distribution has received much attention as the third particle facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. Proton conformation with sharp fall-off is considered to be the radiation beam suitable for confining high doses to a target volume without complications and for verifying which factor out of high RBE or physical dose distribution is more essential for local control in malignant tumors. This paper discusses the current status of the spot scanning method, which allows three dimensional conformation radiotherapy, and preliminary results. Preliminary dose distribution with proton conformation technique was acquired by modifying a computer program for treatment planning in pion treatment. In a patient with prostate carcinoma receiving both proton and pion radiation therapy, proton conformation was found to confine high doses to the target area and spare both the bladder and rectum well; and pion therapy was found to deliver non-homogeneous radiation to these organs. Although there are some obstacles in the proton project at PSI, experimental investigations are encouraging. The dynamic spot scanning method with combination of the kicker magnet, wobbler magnet, range shifter, patient transporter, and position sensitive monitor provides highly confined dose distribution, making it possible to increase total doses and thus to improve local control rate. Proton confirmation is considered to be useful for verifying possible biological effectiveness of negative pion treatment of PSI as well. (N.K.)

  19. Flexible and Compressible PEDOT:PSS@Melamine Conductive Sponge Prepared via One-Step Dip Coating as Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor for Human Motion Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yichun; Yang, Jack; Tolle, Charles R; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2018-05-09

    Flexible and wearable pressure sensor may offer convenient, timely, and portable solutions to human motion detection, yet it is a challenge to develop cost-effective materials for pressure sensor with high compressibility and sensitivity. Herein, a cost-efficient and scalable approach is reported to prepare a highly flexible and compressible conductive sponge for piezoresistive pressure sensor. The conductive sponge, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)@melamine sponge (MS), is prepared by one-step dip coating the commercial melamine sponge (MS) in an aqueous dispersion of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). Due to the interconnected porous structure of MS, the conductive PEDOT:PSS@MS has a high compressibility and a stable piezoresistive response at the compressive strain up to 80%, as well as good reproducibility over 1000 cycles. Thereafter, versatile pressure sensors fabricated using the conductive PEDOT:PSS@MS sponges are attached to the different parts of human body; the capabilities of these devices to detect a variety of human motions including speaking, finger bending, elbow bending, and walking are evaluated. Furthermore, prototype tactile sensory array based on these pressure sensors is demonstrated.

  20. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R. [Fusion Science Center and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J. [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred.

  1. X-ray continuum as a measure of pressure and fuel–shell mix in compressed isobaric hydrogen implosion cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Nora, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Pressure, by definition, characterizes the conditions within an isobaric implosion core at peak compression [Gus'kov et al., Nucl. Fusion 16, 957 (1976); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 5257 (2001)] and is a key parameter in quantifying its near-ignition performance [Lawson, Proc. Phys. Soc. London, B 70, 6 (1957); Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010); Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014); and Glenzer et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 056318 (2012)]. At high spectral energy, where the x-ray emission from an imploded hydrogen core is optically thin, the emissivity profile can be inferred from the spatially resolved core emission. This emissivity, which can be modeled accurately under hot-core conditions, is dependent almost entirely on the pressure when measured within a restricted spectral range matched to the temperature range anticipated for the emitting volume. In this way, the hot core pressure at the time of peak emission can be inferred from the measured free-free emissivity profile. The pressure and temperature dependences of the x-ray emissivity and the neutron-production rate explain a simple scaling of the total filtered x-ray emission as a constant power of the total neutron yield for implosions of targets of similar design over a broad range of shell implosion isentropes. This scaling behavior has been seen in implosion simulations and is confirmed by measurements of high-isentrope implosions [Sangster et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056317 (2013)] on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Attributing the excess emission from less-stable, low-isentrope implosions, above the level expected from this neutron-yield scaling, to the higher emissivity of shell carbon mixed into the implosion's central hot spot, the hot-spot “fuel–shell” mix mass can be inferred

  2. Software for X-Ray Images Calculation of Hydrogen Compression Device in Megabar Pressure Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Nikolay; Bykov, Alexander; Pavlov, Valery

    2007-06-01

    Software for x-ray images simulation is described. The software is a part of x-ray method used for investigation of an equation of state of hydrogen in a megabar pressure range. A graphical interface that clearly and simply allows users to input data for x-ray image calculation: properties of the studied device, parameters of the x-ray radiation source, parameters of the x-ray radiation recorder, the experiment geometry; to represent the calculation results and efficiently transmit them to other software for processing. The calculation time is minimized. This makes it possible to perform calculations in a dialogue regime. The software is written in ``MATLAB'' system.

  3. Green technology effect of injection pressure, timing and compression ratio in constant pressure heat addition cycle by an eco-friendly material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikayan, S; Sankaranarayanan, G; Karthikeyan, R

    2015-11-01

    Present energy strategies focus on environmental issues, especially environmental pollution prevention and control by eco-friendly green technologies. This includes, increase in the energy supplies, encouraging cleaner and more efficient energy management, addressing air pollution, greenhouse effect, global warming, and climate change. Biofuels provide the panorama of new fiscal opportunities for people in rural area for meeting their need and also the demand of the local market. Biofuels concern protection of the environment and job creation. Renewable energy sources are self-reliance resources, have the potential in energy management with less emissions of air pollutants. Biofuels are expected to reduce dependability on imported crude oil with connected economic susceptibility, reduce greenhouse gases, other pollutants and invigorate the economy by increasing demand and prices for agricultural products. The use of neat paradise tree oil and induction of eco-friendly material Hydrogen through inlet manifold in a constant pressure heat addition cycle engine (diesel engine) with optimized engine operating parameters such as injection timing, injection pressure and compression ratio. The results shows the heat utilization efficiency for neat vegetable oil is 29% and neat oil with 15% Hydrogen as 33%. The exhaust gas temperature (EGT) for 15% of H2 share as 450°C at full load and the heat release of 80J/deg. crank angle for 15% Hydrogen energy share. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressured Oxy-combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron; Davis, John

    2014-03-31

    The team of Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI) and Thar Energy LLC (Thar) applied technology engineering and economic analysis to evaluate two advanced oxy-combustion power cycles, the Cryogenic Pressurized Oxy-combustion Cycle (CPOC), and the Supercritical Oxy-combustion Cycle. This assessment evaluated the performance and economic cost of the two proposed cycles with carbon capture, and included a technology gap analysis of the proposed technologies to determine the technology readiness level of the cycle and the cycle components. The results of the engineering and economic analysis and the technology gap analysis were used to identify the next steps along the technology development roadmap for the selected cycle. The project objectives, as outlined in the FOA, were 90% CO{sub 2} removal at no more than a 35% increase in cost of electricity (COE) as compared to a Supercritical Pulverized Coal Plant without CO{sub 2} capture. The supercritical oxy-combustion power cycle with 99% carbon capture achieves a COE of $121/MWe. This revised COE represents a 21% reduction in cost as compared to supercritical steam with 90% carbon capture ($137/MWe). However, this represents a 49% increase in the COE over supercritical steam without carbon capture ($80.95/MWe), exceeding the 35% target. The supercritical oxy-combustion cycle with 99% carbon capture achieved a 37.9% HHV plant efficiency (39.3% LHV plant efficiency), when coupling a supercritical oxy-combustion thermal loop to an indirect supercritical CO{sub 2} (sCO{sub 2}) power block. In this configuration, the power block achieved 48% thermal efficiency for turbine inlet conditions of 650°C and 290 atm. Power block efficiencies near 60% are feasible with higher turbine inlet temperatures, however a design tradeoff to limit firing temperature to 650°C was made in order to use austenitic stainless steels for the high temperature pressure vessels and piping and to minimize the need for advanced turbomachinery features

  5. High-pressure compressibility and vibrational properties of (Ca,Mn)CO 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jin; Caracas, Razvan; Fan, Dawei; Bobocioiu, Ema; Zhang, Dongzhou; Mao, Wendy L.

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of potential carbon carriers such as carbonates is critical for our understanding of the deep-carbon cycle and related geological processes within the planet. Here we investigated the high-pressure behavior of (Ca,Mn)CO3 up to 75 GPa by synchrotron single-crystal X-ray diffraction, laser Raman spectroscopy, and theoretical calculations. MnCO3-rich carbonate underwent a structural phase transition from the CaCO3-I structure into the CaCO3-VI structure at 45–48 GPa, while CaCO3-rich carbonate transformed into CaCO3-III and CaCO3-VI at approximately 2 and 15 GPa, respectively. The equation of state and vibrational properties of MnCO3-rich and CaCO3-rich carbonates changed dramatically across the phase transition. The CaCO3-VI-structured CaCO3-rich and MnCO3-rich carbonates were stable at room temperature up to at least 53 and 75 GPa, respectively. The addition of smaller cations (e.g., Mn2+, Mg2+, and Fe2+) can enlarge the stability field of the CaCO3-I phase as well as increase the pressure of the structural transition into the CaCO3-VI phase.

  6. Temperature and pressure dependence of the order parameter fluctuations, conformational compressibility, and the phase diagram of the PEP-PDMS diblock copolymer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwahn, D.; Frielinghaus, H.; Mortensen, K.

    1996-01-01

    The structure factor of a poly(ethylene-propylene)-poly(dimethylsiloxane) diblock copolymer has been measured by small-angle neutron scattering as a function of temperature and pressure. The conformational compressibility exhibits a pronounced maximum at the order-disorder phase transition. The p...

  7. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  8. PSI: Very slow polarized muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    At the 'pion factory' of the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute, a collaboration of PSI, Heidelberg and Zurich (ETH) has recently produced intense beams of positive muons which have kinetic energies as low as 10 eV and with complete polarization (spin orientation). The new results were achieved at a surface muon channel, transporting positive muons from the decay of positive pions stopped at the surface of a pion production target. Surface muons with 4 MeV kinetic energy were transported by a conventional secondary beam channel and partially stopped in a moderator consisting of a layer of solidified noble gas deposited on a cold metallic substrate

  9. Summary of the PSI workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The PSI workshop had been held at JAERI-Naka, from March 15th to 16th, 2002. This workshop is held twice a year as the skull practice session to report the recent progress on the plasma - surface interactions of the experimental reactors such as ITER, JT-60, LHD, etc. and the development of the plasma facing components. There were 34 participants from the university and 18 participants from JAERI and 26 papers were presented. This booklet was published for the purpose of saving a record of this workshop performed in oral lecture form. (author)

  10. Konstruksi Image Psy: Artis Gangnam Style

    OpenAIRE

    Iriany, Rany Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui citra diri Psy setelah secara Internasional terkenal dengan lagu Gangnam Style, yang dikonstruksi dan ditampilkan melalui berbagai teks media. Peneliti menggunakan metode star studies terhadap citra Psy melalui video musik, wawancara dan penampilan di televisi, iklan, berita dalam media cetak dan online, serta pendapat penggemarnya. Psy sebagai seorang penyanyi solo K-Pop, memiliki standarisasi dari segi visual, verbal, dan nonverbal yang berbeda deng...

  11. High Pressure In Situ X-ray Diffraction Study of MnO to 120 GPa and Comparison with Shock Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Takehiko; Kondo, Tadashi; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1997-07-01

    In order to clarify the nature of the phase transformation in MnO observed at around 90 GPa by shock compression experiment (Syono et al., this symposium), high pressure in situ x-ray experiments were carried out up to 120 GPa. Powdered sample was directly compressed in Mao-Bell type diamond anvil and x-ray experiments were carried out using angle dispersive technique by combining synchrotron radiation and imaging plate detector. Distortion of the B1 structured phase into hexagonal unit cell was observed from 25-40 GPa, which continues to increase up to 90 GPa. At around 90 GPa, discontinuous change of the diffraction was observed. This new phase cannot be explained by a simple B2 structure and the analysis of this phase is in progress. This high pressure phase has metallic appearance, which reverses to transparent MnO on release of pressure.

  12. Influence of Pressure Build-Up Time of Compression Chamber on Improving the Operation Frequency of a Single-Piston Hydraulic Free-Piston Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-bo Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A single-piston hydraulic free-piston engine with a two-cylinder four-stroke diesel engine as its driver is introduced. It takes the free-piston assembly a certain time to move after the pressure in the compression chamber starts to increase. The time difference between the pressure increasing and the piston starting to move is defined as the pressure build-up time. The characteristics of the pressure build-up time and its influence on the performance of the free-piston engine are introduced and analyzed. Based on the basic law of dynamics of the free-piston assembly, the parameters which influence the pressure build-up time are analyzed. And then improvement and optimization are proposed to shorten the pressure build-up time.

  13. A hybrid approach to predict the relationship between tablet tensile strength and compaction pressure using analytical powder compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ann-Sofie; Alderborn, Göran

    2018-04-01

    The objective was to present a hybrid approach to predict the strength-pressure relationship (SPR) of tablets using common compression parameters and a single measurement of tablet tensile strength. Experimental SPR were derived for six pharmaceutical powders with brittle and ductile properties and compared to predicted SPR based on a three-stage approach. The prediction was based on the Kawakita b -1 parameter and the in-die Heckel yield stress, an estimate of maximal tensile strength, and a parameter proportionality factor α. Three values of α were used to investigate the influence of the parameter on the SPR. The experimental SPR could satisfactorily be described by the three stage model, however for sodium bicarbonate the tensile strength plateau could not be observed experimentally. The shape of the predicted SPR was to a minor extent influenced by the Kawakita b -1 but the width of the linear region was highly influenced by α. An increased α increased the width of the linear region and thus also the maximal predicted tablet tensile strength. Furthermore, the correspondence between experimental and predicted SPR was influenced by the α value and satisfactory predictions were in general obtained for α = 4.1 indicating the predictive potential of the hybrid approach. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. MacCormack's technique-based pressure reconstruction approach for PIV data in compressible flows with shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shun; Xu, Jinglei; Yu, Kaikai

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes an improved approach for extraction of pressure fields from velocity data, such as obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV), especially for steady compressible flows with strong shocks. The principle of this approach is derived from Navier-Stokes equations, assuming adiabatic condition and neglecting viscosity of flow field boundaries measured by PIV. The computing method is based on MacCormack's technique in computational fluid dynamics. Thus, this approach is called the MacCormack method. Moreover, the MacCormack method is compared with several approaches proposed in previous literature, including the isentropic method, the spatial integration and the Poisson method. The effects of velocity error level and PIV spatial resolution on these approaches are also quantified by using artificial velocity data containing shock waves. The results demonstrate that the MacCormack method has higher reconstruction accuracy than other approaches, and its advantages become more remarkable with shock strengthening. Furthermore, the performance of the MacCormack method is also validated by using synthetic PIV images with an oblique shock wave, confirming the feasibility and advantage of this approach in real PIV experiments. This work is highly significant for the studies on aerospace engineering, especially the outer flow fields of supersonic aircraft and the internal flow fields of ramjets.

  15. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Zhitao [Georgia Tech Research Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0826 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Banishev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana D. [School of Chemical Sciences and Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N., E-mail: naresh.thadhani@mse.gatech.edu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Xiao, Pan [LNM, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Zhou, Min [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  16. Exploration of CdTe quantum dots as mesoscale pressure sensors via time-resolved shock-compression photoluminescent emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Zhitao; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James; Dlott, Dana D.; Lee, Gyuhyon; Scripka, David A.; Breidenich, Jennifer; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N.; Xiao, Pan; Zhou, Min

    2016-01-01

    The nanometer size of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and their unique optical properties, including size-tunable narrow photoluminescent emission, broad absorption, fast photoluminescence decay, and negligible light scattering, are ideal features for spectrally tagging the shock response of localized regions in highly heterogeneous materials such as particulate media. In this work, the time-resolved laser-excited photoluminescence response of QDs to shock-compression was investigated to explore their utilization as mesoscale sensors for pressure measurements and in situ diagnostics during shock loading experiments. Laser-driven shock-compression experiments with steady-state shock pressures ranging from 2.0 to 13 GPa were performed on nanocomposite films of CdTe QDs dispersed in a soft polyvinyl alcohol polymer matrix and in a hard inorganic sodium silicate glass matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescent emission spectroscopy was used to correlate photoluminescence changes with the history of shock pressure and the dynamics of the matrix material surrounding the QDs. The results revealed pressure-induced blueshifts in emitted wavelength, decreases in photoluminescent emission intensity, reductions in peak width, and matrix-dependent response times. Data obtained for these QD response characteristics serve as indicators for their use as possible time-resolved diagnostics of the dynamic shock-compression response of matrix materials in which such QDs are embedded as in situ sensors.

  17. Fabrication and simulation of semi-transparent and flexible PMMA/ATO conductive nanocomposites obtained by compression molding at different temperatures and pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngho Jin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of temperature and pressure on the microstructure and electrical behavior of compression molded and mechanically blended polymer composites. Poly (methyl methacrylate (PMMA and antimony tin oxide (ATO were used as the matrix and conductive filler respectively and the composition was varied from 0 to 1.75 ATO vol %. Mixtures of the two precursor materials were compression molded at temperatures ranging from 150 to 190 °C and pressures ranging from 12 to 50 MPa. It was found that a segregated network microstructure was formed in all cases but that the distribution of the conductive ATO fillers varied as a function of the compression molding temperature and pressure used. The thickness of the specimens, determined by the amount of precursor materials and pressure used during compression molding, was also found to affect the resulting microstructure and concomitant properties. The electrical conductivity of these polymer matrix composites can be increased by up to 2 orders of magnitude by decreasing the processing temperature, while maintaining the processing pressure and the filler concentration constant. On the other hand, the flexibility of PMCs can be improved by increasing the processing temperature. For the compositions evaluated, the maximum electrical conductivity obtained was 5 x 10-3 S/m (about three orders of magnitude lower than the conductivity of the filler. Finite element simulations were used to model this microstructure-driven phase segregated percolation behavior. COMSOL Multiphysics® was used to calculate the electric potential and current density distribution in a 3D geometry. There was good agreement between the experimental and simulation results.

  18. PSI annual report 1995. General volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzmann, M [ed.

    1996-04-01

    The report gives an overview of the PSI`s activities in 1995 in the fields of research: nuclear and particle physics, life sciences, solid state research at large facilities, applied solid state physics, nuclear energy, safety, and general energy research. The theme 1995 of the report deals with the proton therapy at PSI. figs., tabs.

  19. PSI annual report 1995. General volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzmann, M.

    1996-04-01

    The report gives an overview of the PSI's activities in 1995 in the fields of research: nuclear and particle physics, life sciences, solid state research at large facilities, applied solid state physics, nuclear energy, safety, and general energy research. The theme 1995 of the report deals with the proton therapy at PSI. figs., tabs

  20. Interrupting the Psy-Disciplines in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , and beyond to enable reflection and critique of the implications of psy-based knowledge and practice. With chapters by a mixture of established and emerging international scholars in the field this is an interdisciplinary and authoritative study into the role of the psy-disciplines in the education system...

  1. 20 years PSI accelerator. The speeches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This publication contains the text of four papers presented at the occasion of the 20 year Symposium of the PSI accelerator. The papers dealt with the following topics: Scientific research and its dual interaction with industry and with the general public, the history of the PSI accelerator, μ-n-γ investigations on high temperature superconductors, therapy with charged particles. figs., tabs., refs

  2. Coronary perfusion pressure and compression quality in maternal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in supine and left-lateral tilt positions: A prospective, crossover study using mannequins and swine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Satoshi; Ichizuka, Kiyotake; Matsuoka, Ryu; Seo, Kohei; Nagatsuka, Masaaki; Sekizawa, Akihiko

    2017-09-01

    The risk of maternal and fetal mortality is high if cardiopulmonary arrest occurs during pregnancy. To assess the best position for maternal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), a prospective randomized crossover study was undertaken, involving basic life support mannequin-based simulation (BLS-MS) and a swine model of pulseless electrical activity (an unstable cardiac state) incorporating a fetal mannequin (PEA-FM). The BLS-MS (performed by certified rescuers) served to evaluate the quality of chest compressions in 30° left lateral tilt (LLT) and supine positions. Based on a 5-point scale, each rescuer subjectively graded their experience. The PEA-FM model was used to compare coronary perfusion pressure readings during CPR in supine, supine with left uterine displacement, 30° LLT, and 30° right lateral tilt positions. Compression rate and correctness of hand position, compression depth, and recoil were measures of compression quality (BLS-MS). Compared with LLT position, supine position enabled correct hand position (rate: 0.99 vs 0.88; p<0.05) and compression depth (rate: 0.76 vs 0.36; p<0.001) significantly more often. Moreover, BLS-MS rescuers found chest compressions significantly easier to perform with the mannequin in supine (vs LLT) position (difficulty score: 1.75 vs 3.95; p<0.001). In the PEA-FM study arm, supine position with left uterine displacement and right lateral tilt positions had the highest and lowest recorded coronary perfusion pressure readings, respectively. Supine position with left uterine displacement is optimal for maternal CPR. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Consuming an edge: ADHD, stimulant use, and psy culture at the corporate university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Jack; McKinney, Kelly A

    2013-06-01

    We examine "psy" on the college campus. Psy refers to ways of knowing and acting on ourselves that shape everyday life psychologically. We suggest that there is an "elective affinity" between psy and the neoliberal management strategies that now dominate the "corporate university." We describe ways that psy organizes college life by drawing on the history of college health services; interviews about mental health and services at a university in Canada; and historical, social, and media accounts of student mental health and pharmaceutical drug use-both prescribed and not-on campus in the US and Canada. By the 1990s, for the first time, many students were arriving at college as already experienced consumers of psy with diagnoses and prescriptions. We approach this and the increased use of medication as an aspect of the psy-campus. We focus on stimulants, using ADHD to illustrate the blurring line between treatment and enhancement. Students who use stimulants-with or without prescription-do so in the same way: instrumentally in relation to academic demands. The blurred line between academic stress and psychiatric distress is further illustrated by "clinic notes," an institutionalized practice that enables all students to act on academic pressure as a matter of mental health. We describe the links between psy and institutional branding and marketing to illustrate the role of mental health and wellness services in the corporate university.

  4. Impact of external pneumatic compression target inflation pressure on transcriptome-wide RNA expression in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey S; Kephart, Wesley C; Haun, Cody T; McCloskey, Anna E; Shake, Joshua J; Mobley, Christopher B; Goodlett, Michael D; Kavazis, Andreas; Pascoe, David D; Zhang, Lee; Roberts, Michael D

    2016-11-01

    Next-generation RNA sequencing was employed to determine the acute and subchronic impact of peristaltic pulse external pneumatic compression (PEPC) of different target inflation pressures on global gene expression in human vastus lateralis skeletal muscle biopsy samples. Eighteen (N = 18) male participants were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: (1) sham (n = 6), 2) EPC at 30-40 mmHg (LP-EPC; n = 6), and 3) EPC at 70-80 mmHg (MP-EPC; n = 6). One hour treatment with sham/EPC occurred for seven consecutive days. Vastus lateralis skeletal muscle biopsies were performed at baseline (before first treatment; PRE), 1 h following the first treatment (POST1), and 24 h following the last (7th) treatment (POST2). Changes from PRE in gene expression were analyzed via paired comparisons within each group. Genes were filtered to include only those that had an RPKM ≥ 1.0, a fold-change of ≥1.5 and a paired t-test value of <0.01. For the sham condition, two genes at POST1 and one gene at POST2 were significantly altered. For the LP-EPC condition, nine genes were up-regulated and 0 genes were down-regulated at POST1 while 39 genes were up-regulated and one gene down-regulated at POST2. For the MP-EPC condition, two genes were significantly up-regulated and 21 genes were down-regulated at POST1 and 0 genes were altered at POST2. Both LP-EPC and MP-EPC acutely alter skeletal muscle gene expression, though only LP-EPC appeared to affect gene expression with subchronic application. Moreover, the transcriptome response to EPC demonstrated marked heterogeneity (i.e., genes and directionality) with different target inflation pressures. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  5. Anisotropy of linear thermal expansion and compressibility of Y.sub.2./sub.Fe.sub.17./sub. under pressure and its correlation to magnetic structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arnold, Zdeněk; Kamarád, Jiří; Prokhnenko, Olexandr; Ritter, C.; Eto, T.; Honda, F.; Oomi, G.; Garcia-Landa, B.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, - (2002), s. 175-179 ISSN 0895-7959 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0943; GA AV ČR IAA1010018; GA MŠk ME 165 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : intermetallic compounds * pressure effect * compressibility * thermal expansion * magnetic structure Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.414, year: 2002

  6. An advanced analytical solution for pressure build-up during CO2 injection into infinite saline aquifers: The role of compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiqing; Bai, Bing; Li, Xiaochun

    2018-02-01

    Existing analytical or approximate solutions that are appropriate for describing the migration mechanics of CO2 and the evolution of fluid pressure in reservoirs do not consider the high compressibility of CO2, which reduces their calculation accuracy and application value. Therefore, this work first derives a new governing equation that represents the movement of complex fluids in reservoirs, based on the equation of continuity and the generalized Darcy's law. A more rigorous definition of the coefficient of compressibility of fluid is then presented, and a power function model (PFM) that characterizes the relationship between the physical properties of CO2 and the pressure is derived. Meanwhile, to avoid the difficulty of determining the saturation of fluids, a method that directly assumes the average relative permeability of each fluid phase in different fluid domains is proposed, based on the theory of gradual change. An advanced analytical solution is obtained that includes both the partial miscibility and the compressibility of CO2 and brine in evaluating the evolution of fluid pressure by integrating within different regions. Finally, two typical sample analyses are used to verify the reliability, improved nature and universality of this new analytical solution. Based on the physical characteristics and the results calculated for the examples, this work elaborates the concept and basis of partitioning for use in further work.

  7. Flexible and Lightweight Pressure Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotube/Thermoplastic Polyurethane-Aligned Conductive Foam with Superior Compressibility and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenju; Dai, Kun; Zhai, Yue; Liu, Hu; Zhan, Pengfei; Gao, Jiachen; Zheng, Guoqiang; Liu, Chuntai; Shen, Changyu

    2017-12-06

    Flexible and lightweight carbon nanotube (CNT)/thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) conductive foam with a novel aligned porous structure was fabricated. The density of the aligned porous material was as low as 0.123 g·cm -3 . Homogeneous dispersion of CNTs was achieved through the skeleton of the foam, and an ultralow percolation threshold of 0.0023 vol % was obtained. Compared with the disordered foam, mechanical properties of the aligned foam were enhanced and the piezoresistive stability of the flexible foam was improved significantly. The compression strength of the aligned TPU foam increases by 30.7% at the strain of 50%, and the stress of the aligned foam is 22 times that of the disordered foam at the strain of 90%. Importantly, the resistance variation of the aligned foam shows a fascinating linear characteristic under the applied strain until 77%, which would benefit the application of the foam as a desired pressure sensor. During multiple cyclic compression-release measurements, the aligned conductive CNT/TPU foam represents excellent reversibility and reproducibility in terms of resistance. This nice capability benefits from the aligned porous structure composed of ladderlike cells along the orientation direction. Simultaneously, the human motion detections, such as walk, jump, squat, etc. were demonstrated by using our flexible pressure sensor. Because of the lightweight, flexibility, high compressibility, excellent reversibility, and reproducibility of the conductive aligned foam, the present study is capable of providing new insights into the fabrication of a high-performance pressure sensor.

  8. Thermodynamics of aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and methyldiethanolammonium chloride (MDEAH+Cl-) over a wide range of temperature and pressure: Apparent molar volumes, heat capacities, and isothermal compressibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawrylak, B.; Palepu, R.; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2006-01-01

    Apparent molar volumes of aqueous methyldiethanolamine and its salt were determined with platinum vibrating tube densitometers over a range of temperatures from 283K= o , heat capacities C p o , and isothermal compressibilities κ T o . The standard partial molar volumes V o for the neutral amine and its salt show increasingly positive and negative values, respectively, at high temperatures and pressures, as predicted by corresponding states and group additivity arguments. The density model and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) model have been used to represent the temperature and pressure dependence of the standard partial molar properties to yield a full thermodynamic description of the system

  9. Triaxial quasi-static compression and creep behavior of bedded salt from southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, F.D.

    1979-11-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained from a series of triaxial quasi-static compression and creep tests on specimens of bedded salt recovered at depth intervals of 1953 to 1954 and 2711 to 2722 feet in AEC Hole No. 7 in southeastern New Mexico. The primary objective was the determination of the deformational characteristics of the salt for prescribed stress and temperature states under quasi-static and time-dependent conditions. The test conditions encompassed confining pressures of 500 and 2000 psi, differential axial stresses of 1500, 3000 and 4500 psi, temperatures of 23 and 100 0 C, and time durations of several hours to ten days. The data analysis was confined primarily to power law fits to the creep strain-time measurements and to an evaluation of the principal strain ratio behavior for the various test conditions and axial strain magnitudes

  10. Range war: IPALCO's bid for PSI resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studness, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    IPALCO Enterprises Inc. announced a hostile, unsolicited bid to acquire PSI Resources on March 15. IPALCO's bid for PSI is aggressive and well thought out, which befits the strong incentive that it had to take action. Besides topping Cincinnati Gas ampersand Electric's offering price made late last year, IPALCO took the initiative on three other fronts. First, it filed a lawsuit in federal court in Indianapolis to block the merger between PSI and Cincinnati. The suit claims that the proposed merger violates Indiana law and that PSI and Cincinnati have made false and misleading statements about the benefits of their proposed merger. Second, IPALCO announced it will oppose the merger between PSI and Cincinnati in proceedings before Indiana regulators. Third, IPALCO said it plans to nominate a slate of five candidates to stand election for PSI's Board of Directors at the company's annual shareholders meeting this spring. However, these initiatives and IPALCO's accompanying appeal to Hoosier loyality are little more than diversionary tactics. In the final analysis, whether PSI merges with IPALCO or with Cincinnati will depend rather simply on who is willing to make the highest bid

  11. Inclusive J / $\\psi$ Production at D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Christopher R. [Indiana U.

    1995-04-01

    We present results on inclusive $J/\\psi$ and b-quark production in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.8 TeV. The results are based on data collected at the D0 experiment during the 1992-1993 FermiLab collider run. There is excellent agreement between the differential $J/\\psi$ cross section measured at D0 and that measured at the CDF detector. A measurement of the fraction of $J/\\psi$ events due to b-quark decays is presented and we extract from this a measurement of the integrated b-quark cross section. The radiative decays of $_{Xc}$ charmonium states into the $J/\\psi$ is discussed and we present results on the fraction of $J/\\psi$ mesons that are due to $_{Xc}$ decays. We also observe that a fraction of promptly produced $J/\\psi$ mesons is larger than the measured fraction of $J/\\psi$ due to $_{Xc}$ decays and is not accounted for by existing charmonium. production models.

  12. psi and excess leptons in photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritson, D.M.

    1976-03-01

    The A-dependence of psi photoproduction was measured on beryllium and tantalum. From this it is found sigma/sub psi N/ = 2.75 +- 0.90 mb. A study was made of excess leptons relative to pion production in photoproduction. A μ/π ratio of 1.40 +- 0.25 x 10 -4 was found at 20 GeV incident photon energy. The energy dependence of psi photoproduction was determined and appeared to have a ''pseudo-threshold'' at 12 GeV

  13. Effect of component compression on the initial performance of an IPV nickel-hydrogen cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, Randall F.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental method was developed for evaluating the effect of component compression on the charge and discharge voltage characteristics of a 3 1/2 in. diameter boiler plate cell. A standard boiler plate pressure vessel was modified by the addition of a mechanical feedthrough on the bottom of the vessel which permitted different compressions to be applied to the components without disturbing the integrity of the stack. Compression loadings from 0.94 to 27.4 psi were applied by suspending weights from the feedthrough rod. Cell voltages were measured for 0.96-C, 55-min charge and for 1.37-C, 35-min and 2-C, 24-min discharges. An initial change in voltage performance on both charge and discharge as the loading increased was attributed to seating of the components. Subsequent variation of the compression from 2.97 to 27.4 psi caused only minor changes in either the charge or the discharge voltages. Several one month open-circuit voltage stands and 1100 cycles under LEO conditions at the maximum loading have produced no change in performance.

  14. Chest compression with a higher level of pressure support ventilation: effects on secretion removal, hemodynamics, and respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner da Silva Naue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of chest compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation, in comparison with that of aspiration alone, in removing secretions, normalizing hemodynamics, and improving respiratory mechanics in patients on mechanical ventilation. METHODS: This was a randomized crossover clinical trial involving patients on mechanical ventilation for more than 48 h in the ICU of the Porto Alegre Hospital de Clínicas, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Patients were randomized to receive aspiration alone (control group or compression accompanied by a 10-cmH2O increase in baseline inspiratory pressure on pressure support ventilation (intervention group. We measured hemodynamic parameters, respiratory mechanics parameters, and the amount of secretions collected. RESULTS: We included 34 patients. The mean age was 64.2 ± 14.6 years. In comparison with the control group, the intervention group showed a higher median amount of secretions collected (1.9 g vs. 2.3 g; p = 0.004, a greater increase in mean expiratory tidal volume (16 ± 69 mL vs. 56 ± 69 mL; p = 0.018, and a greater increase in mean dynamic compliance (0.1 ± 4.9 cmH2O vs. 2.8 ± 4.5 cmH2O; p = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, chest compression accompanied by an increase in pressure support significantly increased the amount of secretions removed, the expiratory tidal volume, and dynamic compliance. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:NCT01155648 [http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/

  15. The 1996 Radon Intercomparison Exercise at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuler, C.; Butterweck-Dempewolf, G.

    1997-05-01

    The 1996 Radon Intercomparison Exercise at PSI was organized by the PSI Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements. A total of 14 laboratories, companies and institutions participated with radon gas detectors and measuring instruments. The detectors and instruments were exposed in the PSI radon chamber during seven days in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of about 6000 Bqm -3 . Comparison of the results of electret ionization chambers, track etch detectors and measuring instruments with the PSI target value showed the criteria for traceability and reproducibility demanded by the Federal Office for Health for the acknowledgement of Swiss Radon Gas Measurement Laboratories to be fulfilled for all participants. Exposure of track etch detectors stored for more than one year demonstrated that this detector type can suffer sensitivity loss by a too long storage period. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  16. Interrupting the Psy-Disciplines in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to influence education, both regulating and shaping behaviour and morality. The book provides insight into different educational contexts and concerns across a child’s educational lifespan; early childhood education, inclusive education, special education, educational leadership, social media, university......This book offers critical explorations of how the psy-disciplines, Michel Foucault’s collective term for psychiatry, psychology and psycho-analysis, play out in contemporary educational spaces. With a strong focus on Foucault’s theories, it critically investigates how the psy-disciplines continue......, and beyond to enable reflection and critique of the implications of psy-based knowledge and practice. With chapters by a mixture of established and emerging international scholars in the field this is an interdisciplinary and authoritative study into the role of the psy-disciplines in the education system...

  17. Testing J/PSI production mechanisms in B -> J/PSI + X

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, P W; Song, H S

    1999-01-01

    Using the color evaporation model (CEM), we consider the decay rate of B -> J/PSI + X and the polarization of J/PSI therein, and we compare the results with the data and with the predictions by the nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics (NRQCD) approach. In the CEM, we use the input parameter determined from photo/hadro productions of J/PSI, and we find that it is difficult to make the CEM predictions confront with the CLEO data on these observables.

  18. The J/$\\psi$ normal nuclear absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Alessandro, B; Arnaldi, R; Atayan, M; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borges, G; Castanier, C; Castor, J; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Comets, M P; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Grigorian, A A; Grigorian, S; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; kanyan, H; ldzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavicheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Cormick, M M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Riccati, L; Santos, H; Saturnini, P; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, M F; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, E; Villatte, L; Willis, N; Wu T

    2005-01-01

    We present a new determination of the ratio of cross-sections (J/psi) /DY as expected for nucleus-nucleus reactions if J/psi would only be normally absorbed by nuclear matter. This anticipated behaviour is based on proton-nucleus data exclusively, and compared, as a function of centrality, with updated S-U results from experiment NA38 and with the most recent Pb-Pb results from experiment NA50.

  19. The μSR facilities at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abela, R.; Baines, C.; Donath, X.; Herlach, D.; Maden, D.; Reid, I.D.; Renker, D.; Solt, G.; Zimmermann, U.

    1994-01-01

    The μSR Facility Instruments presently available at PSI and the envisaged medium- and long-term developments are presented. The plans focus on further upgrades of the existing instruments and the development of new techniques using the very high fluxes becoming available at PSI, in particular the setup of a beamline with a fast kicker for 'muons on request' (MORE) and the development of very low energy muon beams. (orig.)

  20. PSI-Center Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarboe, Thomas R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Shumlak, Uri [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Hansen, Chris [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Ji, Jeong-Young [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Nelson, Brian [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-04-20

    This is the Final Progress Report of the Plasma Science and Innovation Center (PSI-Center) covering March 2014 through February 2017. The Center has accomplished a great deal during this period. The PSI-Center is organized into four groups: Edge and Dynamic Neutrals; Transport and Kinetic Effects; Equilibrium, Stability, and Kinetic Effects in 3D Topologies; and Interface for Validation. Each group has made good progress and the results from each group are given in detail.

  1. Experience with supermirror production at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeni, P.; Elsenhans, O.; Friedli, H.P.; Grimmer, H.; Anderson, I.S.

    1993-01-01

    Supermirror coatings for the seven neutron guides of the continuous spallation source SINQ at PSI are being produced on a DC-magnetron sputtering plant at PSI since April 1993 at a rate of up to 2 meters of guide per day. All Supermirrors are characterised after production on the test spectrometer TOPSI at reactor Saphir. The more than 300 production runs allow interesting comparisons between coatings made on various types of glasses. (author) 3 figs

  2. PSI life sciences newsletter 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubiger, P.A.

    1989-10-01

    Even as separate institutes, the EIR (Eidg. Institut fuer Reaktorforschung and the SIN (Schweiz. Institut fuer Nuklearforschung) made use of ionizing radiation and radioactivity in medical diagnosis and therapy. After their fusion into a national laboratory, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), these projects were combined with those of the Radiation Protection Group and the Life Sciences Department was formed. In equality with the departments of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Condensed Matter and Materials Sciences, and Energy Research and Engineering Sciences, the department of Life Sciences is one of the major pillars of the new center. The activities are divided into three areas: radiation medicine, radiopharmacy, and radiation protection. The goal of the first two is to develop social and economic uses of radioactivity and elementary particles. The Division of Radiation Medicine proposes to achieve this through the development of original, dynamic and conformal tumor therapy with charged particles and the Division of Radiopharmacy through the investigation into, and the production of, highly specific diagnostic systems for SPECT, PET and MRI and the investigation of the use of radionuclides in therapy. The third division, Radiation Protection, evaluates the risks of ionizing radiation in biology and the ecosphere and proposes adequate protection measures. The present report describes, in the first section, the outstanding scientific results of the past year and, in the second section, gives a progress report on the on-going programs. It is the first report in this style, but it can be considered as a continuation of the earlier Medical Newsletter of SIN. (author) 59 figs., 19 tabs., 61 refs

  3. J/psi physics at BEPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1984-06-01

    J/psi physics is discussed which will be of interest at T > 1988, the period of operation of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider. Emphasis is placed on the gluonic states which are best studied in radiative J/psi decay. The difficulties of these studies are discussed and the need for very high statistics is stressed. In particular it is essential to partial-wave-analyze the hadronic final states produced in J/psi → γX. An estimate using fixed target data suggests that 0(10 8 ) J/psi decays are needed to do an unambiguous partial wave analysis for hadron masses up to about 2 GeV. This requirement is an excellent match to the BEPC design parameters, which imply production of 0(10 8 ) J/psi's per year. With a J/psi production rate an order of magnitude greater than other electron-positron storage rings, BEPC will be a unique world facility for these studies. 58 references

  4. Comparison of efficacy of the intermittent pneumatic compression with a high- and low-pressure application in reducing the lower limbs phlebolymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taradaj J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jakub Taradaj,1 Joanna Rosińczuk,2 Robert Dymarek,2 Tomasz Halski,3 Winfried Schneider4 1Department of Physiotherapy Basics, Academy School of Physical Education in Katowice, Katowice, 2Department of Nervous System Diseases, University of Medicine in Wroclaw, Wroclaw, 3Institute of Physiotherapy, Public Higher Medical Professional School in Opole, Opole, Poland; 4Lymphology Center in Bad Berleburg, Bad Berleburg, Germany Introduction: The primary lymphedema and chronic venous insufficiency present an important medical problem, and effective physical therapeutic methods to treat this problem are still at the search phase. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC of a high- or low-pressure level in the treatment of primary phlebolymphedema of the lower limbs.Methods: The study included 81 patients with chronic venous insufficiency and primary lymphedema of the lower limbs. Group A consisted of 28 patients who underwent a monthly antiedematous therapy including a manual lymphatic drainage, multilayer bandaging, and IPC with the output pressure of 120 mmHg. Group B consisted of 27 patients who underwent the same basic treatment as group A and IPC with the output pressure of 60 mmHg. Group C (control consisted of 26 patients who underwent only a basic treatment – without IPC.Results: After completion of the study, it was found that the greatest reduction of edema occurred in patients who underwent treatment with a pressure of 120 mmHg. The comparison of percentage reduction of edema showed a statistically significant advantage of the group A over groups B and C, both for the changes in the right (P=0.01 and the left limb (P=0.01. Results in patients undergoing intermittent compression of the lower pressure (60 mmHg were similar to those obtained in the control group.Conclusion: The IPC with the pressure of 120 mmHg inside the chambers effectively helps to reduce a phlebolymphedema

  5. Anomalous thermal expansion, negative linear compressibility, and high-pressure phase transition in ZnAu2(CN) 4 : Neutron inelastic scattering and lattice dynamics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mayanak K.; Singh, Baltej; Mittal, Ranjan; Zbiri, Mohamed; Cairns, Andrew B.; Goodwin, Andrew L.; Schober, Helmut; Chaplot, Samrath L.

    2017-12-01

    We present temperature-dependent inelastic-neutron-scattering measurements, accompanied by ab initio calculations of the phonon spectra and elastic properties as a function of pressure to quantitatively explain an unusual combination of negative thermal expansion and negative linear compressibility behavior of ZnAu2(CN) 4 . The mechanism of the negative thermal expansion is identified in terms of specific anharmonic phonon modes that involve bending of the -Zn-NC-Au-CN-Zn- linkage. The soft phonon at the L point at the Brillouin zone boundary quantitatively relates to the high-pressure phase transition at about 2 GPa. The ambient pressure structure is also found to be close to an elastic instability that leads to a weakly first-order transition.

  6. Liquid phase PVTx properties of (water + tert-butanol) binary mixtures at temperatures from 278.15 to 323.15 K and pressures from 0.1 to 100 MPa. II. Molar isothermal compressions, molar isobaric expansions, molar thermal pressure coefficients, and internal pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Gennadiy I.; Makarov, Dmitriy M.; Kolker, Arkadiy M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Molar isothermal compressions and molar isobaric expansions were evaluated. ► Coefficients of thermal pressure and internal pressure were obtained. ► Concentration dependences of coefficients under study display extremes. ► Temperature and pressure dependences of internal pressure of the mixture were linear. -- Abstract: Molar isothermal compressions, molar isobaric expansions, molar coefficients of thermal pressure, and internal pressure were calculated over the whole concentration range of {water (1) + tert-butanol (2)} mixture at pressures from 0.1 to 100 MPa and temperatures from 278.15 to 323.15 K. It was revealed that the extremes, observed on concentration dependences of molar isothermal compression K T,m and molar isobaric expansion E P,m of the mixture, became more pronounced with pressure growth and temperature lowering. Values of molar thermal pressure coefficients of the mixture sharply rose at compositions with small TBA mole fraction and then decreased practically linearly with the alcohol content increasing. Temperature and pressure dependences of the mixture internal pressure were almost linear, and at low TBA concentrations changed significantly from the dependences of water, tert-butanol and their mixtures at large alcohol content

  7. Effect of compression ratio, nozzle opening pressure, engine load, and butanol addition on nanoparticle emissions from a non-road diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Saxena, Mohit Raj; Rai, Piyush; Bhardwaj, Aashish

    2018-05-01

    Currently, diesel engines are more preferred over gasoline engines due to their higher torque output and fuel economy. However, diesel engines confront major challenge of meeting the future stringent emission norms (especially soot particle emissions) while maintaining the same fuel economy. In this study, nanosize range soot particle emission characteristics of a stationary (non-road) diesel engine have been experimentally investigated. Experiments are conducted at a constant speed of 1500 rpm for three compression ratios and nozzle opening pressures at different engine loads. In-cylinder pressure history for 2000 consecutive engine cycles is recorded and averaged data is used for analysis of combustion characteristics. An electrical mobility-based fast particle sizer is used for analyzing particle size and mass distributions of engine exhaust particles at different test conditions. Soot particle distribution from 5 to 1000 nm was recorded. Results show that total particle concentration decreases with an increase in engine operating loads. Moreover, the addition of butanol in the diesel fuel leads to the reduction in soot particle concentration. Regression analysis was also conducted to derive a correlation between combustion parameters and particle number emissions for different compression ratios. Regression analysis shows a strong correlation between cylinder pressure-based combustion parameters and particle number emission.

  8. High pressure in situ X-ray diffraction study of MnO to 137 GPa and comparison with shock compression experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, T.; Kondo, T.; Syono, Y.

    1998-07-01

    In order to clarify the nature of the phase transformation in MnO observed at around 90 GPa by shock compression experiment, high pressure in situ X-ray observations were carried out up to 137 GPa. Powdered sample was directly compressed in Mao-Bell type diamond anvil cell and X-ray experiments were carried out using angle dispersive technique by combining synchrotron radiation and imaging plate detector. Distortion of the B1 structured phase was observed above about 40 GPa, which continues to increase up to 90 GPa. Two discontinuous changes of the diffraction profiles were observed at around 90 GPa and 120 GPa. The nature of the intermediate phase between 90 GPa and 120 GPa is not clear yet. It is neither cesium chloride (B2) nor nickel arsenide (B8) structure. On the other hand, the diffraction profile above 120 GPa can be reasonably well explained by the B8 structure. High pressure phases above 90 GPa have metallic luster and all the transformations are reversible on release of pressure.

  9. 20 years PSI accelerator. The speeches; 20 Jahre PSI-Beschleuniger. Die Festreden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This publication contains the text of four papers presented at the occasion of the 20 year Symposium of the PSI accelerator. The papers dealt with the following topics: Scientific research and its dual interaction with industry and with the general public, the history of the PSI accelerator, {mu}-n-{gamma} investigations on high temperature superconductors, therapy with charged particles. figs., tabs., refs.

  10. Isosymmetric pressure-induced bonding increase changes compression behavior of clinopyroxenes across jadeite-aegirine solid solution in subduction zones: ISOSYMMETRIC PHASE TRANSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jingui [Key Laboratory of High Temperature and High Pressure Study of the Earth' s Interior, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang China; Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawaii USA; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Zhang, Dongzhou [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawaii USA; Fan, Dawei [Key Laboratory of High Temperature and High Pressure Study of the Earth' s Interior, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang China; Downs, Robert T. [Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson Arizona USA; Hu, Yi [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawaii USA; Dera, Przemyslaw K. [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawai' i at Mānoa, Honolulu Hawaii USA

    2017-01-01

    Pyroxenes are among the most important minerals of Earth's crust and upper mantle and play significant role in controlling subduction at convergent margins. In this study, synchrotron-based single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments were carried out on a natural aegirine [NaFe3+Si2O6] sample at ambient temperature and high pressures to 60 GPa, simulating conditions within the coldest part of a subduction zone consisting of old lithosphere. The diffraction data reveal no obvious sign of structural phase transition in aegirine within this pressure range; however, several relevant structural parameter trends change noticeably at approximately 24 GPa, indicating the presence of the previously predicted isosymmetric bonding change, related to increase of coordination number of Na+ at M2 site. The pressure-volume data, fit with third-order Birch-Murnaghan (BM3) equation of state over the whole pressure range, yields KT0 = 126(2) GPa and K'T0 = 3.3(1), while separate BM3 fits performed for the 0–24.0 GPa and 29.9–60.4 GPa pressure ranges give KT0 = 118(3) GPa, K'T0 = 4.2(3) and KT0 = 133(2) GPa, K'T0 = 3.0(1), suggesting that the structure stiffens as a result of the new bond formation. Aegirine exhibits strong anisotropic compression with unit strain axial ratios ε1:ε2:ε3 = 1.00:2.44:1.64. Structural refinements reveal that NaO8 polyhedron is the most compressible and SiO4 tetrahedron has the lowest compressibility. The consequence of bonding transition is that the compressional behavior of aegirine below ~24 GPa and above that pressure is quite different, with likely consequences for relevant thermodynamic parameters and ion diffusion coefficients.

  11. Charmonium spectroscopy from radiative decays of the J/psi and psi'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiser, J.E.

    1982-08-01

    The Crystal Ball NaI(T1) detector was used to study the photon spectra from the following inclusive charmonium decays: e + e - → J/psi → #betta# + hadrons and e + e - → psi' → #betta# + hadrons. Data were collected at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's electron-positron colliding beam machine, SPEAR. The Crystal Ball detector consists of a highly segmented array of 732 NaI(T1) crystals (16 radiation lengths) covering approx. = 98% of 4π steradians, and is used to measure the photon energies, directions, and lateral shower distributions. This detector is excellently suited for studying the radiative transitions among the charmonium family of states: (1) from psi' to the triplet P states, chi(3415), chi (3510), chi(3550); (2) from psi' and J/psi to the singlet S state eta/sub c/(2984); and (3) from psi' to the radially excited singlet S state eta'/sub c/(3592). The analysis of 1.8 x 10 6 psi' and 2.2 x 10 6 J/psi decays yields the following spectrum of states: chi 0 (3418), chi 1 (3512), chi 2 (3558), eta/sub c/(2984), and eta'/sub c/(3592), each with a +-4 meV error on its mass. The branching ratios are measured to be: B(psi' → #betta# chi 0 1 2 ) = (9.9 +- 0.5 +- 0.8)%, (9.0 +- 0.5 +- 0.7)%, and (8.0 +- 0.5 +- 0.7)%, respectively; B(psi' → #betta# eta/sub c/) = 0.28 +- 0.06)% and B(J/psi → #betta# eta/sub c/) = 1.27 +- 0.36)%; and B(psi' → #betta# eta'/sub c/) = (0.5-1.2)% at the 90% confidence level. Values for the natural line widths are obtained: GAMMA(chi 0 1 2 ) = (13.5-20.4) MeV, < 3.8 MeV, (0.85-4.9) MeV, respectively (90% C.L.); GAMMA(eta/sub c/) = 11.5 +4.5/-4.0) MeV; and GAMMA(eta'/sub c/) < 7 MeV (90% C.L.). Cascade product branching ratios B(psi' → #betta# chi/sub J/).B(chi/sub J/ → #betta#J/psi) were measured for J = 1 and 2 to be: (2.56 +- 0.12 +- 0.20)% and (0.99 +- 0.10 +- 0.08)% respectively. No signal was seen for the J = 0 transition

  12. Insights into function of PSI domains from structure of the Met receptor PSI domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, Guennadi; Perreault, Audrey; Schrag, Joseph D.; Park, Morag; Cygler, Miroslaw; Gehring, Kalle; Ekiel, Irena

    2004-01-01

    PSI domains are cysteine-rich modules found in extracellular fragments of hundreds of signaling proteins, including plexins, semaphorins, integrins, and attractins. Here, we report the solution structure of the PSI domain from the human Met receptor, a receptor tyrosine kinase critical for proliferation, motility, and differentiation. The structure represents a cysteine knot with short regions of secondary structure including a three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet and two α-helices. All eight cysteines are involved in disulfide bonds with the pattern consistent with that for the PSI domain from Sema4D. Comparison with the Sema4D structure identifies a structurally conserved core comprising the N-terminal half of the PSI domain. Interestingly, this part links adjacent SEMA and immunoglobulin domains in the Sema4D structure, suggesting that the PSI domain serves as a wedge between propeller and immunoglobulin domains and is responsible for the correct positioning of the ligand-binding site of the receptor

  13. Building Bridges: Psi Chi and International Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes A McCormick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available “How can Psi Chi best partner with international psychologists to expand the honor society world-wide?” This has been an important question since 2009, when the 1,100 chapters of Psi Chi in the United States voted to become “The International Honor Society in Psychology”. This report updates and expands on a unique symposium offered at the 120th meeting of the American Psychological Association in Orlando, Florida, in August of 2012 - the first symposium on the Presidential theme of “Building Bridges” between Psi Chi and international psychology [8]. Here, seven leaders in international psychology in North and South America join to address different aspects of this timely question--with many suggestions on how to “build bridges” to expand Psi Chi globally. It was in part due to this historic symposium that in 2013 Guatemala became the first nation in Latin America, and Russia the first nation in mainland Europe to launch a chapter of Psi Chi.

  14. Thermoeconomic analysis of an integrated multi-effect desalination thermal vapor compression (MED-TVC) system with a trigeneration system using triple-pressure HRSG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaebi, Hadi; Abbaspour, Ghader

    2018-05-01

    In this research, thermoeconomic analysis of a multi-effect desalination thermal vapor compression (MED-TVC) system integrated with a trigeneration system with a gas turbine prime mover is carried out. The integrated system comprises of a compressor, a combustion chamber, a gas turbine, a triple-pressure (low, medium and high pressures) heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) system, an absorption chiller cycle (ACC), and a multi-effect desalination (MED) system. Low pressure steam produced in the HRSG is used to drive absorption chiller cycle, medium pressure is used in desalination system and high pressure superheated steam is used for heating purposes. For thermodynamic and thermoeconomic analysis of the proposed integrated system, Engineering Equation Solver (EES) is used by employing mass, energy, exergy, and cost balance equations for each component of system. The results of the modeling showed that with the new design, the exergy efficiency in the base design will increase to 57.5%. In addition, thermoeconomic analysis revealed that the net power, heating, fresh water and cooling have the highest production cost, respectively.

  15. Effects of compaction pressure and particle shape on the porosity and compression mechanical properties of sintered Ti6Al4V powder compacts for hard tissue implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güden, Mustafa; Celik, Emrah; Hizal, Alpay; Altindiş, Mustafa; Cetiner, Sinan

    2008-05-01

    Sintered Ti6Al4V powder compacts potentially to be used in implant applications were prepared using commercially available spherical and angular powders (100-200 mum) within the porosity range of 34-54%. Cylindrical green powder compacts were cold compacted at various pressures and then sintered at 1200 degrees C for 2 h. The final percent porosity and mean pore sizes were determined as functions of the applied compaction pressure and powder type. The mechanical properties were investigated through compression testing. Results have shown that yield strength of the powder compacts of 40-42% porosity was comparable with that of human cortical bone. As compared with previously investigated Ti powder compacts, Ti6Al4V powder compacts showed higher strength at similar porosity range. Microscopic observations on the failed compact samples revealed that failure occurred primarily by the separation of interparticle bond regions in the planes 45 degrees to the loading axis. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The US proliferation security initiative (PSI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, B.

    2004-01-01

    The proliferation security initiative (PSI), launched by President Bush on May 31, 2003, aims at intercepting any transfer of mass destruction weapons, of their vectors and related equipments, towards or coming from countries or organizations suspected to have a proliferation activity. This initiative, which involves coercive means to fight against proliferation, raises international lawfulness and legal questions, the answers of which are today under construction. This article analyzes the place of the European Union in the PSI, the action means (optimization of existing means, cooperation between intelligence and interception services), and the PSI stakes (lawfulness with respect to the international law, bilateral agreements, draft boarding agreement, sustain of the United Nations, widening of the partnership and of the field of action). (J.S.)

  17. Equations of state and melting curve of boron carbide in the high-pressure range of shock compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molodets, A. M., E-mail: molodets@icp.ac.ru; Golyshev, A. A.; Shakhrai, D. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    We have constructed the equations of state for crystalline boron carbide B{sub 11}C (C–B–C) and its melt under high dynamic and static pressures. A kink on the shock adiabat for boron carbide has been revealed in the pressure range near 100 GPa, and the melting curve with negative curvature in the pressure range 0–120 GPa has been calculated. The results have been used for interpreting the kinks on the shock adiabat for boron carbide in the pressure range of 0–400 GPa.

  18. Effects of air jet duration and timing on the combustion characteristics of high-pressure air jet controlled compression ignition combustion mode in a hybrid pneumatic engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Wuqiang; Meng, Xiangyu; Tian, Jiangping; Tian, Hua; Cui, Jingchen; Feng, Liyan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3-D CFD model of the power cylinder in HPE was developed. • High-pressure air JCCI combustion mode includes two-stage high-temperature reaction. • The combustion phasing of the pre-mixture is controllable via the SOJ timing. • There exists an optimum SOJ timing for obtaining the highest combustion efficiency and shortest burning duration. - Abstract: The high-pressure air jet controlled compression ignition (JCCI) combustion mode was employed to control the premixed diesel compression ignition combustion phasing by using the compound thermodynamic cycle under all operating conditions, which is accomplished in a hybrid pneumatic engine (HPE). A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulation coupled with reduced n-heptane chemical kinetics mechanism has been applied to investigate the effects of high-pressure air jet duration and the start of jet (SOJ) timing on the combustion characteristics in the power cylinder of HPE. By sweeping the high-pressure air jet durations from 6 to 14 °CA and SOJ timings from −12 °CA ATDC to the top dead center (TDC) under the air jet temperatures of 400 and 500 K, respectively, the low- and high-temperature reactions, combustion efficiency, as well as the combustion phasing and burning duration have been analyzed in detail. The results illustrated that a longer air jet duration results in a higher peak in the first-stage high-temperature reaction, and the short air jet duration of 6 °CA can lead to a higher combustion efficiency. The SOJ timing sweep results showed that there exists an optimum timing for obtaining the highest combustion efficiency and shortest burning duration.

  19. Muoproduction of J/psi(3100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, T.W.

    1981-10-01

    Interactions of 209-GeV muons within an instrumented magnetized-steel calorimeter have produced 4374 +- 87 ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/ pairs from J/psi decay, corresponding to the cross section sigma(..mu..N ..-->.. ..mu.. psi X) = 0.64 +- 0.10 nb. These interactions are classified as either elastic (sigma = 0.36 +- 0.07 nb) or inelastic (sigma = 0.28 +- 0.06 nb) based primarily on the calorimetric determination of E/sub X/. The cross section for elastic psi production by virtual photons, sigma/sub eff/(..gamma../sub V/N), rises with energy nu as log nu. Its dependence on Q/sup 2/ fits the vector-meson dominance form P(..lambda..) = (1 + Q/sup 2//..lambda../sup 2/)/sup -2/, with ..lambda.. = (2.0 - 2.4) +- 0.15 GeV, where the spread in values arises from considering the possibility of a Q/sup 2/ dependence in the decay angular distribution W (theta,phi) and in the nuclear shadowing factor. We find that W(theta,phi) is consistent with the form expected if the reaction ..gamma../sub V/N ..-->.. psiN conserves helicity in the s channel through natural-parity exchange in the t channel. After correction for nuclear effects, d sigma/sub eff//dt is described by the sum of two exponential terms in t, with average t slope b = 2.56 (+0.35 or - 0.32). The photon-gluon fusion (..gamma..g ..-->.. psi) perturbative quantum chromodynamic model for psi production provides an excellent description of the nu dependence of sigma/sub eff/, but cannot simultaneously explain the observed cross section and value of ..lambda... The differential cross section d/sup 2/sigma/sub eff//dzdp/sub perpindicular//sup 2/ for inelastically produced psi's rises approximately linearly with elasticity z identical with E/sub psi//nu. The p/sub perpendicular//sup 2/ dependence is flatter than that of d sigma/dt for elastic events, with average p/sub perpendicular//sup 2/ slope b = 1.46 +- 0.10. The Q/sup 2/ dependence of sigma/sub eff/ is that of P(..lambda..) with ..lambda.. = 3.0 +- 0.2 GeV, and

  20. Muonproduction of J/psi(3100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markiewicz, T.W.

    1981-10-01

    Interactions of 209-GeV muons within an instrumented magnetized-steel calorimeter have produced 4374 +- 87 μ + μ - pairs from J/psi decay, corresponding to the cross section sigma(μN → μ psi X) = 0.64 +- 0.10 nb. These interactions are classified as either elastic (sigma = 0.36 +- 0.07 nb) or inelastic (sigma = 0.28 +- 0.06 nb) based primarily on the calorimetric determination of E/sub X/. The cross section for elastic psi production by virtual photons, sigma/sub eff/(γ/sub V/N), rises with energy nu as log nu. Its dependence on Q 2 fits the vector-meson dominance form P(Λ) = (1 + Q 2 /Λ 2 ) -2 , with Λ = (2.0 - 2.4) +- 0.15 GeV, where the spread in values arises from considering the possibility of a Q 2 dependence in the decay angular distribution W (theta,phi) and in the nuclear shadowing factor. We find that W(theta,phi) is consistent with the form expected if the reaction γ/sub V/N → psiN conserves helicity in the s channel through natural-parity exchange in the t channel. After correction for nuclear effects, d sigma/sub eff//dt is described by the sum of two exponential terms in t, with average t slope b = 2.56 (+0.35 or - 0.32). The photon-gluon fusion (γg → psi) perturbative quantum chromodynamic model for psi production provides an excellent description of the nu dependence of sigma/sub eff/, but cannot simultaneously explain the observed cross section and value of Λ. The differential cross section d 2 sigma/sub eff//dzdp/sub perpindicular/ 2 for inelastically produced psi's rises approximately linearly with elasticity z identical with E/sub psi//nu. The p/sub perpendicular/ 2 dependence is flatter than that of d sigma/dt for elastic events, with average p/sub perpendicular/ 2 slope b = 1.46 +- 0.10. The Q 2 dependence of sigma/sub eff/ is that of P(Λ) with Λ = 3.0 +- 0.2 GeV, and the nu dependence is similar to that observed for elastic production. 101 references, 33 figures, 20 tables

  1. Elastic and inelastic psi production by muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, S.C.

    1981-06-01

    Results are presented on the elastic and inelastic production of psi (3.1). The elastic data are qualitative agreement with the predictions of photon-gluon fusion but have a steeper dependence on Q 2 than the model predicts. A QCD calculation accounts well for the shape of the inelastic data in inelasticity, Q 2 and E/sub γ/, but fails to account for the absolute cross section. At 209 GeV, the cross-section for elastic psi production is 0.36 +- 0.07 nb; for inelastic, 0.28 +- 0.06nb

  2. A new technique for obtaining high-resolution pore pressure records in thick claystone aquitards and its use to determine in situ compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura A.; van der Kamp, Garth; Jim Hendry, M.

    2013-02-01

    Laboratory tests are commonly used to determine properties (vertical compressibility, α; specific storage, SS; and vertical hydraulic conductivity, Kv) of claystone aquitards; however, whether data representative of in situ conditions can be obtained from disturbed samples is questionable. Here, we present a method to determine the in situ α and SS of a thick sequence of Cretaceous aged claystone by estimating the loading efficiency (γ) of a formation from pore pressure responses to barometric pressure fluctuations. We installed 10 vibrating wire pressure transducers at different depths (25-325 m below ground) in a thick claystone aquitard by placing them directly within the cement-bentonite grout. Two years of continuous transducer records using this method appeared to provide pore pressure data with a resolution of better than one part in 105, equivalent to millimeter of hydraulic head change. Pore pressure responses to barometric pressure changes, earth tides, and precipitation events can be clearly identified, and the barometric responses can be easily analyzed. The resulting values of γ (0.6-0.93), α (2.5 × 10-7 to 2.2 × 10-6 kPa-1), and SS (2.6 × 10-5 to 4.5 × 10-6 m-1) all decrease with depth. The results are comparable with the limited existing data for in situ estimates of SS and are as much as an order of magnitude smaller than laboratory estimates of SS for similar aquitard deposits. Our findings suggest that the fully grouted transducer method can provide an accurate and reliable means to monitor pore pressure changes and to determine in situ parameters for bedrock aquitard systems.

  3. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  4. Compressibility measurements and phonon spectra of hexagonal transition-metal nitrides at high pressure: ε-TaN, δ-MoN, and Cr2N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soignard, Emmanuel; Shebanova, Olga; McMillan, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    We report compressibility measurements for three transition metal nitrides (ε-TaN, δ-MoN, Cr 2 N) that have structures based on hexagonal arrangements of the metal atoms. The studies were performed using monochromatic synchrotron x-ray diffraction at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell. The three nitride compounds are well-known high hardness materials, and they are found to be highly incompressible. The bulk modulus values measured for ε-TaN, Cr 2 N, and δ-MoN are K 0 =288(6) GPa, 275(23) GPa, and 345(9) GPa, respectively. The data were analyzed using a linearized plot of reduced pressure (F) vs the Eulerian finite strain variable f within a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state formulation. The K 0 ' values for ε-TaN and δ-MoN were 4.7(0.5) and 3.5(0.3), respectively, close to the value of K 0 ' =4 that is typically assumed in fitting compressibility data in equation of state studies using a Birch-Murnaghan equation. However, Cr 2 N was determined to have a much smaller value, K 0 ' =2.0(2.0), indicating a significantly smaller degree of structural stiffening with increased pressure. We also present Raman data for ε-TaN and δ-MoN at high pressure in order to characterize the phonon behavior in these materials. All of the Raman active modes for ε-TaN were identified using polarized spectroscopy. Peaks at low frequency are due to Ta motions, whereas modes at higher wave number contain a large component of N motion. The high frequency modes associated with Ta-N stretching vibrations are more sensitive to compression than the metal displacements occurring at lower wave number. The mode assignments can be generally extended to δ-MoN, that has a much more complex Raman spectrum. The x-ray and Raman data for ε-TaN show evidence for structural disordering occurring above 20 GPa, whereas no such change is observed for δ-MoN

  5. The PSI/ETH tandem accelerator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synal, H.A.; Doebeli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Kubik, P.W.; Nebiker, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The 1996 operation of the PSI/ETH tandem accelerator at ETH Hoenggerberg is summarised with a detailed compilation of the beam time statistics and the statistics of AMS samples for the different radioisotopes and for the major fields of research. (author) 2 tab.

  6. PSI nuclear and particle physics newsletter 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frosch, R.; Furrer, F.

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter contains reports on nuclear and particle physics supported by the F1 division of PSI. Groups were invited to present new preliminary or final results obtained in 1990. As ususal, the contributions were not referred. They should be quoted after consultation with the authors only. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  7. PSI nuclear energy research progress report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    This report gives on overview on the PSI's nuclear energy research in the field of reactor physics and systems, thermal-hydraulics, materials technology and nuclear processes, waste management program and LWR safety program. It contains also papers dealing with reactor safety, high temperature materials, decontamination, radioactive waste management and materials testing. 74 figs., 20 tabs., 256 refs

  8. Application of Television to the PSI Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. E.; Anderson, Lorin W.

    1978-01-01

    The use of television in PSI courses has two advantages: (1) student time involved in learning is comparable with that of students using only written material, and (2) it provides an avenue for learning for those students who prefer auditory learning to written learning. (Author)

  9. Voluntary transmission access: The PSI proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    This article examines a proposal from PSI Energy, Inc. (formerly Public Service Company of Indiana) to allow open access to its power transmission facilities and the response of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's response to that proposal. The topics discussed include transmission tariffs, competition, market share, expansion of transmission capacity and its funding, and reciprocal agreements to provide similar service

  10. Simulation and Damage Analysis of an Accidental Jet Fire in a High-Pressure Compressed Pump Shelter

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Chang Bong; Choi, Sang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background: As one of the most frequently occurring accidents in a chemical plant, a fire accident may occur at any place where transfer or handling of combustible materials is routinely performed. Methods: In particular, a jet fire incident in a chemical plant operated under high pressure may bring severe damage. To review this event numerically, Computational Fluid Dynamics methodology was used to simulate a jet fire at a pipe of a compressor under high pressure. Results: For jet fire...

  11. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David Chen, MD Preventing Pressure Sores Mary Zeigler, MS Transition from ... Rosenberg, PsyD Understanding SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa ...

  12. Pressure correction schemes for compressible flows: application to baro-tropic Navier-Stokes equations and to drift-flux model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaldo, L.

    2007-11-01

    We develop in this PhD thesis a simulation tool for bubbly flows encountered in some late phases of a core-melt accident in pressurized water reactors, when the flow of molten core and vessel structures comes to chemically interact with the concrete of the containment floor. The physical modelling is based on the so-called drift-flux model, consisting of mass balance and momentum balance equations for the mixture (Navier-Stokes equations) and a mass balance equation for the gaseous phase. First, we propose a pressure correction scheme for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations based on mixed non-conforming finite elements. An ad hoc discretization of the advection operator, by a finite volume technique based on a dual mesh, ensures the stability of the velocity prediction step. A priori estimates for the velocity and the pressure yields the existence of the solution. We prove that this scheme is stable, in the sense that the discrete entropy is decreasing. For the conservation equation of the gaseous phase, we build a finite volume discretization which satisfies a discrete maximum principle. From this last property, we deduce the existence and the uniqueness of the discrete solution. Finally, on the basis of these works, a conservative and monotone scheme which is stable in the low Mach number limit, is build for the drift-flux model. This scheme enjoys, moreover, the following property: the algorithm preserves a constant pressure and velocity through moving interfaces between phases (i.e. contact discontinuities of the underlying hyperbolic system). In order to satisfy this property at the discrete level, we build an original pressure correction step which couples the mass balance equation with the transport terms of the gas mass balance equation, the remaining terms of the gas mass balance being taken into account with a splitting method. We prove the existence of a discrete solution for the pressure correction step. Numerical results are presented; they

  13. Measurement of relative branching fractions of B decays to $\\psi(2S)$ and $J/\\psi$ mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    The relative rates of B-meson decays into $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi(2S)$ mesons are measured for the three decay modes in pp collisions recorded with the LHCb detector. The ratios of branching fractions ($\\mathcal{B}$) are measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\begin{array}{lll} \\frac{\\mathcal{B}( B^+ \\to \\psi(2S) K^+)}{\\mathcal{B}( B^+ \\to J/\\psi K^+ )} &=& 0.594 \\pm 0.006 (stat) \\pm 0.016 (syst) \\pm 0.015\\,(R_{\\psi}), \\\\ \\frac{\\mathcal{B}( B^0 \\to \\psi(2S) K^{*0})}{\\mathcal{B}( B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^{*0})} &=& 0.476 \\pm 0.014 (stat) \\pm 0.010 (syst) \\pm 0.012\\,(R_{\\psi}), \\\\ \\frac{\\mathcal{B}^{0}_{s}( B^0_s \\to \\psi(2S)\\phi)}{\\mathcal{B}( B^0_s \\to J/\\psi\\phi)} &=& 0.489 \\pm 0.026 (stat) \\pm 0.021 (syst) \\pm 0.012\\,(R_{\\psi}), \\end{array} \\end{equation*} where the third uncertainty is from the ratio of the $\\psi(2S)$ and $J/\\psi$ branching fractions to $\\mu\\mu$.

  14. Characterizing Excavation Damaged Zone and Stability of Pressurized Lined Rock Caverns for Underground Compressed Air Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Mok; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jeong, Ju-Hwan; Choi, Byung-Hee; Ryu, Dong-Woo; Song, Won-Kyong

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) on the geomechanical performance of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns. We conducted a detailed characterization of the EDZ in rock caverns that have been excavated for a Korean pilot test program on CAES in (concrete) lined rock caverns at shallow depth. The EDZ was characterized by measurements of P- and S-wave velocities and permeability across the EDZ and into undisturbed host rock. Moreover, we constructed an in situ concrete lining model and conducted permeability measurements in boreholes penetrating the concrete, through the EDZ and into the undisturbed host rock. Using the site-specific conditions and the results of the EDZ characterization, we carried out a model simulation to investigate the influence of the EDZ on the CAES performance, in particular related to geomechanical responses and stability. We used a modeling approach including coupled thermodynamic multiphase flow and geomechanics, which was proven to be useful in previous generic CAES studies. Our modeling results showed that the potential for inducing tensile fractures and air leakage through the concrete lining could be substantially reduced if the EDZ around the cavern could be minimized. Moreover, the results showed that the most favorable design for reducing the potential for tensile failure in the lining would be a relatively compliant concrete lining with a tight inner seal, and a relatively stiff (uncompliant) host rock with a minimized EDZ. Because EDZ compliance depends on its compressibility (or modulus) and thickness, care should be taken during drill and blast operations to minimize the damage to the cavern walls.

  15. The development of PSI, ISI technique for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Day-Young; Kwak, Kyung-Jin; Chang, Kee-Ok; Hong, Soon-Shin; Lee, Jong-Po; Chung, Tae-Eon

    1985-01-01

    The analysis and sizing of detect signal is the most essential in PSI/ISI technique. Ultrasonic testing is the most versatile technique, and the knowledge of ultrsonic attenuation of metal component examined by ultrasonic testing is important to evaluate the signal appeared and to size the flaw of the component. Ultrasonic attenuation measurements were made by using the specimens made of AISI 4140 Carbon Steel with different grain size. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were also taken. This report also describes about the principle of multifrequency eddy current test method using two or more operating frequencies simultaneously, and about the simple experiment to read and identify precisely the combined signal caused by more test parameters. It was found that ultrasonic attenuation was increased with increasing grain size and ultrasonic frequency, and yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were decreased with increasing grain size. The results are applicable for ultrasonic testing of carbon steel components as reactor vessel or pressured vessel. The complicated eddy current signal outputs caused by more test parameters and undesirables variables can be identified using multifrequency eddy current test method. It is intended to use multifrequency ECT method for ISI and PSI of steam generator tubes from 1985. (Author)

  16. Injection characteristics study of high-pressure direct injector for Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) using experimental and analytical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Z.; Rahim, MF Abdul; Mamat, R.

    2017-10-01

    The injection characteristics of direct injector affect the mixture formation and combustion processes. In addition, the injector is converted from gasoline operation for CNG application. Thus measurement of CNG direct injector mass flow rate was done by independently tested a single injector on a test bench. The first case investigated the effect of CNG injection pressure and the second case evaluate the effect of pulse-width of injection duration. An analytical model was also developed to predict the mass flow rate of the injector. The injector was operated in a choked condition in both the experiments and simulation studies. In case 1, it was shown that mass flow rate through the injector is affected by injection pressure linearly. Based on the tested injection pressure of 20 bar to 60 bar, the resultant mass flow rate are in the range of 0.4 g/s to 1.2 g/s which are met with theoretical flow rate required by the engine. However, in Case 2, it was demonstrated that the average mass flow rate at short injection durations is lower than recorded in Case 1. At injection pressure of 50 bar, the average mass flow rate for Case 2 and Case 1 are 0.7 g/s and 1.1 g/s respectively. Also, the measured mass flow rate at short injection duration showing a fluctuating data in the range of 0.2 g/s - 1.3 g/s without any noticeable trends. The injector model able to predict the trend of the mass flow rate at different injection pressure but unable to track the fluctuating trend at short injection duration.

  17. Study of J/psi -> p(p)over-bar and J/psi -> n(n)over-bar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Bytev, V.; Cai, X.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Feng, C. Q.; Ferroli, R. B.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y. P.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jia, L. K.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jing, F. F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kuehn, W.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, N. B.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S. L.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, X. R.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Liao, X. T.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, C. Y.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, H. W.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Kai; Liu, Kun; Liu, P. L.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Q. W.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, C. L.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, H.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Morales, C. Morales; Motzko, C.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Nefedov, Y.; Nicholson, C.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Park, J. W.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prencipe, E.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schulze, J.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, D. H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. D.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tian, H. L.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. Q.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, Q. G.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, S. X.; Wu, W.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, G. M.; Xu, H.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, X. P.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z. R.; Xue, F.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, T.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. G.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, T. R.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, K. X.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zheng, Z. P.; Zhong, B.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhu, C.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, X. W.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Zuo, J. X.

    2012-01-01

    The decays J/psi -> p (p) over bar and J/psi -> n (n) over bar have been investigated with a sample of 225.2 x 10(6) J/psi events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e(+)e(-) collider. The branching fractions are determined to be B(J/psi -> p (p) over bar) = (2.112 +/- 0.004 +/- 0.031 x

  18. 30 CFR 75.1730 - Compressed air; general; compressed air systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air; general; compressed air systems... Compressed air; general; compressed air systems. (a) All pressure vessels shall be constructed, installed... Safety and Health district office. (b) Compressors and compressed-air receivers shall be equipped with...

  19. The process of isothermal compression of gasses at sub-atmospheric pressures through regulated water injection in Braysson cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiou, Demos P.; Xenos, Triantafyllos

    2011-01-01

    Although the Braysson cycle constitutes the ideal limit for the Combined Cycle Power Plants, its actual implementation has not been achieved due to the difficulty in building the required isothermal compressor. The present study proposes the incorporation of regulated water injection during the final compression, which could maintain the temperature constant due to the evaporation. The analysis for the thermodynamic implications of the injection on the ideal version of the Braysson cycle indicates that the (ideal cycle) efficiency reduction will be minimal. The study provides an analysis for the water injection rate that will permit such a process and shows that the additional work needed to drive the process will not be affected significantly by the injection. In addition, it shows that the minimum temperature of the Braysson cycle will be lower than the corresponding level of the conventional (Gas-Steam turbine Combined cycle plants), something that could improve the efficiency as well. Finally it shows that the process may be expressed by a polytropic relationship of the type pv β = constant, where β ∼ 1.06.

  20. PSI nuclear energy research progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, H.P.; Wiedemann, K.H.

    1989-07-01

    The progress report at hand deals with nuclear energy research at PSI. The collection of articles covers a large number of topics: different reactor systems, part of the fuel cycle, the behaviour of structural materials. Examples of the state of knowledege in different disciplines are given: reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics, heat transfer, fracture mechanics, instrumental analysis, mathematical modelling. The purpose of this collection is to give a fair account of nuclear energy research at PSI. It should demonstrate that nuclear energy research is a central activity also in the new institute, the scientific basis for the continuing exploitation of nuclear power in Switzerland is preserved, work has continued not only along established lines but also new research topics were tackled, the quality of work corresponds to international standards and in selected areas is in the forefront, the expertise acquired also finds applications in non-nuclear research tasks. (author) 92 figs., 18 tabs., 316 refs

  1. PSI nuclear and particle physics newsletter 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frosch, R.; Furrer, F.

    1990-01-01

    The present newsletter contains reports on nuclear and particle physics supported by the F1 division of PSI. Groups were invited to present new preliminary or final results obtained in 1989. As usual there has been no refereeing. The contributions must not be quoted without previous consultation with the authors. Spokespersons are indicated by superscripts 'S' following their names in the headings of the contributions. (author) 85 figs., 10 tabs., 307 refs

  2. PSI nuclear and particle physics newsletter 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frosch, R.; Furrer, F.

    1989-01-01

    The present Newsletter contains reports on nuclear and particle physics supported by the F1 division of PSI. Groups were invited to present new preliminary or final results obtained in 1989. As usual there has been no refereeing. The contributions must not be quoted without previous consultation with the authors. Spokespersons are indicated by superscripts 'S' following their names in the headings of the contributions. (author) 65 figs., 9 tabs., 189 refs

  3. Long term testing of PSI-membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huslage, J; Brack, H P; Geiger, F; Buechi, F N; Tsukada, A; Scherer, G G [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Long term tests of PSI membranes based on radiation-grafted FEP and ETFE films were carried out and FEP-based membranes were evaluated by monitoring the in-situ membrane area resistance measured by a current pulse method. By modifying our irradiation procedure and using the double crosslinking concept we obtain reproducible membrane cell lifetimes (in term of in-situ membrane resistance) of greater than 5000 hours at 60-65{sup o}C. Preliminary tests at 80-85{sup o}C with lifetimes of greater than 2500 demonstrate the potential long term stability of PSI proton exchange membranes based on FEP over the whole operating temperature range of low-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Radiation grafted PSI membranes based on ETFE have better mechanical properties than those of the FEP membranes. Mechanical properties are particularly important in large area cells and fuel cell stacks. ETFE membranes have been tested successfully for approximately 1000 h in a 2-cell stack (100 cm{sup 2} active area each cell). (author) 4 figs., 4 refs.

  4. Decays of J/psi (3100) to baryon final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, M.W.

    1982-05-01

    We present results for the decays of psi(3100) into baryon and hyperon final states. The sample studied here consists of 1.3 million produced psi decays. The decays into nonstrange baryons agree well with currently established results, but with better statistics. In addition, significant resonance formation in multibody final states is observed. The decay psi → anti ppγ, the first direct photon decay of the psi involving baryons in the final state, is presented and the theoretical implications of the decays are briefly explored. Several new decays of the psi involving strange baryons are explored, including the first observations of three body final states involving hyperons. The I-spin symmetry of the strong decay psi → baryons has clearly been observed. The reduced matrix elements for psi → B anti B are presented for final states of different SU(3) content. The B 8 anti B 8 results are in excellent agreement with the psi being an SU(3) singlet as are the results for psi → B 10 anti B 10 . We present the first evidence for the SU(3) violating decays of the type psi → B 8 anti B 10 + c.c.. Angular distributions for psi → B 8 anti B 8 are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Statistics are limited, but the data tends to prefer other than a 1 + Cos 2 theta distribution

  5. Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is sponsored jointly by Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology, and the APA. The award is presented annually to the psychology graduate student who submits the best research paper that was published or presented at a national, regional, or state psychological association conference during the past calendar year. The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and APA. Members of the 2016 Edwin B. Newman Award Committee were Shawn Carlton, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Christina Frederick-Recascino, PhD; John Norcross, PhD, APA representative; Karenna Malavanti, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Steven Kohn, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Warren Fass, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Chris Lovelace, PhD, Psi Chi representative; and Cathy Epkins, PhD, APA representative. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Measurement of inelastic J/{psi} and {psi}' photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Physics; Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Abt, I. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L. [AGH-Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science] [and others; Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration

    2012-11-15

    The cross sections for inelastic photoproduction of J/{psi} and {psi}' mesons have been measured in ep collisions with the ZEUS detector at HERA, using an integrated luminosity of 468 pb{sup -1} collected in the period 1996-2007. The {psi}' to J/{psi} cross section ratio was measured in the range 0.55psi} cross sections were measured for 0.11 GeV. Theoretical predictions within the non-relativistic QCD framework including NLO colour-singlet and colour-octet contributions were compared to the data, as were predictions based on the k{sub T}-factorisation approach.

  7. Charmonium spectroscopy from inclusive psi' and J/psi radiative decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiser, J.E.; Bloom, E.; Bulos, F.

    1986-01-01

    Results from a detailed study using the Crystal Ball detector at the SLAC e + e - storage ring SPEAR of the inclusive photon spectra from 1.8 x 10 6 psi' and 2.2 x 10 6 J/psi decays are presented. Radiative transitions from the psi' to the chi/sub 2,1,0/ states are observed with photon energies of 126.0 +- 0.2 +- 4, 169.6 +- 0.3 +- 4, and 258.4 +- 0.4 +- 4 MeV and branching ratios B(psi'→γchi/sub 2,1,0/) = (8.0 +- 0.5 +- 0.7)%, (9.0 +- 0.5 +- 0.7)%, and (9.9 +- 0.5 +- 0.8)%, respectively. Values for the natural linewidths of the chi states are obtained: GAMMA(chi/sub 2,1,0/) = 0.8--4.9, <3.8, and 13--21 MeV, respectively (90% C.L.). Improved values are found for the branching ratios B(psi'→γeta/sub c/) = (0.28 +- 0.06)% and B(J/psi→γeta/sub c/) = (1.27 +- 0.36)%, and for the natural width GAMMA(eta/sub c/) = 11.5 +- 4.5 MeV

  8. A micro-gas phase chromatography with a re-compression system used to measure impurities in low pressure tritiated gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godot, A.; Colas, S.; Hubinois, J.C. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2008-07-15

    The measurement of the amount of impurities in tritiated gases can be achieved by means of mass spectrometry or gas phase chromatography. A growing number of disadvantages associated to the 'life expectancy' of the mass spectrometer and its tricky maintenance (when enclosed in a gloves box) have led us to acquire a micro gas phase chromatograph. This device is based on a modular concept with the injector, the column and the detector packed in a compact unit which is easy to replace. Thanks to constant improvement in the field of capillary column, new micro chromatographs are now able to perform measurement in absence of pre-column and presence of argon instead of nitrogen as a carrier gas. Of importance, this new apparatus allow better performances (running time: 1 m 30 sec, limit of detection: {<=}10 ppm). However, in normal use, this apparatus requires 800 milli-bar in the inlet, a pressure that doesn't match with the feature of our process gas. To overcome this inconvenience, we have developed an automatic functioning system with a bellows that samples and compresses the gas to pressures compatible with the micro gas chromatograph. The apparatus and the experimental procedures will be presented as well as experimental performances (reproducibility, detection limits..) for some impurities such as nitrogen, oxygen and helium. (authors)

  9. Observation of B+ -> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-) and B+ -> psi (2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) decays

    OpenAIRE

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M. H.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A. Jr; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The decays B+-> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-) and B+ -> psi(2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) are observed for the first time using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment in proton- proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The branching fractions relative to that of B+ -> psi(2S)K+ are measured to be B(B+-> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-))/B(B+ -> psi (2S)K+) = (1.88 +/- 0.17 +/- 0.09)x10(-2). B(B+ -> psi(2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-))/B(B+ -> psi (2...

  10. Using neutrons to measure keV temperatures in highly compressed plastic at multi-Gbar pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, J.; Bachmann, B.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Hatarik, R.; Döppner, T.; Swift, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Collins, G. W.; Falcone, R. W.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kraus, D.; Landen, O. L.; Kritcher, A. L.

    2016-12-01

    We have designed an experiment for the National Ignition Facility to measure the Hugoniot of materials such as plastic at extreme pressures. The design employs a strong spherically converging shock launched through a solid ball of material using a hohlraum radiation drive. The shock front conditions can be characterized using X-ray radiography until background from shock coalescence overtakes the backlit signal. Shock coalescence at the center is predicted to reach tens of Gbars and can be further characterized by measuring the X-ray self-emission and 2.45 MeV neutrons emitted from the shock flash region. In this simulation design work the standard plastic sphere is replaced with a deuterated polyethylene sphere, CD2, that reaches sufficiently high densities and temperatures in the central hot spot to produce neutrons from Deuterium-Deuterium (DD) fusion reactions that can be measured by a neutron time of flight spectrometer (nTOF) and act as a temperature diagnostic. This paper focuses on the design of these experiments, based on an extensive suite of radiation-hydrodynamics simulations, and the interpretation of the predicted DD neutron signals. The simulations predict mean temperatures of 1 keV in the central hot spot with mean densities of 33 g/cc and mean pressures of 25 Gbar. A preliminary comparison with early experimental results looks promising with an average ion temperature of 1.06 ± 0.15 keV in the central hot spot estimated from the nTOF spectral width and measured neutron yield of 7.0 (±0.5) × 109 DD neutrons.

  11. The PSI family of nuclear proteins is required for growth in arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stührwohldt, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Dahlke, Renate I; Oecking, Claudia; Sauter, Margret

    2014-10-01

    PSI1 was identified as a gene that is co-expressed with the phytosulfokine (PSK) receptor genes PSKR1 and PSKR2 in Arabidopsis thaliana. It represents a plant-specific protein family of unknown function with six members in two clades. Clade 1 members PSI1, PSI2 and PSI3 were characterized in this study. All three are nuclear localized. A predicted N-terminal myristoylation site was functionally analyzed. psi1-1 seedlings have shorter roots and hypocotyls. This growth-retarded phenotype was restored by expression of either wildtype PSI1 or PSI1 G2A with a mutated myristate attachment site in the psi1-1 background suggesting that myristate attachment was not essential for PSI1 function. psi2-1 and psi3-1 seedlings have a wildtype phenotype but overexpression of PSI1 or PSI2 promoted seedling growth. PSI2 activity appears to be linked to PSK signaling as psi2-1 and psi2-1 psi3-1 roots are unresponsive to PSK. PSI3 functions in vegetative plant growth synergistic with PSI2. psi3-1 and particularly psi2-1 psi3-1 rosettes are small. Overexpression of PSI3 promoted plant growth indicating that PSI3 is limiting at the vegetative stage. Severe dwarfism of psi2-1 psi3-1 plants results from reduced cell growth and proliferation and premature leaf growth arrest. Plants further display reduced fertility and premature senescence revealing a crucial function of PSI proteins in vegetative growth and reproduction. Psi single and double knock-out plants have less and PSI3ox plants have more starch compared to wt and growth retardation is partially rescued by sucrose. Our studies reveal a crucial function of the nuclear-localized PSI proteins in growth possibly through metabolic control.

  12. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-22

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  13. Compression stockings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call your health insurance or prescription plan: Find out if they pay for compression stockings. Ask if your durable medical equipment benefit pays for compression stockings. Get a prescription from your doctor. Find a medical equipment store where they can ...

  14. Experimental Status Of $J/\\psi$ Suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Kluberg, L; Alessandro, B; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Astruc, J; Atayan, M; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, M; Bellaiche, F; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Bussière, A; Capelli,L; Capony, V; Casagrande, L; Castor, J; Chambon, T; Chaurand, B; Chevrot, I; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Comets, M P; Constans, N; Constantinescu, S; Cruz, J; De Falco, A; De Marco, N; Dellacasa, G; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Ducroux, L; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Filippov, S N; Fleuret, F; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Y K; Gerschel, C; Giubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanyan, H; Hakobyan, R; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenrço, C; Macciotta, P; Mac Cormick, M; Marzari- Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Mehrabyan, S; Monteno, M; Mourgues, S; Musso, A; Ohlsson-Malek, F; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Prado da Silva, W L; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Racca, C; Ramello, L; Ramos, S; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Ropotar, I; Saturnini, P; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Silva, S; Sitta, M; Soave, C; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, E; Villatte, L; Willis, N

    2001-01-01

    The most recent results obtained by experiment NA50 show that the $J /\\psi$ cross-section per nucleon-nucleon collision in semi-peripheral Pb-Pb reactions is "normally" suppressed in the sense that it follows the trend already observed from p-p and up to the most central S-U reactions. A clear change of behaviour is observed for more central Pb-Pb collisions which could be due to the transition of normal nuclear matter to its predicted Quark-Gluon Plasma state

  15. Charmonium spectroscopy from inclusive photons in J/psi and psi' decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaiser, J.E.

    1982-03-01

    Comparing our precise measurements for the E1 transitions psi' → γ chi/sub J/ with theory has underscored the importance of including (i) spin and relativistic corrections, (ii) variations in the 2P and 1S wave function shapes resulting from corrections, and (iii) coupling to closed and open decay channels. Considering our best measured total widths, i.e., GAMMA/sub tot/(eta/sub c) and GAMMA/sub tot(chi/sub o/), it appears that higher order QCD corrections are important and large. Our measurements for the E1 rates chi/sub J/ → γ J/sub psi/ suffer from the large errors in GAMMA/sub tot/(chi/sub J/); our best value is for GAMMA(chi/sub o/ → γ J/psi), and the agreement here is slightly better with the corrected theories. Both the potential models and the lowest order QCD derived predictions are capable of consistency with our observed HFS, although QCD radiative corrections appear to go in the wrong direction (less splitting than measured). For the best measured M1 allowed pseudoscalar transition, J/psi → γ eta/sub c/, the naive potential model and dispersion theory predictions are roughly a factor of 2 large. Perhaps corrections to the M1 formula are important

  16. Observation of B-meson decay into J/psi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, H.; Binder, U.; Harder, G.; Lembke-Koppitz, I.; Philipp, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schroeder, H.; Schulz, H.D.; Wurth, R.; Drescher, H.; Graewe, B.; Matthiesen, U.; Scheck, H.; Spengler, J.; Wegener, D.; Edwards, K.W.; Kapitza, H.; Yun, J.C.; Frisken, W.R.; Fukunaga, C.; Goddard, M.; Gilkinson, D.J.; Gingrich, D.M.; Kim, P.C.H.; Kutschke, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; McKenna, J.A.; Orr, R.S.; Padley, P.; Prentice, J.D.; Seywerd, H.C.J.; Stacey, B.J.; Yoon, T.S.; Ammar, R.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kanekal, S.; Kwak, N.; Kernel, G.; Plesko, M.; Childers, R.; Darden, C.W.; Gennow, H.

    1985-07-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, we have observed the colour suppressed decay B->J/psiX, with a branching ratio of (1.37(+0.6-0.5))% for the mixture of charged and neutral B's produced on the Y(4S). From the momentum distribution of the J/psi we conclude that Br(B->J/psiX) 2 . (orig.)

  17. Investigation of spray characteristics from a low-pressure common rail injector for use in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kihyung; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2004-03-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion provides extremely low levels of pollutant emissions, and thus is an attractive alternative for future IC engines. In order to achieve a uniform mixture distribution within the engine cylinder, the characteristics of the fuel spray play an important role in the HCCI engine concept. It is well known that high-pressure common rail injection systems, mainly used in diesel engines, achieve poor mixture formation because of the possibility of direct fuel impingement on the combustion chamber surfaces. This paper describes spray characteristics of a low-pressure common rail injector which is intended for use in an HCCI engine. Optical diagnostics including laser diffraction and phase Doppler methods, and high-speed camera photography, were applied to measure the spray drop diameter and to investigate the spray development process. The drop sizing results of the laser diffraction method were compared with those of a phase Doppler particle analyser (PDPA) to validate the accuracy of the experiments. In addition, the effect of fuel properties on the spray characteristics was investigated using n-heptane, Stoddard solvent (gasoline surrogate) and diesel fuel because HCCI combustion is sensitive to the fuel composition. The results show that the injector forms a hollow-cone sheet spray rather than a liquid jet, and the atomization efficiency is high (small droplets are produced). The droplet SMD ranged from 15 to 30 µm. The spray break-up characteristics were found to depend on the fuel properties. The break-up time for n-heptane is shorter and the drop SMD is smaller than that of Stoddard solvent and diesel fuel.

  18. Elastic J/Psi Production at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Cross sections for elastic production of J/Psi mesons in photoproduction and electroproduction are measured in electron proton collisions at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 55 pb^{-1}. Results are presented for photon virtualities Q^2 up to 80 GeV^2. The dependence on the photon-proton centre of mass energy W_{gamma p} is analysed in the range 40 < \\Wgp < 305 GeV in photoproduction and 40 < \\Wgp < 160 GeV in electroproduction. The \\Wgp dependences of the cross sections do not change significantly with Q^2 and can be described by models based on perturbative QCD. Within such models, the data show a high sensitivity to the gluon density of the proton in the domain of low Bjorken x and low Q^2. Differential cross sections d\\sigma/dt, where t is the squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex, are measured in the range |t|<1.2 GeV^2 as functions of \\Wgp and Q^2. Effective Pomeron trajectories are determined for photoproduction and electroproduction. The J/Psi production and decay ang...

  19. Compressed liquid densities and excess molar volumes for (CO2 + 1-pentanol) binary system at temperatures from 313 to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel; Galicia-Luna, Luis A.; Sandler, Stanley I.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of compressed liquid densities for 1-pentanol and for {CO 2 (1) + 1-pentanol (2)} system were carried out at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa. Densities were measured for binary mixtures at 10 different compositions, x 1 = 0.0816, 0.1347, 0.3624, 0.4651, 0.6054, 0.7274, 0.8067, 0.8573, 0.9216, and 0.9757. A vibrating tube densimeter was used to perform density measurements using two reference calibration fluids. The uncertainty is estimated to be better than ±0.2 kg . m -3 for the experimental density measurements. For each mixture and for 1-pentanol, the experimental densities were correlated using an explicit volume equation of six parameters and an 11-parameter equation of state (EoS). Excess molar volumes were determined for the (CO 2 + 1-pentanol) system using 1-pentanol densities calculated from the 11-parameter EoS and CO 2 densities calculated from a multiparameter reference EoS

  20. Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles involved in malarial peptide bonds determine sterile protective immunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@gmail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Bermudez, Adriana [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles determine sterile protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified peptide's tendency to assume a regular conformation related to a PPII{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural modifications in mHABPs induce Ab and protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mHABP backbone atom's interaction with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} is stabilised by H-bonds. -- Abstract: Modified HABP (mHABP) regions interacting with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules have a more restricted conformation and/or sequence than other mHABPs which do not fit perfectly into their peptide binding regions (PBR) and do not induce an acceptable immune response due to the critical role of their {Phi} and {Psi} torsion angles. These angle's critical role was determined in such highly immunogenic, protection-inducing response against experimental malaria using the conformers (mHABPs) obtained by {sup 1}H-NMR and superimposed into HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator }-like Aotus monkey molecules; their phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles were measured and the H-bond formation between these molecules was evaluated. The aforementioned mHABP propensity to assume a regular conformation similar to a left-handed polyproline type II helix (PPII{sub L}) led to suggesting that favouring these conformations according to their amino acid sequence would lead to high antibody titre production and sterile protective immunity induction against malaria, thereby adding new principles or rules for vaccine development, malaria being one of them.

  1. [Study of setting of ventilator volume tidal and airway pressure alarm threshold with continuous extra-sternum heart compression in cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jian-yu; Wang, Xiao-yuan; Cai, Tian-bin; Jiang, Wen-fang

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the setting of ventilator volume tidal (VT) and airway pressure alarm threshold during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by continuous extra-sternum heart compression. Forty cases with respiration and cardiac arrest in the department of critical care medicine were randomly divided into low VT ventilation group and conventional VT group. Both groups were given the volume control mode. In the low VT ventilation group, VT was set on 6 - 7 ml/kg, and high pressure alarm threshold was adjusted to 60 cm H2O by the conventional 40 cm H2O during CPR. In the conventional VT group, VT and high pressure alarm threshold were set at 8 - 12 ml/kg and 40 cm H2O, respectively. Real-time actual VT, peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), and arterial blood gas test, blood lactic acid at 10 minutes and 30 minutes after CPR were observed. At 10 minutes after CPR, in the low VT ventilation group, arterial blood pH, arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), HCO3(-), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and blood lactic acid were better as compared with those in the conventional VT ventilation group (pH: 7.21±0.09 vs. 7.13±0.07, PaO2: 45.35±5.92 mm Hg vs. 40.70±4.70 mm Hg, PaCO2: 57.10±7.59 mm Hg vs. 61.60±5.47 mm Hg, HCO3(-): 18.50±3.50 mmol/L vs. 14.75±2.65 mmol/L, SaO2: 0.796±0.069 vs. 0.699±0.066, blood lactic acid: 7.07±1.60 mmol/L vs. 8.13±1.56 mmol/L, all P<0.05). The success rate of resuscitation in the low VT ventilation group was higher than that of the conventional VT ventilation group (45% vs. 15%, P<0.05), and PIP (cm H2O) of low VT ventilation group was lower than that of the conventional VT group (37.25±7.99 cm H2O vs. 42.70±7.40 cm H2O, P<0.05). In all the patients in both groups barotrauma did not occur. The strategy of low ventilator VT (6 - 7 ml/kg) with appropriate elevation of airway pressure alarm threshold was better than that of conventional ventilation setting, with no increase in

  2. Psy-disciplinary cogs in the teacher education machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Eva Bendix; Millei, Zsuzsa

    2015-01-01

    set out to explore how the psy- disciplines currently manifest and operate as significant cogs in the teacher education machine. Responding to Law and Urry’s (2004) call for a more “messy” social science, we offer an impressionistic assemblage ethnography, where we pick up and consider the psy...... -disciplinary cogs that we happen upon in our everyday lives as lecturers in Australian initial teacher education. We offer an incomplete list of some of these cogs, and indicate the ways in which they uphold psy-disciplinary knowledges, and the psy- gaze, as relevant and significant. We conclude by reflecting...

  3. Effect of elastic deformation and the magnetic field on the electrical conductivity of p-Si crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lys, R.; Pavlyk, B.; Didyk, R.; Shykorjak, J.; Karbovnyk, I.

    2018-03-01

    It is shown that at a deformation rate of 0.41 kg/min, the characteristic feature of the dependence of the surface resistance of the p-Si sample on the magnitude of its elastic deformation (R(σ)) is the reduction of the resistance during compression and unclamping. With the increase in the number of "compression-unclamping" cycles, the difference between the positions of the compression and unclamping curves decreases. The transformation of two types of magnetically sensitive defects occurs under the impact of a magnetic field on p-Si crystals. The defects are interrelated with two factors that cause the mutually opposite influence on the conductivity of the crystal. The first factor is that the action of the magnetic field decreases the activation energy of the dislocation holders, which leads to an increase in the electrical conductivity of the sample. The second factor is that due to the decay of molecules of oxygen-containing impurities in the magnetic field, the stable chemisorption bonds appear in the crystal that leads to a decrease in its conductivity. If the sample stays in the magnetic field for a long time, the one or the other mechanism predominates, causing a slow growth or decrease in resistance around a certain (averaged) value. Moreover, the frequency of such changes is greater in the deformed sample. The value of the surface resistance of p-Si samples does not change for a long time without the influence of the magnetic field.

  4. Measurement of B(psi -> gamma chi(c1)) and search for psi -> gamma chi(c2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Liao, J. B.; Liao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Komicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiging; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thomdike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zheruchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    We report a measurement of the branching fraction for psi(3770) -> gamma chi(c1) and search for the transition psi(3770) -> gamma chi(c2) based on 2.92 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) data accumulated at root s = 3.773 GeV with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. We measure B(psi(3770) -> gamma chi(c1))

  5. Exclusive J/psi and psi(2S) production in pp collisions at root s=7 TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Beteta, C. Abellan; Adametz, A.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassen, R.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Baesso, C.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bauer, T.; Beddow, J.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, C.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, P.; Chen, P.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dickens, J.; Batista, P. Diniz; Dogaru, M.; Bonal, F. Domingo; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, C.; Elsby, D.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, P.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gordon, H.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Thi, V. N. La; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, Rw; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J-P; Evre, R. Lef; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; McCarthy, J.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nisar, S.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Romero, D. A. Roa; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schindler, H.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Sobczak, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Urner, D.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Voss, H.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    Exclusive J/psi and psi(2S) vector meson production has been observed in the dimuon channel using the LHCb detector. The cross-section times branching fractions to two muons with pseudorapidities between 2.0 and 4.5 are measured to be sigma(pp -> J/psi(->mu+mu-))(2.0

  6. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Rodriquez, P.J.; Younger, S.M.; Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal

  7. Development of PSI and ISI technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.K.; Park, D.Y.; Choi, S.P.; Kim, H.J.; Moon, Y.S.; Shon, G.H.; Kim, T.S.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the experimental results of the subjects selected from the PSI/ISI related problems which encountered by us in 1982. The main contents are 1) the characteristics of the typical ECT signals from the steam generator tubes of nuclear power plant and the results of ECT evaluation of Kori-1 steam generators, 2) the experimental result for the research for directional effects of ultrasonic transducers, 3) the basic experiment for the ultrasonic testing technique by immersion testing method, 4) how to write the scan plan of the mechanized ultrasonic testing for nuclear reactor. Attached appendix is a part of necessary materials for the scan plan of the mechanized ultrasonic testing for Kori-2 nuclear reactor. (Author)

  8. PSI contribution to the EU project ECOMONT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portmann, W; Siegwolf, R T; Saurer, M; Scheidegger, Y; Geissbuehler, P; Furger, M; Poggio, L; Erne, R; Richter, R; Buerki, D; Graber, W K [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Land-use changes (intensification, extensification and abandonment) in agriculture and forestry are considered to be the major driving forces for changes in ecosystem function and dynamics, and in landscape patterns in Europe. The aim of the EU project ECOMONT is to investigate the potential risks due to land-use change in the mountainous ecosystem. Fluxes of sensible and latent heat, water vapour, CO{sub 2} and pollutants between the vegetation and the atmosphere are sensitive and critical factors characterising landscape function. The Atmospheric Pollution Section of the PSI contributes to this project with the measurements of these fluxes. The measuring techniques, the experimental setup and first results are presented. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  9. J/psi and Υ radiative and hadronic decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.D.

    1987-07-01

    The search for gluonium at the J/psi and Υ is discussed, as well as the search for exotics at the Υ. Reactions discussed include radiative and hadronic decays of the J/psi and the search for radiative decays of the Υ. Future perspectives are also briefly considered. 45 refs., 27 figs

  10. Diffractive Photoproduction of Psi(2S) Mesons at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Wolf, E.A.De; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Mangano, S.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Samson, J.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.

    2002-01-01

    Results on diffractive photoproduction of psi(2S) mesons are presented using data collected between 1996 and 2000 with the H1 detector at the HERA ep collider. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 77 pb^(-1). The energy dependence of the diffractive psi(2S) cross section is found to be similar to or possibly somewhat steeper than that for J/psi mesons. The dependences of the elastic and proton dissociative psi(2S) photoproduction cross sections on the squared momentum transfer t at the proton vertex are measured. The t-dependence of the elastic channel, parametrised as e^(bt), yields b_(el)^(psi(2S))=(4.31+-0.57+-0.46) GeV^(-2), compatible with that of the J/psi. For the proton dissociative channel the result b_(pd)^(psi(2S))=(0.59+-0.13+-0.12) GeV^(-2) is 2.3 standard deviations smaller than that measured for the J/psi. With proper account of the individual wavefunctions theoretical predictions based on perturbative QCD are found to describe the measurements well.

  11. Gas compression infrared generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, W.F.

    1980-01-01

    A molecular gas is compressed in a quasi-adiabatic manner to produce pulsed radiation during each compressor cycle when the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, and part of the energy is recovered during the expansion phase, as defined in U.S. Pat. No. 3,751,666; characterized by use of a cylinder with a reciprocating piston as a compressor

  12. J/psi production in pp collisions from ALICE

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE experiment studied J/psi production in the mu+mu- and e+e- decay channels. Inclusive cross sections were measured at both forward and central rapidity down to zero transverse momentum. The results are compared with NRQCD calculations and, for the pp sample collected at sqrt(s)=2.76 TeV, are used as a reference for the determination of nuclear effects on J/psi production in Pb-Pb. At central rapidity, the fraction of J/psi coming from B-decays has been evaluated down to p_T=1.3 GeV/c. In addition, the J/psi yield has been found to linearly increase as a function of the charged hadron multiplicity produced in the collision. Finally, the first LHC results on J/psi polarization, an essential observable for the understanding of the production mechanisms and for theory comparisons, will be presented.

  13. Mechanical stability of a salt cavern submitted to rapid pressure variations: Application to the underground storage of natural gas, compressed air and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djizanne-Djakeun, Hippolyte

    2014-01-01

    Salt caverns used for the underground storage of large volumes of natural gas are in high demand given the ever-increasing energy needs. The storage of renewable energy is also envisaged in these salt caverns for example, storage of compressed air and hydrogen mass storage. In both cases, salt caverns are more solicited than before because they are subject to rapid injection and withdrawal rates. These new operating modes raise new mechanical problems, illustrated in particular by sloughing, and falling of overhanging blocks at cavern wall. Indeed, to the purely mechanical stress related to changes in gas pressure variations, repeated dozens of degrees Celsius of temperature variation are superimposed; causes in particular during withdrawal, additional tensile stresses whom may lead to fractures at cavern wall; whose evolution could be dangerous. The mechanical behavior of rock salt is known: it is elasto-viscoplastic, nonlinear and highly thermo sensitive. The existing rock salt constitutive laws and failures and damages criteria have been used to analyze the behavior of caverns under the effects of these new loading. The study deals with the thermo mechanics of rocks and helps to analyze the effects of these new operations modes on the structural stability of salt caverns. The approach was to firstly design and validate a thermodynamic model of the behavior of gas in the cavern. This model was used to analyze blowout in gas salt cavern. Then, with the thermo mechanical coupling, to analyze the effects of rapid withdrawal, rapid injection and daily cycles on the structural stability of caverns. At the experimental level, we sought the optimal conditions to the occurrence and the development of cracks on a pastille and a block of rock salt. The creep behavior of rock salt specimens in triaxial extension also was analyzed. (author)

  14. Psi Chi/APA Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is sponsored jointly by Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology, and the APA. The award is presented annually to the psychology graduate student who submits the best research paper that was published or presented at a national, regional, or state psychological association conference during the past calendar year. The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award was established in 1979. The award was established to recognize young researchers at the beginning of their professional lives and to commemorate both the 50th anniversary of Psi Chi and the 100th anniversary of psychology as a science (dating from the founding of Wundt's laboratory). It was named for Dr. Edwin B. Newman, the first national president of Psi Chi (1929) and one of its founders. He was a prolific researcher and a long-time chair of the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. Newman was a member of APA's Board of Directors, served as recording secretary of the board from 1962 to 1967, and was parliamentarian for the APA Council of Representatives for many years. He served both Psi Chi and APA in a distinguished manner for half a century. The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award is given jointly by Psi Chi and APA. Members of the 2017 Edwin B. Newman Award Committee were Shawn Carlton, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Christina Frederick-Recascino, PhD; John Norcross, PhD, APA representative; Karenna Malavanti, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Steven Kohn, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Warren Fass, PhD, Psi Chi representative; Chris Lovelace, PhD, Psi Chi representative; and Cathy Epkins, PhD, APA representative. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Energy dependence of forward-rapidity J/$\\psi$ and $\\psi(2S)$ production in pp collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; An, Mangmang; Andrei, Cristian; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; 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Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zimmermann, Sebastian; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann

    2017-06-14

    We present ALICE results on transverse momentum ($p_{\\rm T}$) and rapidity ($y$) differential production cross sections, mean transverse momentum and mean transverse momentum square of inclusive J/$\\psi$ and $\\psi(2S)$ at forward rapidity ($2.515$ GeV/$c$ the non-prompt contribution reaches up to 50\\% of the total charmonium yield.

  16. Observation of B+ -> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-) and B+ -> psi (2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M. H.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A. Jr; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; BEACH, LA; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R.B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Romeu, J. Arnau; Artamonov, AY; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S; Back, Jaap Willem; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, MG; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, D.E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, R. J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, J. R.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. H. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, T.F.S.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; COOK, AM; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Sobral, C. M. Costa; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Marinho, F. Da Cunha; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; Francisco, O. De Aguiar; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, Paolo; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suarez, A. Dosil; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Deleage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, Martin A.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, SIdi Ould; Esen, S.; Evans, Helen M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Fazzini, D.; FERGUSON, D; Prieto, A. Fernandez; Ferrari, F; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Lima, V. Franco; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Farber, CR; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Martin, L. M. Garcia; Pardinas, J. Garcia; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E. G; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Cazon, B. R. Gruberg; Grunberg, O.; Gushchin, EM; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Gobel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, D.B.; Han, Xiaoyan; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, Christine J.; Hatch, M.; He, J. J.; Head, T.; Heister, J. A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, Lee; Morata, J. A. Hernando; Van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; HILL, D; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, Fuman; John, Jestinah M. Mahachie; Johnson, D; Jones, Jonathan C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T. J.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, N. S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, Vladimir Leonidovich; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Lefevre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Cid, E. Lemos; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, Haibin; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X. R.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, Kate; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, Paolo; Marks, J. D.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, Linda M.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Moreno-Monroy, Ana I.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M; Mussini, M.; Muller, D.; Muller, J.; Muller, K; Muller, V; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, Randall P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parker, Anthony W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A. D.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, P. E.; Price, Daniel J.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, S. W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Pernas, M. Ramos; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, Andreas S.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Alepuz, C. Remon; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, Eliane R.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, Thomas; Valls, P. Ruiz; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Gonzalez-Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Oliveira, L. Silva de; Simi, G.; Simone Doolaard, [No Value; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, Sherin S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, Ian S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Tilburg, Jeroen J H C; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, Miranda J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; VIEIRA, DF; Diaz, M. Vieites; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Sierra, C. Vazquez; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R; Walsh, J.; Wang, J; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, Tishan; Wilson, F. Perry; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y; Xing, Zhe; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.-L.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; Rudolph, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    The decays B+-> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-) and B+ -> psi(2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) are observed for the first time using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment in proton- proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The

  17. Development of intelligent database program for PSI/ISI data management of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, Byong Guk; Park, Un Su; Park, Ik Keun; Park, Yun Won; Kang, Suk Chul

    1998-01-01

    An intelligent database program has been developed under fully compatible with windows 95 for the construction of total support system and the effective management of Pre-/In-Service Inspection data. Using the database program, it can be executed the analysis and multi-dimensional evaluation of the defects detected during PSI/ISI in the pipe and the pressure vessel of the nuclear power plants. And also it can be used to investigate the NDE data inspected repetitively and the contents of treatment, and to offer the fundamental data for application of evaluation data related to Fracture Mechanics Analysis(FMA). Furthermore, the PSI/ISI database loads and material properties can be utilized to secure the higher degree of safety, integrity, reliability, and life-prediction of components and systems in nuclear power plant.

  18. Improved compression molding technology for continuous fiber reinforced composite laminates. Part 2: AS-4/Polyimidesulfone prepreg system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucom, Robert M.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Kidder, Paul W.; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1991-01-01

    AS-4/polyimidesulfone (PISO2) composite prepreg was utilized for the improved compression molding technology investigation. This improved technique employed molding stops which advantageously facilitate the escape of volatile by-products during the B-stage curing step, and effectively minimize the neutralization of the consolidating pressure by intimate interply fiber-fiber contact within the laminate in the subsequent molding cycle. Without the modifying the resin matrix properties, composite panels with both unidirectional and angled plies with outstanding C-scans and mechanical properties were successfully molded using moderate molding conditions, i.e., 660 F and 500 psi, using this technique. The size of the panels molded were up to 6.00 x 6.00 x 0.07 in. A consolidation theory was proposed for the understanding and advancement of the processing science. Processing parameters such as vacuum, pressure cycle design, prepreg quality, etc. were explored.

  19. High-pressure X-ray study of LiCrSi2O6 clinopyroxene and the general compressibility trends of Li-clinopyroxenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periotto, Benedetta; Angel, Ross J.; Nestola, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    High-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction measurements of synthetic LiCrSi2O6 clinopyroxene (with space group P21/c) were performed in a diamond-anvil cell up to 7.970 GPa. No phase transition has been observed within the pressure range investigated, but the elastic behavior at lower pressures...... phase transition above 8 GPa to the HP-C2/c space group. A comparison of the Li-clinopyroxenes (M1 = Cr, Al, Sc, Ga, Mg + Fe) previously investigated and our sample shows that their elastic behavior and structural mechanisms of compression are analogous....... derivative K0 = 8.8(6). The structural data measured up to 7.970 GPa confirm that the space group P21/c is maintained throughout the whole pressure range investigated. The atomic parameters, obtained from the integrated diffraction intensities, suggest that the Li coordination polyhedron changes its...

  20. Comparison Between a New, Two-component Compression System With Zinc Paste Bandages for Leg Ulcer Healing: A Prospective, Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trial Monitoring Sub-bandage Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosti, Giovanni; Crespi, Aldo; Mattaliano, Vincenzo

    2011-05-01

    Compression therapy is standard treatment for venous leg ulcers. The authors prefer multi-layer, multi-component, stiff, high-pressure bandages to treat venous leg ulcers. The Unna boot (UB) is an example of this type of bandage. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and tolerability of UB to a new, two-component bandage. One hundred (100) patients with venous ulcers were randomized into two groups: group A (n = 50) received UB and group B (n = 50) 3M™ Coban™ 2 Layer Compression System (C2L). All patients were followed weekly for 3 months and then monthly until complete healing was achieved. The primary outcomes were: ulcer healing or surface reduction; pain; and exudate control. The secondary outcomes were: ease of application and removal of the bandage, pressure exerted in the supine and standing position after application and before removal, and bandage comfort. C2L was associated with 100% ulcer healing; 47 out of 50 cases healed within the first 3 months after application of the bandage. Compared with the UB, there was no statistically significant difference. In both groups the effect of compression on pain and overall well being was excellent; pain decreased by 50% within 1-2 weeks and remained low throughout the duration of treatment and overall well being improved significantly. There was no significant difference between the two systems concerning level of comfort. C2L proved to be effective in treating venous ulcers due to its stiffness and pressure. Its effectiveness was similar to UB, which is often considered the gold-standard compression device for venous ulcers. This fact, in combination with high tolerability and ease of application and removal, make this new bandage particularly suitable for the treatment of venous leg ulcers. .

  1. Ssb1 chaperone is a [PSI+] prion-curing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacinska, A; Szczesniak, B; Kochneva-Pervukhova, N V; Kushnirov, V V; Ter-Avanesyan, M D; Boguta, M

    2001-04-01

    Yeast SUP7' or SUP11 nonsense suppressors have no phenotypic expression in strains deficient in the isopentenylation of A37 in tRNA. Here we show that such strains spontaneously produce cells with a nonsense suppressor phenotype which is related to the cytoplasmically inherited determinant and manifests all the key features of the [PSI+] prion. A screen of a multicopy yeast genomic library for genes that inactivate the [PSI+]-related suppressor phenotype resulted in the isolation of the SSB1 gene. Moreover, we demonstrate that multicopy plasmid encoding the Ssb1 chaperone cures cells of the [PSI+] prion.

  2. Recent results on J${\\psi}$ from experiment NA50

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Ataian, M R; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, Marc; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borenstein, S R; Borges, C; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castagner, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constans, N; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; Cruz, J; De Falco, A; Dellacasa, G; De Marco, N; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Glubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hakobyan, R S; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Da Silva, W; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Ramello, L; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Saturnini, P; Santos, H; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Silva, S; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, Ermanno; Villatte, L; Willis, N

    2002-01-01

    The J/ psi production in Pb-Pb interactions induced by 158 GeV/c incident Pb ions is studied as a function of centrality, as estimated from the neutral transverse energy or, alternatively, from the very forward hadronic energy of the collision. The J/ psi yield exhibits a similar pattern with a first drop for mid-peripheral collisions and a steady decrease for the most central reactions. Conventional hadronic models axe unable to fairly reproduce this trend which finds a natural explanation in a deconfined quark-gluon phase scenario. The J / psi transverse momentum distributions and their dependence with centrality are also reviewed in this presentation. (20 refs).

  3. Mechanism of J/PSI production: determining gluon distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, S.; Schneider, H.R.

    1978-01-01

    Assuming a generalised Drell-Yan type mechanism for hadronic PSI-production, the relative importance of the different possible contributions is estimated from the data. We find that about 80% of the pp → PSI X cross-section is due to gluons. Therefore, these data give some information on the gluon distribution G(x) in the proton. Assuming xG(x) approximately (1-x)sup(n), data restrict n to 4... 6, in agreement with dimensional counting rules. The energy dependence of sigma(anti p p → PSI X)/sigma(pp → PSIX) is predicted. (orig.) [de

  4. Bridging the PSI Knowledge Gap: A Multi-Scale Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-01-08

    Plasma-surface interactions (PSI) pose an immense scientific hurdle in magnetic confinement fusion and our present understanding of PSI in confinement environments is highly inadequate; indeed, a recent Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee report found that 4 out of the 5 top five fusion knowledge gaps were related to PSI. The time is appropriate to develop a concentrated and synergistic science effort that would expand, exploit and integrate the wealth of laboratory ion-beam and plasma research, as well as exciting new computational tools, towards the goal of bridging the PSI knowledge gap. This effort would broadly advance plasma and material sciences, while providing critical knowledge towards progress in fusion PSI. This project involves the development of a Science Center focused on a new approach to PSI science; an approach that both exploits access to state-of-the-art PSI experiments and modeling, as well as confinement devices. The organizing principle is to develop synergistic experimental and modeling tools that treat the truly coupled multi-scale aspect of the PSI issues in confinement devices. This is motivated by the simple observation that while typical lab experiments and models allow independent manipulation of controlling variables, the confinement PSI environment is essentially self-determined with few outside controls. This means that processes that may be treated independently in laboratory experiments, because they involve vastly different physical and time scales, will now affect one another in the confinement environment. Also, lab experiments cannot simultaneously match all exposure conditions found in confinement devices typically forcing a linear extrapolation of lab results. At the same time programmatic limitations prevent confinement experiments alone from answering many key PSI questions. The resolution to this problem is to usefully exploit access to PSI science in lab devices, while retooling our thinking from a linear and de

  5. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pAsian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  6. Psi: é possível treinar? revisando a literatura sobre desenvolvimento psi

    OpenAIRE

    Fábio Eduardo da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Estuda as experiências anômalas (EAs), as quais podem ser definidas como incomuns e irregulares, ainda que vivenciadas por uma grande parcela da população. Dentre a variedade de EAs, concentra-se nas experiências relacionadas a psi, que incluem duas categorias. A primeira abrange relatos de percepção extra-sensorial (ESP), ou seja, indicativos da capacidade de se obter informação sem a utilização dos canais sensoriais ou de inferências lógicas. A segunda é chamada de Psicocinesia (PK) e refer...

  7. Production of J/$\\Psi$-Particles at RHIC and LHC energies: An Alternative `Psi'-chology

    OpenAIRE

    Guptaroy, P.; Sau, Goutam; Biswas, S. K.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2012-01-01

    We attempt here to understand successfully some crucial aspects of $J/\\Psi$-production in some high energy nuclear collisions in the light of a non-standard framework outlined in the text. It is found that the results arrived at with this main working approach here is fairly in good agreement with both the measured data and the results obtained on the basis of some other models of the `standard' variety. Impact and implications of this comparative study have also been precisely highlighted in...

  8. Impact of Compression Stockings vs. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Overnight Fluid Shift and Obstructive Sleep Apnea among Patients on Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno C. Silva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionObstructive sleep apnea (OSA is common in edematous states, notably in hemodialysis patients. In this population, overnight fluid shift can play an important role on the pathogenesis of OSA. The effect of compression stockings (CS and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on fluid shift is barely known. We compared the effects of CS and CPAP on fluid dynamics in a sample of patients with OSA in hemodialysis, through a randomized crossover study.MethodsEach participant performed polysomnography (PSG at baseline, during CPAP titration, and after 1 week of wearing CS. Neck circumference (NC and segmental bioelectrical impedance were done before and after PSG.ResultsFourteen patients were studied (53 ± 9 years; 57% men; body mass index 29.7 ± 6.8 kg/m2. Apnea–hypopnea index (AHI decreased from 20.8 (14.2; 39.6 at baseline to 7.9 (2.8; 25.4 during CPAP titration and to 16.7 (3.5; 28.9 events/h after wearing CS (CPAP vs. baseline, p = 0.004; CS vs. baseline, p = 0.017; and CPAP vs. CS, p = 0.017. Nocturnal intracellular trunk water was higher after wearing CS in comparison to baseline and CPAP (p = 0.03. CS reduced the fluid accumulated in lower limbs during the day, although not significantly. Overnight fluid shift at baseline, CPAP, and CS was −183 ± 72, −343 ± 220, and −290 ± 213 ml, respectively (p = 0.006. Overnight NC increased at baseline (0.7 ± 0.4 cm, decreased after CPAP (−1.0 ± 0.4 cm, and while wearing CS (−0.4 ± 0.8 cm (CPAP vs. baseline, p < 0.0001; CS vs. baseline, p = 0.001; CPAP vs. CS, p = 0.01.ConclusionCS reduced AHI by avoiding fluid retention in the legs, favoring accumulation of water in the intracellular component of the trunk, thus avoiding fluid shift to reach the neck. CPAP improved OSA by exerting local pressure on upper airway, with no impact on fluid redistribution. CPAP performed significantly better than CS

  9. Exclusive $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi$(2S) production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    McNulty, R

    2013-01-01

    Exclusive $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi$(2S) vector meson production has been observed in the dimuon channel using the LHCb detector. The cross-section times branching fractions to two muons with pseudorapidities between 2.0 and 4.5 are measured and are found to be in good agreement with results from previous experiments and theoretical predictions. The $J/\\psi$ photoproduction cross-section is reported as a function of the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy, and is shown to be consistent with measurements obtained at HERA with power law behaviour.

  10. $J/\\Psi$ mass shift in nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastao Krein, Anthony Thomas, Kazuo Tsushima

    2011-02-01

    The $J/\\Psi$ mass shift in cold nuclear matter is computed using an effective Lagrangian approach. The mass shift is computed by evaluating $D$ and $D^*$ meson loop contributions to the $J/\\Psi$ self-energy employing medium-modified meson masses. The modification of the $D$ and $D^*$ masses in nuclear matter is obtained using the quark-meson coupling model. The loop integrals are regularized with dipole form factors and the sensitivity of the results to the values of form-factor cutoff masses is investigated. The $J/\\Psi$ mass shift arising from the modification of the $D$ and $D^*$ loops at normal nuclear matter density is found to range from $-16$~MeV to $-24$~MeV under a wide variation of values of the cutoff masses. Experimental perspectives for the formation of a bound state of $J/\\Psi$ to a nucleus are investigated.

  11. Baryonic decay of the J/psi and gluon spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallin, D.

    1985-04-01

    A study of the J/psi state of the charmomium (c antic state) was performed at the D.C.I. collider in Orsay with the DM2 detector. 9 millions of J/psi have been produced, corresponding to more than one half of the actual world statistics. The very simple mecanism of the e +- annihilation into baryon-antibaryon via the J/psi state, allows measurements of the gluon spin through the emitted baryon angular distribution. The analyse of the channels J/psi → p antip and Λ antiΛ, permits to obtain parameters for the angular distributions. These experimental values favour very clearly a vectorial gluon hypothesis, as postulated by the quantum Chromodynamics [fr

  12. PSC/PSI power supply control prototype based on RTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Haoli; Wang Chunhong; Tang Jingyu

    2010-01-01

    A PSC/PSI power supply control prototype was developed by using an open-source real-time operating system RTEMS and PSC/PSI power supply controller developed by BNL. The structure of the prototype, development procedures as well as testing result with a power supply of a corrector magnet were described. It can switch on/off the power supply, ramp up/down the current, and monitor the real-time states of the power supply. (authors)

  13. An experimental platform for triaxial high-pressure/high-temperature testing of rocks using computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Guenther; Lapene, Alexandre; Castanier, Louis M.; Kovscek, Anthony R.

    2018-04-01

    A conventional high-pressure/high-temperature experimental apparatus for combined geomechanical and flow-through testing of rocks is not X-ray compatible. Additionally, current X-ray transparent systems for computed tomography (CT) of cm-sized samples are limited to design temperatures below 180 °C. We describe a novel, high-temperature (>400 °C), high-pressure (>2000 psi/>13.8 MPa confining, >10 000 psi/>68.9 MPa vertical load) triaxial core holder suitable for X-ray CT scanning. The new triaxial system permits time-lapse imaging to capture the role of effective stress on fluid distribution and porous medium mechanics. System capabilities are demonstrated using ultimate compressive strength (UCS) tests of Castlegate sandstone. In this case, flooding the porous medium with a radio-opaque gas such as krypton before and after the UCS test improves the discrimination of rock features such as fractures. The results of high-temperature tests are also presented. A Uintah Basin sample of immature oil shale is heated from room temperature to 459 °C under uniaxial compression. The sample contains kerogen that pyrolyzes as temperature rises, releasing hydrocarbons. Imaging reveals the formation of stress bands as well as the evolution and connectivity of the fracture network within the sample as a function of time.

  14. Measurement of the ratio of $B_c^+$ branching fractions to $J/\\psi\\pi^+$ and $J/\\psi\\mu^+\

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gavrilov, Gennadii; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The first measurement that relates semileptonic and hadronic decay rates of the $B_c^+$ meson is performed using proton-proton collision data corresponding to 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected with the LHCb detector. The measured value of the ratio of branching fractions, ${\\cal B}(B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+)/{\\cal B}(B_c^+\\to J/\\psi\\mu^+\

  15. Composite high-pressure vessels for hydrogen storage in mobile application. Pt. 1 / Light weight composite cylinders for compressed hydrogen. Pt. 2 - custom made hydrogen storage tanks and vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasche, C. [MCS Cylinder Systems GmbH, Dinslaken (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Recent developments on fuel cell technology demonstrated the feasibility of propelling vehicles by converting fuel directly into electricity. Fuel cells conveniently use either compressed (CGH{sub 2}) or liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or methanol as the fuel source from a tank. Mobile storage of these fuelling will become an urgent need as this technology will come into series production expected for 2010. Due to the requirements on mobile hydrogen storage and the energy losses in the hydrogen-to-application-chain, a light-weight and energetic qualities and minimise ist bulky nature. Mobile storage of hydrogen can be realised either at high pressure values (> 20 MPa) or at deep temperatures (<-253 C). CGH{sub 2}: In the last few years, the introduction of natural gas driven vehicles has seen the development of compact mobile pressurised gas tanks in principle, this storage technique is also applicable for the compressed storage of hydrogen at filling pressures of > 20 MPa. LH{sub 2} : Storing hydrogen or natural gases in general in the liquid phase is accomplished either by applying a overpressure or keeping it below the phase transition temperature at ambient pressure in super insulated devices. (orig.)

  16. Are the PSI'→etasub(c)γ, PSI''→etasub(c)γ decays due to the gluon admixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifman, M.A.; Vysotsky, M.I.

    1980-01-01

    A new method for estimating the radiative transitions between the excited 1 - charmonium levels and etasub(c) is proposed. The method is based on quantum chromodynamics plus the hypothesis of local duality and makes no reference to the standard potential picture. It is argued that the psi'(3.698) → etasub(c)γ decay is essentially due to gluon admixture in the psi' wave function. The most native analysis yields approximately 0.15 keV for the psi' → etasub(c)γ decay width, five times smaller than preliminary experimental data. The experimental number for GITA(psi' → etasub(c)γ)=0.7 keV can be reproduced only at a price of introducing a rather large psi''(3.772) → etasub(c)γ amplitude, GITA(psi'' → etasub(c)γ) approximately 1 keV. As a byproduct, a reliable prediction for the rho → πγ decay rate, GITA(rho → πγ) approximately 70 keV, is obtained in good agreement with recent measurement

  17. Low pressure storage of natural gas on activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, J.; Wiesmann, H.; Lee, T.

    The introduction of natural gas to the transportation energy sector offers the possibility of displacing imported oil with an indigenous fuel. The barrier to the acceptance of natural gas vehicles (NGV) is the limited driving range due to the technical difficulties of on-board storage of a gaseous fuel. In spite of this barrier, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles are today being successfully introduced into the market place. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an adsorbent natural gas (ANG) storage system as a viable alternative to CNG storage. It can be argued that low pressure ANG has reached near parity with CNG, since the storage capacity of CNG (2400 psi) is rated at 190 V/V, while low pressure ANG (500 psi) has reached storage capacities of 180 V/V in the laboratory. A program, which extends laboratory results to a full-scale vehicle test, is necessary before ANG technology will receive widespread acceptance. The objective of this program is to field test a 150 V/V ANG vehicle in FY 1994. As a start towards this goal, carbon adsorbents have been screened by Brookhaven for their potential use in a natural gas storage system. This paper reports on one such carbon, trade name Maxsorb, manufactured by Kansai Coke under an Amoco license.

  18. LHCb: Measurement of $J/\\psi$ production cross-section at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Zhang, Y

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the $J/\\psi$ production cross-section with the LHCb detector is presented. The cross-section is measured as a function of the $J/\\psi$ transverse momentum and rapidity, in the forward region. Contributions from prompt $J/\\psi$ and $J/\\psi$ from $b$ are measured separately. Prospects for measurements of the $J/\\psi$ polarisation with a full angular analysis are also shown.

  19. Comprehensive study of psi meson production. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.T.; Harms, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    Our first paper under this grant is a calculation of prompt lepton production in upsilon and toponium decay. The results should prove useful in identifying signals for charm or bottom production. Our work has led to some improvement in our understanding of psi production in hadronic interactions, although further work is needed. Attempts to explain the difference between experimental and theoretical rates of psi hadroproduction led to a study of quark-gluon scattering, which proved to have a negative impact on the theoretical cross section once a leading mass singularity was absorbed into the gluon distribution function. Our study of psi production in B meson decays has led to an improvement in the leading-log calculation of this rate, which gives a much more precise prediction of the decay rate. We have also calculated all first-order QCD corrections to this weak process. We are now completing a companion calculation of n/sub c/ production, for which there is presently no data. Dr. Harms and Dr. Cox have collaborated on an attempt to determine the dominant contribution to the difference sigma(pN → psi x) - sigma(anti pN → psi x). The lowest order process contributing to this difference (q anti q → psi GG) has been shown previously to be small. They have calculated the next order process (q anti q → G*G* → psi G) and have apparently uncovered a new example of the violation of the Bloch-Nordsieck mechanism in QCD. Our work outside the realm of QCD has included a new fit to the total pp and anti pp cross sections. Dr. Cox has also been pursuing the question of representations of extended (especially N=8) supersymmetry

  20. An improved compression molding technology for continuous fiber reinforced composite laminate. Part 1: AS-4/LaRC-TPI 1500 (HFG) Prepreg system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Kidder, Paul W.; Reddy, Rakasi M.

    1991-01-01

    Poor processability of fiber reinforced high performance polyimide thermoplastic resin composites is a well recognized issue which, in many cases, prohibits the fabrication of composite parts with satisfactorily consolidated quality. Without modifying the resin matrix chemistry, improved compression modeling procedures were proposed and investigated with the AS-4/LaRC-TPI 1500 High Flow Grade (HFG) prepreg system. Composite panels with excellent C-scans can be consistently molded by this method under 700 F and a consolidation pressure as low as 100 psi. A mechanism for the consolidation of the composite under this improved molding technique is discussed. This mechanism reveals that a certain degree of matrix shear and tow filament slippage and nesting between plies occur during consolidation, which leads to a reduction of the consolidating pressure necessary to offset the otherwise intimate inter fiber-fiber contact and consequently achieves a better consolidation quality. Outstanding short beam shear strength and flexural strength were obtained from the molded panels. A prolonged consolidation step under low pressure, i.e., 100 psi at 700 F for 75 minutes, was found to significantly enhance the composite mechanical properties.

  1. Calculation of {psi}, {phi} and of their derivatives; calcul de {psi}, {phi} et de leurs derivees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandeu, Y; Gautier, L; Guillermin, J; Olivie, G; Roche, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The functions: {psi}(x,{beta}) = 1/{beta}{radical}{pi} {integral}{sub -{infinity}}{sup +{infinity}} [e{sup -(y-x/{beta}}{sup ){sup }}2/1+y{sup 2}] dx and {phi}(x,{beta}) = 1/{beta}{radical}{pi} {integral}-{infinity}+{infinity} [y e{sup -(y-x/{beta}}{sup ){sup }}2/1+y{sup 2}] dy as well as their primary and secondary derivatives with respect to x and {beta} have been calculated for the whole of the (x,{beta}) plane using a certain number of different methods: series development, asymptotic development, Hermites polynomials and approximating formulae. These methods have made it possible to conserve a constant relative accuracy, except in the neighbourhood of the regions where the derivatives disappear. (authors) [French] Les fonctions: {psi}(x,{beta}) = 1/{beta}{radical}{pi} {integral}{sub -{infinity}}{sup +{infinity}} [e{sup -(y-x/{beta}}{sup ){sup }}2/1+y{sup 2}] dx and {phi}(x,{beta}) = 1/{beta}{radical}{pi} {integral}-{infinity}+{infinity} [y e{sup -(y-x/{beta}}{sup ){sup }}2/1+y{sup 2}] dy ainsi que leurs derivees premieres et secondes par rapport a x et a {beta} ont pu etre calculees dans tout le plan (x,{beta}) en faisant appel a un certain nombre de methodes differentes: developpement en serie, developpement asymptotique, polynomes d'Hermites, et formules approchees. Ces methodes ont permis de conserver une precision relative constante, sauf au voisinage des zones d'annulation des derivees. (auteurs)

  2. Radiative decays of the psi' to all-photon final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.A.

    1985-05-01

    A sample of 1.8 x 10 6 produced psi's collected by the Crystal Ball detector at SPEAR is used to measure branching ratios of selected radiative psi' decays to non-charmonium states which decay into photons. A sample of 2.2 x 10 6 produced J/psi's is used to measure the same radiative decays from the J/psi. The ratios BR(psi' → γf)/BR(J/psi → γf) = 9 +- 3%, BR(psi' → γtheta)/BR(J/psi → γtheta) < 10% - 15%, BR(psi' → γeta)/BR(J/psi → γeta) < 1.8%, and BR(psi' → γeta')/BR(J/psi → γeta') < 2.6% have been obtained. (Upper limits are 90% confidence level. The upper limit for the radiative decay to the theta is uncertain due to the possible presence of an f' signal in the J/psi data). Assuming these decays proceed via the annihilation of the initial quark and antiquark to a photon and two gluons, these ratios are predicted by lowest order QCD to be the same as the ratio of leptonic branching ratios of the psi' and J/psi, or 12.0 +- 2.2%. There currently exists no compelling explanation for the discrepancy between the ratios measured for the last two decays and the theoretical expectation

  3. A piezo-bar pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, W. H.; Murphy, C. L.; Shanfield, I.

    1967-01-01

    Piezo-bar pressure type probe measures the impact velocity or pressure of a moving debris cloud. It measures pressures up to 200,000 psi and peak pressures may be recorded with a total pulse duration between 5 and 65 musec.

  4. 30 CFR 77.412 - Compressed air systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compressed air systems. 77.412 Section 77.412... for Mechanical Equipment § 77.412 Compressed air systems. (a) Compressors and compressed-air receivers... involving the pressure system of compressors, receivers, or compressed-air-powered equipment shall not be...

  5. A measurement of the {psi}' to J/{psi} production ratio in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Werner-Heisenberg-Institut, Muenchen (Germany); Adams, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Agari, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (DE)] (and others)

    2006-07-15

    Ratios of the {psi}' over the J/{psi} production cross sections in the dilepton channel for C, Ti and W targets have been measured in 920 GeV proton-nucleus interactions with the HERA-B detector at the HERA storage ring. The {psi}' and J/{psi} states were reconstructed in both the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and the e{sup +}e{sup -} decay modes. The measurements covered the kinematic range -0.35{<=}x{sub F}{<=}0.1 with transverse momentum p{sub T}{<=}4.5 GeV/c. The {psi}' to J/{psi} production ratio is almost constant in the covered x{sub F} range and shows a slow increase with p{sub T}. The angular dependence of the ratio has been used to measure the difference of the {psi}' and J/{psi} polarization. All results for the muon and electron decay channels are in good agreement: their ratio, averaged over all events, is R{sub {psi}}{sub '}({mu})/R{sub {psi}}{sub '}(e)=1.00{+-}0.08{+-}0.04. This result constitutes a new, direct experimental constraint on the double ratio of branching fractions, (B'({mu}).B(e))/(B({mu}).B'(e)), of {psi}'' and J/{psi} in the two channels. (orig.)

  6. J/{psi} production and decay at the Z resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikas, P

    1994-10-13

    In the Large Electron Positron collider (LEP) bunches of electrons and positrons are brought in collision. At a collision energy of 91.2 GeV the Z resonance is excited. The Z boson, the uncharged mediator of the weak force, decays into a particle and an antiparticle almost instantaneously. The probability that in this process heavy quarks charm-anticharm(c anti c) and bottom-antibottom(b anti b) are formed is {approx}12% and {approx}15% respectively. Thus, LEP provides an ideal environment to make precision measurements in the heavy quark sector. The data for this thesis was collected with the L3 detector from 1990-1992. L3 is one of the four experiments at LEP. The integrated luminosity collected by L3 in this period is 43.5 pb{sup -1}. The L3 detector was designed to measure e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions up to 200 GeV with special emphasis on high resolution measurements of photons, electrons and muons. The detector is installed within a magnet providing 0.5 T field. It consists of subdetectors to detect and measure the direction and momentum/energy of charged particles, electromagnetic particles, hadrons and muons. In this thesis the production of the 1{sup 3} S{sub 1} (the j/{psi} meson) and the 2{sup 3} S{sub 1} (the {psi}` meson) and the c anti c bound states are investigated. The leptonic decays of the two mesons (J/{psi}, {psi}`{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}, l=e, {mu}) provide the cleanest signals of heavy quarks. In this thesis, the {psi}` and J/{psi} mesons have been tagged via their decay into a muon pair. From the invariant mass distribution of the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} pairs the branching ratio for J/{psi} production at the Z, Br(Z{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}+X), was determined to be 4.0{+-}0.6(stat.){+-}0.4(sys.)x10{sup -3} while the branching ratio for {psi}` production at the Z is smaller than <2x10{sup -3}. (orig./HSI).

  7. Search for the Rare Decays $J/\\psi \\to D_{S}^{-} \\pi^{+}$, $J/\\psi \\to D^{-} \\pi^{+}$, and $J/\\psi \\to \\bar D^{0} \\bar K^{0}$

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, J Z; Cai, X; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y B; Chu, Y P; Dai, Y S; Diao, L Y; Deng, Z Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gu, S D; Gu, Y T; Guo, Y N; Guo, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hou, J; Hu, H M; Hu, J H; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, X S; Jiang, X Y; Jiao, J B; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Lai, Y F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, B J; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Liu, Fang; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, Jian; Liu, Q; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Lou, Y C; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Ping, R G; Qi, N D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, C P; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, L; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Zheng; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Weng, Y; Wu, N; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xu, G F; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Yan, M L; Yang, H X; Yang, Y X; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Q; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Yiyun; Zhang, Z X; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Z P; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2007-01-01

    Rare decay modes $J/\\psi \\to D_{S}^{-} \\pi^{+} + c.c.$, $J/\\psi \\to D^{-} \\pi^{+} + c.c.$, and $J/\\psi \\to \\bar D^{0} \\bar K^{0} + c.c.$ are searched for using 5.77$\\times 10^{7}$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESII detector at the BEPC. No signal above background is observed. We present upper limits on the branching fractions $B(J/\\psi \\to D_{S}^{-} \\pi^{+})$ $<$ 1.4$\\times10^{-4}$, $B(J/\\psi \\to D^{-} \\pi^{+})$ $<7.5\\times10^{-5}$, and $B(J/\\psi \\to \\bar D^{0} \\bar K^{0})$ $<$ 1.7$\\times10^{-4}$ at the 90% confidence level.

  8. Study of the Iota in radiative J/PSI decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richman, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the production, decay, and quantum numbers of the iota(1440) in radiative J/psi decays is presented. The iota(1440), because of its large production in this OZI-suppressed channel, is considered a possible gluonic bound-state, or glueball. The data, 2.7 x 10 6 produced J/psi's, were obtained using the Mark III detector at the SPEAR e + e - storage ring. The spin-parity of the iota(1440) is independently determined to be O - using two decays modes, iota → K/sub s/ 0 K/sup +/-/π/sup -/+/ and iota → K + K - π 0 . Measurements of the iota mass, width, and branching fractions are obtained using iota → K/sub s/ 0 K/sup +/-/π/sup -/+/, iota → K + K - π 0 , and iota → K/sub s/ 0 K/sub s/ 0 π 0 . The double radiative channels J/psi α γX, X → γ+ Vector, where Vector = rho 0 , phi, omega are studied to probe the quark content of the object X. Measurements of the hadronic decays J/psi → phi-eta, omega-eta, and omegaπ 0 , as well as the observation of the isospin-violating decay J/psi → rho 0 eta, are presented

  9. Concurrency Models with Causality and Events as Psi-calculi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkon Normann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Psi-calculi are a parametric framework for nominal calculi, where standard calculi are found as instances, like the pi-calculus, or the cryptographic spi-calculus and applied-pi. Psi-calculi have an interleaving operational semantics, with a strong foundation on the theory of nominal sets and process algebras. Much of the expressive power of psi-calculi comes from their logical part, i.e., assertions, conditions, and entailment, which are left quite open thus accommodating a wide range of logics. We are interested in how this expressiveness can deal with event-based models of concurrency. We thus take the popular prime event structures model and give an encoding into an instance of psi-calculi. We also take the recent and expressive model of Dynamic Condition Response Graphs (in which event structures are strictly included and give an encoding into another corresponding instance of psi-calculi. The encodings that we achieve look rather natural and intuitive. Additional results about these encodings give us more confidence in their correctness.

  10. $J/\\psi$ Absorption in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Maiani, Luciano; Polosa, Antonio; Riquer, V

    2004-01-01

    We present a new calculation of the pi-J/psi dissociation cross sections within the Constituent Quark-Meson Model recently introduced. To discuss the absorption of J/psi in heavy-ion collisions, we assume the J/psi to be produced inside a thermalized pion gas, as discussed by Bjorken, and introduce the corrections due to absorption by nuclear matter as well. We fit the absorption length of the J/psi to the data obtained at the CERN SPS by the NA50 Collaboration for Pb-Pb collisions. Collisions of lower centrality allow us to determine the temperature and the energy density of the pion gas. For both these quantities we find values close to those indicated by lattice gauge calculations for the transition to a quark-gluon plasma. A simple extrapolation to more central collisions, which takes into account the increase of the energy deposited due to the increased nucleon flux, fails to reproduce the break in J/psi absorption indicated by NA50, thus lending support to the idea that an unconfined quark-gluon phase m...

  11. Photoproduction of J/{psi}mesons at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, T.; Aid, S.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Baehr, J.; Ban, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H.P.; Behrend, H.J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besancon, M.; Beyer, R.; Biddulph, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Botterweck, F.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Buchholz, R.; Buengener, L.; Buerger, J.; Buesser, F.W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A.B.; Colombo, M.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, C.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D.G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J.B.; Danilov, M.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J.D.; Dreis, H.B.; Duboc, J.; Duellmann, D.; Duenger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T.R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R.J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Fluegge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; Goodall, A.M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Graessler, H.; Graessler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, A.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E.M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W.J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; H1 Collaboration

    1994-08-01

    We present a study of J/{psi} meson production in collisions of 26.7 GeV electrons with 820 GeV protons, performed with the H1-detector at the HERA collider at DESY. The J/{psi} mesons are detected via their leptonic decays both to electrons and muons. Requiring exactly two particles in the detector, a cross section of {sigma}(ep{yields}J/{psi}X)=(8.8{+-}2.0{+-}2.2) nb is determined for 30 GeV{<=}W{sub {gamma}p}{<=}180 GeV and Q{sup 2}< or {approx}4 GeV{sup 2}. Using the flux of quasi-real photons with Q{sup 2}< or {approx}4 GeV{sup 2}, a total photoproduction cross section of {sigma}({gamma}p{yields}J/{psi}X)=(56{+-}13{+-}14) nb is derived at an average W{sub {gamma}p}=90 GeV. The distribution of the squared momentum transfer t from the proton to the J/{psi} can be fitted using an exponential exp(-bvertical stroke tvertical stroke ) below avertical stroke tvertical stroke of 0.75 GeV{sup 2} yielding a slope parameter of b=(4.7{+-}1.9) GeV{sup -2}. (orig.)

  12. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  13. Compressed air injection technique to standardize block injection pressures : [La technique d'injection d'air comprimé pour normaliser les pressions d'injection d'un blocage nerveux].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ban C H; Li, Lisa X Y; Pillay, Jennifer J

    2006-11-01

    Presently, no standardized technique exists to monitor injection pressures during peripheral nerve blocks. Our objective was to determine if a compressed air injection technique, using an in vitro model based on Boyle's law and typical regional anesthesia equipment, could consistently maintain injection pressures below a 1293 mmHg level associated with clinically significant nerve injury. Injection pressures for 20 and 30 mL syringes with various needle sizes ( 18G, 20G, 21 G, 22G, and 24G) were measured in a closed system. A set volume of air was aspirated into a saline-filled syringe and then compressed and maintained at various percentages while pressure was measured. The needle was inserted into the injection port of a pressure sensor, which had attached extension tubing with an injection plug clamped "off". Using linear regression with all data points, the pressure value and 99% confidence interval (CI) at 50% air compression was estimated. The linearity of Boyle's law was demonstrated with a high correlation, r = 0.99, and a slope of 0.984 (99% CI: 0.967-1.001). The net pressure generated at 50% compression was estimated as 744.8 mmHg, with the 99% CI between 729.6 and 760.0 mmHg. The various syringe/needle combinations had similar results. By creating and maintaining syringe air compression at 50% or less, injection pressures will be substantially below the 1293 mmHg threshold considered to be an associated risk factor for clinically significant nerve injury. This technique may allow simple, real-time and objective monitoring during local anesthetic injections while inherently reducing injection speed. Présentement, aucune technique normalisée ne permet de vérifier les pressions d'injection pendant les blocages nerveux périphériques. Nous voulions vérifier si une technique d'injection d'air comprimé, utilisant un modèle in vitro fondé sur la loi de Boyle et du matériel propre à l'anesthésie régionale, pouvait maintenir avec régularité les

  14. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  15. Recent results on J/$\\psi$ from experiment NA50

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, M C; Alessandro, B; Alexa, C; Arnaldi, R; Ataian, M R; Baglin, C; Baldit, A; Bedjidian, Marc; Beolè, S; Boldea, V; Bordalo, P; Borenstein, S R; Borges, C; Bussière, A; Capelli, L; Castagner, C; Castor, J I; Chaurand, B; Cheynis, B; Chiavassa, E; Cicalò, C; Claudino, T; Comets, M P; Constans, N; Constantinescu, S; Cortese, P; Cruz, J; De Falco, A; Dellacasa, G; De Marco, N; Devaux, A; Dita, S; Drapier, O; Espagnon, B; Fargeix, J; Force, P; Gallio, M; Gavrilov, Yu K; Gerschel, C; Glubellino, P; Golubeva, M B; Gonin, M; Grigorian, A A; Grossiord, J Y; Guber, F F; Guichard, A; Gulkanian, H R; Hakobyan, R S; Haroutunian, R; Idzik, M; Jouan, D; Karavitcheva, T L; Kluberg, L; Kurepin, A B; Le Bornec, Y; Lourenço, C; Macciotta, P; MacCormick, M; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Masera, M; Masoni, A; Monteno, M; Musso, A; Petiau, P; Piccotti, A; Pizzi, J R; Da Silva, W; Prino, F; Puddu, G; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Ramello, L; Rato-Mendes, P; Riccati, L; Romana, A; Saturnini, P; Santos, H; Scalas, E; Scomparin, E; Serci, S; Shahoyan, R; Sigaudo, F; Silva, S; Sitta, M; Sonderegger, P; Tarrago, X; Topilskaya, N S; Usai, G L; Vercellin, Ermanno; Villatte, L; Willis, N

    2002-01-01

    The J/$\\psi$ production in Pb-Pb interactions induced by 158 GeV/c incident Pb ions is studied as a function of centrality, as estimated from the neutral transverse energy or, alternatively, from the very forward hadronic energy of the collision. The J/$\\psi$ yield exhibits a similar pattern with a first drop for mid-peripheral collisions and a steady decrease for the most central reactions. Conventional hadronic models axe unable to fairly reproduce this trend which finds a natural explanation in a deconfined quark-gluon phase scenario. The J/$\\psi$ transverse momentum distributions and their dependence with centrality are also reviewed in this presentation. (20 refs).

  16. Inelastic Leptoproduction of J/Psi Mesons at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Mangano, S.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Samson, J.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; zur Nedden, M.

    2002-01-01

    The leptoproduction of J/psi mesons is studied in inelastic reactions for four momentum transfers 2psi fractional energy, z, which deviates significantly from that of the data. Comparisons with photoproduction are made and the polarisation of the produced J/psi meson is analysed.

  17. High pressure study of low compressibility tetracalcium aluminum carbonate hydrates 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·11H2O

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Juhyuk; Oh, Jae Eun; Balonis, Magdalena; Glasser, Fredrik P.; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data was collected from a sample of monocarboaluminate 3CaO•Al2O3•CaCO 3•11H2O from ambient pressure to 4.3 GPa. The refined crystal structure at ambient pressure is triclinic with parameters a = 5.77(2) Å, b = 8

  18. Exclusive J/$\\psi$ and $\\psi$(2S) production in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Exclusive $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi(2S)$ vector meson production has been observed in the dimuon channel using the LHCb detector. The cross-section times branching fractions to two muons with pseudorapidities between 2.0 and 4.5 are measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\sigma_{pp\\rightarrow J/\\psi (\\rightarrow \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-})} (2.0 <\\eta_{\\mu^{\\pm}}< 4.5) = 307 \\pm 21 \\pm 36~\\text{pb}, \\end{equation*} \\begin{equation*} \\sigma_{pp\\rightarrow \\psi(2S) (\\rightarrow \\mu^{+} \\mu^{-})} (2.0 <\\eta_{\\mu^{\\pm}}< 4.5) = 7.8 \\pm 1.3 \\pm 1.0~\\text{pb}, \\end{equation*} where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. The measurements are found to be in good agreement with results from previous experiments and theoretical predictions. The $J/\\psi$ photoproduction cross-section has been measured as a function of the photon-proton centre-of-mass energy. The results are consistent with measurements obtained at HERA and confirm a similar power law behaviour for the photoproduction cross-se...

  19. An Efficient, Semi-implicit Pressure-based Scheme Employing a High-resolution Finitie Element Method for Simulating Transient and Steady, Inviscid and Viscous, Compressible Flows on Unstructured Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard C. Martineau; Ray A. Berry

    2003-04-01

    A new semi-implicit pressure-based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) scheme for simulating a wide range of transient and steady, inviscid and viscous compressible flow on unstructured finite elements is presented here. This new CFD scheme, termed the PCICEFEM (Pressure-Corrected ICE-Finite Element Method) scheme, is composed of three computational phases, an explicit predictor, an elliptic pressure Poisson solution, and a semiimplicit pressure-correction of the flow variables. The PCICE-FEM scheme is capable of second-order temporal accuracy by incorporating a combination of a time-weighted form of the two-step Taylor-Galerkin Finite Element Method scheme as an explicit predictor for the balance of momentum equations and the finite element form of a time-weighted trapezoid rule method for the semi-implicit form of the governing hydrodynamic equations. Second-order spatial accuracy is accomplished by linear unstructured finite element discretization. The PCICE-FEM scheme employs Flux-Corrected Transport as a high-resolution filter for shock capturing. The scheme is capable of simulating flows from the nearly incompressible to the high supersonic flow regimes. The PCICE-FEM scheme represents an advancement in mass-momentum coupled, pressurebased schemes. The governing hydrodynamic equations for this scheme are the conservative form of the balance of momentum equations (Navier-Stokes), mass conservation equation, and total energy equation. An operator splitting process is performed along explicit and implicit operators of the semi-implicit governing equations to render the PCICE-FEM scheme in the class of predictor-corrector schemes. The complete set of semi-implicit governing equations in the PCICE-FEM scheme are cast in this form, an explicit predictor phase and a semi-implicit pressure-correction phase with the elliptic pressure Poisson solution coupling the predictor-corrector phases. The result of this predictor-corrector formulation is that the pressure Poisson

  20. Pressure Measurement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the 600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  1. Effect of compressibility on the hypervelocity penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W. J.; Chen, X. W.; Chen, P.

    2018-02-01

    We further consider the effect of rod strength by employing the compressible penetration model to study the effect of compressibility on hypervelocity penetration. Meanwhile, we define different instances of penetration efficiency in various modified models and compare these penetration efficiencies to identify the effects of different factors in the compressible model. To systematically discuss the effect of compressibility in different metallic rod-target combinations, we construct three cases, i.e., the penetrations by the more compressible rod into the less compressible target, rod into the analogously compressible target, and the less compressible rod into the more compressible target. The effects of volumetric strain, internal energy, and strength on the penetration efficiency are analyzed simultaneously. It indicates that the compressibility of the rod and target increases the pressure at the rod/target interface. The more compressible rod/target has larger volumetric strain and higher internal energy. Both the larger volumetric strain and higher strength enhance the penetration or anti-penetration ability. On the other hand, the higher internal energy weakens the penetration or anti-penetration ability. The two trends conflict, but the volumetric strain dominates in the variation of the penetration efficiency, which would not approach the hydrodynamic limit if the rod and target are not analogously compressible. However, if the compressibility of the rod and target is analogous, it has little effect on the penetration efficiency.

  2. $J/\\psi+Z$ production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    We briefly review recent results which we have obtained in the study of J/psi+Z production at the LHC. Considering our NLO computation in the Colour Evaporation Model (CEM) as an upper theory limit for the single-parton-scattering contributions, we claim that the existing data set from ATLAS points at a dominant double-parton-scattering contribution with an effective cross section smaller than that for jet-related observables. As a side product of our analysis, we have computed, for the first time, the one-loop QCD corrections to the J/psi P_T-differential cross section in the CEM.

  3. Observation of the $B^0_{s}\\to\\psi{(2\\mathrm{S})}\\eta$ and $B^0_{(s)}\\to\\psi{(2\\mathrm{S})}\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Oyanguren Campos, M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lohn, S; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Mcnab, A; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polikarpov, S; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    First observations of the $B^0_s \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\eta$, $B^0 \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $B^0_s \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decays are made using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 $fb^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV. The ratios of the branching fractions of each of the $\\psi(2S)$ modes with respect to the corresponding $J/\\psi$ decays are \\[ \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^0_s \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\eta) }{\\mathcal{B}(B^0_s \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\eta)} =0.83\\pm0.14\\,(stat)\\pm0.12\\,(syst)\\pm0.02\\,(\\mathcal{B}), \\] \\[ \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^0 \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-)}{\\mathcal{B}(B^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-)} =0.56\\pm0.07\\,(stat)\\pm0.05\\,(syst)\\pm0.01\\,(\\mathcal{B}), \\] \\[ \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B^0_s \\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+ \\pi^-)}{\\mathcal{B}(B^0_s \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-)} =0.34\\pm0.04\\,(stat)\\pm0.03\\,(syst)\\pm0.01\\,(\\mathcal{B}), \\] where the third uncertainty corresponds to the ...

  4. Calibration of flavour tagging with B+ -> J/psi(mm)K+ and B0 ->J/psi(mm)K* control channels at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Calvi, M; Leroy, O; Musy, M; Poss, S; Vecchi, S

    2009-01-01

    B+ -> J/psi(mm)K+ and B0 ->J/psi(mm)K* are suitable control channels for the calibration of flavour tagging for CP measurements in Bs ->J/psi(mm) phi and B0 ->J/psi(mm)KS channels; in the first case if opposite side tagging only is considered. In this note we describe the calibration of the probability of mistag performed with B+ ->J/psi(mm)K+ events and the measurement of the mistag performed with B0 ->J/psi(mm)K* events in a fit to flavour oscillation as a function of proper time. Models are developed to extract this information from selected events taking into account different background components. An expected statistical sensitivity on the average opposite side mistag rate sigma(wOS)/ wOS = 0.3 % is obtained for B0 ->J/psi(mm)K* events, in 2 fb-1 of data.

  5. Suppression of inclusive J/$\\mathbf{\\psi}$ and $\\mathbf{\\psi}$(2S) production in p-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Biswarup

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration has studied inclusive J/$\\psi$ and $\\psi$(2S) production in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.02$ TeV with the Muon Spectrometer. The measurement was performed at forward (2.03 $<$ $y_{\\rm cms}$ $<$ 3.53) and backward ($-$4.46 $<$ $y_{\\rm cms}$ $<$ $-$2.96) centre of mass rapidities. The nuclear modification factor of J/$\\psi$ and $\\psi$(2S) has been measured as a function of transverse momentum and event activity. Theoretical models based on nuclear shadowing, coherent energy loss or both are in reasonable agreement with the J/$\\psi$ results but cannot describe the $\\psi$(2S) behaviour. Other mechanisms must be invoked in order to explain the $\\psi$(2S) suppression in p-Pb collisions.

  6. The US proliferation security initiative (PSI); L'initiative americaine de securite contre la proliferation (PSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, B

    2004-10-01

    The proliferation security initiative (PSI), launched by President Bush on May 31, 2003, aims at intercepting any transfer of mass destruction weapons, of their vectors and related equipments, towards or coming from countries or organizations suspected to have a proliferation activity. This initiative, which involves coercive means to fight against proliferation, raises international lawfulness and legal questions, the answers of which are today under construction. This article analyzes the place of the European Union in the PSI, the action means (optimization of existing means, cooperation between intelligence and interception services), and the PSI stakes (lawfulness with respect to the international law, bilateral agreements, draft boarding agreement, sustain of the United Nations, widening of the partnership and of the field of action). (J.S.)

  7. Treatment of fully enclosed FSI using artificial compressibility

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bogaers, Alfred EJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available artificial compressibility (AC), whereby the fluid equations are modified to allow for compressibility which internally incorporates an approximation of the system volume change as a function of pressure....

  8. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  9. 49 CFR 192.621 - Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Operations § 192.621 Maximum allowable operating pressure: High-pressure distribution systems. (a) No person may operate a segment of a high pressure distribution system at a pressure that exceeds the... segment of a distribution system otherwise designed to operate at over 60 p.s.i. (414 kPa) gage, unless...

  10. Variation of the Jahn-Teller distortion with pressure in the layered perovskite Rb{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4}: local and crystal compressibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, F [DCITIMAC, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander 39005 (Spain); RodrIguez, F [DCITIMAC, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander 39005 (Spain); Valiente, R [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander 39005 (Spain); Hanfland, M [ESRF, BP220, 156 rue des Martires, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Itie, J P [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, B77 4 Place Jussieu 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2007-08-29

    This work investigates the effect of pressure on the Jahn-Teller distortion (JTD) associated with the axially elongated CuCl{sub 6} octahedra in the A{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} perovskite layer (A: Rb, CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NH{sub 3}, C{sub 3}H{sub 7}NH{sub 3}). The aim is to elucidate whether pressure favours disappearance of the JTD in the antiferrodistortive (AFD) structure exhibited by Cu{sup 2+} within the layers or whether it induces tilts of the CuCl{sub 6} octahedra preserving the molecular distortion associated with the JT effect. We have carried out x-ray absorption (XAS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments under pressure along the compound series, whose interlayer distances at ambient pressure vary from 7.77 to 12.33 A. The use of both XAS and XRD techniques allows us a complete local- and crystal-structure characterization in Rb{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} as a function of pressure in the 0-16 GPa range. We show that pressure reduces the axial (long) and equatorial (short) Cu-Cl distances, R{sub ax} and R{sub eq}, as well as the intralayer and interlayer Cu-Cu distances, d{sub Cu-Cu} and d{sub inter}. Interestingly, the variation of R{sub ax} is an order of magnitude bigger than that of the corresponding R{sub eq}, yielding a reduction of the JTD. However, no evidence of JTD suppression has been observed below 16 GPa. Pressure-induced CuCl{sub 6} tilting preserves the JTD in a wide pressure range. Estimates based on structural data suggest that JT suppression would occur at about 40 GPa.

  11. Variation of the Jahn-Teller distortion with pressure in the layered perovskite Rb2CuCl4: local and crystal compressibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguado, F; RodrIguez, F; Valiente, R; Hanfland, M; Itie, J P

    2007-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of pressure on the Jahn-Teller distortion (JTD) associated with the axially elongated CuCl 6 octahedra in the A 2 CuCl 4 perovskite layer (A: Rb, CH 3 NH 3 , C 2 H 5 NH 3 , C 3 H 7 NH 3 ). The aim is to elucidate whether pressure favours disappearance of the JTD in the antiferrodistortive (AFD) structure exhibited by Cu 2+ within the layers or whether it induces tilts of the CuCl 6 octahedra preserving the molecular distortion associated with the JT effect. We have carried out x-ray absorption (XAS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments under pressure along the compound series, whose interlayer distances at ambient pressure vary from 7.77 to 12.33 A. The use of both XAS and XRD techniques allows us a complete local- and crystal-structure characterization in Rb 2 CuCl 4 as a function of pressure in the 0-16 GPa range. We show that pressure reduces the axial (long) and equatorial (short) Cu-Cl distances, R ax and R eq , as well as the intralayer and interlayer Cu-Cu distances, d Cu-Cu and d inter . Interestingly, the variation of R ax is an order of magnitude bigger than that of the corresponding R eq , yielding a reduction of the JTD. However, no evidence of JTD suppression has been observed below 16 GPa. Pressure-induced CuCl 6 tilting preserves the JTD in a wide pressure range. Estimates based on structural data suggest that JT suppression would occur at about 40 GPa

  12. Plant for compacting compressible radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baatz, H.; Rittscher, D.; Lueer, H.J.; Ambros, R.

    1983-01-01

    The waste is filled into auxiliary barrels made of sheet steel and compressed with the auxiliary barrels into steel jackets. These can be stacked in storage barrels. A hydraulic press is included in the plant, which has a horizontal compression chamber and a horizontal pressure piston, which works against a counter bearing slider. There is a filling and emptying device for the pressure chamber behind the counter bearing slider. The auxiliary barrels can be introduced into the compression chamber by the filling and emptying device. The pressure piston also pushes out the steel jackets formed, so that they are taken to the filling and emptying device. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Pressure correction schemes for compressible flows: application to baro-tropic Navier-Stokes equations and to drift-flux model; Methodes de correction de pression pour les ecoulements compressibles: application aux equations de Navier-Stokes barotropes et au modele de derive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gastaldo, L

    2007-11-15

    We develop in this PhD thesis a simulation tool for bubbly flows encountered in some late phases of a core-melt accident in pressurized water reactors, when the flow of molten core and vessel structures comes to chemically interact with the concrete of the containment floor. The physical modelling is based on the so-called drift-flux model, consisting of mass balance and momentum balance equations for the mixture (Navier-Stokes equations) and a mass balance equation for the gaseous phase. First, we propose a pressure correction scheme for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations based on mixed non-conforming finite elements. An ad hoc discretization of the advection operator, by a finite volume technique based on a dual mesh, ensures the stability of the velocity prediction step. A priori estimates for the velocity and the pressure yields the existence of the solution. We prove that this scheme is stable, in the sense that the discrete entropy is decreasing. For the conservation equation of the gaseous phase, we build a finite volume discretization which satisfies a discrete maximum principle. From this last property, we deduce the existence and the uniqueness of the discrete solution. Finally, on the basis of these works, a conservative and monotone scheme which is stable in the low Mach number limit, is build for the drift-flux model. This scheme enjoys, moreover, the following property: the algorithm preserves a constant pressure and velocity through moving interfaces between phases (i.e. contact discontinuities of the underlying hyperbolic system). In order to satisfy this property at the discrete level, we build an original pressure correction step which couples the mass balance equation with the transport terms of the gas mass balance equation, the remaining terms of the gas mass balance being taken into account with a splitting method. We prove the existence of a discrete solution for the pressure correction step. Numerical results are presented; they

  14. Inclusive Psi(2S) production in p-Pb collisions with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaldi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE Collaboration has studied the inclusive $\\psi(\\rm 2S)$ production in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.02$ TeV at the CERN LHC. Measurements are performed, in the $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ decay channel, in a forward (2.03$psi(\\rm 2S)$ production is compared to the $\\rm J/\\psi$ one through the double ratio $[\\sigma_{\\psi(\\rm 2S)}/\\sigma_{\\rm J/\\psi}]_{\\rm pPb}/[\\sigma_{\\psi(\\rm 2S)}/\\sigma_{\\rm J/\\psi}]_{\\rm pp}$ between the cross sections evaluated in p-Pb and pp collisions and by calculating the $\\rm J/\\psi$ and $\\psi(\\rm 2S)$ nuclear modification factors. Results indicate that the $\\psi(\\rm 2S)$ production is suppressed with respect to pp and, in particular in the backward rapidity region, the suppression is stronger than the $\\rm J/\\psi$ one. This unexpected difference between the $\\rm J/\\psi$ and $\\psi(\\rm 2S)$ behaviour, not ...

  15. Moessbauer effect measurements on NpAs at high pressures and compressibility determination by means of angular dispersive X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potzel, U.A.

    1987-01-01

    The intermetallic compound NpAs was studied with the help of the 60 keV Mossbauer resonance in 237 Np within a temperature range between 4.2 K and room temperature, and under quasi-hydrostatic pressures (of up to 85 kbar). Furthermore, the modification of the lattice parameter with the pressure of up to 99 kbar at room temperature was determined with the help of a Guinier X-ray diffractometer. In both experimental methods, the pressure in Cu-Be forming pliers was transmitted to the pulverized sample material via two B 4 C punches. At low temperatures (4.2 K) and under zero pressure, NpAs crystallizes with a cubic NaCl structure and an antiferromagnetic order. Between T=154 K and T=173 K we find a tetragonal crystalline structure with several complex magnetic phases. If the external pressure is raised at a temperature of 4.2 K, then a considerable reduction of the magnetic hyperfine field B hf , the isomeric shift S and the Neel temperature T N is observed. Under pressures above 26 kbar, a new magnetic phase emerges in which two magnetic hyperfine fields (B 1 and B 2 ) are measured. The surprisingly strong pressure dependence of the hyperfine field parameters B hf and S as well as of the Neel temperature and the low value of the bulk modulus of NpAs by comparison with the alloys DyAl 2 , NpCo 2 Si 2 , NpAl 2 and NpOS 2 is a strong indication of the fact that the 5f electrons of neptunium are far less strongly localized than has so far been assumed, and that they hybridize to a considerable extent with the 4s, 4p and possibly with the 3d electrons of the As ligands. (orig./RB) [de

  16. PSI condensed matter research and material sciences progress report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeggeler, H.W.; Lorenzen, R.

    1991-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the research performed in 1990 at PSI's research department F3 in the fields of muon spectroscopy, neutron scattering, accelerator mass spectroscopy, applied and technical physics, geochemistry, trace elements, aerosol chemistry, heavy elements, defect physics, PIREX and spallation neutron source project. figs., tabs., refs

  17. Evidence for the decay X -> psi(2S)gamma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Esen, S.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Men, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jezabek, M.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanii, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manzali, M.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Main Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sanchez, A. Martin; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matey, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Montei, S.; Moran, D.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W. W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Romero, D. A. Roa; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spinella, F.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Sierra, C. Vazquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    Evidence for the decay mode X(3872) -> psi(2S)gamma in B+ -> X(3872)K+ decays is found with a significance of 4.4 standard deviations. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton proton collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), collected with the LHCb detector, at

  18. Polarized neutron physics at P.S.I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, G.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the characteristics of the recent polarized neutron facility using the existing unpolarized neutron beam line nE1 developed at PSI and of the future nAl beam line are given. The physics program which started in 1986 is presented

  19. The PSI web interface to the EPICS channel archiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudenz Jud; Luedeke, A.; Portmann, W.

    2012-01-01

    the EPICS (Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System) channel archiver is used at different facilities at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute) like the Swiss Light Source or the medical cyclotron. The EPICS channel archiver is a powerful tool to collect control system data of thousands of EPICS process variables with rates of many Hertz each to an archive for later retrieval. Within the package of the channel archiver version 2 you get a Java application for graphical data retrieval and a command line tool for data extraction into different file formats. For the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) we wanted a possibility to retrieve the archived data from a web interface. It was desired to have flexible retrieval functions and to allow interchanging data references by e-mail. This web interface has been implemented by the PSI controls group and has now been in operation for several years. This paper will highlight the special features of the PSI web interface to the EPICS channel archiver

  20. Radiative transitions from the psi (3095) to ordinary hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharre, D.L.

    1980-05-01

    Preliminary results from the Mark II and Crystal Ball experiments on radiative transitions from the psi to ordinary hadrons are presented. In additon to the previously observed transitions to the eta, eta'(958), and f(1270), both groups observe a transition to a state which is tentatively identified as the E(1420).

  1. Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) annual report 1996. General volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzmann, M. [ed.

    1997-03-01

    This annual report presents an overview of the work performed by the PSI research departments including the supporting services and deals with the theme `Neutrons for the research: SINQ`. Information is communicated on the status of the Swiss Light Source project (SLS). figs., tabs.

  2. Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) annual report 1996. General volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzmann, M.

    1997-03-01

    This annual report presents an overview of the work performed by the PSI research departments including the supporting services and deals with the theme 'Neutrons for the research: SINQ'. Information is communicated on the status of the Swiss Light Source project (SLS). figs., tabs

  3. Low pressure process for continuous fiber reinforced polyamic acid resin matrix composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druyun, Darleen A. (Inventor); Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Kidder, Paul W. (Inventor); Reddy, Rakasi M. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A low pressure processor was developed for preparing a well-consolidated polyimide composite laminate. Prepreg plies were formed from unidirectional fibers and a polyamic acid resin solution. Molding stops were placed at the sides of a matched metal die mold. The prepreg plies were cut shorter than the length of the mold in the in-plane lateral direction and were stacked between the molding stops to a height which was higher than the molding stops. The plies were then compressed to the height of the stops and heated to allow the volatiles to escape and to start the imidization reaction. After removing the stops from the mold, the heat was increased and 0 - 500 psi was applied to complete the imidization reaction. The heat and pressure were further increased to form a consolidated polyimide composite laminate.

  4. Evidence for the decay $B^0 \\to J/\\psi \\omega$ and measurement of the relative branching fractions of $B^0_s$ meson decays to $J/\\psi \\eta$ and $J/\\psi \\eta'$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Komarov, V; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Maino, M; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, H; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    First evidence of the $\\mathrm{B}^0\\to J/\\psi\\omega$ decay is found and the $\\mathrm{B}_{s}^0\\to J/\\psi\\eta$ and $\\mathrm{B}_{s}^0\\to J/\\psi\\eta^{\\prime}$ decays are studied using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0~$\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 7$~TeV. The branching fractions of these decays are measured relative to that of the $\\mathrm{B}^0\\to J/\\psi\\rho^0$ decay: %The following ratios are measured \\begin{equation} \\begin{array}{lll} \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(\\mathrm{B}^0\\to J/\\psi\\omega)}{\\mathcal{B}(\\mathrm{B}^0\\to J/\\psi\\rho^0)} $=$ \\:0.89 \\pm0.19\\,(\\mathrm{stat})\\,^{+0.07}_{-0.13}\\,(\\mathrm{syst}),\

  5. Observation of B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi and measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Beta(B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi)/Beta(B(0)(s)-->J/PsiPhi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Haim, E Ben; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'orso, M; Paoli, F Delli; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Sciveres, M Garcia; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-06-16

    We report the first observation of B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi decay in p(p_) collisions at square root of 8=1.96 TeV using 360 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We observe 20.2 +/- 5.0 and 12.3 +/- 4.1 B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi candidates, in Psi(2S)-->mu(+)mu(-) and Phi(2S)-->J/Phipi(+)pi(-) decay modes, respectively. We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction Beta(B(0)(s)-->Psi(2S)Phi)/Beta(B(0)(s)-->J/PsiPhi)=0.52 +/- 0.13(stat) +/- 0.04(syst) +/- 0.06(BR) using the Psi(2S)-->mu(+)mu(-) decay mode.

  6. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately

  7. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  8. High pressure study of low compressibility tetracalcium aluminum carbonate hydrates 3CaO·Al2O3·CaCO3·11H2O

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Juhyuk

    2012-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data was collected from a sample of monocarboaluminate 3CaO•Al2O3•CaCO 3•11H2O from ambient pressure to 4.3 GPa. The refined crystal structure at ambient pressure is triclinic with parameters a = 5.77(2) Å, b = 8.47(5) Å, c = 9.93(4) Å, α = 64.6(2)°, β = 82.8(3)°, γ = 81.4(4)°, and space group of P1 or P1̄. It showed some degree of perfectly reversible pressure-induced dehydration with a non-hygroscopic pressure-transmitting medium. However the dehydration effect does not critically affect a bulk modulus due to its strong framework. The isothermal bulk modulus of monocarboaluminate was found to be 53(5) GPa and 54(4) GPa with 3rd order and 2nd order Birch-Murnaghan Equation of state, respectively. That value is higher than for any other reported AFm or AFt phase. The pressure-volume behavior of the monocarboaluminate was compared with that of previous studied hemicarboaluminate. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of synthetic oil in a compression refrigeration system using R410A. Part II: quality of heat transfer and pressure losses within the heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottin, O.; Guillemet, P. [Ecole Polytechnique de l' Universite de Nantes (France). Laboratoire de Thermocinetique; Lebreton, J-M. [Electricite de France, Moret sur Loing (France)

    2003-11-01

    The consequences of the oil rejected by the compressor of a vapour-compression refrigeration system on the operation of the evaporator and condenser are analysed. The modelled prototype uses the mixture of HFC R410A and a synthetic polyolester (POE) oil. The rise of the amount of lubricant circulating in the system leads to a progressive change in the behaviour of the mixture of refrigerant and oil that, for the higher oil mass fraction, evolves like a zeotropic mixture. One also observes that the presence of lubricant is generally associated with a fall of the performances of the heat exchangers, except however in the evaporator where an optimum is observed when the quantity of oil is equal to 0.1% of the total mass of the mixture. Some conclusions are drawn about the choice of correlations for the calculation of the refrigerant side heat transfer coefficient in a plate evaporator. (author)

  10. Magnum-PSI: A new plasma-wall interaction experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppers, W.; Eck, H. van; Scholten, J.

    2006-01-01

    The FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen is preparing the construction of Magnum-PSI, a magnetized (3 T), steady-state, large area (diameter 10 cm), high-flux plasma (10 24 ions m -2 s -1 generator. The aim of the linear plasma device Magnum-PSI is to provide a controlled, highly accessible laboratory experiment in which the interaction of a magnetized plasma with different surfaces can be studied in detail. Plasma parameters can be varied over a wide range, in particular covering the high-density, low-temperature conditions expected for the detached divertor plasma of ITER. The target set-up will be extremely flexible allowing the investigation of different materials under a large variety of conditions (temperatures, inclination, biasing, coatings, etc.). A range of target materials will be used, including carbon, tungsten and other metals, and mixed materials. Because of the large plasma beam of 10 cm diameter and spacious vacuum tank, even the test of whole plasma-facing component mock-ups will be possible. Dedicated diagnostics will be installed to allow for detailed studies of the fundamental physics and chemistry of plasma-surface interaction, such as erosion and deposition, hydrogen recycling, retention and removal, dust and layer formation, plasma sheath physics and heat loads (steady-state or transient). Magnum-PSI will be a unique experiment to address the ITER divertor physics which will essentially differ from present day Tokamak and/or linear plasma generator physics. In this contribution, we will present the pre-design of the Magnum-PSI experiment. We will discuss the requirements on the vacuum system, 3T superconducting magnet, plasma source, target manipulator and additional plasma heating. In addition, we will briefly introduce the plasma and surface diagnostics that will be used in the Magnum-PSI experiment. (author)

  11. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  12. Observation of the decay $B_c^+ \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Oyanguren Campos, M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lohn, S; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Mcnab, A; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The decay $B_c^+ \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+$ with $\\psi(2S) \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ is observed with a significance of $5.2\\,\\sigma$ using $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 $fb^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment. The branching fraction of $B_c^+ \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+$ decays relative to that of the $B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+$ mode is measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B_c^+ \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+)}{\\mathcal{B}(B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+)} = 0.250 \\pm 0.068 \\,\\text{stat} \\pm 0.014 \\,\\text{\\syst} \\pm 0.006 \\,(\\mathcal{B}). \\end{equation*} The last term is the uncertainty on the ratio $\\mathcal{B}(\\psi(2S) \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-)/\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-)$.

  13. Compressed air energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Frederick W.; Kartsounes, George T.

    1981-01-01

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  14. J/psi and psi(2S) production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); et al.

    2012-02-01

    A measurement of the J/psi and psi(2S) production cross sections in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 37 inverse picobarns. Using a fit to the invariant mass and decay length distributions, production cross sections have been measured separately for prompt and non-prompt charmonium states, as a function of the meson transverse momentum in several rapidity ranges. In addition, cross sections restricted to the acceptance of the CMS detector are given, which are not affected by the polarization of the charmonium states. The ratio of the differential production cross sections of the two states, where systematic uncertainties largely cancel, is also determined. The branching fraction of the inclusive B to psi(2S) X decay is extracted from the ratio of the non-prompt cross sections to be: BR(B to psi(2S) X) = (3.08 +/- 0.12(stat.+syst.) +/- 0.13(theor.) +/- 0.42(BR[PDG])) 10^-3

  15. J/$\\psi$ and $\\psi$(2S) production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Trauner, Christine; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Benucci, Leonardo; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; 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Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Tornier, Daiske; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Cakir, Altan; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Rosin, Michele; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Bauer, Julia; Berger, Joram; Buege, Volker; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Feindt, Michael; Gruschke, Jasmin; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kuhr, Thomas; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Renz, Manuel; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Petrakou, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Triantis, Frixos A; Aranyi, Attila; Bencze, Gyorgy; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Kapusi, Anita; Krajczar, Krisztian; Sikler, Ferenc; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Veszpremi, Viktor; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Anil; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Gupta, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Devdatta; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Saha, Anirban; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Romano, Francesco; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Tupputi, Salvatore; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Giunta, Marina; Grandi, Claudio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Mazzucato, Mirco; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Baesso, Paolo; Berzano, Umberto; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Viviani, Claudio; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Caponeri, Benedetta; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Valdata, Marisa; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Rizzi, Andrea; Segneri, Gabriele; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Franci, Daniele; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Heo, Seong Gu; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Martisiute, Dalia; Petrov, Pavel; Polujanskas, Mindaugas; Sabonis, Tomas; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Tam, Jason; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Silverwood, Hamish; Tambe, Norbert; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Nayak, Aruna; Pela, Joao; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kossov, Mikhail; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bernet, Colin; Bialas, Wojciech; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Breuker, Horst; Bunkowski, Karol; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Curé, Benoît; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaddi, Andrea; Georgiou, Georgios; Gerwig, Hubert; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Guiducci, Luigi; Gundacker, Stefan; Hansen, Magnus; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hegner, Benedikt; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Lecoq, Paul; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Cittolin, Sergio; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marchica, Carmelo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Milenovic, Predrag; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Matthias; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Snoek, Hella; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Uzun, Dilber; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Özbek, Melih; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Camanzi, Barbara; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Ballin, Jamie; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Tourneur, Stephane; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Wardrope, David; Whyntie, Tom; Barrett, Matthew; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Henderson, Conor; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Liu, Haidong; Mall, Orpheus; Maruyama, Sho; Miceli, Tia; Pellett, Dave; Robles, Jorge; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Arisaka, Katsushi; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Tucker, Jordan; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pi, Haifeng; Pieri, Marco; Ranieri, Riccardo; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Jun, Soon Yung; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Zang, Shi-Lei; Agostino, Lorenzo; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Puigh, Darren; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Shi, Xin; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Biselli, Angela; Cirino, Guy; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Atac, Muzaffer; Bakken, Jon Alan; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cooper, William; Eartly, David P; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Esen, Selda; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jensen, Hans; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Miao, Ting; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pivarski, James; Pordes, Ruth; Prokofyev, Oleg; Schwarz, Thomas; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Goldberg, Sean; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Myeonghun, Park; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Schmitt, Michael; Scurlock, Bobby; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Wang, Dayong; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Sekmen, Sezen; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kunde, Gerd J; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Silvestre, Catherine; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Lae, Chung Khim; McCliment, Edward; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Olson, Jonathan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Bonato, Alessio; Eskew, Christopher; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Tran, Nhan Viet; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Rossato, Kenneth; Rumerio, Paolo; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Alver, Burak; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Harris, Philip; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lee, Yen-Jie; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Cushman, Priscilla; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rekovic, Vladimir; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Godang, Romulus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Summers, Don; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Jindal, Pratima; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Smith, Kenneth; Wan, Zongru; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Reucroft, Steve; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Kolberg, Ted; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Ziegler, Jill; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Killewald, Phillip; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Laird, Edward; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Borrello, Laura; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Flacher, Henning; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Gotra, Yury; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Petrillo, Gianluca; Sakumoto, Willis; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Atramentov, Oleksiy; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hits, Dmitry; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Richards, Alan; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Gurrola, Alfredo; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Bardak, Cemile; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Mane, Poonam; Roh, Youn; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Yazgan, Efe; Appelt, Eric; Brownson, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Issah, Michael; Johns, Willard; Johnston, Cody; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Conetti, Sergio; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goadhouse, Stephen; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Bellinger, James Nugent; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Efron, Jonathan; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Parker, William; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua; Weinberg, Marc

    2012-01-01

    A measurement of the J/$\\psi$ and psi(2S) production cross sections in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC is presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 37 inverse picobarns. Using a fit to the invariant mass and decay length distributions, production cross sections have been measured separately for prompt and non-prompt charmonium states, as a function of the meson transverse momentum in several rapidity ranges. In addition, cross sections restricted to the acceptance of the CMS detector are given, which are not affected by the polarization of the charmonium states. The ratio of the differential production cross sections of the two states, where systematic uncertainties largely cancel, is also determined. The branching fraction of the inclusive B to psi(2S) X decay is extracted from the ratio of the non-prompt cross sections to be: $BR(B \\to \\psi(2S) X) = (3.08 \\pm 0.12(stat.+syst.) \\pm 0.13(theor.) \\pm 0.42(BR_{PDG}))\\times 10^{-3}$.

  16. Compressive strength of different brands of cement (OPC) in province of Sindh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, G.B.; Kumar, A.; Sheikh, A.

    2009-01-01

    OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement) is the most common type of cement used in construction industry. Three major brands of OPC are normal OPC, SRC (Sulphate Resisting Cement) and SC (Slag Cement). It is seen that the variation in constituents of cement may cause serious effects on the quality of cement. Thus the motivation of this research is to study the basic properties (consistency, setting time, and fineness), compressive strength (cement mortar and concrete cubes) and modulus of elasticity of all the OPC brands (OPC, SRC and SC) manufactured in Sindh. In total 10 cement factories, altogether 21 different brands of cement, were studied in the light of BS and ASTM Code specifications. In total 126 mortar cubes (1:3), 252 concrete cubes (126 for 3000 psi mix design and remaining for 5000 psi) and 126 concrete cylinders (6 for the each brand of cement pertaining to 3000 psi and 5000 psi mix design) were manufactured and tested. Experimental results demonstrated that all the cement brands fulfilled the BS and ASTM Code requirements for (i) basic properties (ii) compressive strength of mortar cubes at 3 and 28 days curing age (iii) compressive strength of concrete cubes at 28 days curing age, and (iv) modulus of elasticity. Some of the cements did not fulfill the BS and ASTM Code requirements for compressive strength of concrete cubes at 7 days curing age. (author)

  17. Distinct binding interactions of HIV-1 Gag to Psi and non-Psi RNAs: implications for viral genomic RNA packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Joseph A; Jones, Christopher P; Parent, Leslie J; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-08-01

    Despite the vast excess of cellular RNAs, precisely two copies of viral genomic RNA (gRNA) are selectively packaged into new human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) particles via specific interactions between the HIV-1 Gag and the gRNA psi (ψ) packaging signal. Gag consists of the matrix (MA), capsid, nucleocapsid (NC), and p6 domains. Binding of the Gag NC domain to ψ is necessary for gRNA packaging, but the mechanism by which Gag selectively interacts with ψ is unclear. Here, we investigate the binding of NC and Gag variants to an RNA derived from ψ (Psi RNA), as well as to a non-ψ region (TARPolyA). Binding was measured as a function of salt to obtain the effective charge (Zeff) and nonelectrostatic (i.e., specific) component of binding, Kd(1M). Gag binds to Psi RNA with a dramatically reduced Kd(1M) and lower Zeff relative to TARPolyA. NC, GagΔMA, and a dimerization mutant of Gag bind TARPolyA with reduced Zeff relative to WT Gag. Mutations involving the NC zinc finger motifs of Gag or changes to the G-rich NC-binding regions of Psi RNA significantly reduce the nonelectrostatic component of binding, leading to an increase in Zeff. These results show that Gag interacts with gRNA using different binding modes; both the NC and MA domains are bound to RNA in the case of TARPolyA, whereas binding to Psi RNA involves only the NC domain. Taken together, these results suggest a novel mechanism for selective gRNA encapsidation.

  18. The QED contribution to J/{psi} plus light hadrons production at B-factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhi-Guo [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Wang, Jian-Xiong [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics; Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China). Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities

    2013-01-15

    To understand the direct J/{psi}+X{sub non-c} {sub anti} {sub c} production mechanism in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, in this work, we propose to measure the inclusive J/{psi} plus light hadrons (LH) production at B-factories and present a detailed study on its QED production due to {psi}(2S) feed-down, where the {psi}(2S) are produced in e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{psi}(2S)+{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{psi}(2S) +f anti f, f = lepton, lightquark, and QED contribution to direct J/{psi}+q anti q production with q = u, d, s quark. We find that the QED contribution is huge in the whole phase space region, but can be reduced largely and is in the same order as the QCD contribution when a suitable cut on the angel {theta}{sub J/{psi}} between J/{psi} and the e{sup +}e{sup -} beam is made. In this way, the cross section of J/{psi} + LH QCD production % which was predicted theoretical at next-to-leading order QCD together with relativistic correction, can be obtained by subtracting the QED contribution from the experimental measurement on inclusive J/{psi} plus light hadrons. To help to remove the QED background, we also calculate the angular and momentum distribution of J/{psi} in the QED contribution.

  19. Observation of the electromagnetic doubly OZI-suppressed decay J/psi -> phi pi(0)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of 1.31 billion J/psi events accumulated with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we report the observation of the decay J/psi -> phi pi(0), which is the first evidence for a doubly Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka suppressed electromagnetic J/psi decay. A clear structure is observed in the

  20. The Personality Psychopathology-Five (PSY-5): Recent Constructive Replication and Assessment Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Allan R.; Finn, Jacob A.; McNulty, John L.; Shields, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Personality Psychopathology-Five (PSY-5; Harkness & McNulty, 1994) is a model of individual differences relevant to adaptive functioning in both clinical and non-clinical populations. In this article, we review the development of the PSY-5 model (Harkness, 1992; Harkness & McNulty, 1994) and discuss the ways in which the PSY-5 model is…

  1. Model-independent evidence for $J/\\psi p$ contributions to $\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi p K^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hongming, Li; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-08-18

    The data sample of $\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi p K^-$ decays acquired with the LHCb detector from 7 and 8~TeV $pp$ collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$, is inspected for the presence of $J/\\psi p$ or $J/\\psi K^-$ contributions with minimal assumptions about $K^- p$ contributions. It is demonstrated at more than 9 standard deviations that $\\Lambda_b^0\\to J/\\psi p K^-$ decays cannot be described with $K^- p$ contributions alone, and that $J/\\psi p$ contributions play a dominant role in this incompatibility. These model-independent results support the previously obtained model-dependent evidence for $P_c^+\\to J/\\psi p$ charmonium-pentaquark states in the same data sample.

  2. Production of the J/psi and psi' (3.7) by 225-GeV/c π+- and proton beams on C and Sn targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branson, J.G.; Sanders, G.H.; Smith, A.J.S.; Thaler, J.J.; Anderson, K.J.; Henry, G.G.; McDonald, K.T.; Pilcher, J.E.; Rosenberg, E.I.

    1977-01-01

    We present results of a large-acceptance experiment in which muon pairs were observed in the mass range 0.6 to 6.0 GeV/c 2 . Emphasis is given to features of the production of J/psi and psi' (3.7) particles. We find [Bsigma]/sub psi prime//sub(/ 3 /sub ./ 7 )/[Bsigma]/sub J/ psi/ to be 0.007 +- 0.004 for p-C and 0.018 +- 0.007 for π + -C interactions. Comparison with results from e + e - storage rings indicates that both the J/psi and the psi' (3.7) are produced strongly rather than electromagnetically in our experiment

  3. Self-ignition and oxidation of various hydrocarbons between 600 and 1000 K at high pressure: experimental study with fast compression machine and modeling; Autoinflammation et oxydation de divers hydrocarbures entre 600 et 1000 K a haute pression: etude experimentale en machine a compression rapide et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribaucour, M.

    2002-12-01

    Low- and intermediate-temperature oxidation and self-ignition of hydrocarbons play a major role in spark ignition, diesel and HCCI (homogenous charge compression ignition) engines. A deep understanding of the chemistry linked with both phenomena is necessary to improve the engines efficiency and to reduce the formation of pollutants. This document treats of works about the self-ignition and oxidation at high pressure of various hydrocarbons between 600 and 1000 deg. K. The experimental tool used is a fast compression machine fitted with a fast sampling system for the measurement of self-ignition delays and of the concentrations of intermediate oxidation products. The advantages and limitations of this tool are discussed. The self-ignition of various hydrocarbons is compared using pre-defined data which characterize the phenomenologies like cold flames, negative temperature coefficients and self-ignition limits. The hydrocarbons considered are pure or binary mixtures of alkanes, pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. The development of high pressure oxidation reaction schemes of alkanes between 600 and 1000 deg. K is described. It is directly based on the analysis of intermediate oxidation products. This methodology is also applied to pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. The construction of detailed thermo-kinetic models of oxidation and the modeling of phenomena are made for n-butane, n-heptane, for the 3 pentane isomers, for pent-1-ene and n-butyl-benzene. Finally, the perspectives of future works are evoked. They concern new modeling and new methodologies to be applied in more predictive thermo-kinetic models and the reduction of detailed models in order to include them inside fluid dynamics codes. (J.S.)

  4. Experimental Studies of Diestrol-Micro Emulsion Fuel in a Direct Injection Compression Ignition Engine under Varying Injection Pressures and Timings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Gopal Radhakrishnan

    2018-02-01

    The research work on biodiesel becomes more attractive in the context of limited availability of petroleum fuels and rapid increase of harmful emissions from diesel engine using conventional fossil fuels. The present investigation has dealt with the influence of biodiesel-diesel-ethanol (diestrol) water micro emulsion fuel (B60D20E20M) on the performance, emission and combustion characteristics of a diesel engine under different injection pressure and timing. The results revealed that the maximum brake thermal efficiency of 32.4% was observed at an injection pressure of 260 bar and injection timing of 25.5°bTDC. In comparison with diesel, micro emulsion fuel showed reduction in carbon monoxide (CO) and total hydrocarbon (THC) by 40 and 24%, respectively. Further, micro emulsion fuel decreased nitric oxide (NO) emission and smoke emission by 7 and 20.7%, while the carbon dioxide (CO2) emission is similar to that of diesel.

  5. Measurements of psi -> K-Lambda(Xi)over-bar(+) + c.c. and psi -> gamma K-Lambda(Xi)over-bar(+) + c.c.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Duan, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, H. S.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of 1.06 x 10(8) psi(3686) events produced in e(+)e(-) collisions at root s = 3.686 GeV and collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we present studies of the decays psi(3686) -> K-Lambda(Xi) over bar (+) + c.c. and psi(3686) -> gamma K-Lambda(Xi) over bar (+) + c.c.

  6. Dual compression is not an uncommon type of iliac vein compression syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wan-Yin; Gu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Chang-Jian; Lou, Wen-Sheng; He, Xu

    2017-09-01

    Typical iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS) is characterized by compression of left common iliac vein (LCIV) by the overlying right common iliac artery (RCIA). We described an underestimated type of IVCS with dual compression by right and left common iliac arteries (LCIA) simultaneously. Thirty-one patients with IVCS were retrospectively included. All patients received trans-catheter venography and computed tomography (CT) examinations for diagnosing and evaluating IVCS. Late venography and reconstructed CT were used for evaluating the anatomical relationship among LCIV, RCIA and LCIA. Imaging manifestations as well as demographic data were collected and evaluated by two experienced radiologists. Sole and dual compression were found in 32.3% (n = 10) and 67.7% (n = 21) of 31 patients respectively. No statistical differences existed between them in terms of age, gender, LCIV diameter at the maximum compression point, pressure gradient across stenosis, and the percentage of compression level. On CT and venography, sole compression was commonly presented with a longitudinal compression at the orifice of LCIV while dual compression was usually presented as two types: one had a lengthy stenosis along the upper side of LCIV and the other was manifested by a longitudinal compression near to the orifice of external iliac vein. The presence of dual compression seemed significantly correlated with the tortuous LCIA (p = 0.006). Left common iliac vein can be presented by dual compression. This type of compression has typical manifestations on late venography and CT.

  7. Photoproduction of Inelastic and Elastic $J/\\psi$ Vector Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stundzia, Audrius Bronius [Toronto U.

    1992-06-01

    Results and analysis on the inelastic and elastic photoproduction of $J /\\psi$ vector mesons by Fermilab experiment E691 are presented. The inelastic, deep inelastic, coherent elastic and incoherent elastic cross sections were measured at ($E_{\\gamma}$) = 145 GeV. The $d\\sigma / dzdp^2_{\\tau}$} distribution and the photon energy dependence of the cross sections for these production processes were also measured. The deep inelastic $J /\\psi$ was analyzed in the colour-singlet photon-gluon-fusion model. It was found that the $d\\sigma / dzdp^2_{\\tau}$ distribution and the the rise of the cross section with $E\\gamma$ are both well described by a relatively soft gluon distribution [xG( x) $\\alpha$ ($1 - x )^{ng}$, where $n_g$ = 6.5 ± 1.1 (stat.)$^{+1.0}_{-0.6}$(syst.)].

  8. Modelling the Grimsel migration field experiments at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heer, W.

    1997-01-01

    For several years tracer migration experiments have been performed at Nagra's Grimsel Test Site as a joint undertaking of Nagra, PNC and PSI. The aims of modelling the migration experiments are (1) to better understand the nuclide transport through crystalline rock; (2) to gain information on validity of methods and correlating parameters; (3) to improve models for safety assessments. The PSI modelling results, presented here, show a consistent picture for the investigated tracers (the non-sorbing uranine, the weakly sorbing sodium, the moderately sorbing strontium and the more strongly sorbing cesium). They represent an important step in building up confidence in safety assessments for radioactive waste repositories. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs

  9. Spin tests for intermediate states in radiative psi'(3684) decay chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, P.K.; Hey, A.J.G.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the multiple angular-correlation functions for the sequential decays psi'(1 - ) → γ + chi, chi → M anti M, where M is a spinless meson, and psi'(1 - ) → γ 1 + chi, chi → γ 2 + psi, psi (1 - ) → l anti l, when the psi' is formed in e + e - collisions, shows that these can unambiguously distinguish between the spin assignments s/sub chi/ = 0, 1 or 2 for the intermediate states occurring in these decays, as well as determine the multipole amplitudes contributing to the radiative transitions. No dynamical assumptions are made beyond the conservation of angular momentum and parity; recoils are fully taken into account

  10. Analysis of Energy Consumption of "Compression Heat" Pressure Heat Dryer%“压缩热”干燥机能耗分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李申

    2015-01-01

    作为典型的热质交换设备,吸附干燥器再生能量是被吸水量锁定的。总耗能受到吸附剂本身物理性质的制约,可用“质量守恒”与“能量守恒”两大定律来解释其能耗过程。各类吸附干燥器能耗量都要通过“能量衡算”来确定。“压缩热”干燥器与其他一切加热干燥器一样采取了“长周期”工作循环制,解吸环节无效热损很大。无热再生干燥器则采用了“短周期”工作制,为实际耗气量减少留有了较大的空间。%As the typical heat and mass transfer equipment, the energy of regenerative desiccant dryers is limited by water absorption. The total energy consumption is restricted by the physical properties of the adsorbent, which can be explained through two laws of conservation of mass and energy conservation. The energy consumption in each absorption dryers should be determined by“energy balance”.“Compression heat”dryer adopts“long-period”working cycle system as other heating dryers, in which invalid heat losses are great in desorption process. However, regenerated dryer without heat adopts“short-period”working cycle system, which provides greater space for actual gas consumption reduction.

  11. PSI contribution to the CASTOC round robin on EAC of low-alloy RPV steels under BWR conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S

    2001-08-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5th EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack growth (EAC) behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR power operation conditions by 6 European laboratories. The present report contains a summary of the PSI contribution to the Working Package 1 (WP1) of this project. WP1 is an interlaboratory round robin EAC test in simulated BWR/NWC environment under cyclic and static loading conditions. The round robin shall demonstrate the applicability of the used advanced test technique and establishes the technical basis for the decision of test conditions in the other working packages. In the first part of the report, the PSI testing facility/measurement instruments and the applied test and evaluation procedure are discussed in detail. In the second part, the exact test conditions and test results with detailed post-test fractographical evaluation in the SEM are presented. The test results are compared with other PSI results, literature data and nuclear codes. Stable and stationary test conditions within the specified range could be achieved in the PSI test during the whole conditioning and experimental phase. The cyclic crack growth rate results agree well with recent PSI results at a higher dissolved oxygen content of 8 ppm and are slightly below the 'high-sulphur line' of the PLEDGE-model. The crack growth rates are significantly above the ASME XI 'wet' curve. Compared to fatigue crack growth rates in air under otherwise identical test conditions, the effect of the high-temperature water environment resulted in an acceleration of crack growth by a factor of 150-250 under these low-cyclic loading conditions. The test results at constant load confirm the extremely low susceptibility to SCC crack growth under static load at 288 {sup o}C observed in tests at MPA, PSI and in a European Round Robin. They agree well with the RPV

  12. PSI contribution to the CASTOC round robin on EAC of low-alloy RPV steels under BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S.

    2001-08-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5th EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack growth (EAC) behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR power operation conditions by 6 European laboratories. The present report contains a summary of the PSI contribution to the Working Package 1 (WP1) of this project. WP1 is an interlaboratory round robin EAC test in simulated BWR/NWC environment under cyclic and static loading conditions. The round robin shall demonstrate the applicability of the used advanced test technique and establishes the technical basis for the decision of test conditions in the other working packages. In the first part of the report, the PSI testing facility/measurement instruments and the applied test and evaluation procedure are discussed in detail. In the second part, the exact test conditions and test results with detailed post-test fractographical evaluation in the SEM are presented. The test results are compared with other PSI results, literature data and nuclear codes. Stable and stationary test conditions within the specified range could be achieved in the PSI test during the whole conditioning and experimental phase. The cyclic crack growth rate results agree well with recent PSI results at a higher dissolved oxygen content of 8 ppm and are slightly below the 'high-sulphur line' of the PLEDGE-model. The crack growth rates are significantly above the ASME XI 'wet' curve. Compared to fatigue crack growth rates in air under otherwise identical test conditions, the effect of the high-temperature water environment resulted in an acceleration of crack growth by a factor of 150-250 under these low-cyclic loading conditions. The test results at constant load confirm the extremely low susceptibility to SCC crack growth under static load at 288 o C observed in tests at MPA, PSI and in a European Round Robin. They agree well with the RPV operating experience

  13. Exploring PSI-MI XML Collections Using DescribeX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samavi Reza

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available PSI-MI has been endorsed by the protein informatics community as a standard XML data exchange format for protein-protein interaction datasets. While many public databases support the standard, there is a degree of heterogeneity in the way the proposed XML schema is interpreted and instantiated by different data providers. Analysis of schema instantiation in large collections of XML data is a challenging task that is unsupported by existing tools.

  14. Diquarks as an explanation for psi's R, and everything else

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavkovic, M [Stanford Univ., Calif. (USA). School of Medicine

    1976-06-05

    In order to overcome some contradictions and limitations in the charm model without introducing new quantum numbers, a new quark model is required. The letter presents a candidate for such a model. Some tests of the model are discussed including the explanation of the observed behaviour of R=sigma(e/sup +/e/sup -/..-->..hadrons)/sigma(e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..--> mu..sup(+)..mu..sup(-)) and the narrow width of psi's. Moreover some predictions of the model are illustrated.

  15. Proposal for an intense slow positron beam facility at PSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waeber, W.B.; Taqqu, D.; Zimmermann, U.; Solt, G.

    1990-05-01

    In the domain of condensed matter physics and materials sciences monoenergetic slow positrons in the form of highest intensity beams are demonstrated to be extreamly useful and considered to be highly needed. This conclusion has been reached and the scientific relevance of the positron probe has been highlighted at an international workshop in November 1989 at PSI, where the state of the art and the international situation on slow positron beams, the fields of application of intense beams and the technical possibilities at PSI for installing intense positron sources have been evaluated. The participants agreed that a high intensity beam as a large-scale user facility at PSI would serve fundamental and applied research. The analysis of responses given by numerous members of a widespread positron community has revealed a large research potential in the domain of solid-state physics, atomic physics and surface, thin-film and defect physics, for example. The excellent feature of slow positron beams to be a suitable probe also for lattice defects near surfaces or interfaces has attracted the interest not only of science but also of industry.In this report we propose the installation of an intense slow positron beam facility at PSI including various beam lines of different qualities and based on the Cyclotron production of β + emitting source material and on a highest efficiency moderation scheme which exceeds standard moderation efficiencies by two orders of magnitude. In its proposed form, the project is estimated to be realizable in the nineties and costs will amount to between 15 and 20 MSFr. (author) 10 figs., 6 tabs., 78 refs

  16. $B_{s}\\to J/\\psi ~\\phi$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, C

    2009-01-01

    CP violation in the interference between mixing and decay of $B_{s}\\to J/\\psi ~\\phi$ is characterised by the weak phase $\\Phi$ which is predicted to be $-2\\beta_s$ in the SM. A deviation in $\\Phi$ from $-2\\beta_s$ is an indicator of new physics entering into $B_{s}/\\bar{B}_{s}$ mixing. LHCb will yield a competitive measurement of the phase $\\Phi$ in less than one year of data taking.

  17. Enhanced J/psi suppression due to gluon depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Hwa, R. C.; Pisut, J.; Pisutova, N.

    1997-01-01

    The nonlinear effect of gluon depletion in the collision of large nuclei can be large. It is due to multiple scatterings among comoving partons initiated by primary scattering of partons in the colliding nuclei. The effect can give rise to substantial suppression of $J/\\psi$ production in very large nuclei, even if the linear depletion effect is insignificant for the collisions of nuclei of smaller sizes. This mechanism offers a natural explanation of the enhanced suppression in the Pb-Pb dat...

  18. Quantum numbers and decay widths of the psi (3684)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luth, V.; Boyarski, A.M.; Lynch, H.L.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Feldman, G.J.; Fryberger, D.; Hanson, G.; Hartill, D.L.; Jean-Marie, B.; Larsen, R.R.; Luke, D.; Morehouse, C.C.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Tanenbaum, W.; Vannucci, F.; Abrams, G.S.; Chinowsky, W.; Friedberg, C.E.; Goldhaber, G.; Kadyk, J.A.; Litke, A.M.; Lulu, B.A.; Pierre, F.M.; Sadoulet, B.; Trilling, G.H.; Whitaker, J.S.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Wiss, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    Cross sections for e + e - →hadrons, e + e - , and μ + μ - near 3684 MeV are presented. The psi(3684) resonance is established as having the assignment J/sup PC/=1 -- . The mass is 3684+-5 MeV. The partial width for decay to electrons is GAMMA/sube/=2.1+-0.3 keV and the total width is GAMMA=228+-56 keV

  19. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our ...

  20. PSI Scientific Report 2005. Volume 3: Energy and Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaepfer-Miller, J; Gerber, B [eds.

    2006-04-15

    The overarching goal of energy research at PSI is to provide scientific nd technical solutions for the development of cost-effective, reliable, socially acceptable and environmentally sustainable energy. his research is done within two departments: General Energy and nuclear Energy and Safety, their research highlights from 2005 are documented in the following chapter. Major accomplishments of the past year include: a pioneer solar power-plant; improvements in catalysts and processes for the production of methane from wood; development of characterization tools to improve combustion processes; fuel cells, and batteries under operating conditions; carbon dioxide in forests; and a new dating method for glacial ice. Progress was made in determining the suitability of opalinus clay to store radioactive waste and how iodine exposure could be reduced under normal operation and in the event of a severe accident at a nuclear power-plant. Systems analysis research also included a report on the external environmental costs of electricity and whether the Swiss population are willing to pay for renewable energy. This report only highlights a selection of the work done at PSI in the past year; information about many other ongoing projects can be accessed through our website, (www.psi.ch). (author)

  1. PSI Scientific Report 2005. Volume 3: Energy and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaepfer-Miller, J.; Gerber, B.

    2006-04-01

    The overarching goal of energy research at PSI is to provide scientific nd technical solutions for the development of cost-effective, reliable, socially acceptable and environmentally sustainable energy. his research is done within two departments: General Energy and nuclear Energy and Safety, their research highlights from 2005 are documented in the following chapter. Major accomplishments of the past year include: a pioneer solar power-plant; improvements in catalysts and processes for the production of methane from wood; development of characterization tools to improve combustion processes; fuel cells, and batteries under operating conditions; carbon dioxide in forests; and a new dating method for glacial ice. Progress was made in determining the suitability of opalinus clay to store radioactive waste and how iodine exposure could be reduced under normal operation and in the event of a severe accident at a nuclear power-plant. Systems analysis research also included a report on the external environmental costs of electricity and whether the Swiss population are willing to pay for renewable energy. This report only highlights a selection of the work done at PSI in the past year; information about many other ongoing projects can be accessed through our website, (www.psi.ch). (author)

  2. Una apuesta analítica del funcionamiento del dispositivo psi pericial en el campo penal Uma aposta analitica do funcionamento do dispositivo psi pericial inserido no campo penal An analysis of the psy expert assemblage in the penal field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura López Gallego

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available La aproximación al dispositivo psi pericial inserto en el campo penal aquí efectuada, traza un itinerario de análisis que aborda el funcionamiento de dicho dispositivo, poniendo especial énfasis en las imbricadas relaciones entre los saberes jurídicos y lo psi. Para efectuar dicho análisis, se utilizan documentos específicos producidos por los peritos psi en el marco del Poder Judicial del Uruguay. Se entiende a las prácticas psi como el efecto de ciertas confluencias históricas relacionadas con el examen, con las estrategias de objetividad, con la traducción de categorías psi en categorías jurídicas y con la incorporación de la lógica de individualización como eje del dispositivo psi pericial. La pregunta que guía el análisis versa sobre lo que posibilita la incorporación del dispositivo psi pericial en el campo penal.A aproximação ao dispositivo psi pericial inserido no campo penal aqui realizada traça um itinerário de análise que aborda o funcionamento do dispositivo, enfatizando as relações imbricadas entre os saberes jurídicos e psi. Para realizar a análise, utilizam-se documentos específicos produzidos por peritos psi no marco do Poder Judicial do Uruguai. Entendem-se as práticas psi como efeito de certas confluências históricas relacionadas ao exame, às estratégias de objetividade, à tradução de categorias psi em categorias jurídicas e à incorporação da lógica da individualização como um ponto central do dispositivo psi pericial. A pergunta que orienta a análise é o que possibilita a incorporação do dispositivo psi pericial no campo penal.The approach made here about the "expert psy assemblage" inserted into the criminal field draws a path of analysis that considers the operation of this assemblage, highlighting the intertwined relationships between the legal and psychological knowledge. To undertake such analysis, specific documents produced by the psy experts, working under the Judiciary

  3. DNABIT Compress – Genome compression algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, “DNABIT Compress” for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that “DNABIT Compress” algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases. PMID:21383923

  4. The Distinction of Hot Herbal Compress, Hot Compress, and Topical Diclofenac as Myofascial Pain Syndrome Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonruab, Jurairat; Nimpitakpong, Netraya; Damjuti, Watchara

    2018-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial aimed to investigate the distinctness after treatment among hot herbal compress, hot compress, and topical diclofenac. The registrants were equally divided into groups and received the different treatments including hot herbal compress, hot compress, and topical diclofenac group, which served as the control group. After treatment courses, Visual Analog Scale and 36-Item Short Form Health survey were, respectively, used to establish the level of pain intensity and quality of life. In addition, cervical range of motion and pressure pain threshold were also examined to identify the motional effects. All treatments showed significantly decreased level of pain intensity and increased cervical range of motion, while the intervention groups exhibited extraordinary capability compared with the topical diclofenac group in pressure pain threshold and quality of life. In summary, hot herbal compress holds promise to be an efficacious treatment parallel to hot compress and topical diclofenac.

  5. Method of making Tl-Sr-Ca-Cu-oxide superconductors comprising heating at elevated pressures in a sealed container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechtev, W.L.; Osofsky, M.S.; Skelton, E.F.; Toth, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method of forming a Tl-Sr-Ca-Cu-oxide high T c superconductor. It comprises forming a reaction mixture of the oxides of Sr, Cu, Ca, and Tl in stoichiometric proportions to make a Tl-Sr-Ca-Cu-oxide high T c superconducting compound; compressing the reaction mixture into a hard body; placing the hard body into a container for containing thallium vapor; evacuating and sealing the hard body in the container; heating the hard body and the container at a temperature of about 800 degrees C to about 950 degrees C and under pressure of at least about 30,000 psi until the container metal around the hard body and the oxides of Tl, Sr, Ca, and Cu react to form a superconducting compound; and cooling the superconducting compound to room temperature and returning the superconducting compound to atmospheric pressure

  6. Venous Leg Ulcers: Effectiveness of new compression therapy/moist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (Cutimed Sorbact) and compression bandages (Comprilan,. Tensoplast) in the initial oedema phase, followed by a compression stocking system delivering 40mmHg (JOBST. UlcerCARE). Due to their high stiffness characteristics, these compression products exert a high working pressure during walking and a comfortably ...

  7. Compressed liquid densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galicia-Luna, Luis A. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: lgalicial@ipn.mx; Camacho-Camacho, Luis E. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Edif. Z, Secc. 6, 1ER Piso, UPALM, C.P. 07738, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-02-15

    (p, {rho}, T) properties were determined in liquid phase for 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainty is estimated to be lower than {+-}0.2 kg . m{sup -3} for the experimental densities. Nitrogen and water were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. Experimental densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol were correlated with a short empirical equation and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations were reported. Published densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol are compared with values calculated with the BWRS EoS using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with available correlations for 1-butanol and 2-butanol.

  8. Compressed liquid densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuniga-Moreno, Abel; Galicia-Luna, Luis A.; Camacho-Camacho, Luis E.

    2007-01-01

    (p, ρ, T) properties were determined in liquid phase for 1-butanol and 2-butanol at temperatures from 313 K to 363 K and pressures up to 25 MPa using a vibrating tube densimeter. The uncertainty is estimated to be lower than ±0.2 kg . m -3 for the experimental densities. Nitrogen and water were used as reference fluids for the calibration of the vibrating tube densimeter. Experimental densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol were correlated with a short empirical equation and the 11-parameter Benedict-Webb-Rubin-Starling equation of state (BWRS EoS) using a least square optimization. Statistical values to evaluate the different correlations were reported. Published densities of 1-butanol and 2-butanol are compared with values calculated with the BWRS EoS using the parameters obtained in this work. The experimental data determined here are also compared with available correlations for 1-butanol and 2-butanol

  9. A pressure-based semi-implicit space-time discontinuous Galerkin method on staggered unstructured meshes for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations at all Mach numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavelli, Maurizio; Dumbser, Michael

    2017-07-01

    We propose a new arbitrary high order accurate semi-implicit space-time discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for the solution of the two and three dimensional compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on staggered unstructured curved meshes. The method is pressure-based and semi-implicit and is able to deal with all Mach number flows. The new DG scheme extends the seminal ideas outlined in [1], where a second order semi-implicit finite volume method for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a general equation of state was introduced on staggered Cartesian grids. Regarding the high order extension we follow [2], where a staggered space-time DG scheme for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations was presented. In our scheme, the discrete pressure is defined on the primal grid, while the discrete velocity field and the density are defined on a face-based staggered dual grid. Then, the mass conservation equation, as well as the nonlinear convective terms in the momentum equation and the transport of kinetic energy in the energy equation are discretized explicitly, while the pressure terms appearing in the momentum and energy equation are discretized implicitly. Formal substitution of the discrete momentum equation into the total energy conservation equation yields a linear system for only one unknown, namely the scalar pressure. Here the equation of state is assumed linear with respect to the pressure. The enthalpy and the kinetic energy are taken explicitly and are then updated using a simple Picard procedure. Thanks to the use of a staggered grid, the final pressure system is a very sparse block five-point system for three dimensional problems and it is a block four-point system in the two dimensional case. Furthermore, for high order in space and piecewise constant polynomials in time, the system is observed to be symmetric and positive definite. This allows to use fast linear solvers such as the conjugate gradient (CG) method. In

  10. The 2008 intercomparison exercise for radon gas measurement instruments at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessung 2008 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterweck, G.; Schuler, Ch.; Mayer, S.

    2010-09-15

    Sixteen radon measurement services participated in the 2008 Radon Intercomparison Exercise performed at the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) during August 28{sup th} to September 7{sup th}, 2008 on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH). Twelve of these laboratories were approved by the FOPH and their participation in the intercomparison exercise was a requirement to warrant quality of measurement. Radon gas dosemeters (etched-track, electronic and electret ionisation chambers) and instruments (ionization chambers) were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 627 Bq m{sup -3} leading to a radon gas exposure of 155 kBq h m{sup -3}. One measuring instrument participating for testing purposes stored values for part of the exposure interval (30.8. - 7.9.2008). The exposure during this partial interval was 117 kBq h m{sup -3} at an average radon gas concentration of 624 Bq m{sup -3}. The exposure of 155 kBq h m{sup -3} was the lowest used at the PSI intercomparisons down to the present day. Especially the LLT electret ionisation chambers used by some of the laboratories reached the lower end of their measurement range with this exposure. Unexpected deviations of instruments of the same model seem to show a dependence on the serial number and thus production date. (authors)

  11. Observation of a resonancelike structure in the pi +- psi' mass distribution in exclusive B-->Kpi +- psi' decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S-K; Olsen, S L; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Bedny, I; Bitenc, U; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K-F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Eidelman, S; Gabyshev, N; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W-S; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kah, D H; Kang, J H; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kim, H O; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Limosani, A; Lin, S-W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Peak, L S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schwartz, A J; Senyo, K; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S Y; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tanaka, M; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Varner, G; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamashita, Y; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A; Zyukova, O

    2008-04-11

    A distinct peak is observed in the pi +/- psi' invariant mass distribution near 4.43 GeV in B-->K pi +/- psi' decays. A fit using a Breit-Wigner resonance shape yields a peak mass and width of M=4433+/-4(stat)+/-2(syst) MeV and Gamma=45-13+18(stat)-13+30(syst) MeV. The product branching fraction is determined to be B(B 0-->K -/+Z+/-(4430)) x B(Z+/-(4430)-->pi+/-psi')=(4.1+/-1.0(stat)+/-1.4(syst)) x 10(-5), where Z+/-(4430) is used to denote the observed structure. The statistical significance of the observed peak is 6.5 sigma. These results are obtained from a 605 fb(-1) data sample that contains 657 x 10(6) BB pairs collected near the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e+ e- collider.

  12. Compressibility of the protein-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2018-06-01

    The compressibility of a protein relates to its stability, flexibility, and hydrophobic interactions, but the measurement, interpretation, and computation of this important thermodynamic parameter present technical and conceptual challenges. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of protein compressibility and apply it to molecular dynamics simulations of four globular proteins. Using additively weighted Voronoi tessellation, we decompose the solution compressibility into contributions from the protein and its hydration shells. We find that positively cross-correlated protein-water volume fluctuations account for more than half of the protein compressibility that governs the protein's pressure response, while the self correlations correspond to small (˜0.7%) fluctuations of the protein volume. The self compressibility is nearly the same as for ice, whereas the total protein compressibility, including cross correlations, is ˜45% of the bulk-water value. Taking the inhomogeneous solvent density into account, we decompose the experimentally accessible protein partial compressibility into intrinsic, hydration, and molecular exchange contributions and show how they can be computed with good statistical accuracy despite the dominant bulk-water contribution. The exchange contribution describes how the protein solution responds to an applied pressure by redistributing water molecules from lower to higher density; it is negligibly small for native proteins, but potentially important for non-native states. Because the hydration shell is an open system, the conventional closed-system compressibility definitions yield a pseudo-compressibility. We define an intrinsic shell compressibility, unaffected by occupation number fluctuations, and show that it approaches the bulk-water value exponentially with a decay "length" of one shell, less than the bulk-water compressibility correlation length. In the first hydration shell, the intrinsic compressibility is 25%-30% lower than in

  13. Compressibility of the protein-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2018-06-07

    The compressibility of a protein relates to its stability, flexibility, and hydrophobic interactions, but the measurement, interpretation, and computation of this important thermodynamic parameter present technical and conceptual challenges. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of protein compressibility and apply it to molecular dynamics simulations of four globular proteins. Using additively weighted Voronoi tessellation, we decompose the solution compressibility into contributions from the protein and its hydration shells. We find that positively cross-correlated protein-water volume fluctuations account for more than half of the protein compressibility that governs the protein's pressure response, while the self correlations correspond to small (∼0.7%) fluctuations of the protein volume. The self compressibility is nearly the same as for ice, whereas the total protein compressibility, including cross correlations, is ∼45% of the bulk-water value. Taking the inhomogeneous solvent density into account, we decompose the experimentally accessible protein partial compressibility into intrinsic, hydration, and molecular exchange contributions and show how they can be computed with good statistical accuracy despite the dominant bulk-water contribution. The exchange contribution describes how the protein solution responds to an applied pressure by redistributing water molecules from lower to higher density; it is negligibly small for native proteins, but potentially important for non-native states. Because the hydration shell is an open system, the conventional closed-system compressibility definitions yield a pseudo-compressibility. We define an intrinsic shell compressibility, unaffected by occupation number fluctuations, and show that it approaches the bulk-water value exponentially with a decay "length" of one shell, less than the bulk-water compressibility correlation length. In the first hydration shell, the intrinsic compressibility is 25%-30% lower than

  14. Updated measurements of exclusive J/psi and psi(2S) production cross-sections in pp collisions at root s=7 TeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J-P; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sanchez, A. Martin; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M-N; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Mont