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Sample records for psg-assessed sleep improvements

  1. Does sleep improve memory organization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi eTakeuchi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep can integrate information into existing memory networks, look for common patterns and distill overarching rules, or simply stabilize and strengthen the memory exactly as it was learned. Recent research has shown that sleep facilitates abstraction of gist information as well as integration across multiple memories, insight into hidden solutions, and even the ability to make creative connections between distantly related ideas and concepts. To investigate the effect of sleep on memory organization, thirty-five normal volunteers were randomly assigned either to the sleep (n=17 or wake group (n=18. The sleep subjects performed the Japanese Verbal Learning Test (JVLT, a measure of learning and memory, three times in the evening, and slept. On the following morning (9 hours later, they were asked to recall the words on the list. The wake subjects took the same test in the morning, and were asked to recall the words in the same time interval as in the sleep group. The Semantic Clustering Ratio (SCR, divided by the total number of words recalled, was used as an index of memory organization. Our main interest was whether the sleep subjects elicit a greater increase in this measure from the third to the fourth assessments. Time-by-group interaction effect on SCR was not significant between the sleep group and wake group as a whole. Meanwhile, the change in the SCR between the third and fourth trials was negatively correlated with duration of nocturnal waking in the sleep group, but not other sleep indices. Based on this observation, further analysis was conducted for subjects in the sleep group who awoke nocturnally for less than 60 minutes for comparison with the wake group. A significant time-by-group interaction was noted; these good-sleepers showed a significantly greater improvement in the memory index compared with the wake subjects. These results provide the first suggestion that sleep may enhance memory organization, which requires further

  2. Improving sleep: outcomes from a worksite healthy sleep program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Mark W; Hazelton, Angela C; Moore, Wendy R; Jenkins, Sarah M; Clark, Matthew M; Hagen, Philip T

    2015-01-01

    Unhealthy and inadequate sleep is a common and significant problem impacting absenteeism, presenteeism, health, and productivity. This study aimed at analyzing the effect of a worksite-based healthy sleep program. Retrospective analysis of 53 adult members of a worksite wellness center who participated in an 8-week healthy sleep program and completed pre- and postintervention health behavior questionnaires. Following the intervention participants felt significantly more rested, more confident in their ability to deal with sleep problems, and more knowledgeable about sleep. In addition, they reported a reduction in their stress level, improved quality of life, and increase energy level. These results support the effectiveness of worksite programs designed to promote healthy sleep. Future randomized studies are needed to further investigate the effectiveness and optimal delivery of healthy sleep promotion.

  3. A "Sleep 101" Program for College Students Improves Sleep Hygiene Knowledge and Reduces Maladaptive Beliefs about Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Jacqueline D; Nash, Christina O; Walsh, Colleen M; Culnan, Elizabeth; Horsey, Sarah; Sexton-Radek, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Sensitizing young adults about sleep hygiene knowledge and helpful sleep attitudes may have the potential to instill long-lasting healthy sleep practices. Towards these ends, evaluation of psychoeducational program "Sleep 101" tailored to college students was undertaken. Following two weeks of sleep-log recordings, participants were randomly assigned to a Sleep 101 (experimental) condition or a sleep monitoring (control) condition. The Sleep 101 condition was comprised of two 90-minute workshops aimed to educate students about healthy sleep practices, helpful thoughts about sleep, and ways to improve sleep. The sleep monitoring group received a sleep hygiene handout and completed sleep logs for the study duration. Sleep 101 participants endorsed fewer maladaptive beliefs and attitudes about sleep, increased sleep hygiene knowledge, and reduced sleep onset latency compared to the sleep monitoring participants. Brief psychoeducational courses may be a cost-effective way to alleviate current, and/or prevent future, sleep problems in young adults.

  4. Pregabalin Improves Fibromyalgia-related Sleep Disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Bhadra-Brown, Pritha; Pitman, Verne W; Resnick, E Malca

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the effect of pregabalin on wake and sleep bout parameters. A post hoc analysis of polysomnography data from a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study investigating the effect of pregabalin (150 to 450 mg/d) and placebo on sleep in fibromyalgia (FM). Eligible patients had FM and sleep-maintenance problems, including wake after sleep onset ≥45 minutes and total sleep time (TST) 3.0 to 6.5 hours, but no other sleep/circadian rhythm disorders. Polysomnography was performed for 2 consecutive nights (screening, post-treatment). Wake and sleep bout duration and frequency were derived; a "bout"=consecutive 30-s epochs of sleep or wake. Of 119 patients randomized (103 [87%] female), data were available for 103 treated with pregabalin and 106 with placebo. Pregabalin versus placebo treatment decreased mean±SD number of wake/sleep bouts (33.24±1.33 vs. 36.85±1.32; difference: -3.61 [95% confidence interval, -6.03, -1.18]; P=0.0039) and increased sleep bout duration (15.25±0.63 vs. 11.58±0.62 min; +3.67 min [2.22, 5.12 min]; PPregabalin decreased mean duration of wake bouts versus placebo (3.41±0.55 vs. 3.94±0.55 min; -0.53 min [-1.06, -0.002 min]; P=0.0493). An exploratory correlation analysis of treatment effects found stage 1 sleep was negatively correlated with wake and sleep bout duration and positively with wake/sleep bout number; slow wave sleep (%total sleep time) was positively correlated with wake and sleep bout duration and negatively with wake/sleep bout number. Pregabalin improved sleep parameters characteristic of disturbed sleep in FM, by preventing awakenings and increasing sleep bout duration. These effects are reflected in, and correlated with, a decrease in "light sleep" (stage 1) and an increase in "deep sleep" (slow wave sleep).

  5. Shift Work: Improving Daytime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Good daytime sleep is possible, though, if shift work is a necessary part of your work life. To promote better sleep during the day: ... Take naps. Napping late in the day before work might help you make up your sleep debt. ...

  6. Shift Work: Improving Daytime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... than before you go to sleep. Don't use nicotine or alcohol near bedtime. If these tips don't help, consult your doctor or a sleep specialist. With Eric J. Olson, M.D. Sleep deprivation and deficiency. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. ...

  7. Does sleep improve memory organization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masashi; Furuta, Hisakazu; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Suzuki, Michio; Ochiai, Yoko; Hosokawa, Munehito; Matsui, Mie; Kurachi, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Sleep can integrate information into existing memory networks, look for common patterns and distil overarching rules, or simply stabilize and strengthen the memory exactly as it was learned. Recent research has shown that sleep facilitates abstraction of gist information as well as integration across multiple memories, insight into hidden solutions, and even the ability to make creative connections between distantly related ideas and concepts. To investigate the effect of sleep on memory organization, 35 normal volunteers were randomly assigned either to the sleep (n = 17) or wake group (n = 18). The sleep subjects performed the Japanese Verbal Learning Test (JVLT), a measure of learning and memory, three times in the evening, and slept. On the following morning (9 h later), they were asked to recall the words on the list. The wake subjects took the same test in the morning, and were asked to recall the words in the same time interval as in the sleep group. The semantic clustering ratio (SCR), divided by the total number of words recalled, was used as an index of memory organization. Our main interest was whether the sleep subjects elicit a greater increase in this measure from the third to the fourth assessments. Time × Group interaction effect on SCR was not significant between the sleep group and wake group as a whole. Meanwhile, the change in the SCR between the third and fourth trials was negatively correlated with duration of nocturnal waking in the sleep group, but not other sleep indices. Based on this observation, further analysis was conducted for subjects in the sleep group who awoke nocturnally for memory index compared with the wake subjects. These results provide the first suggestion that sleep may enhance memory organization, which requires further study.

  8. Improving sleep for patients in acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Christine; Flood, David; Brittin, Andy; Miles, Jane

    2015-03-11

    Sleep is important to health and recovery from illness, but is known to be difficult in hospital. This article describes a quality improvement project conducted on 18 wards in acute hospitals. Patients reported sleeping an average of five hours per night, and 47% (352/749) rated their sleep quality as good or excellent in hospital. Individualised ward action plans were implemented. At follow up, disturbance by noise and light had fallen significantly and 69% (540/783) of patients rated their sleep as good or excellent, 22% more than before the intervention (Psleep.

  9. Hypnotic Relaxation and Yoga to Improve Sleep and School Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Smith, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Sleep insufficiency, defined as inadequate sleep duration, poor sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness, has been linked with students' learning and behavioral outcomes at school. However, there is limited research on interventions designed to improve the sleep of school-age children. In order to promote more interest on this critical topic, we…

  10. Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsawh, Holly J; Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B; Cissell, Shadha H; Lang, Ariel J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to posttreatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers.

  11. Improving sleep quality interventions among menopausal women with sleep disturbances in Taiwan: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Chin; Tsao, Lee-Ing; Lin, Mei-Hsiang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of improving sleep quality interventions in menopausal women with sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbances are an extensive and common problem among menopausal women. There is an increased trend in the use of non-pharmacological methods to alleviate sleep disturbances. Studies that have implemented two or more non-pharmacological strategies for menopausal women are scant. A repeat measurement with a randomized assignment was conducted. A total of 59 menopausal women with sleep disturbance were recruited and randomly assigned to experimental (n = 29) and control (n = 30) groups. Participants in the experimental group received four 2-hour improving sleep quality activities, whereas the control group received regular greeting calls. Sleep quality was measured prior to intervention, and on the 5th and 8th weeks by using the Pittsburg's Sleep Quality Index, and Actiwatch was worn before and during the 8 weeks of intervention. Generalized estimating equation was used to analyze data. The results revealed that subjective sleep quality had significant main effect in group and time. The findings of the objective measurement showed that participants in the experimental group had significantly shorter frequency of awakening time and increased sleep efficiency. The improving sleep quality intervention is a healthy and cost-effective method to improve sleep quality in community-dwelling menopausal women with sleep disturbance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sleep extension improves neurocognitive functions in chronically sleep-deprived obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Eliane A; Piaggi, Paolo; Dsurney, John; de Jonge, Lilian; Zhao, Xiong-ce; Mattingly, Megan S; Ramer, Angela; Gershengorn, Janet; Csako, Gyorgy; Cizza, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Sleep deprivation and obesity, are associated with neurocognitive impairments. Effects of sleep deprivation and obesity on cognition are unknown, and the cognitive long-term effects of improvement of sleep have not been prospectively assessed in short sleeping, obese individuals. To characterize neurocognitive functions and assess its reversibility. Prospective cohort study. Tertiary Referral Research Clinical Center. A cohort of 121 short-sleeping (Sleep extension (468±88 days) with life-style modifications. Neurocognitive functions, sleep quality and sleep duration. At baseline, 44% of the individuals had an impaired global deficit score (t-score 0-39). Impaired global deficit score was associated with worse subjective sleep quality (p = 0.02), and lower urinary dopamine levels (p = 0.001). Memory was impaired in 33%; attention in 35%; motor skills in 42%; and executive function in 51% of individuals. At the final evaluation (N = 74), subjective sleep quality improved by 24% (psleep duration increased by 11% by questionnaires (psleep quality and sleep efficiency, urinary free cortisol and dopamine and plasma total ghrelin accounted for 1/5 of the variability in global cognitive function. Drop-out rate. Chronically sleep-deprived obese individuals exhibit substantial neurocognitive deficits that are partially reversible upon improvement of sleep in a non-pharmacological way. These findings have clinical implications for large segments of the US population. www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00261898. NIDDK protocol 06-DK-0036.

  13. Effectiveness of sleep education programs to improve sleep hygiene and/or sleep quality in college students: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Shellene K; Francis-Jimenez, Coleen M; Knibbs, Melida Delcina; Umali, Ismael L; Truglio-Londrigan, Marie

    2016-09-01

    Sleep health is essential for overall health, quality of life and safety. Researchers have found a reduction in the average hours of sleep among college students. Poor sleep has been associated with deficits in attention, reduction in academic performance, impaired driving, risk-taking behaviors, depression, impaired social relationships and poorer health. College students may have limited knowledge about sleep hygiene and the behaviors that supports sleep health, which may lead to poor sleep hygiene behavior. To identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of sleep education programs in improving sleep hygiene knowledge, sleep hygiene behavior and/or sleep quality versus traditional strategies. All undergraduate or graduate college students, male or female, 18 years and older and of any culture or ethnicity. Formal sleep education programs that included a curriculum on sleep hygiene behavior. Educational delivery methods that took place throughout the participants' college experience and included a variety of delivery methods. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-experimental studies. Sleep hygiene knowledge, sleep hygiene behavior and/or sleep quality. Literature including published and unpublished studies in the English language from January 1, 1980 through August 17, 2015. A search of CINAHL, CENTRAL, EMBASE, Academic Search Complete, PsychINFO, Healthsource: Nursing/Academic edition, ProQuest Central, PubMed and ERIC were conducted using identified keywords and indexed terms. A gray literature search was also performed. Quantitative papers were assessed by two reviewers using critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI). Data were extracted using the JBI-MAStARI data extraction tool. Data extracted included interventions, populations, study methods and outcomes of significance to the review question and objectives. Meta

  14. Sleep-hygiene Education Improves Sleep Indices in Elite Female Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessel, Shannon; Driller, Matthew W.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of sleep in providing psychophysiological recovery in elite athletes is often overlooked. In other populations (eg shift workers and adolescent students), sleep hygiene education may serve to acutely improve sleep indices. However, this is yet to be examined in an elite athlete...... setting. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of a sleep hygiene education session on sleep indices in elite athletes. The study involved 26 elite female netball athletes performing one week of baseline sleep monitoring (PRE), followed by a sleep hygiene education session......; 22.3 ± 39.9 minutes, p=0.01) PRE to POST sleep hygiene education session, the difference associated with a small effect (ES: 0.39). A significant improvement PRE to POST was found for WV (p=0.03), and for WED (p=0.03). There were no significant differences for SE%, SL, TTB, WE, SOV, SOT, WT...

  15. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118.

  16. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu John

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n=34; control group, n=24. Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118.

  17. Galantamine improves sleep quality in patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naharci, Mehmet Ilkin; Ozturk, Ahmet; Yasar, Halit; Cintosun, Umit; Kocak, Necmettin; Bozoglu, Ergun; Tasci, Ilker; Doruk, Huseyin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influences of cholinesterase inhibitors on sleep pattern and sleep disturbance. A total of 87 mild to moderate stage dementia patients who were not on cholinesterase enzyme inhibitor and memantine treatment were included in the study. The dementia patients were treated with donepezil, galantamine or rivastigmine, depending on the preference of the clinician. Fifty-five dementia patients (63.2 %) completed the study. Twenty-three elderly subjects, who had normal cognitive functions, were included in the study as the control group. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used for evaluating the sleep quality at the beginning and at the final assessment. The improvement in sleep quality was better with regard to changes in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores with galantamine treatment compared to the donepezil and the control groups. A significant decrease in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores was detected in the galantamine group after treatment. Although statistically not significant, rivastigmine decreased and donepezil increased the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores after treatment. Dementia patients who had a poor sleep quality (n: 36), the rate of improvement in sleep disturbance was 81.8 % in the galantamine group, 75 % in the rivastigmine, and 50 % in the donepezil group. Galantamine may be the first choice of cholinesterase inhibitor in mild to moderate dementia patients in terms of improving sleep quality.

  18. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Chouchou

    Full Text Available The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers. Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1 placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2 pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3 REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  19. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  20. School-based sleep education program improves sleep and academic performance of school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Reut; Somerville, Gail; Bergmame, Lana; Fontil, Laura; Paquin, Soukaina

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a school-based sleep education program aimed at improving the sleep and academic performance of school-age children. Using a community-based participatory research approach, we created a school-based sleep education program, "Sleep for Success"™ (SFS), composed of four distinct modules that addressed the children, their family and community, the school staff, and decision makers within the school setting. Implementation was carried out in three elementary schools. Seventy-one students participated in the evaluation of the program. The effectiveness of the SFS program was evaluated using non-randomized controlled before-and-after study groups (intervention and control) assessed over two time points (pre- and post-program implementation). Before (baseline) and after implementation, sleep and academic performance were measured using actigraphy and report card marks, respectively. In the intervention group, true sleep was extended by 18.2 min per night, sleep efficiency improved by 2.3%, and sleep latency was shortened by 2.3 min, and report card grades in mathematics and English improved significantly. No changes were noted in the control group. Participation in the sleep education program was associated with significant improvements in children's sleep and academic performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sleep extension improves neurocognitive functions in chronically sleep-deprived obese individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane A Lucassen

    Full Text Available Sleep deprivation and obesity, are associated with neurocognitive impairments. Effects of sleep deprivation and obesity on cognition are unknown, and the cognitive long-term effects of improvement of sleep have not been prospectively assessed in short sleeping, obese individuals.To characterize neurocognitive functions and assess its reversibility.Prospective cohort study.Tertiary Referral Research Clinical Center.A cohort of 121 short-sleeping (<6.5 h/night obese (BMI 30-55 kg/m(2 men and pre-menopausal women.Sleep extension (468±88 days with life-style modifications.Neurocognitive functions, sleep quality and sleep duration.At baseline, 44% of the individuals had an impaired global deficit score (t-score 0-39. Impaired global deficit score was associated with worse subjective sleep quality (p = 0.02, and lower urinary dopamine levels (p = 0.001. Memory was impaired in 33%; attention in 35%; motor skills in 42%; and executive function in 51% of individuals. At the final evaluation (N = 74, subjective sleep quality improved by 24% (p<0.001, self-reported sleep duration increased by 11% by questionnaires (p<0.001 and by 4% by diaries (p = 0.04, and daytime sleepiness tended to improve (p = 0.10. Global cognitive function and attention improved by 7% and 10%, respectively (both p = 0.001, and memory and executive functions tended to improve (p = 0.07 and p = 0.06. Serum cortisol increased by 17% (p = 0.02. In a multivariate mixed model, subjective sleep quality and sleep efficiency, urinary free cortisol and dopamine and plasma total ghrelin accounted for 1/5 of the variability in global cognitive function.Drop-out rate.Chronically sleep-deprived obese individuals exhibit substantial neurocognitive deficits that are partially reversible upon improvement of sleep in a non-pharmacological way. These findings have clinical implications for large segments of the US population.www.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00261898

  2. Sleep improves memory: the effect of sleep on long term memory in early adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Trudeau Potkin

    Full Text Available Sleep plays an important role in the consolidation of memory. This has been most clearly shown in adults for procedural memory (i.e. skills and procedures and declarative memory (e.g. recall of facts. The effects of sleep and memory are relatively unstudied in adolescents. Declarative memory is important in school performance and consequent social functioning in adolescents. This is the first study to specifically examine the effects of normal sleep on auditory declarative memory in an early adolescent sample. Given that the majority of adolescents do not obtain the recommended amount of sleep, it is critical to study the cognitive effects of normal sleep. Forty male and female normal, healthy adolescents between the ages of ten and fourteen years old were randomly assigned to sleep and no sleep conditions. Subjects were trained on a paired-associate declarative memory task and a control working memory task at 9 am, and tested at night (12 hours later without sleep. The same number of subjects was trained at 9 pm and tested 9 am following sleep. An increase of 20.6% in declarative memory, as measured by the number correct in a paired-associate test, following sleep was observed compared to the group which was tested at the same time interval without sleep (p<0.03. The performance on the control working memory task that involved encoding and memoranda manipulation was not affected by time of day or relationship to sleep. Declarative memory is significantly improved by sleep in a sample of normal adolescents.

  3. Let's talk about sleep: a systematic review of psychological interventions to improve sleep in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Anja; Schlarb, Angelika A

    2018-02-01

    Sleep problems are a common occurrence in college students. Insomnia, nightmares and impaired sleep quality lead to several mental health issues, as well as impaired academic performance. Although different sleep programmes exist, a systematic overview comparing their effectiveness is still missing. This systematic review aims to provide an overview of psychological interventions to improve sleep in college students. Seven databases were searched from November to December 2016 (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cinahl, Cochrane Library, PubMed, OpenSigle). The search string included search terms from three different topics: sleep, intervention and college students. Outcome measures included subjective as well as objective measures and focused on sleep, sleep-related and mental health variables. Twenty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. They were assigned to four intervention categories: (1) sleep hygiene, (2) cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), (3) relaxation, mindfulness and hypnotherapy and (4) other psychotherapeutic interventions. Fifteen studies were randomized controlled trials. While sleep hygiene interventions provided small to medium effects, the CBTs showed large effects. The variability of the effect sizes was especially large in the relaxation category, ranging from very small to very large effect sizes. Other psychotherapeutic interventions showed medium effects. CBT approaches provided the best effects for the improvement of different sleep variables in college students. Five studies included insomnia patients. The other three intervention categories also showed promising results with overall medium effects. In the future, CBT should be combined with relaxation techniques, mindfulness and hypnotherapy. Furthermore, the interventions should broaden their target group and include more sleep disorders. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  4. Music improves sleep quality in students.

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    Harmat, László; Takács, Johanna; Bódizs, Róbert

    2008-05-01

    This paper is a report of a study to investigate the effects of music on sleep quality in young participants with poor sleep. Sleep disorders may result in fatigue, tiredness, depression and problems in daytime functioning. Music can reduce sympathetic nervous system activity, decrease anxiety, blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate and may have positive effects on sleep via muscle relaxation and distraction from thoughts. Control groups have not been used in most previous studies. We used a three-group repeated measures design. Ninety-four students (aged between 19 and 28 years) with sleep complaints were studied in 2006. Participants listened for 45 minutes either to relaxing classical music (Group 1) or an audiobook (Group 2) at bedtime for 3 weeks. The control group (Group 3) received no intervention. Sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index before the study and weekly during the intervention. Depressive symptoms in experimental group participants were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory. Repeated measures anova revealed a main effect of TIME (P audiobook and the control group. Depressive symptoms decreased statistically significantly in the music group (P audiobooks. Relaxing classical music is an effective intervention in reducing sleeping problems. Nurses could use this safe, cheap and easy to learn method to treat insomnia.

  5. Prospective Evaluation of Sleep Improvement Following Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery.

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    Tulipan, Jacob E; Kim, Nayoung; Abboudi, Jack; Jones, Christopher; Liss, Frederic; Kirkpatrick, William; Matzon, Jonas; Rivlin, Michael; Wang, Mark L; Ilyas, Asif M

    2017-05-01

    Sleep disturbance due to nighttime awakening is a well-documented symptom of carpal tunnel syndrome. While relief of nighttime waking following carpal tunnel release (CTR) has been demonstrated, the effect of CTR on overall sleep quality has not been fully investigated. We hypothesized that CTR would result in significant improvement in overall sleep quality as well as patients' overall satisfaction with their sleep habits. Cases of carpal tunnel syndrome with positive nerve studies, and treated with CTR, were prospectively enrolled. Demographic data, electromyography (EMG) severity, Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire, and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) scale data were collected. A total of 398 patients were enrolled, with 99% available at 2 weeks and 64% available at 3-month final follow-up. At final follow-up, average Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score improved significantly from the preoperative value. Average ISI score on all 7 sleep categories on the survey improved significantly from before surgery to the first postoperative visit. However, the total ISI score did not further improve significantly between the 2-week and the 3-month postoperative visits. The ISI score improvements did not correlate with EMG severity. Patients undergoing CTR demonstrated significant improvement in mean scores for 7 aspects of sleep quality. Sleep improvement was unrelated to preoperative EMG severity and was experienced within 2 weeks of surgery. Therapeutic II. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lip muscle training improves obstructive sleep apnea and objective sleep: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Suzuki

    Full Text Available The present study assessed the potential of lip muscle training for improving sleep. A patient with heavy snoring, daytime sleepiness and dry mouth underwent lip muscle training. Lip closure force LCFmax increased by 67.3% and LCFmin by 152% post-training. AHI decreased from 12.2 to 3.9 events/h by reducing hypopneic episodes. TST, sleep stage N3 and REM sleep increased, and WASO, sleep stage N1, and AI decreased. The patient switched from mouth to nose breathing during sleep and stopped snoring. Improved LCF, by moving the tongue into the anterior-superior oral cavity, may increase upper airway space and reduce the hypopnea index.

  7. Overnight improvements in two REM sleep-sensitive tasks are associated with both REM and NREM sleep changes, sleep spindle features, and awakenings for dream recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, T; O'Reilly, C; Carr, M; Dumel, G; Godin, I; Solomonova, E; Lara-Carrasco, J; Blanchette-Carrière, C; Paquette, T

    2015-07-01

    Memory consolidation is associated with sleep physiology but the contribution of specific sleep stages remains controversial. To clarify the contribution of REM sleep, participants were administered two REM sleep-sensitive tasks to determine if associated changes occurred only in REM sleep. Twenty-two participants (7 men) were administered the Corsi Block Tapping and Tower of Hanoi tasks prior to and again after a night of sleep. Task improvers and non-improvers were compared for sleep structure, sleep spindles, and dream recall. Control participants (N = 15) completed the tasks twice during the day without intervening sleep. Overnight Corsi Block improvement was associated with more REM sleep whereas Tower of Hanoi improvement was associated with more N2 sleep. Corsi Block improvement correlated positively with %REM sleep and Tower of Hanoi improvement with %N2 sleep. Post-hoc analyses suggest Tower of Hanoi effects-but not Corsi Block effects-are due to trait differences. Sleep spindle density was associated with Tower of Hanoi improvement whereas spindle amplitude correlated with Corsi Block improvement. Number of REM awakenings for dream reporting (but not dream recall per se) was associated with Corsi Block, but not Tower of Hanoi, improvement but was confounded with REM sleep time. This non-replication of one of 2 REM-sensitive task effects challenges both 'dual-process' and 'sequential' or 'sleep organization' models of sleep-dependent learning and points rather to capacity limitations on REM sleep. Experimental awakenings for sampling dream mentation may not perturb sleep-dependent learning effects; they may even enhance them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Does sleeve gastrectomy improve obstructive sleep apnea?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suliman, Lucy Abdel Mabood; Abdalla, Dina Abouelkheir

    2016-01-01

    .... Bariatric surgery provides a significant weight loss for morbidly obese patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sleeve gastrectomy on OSA symptoms, sleep parameter, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP...

  9. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves subjective sleep quality in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chou-Chin; Huang, Hui-Chuan; Yang, Mei-Chen; Lee, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Chun-Yao; Wu, Yao-Kuang

    2014-10-01

    Poor sleep quality is often reported among patients with COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is beneficial in improving exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). However, its benefit in terms of sleep quality in patients with COPD remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of PR on sleep quality of patients with COPD. Thirty-four subjects with COPD were studied. All subjects participated in a 12-week (2 sessions/week) hospital-based out-patient PR study. Baseline and post-PR status were evaluated by spirometry, a sleep questionnaire (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), a disease-specific questionnaire of HRQOL (St George Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ]), cardiopulmonary exercise testing, respiratory muscle strength, and the Borg dyspnea scale. Mean FEV1/FVC in the subjects was 0.49 ± 0.13, and the mean FEV1 was 1.06 ± 0.49 L/min (49.7 ± 18.0% of predicted). After PR, the PSQI score decreased from 9.41 ± 4.33 to 7.82 ± 3.90 (P 5 also decreased (85.3-64.7%, P = .006). There were significant improvements in HRQOL (SGRQ, P = .003), exercise capacity (peak oxygen uptake, P rate, P sleep quality, along with concurrent improvements in HRQOL and exercise capacity. PR is an effective nonpharmacologic treatment to improve sleep quality in patients with COPD and should be part of their clinical management. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  10. Investigating the Efficacy of Sleep Hygiene Education on Improving Sleep Disorders in Shahid Sadoughi Hospital Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hazeri

    2015-07-01

    Methods:This is an analytical study with Field Trail method and pre- and post-style. Data were collected using a questionnaire consisting of demographic information, ESS, SMII, and ISI. In the first phase of the study, questionnaires were distributed among 207 nurses out of whom 100 nurses were diagnosed with sleep disorder. Eventually after the training period, the data from 66 questionnaires were analysed, using SPSS20 software with Paired T-test and ANOVA. Results:The first part of the findings showed that 48.3 percent of the nurses have sleep disorder. Findings also indicated that factors such as age, gender, marital status, work experience, number of children, type of shift work and job satisfaction did not have significant statistical impact on sleep disorder. The second part measured improvement of sleep disorders related to sleep hygiene education for nurses. Results revealed a better condition of sleep disorder among the participants after their education around sleep hygiene. Although there wasstatistically no significant relationship between pre- and post-training sleep disorder scores, given the small p-value it can be said that a marginal meaningful relationship does exist.

  11. Parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism improves sleep quality: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Justin; Wang, Tracy S; Hammad, Abdulrahman Y; Burgardt, Laura; Doffek, Kara; Carr, Azadeh A; Shaker, Joseph L; Carroll, Ty B; Evans, Douglas B; Yen, Tina W F

    2017-01-01

    This prospective survey study assessed changes in sleep quality in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism after parathyroidectomy. Patients undergoing parathyroidectomy for primary hyperparathyroidism (n = 110) or thyroidectomy for benign euthyroid disease (control group; n = 45) were recruited between June 2013 and June 2015 and completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index preoperatively and at 1- and 6 months postoperatively. "Poor" sleep quality was defined as a score >5; a clinically important and relevant improvement was a ≥3-point decrease. Preoperatively, parathyroid patients had worse sleep quality than thyroid patients (mean 8.1 vs 5.3; P sleep quality (P = .03). Postoperatively, only parathyroid patients demonstrated improvement in sleep quality; mean scores did not differ between the parathyroid and thyroid groups at 1 month (6.3 vs 5.3; P = .12) or 6 months (5.8 vs 4.6; P = .11). The proportion of patients with a clinically important improvement in sleep quality was greater in the parathyroid group at 1 month (37% vs 10%; P sleep quality between the 2 groups at 1 month (50% vs 40%; P = .32) and 6 months (40% vs 29%; P = .22). More than two-thirds of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism report poor sleep quality. After parathyroidectomy, over one-third experienced improvement, typically within the first month postoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... REM sleep? What is the effect of sleep deprivation? What are sleep myths? What are sleep disorders? ... Some hormones produced during sleep affect the body's use of energy. This may be how inadequate sleep ...

  13. The EASE Quality Improvement Project: Improving Safe Sleep Practices in Ohio Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Jamie R; Gittelman, Michael A; Denny, Sarah A; Southworth, Hayley; Arnold, Melissa Wervey

    2016-10-01

    Despite American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations, many hospitalized infants are not observed in the appropriate safe sleep environment. Caregivers tend to model sleep patterns observed in a hospital setting. This project assessed the change in infant safe sleep practices within 6 children's hospitals after the implementation of a statewide quality improvement program. The AAP recruited hospitalists from each of the state's children's hospitals and asked them to form "safe sleep teams" within their institutions. Teams used a standardized data tool to collect information on the infant's age and sleep position/environment. They collected baseline data and then weekly for the duration of the 12-month project. Teams were required to implement at least 3 Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles. We calculated changes in safe sleep practices over time. Providers received Maintenance of Certification Part IV credit for participation. Teams collected 5343 audits at all participating sites. At baseline, only 279 (32.6%) of 856 of the sleeping infants were observed to follow AAP recommendations, compared with 110 (58.2%) of 189 (P sleep practices from 48.2% to 75.4% (P hospitals improved observed infant safe sleep behaviors and family report of safe sleep education. These behavior changes may lead to more appropriate safe sleep practices at home. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Severity of sleep-disordered breathing improves following parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Natalie; Blyton, Diane M; Hennessy, Annemarie; Sullivan, Colin E

    2005-06-01

    Changes in sleep-disordered breathing associated with late pregnancy have not previously been systematically investigated; however, a number of case reports indicate exacerbation of obstructive sleep apnea in late pregnancy, often in association with maternal hypertension. We aimed to compare the severity of sleep-disordered breathing and associated maternal blood-pressure responses in late pregnancy with the nonpregnant state. Case-controlled, longitudinal study of sleep-disordered breathing during late pregnancy and postpartum. Ten women referred for suspected sleep-disordered breathing during the third trimester of pregnancy. None. Full overnight polysomnography and continuous systemic blood pressure were measured during the third trimester of pregnancy and 3 months following delivery. Parameters of sleep-disordered breathing, including apnea hypopnea index and minimum overnight arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation, were compared between antenatal and postnatal studies. An improvement in both apnea-hypopnea index and minimum arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation occurred consistently in all subjects postnatally. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, mean apnea-hypopnea index was reduced from 63 +/- 15 per hour antenatally to 18 +/- 4 per hour postnatally (P = .03), and in rapid eye movement sleep, from 64 +/- 11 per hour to 22 +/- 4 per hour (P = .002). Minimum arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation was increased from 86% +/- 2% antenatally to 91% +/- 1% postnatally (P = .01). Arterial blood-pressure responses to apnea peaked at 170 to 180 mm Hg antenatally, while they only peaked at 130 to 140 mm Hg postnatally. This study indicates that late pregnancy may be associated with increased severity of sleep-disordered breathing and associated blood-pressure responses.

  15. Moderators and mediators of exercise-induced objective sleep improvements in midlife and older adults with sleep complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buman, Matthew P; Hekler, Eric B; Bliwise, Donald L; King, Abby C

    2011-09-01

    Exercise can improve sleep quality, but for whom and by what means remains unclear. We examined moderators and mediators of objective sleep improvements in a 12-month randomized controlled trial among underactive midlife and older adults reporting mild/moderate sleep complaints. Participants (N = 66, 67% women, 55-79 years) were randomized to moderate-intensity exercise or health education control. Putative moderators were gender, age, physical function, self-reported global sleep quality, and physical activity levels. Putative mediators were changes in BMI, depressive symptoms, and physical function at 6 months. Objective sleep outcomes measured by in-home polysomnography were percent time in Stage I sleep, percent time in Stage II sleep, and number of awakenings during the first third of sleep at 12 months. Baseline physical function and sleep quality moderated changes in Stage I sleep; individuals with higher initial physical function (p = .01) and poorer sleep quality (p = .03) had greater improvements. Baseline physical activity level moderated changes in Stage II sleep (p = .04) and number of awakenings (p = .01); more sedentary individuals had greater improvements. Decreased depressive symptoms (CI:-1.57 to -0.02) mediated change in Stage I sleep. Decreased depressive symptoms (CI:-0.75 to -0.01), decreased BMI (CI:-1.08 to -0.06), and increased physical function (CI: 0.01 to 0.72) mediated change in number of awakenings. Initially less active individuals with higher initial physical function and poorer sleep quality improved the most. Affective, functional, and metabolic mediators specific to sleep architecture parameters were suggested. These results indicate strategies to more efficiently treat poor sleep through exercise in older adults.

  16. Multidisciplinary intensive rehabilitation treatment improves sleep quality in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Maestri, Roberto; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Riboldazzi, Giulio; Bera, Rossana; Fontanesi, Cecilia; Rossi, Roger P; Pezzoli, Gianni; Ghilardi, Maria F

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are among the most common non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), greatly interfering with daily activities and diminishing life quality. Pharmacological treatments have not been satisfactory because of side effects and interactions with anti-parkinsonian drugs. While studies have shown that regular exercise improves sleep quality in normal aging, there is no definitive evidence in PD. In a retrospective study, we determined whether an intense physical and multidisciplinary exercise program improves sleep quality in a large group of patients with PD. We analyzed the scores of PD Sleep Scale (PDSS), which was administered twice, 28 days apart, to two groups of patients with PD of comparable age, gender, disease duration and pharmacological treatment. The control group (49 patients) did not receive rehabilitation, The treated group (89 patients) underwent a 28-day multidisciplinary intensive rehabilitation program (three one-hour daily sessions comprising cardiovascular warm-up, relaxation, muscle-stretching, balance and gait training, occupational therapy to improve daily living activities). At enrolment, control and treated groups had similar UPDRS and PDSS scores. At re-test, 28 days later, UPDRS and total PDSS scores improved in the treated (p intensive rehabilitation treatment may have a positive impact on many aspects of sleep in PD.

  17. Moderate Exercise Plus Sleep Education Improves Self-Reported Sleep Quality, Daytime Mood, and Vitality in Adults with Chronic Sleep Complaints: A Waiting List-Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gebhart, Carmen; Erlacher, Daniel; Schredl, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates that physical exercise can contribute to better sleep quality. This study investigates the six-week influence of a combined intervention on self-rated sleep quality, daytime mood, and quality of life. A nonclinical sample of 114 adults with chronic initiating and the maintaining of sleep complaints participated in the study. The intervention group of 70 adults underwent moderate physical exercise, conducted weekly, plus sleep education sessions. Improvements among participa...

  18. A new function of rapid eye movement sleep: improvement of muscular efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zi-Jian

    2015-05-15

    Previously I demonstrated that the slow wave sleep (SWS) functioned to adjust the emotional balance disrupted by emotional memories randomly accumulated during waking, while the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep played the opposite role. Many experimental results have unambiguously shown that various emotional memories are processed during REM sleep. In this article, it is attempted to combine this confirmed function of REM sleep with the atonic state unique to REM sleep, and to integrate a new theory suggesting that improvement of muscular efficiency be a new function of REM sleep. This new function of REM sleep is more advantageous than the function of REM sleep in emotional memories and disinhibited drives to account for the phylogenetic variations of REM sleep, especially the absence of REM sleep in dolphins and short duration of REM sleep in birds in contrary to that in humans and rodents, the absence of penile erections in REM sleep in armadillo, as well as the higher voltage in EEG during REM sleep in platypus and ostrich. Besides, this new function of REM sleep is also advantageous to explain the association of REM sleep with the atonic episodes in SWS, the absence of drastic menopausal change in duration of REM sleep, and the effects of ambient temperature on the duration of REM sleep. These comparative and experimental evidences support the improvement of muscular efficiency as a new and major function of REM sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Can mental healthcare nurses improve sleep quality for inpatients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Niet, Gerrit; Tiemens, Bea; Hutschemaekers, Giel

    This article describes a pilot study that was carried out to in order to gain an indication as to whether mental healthcare nurses can apply evidence-based interventions for sleep problems effectively in inpatient mental health care. The study had a pre-test/post-test design and a comparison group was used. The study was performed on three psychiatric admission wards, located in three different towns in one province of The Netherlands. The participants were inpatients (18-60 years old) admitted owing to severe mental health problems like psychotic, mood or anxiety disorders. Of the newly admitted patients, 62.8% perceived having a sleep problem. Two brief, evidence-based interventions were introduced on two of the wards: the first with stimulus control (SC) as active component; the second with music-assisted relaxation (MAR). A third ward, with no interventions other than usual care, served as a point of comparison. Sleep quality was monitored using the Richards-Campbell Sleep Questionnaire (RCSQ). The change score means of the treatment groups were compared with the mean score of the comparison group by means of a t-test. Estimates of effect were calculated. The results of this study showed that MAR produced a statistically significant improvement of sleep quality and showed a large effect size. The total RCSQ score did not improve significantly. SC failed to produce statistically significant improvement of sleep quality, nor of the RCSQ total score. This pilot study provided a strong indication that mental health nurses can apply MAR effectively. No such indication was found for stimulus control.

  20. Can a Brief Educational Intervention Improve Parents' Knowledge of Healthy Children's Sleep? A Pilot-Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Caroline H. D.; Owens, Judith A.; Pham, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Insufficient and poor quality sleep is prevalent in children, and is a significant public health concern due to the negative consequences for health. Certain sleep-related behaviours are associated with improved sleep, and sleep behaviours are amenable to efforts targeted towards behaviour change. Parental educational interventions have…

  1. Moderators and Mediators of Exercise-Induced Objective Sleep Improvements in Midlife and Older Adults with Sleep Complaints

    OpenAIRE

    Buman, Matthew P.; Hekler, Eric B.; Bliwise, Donald L.; King, Abby C.

    2011-01-01

    Regular exercise can improve sleep quality, but for whom and by what means this occurs remain unclear. We examined moderators and mediators of objective sleep improvements in a 12-month randomized controlled trial among initially underactive midlife and older adults reporting mild/moderate sleep complaints. Participants (N=66, 67% women, 55–79 years) were randomized to moderate-intensity exercise or health education control. Putative moderators were gender, age, and baseline physical function...

  2. Preventing Weight Gain Improves Sleep Quality Among Black Women: Results from a RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Dori M; Christy, Jacob; Batch, Bryan C; Askew, Sandy; Moore, Reneé H; Parker, Portia; Bennett, Gary G

    2017-02-17

    Obesity and poor sleep are highly prevalent among Black women. We examined whether a weight gain prevention intervention improved sleep among Black women. We conducted a randomized trial comparing a 12-month weight gain prevention intervention that included self-monitoring through mobile technologies and phone coaching to usual care in community health centers. We measured sleep using the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale at baseline, 12 months, and 18 months. The scale examines quantity of sleep, sleep disturbance, sleep adequacy, daytime somnolence, snoring, shortness of breath, and global sleep problems (sleep problem indices I and II). Participants (n = 184) were on average 35.4 years and obese (BMI 30.2 kg/m2); 74% made sleep duration was 6.4 (1.5) hours. Controlling for weight change and sleep medication, the intervention group reported greater improvements in sleep disturbance [-8.35 (-16.24, -0.45)] and sleep problems at 12 months: sleep problem index I [-8.35 (-16.24, -0.45)]; sleep problem index II [-8.35 (-16.24, -0.45)]. However, these findings did not persist at 18 months. Preventing weight gain may afford clinical benefit on improving sleep quality. The trial was registered with the ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT00938535).

  3. Exercise to improve sleep in insomnia: exploration of the bidirectional effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2013-08-15

    Exercise improves sleep quality, mood, and quality of life among older adults with insomnia. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the daily bidirectional relationships between exercise and sleep in a sample of women with insomnia. Participants included 11 women (age M = 61.27, SD 4.15) with insomnia who engaged in 30 min of aerobic exercise 3 times per week. Self-reported sleep quality was assessed at baseline and at 16 weeks. Sleep and exercise logs and wrist activity were collected continuously. Sleep variables included subjective sleep quality and objective measures recorded via wrist actigraphy (sleep onset latency [SOL], total sleep time [TST], sleep efficiency [SE], wake after sleep onset [WASO], and fragmentation index [FI]). Age, subjective sleep quality, TST, SOL, and physical fitness at baseline were tested as moderators of the daily effects. TST, SE, and self-reported global sleep quality improved from baseline to 16 weeks (p values exercise session duration (p exercise was not associated with subjective or objective sleep variables during the corresponding night. However, participants had shorter exercise duration following nights with longer SOL (p exercise duration (p exercise was stronger in participants who had shorter TST at baseline. Results suggest that sleep influences next day exercise rather than exercise influencing sleep. The relationship between TST and next day exercise was stronger for those with shorter TST at baseline. These results suggest that improving sleep may encourage exercise participation.

  4. Broadband Sound Administration Improves Sleep Onset Latency in Healthy Subjects in a Model of Transient Insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Ludovico Messineo; Ludovico Messineo; Ludovico Messineo; Luigi Taranto-Montemurro; Scott A. Sands; Scott A. Sands; Melania D. Oliveira Marques; Melania D. Oliveira Marques; Ali Azabarzin; David Andrew Wellman

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundInsomnia is a major public health problem in western countries. Previous small pilot studies showed that the administration of constant white noise can improve sleep quality, increase acoustic arousal threshold, and reduce sleep onset latency. In this randomized controlled trial, we tested the effect of surrounding broadband sound administration on sleep onset latency, sleep architecture, and subjective sleep quality in healthy subjects.MethodsEighteen healthy subjects were studied ...

  5. Continuous positive airway pressure improves sleep and daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson disease and sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neikrug, Ariel B; Liu, Lianqi; Avanzino, Julie A; Maglione, Jeanne E; Natarajan, Loki; Bradley, Lenette; Maugeri, Alex; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Palmer, Barton W; Loredo, Jose S; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common in Parkinson disease (PD), contributes to sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness. We assessed the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on OSA, sleep, and daytime sleepiness in patients with PD. This was a randomized placebo-controlled, crossover design. Patients with PD and OSA were randomized into 6 w of therapeutic treatment or 3 w of placebo followed by 3 w of therapeutic treatment. Patients were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) pretreatment (baseline), after 3 w, and after 6 w of CPAP treatment. Analyses included mixed models, paired analysis, and within-group analyses comparing 3 w to 6 w of treatment. Sleep laboratory. Thirty-eight patients with PD (mean age = 67.2 ± 9.2 y; 12 females). Continuous positive airway pressure. PSG OUTCOME MEASURES: sleep efficiency, %sleep stages (N1, N2, N3, R), arousal index, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and % time oxygen saturation sleep-onset latency (MSL). There were significant group-by-time interactions for AHI (P treatment of OSA, improvement in nighttime oxygenation, and in deepening sleep. The paired sample analyses revealed that 3 w of therapeutic treatment resulted in significant decreases in arousal index (t = 3.4, P = 0.002). All improvements after 3 w were maintained at 6 w. Finally, 3 w of therapeutic CPAP also resulted in overall decreases in daytime sleepiness (P = 0.011). Therapeutic continuous positive airway pressure versus placebo was effective in reducing apnea events, improving oxygen saturation, and deepening sleep in patients with Parkinson disease and obstructive sleep apnea. Additionally, arousal index was reduced and effects were maintained at 6 weeks. Finally, 3 weeks of continuous positive airway pressure treatment resulted in reduced daytime sleepiness measured by multiple sleep latency test. These results emphasize the importance of identifying and treating obstructive sleep apnea in patients with

  6. Protein ingestion before sleep improves postexercise overnight recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Res, Peter T; Groen, Bart; Pennings, Bart; Beelen, Milou; Wallis, Gareth A; Gijsen, Annemie P; Senden, Joan M G; VAN Loon, Luc J C

    2012-08-01

    The role of nutrition in modulating postexercise overnight recovery remains to be elucidated. We assessed the effect of protein ingestion immediately before sleep on digestion and absorption kinetics and protein metabolism during overnight recovery from a single bout of resistance-type exercise. Sixteen healthy young males performed a single bout of resistance-type exercise in the evening (2000 h) after a full day of dietary standardization. All subjects were provided with appropriate recovery nutrition (20 g of protein, 60 g of CHO) immediately after exercise (2100 h). Thereafter, 30 min before sleep (2330 h), subjects ingested a beverage with (PRO) or without (PLA) 40 g of specifically produced intrinsically [1-C]phenylalanine-labeled casein protein. Continuous intravenous infusions with [ring-H5]phenylalanine and [ring-H2]tyrosine were applied with blood and muscle samples collected to assess protein digestion and absorption kinetics, whole-body protein balance and mixed muscle protein synthesis rates throughout the night (7.5 h). During sleep, casein protein was effectively digested and absorbed resulting in a rapid rise in circulating amino acid levels, which were sustained throughout the remainder of the night. Protein ingestion before sleep increased whole-body protein synthesis rates (311 ± 8 vs 246 ± 9 μmol·kg per 7.5 h) and improved net protein balance (61 ± 5 vs -11 ± 6 μmol·kg per 7.5 h) in the PRO vs the PLA experiment (P sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, thereby stimulating muscle protein synthesis and improving whole-body protein balance during postexercise overnight recovery.

  7. Tiotropium Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler versus HandiHaler to improve sleeping oxygen saturation and sleep quality in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouloukaki, Izolde; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Mermigkis, Charalampos; Giannadaki, Katerina; Moniaki, Violeta; Mauroudi, Eleni; Michelakis, Stylianos; Schiza, Sophia E

    2016-05-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have poor sleep quality as a result of various alterations in oxygenation parameters and sleep macro- and micro-architecture. There is a shortage of data to support the efficacy of long-acting inhaled anticholinergic agents in improving these adverse effects, which are known to have a negative impact on clinical outcomes. We aimed to compare the tiotropium Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler and the HandiHaler in terms of their effects on sleeping oxygen saturation (SaO2) and sleep quality in patients with COPD. In a randomized, open-label, parallel-group trial involving 200 patients with mild to moderate COPD (resting arterial oxygen tension >60 mmHg while awake), we compared the effects of 6 months' treatment with the two devices on sleeping SaO2 and sleep quality. Overnight polysomnography and pulmonary function testing were performed at baseline and after 6 months' treatment. A total of 188 patients completed the trial. Both groups showed significant improvement in minimum sleep SaO2 and time of sleep spent with SaO2 below 90 (TST90) compared to baseline. The patients using the Respimat had significantly better TST90 than did those using the HandiHaler. Sleep disturbance was highly variable in these patients, but the sleep stage durations were significantly better in the Respimat group. Sleeping SaO2 can be improved by tiotropium delivered using either the HandiHaler device or the Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler. However, the patients who used the Respimat device had significantly better TST90 and sleep architecture parameters.

  8. Improving activity in adults with diabetes and coexisting obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasens, Eileen R; Korytkowski, Mary; Sereika, Susan M; Burke, Lora E; Drumheller, Oliver J; Strollo, Patrick J

    2014-03-01

    This study in participants with type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea evaluated changes in activity, sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness after 4 weeks of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). This pilot study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Sleep apnea was quantified with an overnight sleep study. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, daytime sleepiness by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, vigor and fatigue with the Profiles of Mood States, subjective activity with the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire, and objective activity with the Bodymedia SenseWear Armband. Subjects were randomized to either CPAP (n = 12) or sham-devices (n = 11). The intervention group had reduced apneas and hypopneas, daytime sleepiness, and fatigue; they also had improved sleep quality and increased objective activity and vigor. The study suggested that treatment of obstructive sleep apnea results in a modest improvement of activity in persons with type 2 diabetes.

  9. Physical exercise performed before bedtime improves the sleep pattern of healthy young good sleepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flausino, Noler Heyden; Da Silva Prado, Juliana Martuscelli; de Queiroz, Sandra Souza; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the influence of different intensities and durations of exercise before bedtime on the sleep pattern and core body temperature of individuals considered good sleepers, we selected 17 healthy males and all underwent 5 nonconsecutive days of study. Measurements of polysomnographic parameters and core body temperature were taken at baseline and after each experimental protocol, performed at night. We found increased sleep efficiency (p = .016) among all protocols compared with baseline data and increase in REM sleep latency (p = .047) between two experiments; there was decrease in the percentage of stage 1 sleep (p = .046) and wake after sleep onset (p = .003). Core body temperature did not change significantly during the nights following exercise. Exercise performed before sleep does not impair sleep quality; rather, its practice improves sleep in good sleepers who are nonathletes, and may be considered to improve sleep pattern. Copyright © 2011 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  10. Sleep of professional athletes: Underexploited potential to improve health and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomilehto, Henri; Vuorinen, Ville-Pekka; Penttilä, Elina; Kivimäki, Marko; Vuorenmaa, Markus; Venojärvi, Mika; Airaksinen, Olavi; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    Sleep disorders have become increasingly prevalent affecting health and working ability. Restorative sleep may be considered important for athletes' successful recovery and performance. However, some athletes seem to experience major problems in sleeping. Thus far, there is limited scientific information about their sleep. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of sleep and the prevalence of sleep disorders as well as the impact of a structured sleep counselling protocol in professional athletes. A total of 107 professional ice hockey players participated in the study. The exploratory observational 1-year follow-up study consisted of questionnaire-based sleep assessment followed by general sleep counselling and, when needed, polysomnography and an individual treatment plan. One in every four players was found to have a significant problem in sleeping. All athletes considered sleep essential for their health and three in every four players considered that counselling would improve their performance. Counselling and individual treatment were found to improve significantly the quality of sleep with the mean alteration of 0.6 (95% CI 0.2-1.0, P = 0.004) in a scale from 0 to 10. Our results support that sleep problems are common in professional athletes. However, systematic examination, counselling and individual treatment planning can improve the quality of their sleep.

  11. Exercise training improves sleep quality in middle-aged and older adults with sleep problems: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Yu; Ho, Ka-Hou; Chen, Hsi-Chung; Chien, Meng-Yueh

    2012-01-01

    Does an exercise training program improve the quality of sleep in middle-aged and older adults with sleep problems? Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Adults aged over 40 years with sleep problems. A formal exercise training program consisting of either aerobic or resistance exercise. Self-reported sleep quality or polysomnography. Six trials were eligible for inclusion and provided data on 305 participants (241 female). Each of the studies examined an exercise training program that consisted of either moderate intensity aerobic exercise or high intensity resistance exercise. The duration of most of the training programs was between 10 and 16 weeks. All of the studies used the self-reported Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index to assess sleep quality. Compared to the control group, the participants who were randomised to an exercise program had a better global Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score, with a standardised mean difference (SMD) of 0.47 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.86). The exercise group also had significantly reduced sleep latency (SMD 0.58, 95% CI 0.08 to 1.08), and medication use (SMD 0.44, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.74). However, the groups did not differ significantly in sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep disturbance, or daytime functioning. Participation in an exercise training program has moderately positive effects on sleep quality in middle-aged and older adults. Physical exercise could be an alternative or complementary approach to existing therapies for sleep problems. Copyright © 2012 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  12. Integrating Safe Sleep Practices into a Pediatric Hospital: Outcomes of a Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Angela D; Sisterhen, Laura L; Mallard, Ellen; Borecky, Betsy; Schmid, Barbara; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Luo, Chunqiao

    2016-01-01

    A quality improvement project for implementing safe sleep practices (SSP) was conducted at a large, U.S children's hospital. The intervention involved education of staff and standardization of infant sleep practices utilizing a multifaceted approach. Staff surveys and environmental audits were conducted pre- and post-intervention. Safe Sleep Environment (SSE) audits showed an improvement from 23% to 34% (phospital setting. Infant safe sleep practices have the potential to reduce infant mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Moderate Exercise Plus Sleep Education Improves Self-Reported Sleep Quality, Daytime Mood, and Vitality in Adults with Chronic Sleep Complaints: A Waiting List-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Gebhart

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that physical exercise can contribute to better sleep quality. This study investigates the six-week influence of a combined intervention on self-rated sleep quality, daytime mood, and quality of life. A nonclinical sample of 114 adults with chronic initiating and the maintaining of sleep complaints participated in the study. The intervention group of 70 adults underwent moderate physical exercise, conducted weekly, plus sleep education sessions. Improvements among participants assigned to the intervention group relative to the waiting-list control group (n=44 were noted for subjective sleep quality, daytime mood, depressive symptoms and vitality. Derived from PSQI subscores, the intervention group reported increased sleep duration, shortened sleep latency, fewer awakenings after sleep onset, and overall better sleep efficiency compared to controls. The attained scores were well sustained and enhanced over a time that lasted through to the follow-up 18 weeks later. These findings have implications in treatment programs concerning healthy lifestyle approaches for adults with chronic sleep complaints.

  14. Is sleep education an effective tool for sleep improvement and minimizing metabolic disturbance and obesity in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Teresa; Taheri, Shahrad

    2017-12-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased significantly in recent years. Obesity is associated with a range of adverse physiological, psychological and social outcomes and places a huge economical burden on healthcare systems around the world. Insufficient sleep duration is common in adolescents and exacerbated by contemporary lifestyles, but may be a contributor to obesity onset and metabolic disruption. We briefly review the current evidence surrounding the associations between sleep and obesity as well as diabetes. Sleep improvement programs have been suggested as a potential avenue to raise awareness of the importance of sleep and ultimately enhance sleep behaviors/routines. A review of the current literature supporting the efficacy of such programs is tentative. Furthermore, very few studies have investigated if sleep enhancement has downstream positive effects on metabolic function or body weight in adolescents. We highlight biological and social factors that intensify sleep loss in adolescents and recommend that these be targeted components in future interventions aimed at improving adolescent sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Melatonin acutely improves the neuroendocrine architecture of sleep in blind individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Stefan; Smolnik, Rüdiger; Herms, Markus; Born, Jan; Fehm, Horst L

    2003-11-01

    In blind individuals, the absence of light cues results in disturbances of sleep and sleep-related neuroendocrine patterns. The Zeitgeber influence of light on the timing of sleep is assumed to be mediated by melatonin, a hormone of the pineal gland, whose secretion is inhibited by light and enhanced during darkness. Here, we investigated whether a single administration of melatonin improves sleep and associated neuroendocrine patterns in blind individuals. In a double-blind crossover study, 12 totally blind subjects received 5 mg melatonin and placebo orally 1 h before bedtime starting at 2300 h. The dose used enhanced blood melatonin concentrations to clearly supraphysiological levels. Melatonin increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency (P blind individuals the single administration of a clearly pharmacological dose of melatonin can improve sleep function by synchronizing in time the inhibition of pituitary-adrenal activity with central nervous sleep processes.

  16. Aerobic exercise improves self-reported sleep and quality of life in older adults with insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kathryn J; Baron, Kelly Glazer; Lu, Brandon; Naylor, Erik; Wolfe, Lisa; Zee, Phyllis C

    2010-10-01

    To assess the efficacy of moderate aerobic physical activity with sleep hygiene education to improve sleep, mood and quality of life in older adults with chronic insomnia. Seventeen sedentary adults aged >or=55 years with insomnia (mean age 61.6 [SD±4.3] years; 16 female) participated in a randomized controlled trial comparing 16 weeks of aerobic physical activity plus sleep hygiene to non-physical activity plus sleep hygiene. Eligibility included primary insomnia for at least 3 months, habitual sleep duration Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score >5. Outcomes included sleep quality, mood and quality of life questionnaires (PSQI, Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS], Short-form 36 [SF-36], Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale [CES-D]). The physical activity group improved in sleep quality on the global PSQI (psleep latency (p=.049), sleep duration (p=.04), daytime dysfunction (p=.027), and sleep efficiency (p=.036) PSQI sub-scores compared to the control group. The physical activity group also had reductions in depressive symptoms (p=.044), daytime sleepiness (p=.02) and improvements in vitality (p=.017) compared to baseline scores. Aerobic physical activity with sleep hygiene education is an effective treatment approach to improve sleep quality, mood and quality of life in older adults with chronic insomnia.

  17. Noninvasive Ventilation Improves Sleep in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Prospective Polysomnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijsen, Bart; Buyse, Bertien; Belge, Catharina; Robberecht, Wim; Van Damme, Philip; Decramer, Marc; Testelmans, Dries

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate the effects of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) on sleep in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) after meticulous titration with polysomnography (PSG). Methods: In this prospective observational study, 24 ALS patients were admitted to the sleep laboratory during 4 nights for in-hospital NIV titration with PSG and nocturnal capnography. Questionnaires were used to assess subjective sleep quality and quality of life (QoL). Patients were readmitted after one month. Results: In the total group, slow wave sleep and REM sleep increased and the arousal-awakening index improved. The group without bulbar involvement (non-bulbar) showed the same improvements, together with an increase in sleep efficiency. Nocturnal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels improved in the total and non-bulbar group. Except for oxygen saturation during REM sleep, no improvement in respiratory function or sleep structure was found in bulbar patients. However, these patients showed less room for improvement. Patient-reported outcomes showed improvement in sleep quality and QoL for the total and non-bulbar group, while bulbar patients only reported improvements in very few subscores. Conclusions: This study shows an improvement of sleep architecture, carbon dioxide, and nocturnal oxygen saturation at the end of NIV titration and after one month of NIV in ALS patients. More studies are needed to identify the appropriate time to start NIV in bulbar patients. Our results suggest that accurate titration of NIV by PSG improves sleep quality. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 511. Citation: Vrijsen B, Buyse B, Belge C, Robberecht W, Van Damme P, Decramer M, Testelmans D. Noninvasive ventilation improves sleep in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a prospective polysomnographic study. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):559–566. PMID:25766713

  18. TodaysBaby Quality Improvement: Safe Sleep Teaching and Role Modeling in 8 US Maternity Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellams, Ann; Parker, Margaret G; Geller, Nicole L; Moon, Rachel Y; Colson, Eve R; Drake, Emily; Corwin, Michael J; McClain, Mary; Golden, W Christopher; Hauck, Fern R

    2017-11-01

    Nursing education and role modeling can increase adherence to safe sleep practices. Eight US hospital maternity units with variable baseline approaches to education participated in a national multicenter nursing quality improvement (QI) intervention to promote safe sleep practices. The goals at participating maternity units were to (1) increase the rate of mothers who reported receiving safe sleep information from nurses to ≥90% and (2) increase the rates of infants observed sleeping supine in a safe environment to ≥90%. A safe sleep QI toolkit, designed for and provided to all sites, included an educational curriculum and tools to use for staff and parent education. Local teams implemented safe sleep education using the tools as plan-do-study-act cycles. After each cycle, audits assessing maternal report of nursing education on safe sleep and inpatient infant sleep position and environment were performed. The QI interventions lasted a median of 160 days (range, 101-273). Mothers reported receiving information on 4 primary safe sleep topics 72% to 95% of the time (a 24%-57% increase over the baseline). Additionally, 93% of infants were observed in a supine sleep position, and 88% of infants were observed in a safe sleep environment (a 24% and 33% increase over baseline, respectively). These rates were sustained up to 12 months later. Implementation of a multisite QI intervention for safe sleep parenting education and role modeling led to increased knowledge of and compliance with safe sleep practices during postpartum hospitalization. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Interventions to Improve Safe Sleep Among Hospitalized Infants at Eight Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Stephanie; Ahlers-Schmidt, Carolyn R; Lukasiewicz, Gloria; Truong, Therese Macasiray

    2016-02-01

    Within hospital pediatric units, there is a lack of consistent application or modeling of the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for safe infant sleep. The purpose of this study was to improve safe sleep practices for infants in nonneonatal pediatric units with implementation of specific interventions. This multi-institutional study was conducted by using baseline observations collected for sleep location, position, and environment (collectively, "safe sleep") of infants admitted to pediatric units. Interventions consisted of: (1) staff education, including a commitment to promote safe sleep; (2) implementing site-generated safe sleep policies; (3) designating supply storage in patient rooms; and/or (4) caregiver education. Postintervention observations of safe sleep were collected. Eight hospitals participated from the Inpatient FOCUS Group of the Children's Hospital Association. Each site received institutional review board approval/exemption. Safe sleep was observed for 4.9% of 264 infants at baseline and 31.2% of 234 infants postintervention (Psleeping environment was reduced by >50% (P=.001). Implementation of site-specific interventions seems to improve overall safe sleep in inpatient pediatric units, although continued improvement is needed. Specifically, extra items are persistently left in the sleeping environment. Moving forward, hospitals should evaluate their compliance with American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations and embrace initiatives to improve modeling of safe sleep. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Does the Treatment of Sleep Apnea Improve the Sexual Performance in Men with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavit Ceylan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available        Aim: We aimed to investigate the eff ect of obstructive sleep apnea treatment on sexual performance in the case of obstructive sleep apnea in men with erectile dysfunction. Material and Methods: IIEF (international index of erectile function form was fi lled for 141 male patients who admitted with obstructive sleep apnea and with erectile dysfunction and investigated in polysomnography laboratory. All patients were examined at ENT (Ear Nose and Throat clinic. Patients in the treatment of surgery and CBAP (continuous positive airway pressure were evaluated according to the apnehipopne index (AHI. Preliminary report has been done at the 3. month aſt er the OSAS(Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome therapy for the 23 patients. IIEF form was fi lled again and symptom scoring has been updated for 23 patients who could be followed aſt er sleep apnea treatment. The age of these patients ranged from 26 to 65 years. Wilcoxon signed ranks, Kruskal Wallis, and Spearman’s rho tests were used to evaluate diff erences in IIEF scores before and aſt er the treatment. Results: Signifi cant improvement were confi rmed at IIEF scores of 23 patients with obstructive sleep apnea who could be followed and treated statistically (p0.05. Discussion: Sexual performance may decline in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and a signifi cant improvement was detected on sexual performance with apnea treatment in this group of patients.

  1. Improved sleep MRI at 3 tesla in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Lewis K; Holbrook, Andrew B; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A; Powell, Nelson B; Fischbein, Nancy J; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2013-11-01

    To describe a real-time MR imaging platform for synchronous, multi-planar visualization of upper airway collapse in obstructive sleep apnea at 3 Tesla (T) to promote natural sleep with an emphasis on lateral wall visualization. A real-time imaging platform was configured for sleep MR imaging which used a cartesian, partial k-space gradient-echo sequence with an inherent temporal resolution of 3 independent slices every 2 s. Combinations of axial, mid-sagittal, and coronal scan planes were acquired. The system was tested in five subjects with polysomnography-proven obstructive sleep apnea during sleep, with synchronous acquisition of respiratory effort and combined oral-nasal airflow data. Sleep was initiated and maintained to allow demonstration of sleep-induced, upper airway collapse as illustrated in two subjects when using a real-time, sleep MR imaging platform at 3T. Lateral wall collapse could not be visualized on mid-sagittal imaging alone and was best characterized on multiplanar coronal and axial imaging planes. Our dedicated sleep MR imaging platform permitted an acoustic environment of constant "white noise" which was conducive to sleep onset and sleep maintenance in obstructive sleep apnea patients at 3T. Apneic episodes, specifically the lateral walls, were more accurately characterized with synchronous, multiplanar acquisitions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Improved Mental Acuity Forecasting with an Individualized Quantitative Sleep Model

    OpenAIRE

    Winslow, Brent D.; Nam Nguyen; Venta, Kimberly E.

    2017-01-01

    Sleep impairment significantly alters human brain structure and cognitive function, but available evidence suggests that adults in developed nations are sleeping less. A growing body of research has sought to use sleep to forecast cognitive performance by modeling the relationship between the two, but has generally focused on vigilance rather than other cognitive constructs affected by sleep, such as reaction time, executive function, and working memory. Previous modeling efforts have also ut...

  3. Lack of perceived sleep improvement after 4-month structured exercise programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavsky, Steriani; McAuley, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Many middle-aged women experience decreases in their sleep quality during the menopausal transition. Physical activity has been shown to improve sleep, but few randomized, controlled trials investigating such effects in this population exist. In 164 previously low-active middle-aged women (mean age = 49.9, SD = 3.6), using a 4-month randomized, controlled trial, we examined structured exercise in the form of walking or yoga to determine the effects on perceived sleep quality. Participants completed body composition and fitness assessments and a battery of psychological measures, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, at the beginning and end of a 4-month randomized, controlled exercise trial with three arms: walking, yoga, and control. A series of mixed-model repeated-measures univariate analyses of covariance did not reveal any statistically significant intervention effects for total sleep quality or any individual sleep-quality domain. The pattern of effect sizes indicated that the walking group tended to experience small improvements in five of the seven assessed sleep-quality domains. Residual changes in menopausal symptoms and depression were associated with residual changes in total sleep quality. However, after controlling for the effects of physical activity, only menopausal symptoms contributed a unique amount of variance in residual change in total sleep quality. In this study, 4-month moderate-intensity walking and low-intensity yoga programs were ineffective in yielding statistically significant improvements in sleep quality. Exercise interventions of longer durations or greater intensity may be needed for such improvements.

  4. A novel sleep optimisation programme to improve athletes' well-being and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryswyk, Emer; Weeks, Richard; Bandick, Laura; O'Keefe, Michaela; Vakulin, Andrew; Catcheside, Peter; Barger, Laura; Potter, Andrew; Poulos, Nick; Wallace, Jarryd; Antic, Nick A

    2017-03-01

    To improve well-being and performance indicators in a group of Australian Football League (AFL) players via a six-week sleep optimisation programme. Prospective intervention study following observations suggestive of reduced sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness in an AFL group. Athletes from the Adelaide Football Club were invited to participate if they had played AFL senior-level football for 1-5 years, or if they had excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS] >10), measured via ESS. An initial education session explained normal sleep needs, and how to achieve increased sleep duration and quality. Participants (n = 25) received ongoing feedback on their sleep, and a mid-programme education and feedback session. Sleep duration, quality and related outcomes were measured during week one and at the conclusion of the six-week intervention period using sleep diaries, actigraphy, ESS, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Profile of Mood States, Training Distress Scale, Perceived Stress Scale and the Psychomotor Vigilance Task. Sleep diaries demonstrated an increase in total sleep time of approximately 20 min (498.8 ± 53.8 to 518.7 ± 34.3; p optimisation programme may improve athletes' well-being. More research is required into the effects of sleep optimisation on athletic performance.

  5. Sleep improvement with levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel infusion in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibetti, M; Rizzone, M; Merola, A; Angrisano, S; Rizzi, L; Montanaro, E; Cicolin, A; Lopiano, L

    2013-05-01

    Sleep disorders are common in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Nocturnal akinesia and sleep fragmentation frequently coexist with daytime sleepiness, influencing daytime functioning. Levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) infusion has been shown to improve motor complications in advanced PD, and preliminary findings suggest that sleep might improve following LCIG infusion. To analyze the impact of LCIG infusion on sleep symptoms and daytime sleepiness in patients with PD. Twelve consecutive patients with PD completed the PD-Sleep-Scale-version-2 (PDSS-2) and the Epworth-Sleepiness-Scale (ESS) at baseline and after 2-4 months of LCIG treatment. Activities of daily living, motor symptoms and complications were assessed with the Unified-PD-rating-Scale section II, III, and IV. Nocturnal sleep improved substantially in all patients switched to LCIG infusion. PDSS-2 total score and subscores for 'Disturbed sleep', 'Motor symptoms at night', and 'PD symptoms at night' were significantly reduced. ESS measures of daytime sleepiness also improved. Motor complications and activities of daily living improved significantly with LCIG. Subjective measures of sleep quality and daytime sleepiness improve in patients with advanced PD undergoing LCIG infusion. Further studies with a larger number of patients and polysomnographic recordings are needed to confirm the beneficial effect on sleep and clarify the underlying mechanisms. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Mindfulness meditation and improvement in sleep quality and daytime impairment among older adults with sleep disturbances: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David S; O'Reilly, Gillian A; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth C; Irwin, Michael R

    2015-04-01

    Sleep disturbances are most prevalent among older adults and often go untreated. Treatment options for sleep disturbances remain limited, and there is a need for community-accessible programs that can improve sleep. To determine the efficacy of a mind-body medicine intervention, called mindfulness meditation, to promote sleep quality in older adults with moderate sleep disturbances. Randomized clinical trial with 2 parallel groups conducted from January 1 to December 31, 2012, at a medical research center among an older adult sample (mean [SD] age, 66.3 [7.4] years) with moderate sleep disturbances (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI] >5). A standardized mindful awareness practices (MAPs) intervention (n = 24) or a sleep hygiene education (SHE) intervention (n = 25) was randomized to participants, who received a 6-week intervention (2 hours per week) with assigned homework. The study was powered to detect between-group differences in moderate sleep disturbance measured via the PSQI at postintervention. Secondary outcomes pertained to sleep-related daytime impairment and included validated measures of insomnia symptoms, depression, anxiety, stress, and fatigue, as well as inflammatory signaling via nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Using an intent-to-treat analysis, participants in the MAPs group showed significant improvement relative to those in the SHE group on the PSQI. With the MAPs intervention, the mean (SD) PSQIs were 10.2 (1.7) at baseline and 7.4 (1.9) at postintervention. With the SHE intervention, the mean (SD) PSQIs were 10.2 (1.8) at baseline and 9.1 (2.0) at postintervention. The between-group mean difference was 1.8 (95% CI, 0.6-2.9), with an effect size of 0.89. The MAPs group showed significant improvement relative to the SHE group on secondary health outcomes of insomnia symptoms, depression symptoms, fatigue interference, and fatigue severity (P anxiety, stress, or NF-κB, although NF-κB concentrations significantly declined over time in both groups (P

  7. Stimulation of the brain with radiofrequency electromagnetic field pulses affects sleep-dependent performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustenberger, Caroline; Murbach, Manuel; Dürr, Roland; Schmid, Marc Ralph; Kuster, Niels; Achermann, Peter; Huber, Reto

    2013-09-01

    Sleep-dependent performance improvements seem to be closely related to sleep spindles (12-15 Hz) and sleep slow-wave activity (SWA, 0.75-4.5 Hz). Pulse-modulated radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMF, carrier frequency 900 MHz) are capable to modulate these electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics of sleep. The aim of our study was to explore possible mechanisms how RF EMF affect cortical activity during sleep and to test whether such effects on cortical activity during sleep interact with sleep-dependent performance changes. Sixteen male subjects underwent 2 experimental nights, one of them with all-night 0.25-0.8 Hz pulsed RF EMF exposure. All-night EEG was recorded. To investigate RF EMF induced changes in overnight performance improvement, subjects were trained for both nights on a motor task in the evening and the morning. We obtained good sleep quality in all subjects under both conditions (mean sleep efficiency > 90%). After pulsed RF EMF we found increased SWA during exposure to pulse-modulated RF EMF compared to sham exposure (P sleep period. Spindle activity was not affected. Moreover, subjects showed an increased RF EMF burst-related response in the SWA range, indicated by an increase in event-related EEG spectral power and phase changes in the SWA range. Notably, during exposure, sleep-dependent performance improvement in the motor sequence task was reduced compared to the sham condition (-20.1%, P = 0.03). The changes in the time course of SWA during the exposure night may reflect an interaction of RF EMF with the renormalization of cortical excitability during sleep, with a negative impact on sleep-dependent performance improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Broadband Sound Administration Improves Sleep Onset Latency in Healthy Subjects in a Model of Transient Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messineo, Ludovico; Taranto-Montemurro, Luigi; Sands, Scott A; Oliveira Marques, Melania D; Azabarzin, Ali; Wellman, David Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Insomnia is a major public health problem in western countries. Previous small pilot studies showed that the administration of constant white noise can improve sleep quality, increase acoustic arousal threshold, and reduce sleep onset latency. In this randomized controlled trial, we tested the effect of surrounding broadband sound administration on sleep onset latency, sleep architecture, and subjective sleep quality in healthy subjects. Eighteen healthy subjects were studied with two overnight sleep studies approximately one week apart. They were exposed in random order to normal environmental noise (40.1 [1.3] dB) or to broadband sound administration uniformly distributed in the room by two speakers (46.0 [0.9] dB). To model transient insomnia, subjects went to bed ("lights out") 90 min before usual bedtime. Broadband sound administration reduced sleep onset latency to stage 2 sleep (time from lights out to first epoch of non-rapid eye movement-sleep stage 2) (19 [16] vs. 13 [23] min, p = 0.011; median reduction 38% baseline). In a subgroup reporting trouble initiating sleep at home (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index section 2 score ≥ 1), sound administration improved subjective sleep quality (p = 0.037) and the frequency of arousals from sleep (p = 0.03). In an experimental model of transient insomnia in young healthy individuals, broadband sound administration significantly reduced sleep onset latency by 38% compared to normal environmental noise. These findings suggest that broadband sound administration might be helpful to minimize insomnia symptoms in selected individuals.

  9. Broadband Sound Administration Improves Sleep Onset Latency in Healthy Subjects in a Model of Transient Insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico Messineo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInsomnia is a major public health problem in western countries. Previous small pilot studies showed that the administration of constant white noise can improve sleep quality, increase acoustic arousal threshold, and reduce sleep onset latency. In this randomized controlled trial, we tested the effect of surrounding broadband sound administration on sleep onset latency, sleep architecture, and subjective sleep quality in healthy subjects.MethodsEighteen healthy subjects were studied with two overnight sleep studies approximately one week apart. They were exposed in random order to normal environmental noise (40.1 [1.3] dB or to broadband sound administration uniformly distributed in the room by two speakers (46.0 [0.9] dB. To model transient insomnia, subjects went to bed (“lights out” 90 min before usual bedtime.ResultsBroadband sound administration reduced sleep onset latency to stage 2 sleep (time from lights out to first epoch of non-rapid eye movement-sleep stage 2 (19 [16] vs. 13 [23] min, p = 0.011; median reduction 38% baseline. In a subgroup reporting trouble initiating sleep at home (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index section 2 score ≥ 1, sound administration improved subjective sleep quality (p = 0.037 and the frequency of arousals from sleep (p = 0.03.ConclusionIn an experimental model of transient insomnia in young healthy individuals, broadband sound administration significantly reduced sleep onset latency by 38% compared to normal environmental noise. These findings suggest that broadband sound administration might be helpful to minimize insomnia symptoms in selected individuals.

  10. Does improving sleep lead to better mental health? A protocol for a meta-analytic review of randomised controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Alexander J; Webb, Thomas L; Rowse, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Sleep and mental health go hand-in-hand, with many, if not all, mental health problems being associated with problems sleeping. Although sleep has been traditionally conceptualised as a secondary consequence of mental health problems, contemporary views prescribe a more influential, causal role of sleep in the formation and maintenance of mental health problems. One way to evaluate this assertion is to examine the extent to which interventions that improve sleep also improve men...

  11. Sleep quality improves with endoscopic sinus surgery in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Värendh, M; Johannisson, A; Hrubos-Strøm, H; Andersson, M

    2017-03-01

    Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyposis (CRSwNP) is a chronic disease that has a major impact on generic and disease-specific quality of life. Little is known about the influence of CRSwNP on sleep and what effect surgery for CRSwNP has on sleep quality. The aim of the study was to investigate sleep quality in patients with CRSwNP before and after endoscopic surgery. Forty-two patients filled out four validated sleep questionnaires and one sino/nasal, disease specific quality of life questionnaire before surgery and three months later. A healthy control group filled out the same questionnaires at baseline and after three months. An impact on sleep patterns was found in all sleep questionnaires and surgery clearly improved the quality of sleep. The Sino-nasal outcome test sum score decreased from median 51,5 to 26,5. Epworth sleepiness scale showed a decline in score from score 7.5 to 6.0. Surgery also reduced the risk for obstructive sleep apnoea in 13 patients evaluated by the Berlin Questionnaire and Multivariable Apnea Prediction Index. Patients with CRSwNP had impaired sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, nasal patency, and risk for sleep apnea, all of which improved after corrective surgery.

  12. Increased physical activity improves sleep and mood outcomes in inactive people with insomnia: a randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hartescu, Iuliana; Morgan, Kevin; Stevinson, Clare D

    2015-01-01

    While high levels of activity and exercise training have been associated with improvements in sleep quality, minimum levels of activity likely to improve sleep outcomes have not been explored. A two...

  13. Use of a Supplementary Internet Based Education Program Improves Sleep Literacy in College Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F.; Anderson, Janis L.; Hodge, Gordon K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. Methods: An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Results: Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p psychology course. Citation: Quan SF; Anderson JL; Hodge GK. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(2):155-160. PMID:23372469

  14. A brief sleep intervention improves outcomes in the school entry year: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Jon; Hiscock, Harriet; Ukoumunne, Obioha Chukwunyere; Wake, Melissa

    2011-10-01

    To determine the feasibility of screening for child sleep problems and the efficacy of a behavioral sleep intervention in improving child and parent outcomes in the first year of schooling. A randomized controlled trial was nested in a population survey performed at 22 elementary schools in Melbourne, Australia. Intervention involved 2 to 3 consultations that covered behavioral sleep strategies for children whose screening results were positive for a moderate/severe sleep problem. Outcomes were parent-reported child sleep problem (primary outcome), sleep habits, psychosocial health-related quality of life, behavior, and parent mental health (all at 3, 6, and 12 months) and blinded, face-to-face learning assessment (at 6 months). The screening survey was completed by 1512 parents; 161 (10.8%) reported a moderate/severe child sleep problem, and 108 of 136 (79.2% of those eligible) entered the trial. Sleep problems tended to resolve more rapidly in intervention children. Sleep problems affected 33% of 54 intervention children versus 43% of 54 control children at 3 months (P = .3), 25.5% vs 46.8% at 6 months (P = .03), and 32% vs 33% at 12 months (P = .8). Sustained sleep-habit improvements were evident at 3, 6, and 12 months (effect sizes: 0.33 [P = .03]; 0.51 [P = .003]; and 0.40 [P = .02]; respectively), and there were initial marked improvements in psychosocial scores that diminished over time (effect sizes: 0.47 [P = .02]; 0.41 [P = .09]; and 0.26 [P = .3]; respectively). Better prosocial behavior was evident at 12 months (effect size: 0.35; P = .03), and learning and parent outcomes were similar between groups. School-based screening for sleep problems followed by a targeted, brief behavioral sleep intervention is feasible and has benefits relevant to school transition.

  15. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F; Anderson, Janis L; Hodge, Gordon K

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p internet-based sleep learning module has the potential to enhance sleep literacy and change behavior among students enrolled in an introductory college psychology course.

  16. Improvement in Physical Activity in Persons With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treated With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Raymonde E; Duttuluri, Manideep; Gibson, Charlisa D; Mir, Sadaf; Fuhrmann, Katherine; Eden, Edward; Supariwala, Azhar

    2017-03-01

    Exercise improves sleep quality, yet people with untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may engage in less physical activity (PA) due to fatigue and daytime sleepiness. We examined changes in PA and sleep quality before and after treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in OSA patients. In this prospective longitudinal study, persons with a primary diagnosis of OSA were enrolled at a community-based hospital in New York City. At 3 time intervals pre- and post-CPAP (3-8 months), we measured sleep quality using validated questionnaires, perceived PA using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and actual PA using pedometer steps per day. We sought to investigate how CPAP use and changes in sleep quality impacted the number of steps taken, as recorded in pedometer steps. In total, 62 patients were enrolled in the study from March 2012 to July 2014. In all, patients averaged 53 years of age, and 26 patients (42%) were female. Among all participants, 86% of persons had moderate to severe sleep apnea (AHI ≥15). Approximately 73% of participants were compliant with CPAP use. Poor sleep quality correlated with lower actual PA (P = .004) at baseline. At 3 and 7 months, there was significant improvement in sleep quality (Δ -2.63 ± 3.4 and Δ -3.5 ± 3.8; P sleep quality and actual PA.

  17. Mastication movements and sleep quality of patients with myofascial pain: occlusal device therapy improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova, Larissa Soares Reis; Gonçalves, Thais Marques Simek Vega; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Bavia, Paula Furlan; Rodrigues Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus

    2014-12-01

    Patients with myofascial pain experience impaired mastication, which might also interfere with their sleep quality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the jaw motion and sleep quality of patients with myofascial pain and the impact of a stabilization device therapy on both parameters. Fifty women diagnosed with myofascial pain by the Research Diagnostic Criteria were enrolled. Pain levels (visual analog scale), jaw movements (kinesiography), and sleep quality (Epworth Sleepiness Scale; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were evaluated before (control) and after stabilization device use. Range of motion (maximum opening, right and left excursions, and protrusion) and masticatory movements during Optosil mastication (opening, closing, and total cycle time; opening and closing angles; and maximum velocity) also were evaluated. Repeated-measures analysis of variance in a generalized linear mixed models procedure was used for statistical analysis (α=.05). At baseline, participants with myofascial pain showed a reduced range of jaw motion and poorer sleep quality. Treatment with a stabilization device reduced pain (Pmastication increased, and improvements in sleep scores for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (P<.001) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (P=.04) were found. Myofascial pain impairs jaw motion and quality of sleep; the reduction of pain after the use of a stabilization device improves the range of motion and sleep parameters. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Home exercise improves the quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness of elderlies: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Glauber Sá; Gomes, Glaucia Sá Brandão Freitas; Brandão, Glaudson Sá; Callou Sampaio, Antônia A; Donner, Claudio F; Oliveira, Luis V F; Camelier, Aquiles Assunção

    2018-01-01

    Aging causes physiological changes which affect the quality of sleep. Supervised physical exercise is an important therapeutic resource to improve the sleep of the elderlies, however there is a low adherence to those type of programs, so it is necessary to implement an exercise program which is feasible and effective. The study aimed to test the hypothesis that a semi-supervised home exercise program, improves sleep quality and daytime sleepiness of elderlies of the community who present poor sleep quality. This was a randomized controlled trial study, conducted from May to September 2017, in Northeastern Brazil, with elderlies of the community aging 60 years old or older, sedentary, with lower scores or equal to 5 at the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and without cognitive decline. From one hundred ninety-one potential participants twenty-eight refused to participate, therefore, one hundred thirty-one (mean age 68 ± 7 years), and 88% female, were randomly assigned to an intervention group - IG (home exercise and sleep hygiene, n = 65) and a control group - CG (sleep hygiene only, n = 66). Sleep assessment tools were used: PSQI, Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) and clinical questionnaire of Berlin. The level of physical activity has been assessed by means of International Physical Activity Questionnaire adapted for the elderly (IPAQ) and Mini-Mental State Examination for cognitive decline. All participants were assessed before and after the 12-week intervention period and, also, the assessors were blind. The IG showed significant improvement in quality of sleep with a mean reduction of 4.9 ± 2.7 points in the overall PSQI (p exercise is effective in improving the quality of sleep and self-referred daytime sleepiness of sedentary elderlies of the community who presented sleep disorders. Ensaiosclinicos.gov.br process number: RBR-3cqzfy.

  19. Cognitive training improves sleep quality and cognitive function among older adults with insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimov, Iris; Shatil, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of an eight-week, home-based, personalized, computerized cognitive training program on sleep quality and cognitive performance among older adults with insomnia. Participants (n = 51) were randomly allocated to a cognitive training group (n = 34) or to an active control group (n = 17). The participants in the cognitive training group completed an eight-week, home-based, personalized, computerized cognitive training program, while the participants in the active control group completed an eight-week, home-based program involving computerized tasks that do not engage high-level cognitive functioning. Before and after training, all participants' sleep was monitored for one week by an actigraph and their cognitive performance was evaluated. COMMUNITY SETTING: residential sleep/performance testing facility. Fifty-one older adults with insomnia (aged 65-85). Eight weeks of computerized cognitive training for older adults with insomnia. Mixed models for repeated measures analysis showed between-group improvements for the cognitive training group on both sleep quality (sleep onset latency and sleep efficiency) and cognitive performance (avoiding distractions, working memory, visual memory, general memory and naming). Hierarchical linear regressions analysis in the cognitive training group indicated that improved visual scanning is associated with earlier advent of sleep, while improved naming is associated with the reduction in wake after sleep onset and with the reduction in number of awakenings. Likewise the results indicate that improved "avoiding distractions" is associated with an increase in the duration of sleep. Moreover, the results indicate that in the active control group cognitive decline observed in working memory is associated with an increase in the time required to fall asleep. New learning is instrumental in promoting initiation and maintenance of sleep in older adults with insomnia. Lasting and personalized cognitive

  20. Non-pharmacologic interventions to improve the sleep of hospitalized patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamrat, Ruth; Huynh-Le, Minh-Phuong; Goyal, Madhav

    2014-05-01

    Despite the known adverse effects of sleep deprivation on recovery from illness, studies have shown that sleep deprivation remains an incompletely addressed problem among acutely ill inpatients. Behavioral interventions are recommended as first-line therapy prior to using pharmacologic therapy due to the side effects of sedative hypnotics. The objective of this systematic review was to identify non-pharmacologic interventions that have been used to improve sleep quality and quantity of non-intensive care unit (ICU) inpatients. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library through January 2013; manual searches of reference lists. Any study in which a non-pharmacologic intervention was conducted in a general inpatient setting, and nighttime sleep quantity or quality was assessed. Information on study design, populations, interventions, comparators, outcomes, time frame, and risk of bias were independently abstracted by two investigators. 13 intervention studies with 1,154 participants were included. Four studies were randomized controlled trials. Seven studies had a low to medium risk of bias, and there was significant heterogeneity in the interventions. Relaxation techniques improved sleep quality 0-38%, interventions to improve sleep hygiene or reduce sleep interruptions improved sleep quantity 5%, and daytime bright light exposure improved sleep quantity 7-18%. The heterogeneity in the types and dose of interventions, outcome measures, length of follow-up, differences in patient populations, and dearth of randomized trials may dilute effects seen or make it more difficult to draw conclusions. There is insufficient to low strength of evidence that any non-pharmacologic intervention improves sleep quality or quantity of general inpatients. Further studies are needed in this area to guide clinicians.

  1. Improved Sleep in Military Personnel is Associated with Changes in the Expression of Inflammatory Genes and Improvement in Depression Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney S. Livingston

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Sleep disturbances are common in military personnel and are associated with increased risk for psychiatric morbidity, including posttraumatic stress disorder and depression, as well as inflammation. Improved sleep quality is linked to reductions in inflammatory bio-markers; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Methods: In this study we examine whole genome expression changes related to improved sleep in 68 military personnel diagnosed with insomnia. Subjects were classified into the following groups and then compared: improved sleep (n=46, or non-improved sleep (n=22 following three months of standard of care treatment for insomnia. Within subject differential expression was determined from microarray data using the Partek Genomics Suite analysis program and the interactive pathway analysis was used to determine key regulators of observed expression changes. Changes in symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder were also compared. Results: At baseline both groups were similar in demographics, clinical characteristics, and gene-expression profiles. The microarray data revealed that 217 coding genes were differentially expressed at the follow-up-period compared to baseline in the participants with improved sleep. Expression of inflammatory cytokines were reduced including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-13, with fold changes ranging from -3.19 to -2.1, and there were increases in the expression of inflammatory regulatory genes including toll-like receptors 1, 4, 7, and 8 in the improved sleep group. Interactive pathway analysis revealed 6 gene networks, including ubiquitin which was a major regulator in these gene-expression changes. The improved sleep group also had a significant reduction in the severity of depressive symptoms.Conclusions: Interventions that restore sleep likely reduce the expression of inflammatory genes, which relate to ubiquitin genes and relate to reductions in depressive symptoms.

  2. Adherence to reduced-polluting biomass fuel stoves improves respiratory and sleep symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accinelli, Roberto A; Llanos, Oscar; López, Lidia M; Pino, María I; Bravo, Yeny A; Salinas, Verónica; Lazo, María; Noda, Julio R; Sánchez-Sierra, Marita; Zárate, Lacey; da Silva, Joao; Gianella, Fabiola; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Gozal, David

    2014-01-17

    Symptoms of sleep apnea are markedly increased in children exposed to smoke from biomass fuels and are reduced by kitchen stoves that improve indoor biomass pollution. However, the impact of adherence to the use of improved stoves has not been critically examined. Sleep-related symptom questionnaires were obtained from children Peru before and 2 years after installation of less-polluting Inkawasi cooking stoves. 82 children with lifetime exposures to indoor fuel pollution were included. When compared to those alternating between both types of stoves or those using traditional stoves only, those children who exclusively used Inkawasi cooking stoves showed significant improvements in sleep and respiratory related symptoms, but some minor albeit significant improvements occurred when both stoves were concomitantly used. Improvements in respiratory and sleep-related symptoms associated with elevated indoor biomass pollution occur only following implementation and exclusive utilization of improved kitchen stoves.

  3. Sleep education improves the sleep duration of adolescents: a randomized controlled pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kira, Geoff; Maddison, Ralph; Hull, Michelle; Blunden, Sarah; Olds, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    .... A parallel, two-arm randomized controlled pilot trial was conducted. High school students (13 to 16 years) were randomly allocated to either a classroom-based sleep education program intervention...

  4. Improvement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea With Weight Loss is Dependent on Body Position During Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Simon A; Khoo, Jun K; Edwards, Bradley A; Landry, Shane A; Naughton, Matthew T; Dixon, John B; Hamilton, Garun S

    2017-05-01

    Weight loss fails to resolve obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in most patients; however, it is unknown as to whether weight loss differentially affects OSA in the supine compared with nonsupine sleeping positions. We aimed to determine if weight loss in obese patients with OSA results in a greater reduction in the nonsupine apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) compared with the supine AHI, thus converting participants into supine-predominant OSA. Post hoc analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial assessing the effect of weight loss (bariatric surgery vs. medical weight loss) on OSA in 60 participants with obesity (body mass index: >35 and sleep study at 2 years. Eight of 37 (22%) patients demonstrated a normal nonsupine AHI (sleep avoidance may cure their OSA.

  5. Improved Mental Acuity Forecasting with an Individualized Quantitative Sleep Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent D. Winslow

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep impairment significantly alters human brain structure and cognitive function, but available evidence suggests that adults in developed nations are sleeping less. A growing body of research has sought to use sleep to forecast cognitive performance by modeling the relationship between the two, but has generally focused on vigilance rather than other cognitive constructs affected by sleep, such as reaction time, executive function, and working memory. Previous modeling efforts have also utilized subjective, self-reported sleep durations and were restricted to laboratory environments. In the current effort, we addressed these limitations by employing wearable systems and mobile applications to gather objective sleep information, assess multi-construct cognitive performance, and model/predict changes to mental acuity. Thirty participants were recruited for participation in the study, which lasted 1 week. Using the Fitbit Charge HR and a mobile version of the automated neuropsychological assessment metric called CogGauge, we gathered a series of features and utilized the unified model of performance to predict mental acuity based on sleep records. Our results suggest that individuals poorly rate their sleep duration, supporting the need for objective sleep metrics to model circadian changes to mental acuity. Participant compliance in using the wearable throughout the week and responding to the CogGauge assessments was 80%. Specific biases were identified in temporal metrics across mobile devices and operating systems and were excluded from the mental acuity metric development. Individualized prediction of mental acuity consistently outperformed group modeling. This effort indicates the feasibility of creating an individualized, mobile assessment and prediction of mental acuity, compatible with the majority of current mobile devices.

  6. Amber lenses to block blue light and improve sleep: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Kimberly; Phelps, James R

    2009-12-01

    All light is not equal: blue wavelengths are the most potent portion of the visible electromagnetic spectrum for circadian regulation. Therefore, blocking blue light could create a form of physiologic darkness. Because the timing and quantity of light and darkness both affect sleep, evening use of amber lenses to block blue light might affect sleep quality. Mood is also affected by light and sleep; therefore, mood might be affected by blue light blockade. In this study, 20 adult volunteers were randomized to wear either blue-blocking (amber) or yellow-tinted (blocking ultraviolet only) safety glasses for 3 h prior to sleep. Participants completed sleep diaries during a one-week baseline assessment and two weeks' use of glasses. Outcome measures were subjective: change in overall sleep quality and positive/negative affect. Results demonstrated that sleep quality at study outset was poorer in the amber lens than the control group. Two- by three-way ANOVA revealed significant (p sleep over the three weeks and experimental condition. At the end of the study, the amber lens group experienced significant (p sleep quality relative to the control group and positive affect (p = .005). Mood also improved significantly relative to controls. A replication with more detailed data on the subjects' circadian baseline and objective outcome measures is warranted.

  7. Sleep extension improves serving accuracy: A study with college varsity tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer; Simon, Richard D

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of sleep extension on tennis serving accuracy, as well as daytime sleepiness in college varsity tennis players. Twelve (seven females and five males) healthy students on a college varsity tennis team maintained their habitual sleep-wake schedule for a one-week baseline period followed by a one-week sleep extension period. Participants were requested to sleep at least nine hours, including naps, during the sleep extension period. Serving accuracy was assessed when participants were sleep deprived (prior to the sleep extension period) and after the sleep extension period. Levels of daytime sleepiness were monitored via the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and caffeine consumption was recorded throughout the study. Participants slept significantly more in the second week--the sleep extension week--compared with the first week--the baseline week (8.85 vs. 7.14 h; psleep extension period, accuracy of the tennis serves improved significantly (35.7% vs. 41.8%; psleep of approximately 2h per night significantly increased athletic performance in college varsity tennis players. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Manipulation of skin temperature improves nocturnal sleep in narcolepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Overeem, S.; Romeijn, N.; van Dijk, J. G.; Lammers, G.J.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Besides excessive daytime sleepiness, disturbed nocturnal sleep is a major complaint of patients with narcolepsy. Previously, alterations in skin temperature regulation in narcoleptic patients have been shown to be related to increased sleepiness. This study tests the hypothesis that

  9. Manipulation of skin temperature improves nocturnal sleep in narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Raymann, R.J.; Overeem, S.; Romeijn, N.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Lammers, G.J.; Someren, EJ Van

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Besides excessive daytime sleepiness, disturbed nocturnal sleep is a major complaint of patients with narcolepsy. Previously, alterations in skin temperature regulation in narcoleptic patients have been shown to be related to increased sleepiness. This study tests the hypothesis that

  10. Diverting the Pathway to Substance Misuse by Improving Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    treatment of attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADHD), short-term treatment of obesity, and as an off-label treatment for narcolepsy ...substantially to these problems and is not explicitly addressed by established insomnia treatments . The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a... treatment for sleep problems related to military deployments. The intervention targets nocturnal vigilance and other maladaptive sleep behaviors. We

  11. Self-awakening improves alertness in the morning and during the day after partial sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroki; Kubo, Tomohide; Kuriyama, Kenichi; Takahashi, Masaya

    2014-12-01

    The ability to awaken at a predetermined time without an alarm is known as self-awakening. Self-awakening improves morning alertness by eliminating sleep inertia; however, the effects of self-awakening on daytime alertness and alertness that has deteriorated as a result of sleep loss are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of self-awakening on both morning and daytime alertness after partial sleep deprivation. Fifteen healthy males without the habit of self-awakening participated in a cross-over trial including forced awakening and self-awakening conditions. In each condition, participants' sleep was restricted to 5 h per night in their homes for 4 consecutive days. They completed a psychomotor vigilance task and subjective ratings of sleepiness immediately upon awakening each morning. On the fourth day, participants completed subjective ratings of sleepiness, a psychomotor vigilance task and sleep latency tests in the laboratory seven times at 1-h intervals during the day. The response speed on the psychomotor vigilance task, in the morning and during the day, was higher in the self-awakening than the forced awakening condition. Our results showed that self-awakening improved alertness (assessed by response speeds) by reducing sleep inertia and alleviated daytime sleepiness heightened by partial sleep deprivation. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Enhanced slow wave sleep and improved sleep maintenance after gaboxadol administration during seven nights of exposure to a traffic noise model of transient insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, D-J; Stanley, N; Lundahl, J; Groeger, J A; Legters, A; Trap Huusom, A K; Deacon, S

    2012-08-01

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) has been reported to correlate with sleep maintenance, but whether pharmacological enhancement of SWS also leads to improved sleep maintenance is not known. Here we evaluate the time-course of the effects of gaboxadol, an extra-synaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist, on SWS, sleep maintenance, and other sleep measures in a traffic noise model of transient insomnia. After a placebo run-in, 101 healthy subjects (20-78 y) were randomized to gaboxadol (n = 50; 15 mg in subjects model caused some disruption of sleep initiation and maintenance, with greatest effects on N1. Compared with placebo, gaboxadol increased SWS and slow wave activity throughout N1 to N7 (p maintenance and subjective sleep quality under placebo and gaboxadol (p maintenance.

  13. Acute physical exercise under hypoxia improves sleep, mood and reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino-Lemos, Valdir; Santos, Ronaldo Vagner T; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Lira, Fabio S; Luz Bittar, Irene G; Caris, Aline V; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of two sessions of acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak performed under hypoxia (equivalent to an altitude of 4500 m for 28 h) on sleep, mood and reaction time. Forty healthy men were randomized into 4 groups: Normoxia (NG) (n = 10); Hypoxia (HG) (n = 10); Exercise under Normoxia (ENG) (n = 10); and Exercise under Hypoxia (EHG) (n = 10). All mood and reaction time assessments were performed 40 min after awakening. Sleep was reassessed on the first day at 14 h after the initiation of hypoxia; mood and reaction time were measured 28 h later. Two sessions of acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak were performed for 60 min on the first and second days after 3 and 27 h, respectively, after starting to hypoxia. Improved sleep efficiency, stage N3 and REM sleep and reduced wake after sleep onset were observed under hypoxia after acute physical exercise. Tension, anger, depressed mood, vigor and reaction time scores improved after exercise under hypoxia. We conclude that hypoxia impairs sleep, reaction time and mood. Acute physical exercise at 50% VO2peak under hypoxia improves sleep efficiency, reversing the aspects that had been adversely affected under hypoxia, possibly contributing to improved mood and reaction time.

  14. Elevated upper body position improves pregnancy-related OSA without impairing sleep quality or sleep architecture early after delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba, Sebastian; Mueller, Noomi; Heisig, Anne M; Shin, Christina H; Jung, Stefanie; Leffert, Lisa R; Bateman, Brian T; Pugsley, Lori J; Nagasaka, Yasuko; Duarte, Ingrid Moreno; Ecker, Jeffrey L; Eikermann, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    During pregnancy, upper airway resistance is increased, predisposing vulnerable women to pregnancy-related OSA. Elevation of the upper body increases upper airway cross-sectional area (CSA) and improves severity of OSA in a subgroup of nonpregnant patients (positional-dependent sleep apnea). We tested the hypothesis that elevated position of the upper body improves OSA early after delivery. Following institutional review board approval, we conducted a randomized, crossover study on two postpartum units of Massachusetts General Hospital. Women during the first 48 h after delivery were included. Polysomnography was performed in nonelevated and 45° elevated upper body position. Upper airway CSA was measured by acoustic pharyngometry in nonelevated, 45° elevated, and sitting body position. Fifty-five patients were enrolled, and measurements of airway CSA obtained. Thirty patients completed polysomnography in both body positions. Elevation of the upper body significantly reduced apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) from 7.7 ± 2.2/h in nonelevated to 4.5 ± 1.4/h in 45° elevated upper body position (P = .031) during sleep. Moderate to severe OSA (AHI > 15/h) was diagnosed in 20% of postpartum patients and successfully treated by elevated body position in one-half of them. Total sleep time and sleep architecture were not affected by upper body elevation. Change from nonelevated to sitting position increased inspiratory upper airway CSA from 1.35 ± 0.1 cm2 to 1.54 ± 0.1 cm2 during wakefulness. Position-dependent increase in CSA and decrease in AHI were correlated (r = 0.42, P = .022). Among early postpartum women, 45° upper body elevation increased upper airway CSA and mitigated sleep apnea. Elevated body position might improve respiratory safety in women early after delivery. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01719224; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  15. Improved sleep patterns positively affect learning outcome among Danish nursing students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    physiology is taught at the nursing education programme; this does not mean that nursing students develop good sleep habits. Methods: To support learning an innovative method was chosen where nursing students were motivated to develop good sleep habits through peer learning. Nursing students were taught......-up by social media activities motivated the nursing students to change their sleep habits. Results: This project has been completed by one of two classes of first semester students at the nursing education programme at UCN. This class demonstrated better examination results and a lower drop-oup rate compared...... positive effect on the study environment. Through peer learning, the ambassadors will promote another project on health behaviour among another group of nursing students. A presumed positive side effect is that nursing students become more aware of sleep problems among patients. Moreover, improved sleep...

  16. Transcranial direct current stimulation during sleep improves declarative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Lisa; Mölle, Matthias; Hallschmid, Manfred; Born, Jan

    2004-11-03

    In humans, weak transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates excitability in the motor, visual, and prefrontal cortex. Periods rich in slow-wave sleep (SWS) not only facilitate the consolidation of declarative memories, but in humans, SWS is also accompanied by a pronounced endogenous transcortical DC potential shift of negative polarity over frontocortical areas. To experimentally induce widespread extracellular negative DC potentials, we applied anodal tDCS (0.26 mA) [correction] repeatedly (over 30 min) bilaterally at frontocortical electrode sites during a retention period rich in SWS. Retention of declarative memories (word pairs) and also nondeclarative memories (mirror tracing skills) learned previously was tested after this period and compared with retention performance after placebo stimulation as well as after retention intervals of wakefulness. Compared with placebo stimulation, anodal tDCS during SWS-rich sleep distinctly increased the retention of word pairs (p sleep and during wake intervals. tDCS increased sleep depth toward the end of the stimulation period, whereas the average power in the faster frequency bands (,alpha, and beta) was reduced. Acutely, anodal tDCS increased slow oscillatory activity sleep-dependent consolidation of declarative memories.

  17. Does exercise improve self-reported sleep quality in non-remitted major depressive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethorst, C D; Sunderajan, P; Greer, T L; Grannemann, B D; Nakonezny, P A; Carmody, T J; Trivedi, M H

    2013-04-01

    Sleep disturbances are persistent residual symptoms following remission of major depressive disorder (MDD) and are associated with an increased risk of MDD recurrence. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of exercise augmentation on self-reported sleep quality in participants with non-remitted MDD. Method Participants were randomized to receive selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) augmentation with one of two doses of exercise: 16 kilocalories per kilogram of body weight per week (KKW) or 4 KKW for 12 weeks. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the clinician-rated Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C). The four sleep-related items on the IDS-C (Sleep Onset Insomnia, Mid-Nocturnal Insomnia, Early Morning Insomnia, and Hypersomnia) were used to assess self-reported sleep quality. Significant decreases in total insomnia (p depressive symptoms. Higher baseline hypersomnia predicted a greater decrease in depression severity following exercise treatment (p = 0.0057). No significant moderating effect of any baseline sleep on change in depression severity was observed. There were no significant differences between exercise treatment groups on total insomnia or any individual sleep item. Exercise augmentation resulted in improvements in self-reported sleep quality in patients with non-remitted MDD. Given the prevalence of insomnia as a residual symptom following MDD treatment and the associated risk of MDD recurrence, exercise augmentation may have an important role in the treatment of MDD.

  18. Improving Cardiometabolic Health with Diet, Physical Activity, and Breaking Up Sitting: What about Sleep?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E. Vincent

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiometabolic disease poses a serious health and economic burden worldwide and its prevalence is predicted to increase. Prolonged sitting, lack of physical activity, poor diet, and short sleep duration are ubiquitous behaviors in modern society, and all are independent risk factors in the development of cardiometabolic disease. Existing evidence demonstrates that breaking up prolonged periods of sitting is beneficial for cardiometabolic health, however, studies have not controlled for prior sleep duration. This article examines how prolonged sitting and short sleep duration independently contribute to cardiometabolic risk, and how breaking up sitting and obtaining adequate sleep may reduce this risk. We suggest that as prolonged sitting and short sleep duration influence the same cardiometabolic parameters, there is potential for short sleep to attenuate the positive impact of breaking up prolonged sitting with physical activity. Likewise, breaking up prolonged sitting and obtaining adequate sleep together could improve predictors of cardiometabolic disease, i.e., the combined effect may be stronger than either alone. To explore these perspectives, we propose a research agenda to investigate the relationship between breaking up prolonged sitting with physical activity and short sleep duration. This will provide an evidence-base for informing the design of interventions to reduce the burden of cardiometabolic disease on communities worldwide.

  19. Predictability of Sleep in Patients with Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Annie; Ivers, Hans; Beaulieu-Bonneau, Simon; Morin, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate whether the night-to-night variability in insomnia follows specific predictable patterns and to characterize sleep patterns using objective sleep and clinical variables. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: University-affiliated sleep disorders center. Participants: 146 participants suffering from chronic and primary insomnia. Measurements and Results: Daily sleep diaries were completed for an average of 48 days and self-reported questionnaires once. Three nights were spent in the sleep laboratory for polysomnographic (PSG) assessment. Sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, and total sleep time were derived from sleep diaries and PSG. Time-series diary data were used to compute conditional probabilities of having an insomnia night after 1, 2, or 3 consecutive insomnia night(s). Conditional probabilities were submitted to a k-means cluster analysis. A 3-cluster solution was retained. One cluster included 38 participants exhibiting an unpredictable insomnia pattern. Another included 30 participants with a low and decreasing probability to have an insomnia night. The last cluster included 49 participants exhibiting a high probability to have insomnia every night. Clusters differed on age, insomnia severity, and mental fatigue, and on subjective sleep variables, but not on PSG sleep variables. Conclusion: These findings replicate our previous study and provide additional evidence that unpredictability is a less prevalent feature of insomnia than suggested previously in the literature. The presence of the 3 clusters is discussed in term of sleep perception and sleep homeostasis dysregulation. Citation: Vallières A; Ivers H; Beaulieu-Bonneau S; Morin CM. Predictability of sleep in patients with insomnia. SLEEP 2011;34(5):609-617. PMID:21532954

  20. Goodnight Book: Sleep Consolidation Improves Word Learning via Storybooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie E. Williams

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Reading the same storybooks repeatedly helps preschool children learn words. In addition, sleeping shortly after learning also facilitates memory consolidation and aids learning in older children and adults. The current study explored how sleep promotes word learning in preschool children using a shared storybook reading task. Children were either read the same story repeatedly or different stories and either napped after the stories or remained awake. Children’s word retention were tested 2.5 hours later, 24 hours later and 7 days later. Results demonstrate strong, persistent effects for both repeated readings and sleep consolidation on young children’s word learning. A key finding is that children who read different stories before napping learned words as well as children who had the advantage of hearing the same story. In contrast, children who read different stories and remained awake never caught up to their peers on later word learning tests. Implications for educational practices are discussed.

  1. Listening to music for improving sleep in adults with insomnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kira Vibe; Koenig, Julian; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:To assess the effects of music listening on sleep quality in adults with insomnia and to assess the influence of specific variables that may moderate the effect.......This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows:To assess the effects of music listening on sleep quality in adults with insomnia and to assess the influence of specific variables that may moderate the effect....

  2. Scheduled evening sleep and enhanced lighting improve adaptation to night shift work in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinoy, Evan D; Harris, Michael P; Kim, Min Ju; Wang, Wei; Duffy, Jeanne F

    2016-12-01

    We tested whether a sleep and circadian-based treatment shown to improve circadian adaptation to night shifts and attenuate negative effects on alertness, performance and sleep in young adults would also be effective in older adults. We assessed subjective alertness, sustained attention (psychomotor vigilance task, PVT), sleep duration (actigraphy) and circadian timing (salivary dim-light melatonin onset, DLMO) in 18 older adults (57.2±3.8 years; mean±SD) in a simulated shift work protocol. 4 day shifts were followed by 3 night shifts in the laboratory. Participants slept at home and were randomised to either the treatment group (scheduled evening sleep and enhanced lighting during the latter half of night shifts) or control group (ad-lib sleep and typical lighting during night shifts). Compared with day shifts, alertness and sustained attention declined on the first night shift in both groups, and was worse in the latter half of the night shifts. Alertness and attention improved on nights 2 and 3 for the treatment group but remained lower for the control group. Sleep duration in the treatment group remained similar to baseline (6-7 hours) following night shifts, but was shorter (3-5 hours) following night shifts in the control group. Treatment group circadian timing advanced by 169.3±16.1 min (mean±SEM) but did not shift (-9.7±9.9 min) in the control group. The combined treatment of scheduled evening sleep and enhanced lighting increased sleep duration and partially aligned circadian phase with sleep and work timing, resulting in improved night shift alertness and performance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Scheduled Evening Sleep and Enhanced Lighting Improve Adaptation to Night Shift Work in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinoy, Evan D.; Harris, Michael P.; Kim, Min Ju; Wang, Wei; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We tested whether a sleep and circadian-based treatment shown to improve circadian adaptation to night shifts and attenuate negative effects on alertness, performance, and sleep in young adults would also be effective in older adults. Methods We assessed subjective alertness, sustained attention (psychomotor vigilance task, PVT), sleep duration (actigraphy), and circadian timing (salivary dim-light melatonin onset, DLMO) in eighteen older adults (57.2±3.8 y; mean±SD) in a simulated shift work protocol. Four day shifts were followed by three night shifts in the laboratory. Participants slept at home and were randomized to either the Treatment Group (scheduled evening sleep and enhanced lighting during the latter half of night shifts), or Control Group (ad lib sleep and typical lighting during night shifts). Results Compared to day shifts, alertness and sustained attention declined on the first night shift in both groups, and was worse in the latter half of the night shifts. Alertness and attention improved on nights 2 and 3 for the Treatment Group but remained lower for the Control Group. Sleep duration in the Treatment Group remained similar to baseline (6–7 h) following night shifts, but was shorter (3–5 h) following night shifts in the Control Group. Treatment Group circadian timing advanced by 169.3±16.1 min (mean±SEM) but did not shift (−9.7±9.9 min) in the Control Group. Conclusions The combined treatment of scheduled evening sleep and enhanced lighting increased sleep duration and partially aligned circadian phase with sleep and work timing, resulting in improved night shift alertness and performance. PMID:27566781

  4. Time for bed: parent-set bedtimes associated with improved sleep and daytime functioning in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Michelle A; Gradisar, Michael; Wright, Helen; Lack, Leon C; Dohnt, Hayley; Carskadon, Mary A

    2011-06-01

    To determine the proportion of adolescents whose bedtime is set by their parents and to evaluate whether parent-set bedtimes are associated with earlier bedtimes, more sleep, and better daytime functioning. 385 adolescents aged 13-18 years (mean = 15.6, SD = 0.95; 60% male) from 8 socioeconomically diverse schools in South Australia. Adolescents completed the School Sleep Habits Survey during class time and then completed an 8-day Sleep Diary. The Flinders Fatigue Scale was completed on the final day of the study. 17.5% of adolescents reported a parent-set bedtime as the main factor determining their bedtime on school nights. Compared to adolescents without parent-set bedtimes, those with parent-set bedtimes had earlier bedtimes, obtained more sleep, and experienced improved daytime wakefulness and less fatigue. They did not differ significantly in terms of time taken to fall asleep. When parent-set bedtimes were removed on weekends, sleep patterns did not significantly differ between groups. Significant personal and public health issues, such as depression and accidental injury and mortality, are associated with insufficient sleep. Converging biological and psychosocial factors mean that adolescence is a period of heightened risk. Parent-set bedtimes offer promise as a simple and easily translatable means for parents to improve the sleep and daytime functioning of their teens.

  5. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trommelen, Jorn; van Loon, Luc J C

    2016-11-28

    Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  6. Lower-limb warming improves sleep quality in elderly people living in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Oshima-Saeki

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances are common in older people. This study was conducted to examine the effects of a hot pack, which was used to warm the lower limbs, on the sleep of elderly people living in a nursing home. This is a prospective cohort involving seven elderly women. Subjects aged 74-93 years old were treated by warming the lower limbs for 40 minutes using hot packs every night over 8 weeks. A hot pack made of a dense polymer and warmed in a microwave oven was used as a warming device. In the first and last week, the subjects were required to wear an activity monitor to determine their sleep-awake status. During the second to ninth week, they received limb-warming treatment by a hot pack heated to 42ºC for 40 min every night. Surface skin temperature data were collected by thermographic measurement. As a result, lower-limb warming by a hot pack significantly improved the quality of sleep in the subjects. During warming, the surface temperature of the hands and face rose by approximately 0.5-1.5ºC. This study showed that lower-limb warming with a hot pack reduced sleep latency and wake episodes after sleep onset; thus, improving the quality of sleep in elderly people living in a nursing home.

  7. Pre-Sleep Protein Ingestion to Improve the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorn Trommelen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein ingestion following resistance-type exercise stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates, and enhances the skeletal muscle adaptive response to prolonged resistance-type exercise training. As the adaptive response to a single bout of resistance exercise extends well beyond the first couple of hours of post-exercise recovery, recent studies have begun to investigate the impact of the timing and distribution of protein ingestion during more prolonged recovery periods. Recent work has shown that overnight muscle protein synthesis rates are restricted by the level of amino acid availability. Protein ingested prior to sleep is effectively digested and absorbed, and thereby stimulates muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery. When applied during a prolonged period of resistance-type exercise training, protein supplementation prior to sleep can further augment gains in muscle mass and strength. Recent studies investigating the impact of pre-sleep protein ingestion suggest that at least 40 g of protein is required to display a robust increase in muscle protein synthesis rates throughout overnight sleep. Furthermore, prior exercise allows more of the pre-sleep protein-derived amino acids to be utilized for de novo muscle protein synthesis during sleep. In short, pre-sleep protein ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to improve overnight muscle protein synthesis, thereby improving the skeletal muscle adaptive response to exercise training.

  8. Impact of sleep disorders in Japanese patients with functional dyspepsia (FD): nizatidine improves clinical symptoms, gastric emptying and sleep disorders in FD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagami, Seiji; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Izumi, Nikki; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Kodaka, Yasuhiro; Wakabayashi, Taiga; Nagoya, Hiroyuki; Shindo, Tomotaka; Kawagoe, Tetsuro; Gudis, Katya; Itoh, Takashi; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2013-08-01

    The association between functional dyspepsia (FD) and sleep disorders has yet to be studied in detail. The aim of this study is to evaluate the risk factors associated with sleep disorders and the clinical response to nizatidine therapy for sleep disorders in Rome III-based FD patients. We enrolled 94 FD patients and 52 healthy volunteers. We used Rome III criteria to evaluate upper abdominal symptoms, and the Self-Rating Questionnaire for Depression scores to determine depression status. Sleep disorder was evaluated using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores, and degree of anxiety by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Gastric motility was evaluated. Thirty-four FD patients were treated with nizatidine (300 mg/day) or placebo for 4 weeks in a crossover trial. The primary end point of this study was to determine whether nizatidine could improve clinical symptoms and sleep disorders in FD patients. The global PSQI score for FD patients was significantly (P FD patients than in healthy volunteers. We found significant relationships between subjective sleep quality and both Tmax and T1/2 values in FD patients. Nizatidine significantly improved certain clinical symptoms, gastric emptying, and global PSQI score compared with placebo treatment. Sleep disorders in FD patients correlated significantly with both clinical symptoms of dyspepsia and depression compared with healthy volunteers. Nizatidine significantly improved gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, gastric emptying, and sleep disorders in FD patients. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Sleep improvement for restless legs syndrome patients. Part III: effect of treatment assignment belief on sleep improvement in restless legs syndrome patients. A mediation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burbank F

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fred Burbank Director, Salt Creek International Women's Health Foundation, San Clemente, CA, USA Purpose: Two parallel-design, randomized, sham-controlled clinical trials were conducted to study the safety and efficacy of vibratory stimulation (VS on restless legs syndrome (RLS patients (Part I of this series of articles. Pooled data from the two studies was retroactively analyzed to compare the relative effects of actual pad assignment with therapeutic pad assignment belief on sleep improvement for patients with RLS. Patients and methods: One hundred fifty-eight patients with at least moderately severe RLS, as measured by a score of 15 points or greater on the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale (IRLS, were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment (patient-controlled vibration or sham (patient-controlled sound or light-emitting pads. Patients and clinicians were blinded to pad assignment. The pad was placed under the patient's legs while in bed at night and activated during an RLS episode. Improvements in Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Problems Index II (MOS-II scores from baseline to week 4 were examined as a function of pad assignment (independent variable and therapeutic pad assignment belief held by each patient (mediator variable through mediation analysis. Results: Therapeutic pad assignment belief influenced change in MOS-II scores more than actual pad assignment. Patients who believed they had been assigned a therapeutic pad had substantially greater sleep improvement than those who concluded the opposite. When a patient believed that a therapeutic pad had been assigned, sleep improvement was comparable in magnitude, independent of the type of pad assigned (vibrating or sham. Patients assigned vibrating pads believed that they had been assigned a therapeutic pad 2.6 times more frequently than patients assigned sham pads. Consequently, vibrating pads were more efficient at improving

  10. Rotigotine Objectively Improves Sleep in Parkinson’s Disease: An Open-Label Pilot Study with Actigraphic Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Calandra-Buonaura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances represent important predictors of poor quality of life (QoL in Parkinson’s disease (PD. This open-label pilot study aimed to objectively assess, by means of actigraphic recording, effect of rotigotine on sleep in PD patients with self-reported sleep complaints. 15 PD patients underwent one-week actigraphic recording before (T0 and during (T1 rotigotine treatment, which was titrated to the dose subjectively improving motor symptoms (4–8 mg/24 h. Sleep disturbances, daytime sleepiness, cognitive performance, QoL, and depression were also evaluated with questionnaires. Actigraphic recordings showed a significant reduction in nocturnal motor activity and mean duration of wake episodes after sleep onset during rotigotine treatment compared to baseline. In 10 patients presenting objective evidence of poor sleep quality at T0 (sleep efficiency ≤ 85%, rotigotine also significantly improved other sleep parameters and further reduced nocturnal motor activity and mean duration of wake episodes. A significant decrease in number and duration of daytime sleep episodes was also observed at T1. Finally we confirmed that rotigotine significantly improves perceived sleep quality and QoL. Our study showed for the first time that rotigotine is associated with an objective improvement of nocturnal and diurnal sleep disturbances in PD patients with self-reported sleep complaints. This study is registered with AIFA-observational study registry number 12021.

  11. Increased estradiol and improved sleep, but not hot flashes, predict enhanced mood during the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Hadine; Petrillo, Laura Fagioli; Koukopoulos, Alexia; Viguera, Adele C; Hirschberg, April; Nonacs, Ruta; Somley, Brittny; Pasciullo, Erica; White, David P; Hall, Janet E; Cohen, Lee S

    2011-07-01

    The antidepressant effect of estrogen in women undergoing the menopause transition is hypothesized to be mediated by central nervous system effects of increasing estradiol on mood or through a pathway involving suppression of hot flashes and associated sleep disturbance. Estrogen therapy (ET) and the hypnotic agent zolpidem were selected as interventions in a three-arm, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to distinguish the effects of estradiol, sleep, and hot flashes on depression. Women with depressive disorders, hot flashes, and sleep disturbance were randomly assigned to transdermal 17β-estradiol 0.05 mg/d, zolpidem 10 mg/d, or placebo for 8 wk. Changes in serum estradiol, perceived sleep quality, objectively measured sleep, and hot flashes were examined as predictors of depression improvement [Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)] using multivariate linear regression. Seventy-two peri/postmenopausal women with depression disorders were randomized to 17β-estradiol (n = 27), zolpidem (n = 31), or placebo (n = 14). There was no significant difference between groups in depression improvement (overall MADRS decrease 11.8 ± 8.6). Increasing estradiol (P = 0.009) and improved sleep quality (P mood in adjusted models but reduced hot flashes (P = 0.99) did not. Post hoc subgroup analyses revealed that the therapeutic effect of increasing estradiol levels on mood was seen in perimenopausal (P = 0.009), but not postmenopausal, women. For women with menopause-associated depression, improvement in depression is predicted by improved sleep, and among perimenopausal women, by increasing estradiol levels. These results suggest that changes in estradiol and sleep quality, rather than hot flashes, mediate depression during the menopause transition. Therapies targeting insomnia may be valuable in treating menopause-associated depression.

  12. Can mental healthcare nurses improve sleep quality for inpatients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, G.J. De; Tiemens, B.G.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a pilot study that was carried out to in order to gain an indication as to whether mental healthcare nurses can apply evidence-based interventions for sleep problems effectively in inpatient mental health care. The study had a pre-test/post-test design and a comparison group

  13. Reducing dysfunctional beliefs about sleep does not significantly improve insomnia in cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Isa; Nakajima, Shun; Ochi, Moeko; Inoue, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined to examine whether improvement of insomnia is mediated by a reduction in sleep-related dysfunctional beliefs through cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. In total, 64 patients with chronic insomnia received cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia consisting of 6 biweekly individual treatment sessions of 50 minutes in length. Participants were asked to complete the Athens Insomnia Scale and the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale both at the baseline and at the end of treatment. The results showed that although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia greatly reduced individuals' scores on both scales, the decrease in dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep with treatment did not seem to mediate improvement in insomnia. The findings suggest that sleep-related dysfunctional beliefs endorsed by patients with chronic insomnia may be attenuated by cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, but changes in such beliefs are not likely to play a crucial role in reducing the severity of insomnia.

  14. Reducing dysfunctional beliefs about sleep does not significantly improve insomnia in cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Okajima

    Full Text Available The present study examined to examine whether improvement of insomnia is mediated by a reduction in sleep-related dysfunctional beliefs through cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. In total, 64 patients with chronic insomnia received cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia consisting of 6 biweekly individual treatment sessions of 50 minutes in length. Participants were asked to complete the Athens Insomnia Scale and the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale both at the baseline and at the end of treatment. The results showed that although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia greatly reduced individuals' scores on both scales, the decrease in dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep with treatment did not seem to mediate improvement in insomnia. The findings suggest that sleep-related dysfunctional beliefs endorsed by patients with chronic insomnia may be attenuated by cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, but changes in such beliefs are not likely to play a crucial role in reducing the severity of insomnia.

  15. A dietary supplement to improve the quality of sleep: a randomized placebo controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claustrat Bruno

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effect of a dietary supplement containing polyunsaturated fatty acids, in association with Humulus lupulus extract, on the quality of sleep using the Leeds sleep evaluation questionnaire (LSEQ in subjects with moderate to severe sleep disorders. Methods Randomized placebo-controlled trial, in a Population-based setting. Participants were adult patients 25 to 65 years old with a chronic primary insomnia who volunteered for the study. The tested intervention consisted of two soft gelatine capsules per day, containing either the dietary supplement (active group or olive oil (placebo group for a month. Subjects could also volunteer for two ancillary studies on melatonin and actigraphy. Evaluation criteria included i perception of the quality of sleep at the end of treatment using the LSEQ questionnaire, ii sleep efficiency measured by one-week actigraphic movement measurement performed before and during the treatment in a subsample of subjects, iii night melatonin and 6 sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6S urine rates in a subsample of subjects. Results The average of Leeds score was similar in both groups (p = 0.95. A marked improvement in the quality of sleep was observed in both placebo (62% and active (65% group (p = 0.52. The evolution of urinary melatonin, aMT6S, and of the Mel/aMT6S ratio showed no differences between the two groups. Sleep efficiency, as measured by actigraphy, improved similarly in both groups during the treatment period, from 72% to 76% and 75% in the active and placebo group respectively (p = 0.91. Conclusions The dietary supplement had neither effect on the perceived quality of sleep, nor on the melatonin metabolism and sleep-wake cycle. Trial registration: clinical trials.gov:NCT00484497

  16. Vedolizumab Therapy Is Associated with an Improvement in Sleep Quality and Mood in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Betsy W; Borren, Nynke Z; Velonias, Gabriella; Conway, Grace; Cleland, Thom; Andrews, Elizabeth; Khalili, Hamed; Garber, John G; Xavier, Ramnik J; Yajnik, Vijay; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N

    2017-01-01

    Poor sleep, depression, and anxiety are common in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and associated with increased risk of relapse and poor outcomes. The effectiveness of therapies in improving such psychosocial outcomes is unclear but is an important question to examine with increasing selectivity of therapeutic agents. This prospective cohort enrolled patients with moderate-to-severe CD or UC starting biologic therapy with vedolizumab or anti-tumor necrosis factor α agents (anti-TNF). Sleep quality, depression, and anxiety were measured using validated short-form NIH PROMIS questionnaires assessing sleep and mood quality over the past 7 days. Disease activity was assessed using validated indices. Improvement in sleep and mood scores from baseline was assessed, and regression models were used to identify determinants of sleep quality. Our study included 160 patients with IBD (49 anti-TNF, 111 Vedolizumab) among whom half were women and the mean age was 40.2 years. In the combined cohort, we observed a statistically significant and meaningful decrease in mean scores from baseline (52.8) by week 6 (49.8, p = 0.002). Among vedolizumab users, sleep T-score improved from baseline (53.6) by week 6 (50.7) and persisted through week 54 (46.5, p = 0.009). Parallel reductions in depression and anxiety were also noted (p sleep, depression, and anxiety between vedolizumab and anti-TNF use at week 6. Both vedolizumab and anti-TNF biologic therapies were associated with improvement in sleep and mood quality in IBD.

  17. Donepezil improves episodic memory in young individuals vulnerable to the effects of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Lisa Y M; Chong, Delise L; Chen, Annette K; Rekshan, William R; Tan, Jiat-Chow; Zheng, Hui; Chee, Michael W L

    2009-08-01

    We investigated if donepezil, a long-acting orally administered cholinesterase inhibitor, would reduce episodic memory deficits associated with 24 h of sleep deprivation. Double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study involving 7 laboratory visits over 2 months. Participants underwent 4 functional MRI scans; 2 sessions (donepezil or placebo) followed a normal night's sleep, and 2 sessions followed a night of sleep deprivation. The study took place in a research laboratory. 26 young, healthy volunteers with no history of any sleep, psychiatric, or neurologic disorders. 5 mg of donepezil was taken once daily for approximately 17 days. Subjects were scanned while performing a semantic judgment task and tested for word recognition outside the scanner 45 minutes later. Sleep deprivation increased the frequency of non-responses at encoding and impaired delayed recognition. No benefit of donepezil was evident when participants were well rested. When sleep deprived, individuals who showed greater performance decline improved with donepezil, whereas more resistant individuals did not benefit. Accompanying these behavioral effects, there was corresponding modulation of task-related activation in functionally relevant brain regions. Brain regions identified in relation to donepezil-induced alteration in non-response rates could be distinguished from regions relating to improved recognition memory. This suggests that donepezil can improve delayed recognition in sleep-deprived persons by improving attention as well as enhancing memory encoding. Donepezil reduced decline in recognition performance in individuals vulnerable to the effects of sleep deprivation. Additionally, our findings demonstrate the utility of combined fMRI-behavior evaluation in psychopharmacological studies.

  18. Strategies for Getting Enough Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Strategies for Getting Enough Sleep You can take steps to improve your sleep ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: June 7, 2017 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through ...

  19. Post learning sleep improves cognitive-emotional decision-making: evidence for a 'deck B sleep effect' in the Iowa Gambling Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrine J Seeley

    Full Text Available The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT is widely used to assess real life decision-making impairment in a wide variety of clinical populations. Our study evaluated how IGT learning occurs across two sessions, and whether a period of intervening sleep between sessions can enhance learning. Furthermore, we investigate whether pre-sleep learning is necessary for this improvement. A 200-trial version of the IGT was administered at two sessions separated by wake, sleep or sleep and wake (time-of-day control. Participants were categorized as learners and non-learners based on initial performance in session one. In session one, participants initially preferred the high-frequency reward decks B and D, however, a subset of learners decreased choice from negative expected value 'bad' deck B and increased choices towards with a positive expected value 'good' decks (decks C and D. The learners who had a period of sleep (sleep and sleep/wake control conditions between sessions showed significantly larger reduction in choices from deck B and increase in choices from good decks compared to learners that had intervening wake. Our results are the first to show that post-learning sleep can improve performance on a complex decision-making task such as the IGT. These results provide new insights into IGT learning and have important implications for understanding the neural mechanisms of "sleeping on" a decision.

  20. Cognitive Training Improves Sleep Quality and Cognitive Function among Older Adults with Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimov, Iris; Shatil, Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives To investigate the effect of an eight-week, home-based, personalized, computerized cognitive training program on sleep quality and cognitive performance among older adults with insomnia. Design Participants (n = 51) were randomly allocated to a cognitive training group (n = 34) or to an active control group (n = 17). The participants in the cognitive training group completed an eight-week, home-based, personalized, computerized cognitive training program, while the participants in the active control group completed an eight-week, home-based program involving computerized tasks that do not engage high-level cognitive functioning. Before and after training, all participants' sleep was monitored for one week by an actigraph and their cognitive performance was evaluated. Setting Community setting: residential sleep/performance testing facility. Participants Fifty-one older adults with insomnia (aged 65–85). Interventions Eight weeks of computerized cognitive training for older adults with insomnia. Results Mixed models for repeated measures analysis showed between-group improvements for the cognitive training group on both sleep quality (sleep onset latency and sleep efficiency) and cognitive performance (avoiding distractions, working memory, visual memory, general memory and naming). Hierarchical linear regressions analysis in the cognitive training group indicated that improved visual scanning is associated with earlier advent of sleep, while improved naming is associated with the reduction in wake after sleep onset and with the reduction in number of awakenings. Likewise the results indicate that improved “avoiding distractions” is associated with an increase in the duration of sleep. Moreover, the results indicate that in the active control group cognitive decline observed in working memory is associated with an increase in the time required to fall asleep. Conclusions New learning is instrumental in promoting initiation and

  1. Cognitive training improves sleep quality and cognitive function among older adults with insomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Haimov

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of an eight-week, home-based, personalized, computerized cognitive training program on sleep quality and cognitive performance among older adults with insomnia.Participants (n = 51 were randomly allocated to a cognitive training group (n = 34 or to an active control group (n = 17. The participants in the cognitive training group completed an eight-week, home-based, personalized, computerized cognitive training program, while the participants in the active control group completed an eight-week, home-based program involving computerized tasks that do not engage high-level cognitive functioning. Before and after training, all participants' sleep was monitored for one week by an actigraph and their cognitive performance was evaluated.COMMUNITY SETTING: residential sleep/performance testing facility.Fifty-one older adults with insomnia (aged 65-85.Eight weeks of computerized cognitive training for older adults with insomnia.Mixed models for repeated measures analysis showed between-group improvements for the cognitive training group on both sleep quality (sleep onset latency and sleep efficiency and cognitive performance (avoiding distractions, working memory, visual memory, general memory and naming. Hierarchical linear regressions analysis in the cognitive training group indicated that improved visual scanning is associated with earlier advent of sleep, while improved naming is associated with the reduction in wake after sleep onset and with the reduction in number of awakenings. Likewise the results indicate that improved "avoiding distractions" is associated with an increase in the duration of sleep. Moreover, the results indicate that in the active control group cognitive decline observed in working memory is associated with an increase in the time required to fall asleep.New learning is instrumental in promoting initiation and maintenance of sleep in older adults with insomnia. Lasting and personalized

  2. A shower before bedtime may improve the sleep onset latency of youth soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth-Turner, Craig; Di Michele, Rocco; Muir, Ian; Gregson, Warren; Drust, Barry

    2017-10-01

    During the competitive season, soccer players are likely exposed to numerous factors that may disrupt the process of sleep. The current investigation looked to evaluate a practical sleep hygiene strategy (10-min showering at ∼40°C before lights out), within a group of 11 youth soccer players in comparison to normal sleeping conditions (control). Each condition consisted of three days within a randomised crossover trial design. Sleep information was collected using a commercial wireless bedside sleep monitor. Measures of skin temperature were evaluated using iButton skin thermistors to establish both distal and proximal skin temperatures and distal to proximal gradient. The shower intervention elevated distal skin temperature by 1.1°C (95% CI: 0.1-2.1°C, p = .04) on average prior to lights out. The elevation in distal temperature was also present during the first 30-min following lights out (1.0°C, 95% CI: 0.4-1.6°C, p < .01). The distal to proximal gradient also showed a significant effect between the conditions within the first 30-min after lights out (0.7°C, 95% CI: 0.3-1.2°C, p < .01). On average the sleep latency of the youth soccer players was -7-min lower (95% CI: -13 to -2 min, p < .01) and sleep efficiency +2% higher (95% CI: 1-3%; p < .01) in the shower condition. These findings demonstrate that a warm shower performed before lights out may offer a practical strategy to promote thermoregulatory changes that may advance sleep onset latency and improve sleep efficiency in athletes.

  3. Antagonism of serotonergic 5-HT2A/2C receptors: mutual improvement of sleep, cognition and mood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolt, H-P; Wehrle, R

    2009-05-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] and 5-HT receptors are involved in sleep and in waking functions such as cognition and mood. Animal and human studies support a particular role for the 5-HT(2A) receptor in sleep, which has led to renewed interest in this receptor subtype as a target for the development of novel pharmacological agents to treat insomnia. Focusing primarily on findings in healthy human volunteers, a review of the available data suggests that antagonistic interaction with 5-HT(2A) receptors (and possibly also 5-HT(2C) receptors) prolongs the duration of slow wave sleep and enhances low-frequency (sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), a widely accepted marker of sleep intensity. Despite certain differences, the changes in sleep and the sleep EEG appear to be remarkably similar to those of physiologically more intense sleep after sleep deprivation. It is currently unclear whether these changes in sleep are associated with improved vigilance, cognition and mood during wakefulness. While drug-induced interaction with sleep must be interpreted cautiously, too few studies are available to provide a clear answer to this question. Moreover, functional relationships between sleep and waking functions may differ between healthy controls and patients with sleep disorders. A multimodal approach investigating subjective and objective aspects of sleep and wakefulness provides a promising research avenue for shedding light on the complex relationships among 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor-mediated effects on sleep, the sleep EEG, cognition and mood in health and various diseases associated with disturbed sleep and waking functions.

  4. Acetazolamide improves central sleep apnea in heart failure: a double-blind, prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri, Shahrokh

    2006-01-15

    Acetazolamide is a mild diuretic and a respiratory stimulant. It is used to treat periodic breathing at high altitude. To determine the therapeutic efficacy of acetazolamide on central sleep apnea associated with heart failure. Twelve male patients with stable systolic heart failure whose initial polysomnograms showed more than 15 episodes per hour of apnea and hypopnea participated in the study. The patients were randomized to a double-blind cross-over protocol with acetazolamide or placebo, taken 1 h before bedtime for six nights with 2 wk of washout. Polysomnography, pulmonary function tests, arterial blood gases, and left ventricular ejection fraction were obtained initially along with a sleep questionnaire, history, and physical examination. Baseline measurements were repeated at the end of each arm. There were no significant differences between parameters at baseline and placebo. In comparing placebo with acetazolamide, the hourly number of episodes of central apnea (49 +/- 28 vs. 23 +/- 21 [mean +/- SD]; p = 0.004) and the percentage of total sleep time spent below an arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation of 90% (19 +/- 32 vs. 6 +/- 13%; p = 0.01) decreased significantly. Acetazolamide improved subjective perception of overall sleep quality (p = 0.003), feeling rested on awakening (p = 0.007), daytime fatigue (p = 0.02), and falling asleep unintentionally during daytime (p = 0.002). In patients with heart failure, administration of a single dose of acetazolamide before sleep improves central sleep apnea and related daytime symptoms.

  5. Evaluating and Improving Automatic Sleep Spindle Detection by Using Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yin Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are brief bursts of brain activity in the sigma frequency range (11–16 Hz measured by electroencephalography (EEG mostly during non-rapid eye movement (NREM stage 2 sleep. These oscillations are of great biological and clinical interests because they potentially play an important role in identifying and characterizing the processes of various neurological disorders. Conventionally, sleep spindles are identified by expert sleep clinicians via visual inspection of EEG signals. The process is laborious and the results are inconsistent among different experts. To resolve the problem, numerous computerized methods have been developed to automate the process of sleep spindle identification. Still, the performance of these automated sleep spindle detection methods varies inconsistently from study to study. There are two reasons: (1 the lack of common benchmark databases, and (2 the lack of commonly accepted evaluation metrics. In this study, we focus on tackling the second problem by proposing to evaluate the performance of a spindle detector in a multi-objective optimization context and hypothesize that using the resultant Pareto fronts for deriving evaluation metrics will improve automatic sleep spindle detection. We use a popular multi-objective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA, the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA2, to optimize six existing frequency-based sleep spindle detection algorithms. They include three Fourier, one continuous wavelet transform (CWT, and two Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT based algorithms. We also explore three hybrid approaches. Trained and tested on open-access DREAMS and MASS databases, two new hybrid methods of combining Fourier with HHT algorithms show significant performance improvement with F1-scores of 0.726–0.737.

  6. Does subjective sleep quality improve by a walking intervention? A real-world study in a Japanese workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hikaru; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Yoshimura, Reiji; Nakamura, Jun

    2016-10-24

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a 4-week walking intervention on subjective sleep quality. A prospective open-label study. A total of 490 healthy workers were included in the study. The 490 participants were divided into a group of 214 participants with exercise habits (exercising group, EG) and a group of 276 participants without exercise habits (non-EG). A walking intervention with a target of walking 10 000 steps daily for 4 weeks. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire was administered twice (before the start and after the end of the study). Overall, the walking intervention improved the participants' PSQI global score, sleep latency (minutes), sleep duration (hours), perceived sleep quality factor and daily disturbance factor. Among the EG participants, the walking intervention significantly improved the PSQI global score and perceived sleep quality. Among the non-EG participants, the walking intervention significantly improved the PSQI global score, sleep latency, sleep duration and perceived sleep quality. A walking intervention might reduce the sleep latency and increase total sleep duration in working persons without exercise habits. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Improvement of mood and sleep alterations in posttraumatic stress disorder patients by eye movement desensitization and reprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboni, Mara R; Alonso, Fabiana F D; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients exhibit depressive and anxiety symptoms, in addition to nightmares, which interfere with sleep continuity. Pharmacologic treatment of these sleep problems improves PTSD symptoms, but very few studies have used psychotherapeutic interventions to treat PTSD and examined their effects on sleep quality. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to investigate the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing therapy on indices of mood, anxiety, subjective, and objective sleep. The sample was composed of 11 healthy controls and 13 PTSD patients that were victims of assault and/or kidnapping. All participants were assessed before, and 1 day after, the end of treatment for depressive and anxiety profile, general well-being and subjective sleep by filling out specific questionnaires. In addition, objective sleep patterns were evaluated by polysomnographic recording. Healthy volunteers were submitted to the therapy for three weekly sessions, whereas PTSD patients underwent five sessions, on average. Before treatment, PTSD patients exhibited high levels of anxiety and depression, poor quality of life and poor sleep, assessed both subjectively and objectively; the latter was reflected by increased time of waking after sleep onset. After completion of treatment, patients exhibited improvement in depression and anxiety symptoms, and in quality of life; with indices that were no longer different from control volunteers. Moreover, these patients showed more consolidated sleep, with reduction of time spent awake after sleep onset. In conclusion, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing was an effective treatment of PTSD patients and improved the associated sleep and psychological symptoms.

  8. Improvement of mood and sleep alterations in posttraumatic stress disorder patients by eye movement desensitization and reprocessing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Regina Raboni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD patients exhibit depressive and anxiety symptoms, in addition to nightmares, which interfere with sleep continuity. Pharmacologic treatment of these sleep problems improves PTSD symptoms, but very few studies have used psychotherapeutic interventions to treat PTSD and examined their effects on sleep quality. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to investigate the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing therapy on indices of mood, anxiety, subjective and objective sleep. The sample was composed of 11 healthy controls and 13 PTSD patients that were victims of assault and/or kidnapping. All participants were assessed before, and one day after, the end of treatment for depressive and anxiety profile, general well-being and subjective sleep by filling out specific questionnaires. In addition, objective sleep patterns were evaluated by polysomnographic recording. Healthy volunteers were submitted to the therapy for three weekly sessions, whereas PTSD patients underwent five sessions, on average. Before treatment, PTSD patients exhibited high levels of anxiety and depression, poor quality of life and poor sleep, assessed both subjectively and objectively; the latter was reflected by increased time of waking after sleep onset. After completion of treatment, patients exhibited improvement in depression and anxiety symptoms, and in quality of life; with indices that were no longer different from control volunteers. Moreover, these patients showed more consolidated sleep, with reduction of time spent awake after sleep onset. In conclusion, Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing was an effective treatment of PTSD patients and improved the associated sleep and psychological symptoms.

  9. Buprenorphine Transdermal System Improves Sleep Quality and Reduces Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Chronic Low Back Pain: Results from Two Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarlas, Aaron; Miller, Kate; Wen, Warren; Lynch, Shau Yu; Ripa, Steven R; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Raffa, Robert B

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of buprenorphine (Butrans®) transdermal System (BTDS) treatment on sleep outcomes for patients with moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain (CLBP). Two enriched-enrollment, randomized-withdrawal, double-blind, controlled trials examined BTDS treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe CLBP. Trial I evaluated BTDS 10 and 20 mcg/hour against a placebo control among opioid-naïve patients. Trial II compared BTDS 20 mcg/hour against a lower-dose control (BTDS 5 mcg/hour) among opioid-experienced patients. The patient-reported Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale (MOS-SS) assessed overall sleep quality (Sleep Problems Index [SPI]), Disturbance, and other sleep outcomes. In each trial, MOS-SS scores were compared between target treatment and control arms during the 12-week double-blind phase. Correspondence of changes in sleep outcomes and pain severity and the degree to which pain reduction mediates treatment impact on sleep outcomes were examined. Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale scores were collected from 541 (Trial I) and 441 (Trial II) patients prior to randomization and from 369 (Trial I) and 274 (Trial II) patients at week 12. Patients receiving target treatment showed statistically significantly more improvement in SPI and Disturbance scores at 12 weeks than their respective controls (Ps sleep outcomes. Buprenorphine Transdermal System improved sleep quality and disturbance for opioid-naïve and opioid-experienced patients with moderate-to-severe CLBP. Benefits of BTDS for these sleep outcomes emerged within 4 weeks and were maintained over the entire 12-week treatment period. © 2015 Optum. Pain Practice published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.

  10. Memory improvement via slow-oscillatory stimulation during sleep in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Carmen E; Florczak, Susan M; Weintraub, Sandra; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Marshall, Lisa; Zee, Phyllis C; Paller, Ken A

    2015-09-01

    We examined the intriguing but controversial idea that disrupted sleep-dependent consolidation contributes to age-related memory decline. Slow-wave activity during sleep may help strengthen neural connections and provide memories with long-term stability, in which case decreased slow-wave activity in older adults could contribute to their weaker memories. One prediction from this account is that age-related memory deficits should be reduced by artificially enhancing slow-wave activity. In young adults, applying transcranial current oscillating at a slow frequency (0.75 Hz) during sleep improves memory. Here, we tested whether this procedure can improve memory in older adults. In 2 sessions separated by 1 week, we applied either slow-oscillatory stimulation or sham stimulation during an afternoon nap in a double-blind, crossover design. Memory tests were administered before and after sleep. A larger improvement in word-pair recall and higher slow-wave activity was observed with slow-oscillatory stimulation than with sham stimulation. This is the first demonstration that this procedure can improve memory in older adults, suggesting that declarative memory performance in older adults is partly dependent on slow-wave activity during sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Coronary Health Improvement Projects Impact on Lowering Eating, Sleep, Stress, and Depressive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ray M.; Aldana, Stephen G.; Greenlaw, Roger L.; Diehl, Hans A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) is designed to lower cardiovascular risk factors among a group of generally healthy individuals through health education. Purpose: This study will evaluate the efficacy of the CHIP intervention at improving eating, sleep, stress, and depressive disorders. Methods: A health education…

  12. The SENSE Study: Treatment Mechanisms of a Cognitive Behavioral and Mindfulness-Based Group Sleep Improvement Intervention for At-Risk Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Matthew; Schwartz, Orli; Waloszek, Joanna M; Raniti, Monika; Simmons, Julian G; Murray, Greg; Blake, Laura; Dahl, Ronald E; Bootzin, Richard; McMakin, Dana L; Dudgeon, Paul; Trinder, John; Allen, Nicholas B

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether a cognitive behavioral and mindfulness-based group sleep intervention would improve sleep and anxiety on school nights in a sample of at-risk adolescents. We also examined whether benefits to sleep and anxiety would be mediated by improvements in sleep hygiene awareness and presleep hyperarousal. Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial conducted with 123 adolescent participants (female = 60%; mean age = 14.48) who had high levels of sleep problems and anxiety symptoms. Participants were randomized into a sleep improvement intervention (n = 63) or active control "study skills" intervention (n = 60). Preintervention and postintervention, participants completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS), Sleep Beliefs Scale (SBS), and Presleep Hyperarousal Scale (PSAS) and wore an actiwatch and completed a sleep diary for five school nights. The sleep intervention condition was associated with significantly greater improvements in actigraphy-measured sleep onset latency (SOLobj), sleep diary measured sleep efficiency (SEsubj), PSQI, SCAS, SBS, and PSAS, with medium to large effect sizes. Improvements in the PSQI and SCAS were specifically mediated by the measured improvements in the PSAS that resulted from the intervention. Improvements in SOLobj and SEsubj were not specifically related to improvements in any of the putative treatment mechanisms. This study provides evidence that presleep arousal but not sleep hygiene awareness is important for adolescents' perceived sleep quality and could be a target for new treatments of adolescent sleep problems.

  13. Preoperative Drug Induced Sleep Endoscopy Improves the Surgical Approach to Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Colin; Chou, David; Doghramji, Karl; Boon, Maurits

    2017-06-01

    Drug induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) allows for preoperative evaluation of the specific site and character of upper airway obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We aim to assess the impact DISE has on customizing the surgical plan and evaluate its role in surgical success. We retrospectively reviewed patients undergoing surgery for OSA. We compared those patients undergoing preoperative DISE to those that did not to assess procedures performed and surgical outcomes. We found 87 patients undergoing surgery for OSA who had postoperative polysomnogram results. Of the group undergoing preoperative DISE, 8% had multilevel surgery. This compared to 59.5% in those not undergoing DISE ( p = .0004). The success rate of patients who had preoperative DISE was 86% compared to 51.4% in those who did not have preoperative DISE ( p BMI) and postoperative oxygen nadir, ESS, or BMI in the DISE and no DISE cohorts. The addition of DISE to our preoperative workup has contributed to a decreased rate of multilevel surgery and increased rate of surgical success through identification of the individual patient's OSA architecture and customization of the surgical plan.

  14. A Four-Session Sleep Intervention Program Improves Sleep for Older Adult Day Health Care Participants: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jennifer L; Song, Yeonsu; Hughes, Jaime; Jouldjian, Stella; Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Fung, Constance H; Rodriguez Tapia, Juan Carlos; Mitchell, Michael N; Alessi, Cathy A

    2017-08-01

    To test the effectiveness of a 4-week behavioral Sleep Intervention Program (SIP: sleep compression, modified stimulus control, and sleep hygiene) compared to a 4-week information-only control (IC) among older adults attending a VA Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) program in a double-blind, randomized, clinical trial. Forty-two individuals (mean age: 77 years, 93% male) enrolled in a VA ADHC program were randomized to receive SIP or IC. All completed in-person sleep and health assessments at baseline, post-treatment and 4-months follow-up that included 3 days/nights of wrist actigraphy, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Mixed repeated measures analysis was used to compare sleep outcomes at post-treatment and 4-months follow-up, with baseline values as covariates. SIP participants (n = 21) showed significant improvement on actigraphy sleep efficiency (p = .007), number of nighttime awakenings (p = .016), and minutes awake at night (p = .001) at post-treatment, compared to IC participants (n = 21). Benefits were slightly attenuated but remained significant at 4-month follow-up (all p's sleep time between groups. There was significant improvement on PSQI factor 3 (daily disturbances) at 4-month follow-up (p = .016), but no differences were observed between SIP and IC on other PSQI components or ISI scores at post-treatment or 4-month follow-up. A short behavioral sleep intervention may have important benefits in improving objectively measured sleep in older adults participating in ADHC. Future studies are needed to study implementation of this intervention into routine clinical care within ADHC.

  15. Sleep-dependent improvement in visuomotor learning: a causal role for slow waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsness, Eric C; Crupi, Domenica; Hulse, Brad K; Peterson, Michael J; Huber, Reto; Ansari, Hidayath; Coen, Michael; Cirelli, Chiara; Benca, Ruth M; Ghilardi, M Felice; Tononi, Giulio

    2009-10-01

    Sleep after learning often benefits memory consolidation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In previous studies, we found that learning a visuomotor task is followed by an increase in sleep slow wave activity (SWA, the electroencephalographic [EEG] power density between 0.5 and 4.5 Hz during non-rapid eye movement sleep) over the right parietal cortex. The SWA increase correlates with the postsleep improvement in visuomotor performance, suggesting that SWA may be causally responsible for the consolidation of visuomotor learning. Here, we tested this hypothesis by studying the effects of slow wave deprivation (SWD). After learning the task, subjects went to sleep, and acoustic stimuli were timed either to suppress slow waves (SWD) or to interfere as little as possible with spontaneous slow waves (control acoustic stimulation, CAS). Sound-attenuated research room. Healthy subjects (mean age 24.6 +/- 1.0 years; n = 9 for EEG analysis, n = 12 for behavior analysis; 3 women). Sleep time and efficiency were not affected, whereas SWA and the number of slow waves decreased in SWD relative to CAS. Relative to the night before, visuomotor performance significantly improved in the CAS condition (+5.93% +/- 0.88%) but not in the SWD condition (-0.77% +/- 1.16%), and the direct CAS vs SWD comparison showed a significant difference (P = 0.0007, n = 12, paired t test). Changes in visuomotor performance after SWD were correlated with SWA changes over right parietal cortex but not with the number of arousals identified using clinically established criteria, nor with any sign of "EEG lightening" identified using a novel automatic method based on event-related spectral perturbation analysis. These results support a causal role for sleep slow waves in sleep-dependent improvement of visuomotor performance.

  16. Improvement of a patient's circadian rhythm sleep disorders by aripiprazole was associated with stabilization of his bipolar illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Tetsuo

    2017-04-01

    Splitting of the behavioural activity phase has been found in nocturnal rodents with suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) coupling disorder. A similar phenomenon was observed in the sleep phase in the diurnal human discussed here, suggesting that there are so-called evening and morning oscillators in the SCN of humans. The present case suffered from bipolar disorder refractory to various treatments, and various circadian rhythm sleep disorders, such as delayed sleep phase, polyphasic sleep, separation of the sleep bout resembling splitting and circabidian rhythm (48 h), were found during prolonged depressive episodes with hypersomnia. Separation of sleep into evening and morning components and delayed sleep-offset (24.69-h cycle) developed when lowering and stopping the dose of aripiprazole (APZ). However, resumption of APZ improved these symptoms in 2 weeks, accompanied by improvement in the patient's depressive state. Administration of APZ may improve various circadian rhythm sleep disorders, as well as improve and prevent manic-depressive episodes, via augmentation of coupling in the SCN network. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society.

  17. The Therapeutic Potential of Exercise to Improve Mood, Cognition, and Sleep in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gretchen O; Otto, Michael W; Ellis, Terry D; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the classic motor symptoms, Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with a variety of nonmotor symptoms that significantly reduce quality of life, even in the early stages of the disease. There is an urgent need to develop evidence-based treatments for these symptoms, which include mood disturbances, cognitive dysfunction, and sleep disruption. We focus here on exercise interventions, which have been used to improve mood, cognition, and sleep in healthy older adults and clinical populations, but to date have primarily targeted motor symptoms in PD. We synthesize the existing literature on the benefits of aerobic exercise and strength training on mood, sleep, and cognition as demonstrated in healthy older adults and adults with PD, and suggest that these types of exercise offer a feasible and promising adjunct treatment for mood, cognition, and sleep difficulties in PD. Across stages of the disease, exercise interventions represent a treatment strategy with the unique ability to improve a range of nonmotor symptoms while also alleviating the classic motor symptoms of the disease. Future research in PD should include nonmotor outcomes in exercise trials with the goal of developing evidence-based exercise interventions as a safe, broad-spectrum treatment approach to improve mood, cognition, and sleep for individuals with PD. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. The Therapeutic Potential of Exercise to Improve Mood, Cognition, and Sleep in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gretchen O.; Otto, Michael W.; Ellis, Terry D.; Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the classic motor symptoms, Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with a variety of non-motor symptoms that significantly reduce quality of life, even in the early stages of the disease. There is an urgent need to develop evidence-based treatments for these symptoms, which include mood disturbances, cognitive dysfunction, and sleep disruption. We focus here on exercise interventions, which have been used to improve mood, cognition, and sleep in healthy older adults and clinical populations, but to date have primarily targeted motor symptoms in PD. We synthesize the existing literature on the benefits of aerobic exercise and strength training on mood, sleep, and cognition as demonstrated in healthy older adults and adults with PD, and suggest that these types of exercise offer a feasible and promising adjunct treatment for mood, cognition, and sleep difficulties in PD. Across stages of the disease, exercise interventions represent a treatment strategy with the unique ability to improve a range of non-motor symptoms while also alleviating the classic motor symptoms of the disease. Future research in PD should include non-motor outcomes in exercise trials with the goal of developing evidence-based exercise interventions as a safe, broad-spectrum treatment approach to improve mood, cognition, and sleep for individuals with PD. PMID:26715466

  19. Valeriana wallichii root extract improves sleep quality and modulates brain monoamine level in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Surajit; Ray, Koushik; Yogendra Kumar, M S; Gupta, Shilpa; Kauser, Hina; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mishra, Kshipra; Panjwani, Usha

    2012-07-15

    The present study was performed to investigate the effects of Valeriana wallichi (VW) aqueous root extract on sleep-wake profile and level of brain monoamines on Sprague-Dawley rats. Electrodes and transmitters were implanted to record EEG and EMG in freely moving condition and the changes were recorded telemetrically after oral administration of VW in the doses of 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight. Sleep latency was decreased and duration of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was increased in a dose dependent manner. A significant decrease of sleep latency and duration of wakefulness were observed with VW at doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg. Duration of NREM sleep as well as duration of total sleep was increased significantly after treatment with VW at the doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg. VW also increased EEG slow wave activity during NREM sleep at the doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg. Level of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), serotonin (5-HT) and hydroxy indole acetic acid (HIAA) were measured in frontal cortex and brain stem after VW treatment at the dose of 200mg/kg. NE and 5HT level were decreased significantly in both frontal cortex and brain stem. DA and HIAA level significantly decreased only in cortex. DOPAC level was not changed in any brain region studied. In conclusion it can be said that VW water extract has a sleep quality improving effect which may be dependent upon levels of monoamines in cortex and brainstem. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Sleep-related breathing disorders in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome depending on the period of growth hormone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecka-Ambroziak, Agnieszka; Jędrzejczak, Małgorzata; Wysocka-Mincewicz, Marta; Szalecki, Mieczysław

    2017-10-12

    Sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD) are commonly present in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment is reported to improve breathing function in PWS, but the findings are not explicit. Screening polysomnography- polygraphy (PSG), assessing nasal respiratory flow, respiratory effort, and blood oxygen saturation, was used. Group 1 - before rhGH therapy (n = 11, mean age 3.0 years); PSG was repeated after the start of rhGH therapy in a mean time of 0.9 years in six patients (Group 1a). Group 2 - on rhGH treatment, for a mean time of four years (n = 17, mean age 8.8 years). Group 3 - without rhGH therapy due to severe obesity (n = 8, mean age 13.1 years). Group 1 - mean apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) was 10.2, oxygen desaturation index (ODI)- 36.3, Group 1a- AHI 12.0, ODI 60.9, Group 2-AHI 9.0, ODI 25.1, Group 3- AHI 8.2, ODI 22.0. ODI was significantly higher in Group 1a than in the other groups (p < 0.005), but not strictly related to SRBD. The results in Group 2 did not differ significantly from those of Group 1. Our study proves the high frequency of SRBD among PWS patients, with worsening of ODI after short-term rhGH therapy.

  1. How Much Sleep Is Enough

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... June 7, 2017 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through Research National Institutes of Health- (NIH) supported research is shedding light on how sleep and lack of sleep affect the human body. ...

  2. Music-assisted relaxation to improve sleep quality: meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Niet, Gerrit; Tiemens, Bea; Lendemeijer, Bert; Hutschemaekers, Giel

    2009-07-01

    This paper is a report of a meta-analysis conducted to evaluate the efficacy of music-assisted relaxation for sleep quality in adults and elders with sleep complaints with or without a co-morbid medical condition. Clinical studies have shown that music can influence treatment outcome in a positive and beneficial way. Music holds the promise of counteracting psychological presleep arousal and thus improving the preconditions for sleep. We conducted a search in the Embase (1997 - July 2008), Medline (1950 - July 2008), Cochrane (2000 - July 2008), Psychinfo (1987 - July 2008) and Cinahl (1982 - July 2008) databases for randomized controlled trials reported in English, German, French and Dutch. The outcome measure of interest was sleep quality. Data were extracted from the included studies using predefined data fields. The researchers independently assessed the quality of the trials using the Delphi list. Only studies with a score of 5 points or higher were included. A pooled analysis was performed based on a fixed effect model. Five randomized controlled trials with six treatment conditions and a total of 170 participants in intervention groups and 138 controls met our inclusion criteria. Music-assisted relaxation had a moderate effect on the sleep quality of patients with sleep complaints (standardized mean difference, -0.74; 95% CI: -0.96, -0.46). Subgroup analysis revealed no statistically significant contribution of accompanying measures. Music-assisted relaxation can be used without intensive investment in training and materials and is therefore cheap, easily available and can be used by nurses to promote music-assisted relaxation to improve sleep quality.

  3. Using patient flow simulation to improve access at a multidisciplinary sleep centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendharkar, Sachin R; Bischak, Diane P; Rogers, Paul; Flemons, Ward; Noseworthy, Tom W

    2015-06-01

    The lack of timely access to diagnosis and treatment for sleep disorders is well described, but little attention has been paid to understanding how multiple system constraints contribute to long waiting times. The objectives of this study were to identify system constraints leading to long waiting times at a multidisciplinary sleep centre, and to use patient flow simulation modelling to test solutions that could improve access. Discrete-event simulation models of patient flow were constructed using historical data from 150 patients referred to the sleep centre, and used to both examine reasons for access delays and to test alternative system configurations that were predicted by administrators to reduce waiting times. Four possible solutions were modelled and compared with baseline, including addition of capacity to different areas at the sleep centre and elimination of prioritization by urgency. Within the model, adding physician capacity improved time from patient referral to initial physician appointment, but worsened time from polysomnography requisition to test completion, and had no effect on time from patient referral to treatment initiation. Adding respiratory therapist did not improve model performance compared with baseline. Eliminating triage prioritization worsened time to physician assessment and treatment initiation for urgent patients without improving waiting times overall. This study demonstrates that discrete-event simulation can identify multiple constraints in access-limited healthcare systems and allow suggested solutions to be tested before implementation. The model of this sleep centre predicted that investments in capacity expansion proposed by administrators would not reduce the time to a clinically meaningful patient outcome. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  4. Developing, implementing, and evaluating a multifaceted quality improvement intervention to promote sleep in an ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Biren B; Yang, Jessica; King, Lauren M; Neufeld, Karin J; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Rowden, Annette M; Brower, Roy G; Collop, Nancy A; Needham, Dale M

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients commonly experience poor sleep quality in the intensive care unit (ICU) because of various modifiable factors. To address this issue, an ICU-wide, multifaceted quality improvement (QI) project was undertaken to promote sleep in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Medical ICU (MICU). To supplement previously published results of this QI intervention, the present article describes the specific QI framework used to develop and implement this intervention, which consists of 4 steps: (a) summarizing the evidence to create a list of sleep-promoting interventions, (b) identifying and addressing local barriers to implementation, (c) selecting performance measures to assess intervention adherence and patient outcomes, and (d) ensuring that all patients receive the interventions through staff engagement and education and regular project evaluation. Measures of performance included daily completion rates of daytime and nighttime sleep improvement checklists and completion rates of individual interventions. Although long-term adherence and sustainability pose ongoing challenges, this model provides a foundation for future ICU sleep promotion initiatives. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  5. [Non-face-to-face sleep improvement program in a workplace: bibliotherapy with and without behavioral self-control procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiko; Kunitsuka, Kouko; Taniyama, Katsuko; Hayashi, Chikako; Tanaka, Minori; Sato, Chifumi

    2010-01-01

    Sleep hygiene education has been important health issue in the health promotion and the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases. A feasible and effective method is necessary for population approach. To evaluate the effects of a non-face-to-face brief behavioral program for a sleep improvement in workplaces. Research design was a cluster control trial. Three hundred and thirty participants were allocated to the bibliotherapy group (BTG; n=130) or self-control group (SCG; n=200). Two groups were recruited from separated local sections of a Japanese company each other. There was no eligibility criteria and the intervention was open to every worker in the workplaces. All participants received a self-help booklet and information on recent topics of insomnia-related health problems. SCG participants set several behaviors for habit improvement and monitored those behaviors for 4 wk additionally. The replies to the questionnaire showed that almost all of them had any sleep disturbances. A total of 158 participants in SCG (79%) and a total of 106 participants in BTG (82%) responded to the post questionnaire. Sleep parameters of pre and post questionnaires were compared between SCG and BTG. Overall, sleep onset latency was reduced and sleep efficiency was improved. The significant changes were found in only SCG. Re-analysis of pre and post 3-days' sleep diaries showed that the subjects in both group improved significantly in the main variables (total sleep time, number of awakenings, time spent awake, sleep efficiency). Sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, and daytime sleepiness improved significantly in only SCG. These results suggest that an additional target setting and self-monitoring could promote the effectiveness for sleep improvement of a bibliotherapy.

  6. Rotigotine may improve sleep architecture in Parkinson's disease: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled polysomnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Placidi, Fabio; Liguori, Claudio; Albanese, Maria; Imbriani, Paola; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Stanzione, Paolo; Stefani, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that in Parkinson's Disease (PD) sleep disturbances are frequent and difficult to treat. Since the efficacy of rotigotine on sleep is corroborated by studies lacking polysomnography (PSG), this study explores the possible rotigotine-mediated impact on PSG parameters in PD patients. This is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study to determine the efficacy of rotigotine vs placebo on PSG parameters in moderately advanced PD patients. An unusual protocol was utilized, since patches were maintained from 18:00 h to awakening, minimizing the possible diurnal impact on motor symptoms. All participants underwent sleep PSG recordings, subjective sleep questionnaires (Parkinson Disease Sleep Scale [PDSS], Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), and the assessment of early-morning motor disability. We evaluated 42 PD patients (Hoehn & Yahr stages 2 and 3) with sleep impairment randomly assigned to active branch (N =21) or placebo (N = 21). Rotigotine significantly increased sleep efficiency and reduced both wakefulness after sleep onset and sleep latency compared to placebo. Moreover, the mean change in REM sleep quantity was significantly higher in the rotigotine than placebo group. The improvement of PSG parameters corresponded to the amelioration of PDSS and PSQI scores together with the improvement of patient morning motor symptoms. This study demonstrated the significant effect of rotigotine on sleep quality and continuity in PD patients by promoting sleep stability and increasing REM. The effectiveness of rotigotine on sleep may be ascribed to its pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile directly on both D1 and D2 receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Qigong Exercise Alleviates Fatigue, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms, Improves Sleep Quality, and Shortens Sleep Latency in Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie S. M. Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of Baduanjin Qigong exercise on sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS- like illness and to determine the dose-response relationship. Methods. One hundred fifty participants with CFS-like illness (mean age = 39.0, SD = 7.9 were randomly assigned to Qigong and waitlist. Sixteen 1.5-hour Qigong lessons were arranged over 9 consecutive weeks. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Chalder Fatigue Scale (ChFS, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS were assessed at baseline, immediate posttreatment, and 3-month posttreatment. The amount of Qigong self-practice was assessed by self-report. Results. Repeated measures analyses of covariance showed a marginally nonsignificant (P= 0.064 group by time interaction in the PSQI total score, but it was significant for the “subjective sleep quality” and “sleep latency” items, favoring Qigong exercise. Improvement in “subjective sleep quality” was maintained at 3-month posttreatment. Significant group by time interaction was also detected for the ChFS and HADS anxiety and depression scores. The number of Qigong lessons attended and the amount of Qigong self-practice were significantly associated with sleep, fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptom improvement. Conclusion. Baduanjin Qigong was an efficacious and acceptable treatment for sleep disturbance in CFS-like illness. This trial is registered with Hong Kong Clinical Trial Register: HKCTR-1380.

  8. Treating insomnia improves mood state, sleep, and functioning in bipolar disorder: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Allison G; Soehner, Adriane M; Kaplan, Kate A; Hein, Kerrie; Lee, Jason; Kanady, Jennifer; Li, Descartes; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Ketter, Terence A; Neylan, Thomas C; Buysse, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    To determine if a treatment for interepisode bipolar disorder I patients with insomnia improves mood state, sleep, and functioning. Alongside psychiatric care, interepisode bipolar disorder I participants with insomnia were randomly allocated to a bipolar disorder-specific modification of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBTI-BP; n = 30) or psychoeducation (PE; n = 28) as a comparison condition. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, the end of 8 sessions of treatment, and 6 months later. This pilot was conducted to determine initial feasibility and generate effect size estimates. During the 6-month follow-up, the CBTI-BP group had fewer days in a bipolar episode relative to the PE group (3.3 days vs. 25.5 days). The CBTI-BP group also experienced a significantly lower hypomania/mania relapse rate (4.6% vs. 31.6%) and a marginally lower overall mood episode relapse rate (13.6% vs. 42.1%) compared with the PE group. Relative to PE, CBTI-BP reduced insomnia severity and led to higher rates of insomnia remission at posttreatment and marginally higher rates at 6 months. Both CBTI-BP and PE showed statistically significant improvement on selected sleep and functional impairment measures. The effects of treatment were well sustained through follow-up for most outcomes, although some decline on secondary sleep benefits was observed. CBTI-BP was associated with reduced risk of mood episode relapse and improved sleep and functioning on certain outcomes in bipolar disorder. Hence, sleep disturbance appears to be an important pathway contributing to bipolar disorder. The need to develop bipolar disorder-specific sleep diary scoring standards is highlighted. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Low-frequency electroacupuncture suppresses focal epilepsy and improves epilepsy-induced sleep disruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Pei-Lu; Lu, Chin-Yu; Jou, Shuo-Bin; Chang, Fang-Chia

    2015-07-07

    The positive effects of acupuncture at Feng-Chi acupoints on treating epilepsy and insomnia have been well-documented in ancient Chinese literature. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence to elucidate the underlying mechanisms behind these effects. Our previous study demonstrated that high-frequency (100 Hz) electroacupuncture (EA) at Feng-Chi acupoints deteriorates both pilocarpine-induced focal epilepsy and sleep disruptions. This study investigated the effects of low-frequency (10 Hz) EA on epileptic activities and epilepsy-induced sleep disruptions. In rats, the Feng-Chi acupoint is located 3 mm away from the center of a line between the two ears. Rats received 30 min of 10 Hz EA stimuli per day before each day's dark period for three consecutive days. Our results indicated that administration of pilocarpine into the left CeA at the beginning of the dark period induced focal epilepsy and decreased both rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep during the consequent light period. Low-frequency (10 Hz) EA at Feng-Chi acupoints suppressed pilocarpine-induced epileptiform EEGs, and this effect was in turn blocked by naloxone (a broad-spectrum opioid receptor antagonist), but not by naloxonazine (a μ-receptor antagonist), naltrindole (a δ-receptor antagonist) and nor-binaltorphimine (a κ-receptor antagonist). Ten Hz EA enhanced NREM sleep during the dark period, and this enhancement was blocked by all of the opioid receptor antagonists. On the other hand, 10 Hz EA reversed pilocarpine-induced NREM suppression during the light period, and the EA's effect on the sleep disruption was only blocked by naloxonazine. These results indicate that low-frequency EA stimulation of Feng-Chi acupoints is beneficial in improving epilepsy and epilepsy-induced sleep disruptions, and that opioid receptors in the CeA mediate EA's therapeutic effects.

  10. Chronic Stress is Prospectively Associated with Sleep in Midlife Women: The SWAN Sleep Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Martica H; Casement, Melynda D; Troxel, Wendy M; Matthews, Karen A; Bromberger, Joyce T; Kravitz, Howard M; Krafty, Robert T; Buysse, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Evaluate whether levels of upsetting life events measured over a 9-y period prospectively predict subjective and objective sleep outcomes in midlife women. Prospective cohort study. Four sites across the United States. 330 women (46-57 y of age) enrolled in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Sleep Study. N/A. Upsetting life events were assessed annually for up to 9 y. Trajectory analysis applied to life events data quantitatively identified three distinct chronic stress groups: low stress, moderate stress, and high stress. Sleep was assessed by self-report and in-home polysomnography (PSG) during the ninth year of the study. Multivariate analyses tested the prospective association between chronic stress group and sleep, adjusting for race, baseline sleep complaints, marital status, body mass index, symptoms of depression, and acute life events at the time of the Sleep Study. Women characterized by high chronic stress had lower subjective sleep quality, were more likely to report insomnia, and exhibited increased PSG-assessed wake after sleep onset (WASO) relative to women with low to moderate chronic stress profiles. The effect of chronic stress group on WASO persisted in the subsample of participants without baseline sleep complaints. Chronic stress is prospectively associated with sleep disturbance in midlife women, even after adjusting for acute stressors at the time of the sleep study and other factors known to disrupt sleep. These results are consistent with current models of stress that emphasize the cumulative effect of stressors on health over time. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Pilot Study of Massage to Improve Sleep and Fatigue in Hospitalized Adolescents With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Shana; Mowbray, Catriona; Cates, Lauren Muser; Baylor, Allison; Gable, Christopher; Skora, Elizabeth; Estrada, Monica; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Jichuan; Lewin, Daniel; Hinds, Pamela

    2016-05-01

    Adolescents with cancer experience many troubling symptoms, including sleep disruptions that can affect mood and quality of life. Massage is a safe and popular intervention that has demonstrated efficacy in pediatric and adult patients with cancer. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of conducting a massage intervention to help with sleep in hospitalized adolescent oncology patients. Adolescents ages 12-21 with cancer who were expected to be hospitalized for at least four consecutive nights were recruited from the inpatient unit at Children's National Health System and randomized to either massage intervention or a waitlist control. Patients in the intervention group received one massage per night, for two or three nights. Sleep was measured with actigraphy and patient and proxy reported instruments were used to measure fatigue, mood, and anxiety. The majority (78%) of patients approached for the study consented, and almost all patients in the intervention group (94%) received at least one massage, 69% received two, and rates of completion of instruments among adolescents were high demonstrating feasibility. There were trends toward increased night time and overall sleep in the intervention group compared with standard of care, but no differences between groups in the patient reported outcome measures. Participant and parent feedback on the intervention was positive and was the impetus for starting a clinical massage service at the hospital. Massage for hospitalized adolescents with cancer is feasible, well received, and can potentially improve patients' sleep. A randomized multicenter efficacy study is warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Envelope analysis of the airflow signal to improve polysomnographic assessment of sleep disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Javier A; Arancibia, José M; Bassi, Alejandro; Vivaldi, Ennio A

    2014-01-01

    Given the detailed respiratory waveform signal provided by the nasal cannula in polysomnographic (PSG) studies, to quantify sleep breathing disturbances by extracting a continuous variable based on the coefficient of variation of the envelope of that signal. Application of an algorithm for envelope analysis to standard nasal cannula signal from actual polysomnographic studies. PSG recordings from a sleep disorders center were analyzed by an algorithm developed on the Igor scientific data analysis software. Recordings representative of different degrees of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) severity or illustrative of the covariation between breathing and particularly relevant factors and variables. The method calculated the coefficient of variation of the envelope for each 30-second epoch. The normalized version of that coefficient was defined as the respiratory disturbance variable (RDV). The method outcome was the all-night set of RDV values represented as a time series. RDV quantitatively reflected departure from normal sinusoidal breathing at each epoch, providing an intensity scale for disordered breathing. RDV dynamics configured itself in recognizable patterns for the airflow limitation (e.g., in UARS) and the apnea/hypopnea regimes. RDV reliably highlighted clinically meaningful associations with staging, body position, oximetry, or CPAP titration. Respiratory disturbance variable can assess sleep breathing disturbances as a gradual phenomenon while providing a comprehensible and detailed representation of its dynamics. It may thus improve clinical diagnosis and provide a revealing descriptive tool for mechanistic sleep disordered breathing modeling. Respiratory disturbance variable may contribute to attaining simplified screening methodologies, novel diagnostic criteria, and insightful research tools.

  13. The effects of aromatherapy on sleep improvement: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eunhee; Shin, Sujin

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the existing data on aromatherapy interventions for improvement of sleep quality. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis on the effects of aromatherapy. Study Sources: Electronic databases, including the Korea Education and Research Information Service (KERIS), Korean studies Information Service System (KISS), National Assembly Library, and eight academies within the Korean Society of Nursing Science, were searched to identify studies published between 2000 and August 2013. Randomized controlled and quasi-experimental trials that included aromatherapy for the improvement of sleep quality. Of the 245 publications identified, 13 studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and 12 studies were used in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of the 12 studies using a random-effects model revealed that the use of aromatherapy was effective in improving sleep quality (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.540-1.745; Z=3.716). Subgroup analysis revealed that inhalation aromatherapy (95% CI, 0.792-1.541; Z=6.107) was more effective than massage therapy (95% CI, 0.128-2.166; Z=2.205) in unhealthy (95% CI, 0.248-1.100; Z=3.100) and healthy (95% CI, 0.393-5.104; Z=2.287) participants, respectively. Readily available aromatherapy treatments appear to be effective and promote sleep. Thus, it is essential to develop specific guidelines for the efficient use of aromatherapy.

  14. A Chinese Chan-Based Mind-Body Intervention Improves Sleep on Patients with Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes S. Chan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbance is a common problem associated with depression, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT is a more common behavioral intervention for sleep problems. The present study compares the effect of a newly developed Chinese Chan-based intervention, namely Dejian mind-body intervention (DMBI, with the CBT on improving sleep problems of patients with depression. Seventy-five participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder were randomly assigned to receive 10 weekly sessions of CBT or DMBI, or placed on a waitlist. Measurements included ratings by psychiatrists who were blinded to the experimental design, and a standardized questionnaire on sleep quantity and quality was obtained before and after the 10-week intervention. Results indicated that both the CBT and DMBI groups demonstrated significantly reduced sleep onset latency and wake time after sleep onset (effect size range = 0.46–1.0, P≤0.05 as compared to nonsignificant changes in the waitlist group (P>0.1. Furthermore, the DMBI group, but not the CBT or waitlist groups, demonstrated significantly reduced psychiatrist ratings on overall sleep problems (effect size = 1.0, P=0.00 and improved total sleep time (effect size = 0.8, P=0.05 after treatment. The present findings suggest that a Chinese Chan-based mind-body intervention has positive effects on improving sleep in individuals with depression.

  15. Short-term improvement in insomnia symptoms predicts long-term improvements in sleep, pain, and fatigue in older adults with comorbid osteoarthritis and insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Michael V; McCurry, Susan M; Shortreed, Susan M; Baker, Laura D; Rybarczyk, Bruce D; Keefe, Francis J; Von Korff, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In a primary care population of 367 older adults (aged ⩾60 years) with osteoarthritis (OA) pain and insomnia, we examined the relationship between short-term improvement in sleep and long-term sleep, pain, and fatigue outcomes through secondary analyses of randomized controlled trial data. Study participants, regardless of experimental treatment received, were classified either as improvers (⩾30% baseline to 2-month reduction on the Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]) or as nonimprovers. After controlling for treatment arm and potential confounders, improvers showed significant, sustained improvements across 18 months compared with nonimprovers in pain severity (PSleep Quality Index Total (Psleep quality (PSleep Scale (P=0.037, -2.44 [-4.74, -0.15]), but no improvements on the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire or the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. We conclude that short-term (2-month) improvements in sleep predicted long-term (9- and 18-month) improvements for multiple measures of sleep, chronic pain, and fatigue. These improvements were not attributable to nonspecific benefits for psychological well-being, such as reduced depression. These findings are consistent with benefits of improved sleep for chronic pain and fatigue among older persons with osteoarthritis pain and comorbid insomnia if robust improvements in sleep are achieved and sustained. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01142349. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-Monitoring vs. Implementation Intentions: a Comparison of Behaviour Change Techniques to Improve Sleep Hygiene and Sleep Outcomes in Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairs, Lucinda; Mullan, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    This study seeks to investigate and compare the efficacy of self-monitoring and implementation intentions-two post-intentional behaviour change techniques-for improving sleep hygiene behaviours and sleep outcomes in university students. Seventy-two undergraduate students completed baseline measures of four sleep hygiene behaviours (making the sleep environment restful, avoiding going to bed hungry/thirsty, avoiding stress/anxiety-provoking activities near bed time and avoiding caffeine in the evening), as well as the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and the insomnia severity index (ISI). Participants were randomly assigned to an active-control diary-keeping, self-monitoring condition or completed implementation intentions for each behaviour. Post-intervention measurement was completed 2 weeks after baseline. Repeated measures analyses of variance found significant main effects of time for improvements in making the sleep environment restful and avoiding going to bed hungry or thirsty, as well as PSQI and ISI scores. Non-significant interactions suggested no group differences on any variable, except for increasing avoidance of stress and anxiety-provoking activities before bed time, for which only implementation intentions were found to be effective. Attrition was higher amongst self-monitoring participants. Both self-monitoring and implementation intentions appear to be promising behaviour change techniques for improving sleep hygiene and sleep. Future research should examine the acceptability of the two behaviour change techniques and the relationship with differential attrition, as well as effect size variations according to behaviour and technique. Researchers should investigate potential additive or interactive effects of the techniques, as they could be utilised in a complementary manner to target different processes in effecting behaviour change.

  17. Preliminary report of improved sleep quality in patients with dry eye disease after initiation of topical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaki M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Masahiko Ayaki,1 Ikuko Toda,2 Naoko Tachi,3 Kazuno Negishi,1 Kazuo Tsubota11Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Mimamiaoyama Eye Clinic, Tokyo, 3Eye Center, Shinseikai Toyama Hospital, Imizu, JapanPurpose: Dry eye disease (DED is potentially associated with sleep and mood disorders. This study evaluated sleep quality in patients with DED using a questionnaire-based survey before and after topical eyedrop treatment. The effectiveness of sleep and ophthalmic services in assisting with sleep problems in patients with eye disease was also assessed.Methods: Seventy-one consecutive patients with DED visiting eight general eye clinics in various locations answered a questionnaire containing the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Photophobia and chronotype (morningness/­eveningness were also evaluated with two representative questions from established questionnaires (National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-25 and Morningness/Eveningness questionnaire. Follow-up evaluation was conducted by interview or mail 3–10 months after the initial evaluation. A sleep service was established in two eye clinics to identify possible ocular diseases related to sleep and mood disorders; it comprised a questionnaire, sleep diary, actigram, medical interviews, visual field testing, retinal ganglion cell layer thickness measurement, and DED examination.Results: Patients with newly diagnosed DED exhibited a greater improvement in sleep after DED treatment compared with patients with established DED. Improvement in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was significant (P<0.05 and strongly correlated with improvement in Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (P<0.05 for new patients, but not for patients with established DED. Ten eye clinic patients visited the sleep service and nine of them had DED. They were successfully treated with eyedrops and sleep services, which

  18. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia improves sleep and decreases pain in older adults with co-morbid insomnia and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Michael V; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Von Korff, Michael; Stepanski, Edward J

    2009-08-15

    Osteoarthritis pain affects more than half of all older adults, many of whom experience co-morbid sleep disturbance. Pain initiates and exacerbates sleep disturbance, whereas disturbed sleep maintains and exacerbates pain, which implies that improving the sleep of patients with osteoarthritis may also reduce their pain. We examined this possibility in a secondary analysis of a previously published randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in patients with osteoarthritis and co-morbid insomnia. Twenty-three patients (mean age 69.2 years) were randomly assigned to CBT-I and 28 patients (mean age 66.5 years) to an attention control. Neither directly addressed pain management. Twelve subjects crossed over to CBT-I after control treatment. Sleep and pain were assessed by self-report at baseline, after treatment, and (for CBT-I only) at 1-year follow-up. CBT-I subjects reported significantly improved sleep and significantly reduced pain after treatment. Control subjects reported no significant improvements. One-year follow-up found maintenance of improved sleep and reduced pain for both the CBT-I group alone and among subjects who crossed over from control to CBT-I. CBT-I but not an attention control, without directly addressing pain control, improved both immediate and long-term self-reported sleep and pain in older patients with osteoarthritis and comorbid insomnia. These results are unique in suggesting the long-term durability of CBT-I effects for co-morbid insomnia. They also indicate that improving sleep, per se, in patients with osteoarthritis may result in decreased pain. Techniques to improve sleep may be useful additions to pain management programs in osteoarthritis, and possibly other chronic pain conditions as well.

  19. Exercise improves immune function, antidepressive response, and sleep quality in patients with chronic primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Giselle Soares; Poyares, Dalva; Santana, Marcos Gonçalves; Teixeira, Alexandre Abílio de Souza; Lira, Fábio Santos; Youngstedt, Shawn D; dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of moderate aerobic exercise training on sleep, depression, cortisol, and markers of immune function in patients with chronic primary insomnia. Twenty-one sedentary participants (16 women aged 44.7 ± 9 years) with chronic primary insomnia completed a 4-month intervention of moderate aerobic exercise. Compared with baseline, polysomnographic data showed improvements following exercise training. Also observed were reductions in depression symptoms and plasma cortisol. Immunologic assays revealed a significant increase in plasma apolipoprotein A (140.9 ± 22 to 151.2 ± 22 mg/dL) and decreases in CD4 (915.6 ± 361 to 789.6 ± 310 mm(3)) and CD8 (532.4 ± 259 to 435.7 ± 204 mm(3)). Decreases in cortisol were significantly correlated with increases in total sleep time (r = -0.51) and REM sleep (r = -0.52). In summary, long-term moderate aerobic exercise training improved sleep, reduced depression and cortisol, and promoted significant changes in immunologic variables.

  20. Significant Improvement in Sleep in People with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Residential Settings by Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylkema, T.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Although about 15 to 50 percent of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) living in residential settings suffer from sleep problems, scant attention is paid to these problems. Most available studies focus on pharmaceutical solutions. In this study we focus on improving sleep in people with intellectual disabilities living in…

  1. Moderate-intensity aerobic exercise improves sleep quality in men older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shams Amir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present research was to investigate the effect of low and moderate intensity aerobic exercises on sleep quality in older adults. The statistical sample included 45 volunteer elderly men with age range of 60-70 years old that divided randomly in two experimental groups (aerobic exercise with low and moderate intensity and one control group. The maximum heart rate (MaxHR of subjects was obtained by subtracting one's age from 220. Furthermore, based on aerobic exercise type (40-50% MaxHR for low intensity group and 60-70% MaxHR for moderate intensity group the target MaxHR was calculated for each subject. The exercise protocol consisted of 8 weeks aerobic exercises (2 sessions in per-week based on Rockport one-mile walking/running test and the control group continued their daily activities. All subjects in per-test and post-test stages were completed the Petersburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Results in post-test stage showed that there were significant differences between control and experimental groups in sleep quality and its components (P<0.05. Also, the Tukey Post Hoc showed that the moderate intensity group scores in sleep quality and its components were better than other groups (P<0.05. Finally, the low intensity group scores were better than control group (P<0.05. Generally, the present research showed that the aerobic exercises with moderate intensity have a positive and significant effect on sleep quality and its components. Thus, based on these findings, the moderate intensity aerobic exercises as a useful and medical method for improve the sleep quality among community older adults was recommended.

  2. Diverting the Pathway to Substance Misuse by Improving Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    improvement on several of the outcome measures. They have indicated interest in recommending the program to fellow veterans. We are intensifying ...session, the interventionist will review specified screening tools and provisionally determine intervention targets (using the Intervention Forms

  3. Repeated Melatonin Supplementation Improves Sleep in Hypertensive Patients Treated with Beta-Blockers: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Frank A.J.L.; Morris, Christopher J.; Garcia, Joanna I.; Smales, Carolina; Kelly, Erin E.; Marks, Jenny; Malhotra, Atul; Shea, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: In the United States alone, approximately 22 million people take beta-blockers chronically. These medications suppress endogenous nighttime melatonin secretion, which may explain a reported side effect of insomnia. Therefore, we tested whether nightly melatonin supplementation improves sleep in hypertensive patients treated with beta-blockers. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group design. Setting: Clinical and Translational Research Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston. Patients: Sixteen hypertensive patients (age 45-64 yr; 9 women) treated with the beta-blockers atenolol or metoprolol. Interventions: Two 4-day in-laboratory admissions including polysomnographically recorded sleep. After the baseline assessment during the first admission, patients were randomized to 2.5 mg melatonin or placebo (nightly for 3 weeks), after which sleep was assessed again during the second 4-day admission. Baseline-adjusted values are reported. One patient was removed from analysis because of an unstable dose of prescription medication. Measurements and Results: In comparison with placebo, 3 weeks of melatonin supplementation significantly increased total sleep time (+36 min; P = 0.046), increased sleep efficiency (+7.6%; P = 0.046), and decreased sleep onset latency to Stage 2 (-14 min; P = 0.001) as assessed by polysomnography. Compared with placebo, melatonin significantly increased Stage 2 sleep (+41 min; P = 0.037) but did not significantly change the durations of other sleep stages. The sleep onset latency remained significantly shortened on the night after discontinuation of melatonin administration (-25 min; P = 0.001), suggesting a carryover effect. Conclusion: n hypertensive patients treated with beta-blockers, 3 weeks of nightly melatonin supplementation significantly improved sleep quality, without apparent tolerance and without rebound sleep disturbance during withdrawal of melatonin supplementation (in fact, a

  4. Prefronto-Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Improves Sleep Quality in Euthymic Bipolar Patients: A Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo Minichino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sleep problems are common in bipolar disorder (BD and may persist during the euthymic phase of the disease. The aim of the study was to improve sleep quality of euthymic BD patients through the administration of prefronto-cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. Methods. 25 euthymic outpatients with a diagnosis of BD Type I or II have been enrolled in the study. tDCS montage was as follows: cathode on the right cerebellar cortex and anode over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC; the intensity of stimulation was set at 2 mA and delivered for 20 min/die for 3 consecutive weeks. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI was used to assess sleep quality at baseline and after the tDCS treatment. Results. PSQI total score and all PSQI subdomains, with the exception of “sleep medication,” significantly improved after treatment. Discussion. This is the first study where a positive effect of tDCS on the quality of sleep in euthymic BD patients has been reported. As both prefrontal cortex and cerebellum may play a role in regulating sleep processes, concomitant cathodal (inhibitory stimulation of cerebellum and anodal (excitatory stimulation of DLPFC may have the potential to modulate prefrontal-thalamic-cerebellar circuits leading to improvements of sleep quality.

  5. Consistently High Sports/Exercise Activity Is Associated with Better Sleep Quality, Continuity and Depth in Midlife Women: The SWAN Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Christopher E.; Irish, Leah A.; Krafty, Robert T.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Kravitz, Howard M.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Dugan, Sheila A.; Hall, Martica H.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine relationships between different physical activity (PA) domains and sleep, and the influence of consistent PA on sleep, in midlife women. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Community-based. Participants: 339 women in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study (52.1 ± 2.1 y). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Sleep was examined using questionnaires, diaries and in-home polysomnography (PSG). PA was assessed in three domains (Active Living, Household/Caregiving, Sports/Exercise) using the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey (KPAS) up to 4 times over 6 years preceding the sleep assessments. The association between recent PA and sleep was evaluated using KPAS scores immediately preceding the sleep assessments. The association between the historical PA pattern and sleep was examined by categorizing PA in each KPAS domain according to its pattern over the 6 years preceding sleep assessments (consistently low, inconsistent/consistently moderate, or consistently high). Greater recent Sports/Exercise activity was associated with better sleep quality (diary “restedness” [P sleep continuity (diary sleep efficiency [SE; P = 0.02]) and depth (higher NREM delta electroencephalographic [EEG] power [P = 0.04], lower NREM beta EEG power [P activity was also associated with better Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores (P = 0.02) and higher PSG-assessed SE (P sleep and Active Living or Household/Caregiving activity (either recent or historical pattern) were noted. Conclusion: Consistently high levels of recreational physical activity, but not lifestyle- or household-related activity, are associated with better sleep in midlife women. Increasing recreational physical activity early in midlife may protect against sleep disturbance in this population. Citation: Kline CE; Irish LA; Krafty RT; Sternfeld B; Kravitz HM; Buysse DJ; Bromberger JT; Dugan SA; Hall MH. Consistently high sports/exercise activity is associated with better

  6. In a randomized case-control trial with 10-years olds suffering from attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) sleep and psychological functioning improved during a 12-week sleep-training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, Zahra; Bajoghli, Hafez; Mohamadi, Mohammad Reza; Salmanian, Maryam; Kirov, Roumen; Gerber, Markus; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2014-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that sleep training would improve emotional, social and behavioural functioning in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) compared to children with ADHD without such intervention and to healthy controls. Forty children with ADHD were randomly assigned to intervention and control conditions. Parents of 20 children with ADHD were instructed and thoroughly supervised in improving their children's sleep schedules and sleep behaviour. Parents of the other 20 children with ADHD and parents of 20 healthy children received general information about sleep hygiene. At baseline and 12 weeks later, parents and children completed questionnaires related to children's sleep and psychological functioning. Relative to the control groups, children in the intervention group improved sleep quantitatively and qualitatively (F values intervention group children reported improvements in mood, emotions, and relationships (F values ADHD in regulating and supervising children's sleep schedules leads to positive changes in the emotions, behaviour and social lives of these children.

  7. Sleep-related offline improvements in gross motor task performance occur under free recall requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eMalangre

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal sleep effects on memory consolidation following gross motor sequence learning were examined using a complex arm movement task. This task required participants to produce non-regular spatial patterns in the horizontal plane by successively fitting a small peg into different target-holes on an electronic pegboard. The respective reaching movements typically differed in amplitude and direction. Targets were visualized prior to each transport movement on a computer screen. With this task we tested 18 subjects (22.6 +/- 1.9 years; 8 female using a between-subjects design. Participants initially learned a 10-element arm movement sequence either in the morning or in the evening. Performance was retested under free recall requirements 15 minutes post training, as well as 12 hrs and 24 hrs later. Thus each group was provided with one sleep-filled and one wake retention interval. Dependent variables were error rate (number of erroneous sequences and average sequence execution time (correct sequences only. Performance improved during acquisition. Error rate remained stable across retention. Sequence execution time (inverse to execution speed significantly decreased again during the sleep-filled retention intervals, but remained stable during the respective wake intervals. These results corroborate recent findings on sleep-related enhancement consolidation in ecological valid, complex gross motor tasks. At the same time they suggest this effect to be truly memory-based and independent from repeated access to extrinsic sequence information during retests.

  8. USING FEEDBACK FROM NATURALISTIC DRIVING TO IMPROVE TREATMENT ADHERENCE IN DRIVERS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krone, J Tucker; Dawson, Jeffrey D; Anderson, Steven W; Aksan, Nazan S; Tippin, Jon; Rizzo, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    We are studying the effects of individualized feedback upon adherence with therapy (CPAP) in ongoing research aimed at improving driving safety in at-risk individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The feedback includes specific samples of the individual's own naturalistic driving record, both alert and drowsy, and record of CPAP adherence. We report on this methodology, provide data examples of CPAP usage, and show preliminary data on the results in the first eleven drivers who received this intervention.

  9. Valve repair improves central sleep apnea in heart failure patients with valvular heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hidetoshi; Takahashi, Masafumi; Yaegashi, Hironobu; Eda, Seiichiro; Kitahara, Hiroto; Tsunemoto, Hideo; Kamikozawa, Mamoru; Koyama, Jun; Yamazaki, Kyohei; Ikeda, Uichi

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that treatment of heart failure (HF) could improve cardiac function and sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), but it is unknown how cardiac surgery may affect SAS in HF patients. Relationships between HF with valvular heart diseases and 2 types of SAS (obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central sleep apnea (CSA)) were examined. The effects of valve repair surgery on OSA and CSA was also investigated. Polysomnography, echocardiography and right cardiac catheterization were used to study 150 severe HF patients with mitral valvular and/or aortic valvular diseases. Significant associations between SAS and age, gender, body mass index, or hypertension were observed. The value of the CSA-apnea index (AI) was significantly correlated with pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) and mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). These associations were not identified for OSA-AI. Valve repair surgery was used to treat 74 patients with severe SAS. The treatment led to a significant improvement in PCWP and mean PAP, and CSA-AI, but not in OSA-AI. These findings suggest close associations between CSA and cardiac function in HF patients with valvular heart diseases. Furthermore, improvement of cardiac function with valvular surgery reduces the severity of CSA in HF patients with valvular heart diseases.

  10. Randomized, controlled trial of a nonpharmacological intervention to improve abnormal sleep/wake patterns in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Cathy A; Martin, Jennifer L; Webber, Adam P; Cynthia Kim, E; Harker, Judith O; Josephson, Karen R

    2005-05-01

    Abnormal sleep/wake patterns are common in nursing home residents. Lifestyle and environmental factors likely contribute to these poor sleep patterns. The objective of this study was to test a multidimensional, nonpharmacological intervention to improve abnormal sleep/wake patterns in nursing home residents. Randomized, controlled trial. Four nursing homes in the Los Angeles area. Residents were screened for excessive daytime sleeping (asleep > or = 15% of daytime observations) and nighttime sleep disruption (asleep sleeping. Of these, 133 had nighttime sleep disruption and consented to participate; 120 completed baseline assessments, and 118 (77% female, mean age 86.9, 90% non-Hispanic white) were randomized to intervention versus usual care. Five consecutive days and nights of efforts to decrease daytime in-bed time, 30 minutes or more of daily sunlight exposure, increased physical activity, structured bedtime routine, and efforts to decrease nighttime noise and light. Seventy-two consecutive hours of wrist actigraphy (nighttime sleep) and structured behavioral observations (daytime sleep and participation in social and physical activities and social conversation) at baseline and repeated at follow-up while the intervention or usual care condition was in place. The only effect on nighttime sleep was a modest decrease in mean duration of nighttime awakenings in intervention participants (10.6 minutes at baseline, 9.8 minutes at follow-up) versus an increase in controls (9.8 minutes at baseline, 13.8 minutes at follow-up) (F=4.27, P=.04). There were no significant effects on percentage of nighttime sleep or number of nighttime awakenings. There was a significant decrease in daytime sleeping in intervention participants (32% of daytime observations asleep at baseline, 21% at follow-up), with no change in controls (32% at baseline, 30% at follow-up; F=20.68, Psleep/wake patterns in nursing home residents resulted in decreased daytime sleeping and increased

  11. Recovery from Unrecognized Sleep Loss Accumulated in Daily Life Improved Mood Regulation via Prefrontal Suppression of Amygdala Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Motomura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many modern people suffer from sleep debt that has accumulated in everyday life but is not subjectively noticed [potential sleep debt (PSD]. Our hypothesis for this study was that resolution of PSD through sleep extension optimizes mood regulation by altering the functional connectivity between the amygdala and prefrontal cortex. Fifteen healthy male participants underwent an experiment consisting of a baseline (BL evaluation followed by two successive interventions, namely, a 9-day sleep extension followed by one night of total sleep deprivation (TSD. Tests performed before and after the interventions included a questionnaire on negative mood and neuroimaging with arterial spin labeling MRI for evaluating regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF and functional connectivity. Negative mood and amygdala rCBF were significantly reduced after sleep extension compared with BL. The amygdala had a significant negative functional connectivity with the medial prefrontal cortex (FCamg–MPFC, and this negative connectivity was greater after sleep extension than at BL. After TSD, these indices reverted to the same level as at BL. An additional path analysis with structural equation modeling showed that the FCamg–MPFC significantly explained the amygdala rCBF and that the amygdala rCBF significantly explained the negative mood. These findings suggest that the use of our sleep extension protocol normalized amygdala activity via negative amygdala–MPFC functional connectivity. The resolution of unnoticed PSD may improve mood by enhancing frontal suppression of hyperactivity in the amygdala caused by PSD accumulating in everyday life.

  12. Evaluation of novel school-based interventions for adolescent sleep problems: does parental involvement and bright light improve outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnar, Daniel; Gradisar, Michael; Moseley, Lynette; Coughlin, Anne-Marie; Cain, Neralie; Short, Michelle A

    2015-03-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate school-based motivational sleep education programs (SEPs) with adjunct bright light therapy (BLT) and/or parental involvement (PI). Randomized controlled trial. Six high schools, matched on socio-economic status (SES). A total of 193 adolescents (mean age, 16.3 ± 0.4 years, 79%f). Classes were randomly assigned to (i) SEP + BLT, (ii) SEP + PI, (iii) SEP + BLT + PI, or (iv) classes-as-usual (CAU). Sleep education programs involved 4×50 minute classes (over 4 weeks) based on a Motivational Interviewing framework (Sleep Med 2011;12:246-251). Students in BLT groups attempted a weekend phase advance using portable green light LED glasses (500 nm; 506 lux). Parents of PI groups watched a series of 4 YouTube clips (2-3 minutes in length) outlining their adolescent's learning in class and how they could assist. Students in the CAU groups continued their regular classes. Online questionnaires measuring sleep knowledge, sleep patterns (bedtime, sleep latency, total sleep time [TST], etc) and mood at preintervention and postintervention and 6-week follow-up. Intervention groups also completed a motivation-to-change questionnaire and provided qualitative feedback. Improvements in sleep knowledge (d = 0.59-0.88), sleep onset latency (d = 0.45-0.50), TST (d = 0.32-0.57), and mood (d = 0.24-0.46) were observed in all intervention groups relative to the CAU group. Similar improvements were observed in a subgroup of students identified as having delayed sleep timing (ie, sleep knowledge: d = 0.45-0.92; sleep onset latency: d = 0.59-0.82; TST: d = 0.82-1.18). Increases in motivation to regularize out of bedtimes, obtain morning bright light (BLT groups), and avoid sleeping-in on weekends occurred (all P < .005). This motivational SEP produced meaningful and similar benefits for adolescents in all intervention groups. Longer BLT (ie, over school holidays) and more intensive parental inclusion should be investigated in future studies. Copyright

  13. Shifts Toward Morningness During Behavioral Sleep Interventions Are Associated With Improvements in Depression, Positive Affect, and Sleep Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Brant P; Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Morningness-eveningness (M-E) is typically considered to be a trait-like construct. However, M-E could plausibly shift in concert with changes in circadian or homeostatic processes. We examined M-E changes across three studies employing behavioral or pharmacological sleep treatments. Baseline and posttreatment M-E scores were strongly correlated across all three samples. M-E showed small but systematic changes toward morningness in sleep-disturbed military veterans receiving behavioral interventions. No systematic M-E changes were observed in the two pharmacological studies (sleep-disturbed military veterans and adults with primary insomnia, respectively). In the behavioral study, M-E changes correlated with changes in depression, positive affect, and sleep quality. M-E changes also correlated with changes in positive affect in the adult insomnia group. M-E appears to exhibit state-like aspects in addition to trait-like aspects.

  14. Adherence to positive airway pressure therapy in U.S. military personnel with sleep apnea improves sleepiness, sleep quality, and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysliwiec, Vincent; Capaldi, Vincent F; Gill, Jessica; Baxter, Tristin; O'Reilly, Brian M; Matsangas, Panagiotis; Roth, Bernard J

    2015-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is frequently diagnosed in U.S. military personnel. OSA is associated with sleepiness, poor sleep quality, and service-related illnesses of insomnia, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and traumatic brain injury. Observational study of active duty military personnel with OSA and adherence to positive airway pressure (PAP) assessed with smart chip technology. 58 men with mean age 36.2 ± 7.7 years, mean body mass index 31.4 ± 3.7 with mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 19.1 ± 19.0 are reported. 23 (39.7%) participants were adherent to PAP, and 35 (60.3%) were nonadherent. No significant differences in baseline demographics, apnea-hypopnea index, service-related illnesses, or clinical instrument scores. Military personnel adherent to PAP had significantly improved sleepiness (p = 0.007), sleep quality (p = 0.013), depressive symptoms (p = 0.01), energy/fatigue (p = 0.027), and emotional well-being (p = 0.024). Participants with moderate-severe OSA were more likely to be in the adherent group when compared with participants diagnosed with mild OSA. Military personnel with OSA have low adherence to PAP. Adherence is associated with improved depressive symptoms, sleepiness, sleep quality, energy/fatigue, emotional well-being, and social functioning. Future research should focus on interventions to improve the management of OSA in military personnel. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. Treatment of PTSD by eye movement desensitization reprocessing (EMDR) improves sleep quality, quality of life, and perception of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboni, Mara Regina; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2006-07-01

    The impact of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on the sleep of patients is widely reported. However, the parameters that can be altered are not the same for all patients. Some studies report an impairment of sleep maintenance and recurrent nightmares, while others failed to find such alterations. Among the many treatments, the eye movement desensitization reprocessing (EMDR) is a therapy used specifically to treat PTSD and general trauma. The purpose of this study was to examine whether EMDR treatment can improve PTSD symptoms, such as sleep, depression, anxiety, and poor quality of life.

  16. Improving the quality of sleep with an optimal pillow: a randomized, comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol; Lee, SeungWon; Choi, Wonjae; Park, Jun Hyuck; Tak, Sa Jin; Choi, Dae Ho; Yim, Jongeun

    2014-07-01

    Because sleep comprises one-third of a person's life, using an optimal pillow for appropriate neck support to maintain cervical curve may contribute to improve quality of sleep. Design of orthopedic pillow conforms to orthopedic guidelines to ensure the right support of the cervical curve. The aim of this study was to investigate effect of different pillow shape and content on cervical curve, pillow temperature, and pillow comfort. A feather pillow is regarded as a standard pillow, and a memory foam pillow is one of the most popular pillows among pillow users. We, therefore, compared these two pillows with an orthopedic pillow. Twenty healthy subjects (10 men and 10 women; age range, 21-30 years) participated in the study. Each subject was asked to assume the supine position with 3 different pillows for 30 minute in each trial and then cervical curve, pillow temperature, and pillow comfort were measured. When comparing the cervical curve of the 3 different pillows, that of the orthopedic pillow was significantly higher than that of the other 2 pillows (p pillow than for the memory foam and feather pillows (p pillow comfort was significantly higher in orthopedic pillow than the other 2 pillows. This study shows that pillow shape and content plays a crucial role in cervical curve, pillow temperature, and pillow comfort and orthopedic pillow may be an optimal pillow for sleep quality.

  17. Low-dose paroxetine (7.5 mg) improves sleep in women with vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Joffe, Hadine; Kazempour, Kazem; Mekonnen, Hana; Bhaskar, Sailaja; Lippman, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common among women in midlife; prevalence increases among perimenopausal/postmenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms. Paroxetine 7.5 mg is the only nonhormonal treatment that has been approved in the United States for moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause. In two pivotal phase 3 studies evaluating its efficacy and safety, improvements in sleep disturbances were also prospectively evaluated. Postmenopausal women with moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms were randomly assigned to paroxetine 7.5 mg (n = 591) or placebo (n = 593) once daily for 12 weeks (both studies) or 24 weeks (24-wk study). Predefined assessments on weeks 4, 12, and 24 included number of nighttime awakenings attributed to vasomotor symptoms, sleep-onset latency, sleep duration, and sleep-related adverse events. The two studies' data for weeks 1 to 12 were pooled. At baseline, participants reported a mean of 3.6 awakenings/night attributed to vasomotor symptoms. Nighttime awakenings attributed to vasomotor symptoms were significantly reduced within 4 weeks of initiating paroxetine 7.5 mg treatment (39% reduction vs 28% for placebo; P = 0.0049), and reductions were sustained through 12 or 24 weeks of treatment. Paroxetine 7.5 mg treatment also significantly increased nighttime sleep duration (week 4, +31 vs +16 min for placebo; P = 0.0075), but no significant between-group differences in sleep-onset latency or sleep-related adverse events such as sedation were observed. In postmenopausal women treated for menopausal vasomotor symptoms, paroxetine 7.5 mg significantly reduces the number of nighttime awakenings attributed to vasomotor symptoms and increases sleep duration without differentially affecting sleep-onset latency or sedation.

  18. Consistently high sports/exercise activity is associated with better sleep quality, continuity and depth in midlife women: the SWAN sleep study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Christopher E; Irish, Leah A; Krafty, Robert T; Sternfeld, Barbara; Kravitz, Howard M; Buysse, Daniel J; Bromberger, Joyce T; Dugan, Sheila A; Hall, Martica H

    2013-09-01

    To examine relationships between different physical activity (PA) domains and sleep, and the influence of consistent PA on sleep, in midlife women. Cross-sectional. Community-based. 339 women in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study (52.1 ± 2.1 y). None. Sleep was examined using questionnaires, diaries and in-home polysomnography (PSG). PA was assessed in three domains (Active Living, Household/Caregiving, Sports/Exercise) using the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey (KPAS) up to 4 times over 6 years preceding the sleep assessments. The association between recent PA and sleep was evaluated using KPAS scores immediately preceding the sleep assessments. The association between the historical PA pattern and sleep was examined by categorizing PA in each KPAS domain according to its pattern over the 6 years preceding sleep assessments (consistently low, inconsistent/consistently moderate, or consistently high). Greater recent Sports/Exercise activity was associated with better sleep quality (diary "restedness" [P sleep continuity (diary sleep efficiency [SE; P = 0.02]) and depth (higher NREM delta electroencephalographic [EEG] power [P = 0.04], lower NREM beta EEG power [P Exercise activity was also associated with better Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores (P = 0.02) and higher PSG-assessed SE (P sleep and Active Living or Household/Caregiving activity (either recent or historical pattern) were noted. Consistently high levels of recreational physical activity, but not lifestyle- or household-related activity, are associated with better sleep in midlife women. Increasing recreational physical activity early in midlife may protect against sleep disturbance in this population.

  19. Relationships between Menopausal and Mood Symptoms and EEG Sleep Measures in a Multi-ethnic Sample of Middle-Aged Women: The SWAN Sleep Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Howard M.; Avery, Elizabeth; Sowers, MaryFran; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Owens, Jane F.; Matthews, Karen A.; Hall, Martica; Zheng, Huiyong; Gold, Ellen B.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Examine associations of vasomotor and mood symptoms with visually scored and computer-generated measures of EEG sleep. Design: Cross-sectional analysis. Setting: Community-based in-home polysomnography (PSG). Participants: 343 African American, Caucasian, and Chinese women; ages 48–58 years; pre-, peri- or post-menopausal; participating in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Sleep Study (SWAN Sleep Study). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Measures included PSG-assessed sleep duration, continuity, and architecture, delta sleep ratio (DSR) computed from automated counts of delta wave activity, daily diary-assessed vasomotor symptoms (VMS), questionnaires to collect mood (depression, anxiety) symptoms, medication, and lifestyle information, and menopausal status using bleeding criteria. Sleep outcomes were modeled using linear regression. Nocturnal VMS were associated with longer sleep time. Higher anxiety symptom scores were associated with longer sleep latency and lower sleep efficiency, but only in women reporting nocturnal VMS. Contrary to expectations, VMS and mood symptoms were unrelated to either DSR or REM latency. Conclusions: Vasomotor symptoms moderated associations of anxiety with EEG sleep measures of sleep latency and sleep efficiency and was associated with longer sleep duration in this multi-ethnic sample of midlife women. Citation: Kravitz HM; Avery E; Sowers MF; Bromberger JT; Owens JF; Matthews KA; Hall M; Zheng H; Gold EB; Buysse DJ. Relationships between menopausal and mood symptoms and Eeg sleep measures in a multi-ethnic sample of middle-aged women: the SWAN Sleep Study. SLEEP 2011;34(9):1221-1232. PMID:21886360

  20. The effects of improving sleep on mental health (OASIS): a randomised controlled trial with mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Sheaves, Bryony; Goodwin, Guy M; Yu, Ly-Mee; Nickless, Alecia; Harrison, Paul J; Emsley, Richard; Luik, Annemarie I; Foster, Russell G; Wadekar, Vanashree; Hinds, Christopher; Gumley, Andrew; Jones, Ray; Lightman, Stafford; Jones, Steve; Bentall, Richard; Kinderman, Peter; Rowse, Georgina; Brugha, Traolach; Blagrove, Mark; Gregory, Alice M; Fleming, Leanne; Walklet, Elaine; Glazebrook, Cris; Davies, E Bethan; Hollis, Chris; Haddock, Gillian; John, Bev; Coulson, Mark; Fowler, David; Pugh, Katherine; Cape, John; Moseley, Peter; Brown, Gary; Hughes, Claire; Obonsawin, Marc; Coker, Sian; Watkins, Edward; Schwannauer, Matthias; MacMahon, Kenneth; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Espie, Colin A

    2017-10-01

    Sleep difficulties might be a contributory causal factor in the occurrence of mental health problems. If this is true, improving sleep should benefit psychological health. We aimed to determine whether treating insomnia leads to a reduction in paranoia and hallucinations. We did this single-blind, randomised controlled trial (OASIS) at 26 UK universities. University students with insomnia were randomly assigned (1:1) with simple randomisation to receive digital cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia or usual care, and the research team were masked to the treatment. Online assessments took place at weeks 0, 3, 10 (end of therapy), and 22. The primary outcome measures were for insomnia, paranoia, and hallucinatory experiences. We did intention-to-treat analyses. The trial is registered with the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN61272251. Between March 5, 2015, and Feb 17, 2016, we randomly assigned 3755 participants to receive digital CBT for insomnia (n=1891) or usual practice (n=1864). Compared with usual practice, the sleep intervention at 10 weeks reduced insomnia (adjusted difference 4·78, 95% CI 4·29 to 5·26, Cohen's d=1·11; pmental health problem. It provides strong evidence that insomnia is a causal factor in the occurrence of psychotic experiences and other mental health problems. Whether the results generalise beyond a student population requires testing. The treatment of disrupted sleep might require a higher priority in mental health provision. Wellcome Trust. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an Open Access article under the CC BY 4.0 license. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. The improvement of movement and speech during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, Valérie Cochen; Debs, Rachel; Oudiette, Delphine; Leu, Smaranda; Radji, Fatai; Tiberge, Michel; Yu, Huan; Bayard, Sophie; Roze, Emmanuel; Vidailhet, Marie; Dauvilliers, Yves; Rascol, Olivier; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2011-03-01

    Multiple system atrophy is an atypical parkinsonism characterized by severe motor disabilities that are poorly levodopa responsive. Most patients develop rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. Because parkinsonism is absent during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease, we studied the movements of patients with multiple system atrophy during rapid eye movement sleep. Forty-nine non-demented patients with multiple system atrophy and 49 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were interviewed along with their 98 bed partners using a structured questionnaire. They rated the quality of movements, vocal and facial expressions during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder as better than, equal to or worse than the same activities in an awake state. Sleep and movements were monitored using video-polysomnography in 22/49 patients with multiple system atrophy and in 19/49 patients with Parkinson's disease. These recordings were analysed for the presence of parkinsonism and cerebellar syndrome during rapid eye movement sleep movements. Clinical rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder was observed in 43/49 (88%) patients with multiple system atrophy. Reports from the 31/43 bed partners who were able to evaluate movements during sleep indicate that 81% of the patients showed some form of improvement during rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. These included improved movement (73% of patients: faster, 67%; stronger, 52%; and smoother, 26%), improved speech (59% of patients: louder, 55%; more intelligible, 17%; and better articulated, 36%) and normalized facial expression (50% of patients). The rate of improvement was higher in Parkinson's disease than in multiple system atrophy, but no further difference was observed between the two forms of multiple system atrophy (predominant parkinsonism versus cerebellar syndrome). Video-monitored movements during rapid eye movement sleep in patients with multiple system

  2. Chronotype and Improved Sleep Efficiency Independently Predict Depressive Symptom Reduction after Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Ong, Jason C; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Manber, Rachel

    2015-09-15

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to improve both sleep and depressive symptoms, but predictors of depression outcome following CBT-I have not been well examined. This study investigated how chronotype (i.e., morningness-eveningness trait) and changes in sleep efficiency (SE) were related to changes in depressive symptoms among recipients of CBT-I. Included were 419 adult insomnia outpatients from a sleep disorders clinic (43.20% males, age mean ± standard deviation = 48.14 ± 14.02). All participants completed the Composite Scale of Morningness and attended at least 4 sessions of a 6-session group CBT-I. SE was extracted from sleep diary; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) prior to (Baseline), and at the end (End) of intervention. Multilevel structural equation modeling revealed that from Baseline to End, SE increased and BDI decreased significantly. Controlling for age, sex, BDI, and SE at Baseline, stronger evening chronotype and less improvement in SE significantly and uniquely predicted less reduction in BDI from Baseline to End. Chronotype did not predict improvement in SE. In an insomnia outpatient sample, SE and depressive symptoms improved significantly after a CBT-I group intervention. All chronotypes benefited from sleep improvement, but those with greater eveningness and/or less sleep improvement experienced less reduction in depressive symptom severity. This suggests that evening preference and insomnia symptoms may have distinct relationships with mood, raising the possibility that the effect of CBT-I on depressive symptoms could be enhanced by assessing and addressing circadian factors. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  3. Improved Sleep Quality is Associated with Reductions in Depression and PTSD Arousal Symptoms and Increases in IGF-1 Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Heather L; Guardado, Pedro; Baxter, Tristin; Mysliwiec, Vincent; Gill, Jessica M

    2015-06-15

    One-third of deployed military personnel will be diagnosed with insomnia, placing them at high risk for comorbid depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and medical conditions. The disruption of trophic factors has been implicated in these comorbid conditions, which can impede postdeployment recovery. This study determined if improved sleep quality is associated with (1) reductions in depression and posttraumatic symptoms, as well as enrichments in health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and (2) changes in plasma concentrations of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Forty-four military personnel diagnosed with insomnia underwent clinical evaluations and blood draws at pretreatment and at posttreatment following cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia and automatic positive airway pressure treatment. Participants were classified as sleep improved (n = 28) or sleep declined (n = 16) based on their change in pretreatment to posttreatment Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score. Both groups were compared on outcomes of depression, PTSD, HRQOL, BDNF, and IGF-1. Paired t-tests of the sleep improved group revealed significant declines in depression (p = 0.005) and posttraumatic arousal (p = 0.006) symptoms, and a significant increase in concentrations of IGF-1 (p = 0.009). The sleep declined group had no relevant change in psychiatric symptoms or trophic factors, and had further declines on five of eight dimensions of HRQOL. Between-group change score differences were significant at p sleep quality, are an effective means to reduce the depression and posttraumatic arousal symptoms common to military personnel, as well as increase protective trophic factors implicated in these conditions. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  4. Acupuncture improves sleep in postmenopause in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachul, H; Garcia, T K P; Maciel, A L; Yagihara, F; Tufik, S; Bittencourt, L

    2013-02-01

    Insomnia increases in frequency as women approach and pass through menopause. Studies have not shown acupuncture efficacy for insomnia in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy on sleep parameters, depression symptoms and quality of life in postmenopausal women with insomnia. This study included 18 postmenopausal women aged 50-67 years old. Participants had a body mass index ≤ 30 kg/m(2), presented a diagnosis of insomnia according to the DSM-IV criteria, had experienced at least 1 year of amenorrhea and had a follicle stimulating hormone level ≥ 30 mIU/ml. Participants were not using antidepressants, hypnotics or hormonal therapy. This study was randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled. The sample was divided into two groups: acupuncture and 'sham' acupuncture. We performed ten sessions of acupuncture and 'sham' acupuncture during a period of 5 weeks. A polysomnography exam (PSG) and questionnaires (WHOQOL-BREF, Beck Depression Inventory and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were completed by all patients before and after the treatment period. Anthropometric, polysomnographic, and questionnaire data were similar among the groups at baseline. Comparison of baseline and post-treatment data of the acupuncture group showed that treatment resulted in significantly lower scores on the Pittsburgh Questionnaire and an improvement in psychological WHOQOL. The acupuncture group had a higher percentage of the N3 + 4 stage than the sham group in PSG findings. Acupuncture was effective in improving reported sleep quality and quality of life in postmenopausal women with insomnia.

  5. Tryptophan-enriched cereal intake improves nocturnal sleep, melatonin, serotonin, and total antioxidant capacity levels and mood in elderly humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, R; Matito, S; Cubero, J; Paredes, S D; Franco, L; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, A B; Barriga, C

    2013-08-01

    Melatonin and serotonin rhythms, which exhibit a close association with the endogenous circadian component of sleep, are attenuated with increasing age. This decrease seems to be linked to sleep alterations in the elderly. Chrononutrition is a field of chronobiology that establishes the principle of consuming foodstuffs at times of the day when they are more useful for health, improving, therefore, biorhythms and physical performance. Our aim was to analyze whether the consumption of cereals enriched with tryptophan, the precursor of both serotonin and melatonin, may help in the reconsolidation of the sleep/wake cycle and counteract depression and anxiety in 35 middle-aged/elderly (aged 55-75 year) volunteers in a simple blind assay. Data were collected for 3 weeks according to the following schedule: The control week participants consumed standard cereals (22.5 mg tryptophan in 30 g cereals per dose) at breakfast and dinner; for the treatment week, cereals enriched with a higher dose of tryptophan (60 mg tryptophan in 30 g cereals per dose) were eaten at both breakfast and dinner; the posttreatment week volunteers consumed their usual diet. Each participant wore a wrist actimeter that logged activity during the whole experiment. Urine was collected to analyze melatonin and serotonin urinary metabolites and to measure total antioxidant capacity. The consumption of cereals containing the higher dose in tryptophan increased sleep efficiency, actual sleep time, immobile time, and decreased total nocturnal activity, sleep fragmentation index, and sleep latency. Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels, and urinary total antioxidant capacity also increased respectively after tryptophan-enriched cereal ingestion as well as improving anxiety and depression symptoms. Cereals enriched with tryptophan may be useful as a chrononutrition tool for alterations in the sleep/wake cycle due to age.

  6. A pilot evaluation of an online cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia disorder – targeted screening and interactive Web design lead to improved sleep in a community population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirstie N; Goldsmith, Paul; Gardiner, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Computerized or online cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs) are increasingly being developed to deliver insomnia therapy (CBT-i). They seek to address the difficulty of delivering an evidence-based technology to a large number of patients at low cost. Previous online applications have shown significant but variable improvements in sleep efficiency and a decrease in insomnia severity when compared with control groups. The best online methodology remains debated, and there are no such applications currently available within the UK National Health Service. Method Evaluation of treatment outcomes in 75 participants with insomnia disorder using an open-access, novel, interactive online therapy. Rigorous screening was first undertaken to exclude those with probable sleep apnea, restless legs, circadian rhythm disorder, or significant anxiety or depression prior to commencing therapy. A modern interactive video-based website was used to encourage compliance by personalizing therapy based on response. Sleep efficiency, sleep latency, total sleep time, and sleep quality were all assessed prior to and after intervention. Results Of those who accessed therapy, 62% were excluded based on a likely diagnosis of another sleep disorder (788/1281). Participants who completed therapy all had severe insomnia disorder, with a group mean sleep efficiency of 55%. After intervention there was a significant increase in sleep efficiency and sleep latency, with modest nonsignificant improvements in total sleep time. The majority of users reported improved sleep quality, and compliance with therapy was very good, with over 64/75 completing >90% of sleep diary entries. Conclusion Online CBT-i can be designed to deliver personalized therapy with good reported outcomes and high compliance rates in those who start therapy. This initial evaluation also suggests that screening for other sleep disorders and mental health problems is necessary as many other sleep disorders are detected

  7. Improved sleep after Qigong exercise in breast cancer survivors: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sleep disorder and fatigue are among a few major concerns of breast cancer survivors across the survivorship trajectory. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine feasibility and trends in multiple outcomes after a 6-week Qigong exercise program in breast cancer survivors. Methods: Eight female adults (mean age 55.4 ± 9.4 years, mean time after the completion of cancer treatment 3.9 ± 5.7 years who had a diagnosis of breast cancer and were at least 3 months postcompletion of primary cancer treatment prior to participation in this study. Baseline evaluation was administered using subjective questionnaires on sleep quality, insomnia, fatigue, and quality of life. All subjects participated in two training sessions to learn the "Six Healing Sound" Qigong exercise and attended group Qigong sessions once per week in the following 6 weeks. In addition to the group sessions, subjects were asked to perform the Qigong exercises twice at home right before going to bed in the evening and immediately after getting up in the morning. Following the 6-week intervention, subjects were re-assessed using the same questionnaires. Pre- and post-intervention scores were analyzed for statistical significance. Results: Compliance rate was 89.6% for group sessions and 78.5% (ranging from 65.6% to 90.7% for daily home Qigong exercises. No participant reported any adverse event or side effect during the study. All participants indicated in the end-intervention questionnaire that they would highly recommend the intervention to others. Significant improvements were observed in sleeping quality score (from 10.3 ± 3.6 to 5.4 ± 2.3, P < 0.01, insomnia index score (from 16.2 ± 3.2 to 6.8 ± 4.8, P < 0.01, fatigue score (from 60.3 ± 9.4 to 49.1 ± 8.6, P < 0.01, and SF-36 score (from 66.8 ± 7.7 to 80.9 ± 3.9, P < 0.01. Conclusions: Results of this single arm pilot study showed the feasibility and potential of "Six Healing Sounds" Qigong exercise for

  8. Sophisticated sleep improves our brains: Our advanced cognitive and social skills might derive from the evolution of improved sleep quality; today, sleep therapy could help with mental health issues and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Sleep contributes to humankind's unique cognitive abilities and our mental and physical health. Recent research on the evolution and importance of sleep suggests that sleep is vital to learning and could become an important component of therapies for various mental disorders.

  9. Prolonged release melatonin for improving sleep in totally blind subjects: a pilot placebo-controlled multicenter trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth T

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Roth,1 Tali Nir,2 Nava Zisapel2,3 1Henry Ford Sleep Disorders Center, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Neurim Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Tel Aviv, Israel; 3Department of Neurobiology Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Introduction: Melatonin, secreted by the pineal gland during the night phase, is a regulator of the biological clock and sleep tendency. Totally blind subjects frequently report severe, periodic sleep problems, with 50%–75% of cases displaying non-24-hour sleep–wake disorder (N24HSWD due to inability to synchronize with the environmental day–night cycle. Melatonin immediate-release preparations are reportedly effective in N24HSWD. Here, we studied the efficacy and safety of prolonged-release melatonin (PRM, a registered drug for insomnia, for sleep disorders in totally blind subjects living in normal social environments. The primary endpoint was demonstration of clinically meaningful effects on sleep duration (upper confidence interval [CI] limit >20 minutes whether significant or not to allow early decision-making on further drug development in this indication. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov registry – NCT00972075. Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled proof-of-principle study, 13 totally blind subjects had 2 weeks' placebo run-in, 6 weeks' randomized (1:1 PRM (Circadin® or placebo nightly, and 2 weeks' placebo run-out. Outcome measures included daily voice recorded sleep diary, Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGIC, WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5, and safety. Results: Mean nightly sleep duration improved by 43 minutes in the PRM and 16 minutes in the placebo group (mean difference: 27 minutes, 95% CI: -14.4 to 69 minutes; P=0.18; effect size: 0.82 meeting the primary endpoint. Mean sleep latency decreased by 29 minutes with PRM over placebo (P=0.13; effect size: 0.92 and nap duration decreased in the PRM but not placebo group. The variability in sleep onset/offset and

  10. Differential improvement of the sleep quality among patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy with valproic acid: A longitudinal sleep questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Chetan; Sinha, Sanjib; Ramachandraiah, Chaitra T; Nagappa, Madhu; Thennarasu, Kandivali; Taly, Arun B; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of sodium valproic acid (SVA) on the sleep quality of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Standardized sleep questionnaires viz. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were administered to 30 drug-naïve patients with JME (male:female (M:F) = 14:16; age: 21 ± 3.7 years) and the changes following SVA monotherapy was analyzed using t- and chi-squared tests. The mean age at onset of seizures and diagnosis was 15.43 ± 3.8 and 21 ± 5.1, years respectively. All had myoclonic jerks with mean duration of 5.23 ± 2.7 years, aggravated by sleep deprivation (23, 76.7%) and sleep-wake transition (29, 96.7%). Twenty-seven (90%) had generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS), majority (70%) on awakening from sleep. Seizures were controlled in 25 patients (83.33%) with SVA monotherapy. Abnormal ESS was noted in five (16.66%) drug naïve patients compared to six (20%) patients while on SVA (P = 0.782). Mean ESS remained unchanged before and after SVA therapy (6.27 ± 4.4 vs 6.97 ± 4.7, P = 0.262). On the other hand, only four (13.3%) patients had abnormal PSQI scores at follow-up after initiation of SVA, as compared to 14 (46.7%) subjects in the drug naïve state (P = 0.037). Further, we also found significant reduction in mean PSQI scores after initiating SVA monotherapy (6.7 ± 5.6 vs 2.7 ± 2.84, P £ 0.0001). This study showed that the mean PSQI as well as the number of patients with abnormal PSQI significantly reduced after initiating SVA therapy, suggesting a significant improvement in night-time sleep quality with SVA treatment. However, SVA therapy did not alter ESS.

  11. Does improving sleep lead to better mental health? A protocol for a meta-analytic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alexander J; Webb, Thomas L; Rowse, Georgina

    2017-09-18

    Sleep and mental health go hand-in-hand, with many, if not all, mental health problems being associated with problems sleeping. Although sleep has been traditionally conceptualised as a secondary consequence of mental health problems, contemporary views prescribe a more influential, causal role of sleep in the formation and maintenance of mental health problems. One way to evaluate this assertion is to examine the extent to which interventions that improve sleep also improve mental health. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) describing the effects of interventions designed to improve sleep on mental health will be identified via a systematic search of four bibliographic databases (in addition to a search for unpublished literature). Hedges' g and associated 95% CIs will be computed from means and SDs where possible. Following this, meta-analysis will be used to synthesise the effect sizes from the primary studies and investigate the impact of variables that could potentially moderate the effects. The Jadad scale for reporting RCTs will be used to assess study quality and publication bias will be assessed via visual inspection of a funnel plot and Egger's test alongside Orwin's fail-safe n . Finally, mediation analysis will be used to investigate the extent to which changes in outcomes relating to mental health can be attributed to changes in sleep quality. This study requires no ethical approval. The findings will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal and promoted to relevant stakeholders. CRD42017055450. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Exercise training improves sleep pattern and metabolic profile in elderly people in a time-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Fábio S; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Santos, Ronaldo Vt; Oyama, Lila M; Damaso, Ana R; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia M; Viana, Valter Ar; Boscolo, Rita A; Grassmann, Viviane; Santana, Marcos G; Esteves, Andrea M; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco T

    2011-07-06

    Aging and physical inactivity are two factors that favors the development of cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, and sleep dysfunction. In contrast, the adoption a habitual of moderate exercise may present a non-pharmacological treatment alternative for sleep and metabolic disorders. We aimed to assess the effects of moderate exercise training on sleep quality and on the metabolic profile of elderly people with a sedentary lifestyle. Fourteen male sedentary, healthy, elderly volunteers performed moderate training for 60 minutes/day, 3 days/week for 24 wk at a work rate equivalent to the ventilatory aerobic threshold. The environment was kept at a temperature of 23 ± 2 °C, with an air humidity 60 ± 5%. Blood and polysomnographs analysis were collected 3 times: at baseline (1 week before training began), 3 and 6 months (after 3 and 6 months of training). Training promoted increasing aerobic capacity (relative VO2, time and velocity to VO2max; p sleep parameters, awake time and REM sleep latency were decreased after 6 months exercise training (p exercise training protocol improves the sleep profile in older people, but the metabolism adaptation does not persist. Suggesting that this population requires training strategy modifications as to ensure consistent alterations regarding metabolism.

  13. Qualitative differences in offline improvement of procedural memory by daytime napping and overnight sleep: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Sho K; Koike, Takahiko; Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Makita, Kai; Hamano, Yuki H; Takahashi, Haruka K; Nakagawa, Eri; Sadato, Norihiro

    2017-09-20

    Daytime napping offers various benefits for healthy adults, including enhancement of motor skill learning. It remains controversial whether napping can provide the same enhancement as overnight sleep, and if so, whether the same neural underpinning is recruited. To investigate this issue, we conducted functional MRI during motor skill learning, before and after a short day-nap, in 13 participants, and compared them with a larger group (n=47) who were tested following regular overnight sleep. Training in a sequential finger-tapping task required participants to press a keyboard in the MRI scanner with their non-dominant left hand as quickly and accurately as possible. The nap group slept for 60min in the scanner after the training run, and the previously trained skill was subsequently re-tested. The whole-night sleep group went home after the training, and was tested the next day. Offline improvement of speed was observed in both groups, whereas accuracy was significantly improved only in the whole-night sleep group. Correspondingly, the offline increment in task-related activation was significant in the putamen of the whole-night group. This finding reveals a qualitative difference in the offline improvement effect between daytime napping and overnight sleep. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A pilot evaluation of an online cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia disorder – targeted screening and interactive Web design lead to improved sleep in a community population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson KN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kirstie N Anderson, Paul Goldsmith, Alison Gardiner Regional Sleep Service, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Introduction: Computerized or online cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs are increasingly being developed to deliver insomnia therapy (CBT-i. They seek to address the difficulty of delivering an evidence-based technology to a large number of patients at low cost. Previous online applications have shown significant but variable improvements in sleep efficiency and a decrease in insomnia severity when compared with control groups. The best online methodology remains debated, and there are no such applications currently available within the UK National Health Service. Method: Evaluation of treatment outcomes in 75 participants with insomnia disorder using an open-access, novel, interactive online therapy. Rigorous screening was first undertaken to exclude those with probable sleep apnea, restless legs, circadian rhythm disorder, or significant anxiety or depression prior to commencing therapy. A modern interactive video-based website was used to encourage compliance by personalizing therapy based on response. Sleep efficiency, sleep latency, total sleep time, and sleep quality were all assessed prior to and after intervention. Results: Of those who accessed therapy, 62% were excluded based on a likely diagnosis of another sleep disorder (788/1281. Participants who completed therapy all had severe insomnia disorder, with a group mean sleep efficiency of 55%. After intervention there was a significant increase in sleep efficiency and sleep latency, with modest nonsignificant improvements in total sleep time. The majority of users reported improved sleep quality, and compliance with therapy was very good, with over 64/75 completing >90% of sleep diary entries. Conclusion: Online CBT-i can be designed to deliver personalized therapy with good reported outcomes and high compliance rates in those who start therapy. This initial

  15. Are You Getting Enough Sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Emails Are you getting enough sleep? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Learn how ... more sleep than adults. Habits to improve your sleep There are some important habits that can improve ...

  16. Preliminary study of an exercise programme for reducing fatigue and improving sleep among long-term haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniam, Radha; Subramanian, Pathmawathi; Singh, Surindar Kaur Surat; Lim, Soo Kun; Chinna, Karuthan; Rosli, Roshaslina

    2014-09-01

    Fatigue and quality of sleep are the main factors that contribute to a poor quality of life among patients on long-term haemodialysis. Studies have also emphasised the importance of exercise for improving the wellbeing of dialysis patients. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a predialysis low-to-moderate-intensity exercise programme for reducing fatigue and improving sleep disorders among long-term haemodialysis patients. In this quasi-experimental study, an exercise programme was conducted three times a week for 12 weeks before long-term haemodialysis patients underwent dialysis at two centres. The patients were categorised into either the exercise group (n = 28) or control group (n = 27). The latter was asked to maintain their current lifestyles. Assessments of fatigue and sleep disorder levels were performed for both groups using self-reported questionnaires at baseline and after intervention. The patients' perception of the exercise programme was also determined using self-reported questionnaires. Paired sample t-test indicated improvements in fatigue level in the exercise group (mean fatigue score: post-treatment 40.5 ± 7.9 vs. pre-treatment 30.0 ± 10.9). Improvements in sleep disorders were also observed in the exercise group (mean score: post-treatment 7.6 ± 3.3 vs. pre-treatment 10.1 ± 3.8). However, sleep quality deteriorated in the control group (mean score: post-treatment 10.7 ± 2.9 vs. pre-treatment 9.3 ± 2.9). Simple low-to-moderate-intensity exercise is effective for improving fatigue, sleep disorders and the overall quality of life among haemodialysis patients.

  17. Long-Term Improvements in Sleep and Respiratory Parameters in Preschool Children Following Treatment of Sleep Disordered Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Lisa M; Biggs, Sarah N; Nisbet, Lauren C; Weichard, Aidan J; Hollis, Samantha L; Davey, Margot J; Anderson, Vicki; Nixon, Gillian M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2015-10-15

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in preschool-aged children is common, but long-term outcomes have not been investigated. We aimed to compare sleep and respiratory parameters in preschool children to examine the effects of treatment or non-treatment after 3 years. Children (3-5 years) diagnosed with SDB (n = 45) and non-snoring controls (n = 30) returned for repeat overnight polysomnography (39% of original cohort), 3 years following baseline polysomnography. Children with SDB were grouped according to whether they had received treatment or not. SDB resolution was defined as an obstructive apnea hypopnea index (OAHI) ≤ 1 event/h, no snoring detected on polysomnography and habitual snoring not indicated by parents on questionnaire. Fifty-one percent (n = 23) of the children with SDB were treated. Overall, SDB resolved in 49% (n = 22), either spontaneously (n = 8) or with treatment (n = 14). SDB remained unresolved in 39% (n = 9) of those treated and 64% (n = 14) of the children who were untreated. Two of the non-snoring controls developed SDB at follow-up. The treated group had significantly lower OAHI (p Sleep Medicine.

  18. Sleep Disturbances in Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael J; Peterson, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is frequently accompanied by sleep disturbances such as insomnia or hypersomnia and polysomnographic sleep findings of increased rapid-eye-movement sleep and decreased slow wave sleep. For many patients, insomnia persists even after mood symptoms have been adequately treated. These patients have poorer outcomes than patients without sleep problems. These outcomes suggest that overlapping neural mechanisms regulate sleep and mood. Treatment of these patients can incorporate sedating antidepressants, nonbenzodiazepine γ-aminobutyric acid agonists, and cognitive behavioral therapy. Sleep restriction has been found to improve mood in depressed patients; however, the benefits typically disappear after recovery sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. N-Acetylmannosamine improves sleep-wake quality in middle-aged mice: relevance to autonomic nervous function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Ito, Koichi; Hayakawa, Koji; Yagi, Shintaro; Shiota, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a variety of physiological changes originating peripherally and centrally, including within the autonomic nervous system. Sleep-wake disturbances constitute reliable hallmarks of aging in several animal species and humans. Recent studies have been interested in N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) a potential therapeutic agent for improving quality of life, as well as preventing age-related cognitive decline. In this study, ManNAc (5.0 mg/ml) was administered in the drinking water of middle-aged male C57BL/6J mice (55 weeks old) for 7 days. Mice were housed under a 12:12 h light:dark cycle at 23-24 °C. We evaluated bio-behavioral activity using electrocardiogram, body temperature and locomotor activity recorded by an implanted telemetry transmitter. To estimate sleep-wake profile, surface electroencephalogram and electromyogram leads connected to a telemetry transmitter were also implanted in mice. Autonomic nervous activity was evaluated using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. ManNAc-treated mice spent more time in a wakeful state and less time in slow wave sleep during the dark phase. Parasympathetic nervous activity was increased following ManNAc treatment, then the sympatho-vagal balance was shifted predominance of parasympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, improvement in sleep-wake pattern was associated with increased parasympathetic nervous activity. These results suggest that ManNAc treatment can improve bio-behavioral activity and sleep-wake quality in middle-aged mice. This may have implications for improving sleep patterns in elderly humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Breathing exercise combined with cognitive behavioural intervention improves sleep quality and heart rate variability in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Hui-Ching; Chung, Yu-Chu; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Jia-Fu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise on sleep quality and heart rate variability in patients with major depression. Depression is a long-lasting illness with significant effects not only in individuals themselves, but on their family, work and social relationships as well. Cognitive behavioural therapy is considered to be an effective treatment for major depression. Breathing relaxation may improve heart rate variability, but few studies have comprehensively examined the effect of a cognitive behavioural intervention combined with relaxing breathing on patients with major depression. An experimental research design with a repeated measure was used. Eighty-nine participants completed this study and entered data analysed. The experimental group (n = 43) received the cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise for four weeks, whereas the control group (n = 46) did not. Sleep quality and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, posttest1, posttest2 and follow-up. Data were examined by chi-square tests, t-tests and generalised estimating equations. After adjusting for age, socioeconomic status, severity of disease and psychiatric history, the quality of sleep of the experimental group improved, with the results at posttest achieving significance. Heart rate variability parameters were also significantly improved. This study supported the hypothesis that the cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise could improve sleep quality and heart rate variability in patients with major depression, and the effectiveness was lasting. The cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise that included muscle relaxation, deep breathing and sleep hygiene could be provided with major depression during hospitalisation. Through group practice and experience sharing

  1. Improving the Test-Retest Reliability of Resting State fMRI by Removing the Impact of Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiahui; Han, Junwei; Nguyen, Vinh T; Guo, Lei; Guo, Christine C

    2017-01-01

    Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) provides a powerful tool to examine large-scale neural networks in the human brain and their disturbances in neuropsychiatric disorders. Thanks to its low demand and high tolerance, resting state paradigms can be easily acquired from clinical population. However, due to the unconstrained nature, resting state paradigm is associated with excessive head movement and proneness to sleep. Consequently, the test-retest reliability of rs-fMRI measures is moderate at best, falling short of widespread use in the clinic. Here, we characterized the effect of sleep on the test-retest reliability of rs-fMRI. Using measures of heart rate variability (HRV) derived from simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) recording, we identified portions of fMRI data when subjects were more alert or sleepy, and examined their effects on the test-retest reliability of functional connectivity measures. When volumes of sleep were excluded, the reliability of rs-fMRI is significantly improved, and the improvement appears to be general across brain networks. The amount of improvement is robust with the removal of as much as 60% volumes of sleepiness. Therefore, test-retest reliability of rs-fMRI is affected by sleep and could be improved by excluding volumes of sleepiness as indexed by HRV. Our results suggest a novel and practical method to improve test-retest reliability of rs-fMRI measures.

  2. Improving the Test-Retest Reliability of Resting State fMRI by Removing the Impact of Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahui Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI provides a powerful tool to examine large-scale neural networks in the human brain and their disturbances in neuropsychiatric disorders. Thanks to its low demand and high tolerance, resting state paradigms can be easily acquired from clinical population. However, due to the unconstrained nature, resting state paradigm is associated with excessive head movement and proneness to sleep. Consequently, the test-retest reliability of rs-fMRI measures is moderate at best, falling short of widespread use in the clinic. Here, we characterized the effect of sleep on the test-retest reliability of rs-fMRI. Using measures of heart rate variability (HRV derived from simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG recording, we identified portions of fMRI data when subjects were more alert or sleepy, and examined their effects on the test-retest reliability of functional connectivity measures. When volumes of sleep were excluded, the reliability of rs-fMRI is significantly improved, and the improvement appears to be general across brain networks. The amount of improvement is robust with the removal of as much as 60% volumes of sleepiness. Therefore, test-retest reliability of rs-fMRI is affected by sleep and could be improved by excluding volumes of sleepiness as indexed by HRV. Our results suggest a novel and practical method to improve test-retest reliability of rs-fMRI measures.

  3. A Collaborative Paradigm for Improving Management of Sleep Disorders in Primary Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Jack D; Grubber, Janet; Ulmer, Christi; Zervakis, Jennifer; Olsen, Maren

    2016-01-01

    To test a collaborative care model for interfacing sleep specialists with primary care providers to enhance patients' sleep disorders management. This study used a randomized, parallel group, clinical intervention trial design. A total of 137 adult (29 women) VA outpatients with sleep complaints were enrolled and randomly assigned to (1) an intervention (INT) consisting of a one-time consultation with a sleep specialist who provided diagnostic feedback and treatment recommendations to the patient and the patient's primary care provider; or (2) a control condition consisting of their usual primary care (UPC). Provider-focused outcomes included rates of adherence to recommended diagnostic procedures and sleep-focused interventions. Patient-focused outcomes included measures taken from sleep diaries and actigraphy; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scores; and self-report measures of sleepiness, fatigue, mood, quality of life, and satisfaction with health care. The proportions of provider-initiated sleep-focused interventions were significantly higher in the INT group than in the UPC group for polysomnography referrals (49% versus 6%; P sleep efficiency (+3.7%; 95% CI: 0.8, 6.5; P = 0.01) than did UPC participants. A greater proportion of the INT group showed ≥ 1 standard deviation decline on the PSQI from baseline to the 10-mo follow-up (41% versus 21%; P = 0.02). Moreover, 69% of the INT group had normal (≤ 10) Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores at the 10-mo follow-up, whereas only 50% of the UPC group fell below this clinical cutoff (P = 0.03). A one-time sleep consultation significantly increased healthcare providers' attention to sleep problems and resulted in benefits to patients' sleep/wake symptoms. This study is registered with clinicaltrials.gov with identifier # NCT00390572. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. Wearing blue-blockers in the morning could improve sleep of workers on a permanent night schedule: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasseville, Alexandre; Benhaberou-Brun, Dalila; Fontaine, Charlotte; Charon, Marie-Claude; Hebert, Marc

    2009-07-01

    Night shiftworkers often complain of disturbed sleep during the day. This could be partly caused by morning sunlight exposure during the commute home, which tends to maintain the circadian clock on a daytime rhythm. The circadian clock is most sensitive to the blue portion of the visible spectrum, so our aim was to determine if blocking short wavelengths of light below 540 nm could improve daytime sleep quality and nighttime vigilance of night shiftworkers. Eight permanent night shiftworkers (32-56 yrs of age) of Quebec City's Canada Post distribution center were evaluated during summertime, and twenty others (24-55 yrs of age) during fall and winter. Timing, efficacy, and fragmentation of daytime sleep were analyzed over four weeks by a wrist activity monitor, and subjective vigilance was additionally assessed at the end of the night shift in the fall-winter group. The first two weeks served as baseline and the remaining two as experimental weeks when workers had to wear blue-blockers glasses, either just before leaving the workplace at the end of their shift (summer group) or 2 h before the end of the night shift (fall-winter group). They all had to wear the glasses when outside during the day until 16:00 h. When wearing the glasses, workers slept, on average +/-SD, 32+/-29 and 34+/-60 more min/day, increased their sleep efficacy by 1.95+/-2.17% and 4.56+/-6.1%, and lowered their sleep fragmentation by 1.74+/-1.36% and 4.22+/-9.16% in the summer and fall-winter group, respectively. Subjective vigilance also generally improved on Fridays in the fall-winter group. Blue-blockers seem to improve daytime sleep of permanent night-shift workers.

  5. Review of systematic reviews about the efficacy of non-pharmacological interventions to improve sleep quality in insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, G.J. De; Tiemens, B.G.; Kloos, M.W.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Insomnia is a very common condition in various populations. Non-pharmacological interventions might offer (safe) alternatives for hypnotics. Aim To evaluate the evidence for efficacy from systematic reviews about non-pharmacological interventions to improve sleep quality in insomnia by a

  6. Applicability of two brief evidence-based interventions to improve sleep quality in inpatient mental health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niet, G.J. De; Tiemens, B.G.; Achterberg, T. van; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study explored the applicability of two brief evidence-based interventions to improve sleep quality in inpatient psychiatry. The study involved three comparable admission wards of a psychiatric hospital. Stimulus control was introduced at the first ward, and music-assisted relaxation at

  7. Mirtazapine does not improve sleep disorders in Alzheimer's disease: results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoralick, Francisca M; Louzada, Luciana L; Quintas, Juliana L; Naves, Janeth O S; Camargos, Einstein F; Nóbrega, Otávio T

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the efficacy and safety of mirtazapine in the treatment of sleep disorders in patients with Alzheimer's disease by means of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Measurements were obtained for 7 days before intervention (baseline) and for 2 weeks after the onset of treatment. Alzheimer's disease patients with sleep disorders (n = 24) received 15-mg mirtazapine (n = 8) or placebo (n = 16) once daily at 2100 hours for 2 weeks. Patients were evaluated with actigraphy and structured scales before and after intervention. Historical control was employed. Treatment with mirtazapine or placebo had no effect on cognitive and functional status as assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Katz scale, respectively. There were no differences between groups in the frequency or severity of the adverse events reported. Compared with the placebo group, mirtazapine users showed increased daytime sleepiness but no improvement in the duration or efficiency of nocturnal sleep after treatment. This study showed no significant therapeutic effects of 15-mg mirtazapine in community-dwelling Alzheimer's disease patients with sleep disorders. Instead, this study found evidence of worsening of daytime sleep patterns. © 2016 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  8. Orexin Receptor Antagonism Improves Sleep and Reduces Seizures in Kcna1-null Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundtree, Harrison M; Simeone, Timothy A; Johnson, Chaz; Matthews, Stephanie A; Samson, Kaeli K; Simeone, Kristina A

    2016-02-01

    Comorbid sleep disorders occur in approximately one-third of people with epilepsy. Seizures and sleep disorders have an interdependent relationship where the occurrence of one can exacerbate the other. Orexin, a wake-promoting neuropeptide, is associated with sleep disorder symptoms. Here, we tested the hypothesis that orexin dysregulation plays a role in the comorbid sleep disorder symptoms in the Kcna1-null mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Rest-activity was assessed using infrared beam actigraphy. Sleep architecture and seizures were assessed using continuous video-electroencephalography-electromyography recordings in Kcna1-null mice treated with vehicle or the dual orexin receptor antagonist, almorexant (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Orexin levels in the lateral hypothalamus/perifornical region (LH/P) and hypothalamic pathology were assessed with immunohistochemistry and oxygen polarography. Kcna1-null mice have increased latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep onset, sleep fragmentation, and number of wake epochs. The numbers of REM and non-REM (NREM) sleep epochs are significantly reduced in Kcna1-null mice. Severe seizures propagate to the wake-promoting LH/P where injury is apparent (indicated by astrogliosis, blood-brain barrier permeability, and impaired mitochondrial function). The number of orexin-positive neurons is increased in the LH/P compared to wild-type LH/P. Treatment with a dual orexin receptor antagonist significantly increases the number and duration of NREM sleep epochs and reduces the latency to REM sleep onset. Further, almorexant treatment reduces the incidence of severe seizures and overall seizure burden. Interestingly, we report a significant positive correlation between latency to REM onset and seizure burden in Kcna1-null mice. Dual orexin receptor antagonists may be an effective sleeping aid in epilepsy, and warrants further study on their somnogenic and ant-seizure effects in other epilepsy models. © 2016 Associated

  9. A dietary supplement to improve the quality of sleep: a randomized placebo controlled trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Claustrat Bruno; Roy Pascal; Feugier-Favier Nathalie; Nicolas Alain; Noel-Baron Florence; Remontet Laurent; Cornu Catherine; Saadatian-Elahi Mitra; Kassaï Behrouz

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background To evaluate the effect of a dietary supplement containing polyunsaturated fatty acids, in association with Humulus lupulus extract, on the quality of sleep using the Leeds sleep evaluation questionnaire (LSEQ) in subjects with moderate to severe sleep disorders. Methods Randomized placebo-controlled trial, in a Population-based setting. Participants were adult patients 25 to 65 years old with a chronic primary insomnia who volunteered for the study. The tested intervention...

  10. The SENSE Study (Sleep and Education: learning New Skills Early): a community cognitive-behavioural therapy and mindfulness-based sleep intervention to prevent depression and improve cardiac health in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waloszek, Joanna M; Schwartz, Orli; Simmons, Julian G; Blake, Matthew; Blake, Laura; Murray, Greg; Raniti, Monika; Dahl, Ronald E; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil; Dudgeon, Paul; Trinder, John; Allen, Nicholas B

    2015-11-04

    Sleep problems are a major risk factor for the emergence of depression in adolescence. The aim of this study was to test whether an intervention for improving sleep habits could prevent the emergence of depression, and improve well-being and cardiovascular indices amongst at-risk adolescents. A longitudinal randomised controlled trial (RCT) is being conducted across Victorian Secondary Schools in Melbourne, Australia. Adolescents (aged 12-17 years) were defined as at-risk for depression if they reported high levels of anxiety and sleep problems on in-school screening questionnaires and had no prior history of depression (assessed by clinical diagnostic interview). Eligible participants were randomised into either a sleep improvement intervention (based on cognitive behavioral and mindfulness principles) or an active control condition teaching study skills. Both programs consisted of seven 90 minute-long sessions over seven weeks. All participants were required to complete a battery of mood and sleep questionnaires, seven-days of actigraphy, and sleep diary entry at pre- and post-intervention. Participants also completed a cardiovascular assessment and two days of saliva collection at pre-intervention. Participants will repeat all assessments at two-year follow up (ongoing). This will be the first efficacy trial of a selective group-based sleep intervention for the prevention of depression in an adolescent community sample. If effective, the program could be disseminated in schools and greatly improve health outcomes for anxious adolescents. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612001177842. Date of Registration: 06-Nov-2012.

  11. Self-relaxation training can improve sleep quality and cognitive functions in the older: a one-year randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingxian; Kang, Jiaxun; Wang, Ping; Zeng, Hui

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of self-relaxation training on sleep quality and cognitive functions in the older. Ageing causes declines in sleep quality and cognitive functions in older adults, and decreased sleep quality also accelerates declines in cognitive functions. Therefore, it is necessary to find cost-effective interventions to enhance sleep quality in the older, thereby improving their cognitive functions or delaying cognitive decline. Randomised controlled study. The study was conducted between July 2010 and June 2011 at Wangyuehu Community in Changsha, China. Eighty older adults with reduced sleep quality were selected and randomly assigned to experimental (n = 40) or control (n = 40) group. Subjects in the experimental group received self-relaxation training including progressive muscle relaxation and meditation based on sleep hygiene education, while the control group received sleep hygiene education only. Sleep quality and cognitive functions of the two groups were measured prior to training and at the end of the 3rd, 6th and 12th months using four reliable and valid questionnaires. Repeated measures anova revealed that the self-relaxation training had significant main effect as well as interaction effect with time on sleep quality and cognitive functions. Except for scores of Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Mini-Mental State Examination and number memory, time had significant main effect on scores of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, picture memory, associative memory and understanding memory. Self-relaxation training can improve sleep quality and cognitive functions in the older. Self-relaxation training is a non-invasive, simple and inexpensive therapeutic method of improving sleep quality and cognitive functions in community-dwelling older people. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Chronic sleep reduction in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the results of this thesis, it can be concluded that sleep problems and chronic sleep reduction have a high impact on adolescents’ daytime functioning. Additionally, this research shows that gradual sleep extension can improve adolescents’ sleep and especially their chronic sleep reduction. This approach has beneficial effects on adolescents’ depressive symptoms and their cognitive performance.

  13. Chronic sleep reduction in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the results of this thesis, it can be concluded that sleep problems and chronic sleep reduction have a high impact on adolescents’ daytime functioning. Additionally, this research shows that gradual sleep extension can improve adolescents’ sleep and especially their chronic sleep reduction.

  14. Obesity and Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    WINDA LIVIYA NG

    2017-01-01

    This thesis examines the relationship between obesity and sleep problems, and the consequences of sleep problems on morbidity and mortality. Through a series of different methodologies and datasets, this thesis has found strong, consistent evidence supporting the role of obesity in causing sleep problems, and the benefit of weight loss in improving sleep problems. This thesis has also found evidence towards substantial life expectancy loss associated with having sleep problems. The findings f...

  15. FEEDBACK FROM NATURALISTIC DRIVING IMPROVES TREATMENT COMPLIANCE IN DRIVERS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jeffrey D; Yu, Lixi; Aksan, Nazan S; Tippin, Jon; Rizzo, Matthew; Anderson, Steven W

    2015-06-01

    As part of a study in drivers with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), we conducted a randomized clinical trial to assess whether individualized feedback can increase compliance with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. After completing 3.5 months of naturalistic driving monitoring, OSA drivers were randomized either to receive an intervention, which was feedback regarding their own naturalistic driving record and CPAP compliance, or to receive no such intervention. In the week immediately after the intervention date, drivers receiving feedback (n=30) improved their CPAP usage by an average of 35.8 minutes per night (p=0.008; 95% CI=9.6, 62.0) to a mean level of 296 minutes. By contrast, CPAP usage in the non-feedback group (n=36) decreased an average of 27.5 minutes per night (p=0.022; 95% CI=4.0, 51.0) to a mean level of 236 minutes. The mean group-specific changes were higher (better) in the feedback group than in the non-feedback group during the first, second, and third weeks of follow-up (p0.25 in all cases). Our study suggests that CPAP compliance can be increased using individualized feedback, but that follow-up feedback sessions or reminders may be necessary for sustained improvement.

  16. Reductions in cannabis use are associated with improvements in anxiety, depression, and sleep quality, but not quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Mooney, Larissa J; Huang, David; Zhu, Yuhui; Tomko, Rachel L; McClure, Erin; Chou, Chih-Ping; Gray, Kevin M

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the longitudinal association between reductions in cannabis use and changes in anxiety, depression, sleep quality, and quality of life. Secondary analyses were conducted based on data from a cannabis use disorder medication trial in 302 adults (ages 18-50). Changes in symptoms of anxiety and depression, sleep quality, and quality of life were assessed in relation to changes in cannabis use during the 12-week trial of treatment. Based on the slope of individual cannabis use trajectory, the sample was classified into two groups (Cannabis Use Reduction, n=152 vs. Cannabis Use Increase, n=150) which was included as a binary covariate in subsequent modeling. Controlling for demographics (age, gender, race/ethnicity), treatment condition, and time-varying tobacco and alcohol use, separate latent growth curve models showed a significant association between the Cannabis Use Reduction group and improvement (i.e., lower values in slope) in anxiety (β=-0.09, SE=0.04; pquality (β=-0.07, SE=0.03; pquality of life. These results indicate a longitudinal relationship between reductions in cannabis use and improvements in anxiety, depression, and sleep quality. Clinicians treating patients with co-occurring cannabis use and problems with anxiety, depression, or sleep quality should attend to cannabis use reduction as a component of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Fatigue Management Training to Improve Police Sleep Health and Wellness: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Lois; Samuels, Charles H; Vincent, Fiona

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention for improving sleep health in a sample of employees from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). Using a pre- and post-design we exposed 61 RCMP members to a fatigue-management training program. Pre- and post-intervention surveys included the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL) instrument, and the six item index of psychological distress (Symptom Checklist-90). We found the training improved member satisfaction with sleep (Wald = 2.58; df = 1; P = 0.03) and reduced symptoms of insomnia (Wald = 5.5; df = 1; P = 0.02). Furthermore, the training reduced the incidence of headaches (Wald = 6.5; df = 1; P = 0.01). Our findings suggest that a fatigue management training program resulted in positive sleep health benefits for police. We stress the importance of continued evaluation to inform the large-scale implementation of fatigue-management programs.

  18. Randomized controlled trial of exercise interventions to improve sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in individuals with multiple sclerosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siengsukon, Catherine F; Aldughmi, Mayis; Kahya, Melike; Bruce, Jared; Lynch, Sharon; Ness Norouzinia, Abigail; Glusman, Morgan; Billinger, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Nearly 70% of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience sleep disturbances. Increasing physical activity in people with MS has been shown to produce a moderate improvement in sleep quality, and exercise has been shown to improve sleep quality in non-neurologically impaired adults. The purpose of this pilot randomized controlled trial study was to examine the effect of two exercise interventions on sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in individuals with MS. Twenty-eight individuals with relapsing-remitting or secondary progressive MS were randomized into one of two 12-week exercise interventions: a supervised, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (AE) program or an unsupervised, low-intensity walking and stretching (WS) program. Only individuals who were ≥ 70% compliant with the programs were included in analysis (n = 12 AE; n = 10 WS). Both groups demonstrated a moderate improvement in sleep quality, although only the improvement by the WS group was statistically significant. Only the AE group demonstrated a significant improvement in daytime sleepiness. Change in sleep quality and daytime sleepiness was not correlated with disease severity or with change in cardiovascular fitness, depression, or fatigue. The mechanisms for improvement in sleep quality and daytime sleepiness need further investigation, but may be due to introduction of zeitgebers to improve circadian rhythm.

  19. Passive body heating improves sleep patterns in female patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of passive body heating on the sleep patterns of patients with fibromyalgia. METHODS: Six menopausal women diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to the criteria determined by the American College of Rheumatology were included. All women underwent passive immersion in a warm bath at a temperature of 36 ±1 °C for 15 sessions of 30 minutes each over a period of three weeks. Their sleep patterns were assessed by polysomnography at the following time-points: pre-intervention (baseline, the first day of the intervention (acute, the last day of the intervention (chronic, and three weeks after the end of the intervention (follow-up. Core body temperature was evaluated by a thermistor pill during the baseline, acute, chronic, and follow-up periods. The impact of this treatment on fibromyalgia was assessed via a specific questionnaire termed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire. RESULTS: Sleep latency, rapid eye movement sleep latency and slow wave sleep were significantly reduced in the chronic and acute conditions compared with baseline. Sleep efficiency was significantly increased during the chronic condition, and the awakening index was reduced at the chronic and follow-up time points relative to the baseline values. No significant differences were observed in total sleep time, time in sleep stages 1 or 2 or rapid eye movement sleep percentage. The core body temperature and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire responses did not significantly change over the course of the study. CONCLUSION: Passive body heating had a positive effect on the sleep patterns of women with fibromyalgia.

  20. The role of telemedicine and mobile health in the monitoring of sleep-breathing disorders: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villanueva JA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jair A Villanueva,1,* Monique C Suarez,2,* Onintza Garmendia,2,3 Vera Lugo,2 Concepción Ruiz,2 Josep M Montserrat,2–5 1Unit of Biophysics and Bioengineering, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, 2Sleep Unit, Respiratory Medicine Department, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, 3Center for Biomedical Research in Respiratory Diseases (CIBERES, Madrid, 4Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, 5August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Although the concepts are broad, telemedicine and mobile health (mHealth can be defined as a methodology to provide health care remotely and improve health services and outcomes using telecommunication tools. The widespread adoption of these technologies and current health care challenges, such as the aging population and increasing costs, has encouraged interest in the development of new strategies involving telemedicine. Overall, there is a lack of evidence rigorously assessing the impact of telemedicine and mHealth. Therefore, proper randomized controlled trials, with cost-effectiveness and impact on quality-of-life analysis, are urgently needed. They should also focus on specific populations and their comorbidities, since customizing telemedicine approaches is paramount to ensure success. Obstructive sleep apnea is a highly prevalent chronic condition and the most common of sleep-breathing disorders, and telemedicine and mHealth could play a pivotal role in the different phases of its management. In the future, using new devices capable of signal acquisition and analysis will refine obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis; even smartphones’ built-in sensors could offer improved comfort and the possibility of home sleep monitoring. Continuous positive airway pressure titration could be performed with wireless devices, whose parameters can be changed remotely from sleep centers. Finally, the follow-up phase could be

  1. [Sleep disorder and sleep health promotion for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the effects of the sleep health promotion. Sleep health promotion that included short naps and exercise in the evening was effective in promoting sleep with elderly people. The interventions demonstrated that the proper awakening maintenance and keeping proper arousal level during the evening were effective in improving sleep quality. Sleep health promotion that included sleep education and cognitive-behavioral interventions improved sleep-related habits and the quality of sleep. Sleep health promotion were developed. Mental and physical health were also improved along with improving sleep with the elderly. These results suggest that cognitive-behavioral interventions to improve the sleep are effective for the activity of daily living, and the quality of life.

  2. [Acupuncture therapy for the improvement of sleep quality of outpatients receiving methadone maintenance treatment: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Liu, Xue-bing; Zhang, Yao

    2012-08-01

    To study the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy for the improvement of sleep quality of outpatients receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Using randomized double-blinded controlled design, seventy-five MMT outpatients with low sleep quality [score of Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) > or = 8], were randomly assigned to the acupuncture group (38 cases) and the sham-acupuncture group (37 cases). All patients maintained previous MMT. Acupuncture was applied to Baihui (GV20), Shenmen (bilateral, TF4), Shenting (GV24), Sanyinjiao (bilateral, SP6), and Sishencong (EX-HN1) in the acupuncture group. The same procedures were performed in the sham-acupuncture group, but not to the acupoints (5 mm lateral to the acupoints selected in the acupuncture group) with shallow needling technique. The treatment was performed 5 times each week for 8 successive weeks. The PSQI was assessed before treatment, at the end of the 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th week of the treatment. The detection ratio of low sleep quality and the incidence of adverse acupuncture reactions were compared between the two groups at the end of the 8th week. The overall PSQI score was obviously higher in the acupuncture group than in the sham-acupuncture group with statistical difference (P acupuncture group (60.53%, 23/38 cases) than in the sham-acupuncture group (83.78%, 31/37 cases) with statistical difference (P acupuncture reaction was 5.26% (2/38 cases) in the acupuncture group and 2.70% (1/37 cases) in the sham-acupuncture group respectively, showing no statistical difference (P > 0.05). Acupuncture therapy could effectively and safely improve the sleep quality of outpatients receiving MMT.

  3. [Sleep polygraphy: diagnostic value in depressive pseudo-dementia. Attempt to improve visual scoring by digital periodic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, F S; Pringuey, D; Cherikh, F; Belugou, J L; Cherrey, C

    2000-01-01

    Pseudo depressive dementia is a common pathology for elderly patients. Classically, it is said that depression is taking the mask of dementia, but very often deterioration and depression are present at the same time. Sleep EEG can help the clinician to differentiate dementia and depression in pseudo depressive dementia. Slow Wave Sleep (SWS) is a good indicator of deterioration process. We tried to improve the sleep recording and analysis and our ability to differentiate SWS in this indication. We use a portable digital recording material (Hypnotrace). The signal is analysed by the association of a visual standard method to Digital Periodic Analysis (DPA) which is very sensitive to SWS. The visual analysis gives informations about the macroarchitecture of the night. The Digital Periodic Analysis gives at any moment the value of the wave frequency and thus informations about the microarchitecture. Our hypothesis is that this association helps to better recognise SWS and thus improves sleep EEG as a diagnostic tool in this indication. 23 inpatients meeting both the criteria for major depression and dementia (DSM IV) have been recorded during two nights after 15 days of wash out and before antidepressant treatment. The recordings are analysed with the visual standard method and with the help of DPA. The patients are evaluated every 15 days during two months in order to define three groups based on the clinical evolution. The scoring with DPA is more sensitive to Slow Wave Sleep, particularly for the patients with good clinical evolution (with the strongest depressive component). Thus, this method could be a good diagnostic tool to differentiate dementia and depression in pseudo depressive dementia.

  4. Maxillomandibular Volume Influences the Relationship between Weight Loss and Improvement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kate; Phillips, Craig L; Yee, Brendon J; Grunstein, Ronald R; Cistulli, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is the major risk factor for OSA; however, weight loss reduces OSA to a variable extent. We aimed to assess whether size of the maxillomandibular skeletal enclosure influences the relationship between weight loss and OSA reduction. Obese males (≥ 30 kg/m2) with moderate-severe OSA (AHI > 15/h) participating in a 6-mo open-label weight loss program had craniofacial computed tomography (CT) scans before and after weight loss. CT scans were analysed using three-dimensional cephalometry. Maxillomandibular volume was calculated from skeletal landmarks on the mandible (condyle, gonion, menton) and maxilla (anterior nasal spine). Multiple regression analysis was used to test for moderating effects of maxillomandibular volume on relationship between changes in weight and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). Fifty-two men (age 44.3 ± 8.8 y, AHI 42.9 ± 21.3 events/h, body mass index [BMI] 34.0 ± 2.7 kg/m2) had 7.4 ± 4.1% weight loss and 34.1 ± 32.4% AHI reduction at 6 months. BMI reduction modestly predicted AHI change (r2 = 0.17, P = 0.002). The interaction term of maxillomandibular volume and BMI change was a predictor of OSA improvement (P = 0.03), indicating maxillomandibular volume moderates this relationship. Subgroup analyses of patients by small, medium, and large maxillomandibular volume showed a strong correlation between weight loss and OSA improvement only in the small volume group (r = 0.654, P = 0.004). There was no relationship evident in those with large maxillomandibular volume (r = 0.05, P = 0.9). Maxillomandibular volume influences the relationship between weight loss and OSA improvement with an effect on AHI more evident in those with a smaller craniofacial skeleton. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  5. Melatonin improves health status and sleep in children with idiopathic chronic sleep-onset insomnia: a randomized placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.G.; van Stel, H.F.; van der Heijden, K.; Meijer, A.M.; Coenen, A.M.L.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of melatonin treatment on health status and sleep in children with idiopathic sleep-onset insomnia. Method: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in a Dutch sleep center, involving 62 children, 6 to 12 years of age, who suffered more

  6. Improving CPAP use by patients with the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engleman, Heather M; Wild, Matt R

    2003-02-01

    Though continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice for the sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS), suboptimal adherence to CPAP is common. Internationally, some 5-50% of SAHS patients recommended for CPAP either reject this treatment option or discontinue within the first week, and 12-25% of remaining patients can be expected to have discontinued CPAP by 3 years. Biomedical investigations of patients' CPAP use reveal frequent adverse effects, weak prospective relationships between symptomatic or physiological disease severity and CPAP use, and moderate correlations between use and benefit. Relatively expensive high-technological interventions to improve CPAP use (e.g. "intelligent" CPAP, humidification) are the subject of several well-conducted studies favouring their effectiveness. More basic educational and behavioural supports, and low-technological interventions (e.g. chinstraps, mask re-fitting) appear valued, but are currently less rigorously evaluated. In other diseases with demanding treatment regimens, cognitive constructs including health attitudes and beliefs (health value, locus of control, chance, powerful others, self-efficacy) and mental and physical health status are significant predictors of adherence. The enhancement of multidisciplinary models with psychosocial interpretations may provide increased explanatory and interventional potential in models of CPAP use. While acknowledging the scarcity of evidence, a structured, multidisciplinary, cost-efficient model is suggested, containing educational, behavioural and technological components as basic support, and with high-expertise cognitive-behavioural intervention in more difficult cases of low CPAP use.

  7. Reduced Stress and Improved Sleep Quality Caused by Green Tea Are Associated with a Reduced Caffeine Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Unno

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine, one of the main components in green tea, can interfere with sleep and block the effect of theanine. Since theanine, the main amino acid in tea leaves, has significant anti-stress effects in animals and humans, we examined the effects of green tea with lowered caffeine content, i.e., low-caffeine green tea (LCGT, on stress and quality of sleep of middle–aged individuals (n = 20, mean age 51.3 ± 6.7 years in a double-blind crossover design. Standard green tea (SGT was used as the control. These teas (≥300 mL/day, which were eluted with room temperature water, were consumed over a period of seven days after a single washout term. The level of salivary α-amylase activity (sAA, a stress marker, was significantly lower in participants that consumed LCGT (64.7 U/mL than in those that consumed SGT (73.9 U/mL. Sleep quality was higher in participants that consumed a larger quantity of LCGT. In addition, a self-diagnostic check for accumulated fatigue was significantly lower in those participants that consumed LCGT than SGT. These results indicate that LCGT intake can reduce stress in middle-aged individuals and improve their quality of sleep. The reduction in caffeine is suggested to be a valid reason for enhancing the anti-stress effect of green tea.

  8. Effectiveness of prolonged-release melatonin in Improving Quality of Sleep in Patients Aged 55 or Over

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Kovrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of prolonged-release melatonin used in routine practice to improve sleep quality in Russian patients over 55 years of age.Patients and methods. The results of the multicenter open-label observational study of Circadin (prolonged-release melatonin efficiency for treatment of insomnia in 36 patients older than 55 yeare presented. The drug was administered at a dose of 2 mg one-two hours before bedtime for 3 weeks.Results. Treatment with Circadin resulted in statistically significant (p<0.0001 according to pared t-test (95% CI: 4.8; 7.3 improvement of the sleep quality: the mean value of the modified subjective sleep characteristics scale increased from 11.8±2.6 points at baseline to 17.8±2.3 points after 3 weeks of treatment. The modified Questionnaire Scoring Subjective Characteristics of Sleep was grade from 0 (very bad to 20 (very good taking into account: the amount of time required to fall asleep, the sleep duration, the number of night awakenings and the general well-being in the morning. An increase of 6 points on a scale from 0 to 20 was considered as clinically relevant. A greater effect was observed in patients with severely impaired sleep quality as well as with low level of depression and anxiety and absence of cognitive impairment. Upon completion of Circadin treatment there were statistically significant improvement (p<0.0001 of attention (the mean value of the symbol-digit coding test increased from 34.2±9.7 to 37.3±10.6 points and memory (the median value of the short-term verbal memory test increased from 4 points at baseline to 5 points at the study end, p=0.0069.The drug had a good safety profile; only one adverse event related to study medication (allergic rush was registered in the study. The absolute majority (91.7% of the study patients considered Circadin treatment as either effective or very effective.Conclusion. Taking into consideration the good safety profile of this drug

  9. Improvement in obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and management wait times: A retrospective analysis of home management pathway for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Samuel Alan; Skomro, Robert; Reid, John; Penz, Erika; Fenton, Mark; Gjevre, John; Cotton, David

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common condition within the Canadian population. The current gold standard for diagnosis and management of patients is in-laboratory (in-lab) polysomnography; however, the limited availability of testing options for patients has led to long wait times and increased disease burden within the population. The Sleep Research Laboratory in Saskatoon (Saskatchewan) implemented a home management program to run in parallel with the in-lab system several years ago in an effort to increase their capacity and reduce wait times. The present study was a retrospective analysis of all patients referred to the program between 2009 and 2012. The home management system has improved wait times by diagnosing and managing up to one-half of the referred patient population, reducing the wait for in-lab treatment from a median of 152 days in 2009 to 92 days in 2012 (Pmanagement can provide a viable alternative to in-lab testing for patients who meet strict entry criteria, reducing the in-lab workload and, ultimately, reducing wait times.

  10. Improvement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis and Management Wait Times: A Retrospective Analysis of a Home Management Pathway for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Alan Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea is a common condition within the Canadian population. The current gold standard for diagnosis and management of patients is in-laboratory (in-lab polysomnography; however, the limited availability of testing options for patients has led to long wait times and increased disease burden within the population. The Sleep Research Laboratory in Saskatoon (Saskatchewan implemented a home management program to run in parallel with the in-lab system several years ago in an effort to increase their capacity and reduce wait times. The present study was a retrospective analysis of all patients referred to the program between 2009 and 2012. The home management system has improved wait times by diagnosing and managing up to one-half of the referred patient population, reducing the wait for in-lab treatment from a median of 152 days in 2009 to 92 days in 2012 (P<0.0001. Moving forward, home management can provide a viable alternative to in-lab testing for patients who meet strict entry criteria, reducing the in-lab workload and, ultimately, reducing wait times.

  11. Increased physical activity improves sleep and mood outcomes in inactive people with insomnia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartescu, Iuliana; Morgan, Kevin; Stevinson, Clare D

    2015-10-01

    While high levels of activity and exercise training have been associated with improvements in sleep quality, minimum levels of activity likely to improve sleep outcomes have not been explored. A two-armed parallel randomized controlled trial (N=41; 30 females) was designed to assess whether increasing physical activity to the level recommended in public health guidelines can improve sleep quality among inactive adults meeting research diagnostic criteria for insomnia. The intervention consisted of a monitored program of ≥150 min of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity per week, for 6 months. The principal end-point was the Insomnia Severity Index at 6 months post-baseline. Secondary outcomes included measures of mood, fatigue and daytime sleepiness. Activity and light exposure were monitored throughout the trial using accelerometry and actigraphy. At 6 months post-baseline, the physical activity group showed significantly reduced insomnia symptom severity (F(8,26) = 5.16, P = 0.03), with an average reduction of four points on the Insomnia Severity Index; and significantly reduced depression and anxiety scores (F(6,28) = 5.61, P = 0.02; and F(6,28) = 4.41, P = 0.05, respectively). All of the changes were independent of daily light exposure. Daytime fatigue showed no significant effect of the intervention (F(8,26) = 1.84, P = 0.18). Adherence and retention were high. Internationally recommended minimum levels of physical activity improve daytime and night-time symptoms of chronic insomnia independent of daily light exposure levels. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Melatonin improves sleep in children with epilepsy: a randomized, double-blind, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sejal V; Horn, Paul S; Simakajornboon, Narong; Beebe, Dean W; Holland, Katherine; Byars, Anna W; Glauser, Tracy A

    2015-05-01

    Insomnia, especially maintenance insomnia, is widely prevalent in epilepsy. Although melatonin is commonly used, limited data address its efficacy. We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to identify the effects of melatonin on sleep and seizure control in children with epilepsy. Eleven prepubertal, developmentally normal children aged 6-11 years with epilepsy were randomized by a software algorithm to receive placebo or a 9-mg sustained release (SR) melatonin formulation for four weeks, followed by a one-week washout and a four-week crossover condition. The pharmacy performed blinding; patients, parents, and study staff other than a statistician were blinded. The primary outcomes were sleep onset latency and wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO) measured on polysomnography. The secondary outcomes included seizure frequency, epileptiform spike density per hour of sleep on electroencephalogram (EEG), and reaction time (RT) measures on psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). Statistical tests appropriate for crossover designs were used for the analysis. Data were analyzed from 10 subjects who completed the study. Melatonin decreased sleep latency (mean difference, MD, of 11.4 min and p = 0.02) and WASO (MD of 22 min and p = 0.04) as compared to placebo. No worsening of spike density or seizure frequency was seen. Additionally, slow-wave sleep duration and rapid eye movement (REM) latency were increased with melatonin and REM sleep duration was decreased. These changes were statistically significant. Worsening of headache was noted in one subject with migraine on melatonin. SR melatonin resulted in statistically significant decreases in sleep latency and WASO. No clear effects on seizures were observed, but the study was too small to allow any conclusions to be drawn in this regard. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effect of Nursing Quality Improvement and Mobile Health Interventions on Infant Sleep Practices: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Rachel Y; Hauck, Fern R; Colson, Eve R; Kellams, Ann L; Geller, Nicole L; Heeren, Timothy; Kerr, Stephen M; Drake, Emily E; Tanabe, Kawai; McClain, Mary; Corwin, Michael J

    2017-07-25

    Inadequate adherence to recommendations known to reduce the risk of sudden unexpected infant death has contributed to a slowing in the decline of these deaths. To assess the effectiveness of 2 interventions separately and combined to promote infant safe sleep practices compared with control interventions. Four-group cluster randomized clinical trial of mothers of healthy term newborns who were recruited between March 2015 and May 2016 at 16 US hospitals with more than 100 births annually. Data collection ended in October 2016. All participants were beneficiaries of a nursing quality improvement campaign in infant safe sleep practices (intervention) or breastfeeding (control), and then received a 60-day mobile health program, in which mothers received frequent emails or text messages containing short videos with educational content about infant safe sleep practices (intervention) or breastfeeding (control) and queries about infant care practices. The primary outcome was maternal self-reported adherence to 4 infant safe sleep practices of sleep position (supine), sleep location (room sharing without bed sharing), soft bedding use (none), and pacifier use (any); data were collected by maternal survey when the infant was aged 60 to 240 days. Of the 1600 mothers who were randomized to 1 of 4 groups (400 per group), 1263 completed the survey (78.9%). The mean (SD) maternal age was 28.1 years (5.8 years) and 32.8% of respondents were non-Hispanic white, 32.3% Hispanic, 27.2% non-Hispanic black, and 7.7% other race/ethnicity. The mean (SD) infant age was 11.2 weeks (4.4 weeks) and 51.2% were female. In the adjusted analyses, mothers receiving the safe sleep mobile health intervention had higher prevalence of placing their infants supine compared with mothers receiving the control mobile health intervention (89.1% vs 80.2%, respectively; adjusted risk difference, 8.9% [95% CI, 5.3%-11.7%]), room sharing without bed sharing (82.8% vs 70.4%; adjusted risk difference, 12

  14. Blue-light-blocking intraocular lens implantation improves the sleep quality of cataract patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; She, Chunyan; Chen, Danian; Yan, Fangbing; Zeng, Jihong; Zeng, Liping; Wang, Lin

    2013-08-15

    To evaluate whether blue-light-blocking intraocular lens implantation affects the sleep quality of cataract patients. Pre-test/post-test experiment. N/A. 40 patients having bilateral cataracts with level higher than N3 (LOCS II) nucleus hardness, including 26 females (65%) and 14 males (35%). Cataract phacoemulsification followed by blue-light-blocking intraocular lens (IOLs, SN60WF, Alcon Laboratories, USA) implantation. Patients were contacted in site before cataract surgery and followed by telephone at least 2 months later after second-eye surgery. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaires were administered to evaluate sleep quality. Median age of patients was 74 years (IQR 70 to 78). The median PSQI globe scores were 7 before surgery and 4 after surgery (Z = -2.121, p = 0.037). More specifically, there were significant differences on subjective sleep quality (Z = -2.064, p = 0.045), sleep duration (Z = -2.037, p = 0.047) and daytime dysfunction (Z = -2.142, p = 0.034) when compared between before and after surgeries. The ratio of poor sleepers (PSQI > 5) was reduced significantly after surgery (χ² = 14.532, p Blue-light-blocking IOL had a significantly beneficial effect on the sleep quality of cataract patients.

  15. Wheel running improves REM sleep and attenuates stress-induced flattening of diurnal rhythms in F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Regular physical activity produces resistance to the negative health consequences of stressor exposure. One way that exercise may confer stress resistance is by reducing the impact of stress on diurnal rhythms and sleep; disruptions of which contribute to stress-related disease including mood disorders. Given the link between diurnal rhythm disruptions and stress-related disorders and that exercise both promotes stress resistance and is a powerful non-photic biological entrainment cue, we tested if wheel running could reduce stress-induced disruptions of sleep/wake behavior and diurnal rhythms. Adult, male F344 rats with or without access to running wheels were instrumented for biotelemetric recording of diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity, heart rate, core body temperature (CBT), and sleep (i.e. REM, NREM, and WAKE) in the presence of a 12 h light/dark cycle. Following 6 weeks of sedentary or exercise conditions, rats were exposed to an acute stressor known to disrupt diurnal rhythms and produce behaviors associated with mood disorders. Prior to stressor exposure, exercise rats had higher CBT, more locomotor activity during the dark cycle, and greater %REM during the light cycle relative to sedentary rats. NREM and REM sleep were consolidated immediately following peak running to a greater extent in exercise, compared to sedentary rats. In response to stressor exposure, exercise rats expressed higher stress-induced hyperthermia than sedentary rats. Stressor exposure disrupted diurnal rhythms in sedentary rats; and wheel running reduced these effects. Improvements in sleep and reduced diurnal rhythm disruptions following stress could contribute to the health promoting and stress protective effects of exercise.

  16. Slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation during non-rapid eye movement sleep improves behavioral inhibition in attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Tobias Munz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Behavioral inhibition, which is a later-developing executive function (EF and anatomically located in prefrontal areas, is impaired in attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. While optimal EFs have been shown to depend on efficient sleep in healthy subjects, the impact of sleep problems, frequently reported in ADHD, remains elusive. Findings of macroscopic sleep changes in ADHD are inconsistent, but there is emerging evidence for distinct microscopic changes with a focus on prefrontal cortical regions and non-rapid eye movement (non-REM slow-wave sleep. Recently, slow oscillations (SO during non-REM sleep were found to be less functional and, as such, may be involved in sleep-dependent memory impairments in ADHD. Objective: By augmenting slow-wave power through bilateral, slow oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS, frequency = 0.75 Hz during non-REM sleep, we aimed to improve daytime behavioral inhibition in children with ADHD. Methods: 14 boys (10-14 yrs diagnosed with ADHD were included. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, patients received so-tDCS either in the first or in the second experimental sleep night. Inhibition control was assessed with a visuomotor go/no-go task. Intrinsic alertness was assessed with a simple stimulus response task. To control for visuomotor performance, motor memory was assessed with a finger sequence tapping task. Results: SO-power was enhanced during early non-REM sleep, accompanied by slowed reaction times and decreased standard deviations of reaction times, in the go/no-go task after so-tDCS. In contrast, intrinsic alertness and motor memory performance were not improved by so-tDCS. Conclusion: Since behavioral inhibition but not intrinsic alertness or motor memory was improved by so-tDCS, our results suggest that lateral prefrontal slow oscillations during sleep might play a specific role for executive functioning in ADHD.

  17. Adherence to CPAP therapy improves quality of life and reduces symptoms among obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avlonitou, Eirini; Kapsimalis, Fotis; Varouchakis, George; Vardavas, Constantine I; Behrakis, Panagiotis

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to asses quality of life and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients after adhering to 6 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. A group of 50 patients (41 men and 9 women) were diagnosed by polysomnography and treated with CPAP therapy for 6 months. Their symptoms and health-related quality of life were assessed by administering a validated and translated version of the sleep apnea quality of life index (SAQLI). Sleepiness was measured using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and through electronic monitoring of CPAP usage per night of sleep. Mean CPAP usage was 4.5 ± 0.5 h per night. Comparisons between quality of life indexes before and after CPAP treatment showed an improvement in the total SAQLI score (3.8 ± 0.9 vs. 5.8 ± 0.8 after CPAP, p vs. 6.0 ± 0.9, p vs.6.3 ± 0.7, p vs. 5.7 ± 1.0, p vs. 5.8 ± 1.2, p vs. 3.9 ± 3.8, p watching a spectacle" (96%), "reading" (95%), "carrying on a conversation" (95%), "driving" (92.9%), "restless sleep" (87.8%), and "urinating more than once per night" (84.8%). Smaller improvements were observed for the reported "dry mouth-throat upon awakening" (36.1%),"excessive fatigue" (54.5%), and "decreased energy" (55.3%). We conclude that OSAS patients who adhere to nighttime CPAP therapy show significant improvement of their quality of life, daytime sleepiness, and other symptoms after 6 months of treatment with CPAP.

  18. Relations Between Toddler Sleep Characteristics, Sleep Problems, and Temperament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfese, Victoria J; Rudasill, Kathleen M; Prokasky, Amanda; Champagne, Carly; Holmes, Molly; Molfese, Dennis L; Bates, John E

    2015-01-01

    Two sources of information (parent-reported sleep diaries and actigraph records) were used to investigate how toddler sleep characteristics (bed time/sleep onset, wake time/sleep offset, total nighttime sleep, and total sleep time) are related to sleep problems and temperament. There were 64 toddler participants in the study. Consistent with studies of older children, parent reports differed from actigraph-based records. The findings that parent-reported and actigraph-recorded sleep characteristics varied as a function of parent report of toddler sleep problems and temperament add needed information on toddler sleep. Such information may contribute to improving parents' awareness of their child's sleep characteristics and correlates of problem sleep.

  19. Exercise improves learning and memory impairments in sleep deprived female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadati, Hakimeh; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Esmaeilpour, Khadije; Nazeri, Masoud; Mazhari, Shahrzad; Sheibani, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate sleep is a common problem in modern societies. It has been previously shown that female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive functions. Physical exercise has been suggested to attenuate the cognitive impairments induced by sleep deprivation in male rats. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of physical exercise on cognitive functions of female rats following paradoxical sleep deprivation. Intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats were used in the present study. The exercise protocol was 4 weeks of treadmill running. The multiple platform method was applied for the induction of 72h paradoxical sleep deprivation and the cognitive function was evaluated using Morris water maze (MWM). Plasma corticosterone level was evaluated in separate groups of study. ANOVA and repeated measures were used to analyze the data and Psleep-deprived OVX rats compared to the intact and the other OVX groups. Short term memory impairment was observed in both sleep-deprived OVX and intact groups. Physical exercise alleviated the PSD-induced learning and memory impairments in both intact and OVX groups. Corticosterone levels were not statistically significant among the different groups. The results of our study confirmed the negative effects of PSD on cognitive functions in female rats and regular physical exercise seems to protect rats from these effects. Further studies are suggested to be carried out in order to evaluate the possible underlying mechanisms, and also to evaluate the possible interactions between sex hormones and PSD-induced cognitive impairments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Does Sleep Improve Your Grammar? Preferential Consolidation of Arbitrary Components of New Linguistic Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirković, Jelena; Gaskell, M Gareth

    2016-01-01

    We examined the role of sleep-related memory consolidation processes in learning new form-meaning mappings. Specifically, we examined a Complementary Learning Systems account, which implies that sleep-related consolidation should be more beneficial for new hippocampally dependent arbitrary mappings (e.g. new vocabulary items) relative to new systematic mappings (e.g. grammatical regularities), which can be better encoded neocortically. The hypothesis was tested using a novel language with an artificial grammatical gender system. Stem-referent mappings implemented arbitrary aspects of the new language, and determiner/suffix+natural gender mappings implemented systematic aspects (e.g. tib scoiffesh + ballerina, tib mofeem + bride; ked jorool + cowboy, ked heefaff + priest). Importantly, the determiner-gender and the suffix-gender mappings varied in complexity and salience, thus providing a range of opportunities to detect beneficial effects of sleep for this type of mapping. Participants were trained on the new language using a word-picture matching task, and were tested after a 2-hour delay which included sleep or wakefulness. Participants in the sleep group outperformed participants in the wake group on tests assessing memory for the arbitrary aspects of the new mappings (individual vocabulary items), whereas we saw no evidence of a sleep benefit in any of the tests assessing memory for the systematic aspects of the new mappings: Participants in both groups extracted the salient determiner-natural gender mapping, but not the more complex suffix-natural gender mapping. The data support the predictions of the complementary systems account and highlight the importance of the arbitrariness/systematicity dimension in the consolidation process for declarative memories.

  1. Does Sleep Improve Your Grammar? Preferential Consolidation of Arbitrary Components of New Linguistic Knowledge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Mirković

    Full Text Available We examined the role of sleep-related memory consolidation processes in learning new form-meaning mappings. Specifically, we examined a Complementary Learning Systems account, which implies that sleep-related consolidation should be more beneficial for new hippocampally dependent arbitrary mappings (e.g. new vocabulary items relative to new systematic mappings (e.g. grammatical regularities, which can be better encoded neocortically. The hypothesis was tested using a novel language with an artificial grammatical gender system. Stem-referent mappings implemented arbitrary aspects of the new language, and determiner/suffix+natural gender mappings implemented systematic aspects (e.g. tib scoiffesh + ballerina, tib mofeem + bride; ked jorool + cowboy, ked heefaff + priest. Importantly, the determiner-gender and the suffix-gender mappings varied in complexity and salience, thus providing a range of opportunities to detect beneficial effects of sleep for this type of mapping. Participants were trained on the new language using a word-picture matching task, and were tested after a 2-hour delay which included sleep or wakefulness. Participants in the sleep group outperformed participants in the wake group on tests assessing memory for the arbitrary aspects of the new mappings (individual vocabulary items, whereas we saw no evidence of a sleep benefit in any of the tests assessing memory for the systematic aspects of the new mappings: Participants in both groups extracted the salient determiner-natural gender mapping, but not the more complex suffix-natural gender mapping. The data support the predictions of the complementary systems account and highlight the importance of the arbitrariness/systematicity dimension in the consolidation process for declarative memories.

  2. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure improves myocardial perfusion reserve and endothelial-dependent vasodilation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Patricia K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD, but whether OSA is an independent risk factor for CVD is controversial. The purpose of this study is to determine if patients with OSA have subclinical cardiovascular disease that is detectable by multi-modality cardiovascular imaging and whether these abnormalities improve after nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP. Results Of the 35 consecutive subjects with newly diagnosed moderate to severe OSA recruited from the Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic, 20 patients were randomized to active vs. sham nCPAP. Active nCPAP was titrated to pressures that would prevent sleep disordered breathing based on inpatient polysomnography. OSA patients had baseline vascular function abnormalities including decreased myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR, brachial flow mediated dilation (FMD and nitroglycerin-induced coronary vasodilation. Patients randomized to active nCPAP had improvement of MPR (1.5 ± 0.5 vs. 3.0 ± 1.3, p = 0.02 and brachial FMD (2.5% ± 5.7% vs. 9.0% ± 6.5%, p = 0.03 after treatment, but those randomized to sham nCPAP showed no significant improvement. There were no significant changes seen in chamber sizes, systolic and diastolic function, valvular function and coronary vasodilation to nitroglycerin. Conclusions Patients with moderate to severe OSA had decreased MPR and brachial FMD that improved after 3 months of nCPAP. These findings suggest that relief of apnea in OSA may improve microvascular disease and endothelial dysfunction, which may prevent the development of overt cardiovascular disease. Further study in a larger patient population may be warranted.

  3. Role of a respiratory therapist in improving adherence to positive airway pressure treatment in a pediatric sleep apnea clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambhekar, Supriya K; Com, Gulnur; Tang, Xinyu; Pruss, Kristi K; Jackson, Rithea; Bower, Charles; Carroll, John L; Ward, Wendy

    2013-12-01

    Many pediatric patients need positive airway pressure (PAP) for treatment of obstructive sleep-disordered breathing. Adherence to PAP (defined as percent of nights with PAP use of > 4 h) is often poor and not sustained long-term. With any chronic disease, education has been shown to help with patient outcomes. Education of patients and parents regarding PAP can be provided by different healthcare professionals. There is no published literature assessing the role of respiratory therapists (RTs) in improving adherence to PAP in children. We hypothesized that the addition of RT visits to a PAP clinic would improve PAP adherence. RT services for PAP patients were introduced in a multidisciplinary pediatric sleep clinic in May 2006. We identified children who had been followed in clinic, and had adherence download information before and after introduction of RT services. We collected demographic, polysomnography, and CPAP adherence data at clinic visits. Forty-six subjects met criteria for inclusion. The mean ± SD age was 14.9 ± 6 y. The mean ± SD apnea-hypopnea index was 26.7 ± 30 events/h. Other than the addition of the RT intervention, all subjects continued to receive the same clinical services as before. Subjects were divided into 3 groups, based on baseline adherence: 0% use, use for 1-50% of nights, and use for > 50% of nights. There was a statistically significant improvement in PAP adherence in the subjects with baseline use of 0% and 1-50%, but no improvement in those with > 50% use at baseline. There was no significant change in PAP use at subsequent RT visits. Utilization at clinic visits of an RT trained in the use of PAP improved adherence in pediatric subjects with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing when their baseline PAP adherence was < 50%.

  4. Educational video to improve CPAP use in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea at risk for poor adherence: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralnick, Amy S; Balachandran, Jay S; Szutenbach, Shane; Adley, Kevin; Emami, Leila; Mohammadi, Meelad; Farnan, Jeanne M; Arora, Vineet M; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2017-12-01

    Suboptimal adherence to CPAP limits its clinical effectiveness in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Although rigorous behavioural interventions improve CPAP adherence, their labour-intensive nature has limited widespread implementation. Moreover, these interventions have not been tested in patients at risk of poor CPAP adherence. Our objective was to determine whether an educational video will improve CPAP adherence in patients at risk of poor CPAP adherence. Patients referred by clinicians without sleep medicine expertise to an urban sleep laboratory that serves predominantly minority population were randomised to view an educational video about OSA and CPAP therapy before the polysomnogram, or to usual care. The primary outcome was CPAP adherence during the first 30 days of therapy. Secondary outcomes were show rates to sleep clinic (attended appointment) and 30-day CPAP adherence after the sleep clinic visit date. A total of 212 patients met the eligibility criteria and were randomised to video education (n=99) or to usual care (n=113). There were no differences in CPAP adherence at 30 days (3.3, 95% CI 2.8 to 3.8 hours/day video education; vs 3.5, 95% CI 3.1 to 4.0 hours/day usual care; p=0.44) or during the 30 days after sleep clinic visit. Sleep clinic show rate was 54% in the video education group and 59% in the usual care group (p=0.41). CPAP adherence, however, significantly worsened in patients who did not show up to the sleep clinic. In patients at risk for poor CPAP adherence, an educational video did not improve CPAP adherence or show rates to sleep clinic compared with usual care. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02553694. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Can music improve sleep quality in adults with primary insomnia? A systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fan; Zhang, Yingshi; Hou, Jun; Cai, Jiayi; Jiang, Qiyu; Li, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Qingchun; Li, Bo-An

    2018-01-01

    Primary insomnia is one of the most common issues for adults. However, whether to use music intervention as a non-pharmacological method of treatment, as well as which treatment should be preferred, is still a matter of controversy. Therefore, we aimed to compare and rank music interventions and no-music controls for primary insomnia patients. A network meta-analysis was used to identify evidence from relevant clinical trials. We searched PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure Library for publications up to May 2017, pertaining to music intervention for primary insomnia patients. The prespecified primary outcome was sleep quality (scored by the PSQI and overall), and the secondary outcomes were sleep onset latency and sleep efficiency. We did pairwise meta-analyses using the random-effects model, later completing the random-effects network meta-analyses. The study was registered with PROSPERO, number CRD42017064750. We deemed 20 trials to be eligible, involving 1339 patients and 12 intervention arms. For PSQI scores, all intervention arms were statistically more effective than the usual care, with patients ranking listening to music as the best means of intervention (SMD: -0.61, 95%CrI: -1.01 to -0.20). For overall sleep quality, only music-associated relaxation was statistically more effective than the patients' usual care (-0.28, -0.48 to -0.08). In terms of sleep onset latency, music-associated relaxation and listening to music had significant advantages (-0.26, -0.64 to -0.09, and -0.28, -0.53 to -0.02); listening to music and music with exercise displayed a tendency to improve sleep efficiency. When considering the efficacy, music intervention seemed to offer clear advantages for adults with primary insomnia. Listening to music and music-associated relaxation are probably the best options to consider in the application of music intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repeated awakenings associated with sleep apnea make normal, restorative sleep impossible. People with sleep apnea often experience ... et al. Sleep breathing disorders. In: Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine. 5th ed. St. Louis, Mo.: ...

  7. Polysomnograph chart view by patients: a new educational strategy to improve CPAP adherence in sleep apnea therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Vito Antonio; Damiani, Mario Francesco; Quaranta, Vitaliano Nicola; Capozzolo, Alberto; Resta, Onofrio

    2014-02-01

    CPAP is currently the treatment of choice for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, but therapy adherence is poor. Many educational trials have been proposed to increase CPAP adherence. We tested the hypothesis that polysomnograph chart viewing by patients would improve CPAP adherence. A controlled parallel group study was performed with 206 newly diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients, randomized into 2 groups (n = 103 each): standard support group, and educational support group. Each educational support group subject viewed 2 consecutive polysomnograms on the computer screen: the first recorded during a standard diagnostic overnight polysomnography, and the second during a full-night polysomnography with nasal CPAP. The subject's attention was drawn only to the flow and oxyhemoglobin saturation curves. Clinical outcomes were assessed via polysomnography at CPAP initiation and after 1, 3, and 12 months. After 12 months of CPAP, 76% of the educational support group and 52% of the standard support group returned for a follow-up visit (P CPAP use (measured as hours of use per night) was higher in the educational support group at each control visit. Polysomnograph chart viewing by obstructive sleep apnea patients can increase CPAP adherence, as evaluated by rate of return for the follow-up visit and mean nightly CPAP use.

  8. Manipulating the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms to improve clinical management of major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical psychiatry has always been limited by the lack of objective tests to substantiate diagnoses and a lack of specific treatments that target underlying pathophysiology. One area in which these twin failures has been most frustrating is major depression. Due to very considerable progress in the basic and clinical neurosciences of sleep-wake cycles and underlying circadian systems this situation is now rapidly changing. Discussion The development of specific behavioral or pharmacological strategies that target these basic regulatory systems is driving renewed clinical interest. Here, we explore the extent to which objective tests of sleep-wake cycles and circadian function - namely, those that measure timing or synchrony of circadian-dependent physiology as well as daytime activity and nighttime sleep patterns - can be used to identify a sub-class of patients with major depression who have disturbed circadian profiles. Summary Once this unique pathophysiology is characterized, a highly personalized treatment plan can be proposed and monitored. New treatments will now be designed and old treatments re-evaluated on the basis of their effects on objective measures of sleep-wake cycles, circadian rhythms and related metabolic systems. PMID:23521808

  9. Caffeine improves reaction time, vigilance and logical reasoning during extended periods with restricted opportunities for sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimori, Gary H; McLellan, Tom M; Tate, Charmaine M; Voss, David M; Niro, Phil; Lieberman, Harris R

    2015-06-01

    Various occupational groups are required to maintain optimal physical and cognitive function during overnight periods of wakefulness, often with less than optimal sleep. Strategies are required to help mitigate the impairments in cognitive function to help sustain workplace safety and productivity. To test the effectiveness of repeated 200 mg doses of caffeine on cognitive function and live-fire marksmanship with soldiers during three successive nights of sustained wakefulness followed by 4-h afternoon sleep periods. Twenty Special Forces personnel (28.6 ± 4.7 years, 177.6 ± 7.5 cm and 81.2 ± 8.0 kg) were randomly assigned to receive four 200-mg doses of caffeine (n = 10) or placebo (n = 10) during the late evening and early morning hours during three successive days. An afternoon 4-h sleep period followed. The psychomotor (PVT) and field (FVT) vigilance, logical reasoning (LRT) tests and a vigilance monitor assessed cognitive function throughout the study. Live-fire marksmanship requiring friend-foe discrimination was assessed. Caffeine maintained speed on the PVT (p optimal sleep periods during the day are not available.

  10. Feasibility of Using Actigraphy and Motivational-Based Interviewing to Improve Sleep among School-Age Children and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willgerodt, Mayumi A.; Kieckhefer, Gail M.; Ward, Teresa M.; Lentz, Martha J.

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate sleep occurs in 25% of our nation's children; poor sleep is associated with physical, cognitive, and social consequences. Developing good sleep hygiene in middle childhood is important, because habits typically extend to adolescence and adulthood; yet, there has been little research on sleep interventions for school-age children. The…

  11. An improved methodology for individualized performance prediction of sleep-deprived individuals with the two-process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaraman, Srinivasan; Gribok, Andrei V; Wesensten, Nancy J; Balkin, Thomas J; Reifman, Jaques

    2009-10-01

    We present a method based on the two-process model of sleep regulation for developing individualized biomathematical models that predict performance impairment for individuals subjected to total sleep loss. This new method advances our previous work in two important ways. First, it enables model customization to start as soon as the first performance measurement from an individual becomes available. This was achieved by optimally combining the performance information obtained from the individual's performance measurements with a priori performance information using a Bayesian framework, while retaining the strategy of transforming the nonlinear optimization problem of finding the optimal estimates of the two-process model parameters into a series of linear optimization problems. Second, by taking advantage of the linear representation of the two-process model, this new method enables the analytical computation of statistically based measures of reliability for the model predictions in the form of prediction intervals. Two distinct data sets were used to evaluate the proposed method. Results using simulated data with superimposed white Gaussian noise showed that the new method yielded 50% to 90% improvement in parameter-estimate accuracy over the previous method. Moreover, the accuracy of the analytically computed prediction intervals was validated through Monte Carlo simulations. Results for subjects representing three sleep-loss phenotypes who participated in a laboratory study (82 h of total sleep loss) indicated that the proposed method yielded individualized predictions that were up to 43% more accurate than group-average prediction models and, on average, 10% more accurate than individualized predictions based on our previous method.

  12. A pilot evaluation of an online cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia disorder – targeted screening and interactive Web design lead to improved sleep in a community population

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Kirstie N; Goldsmith, Paul; Gardiner, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Kirstie N Anderson, Paul Goldsmith, Alison Gardiner Regional Sleep Service, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK Introduction: Computerized or online cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs) are increasingly being developed to deliver insomnia therapy (CBT-i). They seek to address the difficulty of delivering an evidence-based technology to a large number of patients at low cost. Previous online applications have shown significant but variable improvements in sleep efficiency and a decreas...

  13. The Circadian Regulation of Sleep: Impact of a Functional ADA-Polymorphism and Its Association to Working Memory Improvements

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Carolin F.; Micheline Maire; Virginie Gabel; Marcel Hofstetter; Viola, Antoine U.; Vitaliy Kolodyazhniy; Werner Strobel; Thomas Goetz; Valérie Bachmann; Hans-Peter Landolt; Christian Cajochen; Christina Schmidt

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is regulated in a time-of-day dependent manner and profits working memory. However, the impact of the circadian timing system as well as contributions of specific sleep properties to this beneficial effect remains largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear to which extent inter-individual differences in sleep-wake regulation depend on circadian phase and modulate the association between sleep and working memory. Here, sleep electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded during a 40-h multip...

  14. Modafinil Increases Awake EEG Activation and Improves Performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David; Bai, Xiao Xue; Williams, Shaun C.; Hua, Shu Cheng; Kim, Jong-Won; Marshall, Nathaniel S.; D'Rozario, Angela; Grunstein, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the changes in waking electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers with modafinil during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to investigate neurophysiological evidence for potential neurocognitive improvements. Design: Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. CPAP was used for the first night and then withdrawn for 2 subsequent nights. Each morning after the 2 CPAP withdrawal nights, patients received either 200 mg modafinil or placebo. After a 5-w washout, the procedure repeated with the crossover drug. Setting: University teaching hospital. Participants: Stable CPAP users (n = 23 men with OSA) Measurement and Results: Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (awake EEG measurement with eyes open and closed), Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), and driving simulator Performance were assessed bihourly during the 3 testing days following CPAP treatment and CPAP withdrawal nights. Compared to placebo, modafinil significantly increased awake EEG activation (faster EEG frequency) with increased alpha/delta (A/D) ratio (P EEG band power of alpha, beta, theta, and delta did not correlate with any neurocognitive performance. Conclusions: Modafinil administration during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal increased awake EEG activation, which correlated to improved performance. This study provides supporting neurophysiological evidence that modafinil is a potential short-term treatment option during acute CPAP withdrawal. Citation: Wang D, Bai XX, Williams SC, Hua SC, Kim JW, Marshall NS, D'Rozario A, Grunstein RR. Modafinil increases awake EEG activation and improves performance in obstructive sleep apnea during continuous positive airway pressure withdrawal. SLEEP 2015;38(8):1297–1303. PMID:26158894

  15. Predictors of improvement in subjective sleep quality reported by older adults following group-based cognitive behavior therapy for sleep maintenance and early morning awakening insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Nicole; Lack, Leon; Wright, Helen; Kennaway, David J

    2013-09-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy is an effective nonpharmacologic treatment for insomnia. However, individualized administration is costly and often results in substantial variability in treatment response across individual patients, particularly so for older adults. Group-based administration has demonstrated impressive potential for a brief and inexpensive answer to the effective treatment of insomnia in the older population. It is important to identify potential predictors of response to such a treatment format to guide clinicians when selecting the most suitable treatment for their patients. The aim of our study was to identify factors that predict subjective sleep quality of older adults following group-based administration of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Eighty-six adults (41 men; mean age, 64.10 y; standard deviation [SD], 6.80) with sleep maintenance or early morning awakening insomnia were selected from a community-based sample to participate in a 4-week group-based treatment program of CBT-I. Participants were required to complete 7-day sleep diaries and a comprehensive battery of questionnaires related to sleep quality and daytime functioning. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to identify factors predicting subjective sleep quality immediately following treatment and at 3-month follow-up. Sleep diaries reported average nightly sleep efficiency (SE), which was used as the outcome measure of sleep quality. Participants with the greatest SE following treatment while controlling for pretreatment SE were relatively younger and had more confidence in their ability to sleep at pretreatment. These characteristics may be useful to guide clinicians when considering the use of a group-based CBT-I for sleep maintenance or early morning awakening insomnia in older adults. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Eighty Kilograms Weight Reduction in a Case of Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Several Comorbidities: Did the Conditions Improve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Foroughi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA together with metabolic disorders is common in severely obese patients. Weight reduction is considered as a treatment modality in these cases while few of them can succeed in considerable weight loss. Here, we present a severely obese man with body mass index of 54 suffered from OSA, type 2 diabetes, hypothyroidism, and hypertension. He intentionally lost 80 kilograms weight during the 2-year follow-up. Diabetes and hypertension completely resolved with considerable improvement in OSA syndrome after this huge weight reduction.

  17. Eighty Kilograms Weight Reduction in a Case of Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Several Comorbidities: Did the Conditions Improve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Moein; Malekmohammad, Majid; Adimi, Parisa

    2016-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) together with metabolic disorders is common in severely obese patients. Weight reduction is considered as a treatment modality in these cases while few of them can succeed in considerable weight loss. Here, we present a severely obese man with body mass index of 54 suffered from OSA, type 2 diabetes, hypothyroidism, and hypertension. He intentionally lost 80 kilograms weight during the 2-year follow-up. Diabetes and hypertension completely resolved with considerable improvement in OSA syndrome after this huge weight reduction.

  18. The circadian regulation of sleep: impact of a functional ADA-polymorphism and its association to working memory improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Carolin F; Maire, Micheline; Gabel, Virginie; Hofstetter, Marcel; Viola, Antoine U; Kolodyazhniy, Vitaliy; Strobel, Werner; Goetz, Thomas; Bachmann, Valérie; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Cajochen, Christian; Schmidt, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is regulated in a time-of-day dependent manner and profits working memory. However, the impact of the circadian timing system as well as contributions of specific sleep properties to this beneficial effect remains largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear to which extent inter-individual differences in sleep-wake regulation depend on circadian phase and modulate the association between sleep and working memory. Here, sleep electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded during a 40-h multiple nap protocol, and working memory performance was assessed by the n-back task 10 times before and after each scheduled nap sleep episode. Twenty-four participants were genotyped regarding a functional polymorphism in adenosine deaminase (rs73598374, 12 G/A-, 12 G/G-allele carriers), previously associated with differences in sleep-wake regulation. Our results indicate that genotype-driven differences in sleep depend on circadian phase: heterozygous participants were awake longer and slept less at the end of the biological day, while they exhibited longer non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and slow wave sleep concomitant with reduced power between 8-16 Hz at the end of the biological night. Slow wave sleep and NREM sleep delta EEG activity covaried positively with overall working memory performance, independent of circadian phase and genotype. Moreover, REM sleep duration benefitted working memory particularly when occurring in the early morning hours and specifically in heterozygous individuals. Even though based on a small sample size and thus requiring replication, our results suggest genotype-dependent differences in circadian sleep regulation. They further indicate that REM sleep, being under strong circadian control, boosts working memory performance according to genotype in a time-of-day dependent manner. Finally, our data provide first evidence that slow wave sleep and NREM sleep delta activity, majorly regulated by sleep homeostatic mechanisms, is linked to working

  19. The circadian regulation of sleep: impact of a functional ADA-polymorphism and its association to working memory improvements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin F Reichert

    Full Text Available Sleep is regulated in a time-of-day dependent manner and profits working memory. However, the impact of the circadian timing system as well as contributions of specific sleep properties to this beneficial effect remains largely unexplored. Moreover, it is unclear to which extent inter-individual differences in sleep-wake regulation depend on circadian phase and modulate the association between sleep and working memory. Here, sleep electroencephalography (EEG was recorded during a 40-h multiple nap protocol, and working memory performance was assessed by the n-back task 10 times before and after each scheduled nap sleep episode. Twenty-four participants were genotyped regarding a functional polymorphism in adenosine deaminase (rs73598374, 12 G/A-, 12 G/G-allele carriers, previously associated with differences in sleep-wake regulation. Our results indicate that genotype-driven differences in sleep depend on circadian phase: heterozygous participants were awake longer and slept less at the end of the biological day, while they exhibited longer non rapid eye movement (NREM sleep and slow wave sleep concomitant with reduced power between 8-16 Hz at the end of the biological night. Slow wave sleep and NREM sleep delta EEG activity covaried positively with overall working memory performance, independent of circadian phase and genotype. Moreover, REM sleep duration benefitted working memory particularly when occurring in the early morning hours and specifically in heterozygous individuals. Even though based on a small sample size and thus requiring replication, our results suggest genotype-dependent differences in circadian sleep regulation. They further indicate that REM sleep, being under strong circadian control, boosts working memory performance according to genotype in a time-of-day dependent manner. Finally, our data provide first evidence that slow wave sleep and NREM sleep delta activity, majorly regulated by sleep homeostatic mechanisms, is

  20. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer's disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Plitnick, Barbara A; Lok, Anna; Jones, Geoffrey E; Higgins, Patricia; Hornick, Thomas R; Rea, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD), with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level "bluish-white" lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light-dark and rest-activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest-activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. The lighting intervention significantly (Psleep scores from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency. The lighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light-dark and rest-activity patterns, suggesting an increase in circadian entrainment. The lighting intervention significantly (Plighting intervention, tailored to increase daytime circadian stimulation, can be used to increase sleep quality and improve behavior in patients with ADRD. The present field study, while promising for application, should be replicated using a larger sample size and perhaps using longer treatment duration.

  1. The impact of an online prematriculation sleep course (sleep 101) on sleep knowledge and behaviors in college freshmen: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Quan SF; Ziporyn PS

    2017-01-01

    College students have a high prevalence of poor sleep quality and sleep deficiency which negatively impacts their academic, mental and physical performance. A prematriculation course focused on improving sleep knowledge and behaviors may reduce sleep problems. “Sleep 101” is an online prematriculation course developed to educate incoming college freshmen about the importance of sleep in their lives and to recommend behaviors that will improve their sleep health. In a pilot program, “Sleep 101...

  2. Improvement of fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with biologics: relationship with sleep disorders, depression and clinical efficacy. A prospective, multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genty, Marlène; Combe, Bernard; Kostine, Marie; Ardouin, Elodie; Morel, Jacques; Lukas, Cédric

    2017-01-01

    To assess predictive factors of improvement in related fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients newly receiving biologic therapy, and specifically the influence of the improvement of the quality of sleep. We conducted a multicentre prospective study in RA patients requiring initiation or change of biologic therapy. The improvement in fatigue, sleep disorders and depression was assessed respectively by the FACIT fatigue scale, Spiegel scale and Beck Depression Inventory at inclusion (M0) and 3 months (M3) after the beginning of treatment. Potential confounders were assessed and adjusted for. The association between evolution of fatigue and other characteristics were evaluated by univariate (χ2) then multivariate (logistic regression) analyses. We followed-up 99 patients. FACIT scores at M0 revealed frequently reported fatigue: 89%, high prevalence of sleep disorders: 95% and depression: 67%. Improvement of fatigue, sleep quality and depression was observed in 58.6%, 26.3% and 34.3% of cases, respectively. Significant factors associated with an improvement in fatigue at M3 were an elevated sedimentation rate at M0 (OR=5.7[2.0-16.0], p=0.001) and a favourable EULAR response at M3 (OR=4.8[1.6-14.8], p=0.006). Furthermore, a number of swollen joints > 5 at baseline (OR=0.3 [0.1-0.8]) and the use of psychotropic drugs (OR=0.2[0.04-0.9]) were predictive of an absence of improvement in fatigue. No significant association with the improvement in sleep disorders could be demonstrated. Fatigue in RA is improved by effective treatment, via decreasing disease activity. Improvement of sleep disorders is more likely a surrogate of therapeutic efficiency rather than an independent outcome.

  3. Melatonin improves inflammatory cytokine profiles in lung inflammation associated with sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Yang-Deok; Kim, Byung-Joon; Kim, Sang-Pil; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Jo, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Ki-Ho; Baik, Haing-Woon

    2012-05-01

    Sleep disturbance has become an endemic behavior in modern countries, and its prevalence has also increased. Even a subtle sleep deficiency is related to health problems. Particularly, patients with pulmonary disease often complain of insomnia. We recently showed that sleep deprivation (SD) exacerbates existing acute lung inflammation, and that melatonin treatment attenuates it via anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant action. In order to reinforce our previous report, the present study was designed to evaluate pro-inflammatory mediators in acute lung inflammation in SD mice. In addition, we investigated the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. Twenty-five ICR mice were divided into 5 groups (n=5/group): control, SD, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), LPS + SD and LPS + SD + melatonin. The SD mice were deprived of sleep for 96 h in a multiplatform water bath. LPS (5 mg/kg) and melatonin (5 mg/kg) were administered on day 2. The mice were sacrificed on day 3, and serum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were collected. The serum levels of inflammatory cytokines were increased in the LPS + SD group. Interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ levels were also increased in BAL fluid in the LPS + SD group. Melatonin reduced inflammatory mediators in the serum and BAL fluid. The accumulation of leukocytes in the LPS and LPS + SD mice was elevated, however, melatonin inhibited the recruitment of inflammatory cells (p<0.05). Lymphocytes in the BAL fluid of the LPS + SD group were increased, and macrophage levels were decreased; however, the increment was attenuated by melatonin administration (p<0.05). In conclusion, this study indicates that melatonin has a protective effect against lung inflammation associated with SD.

  4. Long-Term Pain Treatment Did Not Improve Sleep in Nursing Home Patients with Comorbid Dementia and Depression: A 13-Week Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjersti M. Blytt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Previous research indicates that pain treatment may improve sleep among nursing home patients. We aimed to investigate the long-term effect of pain treatment on 24-h sleep patterns in patients with comorbid depression and dementia.Design: A 13-week, multicenter, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial conducted between August 2014 and September 2016.Setting: Long-term patients from 47 nursing homes in Norway.Participants: We included 106 patients with comorbid dementia and depression according to the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE and the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD.Intervention: Patients who were not using analgesics were randomized to receive either paracetamol (3 g/day or placebo tablets. Those who already received pain treatment were randomized to buprenorphine transdermal system (maximum 10 μg/h/7 days or placebo transdermal patches.Measurements: Sleep was assessed continuously for 7 days by actigraphy, at baseline and in week 13. Total sleep time (TST, sleep efficiency (SE, sleep onset latency (SOL, wake after sleep onset (WASO, early morning awakening (EMA, and number of wake bouts (NoW were evaluated. In addition, daytime total sleep time (DTS was estimated. Pain was assessed with Mobilization-Observation-Behavior-Intensity-Dementia-2 Pain Scale (MOBID-2.Results: The linear mixed model analyses for TST, SE, SOL, WASO, EMA, NoW and DTS showed no statistically significant differences between patients who received active pain treatment and those who received placebo. Post hoc subgroup analyses showed that there were no statistically significant differences between active treatment and placebo from baseline to week 13 in patients who were in pain (MOBID-2 ≥ 3 at baseline, or in patients who had poor sleep (defined as SE < 85% at baseline. Patients who received active buprenorphine showed an increase in TST and SE compared to those who received active paracetamol

  5. Qigong Exercise May Reduce Serum TNF-α Levels and Improve Sleep in People with Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghee Moon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inflammatory cytokine levels are often elevated in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD. People with PD often experience sleep disturbances that significantly impact quality of life. Past studies suggest inflammatory cytokines may be associated with various symptoms of PD. Benefits of Qigong, a mind–body exercise, have been shown in different neurological conditions, but there is still a lack of clinical evidence in the PD population. Methods: Ten people with PD were recruited and randomly assigned into two groups receiving six weeks of Qigong (experimental group or sham Qigong (control group intervention. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in subjects’ serum and sleep quality were measured before and after the intervention. Results: After the intervention, the serum level of TNF-α in the experimental group was significantly decreased in all subjects, while the level in the control group showed a trend to increase. Qigong exercise significantly improved sleep quality at night. There was a strong correlation between changes in the level of TNF-α and sleep quality. Conclusion: Qigong exercise decreased TNF-α level in people with PD and helped improve sleep quality. TNF-α may have a potential to influence the sleep quality in people with PD.

  6. The effects of sleep extension and sleep hygiene advice on sleep and depressive symptoms in adolescents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald-Kaufmann, J F; Oort, F J; Meijer, A M

    2014-03-01

    Sleep problems are common and persistent during adolescence and can have negative effects on adolescents' mood. To date, studies that investigate the effects of sleep extension on adolescents' sleep and depressive symptoms are still lacking. This study aims to investigate the effects of gradual sleep extension combined with sleep hygiene advice in adolescents with chronic sleep reduction on objectively measured sleep, self-reported sleep problems and depressive symptoms. Fifty-five adolescents with chronic sleep reduction (mean age: 15.44 years; 85.5% females) were included in the study. Participants were randomly assigned to either a sleep extension group (gradual sleep extension by advancing bedtimes in the evening and receiving sleep hygiene advice) or to a control group (no instruction). Sleep was measured with actigraphy during three weeks, the first week was the baseline week, and the last two weeks were the experimental weeks during which sleep was extended. Other outcome variables were self-reported sleep problems (daytime sleepiness, symptoms of insomnia and circadian rhythm sleep disorder) and depressive symptoms, which were assessed before and after the experimental manipulation. During the third week of the experiment, adolescents in the sleep extension group had earlier bedtimes, earlier sleep onsets, spent more time in bed and slept longer than adolescents in the control group. Their chronic sleep reduction, insomnia symptoms and depressive symptoms diminished significantly. In addition, there was a trend of improved circadian rhythm sleep disorder symptoms and sleep quality. Gradual sleep extension combined with sleep hygiene advice seems to have beneficial effects on sleep, self-reported sleep problems and depressive symptoms of adolescents with chronic sleep reduction. Although we cannot distinguish between the effects of sleep extension and sleep hygiene advice, the results suggest that advancing bedtimes can extend sleep and improve depressive

  7. Increased phosphatidylcholine concentration in saliva reduces surface tension and improves airway patency in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, M; Kirkness, J P; Yamamura, S; Imaizumi, K; Yoshimine, H; Oi, K; Ayuse, T

    2013-10-01

    Surface tension may have important role for maintaining upper airway patency in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. It has been demonstrated that elevated surface tension increases the pharyngeal pressures required to reopen the upper airway following collapse. The aim of the study was to evaluate the associations between the concentrations of endogenous surfactants in saliva with indices of upper airway patency in obstructive sleep apnoea. We studied 20 male patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (age: 60·3 ± 10·3 years; BMI: 25·9 ± 4·6 kg m(-2); AHI: 41·5 ± 18·6 events h(-1)). We obtained 100-μL samples of saliva prior to overnight polysomnographic sleep study. The surface tension was determined using the pull-off force technique. The concentration of phosphatidylcholine (PC) was evaluated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Regression analysis between apnoea, hypopnoea and apnoea/hypopnoea indices and the ratio of hypopnoea time/total disordered breathing time (HT/DBT) with surface tension and PC were performed. P surface tension was 48·8 ± 8·0 mN m(-1) and PC concentration was 15·7 ± 11·1 nM. The surface tension was negatively correlated with the PC concentration (r = -0·48, P = 0·03). There was a significant positive correlation between surface tension with hypopnoea index (r = 0·50, P = 0·03) and HT/DBT (r = 0·6, P = 0·006), but not apnoea or apnoea/hypopnoea index (P > 0·11). Similarly, PC concentration negatively correlated with hypopnoea index (r = -0·45, P = 0·04) and HT/DBT (r = -0·6, P = 0·004), but not with apnoea index or AHI (P > 0·08). An increase in salivary PC concentration may increase upper airway patency in obstructive sleep apnoea through a reduction in surface tension. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Modafinil Increases Awake EEG Activation and Improves Performance in Obstructive Sleep Apnea during Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David; Bai, Xiao Xue; Williams, Shaun C; Hua, Shu Cheng; Kim, Jong-Won; Marshall, Nathaniel S; D'Rozario, Angela; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2015-08-01

    We examined the changes in waking electroencephalography (EEG) biomarkers with modafinil during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to investigate neurophysiological evidence for potential neurocognitive improvements. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study. CPAP was used for the first night and then withdrawn for 2 subsequent nights. Each morning after the 2 CPAP withdrawal nights, patients received either 200 mg modafinil or placebo. After a 5-w washout, the procedure repeated with the crossover drug. University teaching hospital. Stable CPAP users (n = 23 men with OSA). Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (awake EEG measurement with eyes open and closed), Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), and driving simulator Performance were assessed bihourly during the 3 testing days following CPAP treatment and CPAP withdrawal nights. Compared to placebo, modafinil significantly increased awake EEG activation (faster EEG frequency) with increased alpha/delta (A/D) ratio (P Modafinil administration during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) withdrawal increased awake EEG activation, which correlated to improved performance. This study provides supporting neurophysiological evidence that modafinil is a potential short-term treatment option during acute CPAP withdrawal. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  9. Sleep and Athletic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew M

    Sleep is an essential component of health and well-being, with significant impacts on physical development, emotional regulation, cognitive performance, and quality of life. Along with being an integral part of the recovery and adaptive process between bouts of exercise, accumulating evidence suggests that increased sleep duration and improved sleep quality in athletes are associated with improved performance and competitive success. In addition, better sleep may reduce the risk of both injury and illness in athletes, not only optimizing health but also potentially enhancing performance through increased participation in training. Despite this, most studies have found that athletes fail to obtain the recommended amount of sleep, threatening both performance and health. Athletes face a number of obstacles that can reduce the likelihood of obtaining proper sleep, such as training and competition schedules, travel, stress, academic demands, and overtraining. In addition, athletes have been found to demonstrate poor self-assessment of their sleep duration and quality. In light of this, athletes may require more careful monitoring and intervention to identify individuals at risk and promote proper sleep to improve both performance and overall health. This review attempts to highlight the recent literature regarding sleep issues in athletes, the effects of sleep on athletic performance, and interventions to enhance proper sleep in athletes.

  10. Tai chi qigong as a means to improve night-time sleep quality among older adults with cognitive impairment: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan AWK

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aileen WK Chan, Doris SF Yu, KC Choi, Diana TF Lee, Janet WH Sit, Helen YL Chan The Nethersole School of Nursing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Age-related cognitive decline is a growing public health concern worldwide. More than a quarter of adults with cognitive impairment experience sleep disturbance. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the preliminary effects of tai chi qigong (TCQ on improving the night-time sleep quality of older adults with cognitive impairment. Participants: Older adults with cognitive impairment who complain of sleep disturbance. Methods: A randomized controlled trial with two groups. Fifty-two subjects were recruited from two district elderly community centers and randomly assigned to either the TCQ group (n=27 or the control group (n=25. The intervention group received TCQ training consisting of two 60-minute sessions each week for 2 months. The control group was advised to maintain their usual activities. Sleep quality was measured by the Chinese Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Quality of life was measured by Short-form 12, cognitive functions measured by mini-mental state examination, and subjective memory deficits measured by the memory inventory for Chinese. Results: Data were collected at baseline, 2 months, and 6 months. Significant results were noted at 6 months in the Chinese Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index global score (P=0.004, sleep duration (P=0.003, habitual sleep efficiency (P=0.002, and the Short-form 12 mental health component (P<0.001. The TCQ participants reported better sleep quality and a better (quality of life mental health component than the control group. Conclusion: TCQ can be considered a useful nonpharmacological approach for improving sleep quality in older adults with cognitive impairment.Clinical trial registration: CUHK_CCT00448 (https://www2.ccrb.cuhk.edu.hk/registry/public/287. Keywords: cognitive decline, mind

  11. The Neuroprotective Aspects of Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Eugene, Andy R.; Masiak, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is an important component of human life, yet many people do not understand the relationship between the brain and the process of sleeping. Sleep has been proven to improve memory recall, regulate metabolism, and reduce mental fatigue. A minimum of 7 hours of daily sleep seems to be necessary for proper cognitive and behavioral function. The emotional and mental handicaps associated with chronic sleep loss as well as the highly hazardous situations which can be contributed to the lack of...

  12. Nurse-led intensive interventions improve adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy and quality of life in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofen; Chen, Weiting; Hu, Weijie; Huang, Kui; Huang, Jing; Zhou, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is widely recommended for the treatment of sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (SAHS), but its usage by patients is very low. The aim of this study was to assess intensive educational programs and nursing support for the improvement of CPAP use and outcomes in SAHS patients. Eighty new SAHS patients were randomized to receive nurse-led intensive interventions or usual support at hospital and home. The main outcome measure was CPAP use; changes in sleeping, symptoms, mood, and quality of life were also assessed after 12 months of treatment. All outcome measures were improved after treatment in both groups. However, patients receiving intensive support with significantly higher CPAP use (higher daily CPAP usage by 2.2 hours/day) had greater improvements in SAHS symptoms and mood (Pintensive program in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

  13. Cocaine and Sleep: Early Abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T. Morgan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Compulsive cocaine use is associated with a profound dysregulation of sleep. Perhaps the result of chronic use, a significant deterioration in sleep is apparent over the first 3 weeks of abstinence, with no indication of recovery. Interestingly, the diminished sleep is not accompanied by subjective reports of poor or worsening sleep. Rather, subjective reports actually improve over abstinence, while sleep-related cognitive performance declines. A mechanistic understanding of the apparent difference in objective and subjective measures is currently lacking. Here we review the relevant literature on cocaine use and sleep, and discuss the possible relevance of this sleep disturbance in relationship to the underlying disorder and its treatment.

  14. Review of systematic reviews about the efficacy of non-pharmacological interventions to improve sleep quality in insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Niet, Gerrit J; Tiemens, Bea G; Kloos, Margot W; Hutschemaekers, Giel Jm

    2009-12-01

    Background  Insomnia is a very common condition in various populations. Non-pharmacological interventions might offer (safe) alternatives for hypnotics. Aim  To evaluate the evidence for efficacy from systematic reviews about non-pharmacological interventions to improve sleep quality in insomnia by a systematic review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Search strategy  Search strategies were conducted in the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (2002-July 2008), The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2000-July 2008) and PubMed (1950-July 2008). Sleep quality was the outcome measure of interest. Selection criteria  Systematic reviews about the efficacy of one or more non-pharmacological interventions for insomnia, concerning both adult and elderly populations, were included. Reviews that included studies performed among populations suffering with severe neurological or cognitive impairments or with addictive disorders were excluded. Data analysis  Relevant data were extracted. The quality of the reviews found was appraised by using the Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire. The evidence was appraised and divided into six classes. Results and conclusions  Sixteen reviews about 17 interventions were included. Six reviews were of adequate methodological quality. Of these, only one provided an effect size: a moderate effect was found for music-assisted relaxation. Weak evidence indicating a large effect was found for multicomponent cognitive behavioural therapy, progressive muscle relaxation, stimulus control and 'behavioural only'. Weak evidence indicating a moderate effect was found for paradoxical intention. Finally, weak evidence indicating a moderate to large effect was found for relaxation training. Because of the lack of sufficient methodological quality and the lack of calculated effect sizes, most of the included reviews were not suitable for drawing rigorous conclusions about the effect of non-pharmacological interventions on

  15. [Foshouningshen decoction improves sleeping via the serotonergic system in a rat model of insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie-Cong; Xie, Wei; Deng, Ning; Liang, Wen-Lin; Hu, Dong-Rong; Hong, Yu; Zhou, Yang

    2017-08-20

    To evaluate the sedative and hypnotic effects of Foshouningshen decoction (FSNSD) and study its effects on expressions of 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT) and 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) in the hippocampus in a rat model of insomnia. Male KM mice were divided into control group, estazolam (0.4 mg/kg daily) group, and low-, moderate-, and high-dose FSNSD groups (daily dose of 12, 24, and 48 g/kg, respectively). After corresponding treatments for 1 week, the mice underwent sleep-inducing test with subthreshold and threshold doses of sodium pentobarbital. Forty-eight male SD rats were randomized into control group, insomnia model group, estazolam group (0.2 mg/kg daily), and low-, moderate-, and high-dose FSNSD groups (with daily dose of 6, 12, and 24 g/kg, respectively). Rat models of insomnia were established by intraperitoneal injection of 4-cholro-dl-phenylalanine (PCPA) at the daily dose of 350 mg/kg for 3 days, after which the rats received corresponding treatments via gavage for 1 week. The performance of the rats in open field test was recorded and the hippocampal expression of 5-HT was detected using ELISA; the expressions of 5-HT1AR protein and mRNA in the hippocampus were detected using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR, respectively. In the sleep-inducing test with a subthreshold dose of sodium pentobarbital, the mice treated with high-dose FSNSD showed a significantly higher rate of sleep onset than the control mice (Pmodel group showed increased total distance in open field test (Popen field test (P<0.05) and increased the content of 5-HT (P<0.05) and expressions of 5-HT1AR (P<0.01) in the hippocampus of rats with insomnia. FSNSD can produce therapeutic effects on insomnia possibly by increasing 5-HT content and expressions of 5-HT1AR in the hippocampus.

  16. Short-term stability of sleep and heart rate variability in good sleepers and patients with insomnia: for some measures, one night is enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Benjamin; Buysse, Daniel J; Krafty, Robert T; Begley, Amy; Miewald, Jean; Hall, Martica

    2012-09-01

    Quantify the short-term stability of multiple indices of sleep and nocturnal physiology in good sleeper controls and primary insomnia patients. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to quantify the short-term stability of study outcomes. Sleep laboratory. Fifty-four adults with primary insomnia (PI) and 22 good sleeper controls (GSC). Visually scored sleep outcomes included indices of sleep duration, continuity, and architecture. Quantitative EEG outcomes included power in the delta, theta, alpha, sigma, and beta bands during NREM sleep. Power spectral analysis was used to estimate high-frequency heart rate variability (HRV) and the ratio of low- to high-frequency HRV power during NREM and REM sleep. With the exception of percent stage 3+4 sleep; visually scored sleep outcomes did not exhibit short-term stability across study nights. Most QEEG outcomes demonstrated short-term stability in both groups. Although power in the beta band was stable in the PI group (ICC = 0.75), it tended to be less stable in GSCs (ICC = 0.55). Both measures of cardiac autonomic tone exhibited short-term stability in GSCs and PIs during NREM and REM sleep. Most QEEG bandwidths and HRV during sleep show high short-term stability in good sleepers and patients with insomnia alike. One night of data is, thus, sufficient to derive reliable estimates of these outcomes in studies focused on group differences or correlates of QEEG and/or HRV. In contrast, one night of data is unlikely to generate reliable estimates of PSG-assessed sleep duration, continuity or architecture, with the exception of slow wave sleep.

  17. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  18. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiro MG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mariana G Figueiro,1 Barbara A Plitnick,1 Anna Lok,1 Geoffrey E Jones,1 Patricia Higgins,2,3 Thomas R Hornick,3,4 Mark S Rea1 1Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA; 2School of Nursing, 3School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 4Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USABackground: Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD, with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. Methods: The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level “bluish-white” lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light–dark and rest–activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest–activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. Results: The lighting intervention significantly (P<0.05 decreased global sleep scores from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and increased total sleep time and sleep efficiency. The lighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light–dark and rest–activity patterns, suggesting an increase

  19. Evening dietary tryptophan improves post-sleep behavioral and brain measures of memory function in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markus, C.R.; Jonkman, L.M.; Lammers, J.H.C.M.; Deutz, N.E.P.

    2006-01-01

    Brain serotonin function has been implicated in the control of sleep and sleep related memory dysfunctions are attributed to deficient brain serotonin activity. Depletion of the serotonin precursor tryptophan reduces brain serotonin function and is found to cause sleep abnormalities and cognitive

  20. A Pilot Study to Assess a Teaching Intervention to Improve Sleep-Wake Disturbances in Parents of Children Diagnosed With Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledet, Davonna; Aplin-Kalisz, Christina; Filter, Marilyn; Dycus, Paula

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of screening and teaching interventions for sleep-wake disturbances in parents of childhood patients with epilepsy. This was a prospective, descriptive study using convenience sampling. After informed consent was obtained from eligible parents who agreed to participate, study questionnaires were administered. All parents were provided with an individualized teaching intervention. Study tools were readministered 8-12 weeks later to evaluate if the individualized teaching intervention altered or improved sleep-wake disturbances. The t value for the paired t test of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale prescore and postscore was 0.000 with a two-tailed probability value of 1.000, and the t value for the paired t test of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index prescore and postscore was 0.713 with a two-tailed probability value of .492, indicating no significant difference between pre and post Epworth Sleepiness Scale or Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. A sleep hygiene teaching intervention for parents of children with epilepsy was not effective in this setting of an inner-city epilepsy monitoring unit in changing postintervention scores on measures of both nighttime sleep quality and daytime sleepiness. These results must be interpreted with caution secondary to the small number included in the initial phase of this study. A larger number of participants will be needed to verify these findings. If the results remain consistent with a larger number, studies evaluating variables of cause may be helpful to determine more effective interventions.

  1. Quetiapine improves visual hallucinations in Parkinson disease but not through normalization of sleep architecture: results from a double-blind clinical-polysomnography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Hubert H; Okun, Michael S; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Malaty, Irene A; Romrell, Janet; Sun, Anqi; Wu, Samuel S; Pillarisetty, Sandeep; Nyathappa, Anand; Eisenschenk, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Polysomnographic studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with visual hallucinations (VH) usually reveal short, fragmented rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, with lower sleep efficiency and reduced total REM sleep. Quetiapine has been demonstrated in open-label trials to be effective for the treatment of insomnia and VH in PD. To confirm quetiapine's efficacy in improving VH, and to determine whether the mechanism was due to its effect on REM sleep architecture, we performed a pilot, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Sixteen PD patients experiencing VH were recruited. Eight patients were randomized to quetiapine and eight patients to placebo. Patients underwent pre- and post-treatment polysomnography. The Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGIS), Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), and Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor subscale were obtained. There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the treatment arms except that the placebo group had more sleep in stage REM (74.7 min vs. 40.1 min; p blind trial to show quetiapine's efficacy over placebo in controlling VH in the PD population. However, normalization of sleep architecture was not supported as the mechanism.

  2. The role of a short post-lunch nap in improving cognitive, motor, and sprint performance in participants with partial sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, J; Atkinson, G; Edwards, B; Reilly, T

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a post-lunch nap on subjective alertness and performance following partial sleep loss. Ten healthy males (mean age 23.3 years, s = 3.4) either napped or sat quietly from 13:00 to 13:30 h after a night of shortened sleep (sleep 23:00-03:00 h only). Thirty minutes after the afternoon nap or control (no-nap) condition, alertness, short-term memory, intra-aural temperature, heart rate, choice reaction time, grip strength, and times for 2-m and 20-m sprints were recorded. The afternoon nap lowered heart rate and intra-aural temperature. Alertness, sleepiness, short-term memory, and accuracy at the 8-choice reaction time test were improved by napping (P 0.05). Sprint times were improved. Mean time for the 2-m sprints fell from 1.060 s (s(x) = 0.018) to 1.019 s (s(x) = 0.019) (P = 0.031 paired t-test); mean time for the 20-m sprints fell from 3.971 s (s(x) = 0.054) to 3.878 s (s(x) = 0.047) (P = 0.013). These results indicate that a post-lunch nap improves alertness and aspects of mental and physical performance following partial sleep loss, and have implications for athletes with restricted sleep during training or before competition.

  3. Digital Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia versus sleep hygiene education: the impact of improved sleep on functional health, quality of life and psychological well-being. Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espie, Colin A; Luik, Annemarie I; Cape, John; Drake, Christopher L; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Ong, Jason C; Gordon, Christopher; Bostock, Sophie; Hames, Peter; Nisbet, Mhairi; Sheaves, Bryony; G Foster, Russell; Freeman, Daniel; Costa-Font, Joan; Emsley, Richard; Kyle, Simon D

    2016-05-23

    Previous research has demonstrated that digital CBT (dCBT), delivered via the Internet, is a scalable and effective intervention for treating insomnia in otherwise healthy adults and leads to significant improvements in primary outcomes relating to sleep. The majority of people with insomnia, however, seek help because of the functional impact and daytime consequences of poor sleep, not because of sleep discontinuity per se. Although some secondary analyses suggest that dCBT may have wider health benefits, no adequately powered study has investigated these as a primary endpoint. This study specifically aims to investigate the impact of dCBT for insomnia upon health and well-being, and will investigate sleep-related changes as mediating factors. We propose a pragmatic, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial of 1000 community participants meeting criteria for insomnia disorder. In the DIALS trial (Digital Insomnia therapy to Assist your Life as well as your Sleep), participants will be randomised to dCBT delivered using web and/or mobile channels (in addition to treatment as usual (TAU)) or to sleep hygiene education (SHE), comprising a website plus a downloadable booklet (in addition to TAU). Online assessments will take place at 0 (baseline), 4 (mid-treatment), 8 (post-treatment), and 24 (follow-up) weeks. At week 25 all participants allocated to SHE will be offered dCBT, at which point the controlled element of the trial will be complete. Naturalistic follow-up will be invited at weeks 36 and 48. Primary outcomes are functional health and well-being at 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes are mood, fatigue, sleepiness, cognitive function, productivity and social functioning. All main analyses will be carried out at the end of the final controlled follow-up assessments and will be based on the intention-to-treat principle. Further analyses will determine whether observed changes in functional health and well-being are mediated by changes in sleep. The trial is funded

  4. Dietary Prebiotics and Bioactive Milk Fractions Improve NREM Sleep, Enhance REM Sleep Rebound and Attenuate the Stress-Induced Decrease in Diurnal Temperature and Gut Microbial Alpha Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert S; Roller, Rachel; Mika, Agnieszka; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Knight, Rob; Chichlowski, Maciej; Berg, Brian M; Fleshner, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Severe, repeated or chronic stress produces negative health outcomes including disruptions of the sleep/wake cycle and gut microbial dysbiosis. Diets rich in prebiotics and glycoproteins impact the gut microbiota and may increase gut microbial species that reduce the impact of stress. This experiment tested the hypothesis that consumption of dietary prebiotics, lactoferrin (Lf) and milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) will reduce the negative physiological impacts of stress. Male F344 rats, postnatal day (PND) 24, received a diet with prebiotics, Lf and MFGM (test) or a calorically matched control diet. Fecal samples were collected on PND 35/70/91 for 16S rRNA sequencing to examine microbial composition and, in a subset of rats; Lactobacillus rhamnosus was measured using selective culture. On PND 59, biotelemetry devices were implanted to record sleep/wake electroencephalographic (EEG). Rats were exposed to an acute stressor (100, 1.5 mA, tail shocks) on PND 87 and recordings continued until PND 94. Test diet, compared to control diet, increased fecal Lactobacillus rhamnosus colony forming units (CFU), facilitated non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep consolidation (PND 71/72) and enhanced rapid eye movement (REM) sleep rebound after stressor exposure (PND 87). Rats fed control diet had stress-induced reductions in alpha diversity and diurnal amplitude of temperature, which were attenuated by the test diet (PND 91). Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed a significant linear relationship between early-life Deferribacteres (PND 35) and longer NREM sleep episodes (PND 71/72). A diet containing prebiotics, Lf and MFGM enhanced sleep quality, which was related to changes in gut bacteria and modulated the impact of stress on sleep, diurnal rhythms and the gut microbiota.

  5. THE SERENDIPITY CASE OF THE PEDUNCULOPONTINE NUCLEUS LOW FREQUENCY BRAIN STIMULATION: CHASING A GAIT RESPONSE, FINDING SLEEP AND COGNITION IMPROVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eStefani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN is an efficacious therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD but its effects on non-motor facets may be detrimental. The low-frequency stimulation (LFS of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN or the nucleus tegmenti pedunculopontini –PPTg- opened new perspectives. In our hands, PPTg-LFS revealed a modest influence on gait but increased sleep quality and degree of attentiveness. At odds with potential adverse events following STN-DBS, executive functions, under PPTg-ON, ameliorated. A recent study comparing both targets found that only PPTg-LFS improved night-time sleep and daytime sleepiness.Chances are that different neurosurgical groups influence either the PPN sub-portion identified as pars dissipata (more interconnected with GPi/STN or the caudal PPN region known as pars compacta, preferentially targeting intralaminar and associative nucleus of the thalamus. Yet, the wide electrical field delivered affects a plethora of en passant circuits, and a fine distinction on the specific pathways involved is elusive. This review explores our angle of vision, by which PPTg-LFS activates cholinergic and glutamatergic ascending fibres, influencing non motor behaviours.

  6. Novel molecular and computational methods improve the accuracy of insertion site analysis in Sleeping Beauty-induced tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T Brett

    Full Text Available The recent development of the Sleeping Beauty (SB system has led to the development of novel mouse models of cancer. Unlike spontaneous models, SB causes cancer through the action of mutagenic transposons that are mobilized in the genomes of somatic cells to induce mutations in cancer genes. While previous methods have successfully identified many transposon-tagged mutations in SB-induced tumors, limitations in DNA sequencing technology have prevented a comprehensive analysis of large tumor cohorts. Here we describe a novel method for producing genetic profiles of SB-induced tumors using Illumina sequencing. This method has dramatically increased the number of transposon-induced mutations identified in each tumor sample to reveal a level of genetic complexity much greater than previously appreciated. In addition, Illumina sequencing has allowed us to more precisely determine the depth of sequencing required to obtain a reproducible signature of transposon-induced mutations within tumor samples. The use of Illumina sequencing to characterize SB-induced tumors should significantly reduce sampling error that undoubtedly occurs using previous sequencing methods. As a consequence, the improved accuracy and precision provided by this method will allow candidate cancer genes to be identified with greater confidence. Overall, this method will facilitate ongoing efforts to decipher the genetic complexity of the human cancer genome by providing more accurate comparative information from Sleeping Beauty models of cancer.

  7. Gluten-free diet may improve obstructive sleep apnea-related symptoms in children with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerushalmy-Feler, Anat; Tauman, Riva; Derowe, Ari; Averbuch, Eran; Ben-Tov, Amir; Weintraub, Yael; Weiner, Dror; Amir, Achiya; Moran-Lev, Hadar; Cohen, Shlomi

    2018-02-07

    Enlarged tonsils and adenoids are the major etiology of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. Lymphatic hyperplasia is common to both OSA and celiac disease. We aimed to investigate the effect of a gluten-free diet on OSA symptoms in children with celiac disease. Children with celiac disease aged 2-18 years were prospectively recruited before the initiation of a gluten-free diet. Children with negative celiac serology who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopies for other indications served as controls. All participants completed a validated OSA-related symptoms questionnaire and the pediatric sleep questionnaire (PSQ) at baseline and 6 months later. Thirty-four children with celiac disease (mean age 6.6 ± 3.5 years) and 24 controls (mean age 7.3 ± 4.6 years, P = 0.5) were recruited. There were no significant differences in gender, body mass index or season at recruitment between the two groups. The rate of positive PSQ scores was higher (more OSA-related symptoms) in the control group compared to the celiac group, both at recruitment and at the 6-month follow-up (33.3% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.046, and 16.7% vs. 0, P = 0.014, respectively). PSQ scores improved significantly in both groups at the 6-month follow-up (P celiac group compared to controls (0.1 ± 0.09 vs.0.06 ± 0.06, respectively, P = 0.04). Children with celiac disease had fewer OSA-related symptoms than controls, but the degree of improvement following the initiation of a gluten-free diet was significantly higher. These findings suggest that a gluten-free diet may improve OSA-related symptoms in children with celiac disease.

  8. Sleep apnoea and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sameer; Culebras, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    Sleep disorders have been known to physicians for a long time. In his famous aphorisms, Hippocrates said "Sleep or watchfulness exceeding that which is customary, augurs unfavorably". Modern medicine has been able to disentangle some of the phenomena that disturb sleep. Among the most notable offenders is sleep apnoea that has gained prominence in the past few decades. It is being proposed as one of the potentially modifiable risk factors for vascular diseases including stroke. The pathological mechanisms linking sleep apnoea to vascular risk factors include hypoxia, cardiac arrhythmias, dysautonomia, impaired glucose tolerance, hypertension, dyslipidaemia and inflammation. In this article, we review literature linking sleep apnoea and stroke, including sleep apnoea as a risk factor for primary prevention with the potential to improve outcome after acute stroke and as a secondary risk factor, amenable to modification and hence vascular risk reduction.

  9. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND SLEEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystal, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Psychiatric disorders and sleep are related in important ways. In contrast to the longstanding view of this relationship which viewed sleep problems as symptoms of psychiatric disorders, there is growing experimental evidence that the relationship between psychiatric disorders and sleep is complex and includes bi-directional causation. In this article we provide the evidence that supports this point of view, reviewing the data on the sleep disturbances seen in patients with psychiatric disorders but also reviewing the data on the impact of sleep disturbances on psychiatric conditions. Although much has been learned about the psychiatric disorders-sleep relationship, additional research is needed to better understand these relationships. This work promises to improve our ability to understand both of these phenomena and to allow us to better treat the many patients with sleep disorders and with psychiatric disorders. PMID:23099143

  10. Local sleep and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Reto; Ghilardi, M Felice; Massimini, Marcello; Tononi, Giulio

    2004-07-01

    Human sleep is a global state whose functions remain unclear. During much of sleep, cortical neurons undergo slow oscillations in membrane potential, which appear in electroencephalograms as slow wave activity (SWA) of sleep. It has been suggested that SWA homeostasis may reflect synaptic changes underlying a cellular need for sleep. If this were so, inducing local synaptic changes should induce local SWA changes, and these should benefit neural function. Here we show that sleep homeostasis indeed has a local component, which can be triggered by a learning task involving specific brain regions. Furthermore, we show that the local increase in SWA after learning correlates with improved performance of the task after sleep. Thus, sleep homeostasis can be induced on a local level and can benefit performance.

  11. The Neuroprotective Aspects of Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene, Andy R; Masiak, Jolanta

    2015-03-01

    Sleep is an important component of human life, yet many people do not understand the relationship between the brain and the process of sleeping. Sleep has been proven to improve memory recall, regulate metabolism, and reduce mental fatigue. A minimum of 7 hours of daily sleep seems to be necessary for proper cognitive and behavioral function. The emotional and mental handicaps associated with chronic sleep loss as well as the highly hazardous situations which can be contributed to the lack of sleep is a serious concern that people need to be aware of. When one sleeps, the brain reorganizes and recharges itself, and removes toxic waste byproducts which have accumulated throughout the day. This evidence demonstrates that sleeping can clear the brain and help maintain its normal functioning. Multiple studies have been done to determine the effects of total sleep deprivation; more recently some have been conducted to show the effects of sleep restriction, which is a much more common occurrence, have the same effects as total sleep deprivation. Each phase of the sleep cycle restores and rejuvenates the brain for optimal function. When sleep is deprived, the active process of the glymphatic system does not have time to perform that function, so toxins can build up, and the effects will become apparent in cognitive abilities, behavior, and judgment. As a background for this paper we have reviewed literature and research of sleep phases, effects of sleep deprivation, and the glymphatic system of the brain and its restorative effect during the sleep cycle.

  12. Sleep quality improved following a single session of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise in older women: Results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Youngstedt, Shawn D

    2014-12-01

    Poor sleep quality is associated with adverse effects on health outcomes. It is not clear whether exercise can improve sleep quality and whether intensity of exercise affects any of the effects. Fifteen healthy, non-obese (body mass index = 24.4 ± 2.1 kg/m2, mean ± SD), sedentary (exercise on no more than 3 times/week) older women (66.1 ± 3.9 years) volunteered for the study. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) was evaluated using a graded exercise test on a treadmill with a metabolic cart. Following a 7-day baseline period, each participant completed two exercise sessions (separated by 1 week) with equal caloric expenditure, but at different intensities (60% and 45% VO2peak, sequence randomized) between 9:00 and 11:00 am. A wrist ActiGraph monitor was used to assess sleep at baseline and two nights following each exercise session. The average duration of the exercise was 54 and 72 min, respectively at 60% (moderate-intensity) and 45% VO2peak (light-intensity). Wake time after sleep onset was significantly shorter (p = 0.016), the number of awakenings was less (p = 0.046), and total activity counts were lower (p = 0.05) after the moderate-intensity exercise compared to baseline no-exercise condition. Our data showed that a single moderate-intensity aerobic exercise session improved sleep quality in older women.

  13. Relationship of sleep hygiene awareness, sleep hygiene practices, and sleep quality in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Franklin C; Buboltz, Walter C; Soper, Barlow

    2002-01-01

    College students are known for their variable sleep schedules. Such schedules, along with other common student practices (e.g., alcohol and caffeine consumption), are associated with poor sleep hygiene. Researchers have demonstrated in clinical populations that improving sleep hygiene knowledge and practices is an effective treatment for insomnia. However, researchers who have examined relationships between sleep hygiene and practices in nonclinical samples and overall sleep quality have produced inconsistent findings, perhaps because of questionable measures. In this study, the authors used psychometrically sound instruments to examine these variables and to counter the shortcomings in previous investigations. Their findings suggest that knowledge of sleep hygiene is related to sleep practices, which, in turn, is related to overall sleep quality. The data from their regression modeling indicated that variable sleep schedules, going to bed thirsty, environmental noise, and worrying while falling asleep contribute to poor sleep quality.

  14. Introduction to modern sleep technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying

    2012-01-01

    This book offers a wide range of up-to-date insight on current research in sleep technology, covering advances in sleep medicine, clinical psychology, engineering, industrial design and technology management, all with the aim of improving people's daily lives.

  15. Chapter 8 Military Personnel With Traumatic Brain Injuries and Insomnia Have Reductions in PTSD and Improved Perceived Health Following Sleep Restoration: A Relationship Moderated by Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Taura; Livingston, Whitney; Guardado, Pedro; Baxter, Tristin; Mysliwiec, Vincent; Gill, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    , social functioning, emotional well-being, energy/fatigue, and general health perceptions. In a linear regression model using a forced entry method, the dependent variable of change in C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations was significantly related to changes in PTSD symptoms and HRQOL in the TBI+restored sleep group, with R2=0.43, F33,3=8.31, pMilitary personnel with TBIs who have a reduction in insomnia symptoms following a standard-of-care treatment report less severe symptoms of depression and PTSD and improved HRQOL, which relate to decreased plasma concentrations of CRP. These findings suggest that treatment for sleep disturbances in this TBI+military population is associated with improvements in health and decreases in inflammation. The contributions of inflammation-induced changes in PTSD and depression in sleep disturbances in TBI + military personnel require further study.

  16. Flavanol-rich chocolate acutely improves arterial function and working memory performance counteracting the effects of sleep deprivation in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Davide; Socci, Valentina; Tempesta, Daniela; Ferri, Claudio; De Gennaro, Luigi; Desideri, Giovambattista; Ferrara, Michele

    2016-07-01

    Sleep deprivation is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Cocoa flavonoids exert cardiovascular benefits and neuroprotection. Whether chocolate consumption may mitigate detrimental effects of sleep loss on cognitive performance and cardiovascular parameters has never been studied. We investigated the effects of flavanol-rich chocolate consumption on cognitive skills and cardiovascular parameters after sleep deprivation. Thirty-two healthy participants underwent two baseline sessions after one night of undisturbed sleep and two experimental sessions after one night of total sleep deprivation. Two hours before each testing session, participants were randomly assigned to consume high or poor flavanol chocolate bars. During the tests were evaluated, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task and a working memory task, office SBP and DBP, flow-mediated dilation and pulse-wave velocity. Sleep deprivation increased SBP/DBP. SBP/DBP and pulse pressure were lower after flavanol-rich treatment respect to flavanol-poor treatment (SBP: 116.9 ± 1.6 vs. 120.8 ± 1.9 mmHg, respectively, P = 0.00005; DBP: 70.5 ± 1.2 vs. 72.3 ± 1.2 mmHg, respectively, P = 0.01; pulse pressure: 46.4 ± 1.3 vs. 48.4 ± 1.5 mmHg, P = 0.004). Sleep deprivation impaired flow-mediated dilation (5.5 ± 0.5 vs. 6.5 ± 0.6%, P = 0.02), flavanol-rich, but not flavanol-poor chocolate counteracted this alteration (flavanol-rich/flavanol-poor chocolate: 7.0 ± 0.6 vs. 5.0 ± 0.4%, P = 0.000001). Flavanol-rich chocolate mitigated the pulse-wave velocity increase (P = 0.001). Flavanol-rich chocolate preserved working memory accuracy in women after sleep deprivation. Flow-mediated dilation correlated with working memory performance accuracy in the sleep condition (P = 0.04). Flavanol-rich chocolate counteracted vascular impairment after sleep deprivation and restored working memory performance. Improvement in cognitive performance could be because

  17. Magnesium supplementation improves indicators of low magnesium status and inflammatory stress in adults older than 51 years with poor quality sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Forrest H; Johnson, LuAnn K; Zeng, Huawei

    2010-12-01

    Low magnesium status has been associated with numerous conditions characterized as having a chronic inflammatory stress component. Some animal findings indicate that a moderate magnesium deficiency, similar to which apparently commonly occurs in humans, may enhance inflammatory or oxidative stress induced by other factors, including disrupted sleep/sleep deprivation. Thus, an experiment was performed with 100 adults (22 males and 78 females) aged 59 ± 8 years (range 51 to 85 years) with poor sleep quality revealed by a Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score higher than five. The participants were randomly assigned to two groups matched by gender, age, and overall PSQI score. After baseline assessment (week one) of body mass index (BMI), diet, blood and urine biochemical variables, and sleep quality, one group was given a 320 mg magnesium/day supplement as magnesium citrate and the other group a sodium citrate placebo for seven weeks. Final assessments were made five and seven weeks (which were combined for statistical analysis to reduce intra-individual variation) after supplement initiation for the 96 participants who completed the study as designed. Based on food diaries, 58% of the participants were consuming less than the US. Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for magnesium. Consuming less than the EAR was associated with a significantly higher BMI and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. Only 40 participants had plasma CRP concentrations higher than 3.0 mg/L (an indication of chronic inflammatory stress). Overall PSQI scores improved (10.4 to 6.6, p deficient magnesium status) were analyzed, magnesium supplementation, but not the placebo, increased serum magnesium concentrations. Magnesium supplementation vs placebo decreased plasma CRP in participants with baseline values > 3.0 mg/L. The findings show that many individuals have a low magnesium status associated with increased chronic inflammatory stress that could be alleviated by increased

  18. Can sleep quality and wellbeing be improved by changing the indoor lighting in the homes of healthy, elderly citizens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Birgit; Markvart, Jakob; Kessel, Line; Argyraki, Aikaterini; Johnsen, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of bright blue-enriched versus blue-suppressed indoor light on sleep and wellbeing of healthy participants over 65 years. Twenty-nine participants in 20 private houses in a uniform settlement in Copenhagen were exposed to two light epochs of 3 weeks with blue-enriched (280 lux) and 3 weeks blue-suppressed (240 lux) indoor light or vice versa from 8 to 13 pm in a randomized cross-over design. The first light epoch was in October, the second in November and the two light epochs were separated by one week. Participants were examined at baseline and at the end of each light epoch. The experimental indoor light was well tolerated by the majority of the participants. Sleep duration was 7.44 (95% CI 7.14-7.74) hours during blue-enriched conditions and 7.31 (95% CI 7.01-7.62) hours during blue-suppressed conditions (p = 0.289). Neither rest hours, chromatic pupillometry, nor saliva melatonin profile showed significant changes between blue-enriched and blue-suppressed epochs. Baseline Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was significantly worse in females; 7.62 (95% CI 5.13-10.0) versus 4.06 (95% CI 2.64-5.49) in males, p = 0.009. For females, PSQI improved significantly during blue-enriched light exposure (p = 0.007); no significant changes were found for males. The subjective grading of indoor light quality doubled from participants habitual indoor light to the bright experimental light, while it was stable between light epochs, although there were clear differences between blue-enriched and blue-suppressed electrical light conditions imposed. Even though the study was carried out in the late autumn at northern latitude, the only significant difference in Actiwatch-measured total blue light exposure was from 8 to 9 am, because contributions from blue-enriched, bright indoor light were superseded by contributions from daylight.

  19. [Fast screening of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods by high performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Gong, Xu; Tan, Li

    2015-03-01

    A fast screening method was established for the simultaneous determination of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods by high performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-IT MS). The method was based on the sonication assisted extraction of the improving sleep health food samples using methanol. The extract was then filtrated with 0.45 µm filter membrane and the filtrate was separated on a Phenomenex Luna C18 column with isocratic elution at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. A binary mobile phase was 0.05% (v/v) formic acid (solvent A)-methanol/acetonitrile (15:25, v/v, solvent B). The electrospray ionization (ESI) source in positive ion mode or negative ion mode was used to scan MS1-MS3 spectra for the 24 sedative hypnotics. The MS2 and MS3 spectra were used for qualitative analysis of samples. The calibration graphs were linear in their concentration ranges with the correlation coefficients (r2) more than 0.999. The limits of detection (LODs) were 4.0-446.6 µg/L. The recoveries for all the drugs in the improving sleep health foods were 88.6%-110.3% with the relative standard deviations no more than 9.8% at three spiked levels. Twenty-seven batches of the improving sleep health foods were tested. Melatonin was found in eighteen batches. The method is fast, specific, sensitive, easy and suitable for fast screening of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods.

  20. Association between sleep hygiene awareness and practice with sleep quality among Kuwait University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kandari, S; Alsalem, A; Al-Mutairi, S; Al-Lumai, D; Dawoud, A; Moussa, M

    2017-10-01

    University students are especially vulnerable to poor sleep quality. The aim of this study was to assess students' sleep hygiene awareness and sleep hygiene practices, and evaluate their sleep quality. The association of sleep quality with sleep hygiene awareness and practice was also explored. The median sleep quality score was 7; scores more than 5 indicate poor sleep quality. Hence, a large proportion of Kuwait University students experience a suboptimal level of overall sleep quality according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index criteria. Sleep hygiene knowledge among university students was relatively inadequate. Most respondents (60.9%) failed to recognize that taking a nap during daytime might be disruptive to sleep. Sleep quality was strongly correlated with sleep hygiene practice (Spearman rank correlation, rs=0.267, Psleep hygiene knowledge. Medical students showed poorer sleep hygiene awareness and poor sleep quality compared with students from other universities. Logistic regression analysis showed that female sex (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.8, Pcollege (OR=2.2, Psleep hygiene practice score were independently associated with sleep quality after adjusting for confounders. In conclusion, a large proportion of Kuwait University students experience poor sleep quality. Therefore, the development of sleep hygiene education programs as an intervention and prevention strategy is recommended. This will improve students' knowledge on the importance of adopting healthy sleep hygiene practices for better sleep quality and enhanced academic performance. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modafinil improves event related potentials P300 and contingent negative variation after 24 h sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Koushik; Chatterjee, Abhirup; Panjwani, Usha; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sahu, Surajit; Ghosh, Sayan; Thakur, Lalan; Anand, Jag Parvesh

    2012-08-21

    The efficacy of modafinil as a countermeasure in the reduction of cognitive decline following 24 h of sleep deprivation (SD) on subjective sleepiness scales, event-related potential (ERP) P300, and contingent negative variation (CNV) was evaluated. Eleven healthy males, age 25-30 years participated. The experiment was performed in five sessions on different days between 7 and 8a.m. Session 1, baseline recordings; Session 2, after one night's SD; Session 3, 48 h of recovery from SD; Session 4, after 1 week of Session 1, following one night's SD along with modafinil (400mg/day); Session 5, 48 h of recovery after SD+modafinil. Subjective sleepiness scores increased significantly after SD as compared to baseline (PP300 peak latencies of ERP following SD (PP300 peak latencies after SD (PP300 amplitudes and CNV N100, M200 peak latencies and M100, M200 amplitudes were observed. The results strongly suggest that modafinil in a dose of 400mg/day, reduces the subjective sleepiness and cognitive decline following 24 h of SD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sleep Disturbances in Frontotemporal Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarter, Stuart J; St Louis, Erik K; Boeve, Bradley F

    2016-09-01

    Sleep disorders appear to be frequent comorbidities in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness commonly occur in patients with FTD and significantly contribute to caregiver burden and burnout. Sleep is severely fragmented in FTD patients, likely secondary to behavioral disturbances, other primary sleep disorders such as sleep disordered breathing and restless leg syndrome, and neurodegeneration of nuclei involved in sleep and wakefulness. Treatment of primary sleep disorders may improve excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep quality and may improve daytime cognitive functioning. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder is rare in FTD and may be confused with excessive nocturnal activity due to disturbed circadian rhythm. The relationship between FTD, sleep quality, and sleep disorders requires further study to better understand the contribution of disturbed sleep to daytime neurocognitive functioning and quality of life in FTD. Further, future studies should focus on comparing sleep disturbances between different FTD syndromes, especially behavioral variant FTD and primary progressive aphasia. Comorbid sleep disorders should be promptly sought and treated in patients with FTD to improve patient and caregiver quality of life.

  3. Sleep duration, sleep quality and body weight: parallel developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, Hanne K J; Adam, Tanja C; Hursel, Rick; Rutters, Femke; Verhoef, Sanne P M; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2013-09-10

    The increase in obesity, including childhood obesity, has developed over the same time period as the progressive decrease in self-reported sleep duration. Since epidemiological studies showed an inverse relationship between short or disturbed sleep and obesity, the question arose, how sleep duration and sleep quality are associated with the development of obesity. In this review, the current literature on these topics has been evaluated. During puberty, changes in body mass index (BMI) are inversely correlated to changes in sleep duration. During adulthood, this relationship remains and at the same time unfavorable metabolic and neuro-endocrinological changes develop, that promote a positive energy balance, coinciding with sleep disturbance. Furthermore, during excessive weight loss BMI and fat mass decrease, in parallel, and related with an increase in sleep duration. In order to shed light on the association between sleep duration, sleep quality and obesity, until now it only has been shown that diet-induced body-weight loss and successive body-weight maintenance contribute to sleep improvement. It remains to be demonstrated whether body-weight management and body composition improve during an intervention concomitantly with spontaneous sleep improvement compared with the same intervention without spontaneous sleep improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. β-Globin Matrix Attachment Region Improves Stable Genomic Expression of the Sleeping Beauty Transposon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Meghan C.; Steer, Clifford J.; Kren, Betsy T.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is an attractive target for gene therapy due to its extensive capability for protein production and the numerous diseases resulting from a loss of gene function it normally provides. The Sleeping Beauty Transposon (SB-Tn)1 system is a non-viral vector capable of delivering and mediating therapeutic transgene(s) insertion into the host genome for long-term expression. A current challenge for this system is the low efficiency of integration of the transgene. In this study we use a human hepatoma cell line (HuH-7) and primary human blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) to test vectors containing DNA elements to enhance transposition without integrating themselves. We employed the human β-globin matrix attachment region (MAR) and the Simian virus 40 (SV40) nuclear translocation signal to increase the percent of HuH-7 cells persistently expressing a GFP::Zeo reporter construct by ~50% for each element; while combining both did not show an additive effect. Interestingly, both elements together displayed an additive effect on the number of insertion sites, and in BOECs the SV40 alone appeared to have an inhibitory effect on transposition. In long-term cultures the loss of plasmid DNA, transposase expression and mapping of insertion sites demonstrated bona fide transposition without episomal expression. These results show that addition of the β-globin MAR and potentially other elements to the backbone of SB-Tn system can enhance transposition and expression of therapeutic transgenes. These findings may have a significant influence on the use of SB transgene delivery to liver for the treatment of a wide variety of disorders. PMID:21520245

  5. Fatiguing exercise initiated later in life reduces incidence of fibrillation and improves sleep quality in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lan; Feng, Yue; Wen, Deng Tai; Wang, Hui; Wu, Xiu Shan

    2015-08-01

    As the human body ages, the risk of heart disease and stroke greatly increases. While there is evidence that lifelong exercise is beneficial to the heart's health, the effects of beginning exercise later in life remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate whether exercise training started later in life is beneficial to cardiac aging in Drosophila. We examined 4-week-old wild-type virgin female flies that were exposed to exercise periods of either 1.5, 2.0, or 2.5 h per day, 5 days a week for 2 weeks. Using M-mode traces to analyze cardiac function by looking at parameters including heart rate, rhythmicity, systolic and diastolic diameter, and interval and fractional shortening, we found that cardiac function declined with age, shown by an increase in the number of fibrillation events and a decrease in fractional shortening. About 2.0 and 2.5 h of exercise per day displayed a reduced incidence of fibrillation events, and only physical exercise lasting 2.5-h period increased fractional shortening and total sleep time in Drosophila. These data suggested that training exercise needs to be performed for longer duration to exert physiological benefits for the aging heart. Additionally, climbing ability to assess the exercise-induced muscle fatigue was also measured. We found that 2.0 and 2.5 h of exercise caused exercise-induced fatigue, and fatiguing exercise is beneficial for cardiac and healthy aging overall. This study provides a basis for further study in humans on the impact of beginning an exercise regimen later in life on cardiac health.

  6. Benefits of Sleep Extension on Sustained Attention and Sleep Pressure Before and During Total Sleep Deprivation and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Pierrick J; Sauvet, Fabien; Leger, Damien; van Beers, Pascal; Bayon, Virginie; Bougard, Clément; Rabat, Arnaud; Millet, Guillaume Y; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effects of 6 nights of sleep extension on sustained attention and sleep pressure before and during total sleep deprivation and after a subsequent recovery sleep. Subjects participated in two experimental conditions (randomized cross-over design): extended sleep (EXT, 9.8 ± 0.1 h (mean ± SE) time in bed) and habitual sleep (HAB, 8.2 ± 0.1 h time in bed). In each condition, subjects performed two consecutive phases: (1) 6 nights of either EXT or HAB (2) three days in-laboratory: baseline, total sleep deprivation and after 10 h of recovery sleep. Residential sleep extension and sleep performance laboratory (continuous polysomnographic recording). 14 healthy men (age range: 26-37 years). EXT vs. HAB sleep durations prior to total sleep deprivation. Total sleep time and duration of all sleep stages during the 6 nights were significantly higher in EXT than HAB. EXT improved psychomotor vigilance task performance (PVT, both fewer lapses and faster speed) and reduced sleep pressure as evidenced by longer multiple sleep latencies (MSLT) at baseline compared to HAB. EXT limited PVT lapses and the number of involuntary microsleeps during total sleep deprivation. Differences in PVT lapses and speed and MSLT at baseline were maintained after one night of recovery sleep. Six nights of extended sleep improve sustained attention and reduce sleep pressure. Sleep extension also protects against psychomotor vigilance task lapses and microsleep degradation during total sleep deprivation. These beneficial effects persist after one night of recovery sleep. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  7. Sleep Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the radio up will keep the drowsy driver awake. _____5. Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder marked by " ... disturbed sleep. Sleeping during the day in a dark, quiet bedroom and getting exposure to sufficient bright ...

  8. Response to adrenocorticotropic in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder-like symptoms in electrical status epilepticus in sleep syndrome is related to electroencephalographic improvement: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunel, Attila; Altunel, Emine Özlem; Sever, Ali

    2017-09-01

    Encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) syndrome is a rare epilepsy syndrome of childhood that is characterized by sleep-induced epileptiform discharges and problems with cognition or behavior. The neuropsychiatric symptoms in ESES syndrome, among which the ADHD-like symptoms are prominent, bear a close resemblance to symptoms in various developmental disorders. Positive response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is associated with the normalization of the EEG and improvement of neuropsychiatric function. This study aimed to determine the improvement in ADHD-like symptoms in response to ACTH and establish a relationship between improvement in clinical symptoms and EEG parameters. Seventy-five patients with ESES syndrome, who had clinically displayed ADHD-like symptoms, had been treated with ACTH for ESES, and their medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Sleep EEGs were recorded at referral and follow-up visits, and short courses of ACTH were administered when spike-wave index (SWI) was ≥15%. The assessment of treatment effectiveness was based on reduction in SWI and the clinician-reported improvement in ADHD-like symptoms. Statistical analyses were conducted in order to investigate the relationship between the clinical and EEG parameters. Following treatment with ACTH, a reduction in SWI in all the patients was accompanied by a mean improvement of 67% in ADHD-like symptoms. Disappearance/reduction of foci and cessation/reduction of seizures were achieved in patients with formerly antiepileptic-resistant seizures. Multiple linear regressions established that pretreatment SWI and treatment delay predicted posttreatment SWI, while reduction in SWI, treatment delay, and the presence of foci predicted improvement in ADHD-like symptoms. Improvement in ADHD-like symptoms showed high correlation and was timely with the resolution of ESES. It is suggested that ESES and ADHD may be the two different expressions of a common

  9. Sleep in trigeminal autonomic cephalagias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barløse, Mads; Lund, Nunu; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2014-01-01

    older study suggests chronic paroxysmal hemicranias may be locked to REM sleep but otherwise the relation is unknown. Reports indicate that CH and obstructive sleep apnoea are associated in some individuals but results are diverging. Single cases show improvement of CH upon treatment of sleep apnoea...

  10. Blue-enriched white light in the workplace improves self-reported alertness, performance and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Antoine U; James, Lynette M; Schlangen, Luc J M; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2008-08-01

    Specifications and standards for lighting installations in occupational settings are based on the spectral sensitivity of the classical visual system and do not take into account the recently discovered melanopsin-based, blue-light-sensitive photoreceptive system. The authors investigated the effects of exposure to blue-enriched white light during daytime workhours in an office setting. The experiment was conducted on 104 white-collar workers on two office floors. After baseline assessments under existing lighting conditions, every participant was exposed to two new lighting conditions, each lasting 4 weeks. One consisted of blue-enriched white light (17 000 K) and the other of white light (4000 K). The order was balanced between the floors. Questionnaire and rating scales were used to assess alertness, mood, sleep quality, performance, mental effort, headache and eye strain, and mood throughout the 8-week intervention. Altogether 94 participants [mean age 36.4 (SD 10.2) years] were included in the analysis. Compared with white light (4000 K), blue-enriched white light (17 000 K) improved the subjective measures of alertness (Plight. When the participants' expectation about the effect of the light treatments was entered into the analysis as a covariate, significant effects persisted for performance, alertness, evening fatigue, irritability, difficulty focusing, concentrating, and blurred vision. Exposure to blue-enriched white light during daytime workhours improves subjective alertness, performance, and evening fatigue.

  11. Sleep and vascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Gérard E

    2006-10-01

    It is not surprising that cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure and coronary insufficiency can give rise to varying degrees of sleep impairment; it is less readily appreciated that certain physiologic events occurring during sleep-as well as long-term unsatisfactory sleep-may cause or increase the risk of cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, stroke, and cardiac arrythmias. Heart rate abnormalities during sleep in normotensive subjects predict later cardiovascular disease, and their early identification alerts the physician to undertake preventive measures. Maneuvers, such as induction of hypoxia, can elicit abnormal blood pressure responses during sleep, and such responses have been used to identify impending cardiovascular problems that could become therapeutic targets. The spontaneously hypertensive rat has been used to examine the effect of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity on the heart under a variety of experimental conditions, including quiet and paradoxical sleep. The results have disclosed significant differences between the responses of spontaneously hypertensive rats and normal rats to SNS stimulation. Exploration of other pathophysiologic pathways affected by exposure to light and dark, including those responsive to the cyclic production of melatonin, will improve our understanding of the effect of disruptions of the circadian cycle on cardiovascular function. There is growing evidence that melatonin can influence important processes such as fluid, nitrogen, and acid-base balance. Human subjects whose nocturnal arterial blood pressure fails to show the "normal" decrement during sleep ("nondippers") are also prone to sleep poorly, exhibit increased SNS activity during sleep, and have an increased risk of total and cardiovascular disease mortality. Chronic sleep deficit is now known to be a risk factor for obesity and may contribute to the visceral form of obesity that underlies the metabolic syndrome

  12. Sleep inspires insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ullrich; Gais, Steffen; Haider, Hilde; Verleger, Rolf; Born, Jan

    2004-01-22

    Insight denotes a mental restructuring that leads to a sudden gain of explicit knowledge allowing qualitatively changed behaviour. Anecdotal reports on scientific discovery suggest that pivotal insights can be gained through sleep. Sleep consolidates recent memories and, concomitantly, could allow insight by changing their representational structure. Here we show a facilitating role of sleep in a process of insight. Subjects performed a cognitive task requiring the learning of stimulus-response sequences, in which they improved gradually by increasing response speed across task blocks. However, they could also improve abruptly after gaining insight into a hidden abstract rule underlying all sequences. Initial training establishing a task representation was followed by 8 h of nocturnal sleep, nocturnal wakefulness, or daytime wakefulness. At subsequent retesting, more than twice as many subjects gained insight into the hidden rule after sleep as after wakefulness, regardless of time of day. Sleep did not enhance insight in the absence of initial training. A characteristic antecedent of sleep-related insight was revealed in a slowing of reaction times across sleep. We conclude that sleep, by restructuring new memory representations, facilitates extraction of explicit knowledge and insightful behaviour.

  13. Tailored lighting intervention improves measures of sleep, depression, and agitation in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia living in long-term care facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Plitnick, Barbara A; Lok, Anna; Jones, Geoffrey E; Higgins, Patricia; Hornick, Thomas R; Rea, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Background Light therapy has shown great promise as a nonpharmacological method to improve symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD), with preliminary studies demonstrating that appropriately timed light exposure can improve nighttime sleep efficiency, reduce nocturnal wandering, and alleviate evening agitation. Since the human circadian system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength (blue) light, lower, more targeted lighting interventions for therapeutic purposes, can be used. Methods The present study investigated the effectiveness of a tailored lighting intervention for individuals with ADRD living in nursing homes. Low-level “bluish-white” lighting designed to deliver high circadian stimulation during the daytime was installed in 14 nursing home resident rooms for a period of 4 weeks. Light–dark and rest–activity patterns were collected using a Daysimeter. Sleep time and sleep efficiency measures were obtained using the rest–activity data. Measures of sleep quality, depression, and agitation were collected using standardized questionnaires, at baseline, at the end of the 4-week lighting intervention, and 4 weeks after the lighting intervention was removed. Results The lighting intervention significantly (Plighting intervention also increased phasor magnitude, a measure of the 24-hour resonance between light–dark and rest–activity patterns, suggesting an increase in circadian entrainment. The lighting intervention significantly (Plighting intervention, tailored to increase daytime circadian stimulation, can be used to increase sleep quality and improve behavior in patients with ADRD. The present field study, while promising for application, should be replicated using a larger sample size and perhaps using longer treatment duration. PMID:25246779

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea alters sleep stage transition dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt T Bianchi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced characterization of sleep architecture, compared with routine polysomnographic metrics such as stage percentages and sleep efficiency, may improve the predictive phenotyping of fragmented sleep. One approach involves using stage transition analysis to characterize sleep continuity.We analyzed hypnograms from Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS participants using the following stage designations: wake after sleep onset (WASO, non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep, and REM sleep. We show that individual patient hypnograms contain insufficient number of bouts to adequately describe the transition kinetics, necessitating pooling of data. We compared a control group of individuals free of medications, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, medical co-morbidities, or sleepiness (n = 374 with mild (n = 496 or severe OSA (n = 338. WASO, REM sleep, and NREM sleep bout durations exhibited multi-exponential temporal dynamics. The presence of OSA accelerated the "decay" rate of NREM and REM sleep bouts, resulting in instability manifesting as shorter bouts and increased number of stage transitions. For WASO bouts, previously attributed to a power law process, a multi-exponential decay described the data well. Simulations demonstrated that a multi-exponential process can mimic a power law distribution.OSA alters sleep architecture dynamics by decreasing the temporal stability of NREM and REM sleep bouts. Multi-exponential fitting is superior to routine mono-exponential fitting, and may thus provide improved predictive metrics of sleep continuity. However, because a single night of sleep contains insufficient transitions to characterize these dynamics, extended monitoring of sleep, probably at home, would be necessary for individualized clinical application.

  15. Sleep education with self-help treatment and sleep health promotion for mental and physical wellness in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hideki; Tamura, Norihisa

    The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the effects of the sleep education with self-help treatment for student, teacher, and local resident and sleep health promotion for mental and physical wellness for elderly with actual examples of public health from the community and schools. Sleep education with self-help treatment in schools revealed that delayed or irregular sleep/wake patterns were significantly improved. Also, it was effective for improving sleep-onset latency, sleep satisfaction, mood during the morning, and daytime sleepiness. The strategy of this sleep education included the acquisition of the correct knowledge about sleep and the sleep-related behaviors that are important for improving sleep. Sleep health promotion that included short naps and exercise in the evening (Sleep health class) was effective in promoting sleep and mental health with elderly people. The interventions demonstrated that the proper awakening maintenance, keeping proper arousal level during the evening was effective in improving sleep quality. Furthermore, sleep management that included sleep education and cognitive-behavioral interventions improved sleep-related habits and the quality of sleep. In this study, a sleep educational program using minimal cognitive-behavioral modification techniques was developed. Mental and physical health was also improved with better sleep in the elderly. These results suggest that sleep health promotion is effective for mental and physical wellness for the elderly.

  16. Sleep Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    in these networks create sleep disorders, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep walking, and narcolepsy. Physiological changes associated with sleep can be imbalanced, resulting in excess movements such as periodic leg movements during sleep or abnormal breathing in obstructive sleep apneas......Mammalian sleep has evolved under the influence of the day-night cycle and in response to reproductive needs, food seeking, and predator avoidance, resulting in circadian (predictive) and homeostatic (reactive) regulation. A molecular clock characterized by transcription/translation feedback loops...... mediates circadian regulation of sleep. Misalignment with the rhythm of the sun results in circadian disorders and jet lag. The molecular basis of homeostatic sleep regulation is mostly unknown. A network of mutually inhibitory brain nuclei regulates sleep states and sleep-wake transitions. Abnormalities...

  17. Relative Effects of Sleep Hygiene Behavior and Physical Exercise on Sleep Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Dopp, Austin

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown the relationship between sleep and overall health. A common measure of sleep is sleep quality which has been shown to be influenced by a variety of factors such as physical activity, diet, stress, social engagement, cognitive stimulating, and sleep hygiene behaviors. Data was analyzed from a previous study to determine whether trying to change one’s sleep would improve sleep quality and if this was more effective than physical exercise. A group of 104 individuals, ...

  18. Brief Behavioral Sleep Intervention for Adolescents: An Effectiveness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavonen, E Juulia; Huurre, Taina; Tilli, Maija; Kiviruusu, Olli; Partonen, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common among adolescents, but there are no brief interventions to treat them. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief semistructured, individually delivered sleep intervention to ameliorate adolescents' sleeping difficulties and lengthen sleep duration. All students aged 16-18 years in a high school were screened for sleeping difficulties and 36 students with the highest sleep problem scores were invited to the intervention. Postintervention improvements were observed on self-reported and actiwatch-registered sleep duration, self-reported sleep quality and sleep latency, perceived stress and anxiety (all p values sleep efficiency and sleep latency did not change (p > 0.05). A brief individual sleep intervention can be effective in lengthening sleep duration and improving subjective sleep quality and well-being among adolescents.

  19. Educational, supportive and behavioural interventions to improve usage of continuous positive airway pressure machines in adults with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Dariusz R; Lasserson, Toby J; Smith, Ian

    2014-01-08

    events were not reported in these studies.Low- to moderate-quality evidence showed that all three types of interventions led to increased machine usage in CPAP-naive participants with moderate to severe OSA syndrome. Compared with usual care, supportive ongoing interventions increased machine usage by about 50 minutes per night (0.82 hours, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36 to 1.27, N = 803, 13 studies; low-quality evidence), increased the number of participants who used their machines for longer than four hours per night from 59 to 75 per 100 (odds ratio (OR) 2.06, 95% CI 1.22 to 3.47, N = 268, four studies; low-quality evidence) and reduced the likelihood of study withdrawal (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.97, N = 903, 12 studies; moderate-quality evidence). With the exception of study withdrawal, considerable variation was evident between the results of individual studies across these outcomes. Evidence of an effect on symptoms and quality of life was statistically imprecise (ESS score -0.60 points, 95% CI -1.81 to 0.62, N = 501, eight studies; very low-quality evidence; Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire 0.98 units, 95% CI -0.84 to 2.79, N = 70, two studies; low-quality evidence, respectively).Educational interventions increased machine usage by about 35 minutes per night (0.60 hours, 95% CI 0.27 to 0.93, N = 508, seven studies; moderate-quality evidence), increased the number of participants who used their machines for longer than four hours per night from 57 to 70 per 100 (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.95, N = 285, three studies; low-quality evidence) and reduced the likelihood of withdrawal from the study (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.98, N = 683, eight studies; low-quality evidence). Participants experienced a small improvement in symptoms, the size of which may not be clinically significant (ESS score -1.17 points, 95% CI -2.07 to -0.26, N = 336, five studies).Behavioural therapy led to substantial improvement in average machine usage of 1.44 hours per night (95% CI

  20. Sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, Patricia; Muzet, Alain

    2000-08-01

    Sleep inertia is a transitional state of lowered arousal occurring immediately after awakening from sleep and producing a temporary decrement in subsequent performance. Many factors are involved in the characteristics of sleep inertia. The duration of prior sleep can influence the severity of subsequent sleep inertia. Although most studies have focused on sleep inertia after short naps, its effects can be shown after a normal 8-h sleep period. One of the most critical factors is the sleep stage prior to awakening. Abrupt awakening during a slow wave sleep (SWS) episode produces more sleep inertia than awakening in stage 1 or 2, REM sleep being intermediate. Therefore, prior sleep deprivation usually enhances sleep inertia since it increases SWS. There is no direct evidence that sleep inertia exhibits a circadian rhythm. However, it seems that sleep inertia is more intense when awakening occurs near the trough of the core body temperature as compared to its circadian peak. A more controversial issue concerns the time course of sleep inertia. Depending on the studies, it can last from 1 min to 4 h. However, in the absence of major sleep deprivation, the duration of sleep inertia rarely exceeds 30 min. But all these results should be analysed as a function of type of task and dependent variables. Different cognitive functions are probably not sensitive to the same degree to sleep inertia and special attention should be provided to dependent variables as a result of the cognitive processes under review. Finally, sleep disorders represent risk factors which deserve new insight in treatment strategies to counteract the adverse effects of sleep inertia.

  1. Can sleep quality and wellbeing be improved by changing the indoor lighting in the homes of healthy, elderly citizens?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Birgit; Markvart, Jakob; Kessel, Line

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of bright blue-enriched versus blue-deprived indoor light on sleep and wellbeing of healthy participants over 65 years. Twenty-nine participants in 20 private houses in a uniform settlement in Copenhagen were exposed over 3 weeks to blue-enriched (280 Lux) and 3...... weeks to blue-deprived (240 Lux) indoor light from 8 to 13 pm in a randomized cross-over design. The two light epochs were separated by one week neutral indoor light. Participants were examined at baseline and at the end of each light epoch. The primary endpoint was sleep duration during the last week...... of each light epoch measured by diary. Sleep quality was assessed using Pittsburg sleep questionnaire index (PSQI). Circadian rhythm was measured by Morningness-Eveningness questionnaire (MEscore), chromatic pupillometry and melatonin sampling. Actiwatches were used to monitor light exposure and activity...

  2. Self-reported sleep quantity, quality and sleep hygiene in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knufinke, Melanie; Nieuwenhuys, Arne; Geurts, Sabine A E; Coenen, Anton M L; Kompier, Michiel A J

    2017-03-08

    Sleep is essential for recovery and performance in elite athletes. While actigraphy-based studies revealed suboptimal sleep in athletes, information on their subjective experience of sleep is scarce. Relatively unexplored is also the extent to which athletes' sleep is adversely affected by environmental conditions and daytime behaviours, that is sleep hygiene. This study aimed to provide insight in sleep quantity, quality and its putative association with sleep hygiene. Participants were 98 elite (youth) athletes competing at the highest (inter-)national level. Sleep quantity, quality and sleep hygiene were assessed once covering a 1-month period by using established (sub)clinical questionnaires, and repeatedly during 7 consecutive days. Sleep quality was generally healthy, although 41% of all athletes could be classified as 'poor sleeper', and 12% were identified as having a sleep disorder. Daily self-monitoring revealed sleep durations of 8:11 ± 0:45 h, but elevated wake after sleep onset of 13 ± 19 min. Sleep quality, feeling refreshed, and morning vigor were moderate at best. Regarding sleep hygiene, general measures revealed irregular sleep-wake patterns, psychological strain and activating pre-sleep behaviours. At the daily level, blue-light exposure and late-evening consumption of heavy meals were frequently reported. General sleep hygiene revealed significant associations with sleep quality (0.45  0.50; P sleep onset. Subtle improvements in sleep seem possible, and optimizing sleep hygiene, such as regular sleep-wake patterns and reducing psychological strain, may facilitate this sleep upgrading process. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society.

  3. Nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system for improving sleep-related hypoventilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Miyuki; Kashio, Makoto; Tanaka, Nobuya; Matsumoto, Tomoshige; Ishihara, Sumiko; Nozoe, Tatsuo; Fujii, Takashi; Okuda, Yoshinari; Kawahara, Toshiomi; Miyata, Keigo

    2014-10-13

    Sleep-related hypoventilation should be considered in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, because appropriate respiratory management during sleep is important for preventing elevation of PaCO2 levels. A nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system using a special nasal cannula can deliver suitably heated and humidified oxygen at up to 60 L/min. Since the oxygen concentration remains a constant independent of minute ventilation, this system is particularly useful in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who have hypercapnia. This is the first report of sleep-related hypoventilation with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease improving using a nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system. We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese female who started noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CO2 narcosis due to respiratory infection. Since she became agitated as her level of consciousness improved, she was switched to a nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system. When a repeat polysomnography was performed while using the nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system, the Apnea Hypopnea Index was 3.7 times/h, her mean SpO2 had increased from 89 to 93%, percentage time with SpO2 ≤ 90% had decreased dramatically from 30.8 to 2.5%, and sleep stage 4 was now detected for 38.5 minutes. As these findings indicated marked improvements in sleep-related hypoventilation, nasal high-flow oxygen therapy was continued at home. She has since experienced no recurrences of CO2 narcosis and has been able to continue home treatment. Use of a nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system proved effective in delivering a prescribed concentration of oxygen from the time of acute exacerbation until returning home in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dementia and sleep-related hypoventilation. The nasal high-flow oxygen therapy system is currently used as a device to administer high concentrations of

  4. Effect of sleeping alone on sleep quality in female bed partners of snorers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumen, M; Quera Salva, M A; d'Ortho, M-P; Leroux, K; Audibert, P; Fermanian, C; Chabolle, F; Lofaso, F

    2009-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to objectively measure the effect of sleeping alone for one night on sleep quality in female bed partners of male snorers. Females complaining of poor sleep due to snoring by their bed partner and having no known hearing loss or snoring were included in a prospective multicentre cross-sectional study. 23 females underwent one polysomnography recording while sleeping with their bed partner and another while sleeping alone. Their sleep parameters were compared between the two nights. We excluded seven couples because the female partner snored for >10% of the sleep time (n = 6) or had obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (n = 1). In the remaining 16 females, sleep time, sleep efficiency, arousal index and percentages of deep sleep (stages 3-4) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were not significantly different between the two nights. Percentages of light sleep (non-REM stage 2) and awakening index were lower when sleeping alone (p = 0.023 and p = 0.046, respectively). Sleep quality was decreased and sleep fragmentation increased in females sleeping with male snorers. Some females had unrecognised snoring. However, our data do not suggest that objective sleep quality improves substantially in the female nonsnoring partner when she sleeps alone for one night.

  5. Improved insomnia symptoms and sleep-related next-day functioning in patients with comorbid major depressive disorder and insomnia following concomitant zolpidem extended-release 12.5 mg and escitalopram treatment: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Maurizio; Asnis, Gregory M; Shrivastava, Ram K; Lydiard, Bruce; Bastani, Bijan; Sheehan, David V; Roth, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    This investigation was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of zolpidem extended-release in patients with insomnia associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients (N = 385) received open-label escitalopram 10 mg/d and were randomized to concomitant zolpidem extended-release 12.5 mg/night or placebo for 8 weeks (phase 1) in a randomized, parallel-group, multicenter trial. Responders (≥ 50% in 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS(17)] score) continued 16 weeks of double-blind treatment (phase 2); escitalopram only was given during a 2-week run-out period. The study was conducted between February 2006 and June 2007. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline in subjective total sleep time. Secondary efficacy measures included subjective sleep-onset latency, number of awakenings, wake time after sleep onset, sleep quality, sleep-related next-day functioning, HDRS(17), Sleep Impact Scale score, Patient and Clinical Global Impressions of Insomnia Treatment, the Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire, and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. Adverse events were recorded throughout the study; sleep measures were also evaluated during the run-out period. Throughout phase 1, zolpidem extended-release led to significantly greater improvements in total sleep time (P sleep onset, sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, and sleep quality (P ≤ .0003), and some measures of sleep-related next-day functioning but not in depressive symptoms or quality of life. During phase 2, improvements with the zolpidem extended-release/escitalopram group occurred for total sleep time (significant [P depressive symptoms or quality of life. The most common adverse events associated with combination treatment included nausea, somnolence, dry mouth, dizziness, fatigue, and amnesia. Zolpidem extended-release administered concomitantly with escitalopram for up to 24 weeks was well tolerated

  6. Effects of the Young Adolescent Sleep Smart Program on sleep hygiene practices, sleep health efficacy, and behavioral well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Amy R; Harkins, Elizabeth; Johnson, Michaela; Marco, Christine

    2015-09-01

    Using a social learning model, the aim of the Sleep Smart Program was to primarily improve sleep health behaviors and secondarily improve academic performance and behavioral well-being. Randomized control trial for a social learning-based preventive intervention program. A diverse group of seventh graders from 2 urban, middle schools were randomly assigned, according to school, to an 8-session Sleep Smart Program (SS = 70) or a comparison group (comparison = 73). Sleep patterns, sleep hygiene, and sleep health efficacy; academic performance; and behavioral well-being were assessed at 4 times of measure (baseline, postintervention, 2 follow-up times in eighth grade). SS seventh graders experienced significantly greater sleep health efficacy, improved physiological and emotional sleep hygiene, more time in bed, and earlier bedtimes vs comparison group. SS (vs comparison) participants also reported a significant decrease in internalizing behavior problems and sustained academic performance. Finally, although not maintained at time 4, SS participants continued to report improved sleep health efficacy at time 3, whereas the comparison group participants' sleep health efficacy declined. The Sleep Smart preventive intervention was effective in improving sleep health efficacy, sleep hygiene, time in bed, and bedtimes; in maintaining grades; and in reducing internalizing behavior problems, yet these changes were not sustained at follow-up. Copyright © 2015 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acupuncture improves health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in women with breast cancer and hot flushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, Jessica; Källström, Ann-Christine; Wall, Najme; Fredrikson, Mats; Hammar, Mats

    2012-04-01

    Evaluate effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) and hormone therapy (HT) on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and sleep in breast cancer survivors with vasomotor symptoms. Forty-five women, randomized to EA (n = 27) for 12 weeks or HT (n = 18) for 24 months, were followed for up to 2 years. Distress caused by, and numbers of, hot flushes, hours slept and times woken up/night, Psychological and General Well-being Index (PGWB) and Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ) were registered before and during treatment and at 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months after start of treatment. After 12 weeks of EA (n = 19), WHQ improved from 0.32 (IQR 0.23-0.53) at baseline to 0.24 (IQR 0.12-0.39; p Hot Flush Score (HFS) decreased by 80%. At 12 months, WHQ, PGWB and all sleep parameters remained significantly improved (n = 14) and HFS decreased by 65%. After 12 weeks of HT (n = 18), WHQ improved from 0.29 (IQR 0.15-0.44) at baseline to 0.15 (IQR 0.05-0.22; p = 0.001), PGWB from 75 (IQR 59-88) to 90 (62-97; p = 0.102) and three of five sleep parameters improved. Both EA and HT increased HRQoL and sleep, probably through decreasing numbers of and distress by hot flushes. Although flushes decreased less in the EA group than in the HT group, HRQoL improved at least to the same extent maybe due to other effects of EA, not induced by HT, e.g. on anxiety, vitality and sleep, supported by subscale analyses. EA should be further evaluated as treatment for women with breast cancer and climacteric complaints, since HT no longer can be recommended for these women.

  8. Mobile Phone Interventions for Sleep Disorders and Sleep Quality: Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Jong Cheol; Kim, Julia; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Background Although mobile health technologies have been developed for interventions to improve sleep disorders and sleep quality, evidence of their effectiveness remains limited. Objective A systematic literature review was performed to determine the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving sleep disorders and sleep quality. Methods Four electronic databases (EBSCOhost, PubMed/Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science) were searched for articles on mobile technology and sleep...

  9. Quality of life and sleep quality are similarly improved after aquatic or dry-land aerobic training in patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Delevatti, Rodrigo; Schuch, Felipe Barreto; Kanitz, Ana Carolina; Alberton, Cristine L; Marson, Elisa Corrêa; Lisboa, Salime Chedid; Pinho, Carolina Dertzbocher Feil; Bregagnol, Luciana Peruchena; Becker, Maríndia Teixeira; Kruel, Luiz Fernando M

    2017-09-06

    To compare the effects of two aerobic training models in water and on dry-land on quality of life, depressive symptoms and sleep quality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Randomized clinical trial. Thirty-five patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to aquatic aerobic training group (n=17) or dry-land aerobic training group (n=18). Exercise training length was of 12 weeks, performed in three weekly sessions (45min/session), with intensity progressing from 85% to 100% of heart rate of anaerobic threshold during interventions. All outcomes were evaluated at baseline and 12 weeks later. In per protocol analysis, physical and psychological domains of quality of life improved in both groups (pland environment on quality of life, depressive symptoms and sleep quality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Clinical trial reg. no. NCT01956357, clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Improved Sleep Quality In Older Adults With Insomnia Reduces Biomarkers of Disease Risk: Pilot Results From A Randomized Controlled Comparative Efficacy Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Judith E.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Olmstead, Richard; Melendez, Gerson; Sadakane, Ryan; Bootzin, Richard; Nicassio, Perry; Irwin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Sleep disturbances have been linked to increased morbidity and mortality, yet it is unknown whether improving sleep quality in older adult patients with insomnia alters biomarkers of diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk. Objective Determine the comparative efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), tai chi chih (TCC), and a sleep seminar control (SS) to reduce multisystem biomarkers of disease risk in older adults with insomnia. Design Randomized controlled comparative efficacy trial. Setting Los Angeles community Participants A population-based sample of 109 older adults with chronic and primary insomnia Intervention Random assignment to CBT, TCC, or SS for 2-hour group sessions weekly over 4 months with a 16-month evaluation (1 year after follow-up). Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) Multisystem biological risk comprised of 8 biomarkers: high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, hemoglobinA1c, glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen. Using clinical laboratory cutoffs defined as abnormal, a multisystem risk score was computed representing a sum of the deviation around the cutoffs across the 8 biomarkers. In addition, high risk grouping was classified if subjects exhibited 4 or more biomarkers in the abnormal laboratory range. Results An interaction of time-by-treatment-by-high risk group was found (F(4,197.2)=3.14, p=.02) in which both TCC (p=.04) and CBT (p=.001) showed significantly lower risk scores as compared to SS at 16-months. CBT reduced risk of being in the high risk group at 4-months (odds ratio [OR]=.21 [95%CI, .03–1.47], p<.10) and at 16-months (OR=0.06 [95%CI, .005–.669]; p<.01). TCC reduced the risk at 16-months (OR=.10 [95%CI, .008–1.29]; p<.05) but not at 4 months. Of participants who were classified in the high risk category at baseline, improvements in sleep quality, as defined by a clinical severity threshold, reduced the likelihood of being in the high risk group at 16-months, OR=.08

  11. Effects of total sleep deprivation in major depression: overnight improvement of mood is accompanied by increased pain sensitivity and augmented pain complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundermann, Bernd; Hemmeter-Spernal, Julia; Huber, Martin Tobias; Krieg, Jürgen-Christian; Lautenbacher, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with more pain complaints and an altered pain perception. Studies regarding the longitudinal relationship between depressive symptoms and pain processing have rarely been performed and have produced inconsistent results. To clarify how short-term alleviation of depressive mood is linked to changes in pain processing, the effect of sleep deprivation (SD) on pain and somatosensory thresholds, pain complaints, and mood was investigated in MDD patients. Nineteen drug-free inpatients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, diagnosis of MDD were investigated for 3 weeks. All patients received cognitive-behavioral therapy and were randomized to obtain either additional SD therapy (six nights of total SD, separated by recovery sleep) or no SD therapy (control group). Heat/cold pain thresholds, warmth/cold thresholds, measures of current pain complaints, and mood were assessed the evening before and the morning after SD as well as before and after a normal night sleep in the control group. Long-term changes of depressive symptomatology were assessed by weekly mood ratings. Both treatment groups improved markedly in mood over the 3-week treatment period. SD regularly induced a moderate but statistically nonsignificant overnight improvement of mood, which was abolished by recovery sleep. Compared with the control condition, SD significantly decreased heat pain thresholds and nearly significantly cold pain thresholds; SD significantly augmented pain complaints the next morning. No such effects were observed for somatosensory thresholds. SD induced differential short-term effects on mood and pain, with the patients being less depressed but more pain vulnerable.

  12. [Inertia or overtreatment in children. When sleeping time is disturbed in infants: how to improve the family's distress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, O; Dominé, F

    2010-01-01

    Sleeping disorders are frequently encountered in infants and adolescents. They often induce a distress in the family, an individual sadness possibly leaving at time to maltreatment. In the normal infant or the medically fragile infant due to prematurity or an acute episode, complaints from the patient or family sources force the medical team to find an explanation or a treatment, which are not always adequate. In other conditions such as asthma, obesity, anorexia nervosa, autism, cerebral palsy, hyperactivity, the sleeping disorders may be so unnoticed or remain insufficiently investigated. Globally, in this domain, the clinical description is often imprecise and sleep studies underused. A more accurate assessment should lead to a better educative approach and more appropriate therapy.

  13. Nurse-led intensive interventions improve adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy and quality of life in obstructive sleep apnea patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen XF

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Xiaofen Chen,1 Weiting Chen,1 Weijie Hu,2 Kui Huang,3 Jing Huang,4 Yu Zhou5 1Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 2People Hospital of Tiantai, Taizhou, 3Department of Orthodontics, Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 4The Second Affiliated Hospital Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, 5Department of Orthodontics, Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is widely recommended for the treatment of sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (SAHS, but its usage by patients is very low. The aim of this study was to assess intensive educational programs and nursing support for the improvement of CPAP use and outcomes in SAHS patients.Methods: Eighty new SAHS patients were randomized to receive nurse-led intensive interventions or usual support at hospital and home. The main outcome measure was CPAP use; changes in sleeping, symptoms, mood, and quality of life were also assessed after 12 months of treatment.Results: All outcome measures were improved after treatment in both groups. However, patients receiving intensive support with significantly higher CPAP use (higher daily CPAP usage by 2.2 hours/day had greater improvements in SAHS symptoms and mood (P<0.05. The intervention group further showed an improvement in the Short Form-36 domains of mental and physical health (P<0.05.Conclusion: The CPAP usage and quality of life can be significantly improved by nurse-led intensive program in obstructive sleep apnea patients. Keywords: CPAP, quality of life, SAHS, compliance

  14. Sleep architecture in healthy 5-year-old preschool children: associations between sleep schedule and quality variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Sachiko; Iwata, Osuke; Iemura, Akiko; Iwasaki, Mizue; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2012-03-01

    Although disturbed sleep quality such as night awakenings and difficulties in falling asleep are common symptoms during sleep in preschool children, relationships between sleep quality and sleep schedule are mostly unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between sleep schedule and quality variables in preschool children. Sleep-wake patterns of 48 healthy 5-year-old children were assessed over 7 consecutive days using actigraphy. Children with longer sleep latency had a lower sleep quality, a later bedtime, a later sleep onset time, a shorter nocturnal sleep period and a longer daytime nap. Children with a longer nocturnal sleep period on weekends compared with weekdays had longer sleep latency and a later sleep onset time on weekdays, resulting in a lower sleep quality on weekends. An irregular bedtime on weekdays was associated with a later sleep onset time and a shorter sleep period on weekends. Sleep quality and schedule were linked with each other, which may explain why sleep problems tend to aggregate and form a wider syndrome of disturbed sleep even in young children. Strategies solely targeting the improvement of sleep quantity may not promote ideal sleep; simultaneous considerations for the sleep rhythm and quality may be required. © 2011 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2011 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ...

  16. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depner, Christopher M.; Stothard, Ellen R.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed. PMID:24816752

  17. Rhinitis and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Michael; Craig, Timothy

    2011-10-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a very prevalent disease in developed nations and has been increasing throughout the world. Nasal congestion is one of the most common and bothersome symptoms of rhinitis in both children and adults. Congestion is associated with sleep-disordered breathing and is thought to be a key cause of sleep impairment in rhinitis. The end result is decrease in quality of life and productivity and increased daytime sleepiness. Treatment with intranasal corticosteroids has been shown to reduce nasal congestion. Data on sleep-related endpoints from clinical trials of intranasal corticosteroids indicate that this reduction is associated with improved sleep, reduced daytime fatigue, and improved quality of life. Other therapies, such as montelukast, also have a positive influence on congestion and sleep, while still other therapies for rhinitis do not affect either symptom. This review examines nasal congestion and the associated sleep impairment with allergic rhinitis. It explores the adverse effects of disturbed sleep on patients' quality of life and how these disturbances can be reduced by therapies that address nasal congestion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of exercise on sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngstedt, Shawn D

    2005-04-01

    Historically, perhaps no daytime behavior has been more closely associated with better sleep than exercise. The assumption that exercise promotes sleep has also been central to various hypotheses about the functions of sleep. Hypotheses that sleep serves an energy conservation function, a body tissue restitution function, or a temperature down-regulation function all have predicted a uniquely potent effect of exercise on sleep because no other stimulus elicits greater depletion of energy stores, tissue breakdown, or elevation of body temperature, respectively. Exercise offers a potentially attractive alternative or adjuvant treatment for insomnia. Sleeping pills have a number of adverse side effects and are not recommended for long-term use, partly on the basis of a significant epidemiologic association of chronic hypnotic use with mortality. Other behavioral/cognitive treatments are more effective for chronic insomnia treatment, but difficult and costly to deliver. By contrast, exercise could be a healthy, safe, inexpensive, and simple means of improving sleep.

  19. Objective and subjective sleep quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    and subjective sleep quality during benzodiazepine discontinuation and whether sleep variables were associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal. Eligible patients included adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder and long-term use of benzodiazepines in combination...... with antipsychotics. All participants gradually tapered the use of benzodiazepines after randomization to add-on treatment with melatonin versus placebo. Here we report a subsample of 23 patients undergoing sleep recordings (one-night polysomnography) and 55 patients participating in subjective sleep quality ratings....... Melatonin had no effect on objective sleep efficiency, but significantly improved self-reported sleep quality. Reduced benzodiazepine dosage at the 24-week follow-up was associated with a significantly decreased proportion of stage 2 sleep. These results indicate that prolonged-release melatonin has some...

  20. Sleep and Rest Requirements: Physiological Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, David F.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Sleep is a vital physiological need which must be met to insure optimal functioning. A single night of significantly shortened sleep negatively impacts performance, alertness, and mood. Restricted sleep studies have shown that even a relatively small amount of sleep loss over several consecutive days can be additive and result in a cumulative sleep debt with similar detrimental effects. Compounding the problem of sleep loss in the operational environment is the poor correlation between subjective reports of sleepiness and objective measures of physiological sleep need. Some of the factors determining how sleepy an individual is at a given point in time are: (1) individual characteristics (e.g., amount of prior sleep and wakefulness, circadian phase, age), (2) environmental conditions (e.g., noise, temperature, amount of social interaction), and (3) task variables (e.g., signal rate, workload). Although sleep need can be masked with medications, the only way to reduce it is with sleep itself. The timing of the sleep period can affect sleep duration and quality and thus its restorative strength. The data are clear that increasing sleep time results in improved alertness. This paper will briefly review the scientific findings on sleep need, the effects of sleep loss, napping strategies, and the implications of incorporating physiologically sound sleep and rest strategies into the operational aviation environment.

  1. Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea is a common disorder that causes your breathing to stop or get very shallow. Breathing ... an hour. The most common type is obstructive sleep apnea. It causes your airway to collapse or ...

  2. Sleep Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to ensure that research results lead to health benefits. It works towards this goal by educating health care professionals about sleep disorders and research findings, and translating sleep health ...

  3. Changes in Habitual Sleep Duration after Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Ryo; Minami, Takuma; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Murase, Kimihiko; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Inouchi, Morito; Oga, Toru; Chin, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can affect not only sleep quality but also sleep duration. Determining the therapeutic effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on habitual sleep profiles may shed light on the impact of OSA on sleep duration. To determine whether and how CPAP affects habitual sleep duration in patients with OSA. Assessments of sleep duration and sleep quality were performed on 57 newly diagnosed study subjects with OSA (46 men; median age, 63 yr; apnea-hypopnea index, >20 h(-1)) at baseline and 3 months after initiation of CPAP therapy. Measurements included in-laboratory sleep tests (polysomnography), assessments of habitual sleep (actigraphy with sleep diary for 7 d), and questionnaires on subjective symptoms (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Actigraphic night sleep time did not change after CPAP (from 354.0 ± 64.5 min to 353.0 ± 57.0 min; P = 0.87) in the entire group, despite improvements in sleep efficiency and sleep fragmentation. Changes in habitual night sleep duration varied among the participants; habitual night sleep duration increased by 33 minutes (interquartile range, 14-45 min) in 28 participants (sleep time restorers) and decreased by 23 minutes (interquartile range, -48 to -11 min) in 29 participants (sleep time nonrestorers). Subgroup analyses revealed that sleep time restorers were characterized at baseline as having shorter and more fragmented sleep with frequent daytime napping. Nonrestorers were characterized by frequent use of hypnotic drugs and comorbid insomnia, despite longer habitual sleep duration. Actigraphic sleep fragmentation, sleep efficiency, daytime sleepiness, and the frequency of daytime napping were improved after CPAP only in the sleep time restorers, whereas subjective sleep quality was improved in the nonrestorers. Multivariate linear regression showed that shorter baseline night sleep time, baseline daytime napping

  4. Macular Carotenoid Supplementation Improves Visual Performance, Sleep Quality, and Adverse Physical Symptoms in Those with High Screen Time Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringham, James M; Stringham, Nicole T; O'Brien, Kevin J

    2017-06-29

    The dramatic rise in the use of smartphones, tablets, and laptop computers over the past decade has raised concerns about potentially deleterious health effects of increased "screen time" (ST) and associated short-wavelength (blue) light exposure. We determined baseline associations and effects of 6 months' supplementation with the macular carotenoids (MC) lutein, zeaxanthin, and mesozeaxanthin on the blue-absorbing macular pigment (MP) and measures of sleep quality, visual performance, and physical indicators of excessive ST. Forty-eight healthy young adults with at least 6 h of daily near-field ST exposure participated in this placebo-controlled trial. Visual performance measures included contrast sensitivity, critical flicker fusion, disability glare, and photostress recovery. Physical indicators of excessive screen time and sleep quality were assessed via questionnaire. MP optical density (MPOD) was assessed via heterochromatic flicker photometry. At baseline, MPOD was correlated significantly with all visual performance measures (p sleep quality, headache frequency, eye strain, eye fatigue, and all visual performance measures, versus placebo (p sleep quality was not directly related to increases in MPOD, and may be due to systemic reduction in oxidative stress and inflammation.

  5. Snooze... or Lose!: 10 "No-War" Ways to Improve Your Teen's Sleep Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emsellem, Helene A.

    2006-01-01

    Walk into any first-period high school classroom and it's obvious: teenagers are exhausted. Sleep deprivation is an epidemic as widespread as obesity-and just as damaging. Fortunately, science has answers and Dr. Helene Emsellem has solutions that all parents can use. Affecting the lives of more than 41 million adolescents in the United…

  6. Sleep and Mood During A Winter in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Houseal, Matt; Miller, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Seasonal variations in sleep characteristics and their association with changes in mood were examined in 91 American men and women also who spent the 1991 austral winter at three different research stations in Antarctica. Measures of total hours of sleep over a 24-hr period, duration of longest (i.e.,"nighttime") sleep event, number of sleep events, time of sleep onset, and quality of sleep remained unchanged over the course of the austral winter (March through October). However, exposure to total darkness based on station latitude was significantly associated with total hours of sleep, duration of are longest sleep event, time of sleep onset, and quality of sleep. Reported vigor the previous month was a significant independent predictor of changes in all five sleep measures; previous month's measures of all six POMS subscales were significant independent predictors of sleep quality. Sleep characteristics were significant independent predictors of vigor and confusion the following month; total sleep, longest sleep event, sleep onset and sleep quality were significant independent predictors of tension-anxiety and depression. Changes in mood during the austral winter are preceded by changes in sleep characteristics, but prolonged exposure to the photoperiodicity characteristic of the high latitudes appears to be associated with improved sleep. In turn, mood changes appear to affect certain sleep characteristics, especially sleep quality.

  7. Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Romanovna Nodel'

    2011-01-01

    PD-cognition (SCOPA-Cog, and the PD quality of life scale (PDQ-39 were used. Results. Sleep fragmentation and early morning awakenings are the most common sleep disorders in PD. Pramipexole therapy resulted in a significant improvement in sleep quality, a reduction in the frequency of falling asleep and nocturnal awakenings. The improved characteristics of sleep were favored by a therapy-induced decrease in the severity of motor (hypokinesis, rigidity, tremor, nocturnal and morning dystonia and nonmotor (restless legs syndrome/acathisia, sensory disorders, nocturia PD manifestations.

  8. Survivorship: Sleep Disorders, Version 1.2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; Moslehi, Javid J.; O’Connor, Tracey; Overholser, Linda; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders, including insomnia and excessive sleepiness, affect a significant proportion of patients with cancer and survivors, often in combination with fatigue, anxiety, and depression. Improvements in sleep lead to improvements in fatigue, mood, and quality of life. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, diagnosis, and management recommendations for sleep disorders in survivors. Management includes combinations of sleep hygiene education, physical activity, psychosocial interventions, and pharmacologic treatments. PMID:24812132

  9. Sleep duration, sleep hygiene, and insomnia in adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Lisa J; Ullrich, Maureen; Szefler, Stanley J

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to understand more about modifiable health behaviors that may be related to asthma control. Sleep is one such health behavior that has received little attention in pediatric asthma research. To examine sleep duration, sleep hygiene, and insomnia in adolescents with and without asthma. Adolescents (n = 298; 51% boys; age range, 12-17 years; 48% with asthma) from the general community completed an online survey that included the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire, the Children's Report of Sleep Patterns, and the Insomnia Severity Index. Sleep duration did not differ between the asthma severity groups, yet more adolescents with severe asthma reported insufficient weekday sleep (44%) versus adolescents without asthma (31%). Significant asthma group differences were found for sleep hygiene, with adolescents with severe asthma reporting poorer sleep hygiene. Almost twice as many adolescents with severe asthma reported clinically significant insomnia than adolescents with mild or no asthma. Sleep hygiene variables were correlated with insomnia, although these associations did not differ between adolescents with and without severe asthma. Finally, both insomnia severity and asthma severity were significant predictors of daytime sleepiness; however, asthma severity accounted for only 2% of the variance compared with 28% of the variance accounted for by insomnia severity. Many adolescents with severe asthma regularly obtain insufficient sleep, have poor sleep hygiene, and experience clinically significant insomnia. It is important to ask adolescents with asthma about sleep duration, sleep hygiene, and insomnia because there are effective interventions that can improve sleep for these youths. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Adolescents with greater mental toughness show higher sleep efficiency, more deep sleep and fewer awakenings after sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Serge; Gerber, Markus; Kalak, Nadeem; Kirov, Roumen; Lemola, Sakari; Clough, Peter J; Pühse, Uwe; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Mental toughness (MT) is understood as the display of confidence, commitment, challenge, and control. Mental toughness is associated with resilience against stress. However, research has not yet focused on the relation between MT and objective sleep. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore the extent to which greater MT is associated with objectively assessed sleep among adolescents. A total of 92 adolescents (35% females; mean age, 18.92 years) completed the Mental Toughness Questionnaire. Participants were split into groups of high and low mental toughness. Objective sleep was recorded via sleep electroencephalograms and subjective sleep was assessed via a questionnaire. Compared with participants with low MT, participants with high MT had higher sleep efficiency, a lower number of awakenings after sleep onset, less light sleep, and more deep sleep. They also reported lower daytime sleepiness. Adolescents reporting higher MT also had objectively better sleep, as recorded via sleep electroencephalograms. A bidirectional association between MT and sleep seems likely; therefore, among adolescence, improving sleep should increase MT, and improving MT should increase sleep. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Overview of sleep: the neurologic processes of the sleep-wake cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammell, Thomas E

    2015-05-01

    Sleep problems are common in adults and should be treated to improve overall health and safety. To choose the best treatment for patients with sleep problems, clinicians should understand the sleep-wake cycle and the stages of rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep as well as the neurologic pathways of sleep and wake systems. The sleep- and wake-promoting systems are mutually inhibitory, with the predominantly active system determining if a person is awake or asleep. The orexin system also plays an important role in the stabilization of the sleep-wake cycle. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  12. The role of telemedicine and mobile health in the monitoring of sleep-breathing disorders: improving patient outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Villanueva JA; Suarez MC; Garmendia O; Lugo V; Ruiz C; Montserrat JM

    2017-01-01

    Jair A Villanueva,1,* Monique C Suarez,2,* Onintza Garmendia,2,3 Vera Lugo,2 Concepción Ruiz,2 Josep M Montserrat,2–5 1Unit of Biophysics and Bioengineering, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, 2Sleep Unit, Respiratory Medicine Department, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, 3Center for Biomedical Research in Respiratory Diseases (CIBERES), Madrid, 4Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, 5August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS), Barcelona, Spai...

  13. Macular Carotenoid Supplementation Improves Visual Performance, Sleep Quality, and Adverse Physical Symptoms in Those with High Screen Time Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Stringham, James M.; Stringham, Nicole T.; O'Brien, Kevin J.

    2017-01-01

    The dramatic rise in the use of smartphones, tablets, and laptop computers over the past decade has raised concerns about potentially deleterious health effects of increased ?screen time? (ST) and associated short-wavelength (blue) light exposure. We determined baseline associations and effects of 6 months? supplementation with the macular carotenoids (MC) lutein, zeaxanthin, and mesozeaxanthin on the blue-absorbing macular pigment (MP) and measures of sleep quality, visual performance, and p...

  14. Blocking blue light during mania - markedly increased regularity of sleep and rapid improvement of symptoms: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Tone E G; Skrede, Silje; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Hamre, Børge; Grønli, Janne; Lund, Anders

    2014-12-01

    Available pharmacological treatment of mania is insufficient. Virtual darkness therapy (blue light-blocking treatment by means of orange-tinted glasses) is a promising new treatment option for mania. The basis for this might be the recently identified blue light-sensitive retinal photoreceptor, which is solely responsible for light stimulus to the circadian master clock. This is the first case report describing the clinical course of a closely monitored, hospitalized patient in a manic episode first receiving clear-lensed, and then blue light-blocking glasses. A 58-year-old Caucasian man, with bipolar I disorder and three previous manic episodes, was hospitalized during a manic episode. In addition to pharmacological treatment, he was treated with clear-lensed glasses for seven days, then one day without glasses, followed by six days of blue light-blocking glasses. During the entire observational period, he wore an actigraph with internal light sensors. Manic symptoms were unaltered during the first seven days. The transition to the blue-blocking regime was followed by a rapid and sustained decline in manic symptoms accompanied by a reduction in total sleep, a reduction in motor activity during sleep intervals, and markedly increased regularity of sleep intervals. The patient's total length of hospital stay was 20 days shorter than the average time during his previous manic episodes. The unusually rapid decline in symptoms, accompanied by uniform sleep parameter changes toward markedly increased regularity, suggest that blue-blockers might be targeting a central mechanism in the pathophysiology of mania that needs to be explored both in clinical research and in basic science. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Wen-Dan Decoction Improves Negative Emotions in Sleep-Deprived Rats by Regulating Orexin-A and Leptin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengzhi Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wen-Dan Decoction (WDD, a formula of traditional Chinese medicine, has been clinically used for treating insomnia for approximately 800 years. However, the therapeutic mechanisms of WDD remain unclear. Orexin-A plays a key role in the sleep-wake cycle, while leptin function is opposite to orexin-A. Thus, orexin-A and leptin may be important factors in sleep disorders. In this study, 48 rats were divided into control, model, WDD-treated, and diazepam-treated groups. The model of insomnia was produced by sleep deprivation (SD for 14 days. The expressions of orexin-A, leptin, and their receptors in blood serum, prefrontal cortex, and hypothalamus were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistochemistry, and real time PCR. Open field tests showed that SD increased both crossing movement (Cm and rearing-movement (Rm times. Orexin-A and leptin levels in blood serum increased after SD but decreased in brain compared to the control group. mRNA expressions of orexin receptor 1 and leptin receptor after SD were decreased in the prefrontal cortex but were increased in hypothalamus. WDD treatment normalized the behavior and upregulated orexin-A, leptin, orexin receptor 1 and leptin receptor in brain. The findings suggest that WDD treatment may regulate SD-induced negative emotions by regulating orexin-A and leptin expression.

  16. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD.

  17. Sleep problems in university students - an intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlarb, Angelika Anita; Friedrich, Anja; Claßen, Merle

    2017-01-01

    Up to 60% of all college students suffer from a poor sleep quality, and 7.7% meet all criteria of an insomnia disorder. Sleep problems have a great impact on the students' daily life, for example, the grade point average. Due to irregular daytime routines, chronotype changes, side jobs and exam periods, they need specialized treatments for improving sleep. "Studieren wie im Schlaf" (SWIS; (studying in your sleep)) is a multicomponent sleep training that combines Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia and Hypnotherapy for Insomnia to improve students' sleep, insomnia symptoms and nightmares. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the acceptance, feasibility and the first effects of SWIS. Twenty-seven students (mean =24.24, standard deviation =3.57) participated in a study of pre-post design. The acceptance and feasibility were measured with questionnaires. In addition, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), sleep logs and actigraphy were implemented. Further variables encompassed daytime sleepiness, sleep-related personality traits and cognitions about sleep. Seventy-four percent of the participants reported symptoms of an insomnia disorder, and 51.9% fulfilled all criteria of an insomnia disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (fifth edition). Correspondingly, the students suffered from clinically relevant sleep problems according to the PSQI. The SWIS sleep training is a well-accepted and feasible program. Significant improvements were observed in the subjective sleep quality and sleep-related personality traits, as well as clinical improvements in objective sleep measures. Findings showed that SWIS is a feasible program for the treatment of sleep problems in college and university students due to its various effects on sleep and cognitive outcomes. Further evaluation of follow-up measurements and additional variables, that is, cognitive performance and mental health, is needed.

  18. Mammalian sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Hugh

    2005-05-01

    This review examines the biological background to the development of ideas on rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep), so-called paradoxical sleep (PS), and its relation to dreaming. Aspects of the phenomenon which are discussed include physiological changes and their anatomical location, the effects of total and selective sleep deprivation in the human and animal, and REM sleep behavior disorder, the latter with its clinical manifestations in the human. Although dreaming also occurs in other sleep phases (non-REM or NREM sleep), in the human, there is a contingent relation between REM sleep and dreaming. Thus, REM is taken as a marker for dreaming and as REM is distributed ubiquitously throughout the mammalian class, it is suggested that other mammals also dream. It is suggested that the overall function of REM sleep/dreaming is more important than the content of the individual dream; its function is to place the dreamer protagonist/observer on the topographical world. This has importance for the developing infant who needs to develop a sense of self and separateness from the world which it requires to navigate and from which it is separated for long periods in sleep. Dreaming may also serve to maintain a sense of ‘I’ness or “self” in the adult, in whom a fragility of this faculty is revealed in neurological disorders.

  19. Sleep Quality and Nocturnal Sleep Duration in Pregnancy and Risk of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shirong; Tan, Sara; Gluckman, Peter D; Godfrey, Keith M; Saw, Seang-Mei; Teoh, Oon Hoe; Chong, Yap-Seng; Meaney, Michael J; Kramer, Michael S; Gooley, Joshua J

    2017-02-01

    To examine the influence of maternal sleep quality and nocturnal sleep duration on risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a multiethnic Asian population. A cohort of 686 women (376 Chinese, 186 Malay, and 124 Indian) with a singleton pregnancy attended a clinic visit at 26-28 weeks of gestation as part of the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes mother-offspring cohort study. Self-reported sleep quality and sleep duration were assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). GDM was diagnosed based on a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test administered after an overnight fast (1999 WHO criteria). Multiple logistic regression was used to model separately the associations of poor sleep quality (PSQI score > 5) and short nocturnal sleep duration (sleep quality and 77 women (11.2%) were categorized as short sleepers; 131 women (19.1%) were diagnosed with GDM. Poor sleep quality and short nocturnal sleep duration were independently associated with increased risk of GDM (poor sleep, adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11 to 2.76; short sleep, adjusted OR = 1.96, 95% CI 1.05 to 3.66). During pregnancy, Asian women with poor sleep quality or short nocturnal sleep duration exhibited abnormal glucose regulation. Treating sleep problems and improving sleep behavior in pregnancy could potentially reduce the risk and burden of GDM.

  20. Improvement of Cognitive and Psychomotor Performance in Patients with Mild to Moderate Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treated with Mandibular Advancement Device: A Prospective 1-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galic, Tea; Bozic, Josko; Pecotic, Renata; Ivkovic, Natalija; Valic, Maja; Dogas, Zoran

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to provide the evidence on effect of mandibular advancement device (MAD) therapy on long-term cognitive and psychomotor performance, excessive daytime sleepiness, and quality of life in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A total of 15 patients with mild to moderate OSA were treated with MAD therapy and they were followed up after 3 mo and 1 y of therapy. The patients were tested on three different tests of cognitive and psychomotor performance using the computer-based system Complex Reactionmeter Drenovac (CRD-series) at baseline and at the time of follow-up, and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire and Epworth Sleepiness Scale were used to assess their quality of life and excessive daytime sleepiness, respectively. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) decreased significantly from 22.9 ± 5.9 events/h at baseline, to 9.7 ± 4.5 events/h after 1 y of MAD therapy (p health perception, and health change following MAD therapy showed significant improvements after 1 y of MAD therapy. This study demonstrates significant improvements in cognitive and psychomotor performance, particularly in the domain of perceptive abilities, convergent thinking (constructing and solving simple mathematical tasks) and psychomotor reaction times, excessive daytime sleepiness, and quality of life in patients with mild to moderate OSA following MAD therapy. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  1. Improvements in sleep and handwriting after complementary medical intervention using acupuncture, applied kinesiology, and respiratory exercises in a nine-year-old ADHD patient on methylphenidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molsberger, Friedrich; Raak, Christa; Witthinrich, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    The case study reports on the effect of pharmacological, complementary, and alternative medicine including acupuncture, Applied Kinesiology, and respiratory exercises in a boy with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on methylphenidate. A nine-year-old male patient was referred to treatment with a three-year diagnosis of ADHD, sleeping troubles, and dissatisfaction with methylphenidate. Examination included Applied Kinesiology, the coachman׳s test, assessment of breathing pattern disorders, and traditional chinese medicine (TCM) diagnosis. Muscle weakness related to thoracic breathing was found in the coachman׳s test. Respiratory exercises, acupuncture with permanent needles, and Applied Kinesiology treatments were given. Within the first treatment, muscle function as assessed by the coachman׳s test normalized. After two treatments, sleep behavior improved rapidly, and with further treatments, handwriting was improving. Methylphenidate continues to be given. The results were stable after 15 months. A multimodal approach to ADHD integrating pharmacological treatment and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) including Applied Kinesiology, breathing exercises, and acupuncture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Mindfulness-Based (Baduanjin Exercise for Alleviating Musculoskeletal Pain and Improving Sleep Quality in People with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liye Zou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: we performed the first systematic review with meta-analyses of the existing studies that examined mindfulness-based Baduanjin exercise for its therapeutic effects for individuals with musculoskeletal pain or insomnia. Methods: Both English- (PubMed, Web of Science, Elsevier, and Google Scholar and Chinese-language (CNKI and Wangfang electronic databases were used to search relevant articles. We used a modified PEDro scale to evaluate risk of bias across studies selected. All eligible RCTS were considered for meta-analysis. The standardized mean difference was calculated for the pooled effects to determine the magnitude of the Baduanjin intervention effect. For the moderator analysis, we performed subgroup meta-analysis for categorical variables and meta-regression for continuous variables. Results: The aggregated result has shown a significant benefit in favour of Baduanjin at alleviating musculoskeletal pain (SMD = −0.88, 95% CI −1.02 to −0.74, p < 0.001, I2 = 10.29% and improving overall sleep quality (SMD = −0.48, 95% CI −0.95 to −0.01, p = 004, I2 = 84.42%. Conclusions: Mindfulness-based Baduanjin exercise may be effective for alleviating musculoskeletal pain and improving overall sleep quality in people with chronic illness. Large, well-designed RCTs are needed to confirm these findings.

  3. Effects of Sleep Hygiene Education on Subjective Sleep Quality and Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Sahin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Sleep problems are common in students with one third of university students reporting insufficient sleep. It is known that sleep quality and daytime sleepiness cause decrasing academic performans. For this reason we aimed to investigate the effects of a sleep hygiene education on sleep quality and academic performance of first year medical students. Material and Method: Self-reported sleep data and academic performance of 131 first grade medical students were collected. To all students enrolled Pittsburg Sleep Quality Scale in the assessment of sleep quality and Epworth Sleepiness Scale for assessment of daytime sleepiness in the evaluation.The students were divided into two subgroups and the intervention group received a 30 minute structured sleep hygiene education. Global academic performance was assessed by grade point average at the end of the year. Results: Mean Pittsburgh sleep quality index score of the students was 7.9±3.5 and 106 (82.8% of then had a score %u22655.After intervention, .the worse the initial sleep quality, the more improvement by the sleep hygiene education on sleep quality and academic performance. Discussion: An education on sleep hygiene might improve subjective sleep quality and academic performance of medical students.

  4. Towards standardisation and improved understanding of sleep restriction therapy for insomnia disorder: A systematic examination of CBT-I trial content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Simon D; Aquino, Maria Raisa Jessica; Miller, Christopher B; Henry, Alasdair L; Crawford, Megan R; Espie, Colin A; Spielman, Arthur J

    2015-10-01

    Sleep restriction therapy is a core element of contemporary cognitive-behavioural therapy for insomnia and is also effective as a single-component therapeutic strategy. Since its original description, sleep restriction therapy has been applied in several different ways, potentially limiting understanding of key therapeutic ingredients, mode of action, evidence synthesis, and clinical implementation. We sought to examine the quality of reporting and variability in the application of sleep restriction therapy within the context of insomnia intervention trials. Systematic literature searches revealed 88 trials of cognitive-behavioural therapy/sleep restriction therapy that met pre-defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. All papers were coded in relation to their description of sleep restriction therapy procedures. Findings indicate that a large proportion of papers (39%) do not report any details regarding sleep restriction therapy parameters and, for those papers that do, variability in implementation is present at every level (sleep window generation, minimum time-in-bed, sleep efficiency titration criteria, and positioning of sleep window). Only 7% of papers reported all parameters of sleep restriction treatment. Poor reporting and variability in the application of sleep restriction therapy may hinder progress in relation to evidence synthesis, specification of mechanistic components, and refinement of therapeutic procedures for patient benefit. We set out guidelines for the reporting of sleep restriction therapy as well as a research agenda aimed at advancing understanding of sleep restriction therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Central sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - central; Obesity - central sleep apnea; Cheyne-Stokes - central sleep apnea; Heart failure - central sleep apnea ... Central sleep apnea results when the brain temporarily stops sending signals to the muscles that control breathing. The condition ...

  6. Sleep disorders - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insomnia; Narcolepsy; Hypersomina; Daytime sleepiness; Sleep rhythm; Sleep disruptive behaviors; Jet lag ... excessive daytime sleepiness) Problems sticking to a regular sleep schedule (sleep rhythm problem) Unusual behaviors during sleep ( ...

  7. Sleep deprivation: consequences for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhefka, Julie King

    2011-09-01

    During the adolescent years, a delayed pattern of the sleep-wake cycle occurs. Many parents and health care providers are not aware that once established, these poor sleep habits can continue into adulthood. Early school hours start a pattern of sleep loss that begins a cycle of daytime sleepiness, which may affect mood, behavior, and increase risk for accidents or injury. These sleep-deprived habits established in adolescence can often lead to problems during college years. Sleep hygiene can be initiated to help break the cycle, along with education and implementation of a strict regimen. Monitoring all adolescents and college-aged students for sleep insufficiency is imperative to improve both academic and emotional well-being. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Autoimmune encephalitis and sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan HUANG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that autoimmune encephalitis is associated with sleep disorders. Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS with Ma2 antibodies can cause sleep disorders, particularly narcolepsy and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. Limbic encephalitis (LE and Morvan syndrome, associated with voltage - gated potassium channel (VGKC-complex antibodies, which include leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 antibody and contactin-associated protein 2 (Caspr2, can result in profound insomnia and other sleep disorders. Central neurogenic hypoventilation are found in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor encephalitis, whereas obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, stridor and parasomnia are prominent features of encephalopathy associated with IgLON5 antibodies. Sleep disorders are cardinal manifestations in patients with autoimmune encephalitis. Immunotherapy possiblely can improve clinical symptoms and prognosis in a positive way. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.10.004

  9. Sleep and exercise: a reciprocal issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennaoui, Mounir; Arnal, Pierrick J; Sauvet, Fabien; Léger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    Sleep and exercise influence each other through complex, bilateral interactions that involve multiple physiological and psychological pathways. Physical activity is usually considered as beneficial in aiding sleep although this link may be subject to multiple moderating factors such as sex, age, fitness level, sleep quality and the characteristics of the exercise (intensity, duration, time of day, environment). It is therefore vital to improve knowledge in fundamental physiology in order to understand the benefits of exercise on the quantity and quality of sleep in healthy subjects and patients. Conversely, sleep disturbances could also impair a person's cognitive performance or their capacity for exercise and increase the risk of exercise-induced injuries either during extreme and/or prolonged exercise or during team sports. This review aims to describe the reciprocal fundamental physiological effects linking sleep and exercise in order to improve the pertinent use of exercise in sleep medicine and prevent sleep disorders in sportsmen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of a Workplace-Based Sleep Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Wayne N; Chen, Chin-Yu; Li, Xingquan; McCluskey, Maureen; Erickson, Denise; Barone, Daniel; Lattarulo, Charles; Schultz, Alyssa B

    2016-09-01

    Poor sleep is common among working adults. Chronic sleep deprivation is associated with health problems. A healthy sleep educational program (using webinars and other intranet-based resources) was offered to employees of a financial services corporation. In 2015, a total of 357 employees (50% completion rate) completed both a pre- and post-program questionnaire assessing sleep quality and workplace productivity. Many aspects of sleep statistically improved from T1 to T2 for program participants. These included improvements in hours of sleep, sleep quality, ease of getting asleep, feeling rested, nights of poor sleep, job performance, days of sleepiness, and others. Employees reporting any limitation in productivity also showed significant improvement. This workplace healthy sleep intervention was associated with significant improvements in sleep quality and quantity among program participants.

  11. Sleep apnea in stroke: Diagnosis, consequences & treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common sleep disorder in stroke, but is often left unrecognized and untreated. When left untreated, OSA is thought to contribute to decreased recovery from stroke. The main objectives of this thesis were 1) to improve early recognition of sleep apnea in

  12. Sleep As A Strategy For Optimizing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, Angela M; Deuster, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Recovery is an essential component of maintaining, sustaining, and optimizing cognitive and physical performance during and after demanding training and strenuous missions. Getting sufficient amounts of rest and sleep is key to recovery. This article focuses on sleep and discusses (1) why getting sufficient sleep is important, (2) how to optimize sleep, and (3) tools available to help maximize sleep-related performance. Insufficient sleep negatively impacts safety and readiness through reduced cognitive function, more accidents, and increased military friendly-fire incidents. Sufficient sleep is linked to better cognitive performance outcomes, increased vigor, and better physical and athletic performance as well as improved emotional and social functioning. Because Special Operations missions do not always allow for optimal rest or sleep, the impact of reduced rest and sleep on readiness and mission success should be minimized through appropriate preparation and planning. Preparation includes periods of "banking" or extending sleep opportunities before periods of loss, monitoring sleep by using tools like actigraphy to measure sleep and activity, assessing mental effectiveness, exploiting strategic sleep opportunities, and consuming caffeine at recommended doses to reduce fatigue during periods of loss. Together, these efforts may decrease the impact of sleep loss on mission and performance. 2016.

  13. Sleep duration in Chinese adolescents: biological, environmental, and behavioral predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Wu, Zengqiang; Shen, Zhifei; Zhang, Jun; Shen, Xiaoming; Li, Shenghui

    2014-11-01

    To examine sleep duration-related risk factors from multidimensional domains among Chinese adolescents. A random sample of 4801 adolescents aged 11-20 years participated in a cross-sectional survey. A self-reported questionnaire was used to collect information about the adolescents' sleep behaviors and possible related factors from eight domains. In all, 51.0% and 9.8% of adolescents did not achieve optimal sleep duration (defined as sleep duration sleep duration of father. Biological and psychosocial conditions, sleep environments, school schedules, daily activity and behaviors, and parents' sleep habits significantly may affect adolescents' sleep duration, indicating that the existing chronic sleep loss in adolescents could be, at least partly, intervened by improving adolescents' physical and psychosocial conditions, controlling visual screen exposure, regulating school schedules, improving sleep hygiene and daytime behaviors, and changing parents' sleep habits. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Improved sleep quality in older adults with insomnia reduces biomarkers of disease risk: pilot results from a randomized controlled comparative efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Judith E; Seeman, Teresa E; Olmstead, Richard; Melendez, Gerson; Sadakane, Ryan; Bootzin, Richard; Nicassio, Perry; Irwin, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    Sleep disturbances have been linked to increased morbidity and mortality, yet it is unknown whether improving sleep quality in older adult patients with insomnia alters biomarkers of diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk. Determine the comparative efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), tai chi chih (TCC), and a sleep seminar control (SS) to reduce multisystem biomarkers of disease risk in older adults with insomnia. Randomized controlled comparative efficacy trial. Los Angeles community. A population-based sample of 109 older adults with chronic and primary insomnia. Random assignment to CBT, TCC, or SS for 2-h group sessions weekly over 4 months with a 16-month evaluation (1 year after follow-up). Multisystem biological risk comprised of 8 biomarkers: high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides, hemoglobinA1c, glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen. Using clinical laboratory cutoffs defined as abnormal, a multisystem risk score was computed representing a sum of the deviation around the cutoffs across the 8 biomarkers. In addition, high risk grouping was classified if subjects exhibited 4 or more biomarkers in the abnormal laboratory range. An interaction of time-by-treatment-by-high risk group was found (F(4, 197.2)=3.14, p=.02) in which both TCC (p=.04) and CBT (p=.001) showed significantly lower risk scores as compared to SS at 16-months. CBT reduced risk of being in the high risk group at 4-months (odds ratio [OR]=.21 [95% CI, .03-1.47], pchronic disease in older adults with insomnia. Clinical Trial Registration # and name—ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00280020, Behavioral Treatment of Insomnia in Aging Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Can sleep quality and wellbeing be improved by changing the indoor lighting in the homes of healthy, elderly citizens?

    OpenAIRE

    Sander, Birgit; Markvart, Jakob; Kessel, Line; Argyraki, Aikaterini; Johnsen, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of bright blue-enriched versus blue-suppressed indoor light on sleep and wellbeing of healthy participants over 65 years. Twenty-nine participants in 20 private houses in a uniform settlement in Copenhagen were exposed to two light epochs of 3 weeks with blue-enriched (280 lux) and 3 weeks blue-suppressed (240 lux) indoor light or vice versa from 8 to 13 pm in a randomized cross-over design. The first light epoch was in October, the second in November and the...

  16. Sleep education during pregnancy for new mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Liora; Sharpe, Louise; Bartlett, Delwyn

    2012-12-17

    There is a high association between disturbed (poor quality) sleep and depression, which has lead to a consensus that there is a bidirectional relationship between sleep and mood. One time in a woman's life when sleep is commonly disturbed is during pregnancy and following childbirth. It has been suggested that sleep disturbance is another factor that may contribute to the propensity for women to become depressed in the postpartum period compared to other periods in their life. Post Natal Depression (PND) is common (15.5%) and associated with sleep disturbance, however, no studies have attempted to provide a sleep-focused intervention to pregnant women and assess whether this can improve sleep, and consequently maternal mood post-partum. The primary aim of this research is to determine the efficacy of a brief psychoeducational sleep intervention compared with a control group to improve sleep management, with a view to reduce depressive symptoms in first time mothers. This randomised controlled trial will recruit 214 first time mothers during the last trimester of their pregnancy. Participants will be randomised to receive either a set of booklets (control group) or a 3 hour psychoeducational intervention that focuses on sleep. The primary outcomes of this study are sleep-related, that is sleep quality and sleepiness for ten months following the birth of the baby. The secondary outcome is depressive symptoms. It is hypothesised that participants in the intervention group will have better sleep quality and sleepiness in the postpartum period than women in the control condition. Further, we predict that women who receive the sleep intervention will have lower depression scores postpartum compared with the control group. This study aims to provide an intervention that will improve maternal sleep in the postpartum period. If sleep can be effectively improved through a brief psychoeducational program, then it may have a protective role in reducing maternal postpartum

  17. Sleep Regulates Incubation of Cocaine Craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Wang, Yao; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Zheng; Dong, Yan; Huang, Yanhua H

    2015-09-30

    After withdrawal from cocaine, chronic cocaine users often experience persistent reduction in total sleep time, which is accompanied by increased sleep fragmentation resembling chronic insomnia. This and other sleep abnormalities have long been speculated to foster relapse and further drug addiction, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, we report that after prolonged withdrawal from cocaine self-administration, rats exhibited persistent reduction in nonrapid-eye-movement (NREM) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, as well as increased sleep fragmentation. In an attempt to improve sleep after cocaine withdrawal, we applied chronic sleep restriction to the rats during their active (dark) phase of the day, which selectively decreased the fragmentation of REM sleep during their inactive (light) phase without changing NREM or the total amount of daily sleep. Animals with improved REM sleep exhibited decreased incubation of cocaine craving, a phenomenon depicting the progressive intensification of cocaine seeking after withdrawal. In contrast, experimentally increasing sleep fragmentation after cocaine self-administration expedited the development of incubation of cocaine craving. Incubation of cocaine craving is partially mediated by progressive accumulation of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). After withdrawal from cocaine, animals with improved REM sleep exhibited reduced accumulation of CP-AMPARs in the NAc, whereas increasing sleep fragmentation accelerated NAc CP-AMPAR accumulation. These results reveal a potential molecular substrate that can be engaged by sleep to regulate cocaine craving and relapse, and demonstrate sleep-based therapeutic opportunities for cocaine addiction. Significance statement: Sleep abnormalities are common symptoms in chronic drug users long after drug withdrawal. These withdrawal-associated sleep symptoms, particularly reduction in total sleep time and deteriorating sleep quality, have been

  18. Sleep quality, sleep duration and physical activity in obese adolescents: effects of exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, M; Borowik, A; Michallet, A-S; Perrin, C; Monneret, D; Faure, P; Levy, P; Pépin, J-L; Wuyam, B; Flore, P

    2016-02-01

    Decreased sleep duration and altered sleep quality are risk factors for obesity in youth. Structured exercise training has been shown to increase sleep duration and improve sleep quality. This study aimed at evaluating the impact of exercise training for improving sleep duration, sleep quality and physical activity in obese adolescents (OB). Twenty OB (age: 14.5 ± 1.5 years; body mass index: 34.0 ± 4.7 kg m(-2) ) and 20 healthy-weight adolescents (HW) completed an overnight polysomnography and wore an accelerometer (SenseWear Bodymedia) for 7 days. OB participated in a 12-week supervised exercise-training programme consisting of 180 min of exercise weekly. Exercise training was a combination of aerobic exercise and resistance training. Sleep duration was greater in HW compared with OB (P exercise training, obese adolescents increased their sleep duration (+64.4 min; effect size: 0.88; P = 0.025) and sleep efficiency (+7.6%; effect size: 0.76; P = 0.028). Physical activity levels were increased in OB as evidenced by increased steps per day and average daily METs (P sleep duration was associated with improved average daily METs (r = 0.48, P = 0.04). The present study confirms altered sleep duration and quality in OB. Exercise training improves sleep duration, sleep quality and physical activity. © 2015 World Obesity.

  19. Sleep education with self-help treatment and sleep health promotion for mental and physical wellness in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Hideki; Tamura, Norihisa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide an overview of the effects of the sleep education with self-help treatment for student, teacher, and local resident and sleep health promotion for mental and physical wellness for elderly with actual examples of public health from the community and schools. Sleep education with self-help treatment in schools revealed that delayed or irregular sleep/wake patterns were significantly improved. Also, it was effective for improving sleep-onset latency, sl...

  20. The neurocognitive effects of sleep disruption in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Louise M

    2009-10-01

    Sleep problems in children and adolescents are common, and sleep disruption is associated with a wide range of behavioral, cognitive, and mood impairments, including hyperactivity, reduced school grades, and depression. Insufficient or fragmented sleep may induce sleepiness, which is associated with problematic behavior, impaired learning, and/or negative mood. Furthermore, treatment of sleep disruption, by improving sleep hygiene or treating specific sleep disorders, is often associated with improvements in daytime performance, suggesting a common mechanism for the behavioral manifestations. This article reviews the daytime manifestations of sleep disruption.

  1. Sleep and Mental Health in Undergraduate Students with Generally Healthy Sleep Habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojevich, Helen M; Lukowski, Angela F

    2016-01-01

    Whereas previous research has indicated that sleep problems tend to co-occur with increased mental health issues in university students, relatively little is known about relations between sleep quality and mental health in university students with generally healthy sleep habits. Understanding relations between sleep and mental health in individuals with generally healthy sleep habits is important because (a) student sleep habits tend to worsen over time and (b) even time-limited experience of sleep problems may have significant implications for the onset of mental health problems. In the present research, 69 university students with generally healthy sleep habits completed questionnaires about sleep quality and mental health. Although participants did not report clinically concerning mental health issues as a group, global sleep quality was associated with mental health. Regression analyses revealed that nighttime sleep duration and the frequency of nighttime sleep disruptions were differentially related to total problems and clinically-relevant symptoms of psychological distress. These results indicate that understanding relations between sleep and mental health in university students with generally healthy sleep habits is important not only due to the large number of undergraduates who experience sleep problems and mental health issues over time but also due to the potential to intervene and improve mental health outcomes before they become clinically concerning.

  2. Sleep in intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyko, Yuliya; Jennum, Poul; Nikolic, Miki

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if improving intensive care unit (ICU) environment would enhance sleep quality, assessed by polysomnography (PSG), in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, crossover design. The night intervention "quiet routine......" protocol was directed toward improving ICU environment between 10pm and 6am. Noise levels during control and intervention nights were recorded. Patients on mechanical ventilation and able to give consent were eligible for the study. We monitored sleep by PSG.The standard (American Association of Sleep...... Medicine) sleep scoring criteria were insufficient for the assessment of polysomnograms. Modified classification for sleep scoring in critically ill patients, suggested by Watson et al. (Crit Care Med 2013;41:1958-1967), was used. RESULTS: Sound level analysis showed insignificant effect...

  3. Sleep walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... during REM sleep, it is part of REM behavior disorder and tends to happen near morning. As people age, they have less N3 sleep. This is why sleepwalking is much more common in children and young adults. The cause of sleepwalking in children is usually ...

  4. The effect of systematic light exposure on sleep and sleep quality in a mixed group of fatigued cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lisa; Amidi, Ali; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis

    2018-01-01

    Study objectives: Sleep disturbances are commonly reported by cancer survivors. Systematic light exposure using bright light has been used to improve sleep in other populations. In this secondary data analysis, the effect of morning administration of bright light on sleep and sleep quality was ex...

  5. Pharmacotherapy of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia Mo; Huang, Yu Shu; Guilleminault, Christian

    2012-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common public health problem in the general population. The important health-related consequences of obstructive sleep apnea include cardiovascular disorders, such as myocardial infarction and hypertension, stroke, sudden death and difficult blood sugar control related to diabetes mellitus. The current main treatment options include body weight loss, continuous positive airway pressure, oral appliances and surgical treatment. The effects of pharmacotherapy on sleep apnea continue to be controversial and supplemental only. Current medications for sleep apnea mainly act through reducing risk factors, treating predisposing endocrine disorders, improving residual sleepiness post management and controlling associated hypertension and metabolic disorders. This article discusses the pharmacotherapy of sleep apnea, including ventilatory stimulants, serotoninergic and REM sleep suppressant agents, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, medications for predisposing endocrine disorders, stimulants, associated sleep apnea health problems and sleep apnea patient anesthetic precaution. Weight loss is not a direct pharmacological approach and is only briefly mentioned. At present, there is no appropriate pharmacological treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. There are adjunct treatments such as anti-allergy treatment, and, if residual sleepiness is present, nonamphetaminic stimulants can help. Usage of these stimulants will, however, produce negative effects in an anticipated rate of about 10% of subjects taking these medications.

  6. Sleep in disorders of consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologan, Victor; Schabus, Manvel; Ledoux, Didier; Moonen, Gustave; Maquet, Pierre; Laureys, Steven

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY From a behavioral as well as neurobiological point of view, sleep and consciousness are intimately connected. A better understanding of sleep cycles and sleep architecture of patients suffering from disorders of consciousness (DOC) might therefore improve the clinical care for these patients as well as our understanding of the neural correlations of consciousness. Defining sleep in severely brain-injured patients is however problematic as both their electrophysiological and sleep patterns differ in many ways from healthy individuals. This paper discusses the concepts involved in the study of sleep of patients suffering from DOC and critically assesses the applicability of standard sleep criteria in these patients. The available literature on comatose and vegetative states as well as that on locked-in and related states following traumatic or non-traumatic severe brain injury will be reviewed. A wide spectrum of sleep disturbances ranging from almost normal patterns to severe loss and architecture disorganization are reported in cases of DOC and some patterns correlate with diagnosis and prognosis. At the present time the interactions of sleep and consciousness in brain-injured patients are a little studied subject but, the authors suggest, a potentially very interesting field of research. PMID:19524464

  7. [Sleep disturbance in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, A

    1990-01-01

    Sleep structure is qualitatively and quantitatively changed by aging. The elderly usually go to bed in early evening and wake up in early morning, and they also take several naps in the day time. The polyphasic sleep is one of the typical sleep patterns found in the elderly. Comparing the sleep of the elderly with that of young adults by the method of polysomnography, the characteristics of the sleep of the elderly are in the prolongation of sleep latency, shortening of total sleep time, increase of Stage W and Stage 1, decrease of Stage 3 and 4, and also decrease of Stage REM and the advance of REM phase. Insomnia is a frequently observed symptom in the elderly. The so-called psychophysiological insomnia due to transient psychological or situational stress is common in the elderly. However, insomnia following the mental disturbance (depression), chronic use of drug or alcohol, dementia (vascular or Alzheimer type) are also important in the elderly. Sleep apnea syndrome is recently found as an important cause of insomnia. Concerning the treatment and prevention of insomnia, it is necessary to exclude the causes of insomnia, to improve the environmental conditions and to keep the regular rhythm of sleep-wake cycle. It is also important to carefully select and use the adequate hypnotics considering the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of the drugs in the elderly.

  8. New predictors of sleep efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Da Woon; Lee, Yu Jin; Jeong, Do-Un; Park, Kwang Suk

    2017-01-01

    Sleep efficiency is a commonly and widely used measure to objectively evaluate sleep quality. Monitoring sleep efficiency can provide significant information about health conditions. As an attempt to facilitate less cumbersome monitoring of sleep efficiency, our study aimed to suggest new predictors of sleep efficiency that enable reliable and unconstrained estimation of sleep efficiency during awake resting period. We hypothesized that the autonomic nervous system activity observed before falling asleep might be associated with sleep efficiency. To assess autonomic activity, heart rate variability and breathing parameters were analyzed for 5 min. Using the extracted parameters as explanatory variables, stepwise multiple linear regression analyses and k-fold cross-validation tests were performed with 240 electrocardiographic and thoracic volume change signal recordings to develop the sleep efficiency prediction model. The developed model's sleep efficiency predictability was evaluated using 60 piezoelectric sensor signal recordings. The regression model, established using the ratio of the power of the low- and high-frequency bands of the heart rate variability signal and the average peak inspiratory flow value, provided an absolute error (mean ± SD) of 2.18% ± 1.61% and a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.94 (p efficiency predictive values and the reference values. Our study is the first to achieve reliable and unconstrained prediction of sleep efficiency without overnight recording. This method has the potential to be utilized for home-based, long-term monitoring of sleep efficiency and to support reasonable decision-making regarding the execution of sleep efficiency improvement strategies.

  9. Sleep in trigeminal autonomic cephalagias: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barloese, M; Lund, N; Jensen, R

    2014-09-01

    Sleep and cluster headache (CH) are believed to be interconnected but the precise relation to the other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) is uncertain and complex. A better understanding of these relations may eventually lead to a clarification of the underlying mechanisms and eventually to more effective therapeutic regimens. This review aims to evaluate the existing literature on the subject of TACs and sleep. An association between episodic CH and distinct macrostructural sleep phases, especially the relation to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, has been described in some older studies but could not be confirmed in other, more recent studies. Investigations into the microstructure of sleep in these patients are lacking. Only a few case reports exist on the relation between sleep and other TACs. Recent studies do not find an association between CH and REM sleep. One older study suggests chronic paroxysmal hemicranias may be locked to REM sleep but otherwise the relation is unknown. Reports indicate that CH and obstructive sleep apnoea are associated in some individuals but results are diverging. Single cases show improvement of CH upon treatment of sleep apnoea, but the causal relationship remains in question. Other TACs are probably not connected to sleep and strictly nocturnal attacks should prompt investigations for secondary causes. The relation between CH and sleep is, however, fascinating and detailed sleep studies in carefully diagnosed patients are warranted. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Sleep in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Gabe Beltrami

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Poor sleep quality is a consistently reported by patients in the ICU. In such a potentially hostile environment, sleep is extremely fragmented and sleep architecture is unconventional, with a predominance of superficial sleep stages and a limited amount of time spent in the restorative stages. Among the causes of sleep disruption in the ICU are factors intrinsic to the patients and the acute nature of their condition, as well as factors related to the ICU environment and the treatments administered, such as mechanical ventilation and drug therapy. Although the consequences of poor sleep quality for the recovery of ICU patients remain unknown, it seems to influence the immune, metabolic, cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurological systems. There is evidence that multifaceted interventions focused on minimizing nocturnal sleep disruptions improve sleep quality in ICU patients. In this article, we review the literature regarding normal sleep and sleep in the ICU. We also analyze sleep assessment methods; the causes of poor sleep quality and its potential implications for the recovery process of critically ill patients; and strategies for sleep promotion.

  11. Exercise tolerance in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea (OSAH), before and after CPAP treatment: Effects of autonomic dysfunction improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, F; Boni, E; Pini, L; Bottone, D; Venturoli, N; Corda, L; Tantucci, C

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea (OSAH) is associated with decreased exercise tolerance and autonomic abnormalities and represents a risk for cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of CPAP on cardiovascular autonomic abnormalities and exercise performance in patients with OSAH without changes in lifestyle and body weight during treatment. Twelve overweight subjects with OSAH underwent anthropometric measures, autonomic cardiovascular and incremental symptom-limited cardio-respiratory exercise tests before and after two months of treatment with CPAP. Lower frequency component of power spectrum of heart rate variability (59.5±24.2 msec(2) vs 43.2±25.9 msec(2); pexercise capacity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Sleep Disruption and High Fat Intake on Glucose Metabolism in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Jacqueline M.; Barf, R. Paulien; Opp, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Poor sleep quality or quantity impairs glycemic control and increases risk of disease under chronic conditions. Recovery sleep may offset adverse metabolic outcomes of accumulated sleep debt, but the extent to which this occurs is unclear. We examined whether recovery sleep improves glucose metabolism in mice subjected to prolonged sleep disruption, and whether high-fat intake during sleep disruption exacerbates glycemic control. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 18-h sleep fragmenta...

  13. Incorporating Measures of Sleep Quality into Cancer Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeker, Nancy S.; Pigeon, Wilfred R.; Boudreau, Eilis A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction/background Sleep disturbance may influence the development of cancer and responses to treatment. It is also closely tied to recovery and quality of life in cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers, and recent studies have begun to show beneficial effects of sleep promoting interventions. Despite the importance of sleep to cancer and its treatment and the availability of numerous tools for measuring sleep quality and quantity, sleep measurements are underutilized in cancer studies. Methods This review, written for cancer researchers interested in incorporating sleep measures into their studies, is designed to raise awareness about the importance of sleep and suggest strategies for including sleep evaluation in cancer studies. Conclusions Inclusion of readily available sleep measures may ultimately improve cancer care by facilitating studies that lead to a greater understanding of how sleep and sleep disturbance influence all aspects of cancer care and the patient experience. PMID:25510361

  14. [Melatonin treatment of a blind child with serious sleep disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstad, Kjersti; Loge, Jon Håvard

    2002-04-20

    Children with developmental and neurological disabilities are prone to develop serious sleep-wake cycle disorders that may be difficult to treat. Case history. A 5-year old blind boy with multiple disabilities developed a chronic sleep-wake cycle disorder as his main clinical problem. Treatment included introduction of strict sleep habits and strengthening of environmental "zeitgebers". After five months melatonin 3 mg was administered at night for 4 weeks. The observation period also included 3 weeks without melatonin. Sleep was registered prospectively by a sleep diary. Strict sleep habits combined with strengthening of "zeitgebers" partially improved the sleep problems, but did not establish a normal sleep pattern. When melatonin was added, he normalized his sleep pattern in a few days. His sleep problems returned during the weeks in which he did not receive melatonin. No side effects were observed. Melatonin is a promising treatment alternative for serious sleep problems in blind children.

  15. Modafinil improves daytime sleepiness in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnoea not using standard treatments: a randomised placebo-controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Julia L; Kempler, Liora; Chang, Catherina L; Williams, Shaun C; Sivam, Sheila; Wong, Keith K H; Yee, Brendon J; Grunstein, Ronald R; Marshall, Nathaniel S

    2014-03-01

    Patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) commonly suffer excessive daytime sleepiness. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has limited effectiveness in reducing sleepiness in milder OSA. Modafinil is a wake-promoting drug licensed to treat residual sleepiness in CPAP-treated OSA. We hypothesised that modafinil may effectively treat sleepiness in untreated mild to moderate OSA. Untreated sleepy men with mild to moderate OSA (age 18-70, apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) 5-30/h, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) ≥10) were randomised to receive 200 mg modafinil or matching placebo daily for 2 weeks before crossing over to the alternative treatment after a minimum 2-week washout. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to compare the changes on modafinil to placebo while classifying all randomised patients as random factors. 32 patients were randomised (mean (SD) AHI 13 (6.4)/h, age 47 (10.7) years, ESS 13.6 (3.3), body mass index 28.2 (3.6) kg/m(2)), 29 of whom (91%) completed the trial. The primary outcome (ESS) improved more on modafinil than placebo (3.6 points, 95% CI 1.3 to 5.8, p=0.003) and the secondary outcome (40-min driving simulator performance) also improved more on modafinil than placebo (steering deviation 4.7 cm, 95% CI 0.8 to 8.5, p=0.018). Psychomotor Vigilance Task reciprocal reaction time improved significantly over placebo (0.15 (1/ms), 95% CI 0.03 to 0.27, p=0.016). Improvements on the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire were not significant (5.3 points over placebo, 95% CI -1 to 11.6, p=0.093). Modafinil significantly improved subjective sleepiness in patients with untreated mild to moderate OSA. The size of this effect is clinically relevant at 3-4 ESS points of improvement compared with only 1-2 points in CPAP clinical trials. Driving simulator performance and reaction time also improved on modafinil. ACTRN#12608000128392.

  16. Medicines for sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzodiazepines; Sedatives; Hypnotics; Sleeping pills; Insomnia - medicines; Sleep disorder - medicines ... are commonly used to treat allergies. While these sleep aids are not addictive, your body becomes used ...

  17. A Feasibility Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial of Home-Based Warm Footbath to Improve Sleep in the Chronic Phase of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiao-Yean; Lin, En-Yuan; Chiu, Hsiao-Ting; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2017-12-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common complaint after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a home-based warm footbath intervention on sleep in patients with TBI. This was a randomized controlled crossover study, and 23 adults with TBI were recruited and randomized to receive first a 30-minute, 41°C warm footbath and then a usual care, or vice versa, with each lasting 3 days and separated by a 3-day washout. Sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency (SOL), total sleep time, and wake after sleep onset (WASO) were assessed by actigraphy. We found that home-based warm footbath significantly had a reduced SOL (difference, -5.11 minutes) and a suppressed WASO (difference, -2.57 minutes) compared with those of usual care, but not in sleep efficiency and total sleep time. No adverse effect was reported. This study suggested that home-based warm footbath is practical and effective in relieving post-TBI sleep disturbances, particular in SOL and WASO. Nurses can use home-based warm footbath as an effective intervention for management of sleep disturbances after TBI.

  18. Adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea adhere poorly to positive airway pressure (PAP), but PAP users show improved attention and school performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Dean W; Byars, Kelly C

    2011-03-17

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is associated with medical and neurobehavioral morbidity across the lifespan. Positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment has demonstrated efficacy in treating OSA and has been shown to improve daytime functioning in adults, but treatment adherence can be problematic. There are nearly no published studies examining functional outcomes such as academic functioning in adolescents treated with PAP. This study was conducted as an initial step towards determining whether PAP treatment improves daytime functioning among adolescents with OSA. Self-reported academic grades, self- and parent-reported academic quality of life, and objectively-measured attention were assessed before and after PAP was clinically initiated in a sample of 13 obese adolescents with OSA, as well as 15 untreated obese Controls without OSA. Based on adherence data, the treated group was divided into PAP Users (n = 6) and Non-Adherent participants (n = 7). Though demographically similar, the three groups significantly differed in how their academic performance and attention scores changed from baseline to follow-up. Non-Adherent participants showed worsening functioning over time, while PAP Users showed stable or improved functioning, similar to controls. Although many adolescents prescribed PAP for OSA are non-adherent to the treatment, those who adhere to treatment can display improved attention and academic functioning.

  19. Adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea adhere poorly to positive airway pressure (PAP, but PAP users show improved attention and school performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean W Beebe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is associated with medical and neurobehavioral morbidity across the lifespan. Positive airway pressure (PAP treatment has demonstrated efficacy in treating OSA and has been shown to improve daytime functioning in adults, but treatment adherence can be problematic. There are nearly no published studies examining functional outcomes such as academic functioning in adolescents treated with PAP. This study was conducted as an initial step towards determining whether PAP treatment improves daytime functioning among adolescents with OSA.Self-reported academic grades, self- and parent-reported academic quality of life, and objectively-measured attention were assessed before and after PAP was clinically initiated in a sample of 13 obese adolescents with OSA, as well as 15 untreated obese Controls without OSA. Based on adherence data, the treated group was divided into PAP Users (n = 6 and Non-Adherent participants (n = 7.Though demographically similar, the three groups significantly differed in how their academic performance and attention scores changed from baseline to follow-up. Non-Adherent participants showed worsening functioning over time, while PAP Users showed stable or improved functioning, similar to controls.Although many adolescents prescribed PAP for OSA are non-adherent to the treatment, those who adhere to treatment can display improved attention and academic functioning.

  20. The effects of exercise on self-rated sleep among adults with chronic sleep complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Erlacher

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Improvements on subjective sleep quality after a combined intervention cannot be attributed to the cognitive component alone, but PA has an independent effect. Adults with chronic sleep complaints benefit from exercise. Therefore structured PA should be implemented in any sleep management programs.

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A device which is worn over the teeth like a gum guard, designed to hold the mandible and tongue forward during sleep. • Surgery. May be specifically indicated for patients with a deviated nasal septum, enlarged tonsils and adenoids or a receding mandible. Bariatric surgery in appropriate cases could also improve OSA.

  2. Sleep duration, sleep regularity, body weight, and metabolic homeostasis in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruyt, Karen; Molfese, Dennis L; Gozal, David

    2011-02-01

    The goal was to explore the effects of duration and regularity of sleep schedules on BMI and the impact on metabolic regulation in children. Sleep patterns of 308 community-recruited children 4 to 10 years of age were assessed with wrist actigraphs for 1 week in a cross-sectional study, along with BMI assessment. Fasting morning plasma levels of glucose, insulin, lipids, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein also were measured for a subsample. Children slept 8 hours per night, on average, regardless of their weight categorization. A nonlinear trend between sleep and weight emerged. For obese children, sleep duration was shorter and showed more variability on weekends, compared with school days. For overweight children, a mixed sleep pattern emerged. The presence of high variance in sleep duration or short sleep duration was more likely associated with altered insulin, low-density lipoprotein, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein plasma levels. Children whose sleep patterns were at the lower end of sleep duration, particularly in the presence of irregular sleep schedules, exhibited the greatest health risk. Obese children were less likely to experience "catch-up" sleep on weekends, and the combination of shorter sleep duration and more-variable sleep patterns was associated with adverse metabolic outcomes. Educational campaigns, aimed at families, regarding longer and more-regular sleep may promote decreases in obesity rates and may improve metabolic dysfunction trends in school-aged children.

  3. Congestion and sleep impairment in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Timothy J; Sherkat, Amir; Safaee, Sahar

    2010-03-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a prevalent disease in developed nations, and its prevalence has been increasing throughout the world. Nasal congestion is the most common and bothersome symptoms of rhinitis. Congestion is associated with sleep-disordered breathing and is thought to be a key cause of sleep impairment in individuals with rhinitis. The end result is a decrease in quality of life and productivity and an increase in daytime sleepiness. Treatment with intranasal corticosteroids has been shown to reduce nasal congestion. Data on sleep-related end points from clinical trials of intranasal corticosteroids indicate that this reduction is associated with improved sleep, reduced daytime fatigue, and improved quality of life. Other therapies, such as montelukast, also have a positive influence on congestion and sleep. This review examines nasal congestion and the associated sleep impairment of allergic rhinitis patients. It explores the adverse effects of disturbed sleep on quality of life and how these conditions can be reduced by therapies that decrease congestion.

  4. A descriptive study to assess the impact of surgical stomas on individuals' sleep perceptions & response to sleep hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorbeck, Ellen; Willette-Murphy, Karen; Meiers, Sonja; Rudel, Rebecca; Alakhras, Mazen

    2010-01-01

    Multiple factors affect the sleep quality of individuals with surgically created stomas. Using Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation as the theoretical framework, a study was conducted to: 1) assess subjective sleep quality perceptions and objective sleep measurement in adults with stomas, 2) determine if there is a correlation between subjective and objective measurement of sleep in this group, and 3) implement a stoma-specific sleep hygiene intervention to improve these sleep quality perceptions. Subjective assessment focused on sleep subset questions from the Stoma Quality of Life Index (SQOLI) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Respondents' (n = 26) subjective sleep scores were 7.23 mean global score on seven questions (PSQI, range: 0 [no difficulty sleeping] to 3 [severe difficulty sleeping], total 0 to 21) with a mean score of 7.32 on three questions (SQOLI, range 1 [severe difficulty sleeping] to 4 [no difficulty sleeping], total 0 to 12) on sleep subset questions; composite scores of 5 or greater (PSQI) and 3 or less (SQOLI) indicating sleep problems. Scores showed that adults with stomas have increased sleep disruption and poor sleep quality. Five respondents who met intervention enrollment criteria participated in an objective sleep assessment using actigraphy, overnight oxygenation studies, and a 4-week sleep hygiene intervention. Mean PSQI score improved by 1.20 but the difference was not statistically significant. Because the results of this study confirm that sleep problems are common in older adults with a stoma, larger sample size studies of >4 weeks' duration are warranted. Until additional research results are available, the existence of sleep quality and overnight pouching concerns should be recognized and use of the low-cost, easy-to-use, stoma-specific sleep hygiene intervention considered.

  5. Neurologic Diseases and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Daniel A; Chokroverty, Sudansu

    2017-03-01

    Sleep disorders and neurologic illness are common and burdensome in their own right; when combined, they can have tremendous negative impact at an individual level as well as societally. The socioeconomic burden of sleep disorders and neurologic illness can be identified, but the real cost of these conditions lies far beyond the financial realm. There is an urgent need for comprehensive care and support systems to help with the burden of disease. Further research in improving patient outcomes in those who suffer with these conditions will help patients and their families, and society in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of sleep duration and sleep disordered breathing in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Gooley

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Many women experience sleep problems during pregnancy. This includes difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep due to physiologic changes that occur as pregnancy progresses, as well as increased symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB. Growing evidence indicates that sleep deficiency alters glucose metabolism and increases risk of diabetes. Poor sleep may exacerbate the progressive increase in insulin resistance that normally occurs during pregnancy, thus contributing to the development of maternal hyperglycemia. Here, we critically review evidence that exposure to short sleep duration or SDB during pregnancy is associated with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM. Several studies have found that the frequency of GDM is higher in women exposed to short sleep compared with longer sleep durations. Despite mixed evidence regarding whether symptoms of SDB (e.g., frequent snoring are associated with GDM after adjusting for BMI or obesity, it has been shown that clinically-diagnosed SDB is prospectively associated with GDM. There are multiple mechanisms that may link sleep deprivation and SDB with insulin resistance, including increased levels of oxidative stress, inflammation, sympathetic activity, and cortisol. Despite emerging evidence that sleep deficiency and SDB are associated with increased risk of GDM, it has yet to be demonstrated that improving sleep in pregnant women (e.g., by extending sleep duration or treating SDB protects against the development of hyperglycemia. If a causal relationship can be established, behavioral therapies for improving sleep can potentially be used to reduce the risk and burden of GDM.

  7. Sleep Dependent Memory Consolidation in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maski, Kiran; Holbrook, Hannah; Manoach, Dara; Hanson, Ellen; Kapur, Kush; Stickgold, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Examine the role of sleep in the consolidation of declarative memory in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Case-control study. Home-based study with sleep and wake conditions. Twenty-two participants with ASD and 20 control participants between 9 and 16 y of age. Participants were trained to criterion on a spatial declarative memory task and then given a cued recall test. Retest occurred after a period of daytime wake (Wake) or a night of sleep (Sleep) with home-based polysomnography; Wake and Sleep conditions were counterbalanced. Children with ASD had poorer sleep efficiency than controls, but other sleep macroarchitectural and microarchitectural measures were comparable after controlling for age and medication use. Both groups demonstrated better memory consolidation across Sleep than Wake, although participants with ASD had poorer overall memory consolidation than controls. There was no interaction between group and condition. The change in performance across sleep, independent of medication and age, showed no significant relationships with any specific sleep parameters other than total sleep time and showed a trend toward less forgetting in the control group. This study shows that despite their more disturbed sleep quality, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) still demonstrate more stable memory consolidation across sleep than in wake conditions. The findings support the importance of sleep for stabilizing memory in children with and without neurodevelopmental disabilities. Our results suggest that improving sleep quality in children with ASD could have direct benefits to improving their overall cognitive functioning. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  8. [Arrhythmia and sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrakchi, S; Kammoun, I; Kachboura, S

    2015-10-01

    Arrhythmia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Europe and in the United States. The aim of this review article was to assess the results of the prospective studies that evaluated the risk of arrhythmia in patients with sleep apnea syndrome and discuss the management of this arrhythmia. Reports published with the following search terms were searched: sleep apnea syndrome, atrial flutter, supraventricular arrhythmia, ventricular arrhythmia, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, torsade de pointe, atrial fibrillation and sudden death. The investigation was restricted to reports published in English and French. The outcome of this analysis suggests that patients with untreated overt sleep apnea syndrome are at increased risk of arrhythmia. The timely recognition and effective treatment of sleep apnea syndrome in patients with arrhythmia are mandatory because the prognosis of arrhythmia may be improved with the appropriate treatment of sleep apnea syndrome. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Report and Research Agenda of the American Geriatrics Society and National Institute on Aging Bedside-to-Bench Conference on Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Aging: New Avenues for Improving Brain Health, Physical Health, and Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Constance H; Vitiello, Michael V; Alessi, Cathy A; Kuchel, George A

    2016-12-01

    The American Geriatrics Society, with support from the National Institute on Aging and other funders, held its eighth Bedside-to-Bench research conference, entitled "Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Aging: New Avenues for Improving Brain Health, Physical Health and Functioning," October 4 to 6, 2015, in Bethesda, Maryland. Part of a conference series addressing three common geriatric syndromes-delirium, sleep and circadian rhythm (SCR) disturbance, and voiding dysfunction-the series highlighted relationships and pertinent clinical and pathophysiological commonalities between these three geriatric syndromes. The conference provided a forum for discussing current sleep, circadian rhythm, and aging research; identifying gaps in knowledge; and developing a research agenda to inform future investigative efforts. The conference also promoted networking among developing researchers, leaders in the field of SCR and aging, and National Institutes of Health program personnel. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Sleep and Mood During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Coo, Soledad; Trinder, John

    2015-03-01

    During the perinatal period, compromises in sleep duration and quality are commonly reported by women and confirmed by objective measurements of sleep. Self-reported poor sleep has been associated with concurrent mood disturbance and with increased risk for future mood problems during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Findings on the relationship between objectively measured sleep and mood in perinatal women have been mixed. This article reviews the literature on the nature of and contributing factors to perinatal sleep disturbance, the relationship between sleep and mood, and intervention studies that aim to improve maternal sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Braces Eating Disorders Mitral Valve Prolapse Arrhythmias Obstructive Sleep Apnea KidsHealth > For Parents > Obstructive Sleep Apnea Print ... kids and teens can develop it, too. About Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea happens when a person stops ...

  12. Pediatric sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  14. Advances in Sleep Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Sleep Disorders Advances in Sleep Studies Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table ... Disorders / Tips for Getting A Good Night's Sleep / Advances In Sleep Studies Summer 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  15. What Are Sleep Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Studies Related Topics CPAP Narcolepsy Sleep Apnea Sleep Deprivation and Deficiency Send a link to NHLBI to ... away after they are removed. Your doctor will review your sleep study test results and develop a treatment plan ...

  16. Sleep Disorders (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep disorders are more common in people with cancer. While sleep disorders affect a small number of healthy people, as many as half of patients with cancer have problems sleeping. The sleep disorders ...

  17. Sleep Terrors (Night Terrors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can contribute to sleep terrors, such as: Sleep deprivation and extreme tiredness Stress Sleep schedule disruptions, travel ... such as depression and anxiety In adults, alcohol use Risk factors Sleep terrors are more common if ...

  18. Sleep Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs to treat Sleep Disorders Tips on using CPAP machine (video) More in For Women Medication Safety ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  19. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sufficient to promote a normal circadian rhythm. Avoid sedentary activities during the day. Participate in activities outside ... the name. People with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) do not have the normal relaxation ...

  20. The hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase SB100X improves the genetic modification of T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zeming; Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Olivares, Simon; Mátés, Lajos; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB3) transposon and transposase constitute a DNA plasmid system used for therapeutic human cell genetic engineering. Here we report a comparison of SB100X, a newly developed hyperactive SB transposase, to a previous generation SB11 transposase to achieve stable expression of a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR3) in primary human T cells. The electro-transfer of SB100X expressed from a DNA plasmid or as an introduced mRNA species had superior transposase activity in T cells based on measurement of excision circles released after transposition and emergence of CAR expression on T cells selectively propagated upon CD19+ artificial antigen presenting cells. Given that T cells modified with SB100X and SB11 integrate on average one copy of the CAR transposon in each T-cell genome, the improved transposition mediated by SB100X apparently leads to an augmented founder effect of electroporated T cells with durable integration of CAR. In aggregate, SB100X improves SB transposition in primary human T cells and can be titrated with a SB transposon plasmid to improve the generation of CD19-specific CAR+ T cells. PMID:21451576

  1. The hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase SB100X improves the genetic modification of T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Z; Maiti, S; Huls, H; Singh, H; Olivares, S; Mátés, L; Izsvák, Z; Ivics, Z; Lee, D A; Champlin, R E; Cooper, L J N

    2011-09-01

    Sleeping Beauty (SB3) transposon and transposase constitute a DNA plasmid system used for therapeutic human cell genetic engineering. Here we report a comparison of SB100X, a newly developed hyperactive SB transposase, to a previous generation SB11 transposase to achieve stable expression of a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR3) in primary human T cells. The electro-transfer of SB100X expressed from a DNA plasmid or as an introduced mRNA species had superior transposase activity in T cells based on the measurement of excision circles released after transposition and emergence of CAR expression on T cells selectively propagated upon CD19+ artificial antigen-presenting cells. Given that T cells modified with SB100X and SB11 integrate on average one copy of the CAR transposon in each T-cell genome, the improved transposition mediated by SB100X apparently leads to an augmented founder effect of electroporated T cells with durable integration of CAR. In aggregate, SB100X improves SB transposition in primary human T cells and can be titrated with an SB transposon plasmid to improve the generation of CD19-specific CAR+ T cells.

  2. Characteristics of sleep in socially vulnerable adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanzini, Lisie Polita; Dos Santos, Aline Ávila; Nunes, Magda Lahorgue

    2017-07-01

    This study may help understand the effects of an unfavorable environment in sleep quality of adolescents. To investigate sleep quality in socially vulnerable adolescents, correlating the results with cognitive problems and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and assessing the effectiveness of sleep hygiene and an educational intervention. Cross-sectional and interventional study. an educational charitable center supported by a Catholic institution, in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. 125 male and female high school students. As first step the subjects were administered specific questionnaires, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), followed by an educational activity that was combined with an unblinded, randomized interventional study. Next, a cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the influence of cognition and ADHD on the sleep. Sleep was evaluated using PSQI and ESS. Cognitive assessment was based on the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence and ADHD by a clinical interview the Multimodal Treatment Study for ADHD (MTA-SNAP-IV). The average duration of sleep per night were 6 h 30 m. 80% of the sample presented sleep complains. Of these, 44% had excessive daytime sleepiness and 69.6% had poor sleep quality related to use of electronic media, environmental violence, and emotional issues. There were no significant associations between sleep problems and cognitive problems or ADHD. Sleep quality improved in 17% of the 53 students with previous sleep complains who participated in any of the two interventions. A high prevalence of sleep deprivation and sleep complains was found in the study sample. The interventions showed some positive effects on the improvement of sleep quality. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Substance use, sleep and intervention design: insights from qualitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Joanne; Meadows, Robert; Nettleton, Sarah; Panebianco, Daria; Strang, John; Vitoratou, Silia; Marsden, John

    2017-12-21

    Alcohol and other drug use is associated with poor sleep quality and quantity, but there is limited qualitative research exploring substance users' experiences of sleep and few psychosocial sleep interventions for them. To inform the development of psychosocial interventions to improve sleep amongst people reporting drug/alcohol problems. Qualitative data were collected during a sleep survey. Of the 549 drug/alcohol users completing the survey, 188 (34%) provided additional information about their sleep using a free text box. Responses were analysed via Iterative Categorisation. Findings were reviewed with reference to the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW). All data were categorised inductively under five headings: (i) sleep quality; (ii) nature of sleep problems; (iii) sleep and substances; (iv) factors improving sleep quality; (v) factors undermining sleep quality. Substance use undermined sleep, but poor sleep often persisted after substance use had ceased. Sleep problems were diverse; as were the causes of, and strategies for dealing with, those problems. Causes and strategies had biological, psychological, social and environmental roots. The BCW facilitated the identification of intervention components that might improve the sleep of people who use substances. These components relate to education, training, enablement, modelling, service provision, guidelines and environment.

  4. Refreshing Sleep and Sleep Continuity Determine Perceived Sleep Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Libman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep quality is a construct often measured, employed as an outcome criterion for therapeutic success, but never defined. In two studies we examined appraised good and poor sleep quality in three groups: a control group, individuals with obstructive sleep apnea, and those with insomnia disorder. In Study 1 we used qualitative methodology to examine good and poor sleep quality in 121 individuals. In Study 2 we examined sleep quality in 171 individuals who had not participated in Study 1 and evaluated correlates and predictors of sleep quality. Across all six samples and both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, the daytime experience of feeling refreshed (nonrefreshed in the morning and the nighttime experience of good (impaired sleep continuity characterized perceived good and poor sleep. Our results clarify sleep quality as a construct and identify refreshing sleep and sleep continuity as potential clinical and research outcome measures.

  5. SLEEP APNEA IN ENDOCRINE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Misnikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, an association between sleep apnea and a  number of endocrine diseases has been established. The secretion of many hormones after falling asleep is considerably changed, compared to the period of wakefulness. In patients with endocrine disorders, abnormal hormonal secretion and its pathological consequences may contribute to sleep apnea. Sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxia arising in sleep apnea result in a decrease in insulin sensitivity, which contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of sleep apnea increases in acromegaly, which may affect the risk of cardio-pulmonary complications. There is an association between sleep apnea and testosterone treatment in men, as well as in postmenopausal women. Sleep apnea in hypothyroidism is most frequently related to the development of hypothyroidism per se and can therefore be reversed with thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Timely detection and treatment of sleep apnea in patients with endocrine disorders can improve their survival prognosis and quality of life.

  6. [Fibromyalgia and sleep: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, G; Miro, E

    2012-02-16

    Although medical literature has devoted little attention to sleep compared to other symptoms of fibro-myalgia, the American College of Rheumatology has recently proposed that sleep should be a central aspect of the clinical assessment of fibromyalgia. Despite this, no comprehensive reviews have encompassed the physiopathological, psycho-social and therapeutic aspects of the relationship between sleep and fibromyalgia. A bibliographic search of the terms 'fibromyalgia' and 'sleep' was made in the platforms Scopus and OVID (Medline, PsychINFO and Ovid Nursing Database) from 1 January 1990 to 31 August 2011. After applying certain inclusion criteria, 112 records were selected. The importance of sleep in this syndrome is increasingly being understood thanks to the progress made in research on fibromyalgia and the use of biopsychosocial explanatory models. Many studies have shown complex inter-actions between sleep disturbances, neuroendocrine and immune abnormalities and the clinical symptoms present in fibromyalgia. Such interactions suggest that sleep disturbances may be both a cause and a consequence of fibromyalgia. Although sleep improvement contributes to alleviating various symptoms of fibromyalgia, there are few effective drugs available and their use has some disadvantages. Regarding other non-drug therapies, it is important to highlight the promising findings of cognitive-behavioral therapy and aerobic exercise. Future research should determine the advantages of each of these treatments and assess their cost-effectiveness.

  7. [Objective and subjective measures of sleep of shift-working nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Mitsuhiro; Lee, Bumsuk; Tozato, Fusae; Gennai, Kazuko; Shiihara, Yasufumi

    2014-01-01

    To objectively evaluate sleep quality of shift-working nurses, we used an Actiwatch 2, a watch-like actigraphy device designed to measure sleep and wakefulness based on the amount of movement. Subjective sleep quality was also assessed using the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire. Nineteen shift-working nurses wore the Actiwatch 2 for 5 days. The monitoring began with 2 days of the morning shift, which were followed by a 16-hour night shift and a rest day. Sleep recordings were obtained four times: night sleep after the second morning shift ("sleep 1"), napping on the night shift ("nap 1"), daytime napping after the night shift ("nap 2") and night sleep after the night shift ("sleep 2"). Actiwatch 2 sleep measures include sleep onset latency, snooze time, sleep efficiency, and percent sleep. In addition, the perceived quality of sleep was obtained using five questions of the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire. Objective and subjective sleep quality were compared between different sleep/nap times: sleep 1 vs. sleep 2, and nap 1 vs. nap 2. Percent sleep of sleep 2 was higher than that of sleep 1. In almost all responses to the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire, the perceived quality of sleep on sleep 2 was better than those of sleep 1, and that of nap 2 was better than nap 1. A significant negative correlation was found between the perceived sleep quality of nap 2 and the characteristics of participants (age, number of children, and length of career). There were positive correlations between the perceived sleep quality of sleep and percent sleep, and between the perceived sleep quality of nap and sleep efficiency. Moreover, the perceived sleep quality of nap 2 tended to decrease in participants whose bedtime deviated from the mean value on morning shift days and the rest day. We found that perceived sleep quality is related to percent sleep, and that the perceived sleep quality of nap is related to sleep efficiency. The results suggest that improving

  8. Sleep Tips: 7 Steps to Better Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn every night. Consider simple tips for better sleep, from setting a sleep schedule to including physical activity in your daily ... factors that can interfere with a good night's sleep — from work stress and family responsibilities to unexpected ...

  9. Prioritizing sleep for healthy work schedules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Masaya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Good sleep is advantageous to the quality of life. Sleep-related benefits are particularly helpful for the working class, since poor or inadequate amounts of sleep degrade work productivity and overall health. This review paper explores the essential role of sleep in healthy work schedules and primarily focuses on the timing of sleep in relation to the work period (that is, before, during and after work. Data from laboratory, field and modeling studies indicate that consistent amounts of sleep prior to work are fundamental to improved performance and alertness in the workplace. In addition, planned naps taken during work maintain appropriate levels of waking function for both daytime and night-time work. Clearly, sufficient sleep after work is vital in promoting recovery from fatigue. Recent data also suggest that the time interval between shifts should be adjusted according to the biological timing of sleep. Although sleep is more likely to be replaced by job and other activities in the real life, research shows that it is worthwhile to revise the work schedules in order to optimize sleep before, sometime during and after the work period. Therefore, we suggest establishing work-sleep balance, similar to work-life balance, as a principle for designing and improving work schedules.

  10. Mobile Phone Interventions for Sleep Disorders and Sleep Quality: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong Cheol; Kim, Julia; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana

    2017-09-07

    Although mobile health technologies have been developed for interventions to improve sleep disorders and sleep quality, evidence of their effectiveness remains limited. A systematic literature review was performed to determine the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving sleep disorders and sleep quality. Four electronic databases (EBSCOhost, PubMed/Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science) were searched for articles on mobile technology and sleep interventions published between January 1983 and December 2016. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they met the following criteria: (1) written in English, (2) adequate details on study design, (3) focus on sleep intervention research, (4) sleep index measurement outcome provided, and (5) publication in peer-reviewed journals. An initial sample of 2679 English-language papers were retrieved from five electronic databases. After screening and review, 16 eligible studies were evaluated to examine the impact of mobile phone interventions on sleep disorders and sleep quality. These included one case study, three pre-post studies, and 12 randomized controlled trials. The studies were categorized as (1) conventional mobile phone support and (2) utilizing mobile phone apps. Based on the results of sleep outcome measurements, 88% (14/16) studies showed that mobile phone interventions have the capability to attenuate sleep disorders and to enhance sleep quality, regardless of intervention type. In addition, mobile phone intervention methods (either alternatively or as an auxiliary) provide better sleep solutions in comparison with other recognized treatments (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia). We found evidence to support the use of mobile phone interventions to address sleep disorders and to improve sleep quality. Our findings suggest that mobile phone technologies can be effective for future sleep intervention research.

  11. Mobile Phone Interventions for Sleep Disorders and Sleep Quality: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong Cheol; Kim, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Background Although mobile health technologies have been developed for interventions to improve sleep disorders and sleep quality, evidence of their effectiveness remains limited. Objective A systematic literature review was performed to determine the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving sleep disorders and sleep quality. Methods Four electronic databases (EBSCOhost, PubMed/Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science) were searched for articles on mobile technology and sleep interventions published between January 1983 and December 2016. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they met the following criteria: (1) written in English, (2) adequate details on study design, (3) focus on sleep intervention research, (4) sleep index measurement outcome provided, and (5) publication in peer-reviewed journals. Results An initial sample of 2679 English-language papers were retrieved from five electronic databases. After screening and review, 16 eligible studies were evaluated to examine the impact of mobile phone interventions on sleep disorders and sleep quality. These included one case study, three pre-post studies, and 12 randomized controlled trials. The studies were categorized as (1) conventional mobile phone support and (2) utilizing mobile phone apps. Based on the results of sleep outcome measurements, 88% (14/16) studies showed that mobile phone interventions have the capability to attenuate sleep disorders and to enhance sleep quality, regardless of intervention type. In addition, mobile phone intervention methods (either alternatively or as an auxiliary) provide better sleep solutions in comparison with other recognized treatments (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia). Conclusions We found evidence to support the use of mobile phone interventions to address sleep disorders and to improve sleep quality. Our findings suggest that mobile phone technologies can be effective for future sleep intervention research. PMID:28882808

  12. Sleep in Othello

    OpenAIRE

    Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    Some of our best descriptions of sleep disorders come from literature. While Shakespeare is well known for his references to insomnia and sleep walking, his works also demonstrate a keen awareness of many other sleep disorders. This paper examines sleep themes in Shakespeare's play Othello. The play indicates Shakespeare's astute eye for sleep deprivation, sexual parasomnias, and effects of stress and drugs on sleep.

  13. Periodic Limb Movements during Sleep Mimicking REM Sleep Behavior Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaig, Carles; Iranzo, Alex; Pujo, Montserrat; Perez, Hernando; Santamaria, Joan

    2016-11-28

    To describe a group of patients referredbecause of abnormal sleep behaviors that were suggestive ofREM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) in whom videopolysomnographyruled out RBD and showed the reportedbehaviors associated with vigorous periodic limb movementsduring sleep (PLMS). Clinical history and video-polysomnography reviewof patients identified during routine visits in a sleepcenter. Patients were fifteen men and two women with a median age of 66 (range 48-77) years. Reported sleep behaviors were kicking (n=17), punching (n=16), gesticulating (n=8), falling out of bed (n=5), assaulting the bed partner (n=2), talking (n=15) and shouting (n=10). Behaviors resulted in injuries in three bed partners and one patient. Twelve (70.6%) patients were not aware of displaying abnormal sleep behaviors that were only noticed by their bed partners. Ten (58.8%) patients recalled unpleasant dreams such as being attacked or chased. Video polysomnography showed 1) frequent and vigorous stereo typed PLMS involving the lower limbs, upper limbs and trunk (median PLMS index 61.2; median PLMS index in NREM sleep 61.9; during REM sleep only eight patients had PLMS and Gaig et al. -4- their median PLMS index in REM sleep was 39.5), 2) abnormal behaviors (e.g., punching, groaning) during some of the arousals that immediately followed PLMS in NREM sleep, and3) ruled out RBD and other sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. Dopaminergic agents were prescribed in fourteen out of the seventeen patients andresulted in improvement of abnormal sleep behaviors and unpleasant dreams in all of them. After dopaminergictreatment, follow-up video-polysomnography in seven patients showed a decrease in the median PLMS index from baseline (108.9 vs 19.2, p=0.002) and absence of abnormal behaviors during the arousals. Abnormal sleep behaviors and unpleasant dreams simulating RBD symptomatology may occur in patients with severe PLMS. In these cases, video-polysomnography rulesout RBD and identifies

  14. Relationships between parental sleep quality, fatigue, cognitions about infant sleep, and parental depression pre and post-intervention for infant behavioral sleep problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Wendy A; Moynihan, Melissa; Bhagat, Radhika; Wooldridge, Joanne

    2017-04-04

    Maternal and paternal depression has been associated with infants' behavioral sleep problems. Behavioral sleep interventions, which alter parental cognitions about infant sleep, have improved infant sleep problems. This study reports relationships between parental depression, fatigue, sleep quality, and cognitions about infant sleep pre and post-intervention for a behavioral sleep problem. This secondary analysis of data from Canadian parents (n = 455), with healthy infants aged 6-to-8-months exposed to a behavioral sleep intervention, examined baseline data and follow-up data from 18 or 24 weeks post intervention (group teaching or printed material) exposure. Parents reported on sleep quality, fatigue, depression, and cognitions about infant sleep. Data were analyzed using Pearson's r and stepwise regression analysis. Parents' fatigue, sleep quality, sleep cognitions, and depression scores were correlated at baseline and follow-up. At baseline, sleep quality (b = .52, 95% CI .19-.85), fatigue (b = .48, 95% CI .33-.63), doubt about managing infant sleep (b = .44, 95% CI .19-.69), and anger about infant sleep (b = .69, 95% CI .44-.94) were associated with mothers' depression. At baseline, fathers' depression related to sleep quality (b = .42, 95% CI .01-.83), fatigue (b = .47, 95% CI .32-.63), and doubt about managing infant sleep (b = .50, 95% CI .24-.76). At follow-up, mothers' depression was associated with sleep quality (b = .76, 95% CI .41-1.12), fatigue (b = .25, 95% CI .14-.37), doubt about managing infant sleep (b = .44, 95% CI .16-.73), sleep anger (b = .31, 95% CI .02-.59), and setting sleep limits (b = -.22, 95% CI -.41-[-.03]). At follow-up, fathers' depression related to sleep quality (b = .84, 95% CI .46-1.22), fatigue (b = .31, 95% CI .17-.45), sleep doubt (b = .34, 95% CI .05-.62), and setting sleep limits (b = .25, 95% CI .01-.49). Mothers' and fathers' cognitions about infant

  15. Sleep quality, sleep propensity and academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Andrew J; Jahrig, Jesse C; Powell, Russell A

    2004-10-01

    We examined associations between measures of sleep propensity on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, sleep quality on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and academic performance by GPA and grades in introductory psychology for 414 students. In the total sample, neither sleep propensity nor sleep quality correlated with GPA or introductory psychology grades. However, among students carrying a full course load, those reporting poor sleep quality performed less well on academic measures than those reporting a better quality of sleep. Further research is needed to assess the moderating influence of overall demands of daytime functioning on the association between sleep quality and academic performance.

  16. Impairment of sleep-related memory consolidation in schizophrenia: relevance of sleep spindles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göder, Robert; Graf, Anna; Ballhausen, Felix; Weinhold, Sara; Baier, Paul Christian; Junghanns, Klaus; Prehn-Kristensen, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Deficits in declarative memory performance are among the most severe neuropsychological impairments in schizophrenia and contribute to poor clinical outcomes. The importance of sleep for brain plasticity and memory consolidation is widely accepted, and sleep spindles seem to play an important role in these processes. The aim of this study was to test the associations of sleep spindles and picture memory consolidation in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. We studied 16 patients with schizophrenia on stable antipsychotic medication (mean age ± standard deviation, 29.4 ± 6.4 years) and 16 healthy controls matched for age and educational level. Sleep was recorded and scored according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) standard criteria. We performed a picture recognition paradigm and compared recognition performance for neutral and emotional pictures in sleep and wake conditions. Recognition accuracy was better in healthy controls than in patients with schizophrenia in the sleep and wake conditions. However, the memory-promoting effect of sleep was significantly lower in schizophrenia patients than in controls. Sleep spindle activity was reduced in patients, and sleep spindle density was correlated with sleep-associated facilitation of recognition accuracy for neutral pictures. Reduced sleep spindles seem to play an important role as a possible mechanism or biomarker for impaired sleep-related memory consolidation in patients with schizophrenia, and are a new target for treatment to improve memory functions and clinical outcomes in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnesium (Mg) Supplementation Improves Magnesium Status And Decreases Elevated C-reactive Protein in Adults Older Than 51 Years With Poor Quality Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NHANES data indicate that two-thirds of U.S. adults consume less than the RDA for Mg. A low Mg intake or status has been associated with poor quality sleep and inflammatory stress. Thus, 100 adults (22 males and 78 females) older than 51 yr with a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) higher than 5 ...

  18. Prioritizing Sleep Health: Public Health Policy Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher M; Drake, Christopher L

    2015-11-01

    The schedules that Americans live by are not consistent with healthy sleep patterns. In addition, poor access to educational and treatment aids for sleep leaves people engaging in behavior that is harmful to sleep and forgoing treatment for sleep disorders. This has created a sleep crisis that is a public health issue with broad implications for cognitive outcomes, mental health, physical health, work performance, and safety. New public policies should be formulated to address these issues. We draw from the scientific literature to recommend the following: establishing national standards for middle and high school start times that are later in the day, stronger regulation of work hours and schedules, eliminating daylight saving time, educating the public regarding the impact of electronic media on sleep, and improving access to ambulatory in-home diagnostic testing for sleep disorders. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Improvement of darts performance following lucid dream practice depends on the number of distractions while rehearsing within the dream - a sleep laboratory pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädlich, Melanie; Erlacher, Daniel; Schredl, Michael

    2017-12-01

    In a lucid dream, the dreamer is aware of the dream state and can deliberately practice motor skills. Two field studies indicated that lucid dream practice can improve waking performance in simple motor tasks. The present pilot study investigated the effect of lucid dream practice in a controlled sleep laboratory setting, using a pre-post design with dart throwing in the evening and morning. The experimental group practiced darts in lucid dreams. Because some participants were distracted during lucid dream practice, the group was divided into lucid dreamers with few (n = 4) and many distractions (n = 5). Change of performance was compared to a physical practice group (n = 9) and a control group (n = 9), showing a significant interaction (P = .013, η2 = .368). Only the lucid dreamers with few distractions improved (18%) significantly over time (P = .005, d = 3.84). Even though these results have to be considered preliminary, the present study indicates that lucid dream practice can be an effective tool in sports practice if lucid dreamers find ways to minimise distractions during lucid dream practice. Moreover, the study emphasises the necessity to investigate lucid dream practice experiences on a qualitative level.

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Asher; Ballard, Robert D

    2003-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is an increasingly well-recognized disease characterized by periodic collapse of the upper airway during sleep. This leads to either complete or partial obstruction of the airway, resulting in apneas, hypopneas, or both. This disorder causes daytime somnolence, neurocognitive defects, and depression. It affects almost every system in the body, resulting in an increased incidence of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, stroke, pulmonary hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and altered immune function. It also increases the risk of having an accident, presumably as a result of associated somnolence. The gold standard for the diagnosis of sleep apnea is an overnight polysomnogram. Split-night studies are becoming increasingly common and allow for quicker implementation of therapy at a reduced cost. Treatment options for sleep apnea include weight loss, positional therapy, oral devices, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and upper airway surgery. CPAP is the most efficacious and widely used therapy. Its complications include nasal congestion or dryness, mask discomfort, and claustrophobia. Heated humidifiers, newer types of masks, and nasal steroids have improved tolerance of this therapy. Bilevel positive-pressure therapy can be considered for patients who find it difficult to exhale against the consistently increased pressure of CPAP. The disease requires aggressive treatment to improve quality of life and prevent its complications.

  1. Banking sleep: realization of benefits during subsequent sleep restriction and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Tracy L; Wesensten, Nancy J; Bliese, Paul D; Balkin, Thomas J

    2009-03-01

    Determine whether sleep extension (a) improves alertness and performance during subsequent sleep restriction and (b) impacts the rate at which alertness and performance are restored by post-restriction recovery sleep. Participants were randomly assigned to an Extended (10 h time in bed [TIB]) or Habitual TIB [mean (SD) hours = 7.09 (0.7)] sleep group for one week, followed by 1 Baseline (10 hours or habitual TIB), 7 Sleep Restriction (3 h TIB), and 5 Recovery Sleep nights (8 h TIB). Performance and alertness tests were administered hourly between 08:00-18:00 during all in-laboratory phases of the study. Residential sleep/performance testing facility. Twenty-four healthy adults (ages 18-39) participated in the study. Extended vs. habitual sleep durations prior to sleep restriction. Psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) lapses were more frequent and modified maintenance of wakefulness (MWT) sleep latency was shorter in the Habitual group than in the Extended group across the sleep restriction phase. During the Recovery phase, PVT speed rebounded faster (and PVT lapsing recovered significantly after the first night of recovery sleep) in the Extended group. No group differences in subjective sleepiness were evident during any phase of the study. The extent to which sleep restriction impairs objectively measured alertness and performance, and the rate at which these impairments are subsequently reversed by recovery sleep, varies as a function of the amount of nightly sleep obtained prior to the sleep restriction period. This suggests that the physiological mechanism(s) underlying chronic sleep debt undergo long-term (days/weeks) accommodative/adaptive changes.

  2. Balanced: a randomised trial examining the efficacy of two self-monitoring methods for an app-based multi-behaviour intervention to improve physical activity, sitting and sleep in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mitch J; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Trost, Stewart G; Rebar, Amanda L; Rogers, Naomi; Burton, Nicola W; Murawski, Beatrice; Rayward, Anna; Fenton, Sasha; Brown, Wendy J

    2016-07-30

    Many adults are insufficiently physically active, have prolonged sedentary behaviour and report poor sleep. These behaviours can be improv